Science.gov

Sample records for endogenous murine parkin

  1. Endogenous Parkin Preserves Dopaminergic Substantia Nigral Neurons following Mitochondrial DNA Mutagenic Stress.

    PubMed

    Pickrell, Alicia M; Huang, Chiu-Hui; Kennedy, Scott R; Ordureau, Alban; Sideris, Dionisia P; Hoekstra, Jake G; Harper, J Wade; Youle, Richard J

    2015-07-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PARK2 mutations cause early-onset forms of PD. PARK2 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Parkin, that can selectively translocate to dysfunctional mitochondria to promote their removal by autophagy. However, Parkin knockout (KO) mice do not display signs of neurodegeneration. To assess Parkin function in vivo, we utilized a mouse model that accumulates dysfunctional mitochondria caused by an accelerated generation of mtDNA mutations (Mutator mice). In the absence of Parkin, dopaminergic neurons in Mutator mice degenerated causing an L-DOPA reversible motor deficit. Other neuronal populations were unaffected. Phosphorylated ubiquitin was increased in the brains of Mutator mice, indicating PINK1-Parkin activation. Parkin loss caused mitochondrial dysfunction and affected the pathogenicity but not the levels of mtDNA somatic mutations. A systemic loss of Parkin synergizes with mitochondrial dysfunction causing dopaminergic neuron death modeling PD pathogenic processes.

  2. Crystal structure and molecular dynamics simulation of ubiquitin-like domain of murine parkin.

    PubMed

    Tomoo, Koji; Mukai, Yasuhiro; In, Yasuko; Miyagawa, Hiroo; Kitamura, Kunihiro; Yamano, Akihito; Shindo, Heisaburo; Ishida, Toshimasa

    2008-01-01

    Parkin is the gene product identified as the major cause of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP). Parkin, a ubiquitin ligase E3, contains a unique ubiquitin-like domain in its N-terminus designated Uld which is assumed to be a interaction domain with the Rpn 10 subunit of 26S proteasome. To elucidate the structural and functional role of Uld in parkin at the atomic level, the X-ray crystal structure of murine Uld was determined and a molecular dynamics simulation of wild Uld and its five mutants (K27N, R33Q, R42P, K48A and V56E) identified from AR-JP patients was performed. Murine Uld consists of two alpha helices [Ile23-Arg33 (alpha1) and Val56-Gln57 (alpha2)] and five beta strands [Met1-Phe7 (beta1), Tyr11-Asp18 (beta2), Leu41-Phe45 (beta3), Lys48-Pro51 (beta4) and Ser65-Arg72 (beta5)] and its overall structure is essentially the same as that of human ubiquitin with a 1.22 A rmsd for the backbone atoms of residues 1-76; however, the sequential identity and similarity between both molecules are 32% and 63%, respectively. This close resemblance is due to the core structure built by same hydrogen bond formations between and within the backbone chains of alpha1 and beta1/2/5 secondary structure elements and by nearly the same hydrophobic interactions formed between the nonpolar amino acids of their secondary structures. The side chain NetaH of Lys27 on the alpha1 helix was crucial to the stabilization of the spatial orientations of beta3 and beta4 strands, possible binding region with Rpn 10 subunit, through three hydrogen bonds. The MD simulations showed the K27N and R33Q mutations increase the structural fluctuation of these beta strands including the alpha1 helix. Reversely, the V56E mutant restricted the spatial flexibility at the periphery of the short alpha2 helix by the interactions between the polar atoms of Glu56 and Ser19 residues. However, a large fluctuation of beta4 strand with respect to beta5 strand was induced in the R42P mutant, because

  3. Endogenous Parkin Preserves Dopaminergic Substantia Nigral Neurons following Mitochondrial DNA Mutagenic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pickrell, Alicia M.; Huang, Chiu-Hui; Kennedy, Scott R.; Ordureau, Alban; Sideris, Dionisia P.; Hoekstra, Jake G.; Harper, J. Wade; Youle, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PARK2 mutations cause early-onset forms of PD. PARK2 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Parkin, that can selectively translocate to dysfunctional mitochondria to promote their removal by autophagy. However, Parkin knockout (KO) mice do not display signs of neurodegeneration. To assess Parkin function in vivo, we utilized a mouse model that accumulates dysfunctional mitochondria caused by an accelerated generation of mtDNA mutations (Mutator mice). In the absence of Parkin, dopaminergic neurons in Mutator mice degenerated causing an L-DOPA reversible motor deficit. Other neuronal populations were unaffected. Phosphorylated ubiquitin was increased in the brains of Mutator mice, indicating PINK1-Parkin activation. Parkin loss caused mitochondrial dysfunction and affected the pathogenicity but not the levels of mtDNA somatic mutations. A systemic loss of Parkin synergizes with mitochondrial dysfunction causing dopaminergic neuron death modeling PD pathogenic processes. PMID:26182419

  4. Endogenous murine Aβ increases amyloid deposition in APP23 but not in APPPS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Jasmin; Morales-Corraliza, Jose; Stolz, Julia; Skodras, Angelos; Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Carmen C; Eisele, Yvonne S; Mazzella, Matthew J; Wong, Harrison; Klunk, William E; Nilsson, K Peter R; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Mathews, Paul M; Jucker, Mathias; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M

    2015-07-01

    Endogenous murine amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is expressed in most Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease but its contribution to β-amyloidosis remains unclear. We demonstrate ∼ 35% increased cerebral Aβ load in APP23 transgenic mice compared with age-matched APP23 mice on an App-null background. No such difference was found for the much faster Aβ-depositing APPPS1 transgenic mouse model between animals with or without the murine App gene. Nevertheless, both APP23 and APPPS1 mice codeposited murine Aβ, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed a tight association of murine Aβ with human Aβ fibrils. Deposition of murine Aβ was considerably less efficient compared with the deposition of human Aβ indicating a lower amyloidogenic potential of murine Aβ in vivo. The amyloid dyes Pittsburgh Compound-B and pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid did not differentiate between amyloid deposits consisting of human Aβ and deposits of mixed human-murine Aβ. Our data demonstrate a differential effect of murine Aβ on human Aβ deposition in different APP transgenic mice. The mechanistically complex interaction of human and mouse Aβ may affect pathogenesis of the models and should be considered when models are used for translational preclinical studies.

  5. Interleukin-27 signaling promotes immunity against endogenously arising murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Karlo D T; Junankar, Simon R; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent.

  6. Interleukin-27 Signaling Promotes Immunity against Endogenously Arising Murine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Natividad, Karlo D. T.; Junankar, Simon R.; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C.; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent. PMID:23554861

  7. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of Murine Embryos Lacking Endogenous Retinoic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paschaki, Marie; Schneider, Carole; Rhinn, Muriel; Thibault-Carpentier, Christelle; Dembélé, Doulaye; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol), acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RARs), switching them from potential repressors to transcriptional activators. The repertoire of RA-regulated genes in embryonic tissues is poorly characterized. We performed a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of murine wild-type and Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 null-mutant (Raldh2−/−) embryos — unable to synthesize RA from maternally-derived retinol — using Affymetrix DNA microarrays. Transcriptomic changes were analyzed in two embryonic regions: anterior tissues including forebrain and optic vesicle, and posterior (trunk) tissues, at early stages preceding the appearance of overt phenotypic abnormalities. Several genes expected to be downregulated under RA deficiency appeared in the transcriptome data (e.g. Emx2, Foxg1 anteriorly, Cdx1, Hoxa1, Rarb posteriorly), whereas reverse-transcriptase-PCR and in situ hybridization performed for additional selected genes validated the changes identified through microarray analysis. Altogether, the affected genes belonged to numerous molecular pathways and cellular/organismal functions, demonstrating the pleiotropic nature of RA-dependent events. In both tissue samples, genes upregulated were more numerous than those downregulated, probably due to feedback regulatory loops. Bioinformatic analyses highlighted groups (clusters) of genes displaying similar behaviors in mutant tissues, and biological functions most significantly affected (e.g. mTOR, VEGF, ILK signaling in forebrain tissues; pyrimidine and purine metabolism

  9. Parkin structure and function.

    PubMed

    Seirafi, Marjan; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the parkin or PINK1 genes are the leading cause of the autosomal recessive form of Parkinson's disease. The gene products, the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin and the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, are neuroprotective proteins, which act together in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Here, we review the structure of parkin and mechanisms of its autoinhibition and function as a ubiquitin ligase. We present a model for the recruitment and activation of parkin as a key regulatory step in the clearance of depolarized or damaged mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy). We conclude with a brief overview of other functions of parkin and considerations for drug discovery in the mitochondrial quality control pathway. © 2015 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  10. Parkin loss of function contributes to RTP801 elevation and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Romaní-Aumedes, J; Canal, M; Martín-Flores, N; Sun, X; Pérez-Fernández, V; Wewering, S; Fernández-Santiago, R; Ezquerra, M; Pont-Sunyer, C; Lafuente, A; Alberch, J; Luebbert, H; Tolosa, E; Levy, O A; Greene, L A; Malagelada, C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PARK2 gene are associated with an autosomal recessive form of juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). These mutations affect parkin solubility and impair its E3 ligase activity, leading to a toxic accumulation of proteins within susceptible neurons that results in a slow but progressive neuronal degeneration and cell death. Here, we report that RTP801/REDD1, a pro-apoptotic negative regulator of survival kinases mTOR and Akt, is one of such parkin substrates. We observed that parkin knockdown elevated RTP801 in sympathetic neurons and neuronal PC12 cells, whereas ectopic parkin enhanced RTP801 poly-ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In parkin knockout mouse brains and in human fibroblasts from AR-JP patients with parkin mutations, RTP801 levels were elevated. Moreover, in human postmortem PD brains with mutated parkin, nigral neurons were highly positive for RTP801. Further consistent with the idea that RTP801 is a substrate for parkin, the two endogenous proteins interacted in reciprocal co-immunoprecipitates of cell lysates. A potential physiological role for parkin-mediated RTP801 degradation is indicated by observations that parkin protects neuronal cells from death caused by RTP801 overexpression by mediating its degradation, whereas parkin knockdown exacerbates such death. Similarly, parkin knockdown enhanced RTP801 induction in neuronal cells exposed to the Parkinson's disease mimetic 6-hydroxydopamine and increased sensitivity to this toxin. This response to parkin loss of function appeared to be mediated by RTP801 as it was abolished by RTP801 knockdown. Taken together these results indicate that RTP801 is a novel parkin substrate that may contribute to neurodegeneration caused by loss of parkin expression or activity. PMID:25101677

  11. Endogenous glucocorticoids modulate neutrophil function in a murine model of haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, S A; Fernández, G C; Camerano, G; Dran, G; Rosa, F A; Barrionuevo, P; Isturiz, M A; Palermo, M S

    2005-01-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is caused by Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Although, Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2) is responsible for the renal pathogenesis observed in patients, the inflammatory response, including cytokines and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), plays a key role in the development of HUS. Previously, we demonstrated that Stx2 injection generates an anti-inflammatory reaction characterized by endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) secretion, which attenuates HUS severity in mice. Here, we analysed the effects of Stx2 on the pathogenic function of PMN and the potential role of endogenous GC to limit PMN activation during HUS development in a murine model. For this purpose we assessed the functional activity of isolated PMN after in vivo treatment with Stx2 alone or in simultaneous treatment with Ru486 (GC receptor antagonist). We found that Stx2 increased the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) under phobol-myristate-acetate (PMA) stimulation and that the simultaneous treatment with Ru486 strengthened this effect. Conversely, both treatments significantly inhibited in vitro phagocytosis. Furthermore, Stx2 augmented in vitro PMN adhesion to fibrinogen (FGN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) but not to collagen type I (CTI). Stx2 + Ru486 caused enhanced adhesion to BSA and CTI compared to Stx2. Whereas Stx2 significantly increased migration towards N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), Stx2 + Ru486 treatment enhanced and accelerated this process. The percentage of apoptotic PMN from Stx2-treated mice was higher compared with controls, but equal to Stx2 + Ru486 treated mice. We conclude that Stx2 activates PMN and that the absence of endogenous GC enhances this activation suggesting that endogenous GC can, at least partially, counteract PMN inflammatory functions. PMID:15606615

  12. Direct demonstration of murine thymus-dependent cell surface endogenous immunoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Szenberg, A; Marchalonis, J J; Warner, N L

    1977-01-01

    Antisera raised in mammals to murine immunoglobulin (Ig) do not detect surface Ig on thymus-dependent (T) lymphoma cells as assessed by immunofluorescence analysis. In contrast, chicken antibodies, produced against the (Fab)2 fragment of normal mouse IgG and purified by binding to and elution from IgG-Sepharose 4B, give strong indirect fluorescence with murine T cells and cultured T lymphoma cells. The surface Ig caps, is shed, and reappears, indicating that it is of endogenous origin. Nonlymphoid tumor cells of various myeloid types do not bind this reagent, even though they bear avid Fc receptors. The capacity of chicken antibodies to bind to both bone-marrow-dependent and T cell lymphomas was abolished by adsorption with myeloma-derived kappa chains coupled to Sepharose. The kappa antigenic determinant recognized by the chicken antibodies may thus be different from that seen by mammalian antibodies, and the degree of exposure of Ig on the T lymphoma surface might also affect ease of detectability with these reagents. These data provide direct evidence that T lymphocytes and T lymphoma cells express and synthesize a surface Ig containing determinants that at least 'crossreact with bone-marrow-cell-derived kappa chains. Images PMID:405673

  13. Endogenous murine leukemia retroviral variation across wild European and inbred strains of house mouse.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefanie; Hasenkamp, Natascha; Mayer, Jens; Michaux, Johan; Morand, Serge; Mazzoni, Camila J; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous murine leukemia retroviruses (MLVs) are high copy number proviral elements difficult to comprehensively characterize using standard low throughput sequencing approaches. However, high throughput approaches generate data that is challenging to process, interpret and present. Next generation sequencing (NGS) data was generated for MLVs from two wild caught Mus musculus domesticus (from mainland France and Corsica) and for inbred laboratory mouse strains C3H, LP/J and SJL. Sequence reads were grouped using a novel sequence clustering approach as applied to retroviral sequences. A Markov cluster algorithm was employed, and the sequence reads were queried for matches to specific xenotropic (Xmv), polytropic (Pmv) and modified polytropic (Mpmv) viral reference sequences. Various MLV subtypes were more widespread than expected among the mice, which may be due to the higher coverage of NGS, or to the presence of similar sequence across many different proviral loci. The results did not correlate with variation in the major MLV receptor Xpr1, which can restrict exogenous MLVs, suggesting that endogenous MLV distribution may reflect gene flow more than past resistance to infection.

  14. Organization, distribution, and stability of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA sequences in chromosomes of Mus musculus.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Taylor, B A; Lee, B K

    1982-01-01

    The endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA content and integration sites were characterized for 54 inbred strains and substrains of mice by restriction enzyme digestion, Southern blotting, and hybridization with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA-specific probe. More than 75% of these strains carried endogenous ecotropic proviruses which were located in at least 29 distinct integration sites in chromosomes of Mus musculus. Fourteen of these proviruses have been assigned specific locus designations. Most, but not all, of the endogenous ecotropic proviruses were structurally indistinguishable by this analysis from the prototype AKR ecotropic virus, and the distribution of these proviruses followed known relationships among the inbred strains and substrains of mice. These results suggest that, in general, viral DNA integration preceded the establishment of inbred mouse strains and that these integrations are relatively stable. Images PMID:6287001

  15. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of misregulated BAX.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Zeynep; Funk, Kathrin; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Todt, Franziska; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oelgeklaus, Aline; Tanaka, Atsushi; van der Laan, Martin; Edlich, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein BAX commits human cells to apoptosis by permeabilizing the outer mitochondrial membrane. BAX activation has been suggested to require the separation of helix α5 from α6 - the 'latch' from the 'core' domain - among other conformational changes. Here, we show that conformational changes in this region impair BAX translocation to the mitochondria and retrotranslocation back into the cytosol, and therefore BAX inhibition, but not activation. Redirecting misregulated BAX to the mitochondria revealed an alternative mechanism of BAX inhibition. The E3 ligase parkin, which is known to trigger mitochondria-specific autophagy, ubiquitylates BAX K128 and targets the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for proteasomal degradation. Retrotranslocation-deficient BAX is completely degraded in a parkin-dependent manner. Although only a minor pool of endogenous BAX escapes retrotranslocation into the cytosol, parkin-dependent targeting of misregulated BAX on the mitochondria provides substantial protection against BAX apoptotic activity. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  17. The role of parkin in the differential susceptibility of tuberoinfundibular and nigrostriatal dopamine neurons to acute toxicant exposure.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Lookingland, Keith J; Goudreau, John L

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease causes degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons, while tuberoinfundibular DA neurons remain unaffected. A similar pattern is observed following exposure to 1-methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyradine (MPTP). The mechanism of tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP is associated with up-regulation of parkin protein. Here we tested if parkin mediates tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP by knocking-down parkin in tuberoinfundibular neurons using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed toward parkin. Following knockdown, axon terminal DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) concentrations were analyzed 24h post-MPTP administration. rAAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous parkin rendered tuberoinfundibular neurons susceptible to MPTP induced terminal DA loss, but not TH loss, within 24h post-MPTP. To determine if the neuroprotective benefits of parkin up-regulation could be translated to nigrostriatal neurons, rAAV expressing human parkin was injected into the substantia nigra of mice and axon terminal DA and TH concentrations were analyzed 24h post-MPTP. Nigral parkin over-expression prevented loss of TH in the axon terminals and soma of nigrostriatal neurons, but had no effect on terminal DA loss within 24h post-MPTP. These data show that parkin is necessary for the recovery of terminal DA concentrations within tuberoinfundibular neurons following acute MPTP administration, and parkin can rescue MPTP-induced decreases in TH within nigrostriatal neurons.

  18. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  19. Parkin Regulation and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hang, Liting; Yao, Tso-Pang; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Parkin is a unique, multifunctional ubiquitin ligase whose various roles in the cell, particularly in neurons, are widely thought to be protective. The pivotal role that Parkin plays in maintaining neuronal survival is underscored by our current recognition that Parkin dysfunction represents not only a predominant cause of familial parkinsonism but also a formal risk factor for the more common, sporadic form of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Accordingly, keen research on Parkin over the past decade has led to an explosion of knowledge regarding its physiological roles and its relevance to PD. However, our understanding of Parkin is far from being complete. Indeed, surprises emerge from time to time that compel us to constantly update the paradigm of Parkin function. For example, we now know that Parkin’s function is not confined to mere housekeeping protein quality control (QC) roles but also includes mitochondrial homeostasis and stress-related signaling. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggest a role for Parkin in several other major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Yet, it remains truly amazing to note that a single enzyme could serve such multitude of functions and cellular roles. Clearly, its activity has to be tightly regulated. In this review, we shall discuss this and how dysregulated Parkin function may precipitate neuronal demise in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26793099

  20. The role of endogenous versus exogenous tPA on edema formation in murine ICH.

    PubMed

    Thiex, Ruth; Mayfrank, Lothar; Rohde, Veit; Gilsbach, J Michael; Tsirka, Styliani-Anna E

    2004-09-01

    To minimize the neurotoxic injury by clot-derived substances after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on the surrounding brain tissue, minimally invasive neurosurgical protocols have evolved evacuating the hematoma by stereotaxic injection of a fibrinolytic agent such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), followed by aspiration of the lysed clot. However, the possible contribution of the presence of exogenous tPA itself to the toxic effects of hematoma-derived factors complicates the rationale and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. To clarify the role of exogenous rtPA on edema development, we examined the extent of edema formation in a murine model of collagenase-induced ICH, which included tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice. In 16 (7 tPA-/- and 9 wt mice) out of 32 mice, 1 mg/kg rtPA was injected into the hematoma 5 h after ICH induction followed by aspiration of the liquefied clot 20 min later. In the control group (8 tPA-/- and 8 wt mice), only collagenase was injected. The edema volume was quantified using SPOT software on Luxol Fast Blue and Cresyl violet-stained cross-sections 24 h, 3, and 7 days post surgery. Twenty-four hours after ICH induction, tPA-/- mice had a significantly smaller edema volume (P< 0.01), even when rtPA was administered. Between days 3 and 7 after ICH, exogenous rtPA exerts its edema-promoting effect irrespective of the underlying genotype and exhibits an extensive microglial activation adjacent to the clot. In conclusion, the role of the endogenous tPA appears to be limited to the early phase of edema formation, whereas exogenous rtPA is edema-promoting between days 3 and 7 after ICH.

  1. A locus that enhances the induction of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia viruses is distinct from genome-length ecotropic proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, J M; Risser, R

    1982-01-01

    The segregation of genes that enhance the induction of ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (In loci) has been compared with the segregation of ecotropic-specific nucleotide sequences in 12 low-leukemic mouse strains and 18 recombinant inbred strains. Endogenous ecotropic viruses of these strains are of genome length and structurally similar to AKR ecotropic proviruses. Low-leukemic strains of related pedigree contain ecotropic proviruses at common integration sites. Loci previously identified which enhance induction of ecotropic viruses (In genes) were correlated with the inheritance of ecotropic viral sequences in inbred low-leukemic mouse strains and in CXB recombinant inbred mouse strains. However, four BXH recombinant inbred strains were observed to possess an In gene(s) yet lack the probed envelope gene region for the corresponding endogenous ecotropic virus. These observations indicate that at least one gene that enhances ecotropic virus expression in vitro is encoded by DNA sequences outside ecotropic proviruses or by subgenomic viral sequences. Images PMID:6294342

  2. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  3. Endogenous IL-33 Deficiency Exacerbates Liver Injury and Increases Hepatic Influx of Neutrophils in Acute Murine Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, Virginie; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Le Seyec, Jacques; Lefevre, Benjamin; Farooq, Muhammad; Jan, Aurélien; Manuel, Christelle; Touami-Bernard, Laurence; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Genet, Valentine; Gascan, Hugues; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Chalmel, Frédéric; Lamontagne, Lucie; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The alarmin IL-33 has been described to be upregulated in human and murine viral hepatitis. However, the role of endogenous IL-33 in viral hepatitis remains obscure. We aimed to decipher its function by infecting IL-33-deficient mice (IL-33 KO) and their wild-type (WT) littermates with pathogenic mouse hepatitis virus (L2-MHV3). The IL-33 KO mice were more sensitive to L2-MHV3 infection exhibiting higher levels of AST/ALT, higher tissue damage, significant weight loss, and earlier death. An increased depletion of B and T lymphocytes, NKT cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages was observed 48 h postinfection (PI) in IL-33 KO mice than that in WT mice. In contrast, a massive influx of neutrophils was observed in IL-33 KO mice at 48 h PI. A transcriptomic study of inflammatory and cell-signaling genes revealed the overexpression of IL-6, TNFα, and several chemokines involved in recruitment/activation of neutrophils (CXCL2, CXCL5, CCL2, and CCL6) at 72 h PI in IL-33 KO mice. However, the IFNγ was strongly induced in WT mice with less profound expression in IL-33 KO mice demonstrating that endogenous IL-33 regulated IFNγ expression during L2-MHV3 hepatitis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endogenous IL-33 had multifaceted immunoregulatory effect during viral hepatitis via induction of IFNγ, survival effect on immune cells, and infiltration of neutrophils in the liver. PMID:28607531

  4. Dietary supplementation with apple juice decreases endogenous amyloid-beta levels in murine brain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with age-related neurodegeneration. We demonstrate herein that dietary deficiency in folate and vitamin E, coupled pro-oxidant stress induced by dietary iron, increased amyloid-beta (Abeta) levels in normal adult mice. This increase was potentiated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deficiency as shown by treatment of transgenic mice homozygously lacking murine ApoE. Dietary supplementation with apple juice concentrate in drinking water alleviated the increase in Abeta for both mouse genotypes. These findings provide further evidence linking nutritional and genetic risk factors for age-related neurodegeneration, and underscore that dietary supplementation may be useful to augment therapeutic approaches.

  5. Endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor has a limited effect on host defence in murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Meijers, Joost C M; Schultz, Marcus J; Broze, George J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Coagulation and inflammation interact in the host response to infection. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a natural anticoagulant protein that inhibits tissue factor (TF), the main activator of inflammation-induced coagulation. It was the objective of this study to investigate the effect of endogenous TFPI levels on coagulation, inflammation and bacterial growth during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice. The effect of low endogenous TFPI levels was studied by administration of a neutralising anti-TFPI antibody to wild-type mice, and by using genetically modified mice expressing low levels of TFPI, due to a genetic deletion of the first Kunitz domain of TFPI (TFPIK1(-/-)) rescued with a human TFPI transgene. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae and samples were obtained at 6, 24 and 48 hours after infection. Anti-TFPI reduced TFPI activity by ~50 %. Homozygous lowTFPI mice and heterozygous controls had ~10 % and ~50 % of normal TFPI activity, respectively. TFPI levels did not influence bacterial growth or dissemination. Whereas lung pathology was unaffected in all groups, mice with ~10 % (but not with ~50 %) of TFPI levels displayed elevated lung cytokine and chemokine concentrations 24 hours after infection. None of the groups with low TFPI levels showed an altered procoagulant response in lungs or plasma during pneumonia. These data argue against an important role for endogenous TFPI in the antibacterial, inflammatory and procoagulant response during pneumococcal pneumonia.

  6. Endogenous biosynthesis of thromboxane and prostacyclin in 2 distinct murine models of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Cyrus, T; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2000-12-01

    Thromboxane A(2) is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist; prostacyclin is a potent platelet inhibitor and vasodilator. Altered biosynthesis of these eicosanoids is a feature of human hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. This study examined whether in 2 murine models of atherosclerosis their levels are increased and correlated with the evolution of the disease. Urinary 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha), metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, respectively, were assayed in apoliprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice on chow and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice on chow and a Western-type diet. Atherosclerosis lesion area was measured by en face method. Both eicosanoids increased in apoE-deficient mice on chow and in LDLR-deficient mice on a high-fat diet, but not in LDLR-deficient mice on chow by the end of the study. Aspirin suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation, serum thromboxane B(2), and 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2), and significantly reduced the excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha) in these animals. This study demonstrates that thromboxane as well as prostacyclin biosynthesis is increased in 2 murine models of atherogenesis and is secondary to increased in vivo platelet activation. Assessment of their generation in these models may afford the basis for future studies on the functional role of these eicosanoids in the evolution and progression of atherosclerosis. (Blood. 2000;96:3823-3826)

  7. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  8. Quantitation of Endogenous C-type Virion Production in Several Murine Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Luftig, Ronald B.; Mcmillan, Paul N.; Gudger, Mollie

    1974-01-01

    Quantitation by enumeration of virion particles, measurement of absorbancy at 260 nm, and densitometry on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels has shown that mouse L-M cells yielded 7- to 10-fold less endogenous C-type virions than the parental lines, L or L929. The previously noted stimulation of L-M cell virion production by a concomitant 10% increase in fetal calf serum concentration (D. A. Kindig, R. Karp, and W. H. Kirsten, 1968), was not observed. Images PMID:4371663

  9. Mobilization of Endogenous Stem Cell Populations Enhances Fracture Healing in a Murine Femoral Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Toupadakis, Chrisoula A.; Granick, Jennifer L.; Sagy, Myrrh; Wong, Alice; Ghassemi, Ehssan; Chung, Dai-Jung; Borjesson, Dori L.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells to the site of injury is an effective strategy to enhance bone healing. An alternate approach is to mobilize endogenous, heterogeneous stem cells that will home to the site of injury. AMD3100 is an antagonist of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) that rapidly mobilizes stem cell populations into peripheral blood. Our hypothesis was that increasing circulating numbers of stem and progenitor cells using AMD3100 will improve bone fracture healing. Methods A transverse femoral fracture was induced in C57BL/6 mice, after which they were subcutaneously injected for 3 days with AMD3100 or saline control. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the peripheral blood and bone marrow were evaluated via flow cytometry, automated hematology analysis, and cell culture 24 hours after injection and/or fracture. Healing was assessed up to 84 days after fracture by histomorphometry and µCT. Results AMD3100 injection resulted in higher numbers of circulating MSCs, HSCs, and EPCs. µCT data demonstrated that the fracture callus was significantly larger compared to the saline controls at day 21 and significantly smaller (remodeled) at day 84. AMD3100-treated mice have a significantly higher bone mineral density than saline-treated counterparts at day 84. Discussion Our data demonstrate that early cell mobilization had significant positive effects on healing throughout the regenerative process. Rapid mobilization of endogenous stem cells could provide an effective alternative strategy to cell transplantation for enhancing tissue regeneration. PMID:23831362

  10. Sulfhydration mediates neuroprotective actions of parkin

    PubMed Central

    Vandiver, M. Scott; Paul, Bindu D.; Xu, Risheng; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar; Rao, Feng; Snowman, Adele M.; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Yun Il; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Sen, Nilkantha; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in S-nitrosylation and inactivation of the neuroprotective ubiquitin E3 ligase, parkin, in the brains of patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) are thought to be pathogenic and suggest a possible mechanism linking parkin to sporadic PD. Here we demonstrate that physiologic modification of parkin by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), termed sulfhydration, enhances its catalytic activity. Sulfhydration sites are identified by mass spectrometry analysis and investigated by site directed mutagenesis. Parkin sulfhydration is markedly depleted in the brains of patients with PD, suggesting that this loss may be pathologic. This implies that H2S donors may be therapeutic. PMID:23535647

  11. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  12. BAC Transgenic Mice Expressing a Truncated Mutant Parkin Exhibit Age-dependent Hypokinetic Motor Deficits, Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration, and Accumulation of Proteinase K-Resistant Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Hong; Fleming, Sheila M.; Meurers, Bernhard; Ackerson, Larry C.; Mortazavi, Farzad; Lo, Victor; Hernandez, Daniela; Sulzer, David; Jackson, George R.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Chesselet, Marie-Francoise; Yang, X. William

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recessive mutations in parkin are the most common cause of familial early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent studies suggest that certain parkin mutants may exert dominant toxic effects to cultured cells and such dominant toxicity can lead to progressive dopaminergic (DA) neuron degeneration in Drosophila. To explore whether mutant parkin could exert similar pathogenic effects to mammalian DA neurons in vivo, we developed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse model expressing a C-terminal truncated human mutant parkin (Parkin-Q311X) in DA neurons driven by a dopamine transporter promoter. Parkin-Q311X mice exhibit multiple late-onset and progressive hypokinetic motor deficits. Stereological analyses reveal that the mutant mice develop age-dependent DA neuron degeneration in substantia nigra accompanied by a significant loss of DA neuron terminals in the striatum. Neurochemical analyses reveal a significant reduction of the striatal dopamine level in mutant mice, which is significantly correlated with their hypokinetic motor deficits. Finally, mutant Parkin-Q311X mice, but not wild-type controls, exhibit age-dependent accumulation of proteinase-K resistant endogenous α-synuclein in substantia nigra and co-localized with 3-nitrotyrosine, a marker for oxidative protein damage. Hence, our study provides the first mammalian genetic evidence that dominant toxicity of a parkin mutant is sufficient to elicit age-dependent hypokinetic motor deficits and DA neuron loss in vivo, and uncovers a causal relationship between dominant parkin toxicity and progressive α-synuclein accumulation in DA neurons. Our study underscores the need to further explore the putative link between parkin dominant toxicity and PD. PMID:19228951

  13. Olfaction in Parkin heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, R.N.; Siderowf, A.; Ottman, R.; Caccappolo, E.; Mejia-Santana, H.; Tang, M.-X.; Rosado, L.; Louis, E.; Ruiz, D.; Waters, C.; Fahn, S.; Cote, L.; Frucht, S.; Ford, B.; Orbe-Reilly, M.; Ross, B.; Verbitsky, M.; Kisselev, S.; Comella, C.; Colcher, A.; Jennings, D.; Nance, M.; Bressman, S.; Scott, W.K.; Tanner, C.; Mickel, S.; Rezak, M.; Novak, K.E.; Friedman, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.; Marsh, L.; Hiner, B.; Clark, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: While Parkinson disease (PD) is consistently associated with impaired olfaction, one study reported better olfaction among Parkin mutation carriers than noncarriers. Whether olfaction differs between Parkin mutation heterozygotes and carriers of 2 Parkin mutations (compound heterozygotes) is unknown. Objective: To assess the relationship between Parkin genotype and olfaction in PD probands and their unaffected relatives. Methods: We administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) to 44 probands in the Consortium on Risk for Early-Onset Parkinson Disease study with PD onset ≤50 years (10 Parkin mutation heterozygotes, 9 compound heterozygotes, 25 noncarriers) and 80 of their family members (18 heterozygotes, 2 compound heterozygotes, 60 noncarriers). In the probands, linear regression was used to assess the association between UPSIT score (outcome) and Parkin genotype (predictor), adjusting for covariates. Among family members without PD, we compared UPSIT performance in heterozygotes vs noncarriers using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for family membership, age, gender, and smoking. Results: Among probands with PD, compound heterozygotes had higher UPSIT scores (31.9) than heterozygotes (20.1) or noncarriers (19.9) (p < 0.001). These differences persisted after adjustment for age, gender, disease duration, and smoking. Among relatives without PD, UPSIT performance was similar in heterozygotes (32.5) vs noncarriers (32.4), and better than in heterozygotes with PD (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Olfaction is significantly reduced among Parkin mutation heterozygotes with PD but not among their heterozygous relatives without PD. Compound heterozygotes with PD have olfaction within the normal range. Further research is required to assess whether these findings reflect different neuropathology in Parkin mutation heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes. PMID:21205674

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in parkin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Palacino, James J; Sagi, Dijana; Goldberg, Matthew S; Krauss, Stefan; Motz, Claudia; Wacker, Maik; Klose, Joachim; Shen, Jie

    2004-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in parkin are the predominant cause of familial Parkinson's disease. We previously reported that parkin-/- mice exhibit nigrostriatal deficits in the absence of nigral degeneration. Parkin has been shown to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Loss of parkin function, therefore, has been hypothesized to cause nigral degeneration via an aberrant accumulation of its substrates. Here we employed a proteomic approach to determine whether loss of parkin function results in alterations in abundance and/or modification of proteins in the ventral midbrain of parkin-/- mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry revealed decreased abundance of a number of proteins involved in mitochondrial function or oxidative stress. Consistent with reductions in several subunits of complexes I and IV, functional assays showed reductions in respiratory capacity of striatal mitochondria isolated from parkin-/- mice. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross morphological abnormalities in striatal mitochondria of parkin-/- mice. In addition, parkin-/- mice showed a delayed rate of weight gain, suggesting broader metabolic abnormalities. Accompanying these deficits in mitochondrial function, parkin-/- mice also exhibited decreased levels of proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress. Consistent with these findings, parkin-/- mice showed decreased serum antioxidant capacity and increased protein and lipid peroxidation. The combination of proteomic, genetic, and physiological analyses reveal an essential role for parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial function and provide the first direct evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the absence of nigral degeneration in a genetic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  15. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  16. Parkin and mitochondrial quality control: toward assembling the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Winklhofer, Konstanze F

    2014-06-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with autosomal-recessive Parkinsonism. Moreover, parkin inactivation has been found in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting a wider pathogenic impact than initially predicted. Beyond its role in PD, parkin has also been implicated in innate immune responses. Since its discovery, mounting evidence indicates that parkin can mediate degradative as well as nondegradative ubiquitination. Here we review recent insights into the structure of parkin, the mechanism of its E3 ligase activity, and its functional versatility in an attempt to merge controversial aspects into a more comprehensive picture of this multifaceted E3 ubiquitin ligase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  18. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Madhuparna Itoh, Kie Iijima, Miho Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson’s disease-associated protein—parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1—in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. -- Highlights: •A Drp1-mediated mechanism accounts for ∼95% of mitochondrial division. •Parkin controls the connectivity of mitochondria via a mechanism that is independent of Drp1. •In the absence of Drp1, connected mitochondria transiently depolarize. •The transient depolarization is independent of calcium signaling and uncoupling protein 2.

  19. Role of PINK1 binding to the TOM complex and alternate intracellular membranes in recruitment and activation of the E3 ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Michael; Jin, Seok Min; Kane, Lesley A; Youle, Richard J

    2012-02-14

    Mutations in the mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the cytosolic E3 ligase Parkin can cause Parkinson's disease. Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1 on the outer membrane where, dependent on kinase activity, it recruits and activates Parkin to induce mitophagy, potentially maintaining organelle fidelity. How PINK1 recruits Parkin is unknown. We show that endogenous PINK1 forms a 700 kDa complex with the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) selectively on depolarized mitochondria whereas PINK1 ectopically targeted to the outer membrane retains association with TOM on polarized mitochondria. Inducibly targeting PINK1 to peroxisomes or lysosomes, which lack a TOM complex, recruits Parkin and activates ubiquitin ligase activity on the respective organelles. Once there, Parkin induces organelle selective autophagy of peroxisomes but not lysosomes. We propose that the association of PINK1 with the TOM complex allows rapid reimport of PINK1 to rescue repolarized mitochondria from mitophagy, and discount mitochondrial-specific factors for Parkin translocation and activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b ligands during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis does not compromise murine lung repair.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, BreAnne; Henneke, Ingrid; Hezel, Stefanie; Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Chao, Cho-Ming; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Jones, Matthew; Goth, Kerstin; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Königshoff, Melanie; Herold, Susanne; Rizvanov, Albert A; Günther, Andreas; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) mediate organ repair. Lung epithelial cell overexpression of Fgf10 postbleomycin injury is both protective and therapeutic, characterized by increased survival and attenuated fibrosis. Exogenous administration of FGF7 (palifermin) also showed prophylactic survival benefits in mice. The role of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis is still elusive. This study reports the expression of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands, receptors, and signaling targets in wild-type mice following bleomycin lung injury. In addition, the impact of attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b-ligands following bleomycin-induced fibrosis was tested by using a doxycycline (dox)-based inducible, soluble, dominant-negative form of the Fgfr2b receptor. Double-transgenic (DTG) Rosa26(rtTA/+);tet(O)solFgfr2b mice were validated for the expression and activity of soluble Fgfr2b (failure to regenerate maxillary incisors, attenuated recombinant FGF7 signal in the lung). As previously reported, no defects in lung morphometry were detected in DTG (+dox) mice exposed from postnatal days (PN) 1 through PN105. Female single-transgenic (STG) and DTG mice were subjected to various levels of bleomycin injury (1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 U/kg). Fgfr2b ligands were attenuated either throughout injury (days 0-11; days 0-28) or during later stages (days 6-28 and 14-28). No significant changes in survival, weight, lung function, confluent areas of fibrosis, or hydroxyproline deposition were detected in DTG mice. These results indicate that endogenous Fgfr2b ligands do not significantly protect against bleomycin injury, nor do they expedite the resolution of bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice.

  1. Attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b ligands during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis does not compromise murine lung repair

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, BreAnne; Henneke, Ingrid; Hezel, Stefanie; Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Chao, Cho-Ming; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Jones, Matthew; Goth, Kerstin; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Königshoff, Melanie; Herold, Susanne; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Günther, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) mediate organ repair. Lung epithelial cell overexpression of Fgf10 postbleomycin injury is both protective and therapeutic, characterized by increased survival and attenuated fibrosis. Exogenous administration of FGF7 (palifermin) also showed prophylactic survival benefits in mice. The role of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis is still elusive. This study reports the expression of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands, receptors, and signaling targets in wild-type mice following bleomycin lung injury. In addition, the impact of attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b-ligands following bleomycin-induced fibrosis was tested by using a doxycycline (dox)-based inducible, soluble, dominant-negative form of the Fgfr2b receptor. Double-transgenic (DTG) Rosa26rtTA/+;tet(O)solFgfr2b mice were validated for the expression and activity of soluble Fgfr2b (failure to regenerate maxillary incisors, attenuated recombinant FGF7 signal in the lung). As previously reported, no defects in lung morphometry were detected in DTG (+dox) mice exposed from postnatal days (PN) 1 through PN105. Female single-transgenic (STG) and DTG mice were subjected to various levels of bleomycin injury (1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 U/kg). Fgfr2b ligands were attenuated either throughout injury (days 0–11; days 0–28) or during later stages (days 6–28 and 14–28). No significant changes in survival, weight, lung function, confluent areas of fibrosis, or hydroxyproline deposition were detected in DTG mice. These results indicate that endogenous Fgfr2b ligands do not significantly protect against bleomycin injury, nor do they expedite the resolution of bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:25820524

  2. Activation of PPARγ by endogenous prostaglandin J2 mediates the antileukemic effect of selenium in murine leukemia.

    PubMed

    Finch, Emily R; Tukaramrao, Diwakar B; Goodfield, Laura L; Quickel, Michael D; Paulson, Robert F; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2017-03-30

    Supplementation with nontoxic doses of micronutrient selenium has been shown to alleviate chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) via the elimination of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in mice. This treatment provides a new and novel method for eliminating the LSCs that are otherwise not targeted by existing therapies. The antileukemic effect of selenium was dependent on the production of endogenous cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPGs), Δ-12 prostaglandin J2 (Δ(12)-PGJ2), and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2). Here, we show that these endogenous CyPGs, produced by mice maintained on selenium-supplemented diets, alleviate the symptoms of CML through their ability to activate the nuclear hormone receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). GW9662, a potent PPARγ antagonist, blocked the antileukemic effect of selenium supplementation by significantly reducing CyPGs. This effect was mediated by an increase in 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-Pgdh) activity, which oxidizes and inactivates Δ(12)-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2 In contrast, treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone mimicked selenium supplementation. This treatment led to decreased 15-Pgdh activity and increased CyPG levels, which inhibited CML progression. Selenium-dependent activation of PPARγ mediated by endogenous CyPGs decreased Stat5 expression leading to the downregulation of Cited2, a master regulator of LSC quiescence. These studies suggest a potential role for selenium supplementation as an adjuvant therapy in CML. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Parkin deficiency disrupts calcium homeostasis by modulating phospholipase C signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sandebring, Anna; Dehvari, Nodi; Perez-Manso, Monica; Thomas, Kelly Jean; Karpilovski, Elena; Cookson, Mark R.; Cowburn, Richard F.; Cedazo-Mínguez, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin cause early onset autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (ARJP) presumably by having lack of function that alter the level, activity, aggregation or localization of its substrates. We recently reported that phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1) is a substrate for parkin. Here, we show that parkin mutants and siRNA parkin knockdown cells have enhanced levels of PLCγ1 phosphorylation, basal phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). The protein levels of Ca2+ regulated Protein Kinase C α (PKCα) were decreased in ARJP parkin mutant cells. Neomycin and dantrolene decreased [Ca2+]i levels in parkin mutants to those seen in wild-type (WT) parkin cells, suggesting that differences were a consequence of altered PLC activity. The protection of WT parkin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) toxicity could also be established in ARJP mutants when pretreating with dantrolene, implying that balancing Ca2+ release from ryanodine-sensitive stores is decreasing the toxic effects from 6OHDA. Our findings suggests parkin as an important factor for maintaining Ca2+ homeostasis and that parkin deficiency leads to a PLC-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i levels that makes cells more vulnerable to neurotoxins such as 6OHDA. PMID:19663908

  4. Autoregulation of Parkin activity through its ubiquitin-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Chaugule, Viduth K; Burchell, Lynn; Barber, Kathryn R; Sidhu, Ateesh; Leslie, Simon J; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Parkin is an E3-ubiquitin ligase belonging to the RBR (RING–InBetweenRING–RING family), and is involved in the neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease. Autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism, which is one of the most common familial forms of the disease, is directly linked to mutations in the parkin gene. However, the molecular mechanisms of Parkin dysfunction in the disease state remain to be established. We now demonstrate that the ubiquitin-like domain of Parkin functions to inhibit its autoubiquitination. Moreover pathogenic Parkin mutations disrupt this autoinhibition, resulting in a constitutively active molecule. In addition, we show that the mechanism of autoregulation involves ubiquitin binding by a C-terminal region of Parkin. Our observations provide important molecular insights into the underlying basis of Parkinson's disease, and in the regulation of RBR E3-ligase activity. PMID:21694720

  5. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of synaptotagmin IV by accelerating polyubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Kabayama, Hiroyuki; Tokushige, Naoko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kabayama, Miyuki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase whose mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease (PD). Unlike the human phenotype, parkin knockout (KO) mice show no apparent dopamine neuron degeneration, although they demonstrate reduced expression and activity of striatal mitochondrial proteins believed to be necessary for neuronal survival. Instead, parkin-KO mice show reduced striatal evoked dopamine release, abnormal synaptic plasticity, and non-motor symptoms, all of which appear to mimic the preclinical features of Parkinson's disease. Extensive studies have screened candidate synaptic proteins responsible for reduced evoked dopamine release, and synaptotagmin XI (Syt XI), an isoform of Syt family regulating membrane trafficking, has been identified as a substrate of parkin in humans. However, its expression level is unaltered in the striatum of parkin-KO mice. Thus, the target(s) of parkin and the molecular mechanisms underlying the impaired dopamine release in parkin-KO mice remain unknown. In this study, we focused on Syt IV because of its highly homology to Syt XI, and because they share an evolutionarily conserved lack of Ca(2+)-binding capacity; thus, Syt IV plays an inhibitory role in Ca(2+)-dependent neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells and neurons in various brain regions. We found that a proteasome inhibitor increased Syt IV protein, but not Syt XI protein, in neuron-like, differentiated PC12 cells, and that parkin interacted with and polyubiquitinated Syt IV, thereby accelerating its protein turnover. Parkin overexpression selectively degraded Syt IV protein, but not Syt I protein (indispensable for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis), thus enhancing depolarization-dependent exocytosis. Furthermore, in parkin-KO mice, the level of striatal Syt IV protein was increased. Our data indicate a crucial role for parkin in the proteasomal degradation of Syt IV, and provide a potential mechanism of parkin-regulated, evoked neurotransmitter release

  6. parkin counteracts symptoms in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Annika FM; Staveley, Brian E

    2004-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease, a prevalent neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the reduction of dopaminergic neurons resulting in the loss of motor control, resting tremor, the formation of neuronal inclusions and ultimately premature death. Two inherited forms of PD have been linked to mutations in the α-synuclein and parkin genes. The parkin protein functions as an ubiquitin ligase targeting specific proteins for degradation. Expression of human α-synuclein in Drosophila neurons recapitulates the loss of motor control, the development of neuronal inclusions, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the ommatidial array to provide an excellent genetic model of PD. Results To investigate the role of parkin, we have generated transgenic Drosophila that conditionally express parkin under the control of the yeast UAS enhancer. While expression of parkin has little consequence, co-expression of parkin with α-synuclein in the dopaminergic neurons suppresses the α-synuclein-induced premature loss of climbing ability. In addition directed expression of parkin in the eye counteracts the α-synuclein-induced degeneration of the ommatidial array. These results show that parkin suppresses the PD-like symptoms observed in the α-synuclein-dependent Drosophila model of PD. Conclusion The highly conserved parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase can suppress the damaging effects of human α-synuclein. These results are consistent with a role for parkin in targeting α-synuclein to the proteasome. If this relationship is conserved in humans, this suggests that up-regulation of parkin should suppress α-synucleinopathic PD. The development of therapies that regulate parkin activity may be crucial in the treatment of PD. PMID:15090075

  7. Essential pathogenic role for endogenous interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) during disease onset phase of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis. I. In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M; Yano, A; Xie, Q; Iwahashi, K; Takeuchi, Y; Meroni, P L; Nicoletti, F

    1998-03-01

    We previously found that immunization of CH3/He male mice with syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) without the aid of any adjuvants was sufficient to induce DTH to TGC and experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO). To evaluate the role of endogenous IFN-gamma in this model, C3H/He mice immunized subcutaneously with TGC on days 0 and 14 received a single injection of anti-murine IFN-gamma MoAb on day 15, 20 or 25. On day 45, DTH to TGC was tested, testis specimens were collected for histological examination, and blood samples collected for IFN-gamma measurement. The results showed that whilst MoAb treatment on day 15 or 25 did not influence DTH responses, EAO development, and appearance of IFN-gamma in the circulation, treatment on day 20 significantly suppressed all of them. Thus, a single injection with anti-IFN-gamma MoAb may successfully down-regulate testicular autoimmunity, provided that the treatment is given at an optimal time point during disease development.

  8. Impulsive-compulsive behaviors in parkin-associated Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Ginevrino, Monia; Petrucci, Simona; Ricciardi, Lucia; Bove, Francesco; Criscuolo, Chiara; Moccia, Marcello; De Rosa, Anna; Sorbera, Chiara; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Barone, Paolo; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this multicenter, case-control study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) in a cohort of patients with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to a group of patients without the mutation. Methods: We compared 22 patients with biallelic parkin mutations (parkin-PD) and 26 patients negative for parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and GBA mutations (PD-NM), matched for age at onset, disease duration, levodopa, and dopamine agonist equivalent daily dose. A semistructured interview was used to diagnose each of the following ICBs: compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding, hobbyism, and compulsive medication use. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease–Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) was adopted to rate ICB severity. Results: Frequency of patients with at least one ICB was comparable between parkin-PD and PD-NM. Nevertheless, when analyzing the distribution of specific ICBs, a higher frequency of compulsive shopping, binge eating, and punding/hobbyism was found in the parkin-PD group. Compared to PD-NM, parkin-PD patients with ICB had younger onset age and higher frequency of smokers; in 5 patients, ICB had predated PD onset. Total and partial (compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, binge eating, hobbyism/punding) QUIP-RS scores were higher in patients with parkin-PD compared to patients with PD-NM. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of parkin mutations was associated with smoking status and higher QUIP-RS total score. Conclusions: Our data expand the parkin-associated phenotypic spectrum demonstrating higher frequency and severity of specific ICBs, and suggesting an association between the parkin genotype, smoking status, and ICB severity. PMID:27590295

  9. Impulsive-compulsive behaviors in parkin-associated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Francesca; Fasano, Alfonso; Ginevrino, Monia; Petrucci, Simona; Ricciardi, Lucia; Bove, Francesco; Criscuolo, Chiara; Moccia, Marcello; De Rosa, Anna; Sorbera, Chiara; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Barone, Paolo; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-10-04

    The aim of this multicenter, case-control study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) in a cohort of patients with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to a group of patients without the mutation. We compared 22 patients with biallelic parkin mutations (parkin-PD) and 26 patients negative for parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and GBA mutations (PD-NM), matched for age at onset, disease duration, levodopa, and dopamine agonist equivalent daily dose. A semistructured interview was used to diagnose each of the following ICBs: compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding, hobbyism, and compulsive medication use. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) was adopted to rate ICB severity. Frequency of patients with at least one ICB was comparable between parkin-PD and PD-NM. Nevertheless, when analyzing the distribution of specific ICBs, a higher frequency of compulsive shopping, binge eating, and punding/hobbyism was found in the parkin-PD group. Compared to PD-NM, parkin-PD patients with ICB had younger onset age and higher frequency of smokers; in 5 patients, ICB had predated PD onset. Total and partial (compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, binge eating, hobbyism/punding) QUIP-RS scores were higher in patients with parkin-PD compared to patients with PD-NM. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of parkin mutations was associated with smoking status and higher QUIP-RS total score. Our data expand the parkin-associated phenotypic spectrum demonstrating higher frequency and severity of specific ICBs, and suggesting an association between the parkin genotype, smoking status, and ICB severity. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Characterization of defectiveness in endogenous antigen presentation of novel murine cells established from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, K; Yamashina, K; Kitatani, N; Kagishima, A; Hamaoka, T; Hosaka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Three cell lines (4A1, 4C2 and 6D1 cells) derived from fibrosarcoma induced by the inoculation of 3-methylcholanthrene into C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice were examined for their ability to present antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). 6D1 and 4C2 cells were deficient in presenting endogenously synthesized influenza virus antigens to CTL, but they were able to present antigens when they were sensitized with a synthetic epitope peptide. The expression of the H-2 Kk gene in 4C2 and 6D1 cells was much reduced and was detectable only with Northern blot hybridization. The expression of two transporter genes (TAP1 and TAP2), examined by Northern hybridization, was also reduced in both cells, and negligible particularly in 4C2 cells. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment of these cells induced expression of Kk, TAP1 and TAP2 genes and rescued the defect of class I-restricted antigen presentation in 4C2 and 6D1 cells. Even after this treatment, however, antigen-presentation capability of 4C2 cells was still much lower than that of normal 4A1 cells. This finding suggests that 4C2 cells might have an additional defective gene(s), whose products are involved in the processing of class I-restricted antigen, besides the Kk and TAP genes, and this may explain the difficulty of 4C2 cells to induce tumour-specific immunity, as described previously. To our knowledge, the 4C2 cell is the first tumour cell postulated to have more than three defective genes involved in class I-restricted antigen presentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7890298

  11. HSC70 blockade by the therapeutic peptide P140 affects autophagic processes and endogenous MHCII presentation in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Page, Nicolas; Gros, Frédéric; Schall, Nicolas; Décossas, Marion; Bagnard, Dominique; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2011-05-01

    The P140 phosphopeptide issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K small nuclear ribonucleoprotein protein displays protective properties in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. It binds both major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) and HSC70/Hsp73 molecules. P140 peptide increases MRL/lpr peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases autoepitope recognition by T cells. To explore further the mode of action of P140 peptide on HSC70+ antigen-presenting cells. P140 biodistribution was monitored in real time using an imaging system and by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Fluorescence activated cell sorting and Western blotting experiments were used to evaluate the P140 effects on autophagic flux markers. P140 fluorescence accumulated especially in the lungs and spleen. P140 peptide reduced the number of peripheral and splenic T and B cells without affecting these cells in normal mice. Remaining MRL/lpr B cells responded normally to mitogens. P140 peptide decreased the expression levels of HSC70/Hsp73 chaperone and stable MHCII dimers, which are both increased in MRL/lpr splenic B cells. It impaired refolding properties of chaperone HSC70. In MRL/lpr B cells, it increased the accumulation of the autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 and LC3-II, consistent with a downregulated lysosomal degradation during autophagic flux. The study results suggest that after P140 peptide binding to HSC70, the endogenous (auto)antigen processing might be greatly affected in MRL/lpr antigen-presenting B cells, leading to the observed decrease of autoreactive T-cell priming and signalling via a mechanism involving a lysosomal degradation pathway. This unexpected mechanism might explain the beneficial effect of P140 peptide in treated MRL/lpr mice.

  12. HSC70 blockade by the therapeutic peptide P140 affects autophagic processes and endogenous MHCII presentation in murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Page, Nicolas; Gros, Frédéric; Schall, Nicolas; Décossas, Marion; Bagnard, Dominique; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2011-01-01

    Background The P140 phosphopeptide issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K small nuclear ribonucleoprotein protein displays protective properties in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. It binds both major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) and HSC70/Hsp73 molecules. P140 peptide increases MRL/lpr peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases autoepitope recognition by T cells. Objective To explore further the mode of action of P140 peptide on HSC70+ antigen-presenting cells. Methods P140 biodistribution was monitored in real time using an imaging system and by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Fluorescence activated cell sorting and Western blotting experiments were used to evaluate the P140 effects on autophagic flux markers. Results P140 fluorescence accumulated especially in the lungs and spleen. P140 peptide reduced the number of peripheral and splenic T and B cells without affecting these cells in normal mice. Remaining MRL/lpr B cells responded normally to mitogens. P140 peptide decreased the expression levels of HSC70/Hsp73 chaperone and stable MHCII dimers, which are both increased in MRL/lpr splenic B cells. It impaired refolding properties of chaperone HSC70. In MRL/lpr B cells, it increased the accumulation of the autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 and LC3-II, consistent with a downregulated lysosomal degradation during autophagic flux. Conclusion The study results suggest that after P140 peptide binding to HSC70, the endogenous (auto)antigen processing might be greatly affected in MRL/lpr antigen-presenting B cells, leading to the observed decrease of autoreactive T-cell priming and signalling via a mechanism involving a lysosomal degradation pathway. This unexpected mechanism might explain the beneficial effect of P140 peptide in treated MRL/lpr mice. PMID:21173017

  13. Parkin in cancer: Mitophagy-related/unrelated tasks

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Nabil; Kondo, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctional mitochondria may produce excessive reactive oxygen species, thus inducing DNA damage, which may be oncogenic if not repaired. As a major role of the PINK1-Parkin pathway involves selective autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria via a process termed mitophagy, Parkin-mediated mitophagy may be a tumor-suppressive mechanism. As an alternative mechanism for tumor inhibition beyond mitophagy, Parkin has been reported to have other oncosuppressive functions such as DNA repair, negative regulation of cell proliferation and stimulation of p53 tumor suppressor function. The authors recently reported that acute ethanol-induced mitophagy in hepatocytes was associated with Parkin mitochondrial translocation and colocalization with accumulated 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA damage and mutagenicity). This finding suggests: (1) the possibility of Parkin-mediated repair of damaged mitochondrial DNA in hepatocytes of ethanol-treated rats (ETRs) as an oncosuppressive mechanism; and (2) potential induction of cytoprotective mitophagy in ETR hepatocytes if mitochondrial damage is too severe to be repaired. Below is a summary of the various roles Parkin plays in tumor suppression, which may or may not be related to mitophagy. A proper understanding of the various tasks performed by Parkin in tumorigenesis may help in cancer therapy by allowing the PINK1-Parkin pathway to be targeted. PMID:28321271

  14. PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Eiyama, Akinori; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria-specific autophagy (mitophagy) is a fundamental process critical for maintaining mitochondrial fitness in a myriad of cell types. Particularly, mitophagy contributes to mitochondrial quality control by selectively eliminating dysfunctional mitochondria. In mammalian cells, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin act cooperatively in sensing mitochondrial functional state and marking damaged mitochondria for disposal via the autophagy pathway. Notably, ubiquitin and deubiquitinases play vital roles in modulating Parkin activity and mitophagy efficiency. In this review, we highlight recent breakthroughs addressing the key issues of how PINK1 activates Parkin in response to mitochondrial malfunction, how Parkin localizes specifically to impaired mitochondria, and how ubiquitination and deubiquitination regulate PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy.

  15. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  16. Regulation of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen; Martinez-Torres, R Julio

    2012-09-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease. In addition, it is a putative tumour suppressor, and has roles outside its enzymatic activity. It is critical for mitochondrial clearance through mitophagy, and is an essential protein in most eukaryotes. As such, it is a tightly controlled protein, regulated through an array of external interactions with multiple proteins, posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation, and self-regulation through internal associations. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies into Parkin regulation and discuss future challenges for gaining a full molecular understanding of the regulation of Parkin E3 ligase activity.

  17. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) recruit Parkin to defective mitochondria to promote mitochondrial autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Vashisht, Ajay A; Tchieu, Jason; Wohlschlegel, James A; Dreier, Lars

    2012-11-23

    Parkin is recruited to defective mitochondria to promote degradation by an autophagy mechanism (mitophagy). VDACs specifically interact with Parkin on defective mitochondria and are required for efficient targeting of Parkin to mitochondria and subsequent mitophagy. VDACs recruit Parkin to defective mitochondria. A novel mechanistic aspect of Parkin-dependent mitophagy is proposed that may be relevant to Parkinson disease. Mutations in the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the serine/threonine kinase PINK1 can cause Parkinson disease. Both proteins function in the elimination of defective mitochondria by autophagy. In this process, activation of PINK1 mediates translocation of Parkin from the cytosol to mitochondria by an unknown mechanism. To better understand how Parkin is targeted to defective mitochondria, we purified affinity-tagged Parkin from mitochondria and identified Parkin-associated proteins by mass spectrometry. The three most abundant interacting proteins were the voltage-dependent anion channels 1, 2, and 3 (VDACs 1, 2, and 3), pore-forming proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane. We demonstrate that Parkin specifically interacts with VDACs when the function of mitochondria is disrupted by treating cells with the proton uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-chlorophenylhydrazone. In the absence of all three VDACs, the recruitment of Parkin to defective mitochondria and subsequent mitophagy are impaired. Each VDAC is sufficient to support Parkin recruitment and mitophagy, suggesting that VDACs can function redundantly. We hypothesize that VDACs serve as mitochondrial docking sites to recruit Parkin from the cytosol to defective mitochondria.

  18. Activation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Thomas R; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-04-01

    The PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homologue-induced putative kinase 1)/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control pathway mediates the clearance of damaged organelles, but appears to be disrupted in Parkinson's disease (PD) [Springer and Kahle (2011) Autophagy 7, 266-278]. Upon mitochondrial stress, PINK1 activates the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Parkin through phosphorylation of the Ub-like (UBL) domain of Parkin and of the small modifier Ub itself at a conserved residue [Sauvé and Gehring (2014) Cell Res. 24, 1025-1026]. Recently resolved partial crystal structures of Parkin showed a 'closed', auto-inhibited conformation, consistent with its notoriously weak enzymatic activity at steady state [Wauer and Komander (2013) EMBO J. 32, 2099-2112; Riley et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1982; Trempe et al. (2013) Science 340, 1451-1455; Spratt et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1983]. It has thus become clear that Parkin must undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic functions. Recent published findings derived from X-ray structures and molecular modelling present a complete structural model of human Parkin at an all-atom resolution [Caulfield et al. (2014) PLoS Comput. Biol. 10, e1003935]. The results of the combined in silico simulations-based and experimental assay-based study indicates that PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation of Parkin is required for its activation and triggering of 'opening' conformations. Indeed, the obtained structures showed a sequential release of Parkin's intertwined domains and allowed docking of an Ub-charged E2 coenzyme, which could enable its enzymatic activity. In addition, using cell-based screening, select E2 enzymes that redundantly, cooperatively or antagonistically regulate Parkin's activation and/or enzymatic functions at different stages of the mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) process were identified [Fiesel et al. (2014) J. Cell Sci. 127, 3488-3504]. Other work that aims to pin-point the particular

  19. Cognitive and motor function in long duration PARKIN PD

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, RN; Caccappolo, E; Mejia-Santana, H; Tang, M–X; Rosado, L; Orbe Reilly, M; Ruiz, D; Louis, ED; Comella, C; Nance, M; Bressman, S; Scott, WK; Tanner, C; Mickel, S; Waters, C; Fahn, S; Cote, L; Frucht, S; Ford, B; Rezak, M; Novak, K; Friedman, JH; Pfeiffer, R; Marsh, L; Hiner, B; Payami, H; Molho, E; Factor, SA; Nutt, J; Serrano, C; Arroyo, M; Ottman, R; Pauciulo, M; Nichols, W; Clark, LN; Marder, K

    2013-01-01

    Importance The long term cognitive outcome in PARKIN-PD patients is unknown. This data may be meaningful when counseling PARKIN-PD patients. Objective Among early-onset PD (EOPD) patients with long disease durations, we assessed cognitive and motor performances, comparing compound heterozygote/homozygote PARKIN carriers to non-carriers Design Cross sectional study Setting Seventeen movement disorders centers Participants Forty-four participants in the Consortium on Risk for Early-Onset PD (CORE-PD) with PD duration greater than median (>14 years), including PARKIN compound heterozygotes/homozygotes combined (n=21), and non-carriers (n=23). Main outcome measures Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) and neuropsychological performance. Linear regression models were applied to assess the association between PARKIN mutation status and cognitive domain scores and UPDRS. Models were adjusted for age, education, disease duration, language, and levodopa equivalent daily dose. Results Compound heterozygote/homozygote PARKIN mutation carriers had earlier AAO of PD (p<0.001) and were younger (p=0.004) at time of examination than non-carriers. They performed better on the MMSE (p=0.010) and were more likely to receive lower scores on the CDR (p=0.003). In multivariate analyses, PARKIN compound heterozygotes/homozygotes performed better on the UPDRS Part III (p=0.017), and on tests of attention (p=0.022), memory (p=0.025) and visuospatial (p=0.024) domains. Conclusions and Relevance Cross-sectional analyses demonstrate better cognitive and motor performance in compound heterozygote/homozygote PARKIN EOPD carriers than non-carriers with long disease duration, suggesting slower disease progression. Longitudinal follow up is required to confirm these findings. PMID:24190026

  20. MicroRNA-181a suppresses parkin-mediated mitophagy and sensitizes neuroblastoma cells to mitochondrial uncoupler-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Yuanzhi; Liao, Weijie; Liao, Meijian; Luo, Xuan; Wu, Jiangbin; Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Yaou; Xu, Naihan

    2016-01-01

    Damage to mitochondria often results in the activation of both mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptosis. The elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria is necessary for mitochondrial quality maintenance and efficient energy supply. Here we report that miR-181a is a novel inhibitor of mitophagy. miR-181a is downregulated by mitochondrial uncouplers in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Overexpression of miR-181a inhibits mitochondrial uncoupling agents-induced mitophagy by inhibiting the degradation of mitochondrial proteins without affecting global autophagy. Knock down of endogenous miR-181a accelerates the autophagic degradation of damaged mitochondria. miR-181a directly targets Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase and partially blocks the colocalization of mitochondria and autophagosomes/lysosomes. Re-expression of exogenous Parkin restores the inhibitory effect of miR-181a on mitophagy. Furthermore, miR-181a increases the sensitivity of neuroblastoma cells to mitochondrial uncoupler-induced apoptosis, whereas miR-181a antagomir prevents cell death. Because mitophagy defects are associated with a variety of human disorders, these findings indicate an important link between microRNA and Parkin-mediated mitophagy and highlights a potential therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:27281615

  1. Overexpression of parkin in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system protects against methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Traini, Roberta; Killinger, Bryan; Schneider, Bernard; Moszczynska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a central nervous system psychostimulant with a high potential for abuse. At high doses, METH causes a selective degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, sparing other striatal terminals and cell bodies. We previously detected a deficit in parkin after binge METH in rat striatal synaptosomes. Parkin is an ubiquitin-protein E3 ligase capable of protecting dopamine neurons from diverse cellular insults. Whether the deficit in parkin mediates the toxicity of METH and whether parkin can protect from toxicity of the drug is unknown. The present study investigated whether overexpression of parkin attenuates degeneration of striatal dopaminergic terminals exposed to binge METH. Parkin overexpression in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system was achieved by microinjection of adeno-associated viral transfer vector 2/6 encoding rat parkin (AAV2/6-parkin) into the substantia nigra pars compacta. The microinjections of AAV2/6-parkin dose-dependently increased parkin levels in both the substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. The levels of dopamine synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, remained at the control levels; therefore, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was used as an index of dopaminergic terminal integrity. In METH-exposed rats, the increase in parkin levels attenuated METH-induced decreases in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that parkin can protect striatal dopaminergic terminals against METH neurotoxicity. PMID:23313192

  2. Parkin is protective for substantia nigra dopamine neurons in a tau gene transfer neurodegeneration model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ronald L; Dayton, Robert D; Henderson, Karen M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2006-06-19

    Parkin is a ubiquitin ligase involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Elevating parkin expression in cells reduces markers of oxidative stress while blocking parkin expression increases oxidative stress. In parkin gene knock down mouse and fly models, mitochondria function is deficient. Parkin is neuroprotective against a variety of toxic insults, while it remains unclear which of the above properties of parkin may mediate the protective actions. One of the models for which parkin is protective is overexpression of alpha-synuclein, a protein that self-aggregates in Parkinson disease. The microtubule-associated protein tau is another protein that self-aggregates in specific neurodegenerative diseases that also involve loss of dopamine neurons such as frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. We recently developed a tau-induced dopaminergic degeneration model in rats using adeno-associated virus vectors. In this study, we successfully targeted either a mixed tau/parkin vector or mixed tau/control vector to the rat substantia nigra. While there was significant loss of dopamine neurons in the tau/control group relative to uninjected substantia nigra, there was no cell loss in the tau/parkin group. We found no difference in total tau levels between tau/control and tau/parkin groups. Parkin therefore protects dopamine neurons against tau as it does against alpha-synuclein, which further supports parkin as a therapeutic target for diseases involving loss of dopamine neurons.

  3. Overexpression of parkin in the rat nigrostriatal dopamine system protects against methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Traini, Roberta; Killinger, Bryan; Schneider, Bernard; Moszczynska, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a central nervous system psychostimulant with a high potential for abuse. At high doses, METH causes a selective degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, sparing other striatal terminals and cell bodies. We previously detected a deficit in parkin after binge METH in rat striatal synaptosomes. Parkin is an ubiquitin-protein E3 ligase capable of protecting dopamine neurons from diverse cellular insults. Whether the deficit in parkin mediates the toxicity of METH and whether parkin can protect from toxicity of the drug is unknown. The present study investigated whether overexpression of parkin attenuates degeneration of striatal dopaminergic terminals exposed to binge METH. Parkin overexpression in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system was achieved by microinjection of adeno-associated viral transfer vector 2/6 encoding rat parkin (AAV2/6-parkin) into the substantia nigra pars compacta. The microinjections of AAV2/6-parkin dose-dependently increased parkin levels in both the substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. The levels of dopamine synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, remained at the control levels; therefore, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was used as an index of dopaminergic terminal integrity. In METH-exposed rats, the increase in parkin levels attenuated METH-induced decreases in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that parkin can protect striatal dopaminergic terminals against METH neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Normal cardiovascular reflex testing in patients with parkin disease.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Francesca; Elia, Antonio E; De Joanna, Gabriella; Romito, Luigi M; Garavaglia, Barbara; Albanese, Alberto

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate cardiovascular autonomic function in patients with parkin disease. Ten patients with a genetically confirmed diagnosis were compared to 11 healthy controls. Symptoms related to autonomic dysfunction were collected by structured interviews. Cardiovascular autonomic reflex function was evaluated using a standard battery of eight tests. Autonomic tests included the study of sympathetic function through the analysis of blood pressure responses to head-up tilt, standing, isometric hand grip, cold pressor, mental arithmetic, Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva overshoot), and the study of parasympathetic function through the analysis of heart rate responses to deep breathing, hyperventilation, and Valsalva ratio. Seven out of 10 patients reported symptoms involving different aspects of autonomic function, while 5 out of 11 controls reported symptoms related exclusively to orthostatic dizziness and constipation. Symptoms related to bladder dysfunction were the most frequent autonomic abnormality occurring in six patients, followed by orthostatic dizziness and dry mouth (in four patients each). Constipation occurred in three patients, sialorrhea in two, and erectile dysfunction, dry eye, and warm intolerance in one each. Cardiovascular reflex testing revealed no difference between patients and controls in quantitative assessment of both sympathetic and parasympathetic functions, except for diastolic blood pressure after isometric hand grip that did not increase normally in parkin patients compared to controls (P = 0.007). These data show that cardiovascular dysautonomia is not associated to the parkin phenotype, whereas urinary complaints are more frequently reported by parkin patients than by controls. Urinary dysautonomia warrants further investigation in patients with parkin disease.

  5. Optineurin is an autophagy receptor for damaged mitochondria in parkin-mediated mitophagy that is disrupted by an ALS-linked mutation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yvette C; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2014-10-21

    Mitophagy is a cellular quality control pathway in which the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin targets damaged mitochondria for degradation by autophagosomes. We examined the role of optineurin in mitophagy, as mutations in optineurin are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma, diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate the parkin-dependent recruitment of optineurin to mitochondria damaged by depolarization or reactive oxygen species. Parkin's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is required to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins, allowing optineurin to stably associate with ubiquitinated mitochondria via its ubiquitin binding domain; in the absence of parkin, optineurin transiently localizes to damaged mitochondrial tips. Following optineurin recruitment, the omegasome protein double FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1) transiently localizes to damaged mitochondria to initialize autophagosome formation and the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). Optineurin then induces autophagosome formation around damaged mitochondria via its LC3 interaction region (LIR) domain. Depletion of endogenous optineurin inhibits LC3 recruitment to mitochondria and inhibits mitochondrial degradation. These defects are rescued by expression of siRNA-resistant wild-type optineurin, but not by an ALS-associated mutant in the ubiquitin binding domain (E478G), or by optineurin with a mutation in the LIR domain. Optineurin and p62/SQSTM1 are independently recruited to separate domains on damaged mitochondria, and p62 is not required for the recruitment of either optineurin or LC3 to damaged mitochondria. Thus, our study establishes an important role for optineurin as an autophagy receptor in parkin-mediated mitophagy and demonstrates that defects in a single pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases with distinct pathologies.

  6. Parkin and PINK1: Much More than Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Scarffe, Leslie A.; Stevens, Daniel A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes a debilitating movement disorder. While most cases of PD appear to be sporadic, rare Mendelian forms have provided tremendous insight into disease pathogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that impaired mitochondria underpin PD pathology. In support of this theory, data from multiple PD models has linked PINK1 and parkin, two recessive PD genes, in a common pathway impacting mitochondrial health, prompting a flurry of research to identify their mitochondrial targets. Recent work has focused on the role of PINK1 and parkin in mediating mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), however, emerging evidence casts parkin and PINK1 as key players in multiple domains of mitochondrial health and quality control. PMID:24735649

  7. Parkin Plays a Role in Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurologic disorder, which affects approximately one million men and women in the U.S. alone. PD represents a heterogeneous disorder with common clinical manifestations and for the most part common neuropathological findings. Objective This short article reviews the role of the ubiquitin E3 ligase in sporadic PD. Methods The role of parkin in sporadic PD was reviewed by querying PubMed Results Parkin is inactivated in sporadic PD via S-nitrosylation, oxidative and dopaminergic stress, and phosphorylation by the stress activated kinase, c-Abl leading to the accumulation of AIMP2 and PARIS (ZNF746). Conclusion Strategies aimed at maintaining parkin in a catalytically active state or interfering with toxicity of AIMP2 and PARIS (ZNF746) offer new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24029689

  8. Hydrocortisone-induced parkin prevents dopaminergic cell death via CREB pathway in Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Il; Jo, Minkyung; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Hojin; Jo, Areum; Lee, Gum Hwa; Mo, Yun Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Yun Song; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yunjong

    2017-04-03

    Dysfunctional parkin due to mutations or post-translational modifications contributes to dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Overexpression of parkin provides protection against cellular stresses and prevents dopamine cell loss in several PD animal models. Here we performed an unbiased high-throughput luciferase screening to identify chemicals that can increase parkin expression. Among promising parkin inducers, hydrocortisone possessed the most favorable profiles including parkin induction ability, cell protection ability, and physicochemical property of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) without inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress. We found that hydrocortisone-induced parkin expression was accountable for cell protection against oxidative stress. Hydrocortisone-activated parkin expression was mediated by CREB pathway since gRNA to CREB abolished hydrocortisone's ability to induce parkin. Finally, hydrocortisone treatment in mice increased brain parkin levels and prevented 6-hydroxy dopamine induced dopamine cell loss when assessed at 4 days after the toxin's injection. Our results showed that hydrocortisone could stimulate parkin expression via CREB pathway and the induced parkin expression was accountable for its neuroprotective effect. Since glucocorticoid is a physiological hormone, maintaining optimal levels of glucocorticoid might be a potential therapeutic or preventive strategy for Parkinson's disease.

  9. Parkin-mediated mitophagy is downregulated in browning of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2017-04-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) promotes increased energy expenditure through the action of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and is an attractive target to promote weight loss in obesity. Lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential by UCP1 is uniquely beneficial in this context; in other tissues, reduced membrane potential promotes mitochondrial clearance via mitophagy. It is unknown how parkin-mediated mitophagy is regulated in beige adipocytes. The relationship between parkin expression and WAT browning was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and parkin-deficient male C57BL/6 mice in response to pharmacological browning stimuli. Rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 adipocytes promoted mitochondrial biogenesis, UCP1 expression, and mitochondrial uncoupling. Parkin expression was decreased and reduced mitochondrial-associated parkin, and p62 indicated a reduction in mitophagy activity. Parkin overexpression prevented mitochondrial remodeling in response to rosiglitazone. In CL 316,243-treated wild-type mice, decreased parkin expression was observed in subcutaneous inguinal WAT, where UCP1 was strongly induced. CL 316,243 treatment weakly induced UCP1 expression in the gonadal depot, where parkin expression was unchanged. In contrast, parkin-deficient mice exhibited robust UCP1 expression in gonadal WAT following CL 316,243 treatment. WAT browning was associated with a decrease in parkin-mediated mitophagy, and parkin expression antagonized browning of WAT. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  10. Parkin degrades estrogen-related receptors to limit the expression of monoamine oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Ma, Dingyuan; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Feng, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Parkin, whose mutations cause Parkinson disease (PD), controls oxidative stress by limiting the expression of monoamine oxidases (MAO)—mitochondrial enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of dopamine. Here, we show that parkin performed this function by increasing the ubiquitination and degradation of estrogen-related receptors (ERR), orphan nuclear receptors that play critical roles in the transcription regulation of many nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. All three ERRs (α, β and γ) increased the transcription of MAOs A and B; the effects were abolished by parkin, but not by its PD-linked mutants. Parkin bound to ERRs and increased their ubiquitination and degradation. In fibroblasts from PD patients with parkin mutations or brain slices from parkin knockout mice, degradation of ERRs was significantly attenuated. The results reveal the molecular mechanism by which parkin suppresses the transcription of MAOs to control oxidative stress induced by dopamine oxidation. PMID:21177257

  11. Parkin-independent mitophagy requires Drp1 and maintains the integrity of mammalian heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Yusuke; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Seo, Kinya; Bedja, Djahida; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Andrabi, Shaida A; Chen, Weiran; Höke, Ahmet; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Kass, David A; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy have been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial division dynamin Drp1 and the Parkinson's disease-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin synergistically maintain the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function in mouse heart and brain. Mice lacking cardiac Drp1 exhibited lethal heart defects. In Drp1KO cardiomyocytes, mitochondria increased their connectivity, accumulated ubiquitinated proteins, and decreased their respiration. In contrast to the current views of the role of parkin in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial ubiquitination was independent of parkin in Drp1KO hearts, and simultaneous loss of Drp1 and parkin worsened cardiac defects. Drp1 and parkin also play synergistic roles in neuronal mitochondrial homeostasis and survival. Mitochondrial degradation was further decreased by combination of Drp1 and parkin deficiency, compared with their single loss. Thus, the physiological importance of parkin in mitochondrial homeostasis is revealed in the absence of mitochondrial division in mammals. PMID:25349190

  12. Parkin-independent mitophagy requires Drp1 and maintains the integrity of mammalian heart and brain.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yusuke; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Seo, Kinya; Bedja, Djahida; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Andrabi, Shaida A; Chen, Weiran; Höke, Ahmet; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Kass, David A; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy have been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial division dynamin Drp1 and the Parkinson's disease-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin synergistically maintain the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function in mouse heart and brain. Mice lacking cardiac Drp1 exhibited lethal heart defects. In Drp1KO cardiomyocytes, mitochondria increased their connectivity, accumulated ubiquitinated proteins, and decreased their respiration. In contrast to the current views of the role of parkin in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial ubiquitination was independent of parkin in Drp1KO hearts, and simultaneous loss of Drp1 and parkin worsened cardiac defects. Drp1 and parkin also play synergistic roles in neuronal mitochondrial homeostasis and survival. Mitochondrial degradation was further decreased by combination of Drp1 and parkin deficiency, compared with their single loss. Thus, the physiological importance of parkin in mitochondrial homeostasis is revealed in the absence of mitochondrial division in mammals.

  13. Parallel Parkin: Cdc20 Takes a New Partner.

    PubMed

    Meza-Gutierrez, Fernando; Hundley, Frances V; Toczyski, David P

    2015-10-01

    CDC20 and CDH1 are well-established substrate receptors for the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C). In this issue of Molecular Cell, Lee et al. (2015) show that these adaptors can also target cell cycle proteins for destruction through a second ubiquitin ligase, Parkin.

  14. Disruption of the autoinhibited state primes the E3 ligase parkin for activation and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Aguirre, Jacob D; Condos, Tara E C; Martinez-Torres, R Julio; Chaugule, Viduth K; Toth, Rachel; Sundaramoorthy, Ramasubramanian; Mercier, Pascal; Knebel, Axel; Spratt, Donald E; Barber, Kathryn R; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2015-10-14

    The PARK2 gene is mutated in 50% of autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) cases. It encodes parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase of the RBR family. Parkin exists in an autoinhibited state that is activated by phosphorylation of its N-terminal ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain and binding of phosphoubiquitin. We describe the 1.8 Å crystal structure of human parkin in its fully inhibited state and identify the key interfaces to maintain parkin inhibition. We identify the phosphoubiquitin-binding interface, provide a model for the phosphoubiquitin-parkin complex and show how phosphorylation of the Ubl domain primes parkin for optimal phosphoubiquitin binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the addition of phosphoubiquitin leads to displacement of the Ubl domain through loss of structure, unveiling a ubiquitin-binding site used by the E2~Ub conjugate, thus leading to active parkin. We find the role of the Ubl domain is to prevent parkin activity in the absence of the phosphorylation signals, and propose a model for parkin inhibition, optimization for phosphoubiquitin recruitment, release of inhibition by the Ubl domain and engagement with an E2~Ub conjugate. Taken together, this model provides a mechanistic framework for activating parkin.

  15. Parkin Mutations Reduce the Complexity of Neuronal Processes in iPSC-derived Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Hu, Zhixing; Fan, Kevin; Wang, Jun; Janoschka, Stephen; Wang, Xiaomin; Ge, Shaoyu; Feng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and non-DA neurons in many parts of the brain. Mutations of parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that strongly binds to microtubules, are the most frequent cause of recessively inherited Parkinson’s disease. The lack of robust PD phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests a unique vulnerability of human neurons to parkin mutations. Here, we show that the complexity of neuronal processes as measured by total neurite length, number of terminals, number of branch points and Sholl analysis, was greatly reduced in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived TH+ or TH− neurons from PD patients with parkin mutations. Consistent with these, microtubule stability was significantly decreased by parkin mutations in iPSC-derived neurons. Overexpression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant nor GFP, restored the complexity of neuronal processes and the stability of microtubules. Consistent with these, the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colchicine mimicked the effect of parkin mutations by decreasing neurite length and complexity in control neurons while the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol mimicked the effect of parkin overexpression by enhancing the morphology of parkin-deficient neurons. The results suggest that parkin maintains the morphological complexity of human neurons by stabilizing microtubules. PMID:25332110

  16. PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of PINK1 and Parkin is essential for mitochondrial quality control

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Na; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of a large number of inherited diseases in humans, including Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The Parkinson's disease genes pink1 and parkin, which encode a mitochondrially targeted protein kinase, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase, respectively, participate in a key mitochondrial quality-control pathway that eliminates damaged mitochondria. In the current study, we established an in vivo PINK1/Parkin-induced photoreceptor neuron degeneration model in Drosophila with the aim of dissecting the PINK1/Parkin pathway in detail. Using LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified Serine 346 as the sole autophosphorylation site of Drosophila PINK1 and found that substitution of Serine 346 to Alanine completely abolished the PINK1 autophosphorylation. Disruption of either PINK1 or Parkin phosphorylation impaired the PINK1/Parkin pathway, and the degeneration phenotype of photoreceptor neurons was obviously alleviated. Phosphorylation of PINK1 is not only required for the PINK1-mediated mitochondrial recruitment of Parkin but also induces its kinase activity toward Parkin. In contrast, phosphorylation of Parkin by PINK1 is dispensable for its translocation but required for its activation. Moreover, substitution with autophosphorylation-deficient PINK1 failed to rescue pink1 null mutant phenotypes. Taken together, our findings suggest that autophosphorylation of PINK1 is essential for the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin and for subsequent phosphorylation and activation of Parkin. PMID:27906179

  17. PINK1 Is Selectively Stabilized on Impaired Mitochondria to Activate Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Derek P.; Jin, Seok Min; Tanaka, Atsushi; Suen, Der-Fen; Gautier, Clement A.; Shen, Jie; Cookson, Mark R.; Youle, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 and Parkin cause parkinsonism in humans and mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms. Parkin is selectively recruited from the cytosol to damaged mitochondria to trigger their autophagy. How Parkin recognizes damaged mitochondria, however, is unknown. Here, we show that expression of PINK1 on individual mitochondria is regulated by voltage-dependent proteolysis to maintain low levels of PINK1 on healthy, polarized mitochondria, while facilitating the rapid accumulation of PINK1 on mitochondria that sustain damage. PINK1 accumulation on mitochondria is both necessary and sufficient for Parkin recruitment to mitochondria, and disease-causing mutations in PINK1 and Parkin disrupt Parkin recruitment and Parkin-induced mitophagy at distinct steps. These findings provide a biochemical explanation for the genetic epistasis between PINK1 and Parkin in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, they support a novel model for the negative selection of damaged mitochondria, in which PINK1 signals mitochondrial dysfunction to Parkin, and Parkin promotes their elimination. PMID:20126261

  18. Parkin cooperates with GDNF/RET signaling to prevent dopaminergic neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Durga Praveen; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Nidadavolu, Prakash; Mohammadi, Behnam; Motori, Elisa; Ponna, Srinivas Kumar; Aboutalebi, Helia; Bassal, Mahmoud; Annamneedi, Anil; Finckh, Barbara; Miesbauer, Margit; Rotermund, Natalie; Lohr, Christian; Tatzelt, Jörg; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkin and the glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor RET have both been independently linked to the dopaminergic neuron degeneration that underlies Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that there is genetic crosstalk between parkin and the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in two different mouse models of PD. Mice lacking both parkin and RET exhibited accelerated dopaminergic cell and axonal loss compared with parkin-deficient animals, which showed none, and RET-deficient mice, in which we found moderate degeneration. Transgenic expression of parkin protected the dopaminergic systems of aged RET-deficient mice. Downregulation of either parkin or RET in neuronal cells impaired mitochondrial function and morphology. Parkin expression restored mitochondrial function in GDNF/RET-deficient cells, while GDNF stimulation rescued mitochondrial defects in parkin-deficient cells. In both cases, improved mitochondrial function was the result of activation of the prosurvival NF-κB pathway, which was mediated by RET through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that parkin and the RET signaling cascade converge to control mitochondrial integrity and thereby properly maintain substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons and their innervation in the striatum. The demonstration of crosstalk between parkin and RET highlights the interplay in the protein network that is altered in PD and suggests potential therapeutic targets and strategies to treat PD. PMID:25822020

  19. Parkin Regulates Mitochondrial Autophagy After Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Maimaitirexiati, Xiemuziya; Jiang, Yun; Liu, Liang

    2016-05-08

    BACKGROUND To study the role of Parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial autophagy in the heart by assessing mitochondrial autophagy and changes in Parkin protein expression in rat myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI). MATERIAL AND METHODS Rats were randomly assigned to three groups: control, sham, and MI. Four weeks after induction of MI, ultrasonic examination of the rats was performed to measure left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD), left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular fractional shortening (FS), and left ventricular diastolic/systolic volume. Rat myocardium was collected from each group and examined for changes in morphology, size, and amount of mitochondria and autophagosomes by transmission electronic microscopy. A Western blot was performed to analyze the levels of Parkin and the autophagy-related protein LC3. RESULTS Four weeks after MI, cardiac function of the MI rats was impaired compared with the control rats. Both LVESD and LVEDD were elevated in the MI rats (p<0.05) while EF was decreased, indicating that the MI model was constructed successfully. After MI, increased numbers of mitochondria and autophagosomes were observed in the myocardium (p<0.05), and the mitochondrial morphology was destroyed. Chloroquine (CQ) treatment increased the number of autophagosomes in the myocardium of the control rats (p<0.05) but not in MI rats (p>0.05). In addition, the levels of the autophagy-related proteins LC3II/LC3I were elevated in the myocardium after MI (p<0.05) and the activity of Parkin was significantly reduced (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Under conditions of chronic MI, mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of autophagosomal clearance are associated with Parkin expression.

  20. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Baek; Kim, Jung Jin; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Qin, Bo; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Ham, Hyoungjun; Evans, Debra; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Min; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Billadeau, Daniel D; Wang, Liewei; Giaime, Emilie; Shen, Jie; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Jen, Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate the degradation of several key mitotic regulators independent of APC/C. We demonstrate that ordered progression through mitosis is orchestrated by two distinct E3 ligases through the shared use of Cdc20 and Cdh1. Furthermore, Parkin is phosphorylated and activated by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) during mitosis. Parkin deficiency results in overexpression of its substrates, mitotic defects, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. These results suggest that the Parkin-Cdc20/Cdh1 complex is an important regulator of mitosis.

  1. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Parkin Promotes Degradation of the Mitochondrial Pro-Apoptotic ARTS Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kemeny, Stav; Dery, Dikla; Loboda, Yelena; Rovner, Marshall; Lev, Tali; Zuri, Dotan; Finberg, John P. M.; Larisch, Sarit

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with excessive cell death causing selective loss of dopaminergic neurons. Dysfunction of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) is associated with the pathophysiology of PD. Mutations in Parkin which impair its E3-ligase activity play a major role in the pathogenesis of inherited PD. ARTS (Sept4_i2) is a mitochondrial protein, which initiates caspase activation upstream of cytochrome c release in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Here we show that Parkin serves as an E3-ubiquitin ligase to restrict the levels of ARTS through UPS-mediated degradation. Though Parkin binds equally to ARTS and Sept4_i1 (H5/PNUTL2), the non-apoptotic splice variant of Sept4, Parkin ubiquitinates and degrades only ARTS. Thus, the effect of Parkin on ARTS is specific and probably related to its pro-apoptotic function. High levels of ARTS are sufficient to promote apoptosis in cultured neuronal cells, and rat brains treated with 6-OHDA reveal high levels of ARTS. However, over-expression of Parkin can protect cells from ARTS-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, Parkin loss-of-function experiments reveal that reduction of Parkin causes increased levels of ARTS and apoptosis. We propose that in brain cells in which the E3-ligase activity of Parkin is compromised, ARTS levels increase and facilitate apoptosis. Thus, ARTS is a novel substrate of Parkin. These observations link Parkin directly to a pro-apoptotic protein and reveal a novel connection between Parkin, apoptosis, and PD. PMID:22792159

  3. Versatile members of the DNAJ family show Hsp70 dependent anti-aggregation activity on RING1 mutant parkin C289G

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Kuiper, E. F. Elsiena; Pandey, Abhinav; Braakman, Ineke; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and several mutations in different genes have been identified to contribute to the disease. A loss of function parkin RING1 domain mutant (C289G) is associated with autosomal-recessive juvenile-onset Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and displays altered solubility and sequesters into aggregates. Single overexpression of almost each individual member of the Hsp40 (DNAJ) family of chaperones efficiently reduces parkin C289G aggregation and requires interaction with and activity of endogenously expressed Hsp70 s. For DNAJB6 and DNAJB8, potent suppressors of aggregation of polyglutamine proteins for which they rely mainly on an S/T-rich region, it was found that the S/T-rich region was dispensable for suppression of parkin C289G aggregation. Our data implies that different disease-causing proteins pose different challenges to the protein homeostasis system and that DNAJB6 and DNAJB8 are highly versatile members of the DNAJ protein family with multiple partially non-overlapping modes of action with respect to handling disease-causing proteins, making them interesting potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27713507

  4. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  5. Structure of phosphorylated UBL domain and insights into PINK1-orchestrated parkin activation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Jacob D; Dunkerley, Karen M; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in PARK2 and PARK6 genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary Parkinson's disease cases. These genes encode the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin and the protein kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), respectively. Together, parkin and PINK1 regulate the mitophagy pathway, which recycles damaged mitochondria following oxidative stress. Native parkin is inactive and exists in an autoinhibited state mediated by its ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. PINK1 phosphorylation of serine 65 in parkin's UBL and serine 65 of ubiquitin fully activate ubiquitin ligase activity; however, a structural rationale for these observations is not clear. Here, we report the structure of the phosphorylated UBL domain from parkin. We find that destabilization of the UBL results from rearrangements to hydrophobic core packing that modify its structure. Altered surface electrostatics from the phosphoserine group disrupt its intramolecular association, resulting in poorer autoinhibition in phosphorylated parkin. Further, we show that phosphorylation of both the UBL domain and ubiquitin are required to activate parkin by releasing the UBL domain, forming an extended structure needed to facilitate E2-ubiquitin binding. Together, the results underscore the importance of parkin activation by the PINK1 phosphorylation signal and provide a structural picture of the unraveling of parkin's ubiquitin ligase potential.

  6. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser(65))--which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)--and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser(65). How Ser(65)-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65)) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser(65) by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), thereby promoting Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser(65). Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser(65) in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65). Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65), leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser(65)-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), which could aid in the development of Parkin

  7. Adoptive Transfer of Treg Cells Combined with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitates Repopulation of Endogenous Treg Cells in a Murine Acute GVHD Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Sol; Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have recently been studied in acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) models. However, the underlying, seemingly synergistic mechanism behind combined cell therapy has not been determined. We investigated the origin of Foxp3+ Treg cells and interleukin 17 (IL-17+) cells in recipients following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) to identify the immunological effects of combined cell therapy. Treg cells were generated from eGFP-expressing C57BL/6 mice (Tregegfp cells) to distinguish the transferred Treg cells; recipients were then examined at different time points after BMT. Systemic infusion of MSCs and Treg cells improved survival and GVHD scores, effectively downregulating pro-inflammatory Th×and Th17 cells. These therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy resulted in an increased Foxp3+ Treg cell population. Compared to single cell therapy, adoptively transferred Tregegfp cells only showed prolonged survival in the combined cell therapy group on day 21 after allogeneic BMT. In addition, Foxp3+ Treg cells, generated endogenously from recipients, significantly increased. Significantly higher levels of Tregegfp cells were also detected in aGVHD target organs in the combined cell therapy group compared to the Treg cells group. Thus, our data indicate that MSCs may induce the long-term survival of transferred Treg cells, particularly in aGVHD target organs, and may increase the repopulation of endogenous Treg cells in recipients after BMT. Together, these results support the potential of combined cell therapy using MSCs and Treg cells for preventing aGVHD.

  8. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H; Levine, Bruce L; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H; Vallera, Daniel A; Weigel, Brenda J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2009-10-29

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated, potently lytic anti-AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease burden or extend survival. Compared with non-AML-bearing hosts, transferred CTLs had reduced proliferation in AML sites of metastases. Treg depletion by a brief course of interleukin-2 diphtheria toxin (IL-2DT) transiently reduced AML disease burden but did not permit long-term survival. In contrast, IL-2DT prevented anti-AML CTL hypoproliferation, increased the number of transferred CTLs at AML disease sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors that sustained an anti-AML memory response. These data demonstrated that Tregs present at AML disease sites suppress adoptively transferred CTL proliferation, limiting their in vivo expansion, and Treg depletion before CTL transfer can result in therapeutic efficacy in settings of substantial pre-existing tumor burden in which antitumor reactive CTL infusion alone has proven ineffective.

  9. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E.; Highfill, Steven L.; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H.; Levine, Bruce L.; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Weigel, Brenda J.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro–generated, potently lytic anti–AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease burden or extend survival. Compared with non–AML-bearing hosts, transferred CTLs had reduced proliferation in AML sites of metastases. Treg depletion by a brief course of interleukin-2 diphtheria toxin (IL-2DT) transiently reduced AML disease burden but did not permit long-term survival. In contrast, IL-2DT prevented anti-AML CTL hypoproliferation, increased the number of transferred CTLs at AML disease sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors that sustained an anti-AML memory response. These data demonstrated that Tregs present at AML disease sites suppress adoptively transferred CTL proliferation, limiting their in vivo expansion, and Treg depletion before CTL transfer can result in therapeutic efficacy in settings of substantial pre-existing tumor burden in which antitumor reactive CTL infusion alone has proven ineffective. PMID:19724059

  10. NH2-truncated human tau induces deregulated mitophagy in neurons by aberrant recruitment of Parkin and UCHL-1: implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, V; Florenzano, F; Atlante, A; Bobba, A; Ciotti, M T; Natale, F; Della Valle, F; Borreca, A; Manca, A; Meli, G; Ferraina, C; Feligioni, M; D'Aguanno, S; Bussani, R; Ammassari-Teule, M; Nicolin, V; Calissano, P; Amadoro, G

    2015-06-01

    Disarrangement in functions and quality control of mitochondria at synapses are early events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathobiology. We reported that a 20-22 kDa NH2-tau fragment mapping between 26 and 230 amino acids of the longest human tau isoform (aka NH2htau): (i) is detectable in cellular and animal AD models, as well in synaptic mitochondria and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from human AD subjects; (ii) is neurotoxic in primary hippocampal neurons; (iii) compromises the mitochondrial biology both directly, by inhibiting the ANT-1-dependent ADP/ATP exchange, and indirectly, by impairing their selective autophagic clearance (mitophagy). Here, we show that the extensive Parkin-dependent turnover of mitochondria occurring in NH2htau-expressing post-mitotic neurons plays a pro-death role and that UCHL-1, the cytosolic Ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase L1 which directs the physiological remodeling of synapses by controlling ubiquitin homeostasis, critically contributes to mitochondrial and synaptic failure in this in vitro AD model. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of improper mitophagy, either by inhibition of mitochondrial targeting to autophagosomes or by shRNA-mediated silencing of Parkin or UCHL-1 gene expression, restores synaptic and mitochondrial content providing partial but significant protection against the NH2htau-induced neuronal death. Moreover, in mitochondria from human AD synapses, the endogenous NH2htau is stably associated with Parkin and with UCHL-1. Taken together, our studies show a causative link between the excessive mitochondrial turnover and the NH2htau-induced in vitro neuronal death, suggesting that pathogenetic tau truncation may contribute to synaptic deterioration in AD by aberrant recruitment of Parkin and UCHL-1 to mitochondria making them more prone to detrimental autophagic clearance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Optineurin is an autophagy receptor for damaged mitochondria in parkin-mediated mitophagy that is disrupted by an ALS-linked mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yvette C.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular quality control pathway in which the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin targets damaged mitochondria for degradation by autophagosomes. We examined the role of optineurin in mitophagy, as mutations in optineurin are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma, diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate the parkin-dependent recruitment of optineurin to mitochondria damaged by depolarization or reactive oxygen species. Parkin’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is required to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins, allowing optineurin to stably associate with ubiquitinated mitochondria via its ubiquitin binding domain; in the absence of parkin, optineurin transiently localizes to damaged mitochondrial tips. Following optineurin recruitment, the omegasome protein double FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1) transiently localizes to damaged mitochondria to initialize autophagosome formation and the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). Optineurin then induces autophagosome formation around damaged mitochondria via its LC3 interaction region (LIR) domain. Depletion of endogenous optineurin inhibits LC3 recruitment to mitochondria and inhibits mitochondrial degradation. These defects are rescued by expression of siRNA-resistant wild-type optineurin, but not by an ALS-associated mutant in the ubiquitin binding domain (E478G), or by optineurin with a mutation in the LIR domain. Optineurin and p62/SQSTM1 are independently recruited to separate domains on damaged mitochondria, and p62 is not required for the recruitment of either optineurin or LC3 to damaged mitochondria. Thus, our study establishes an important role for optineurin as an autophagy receptor in parkin-mediated mitophagy and demonstrates that defects in a single pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases with distinct pathologies. PMID:25294927

  12. Small, N-Terminal Tags Activate Parkin E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity by Disrupting Its Autoinhibited Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Lynn; Chaugule, Viduth K.; Walden, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, mutations in which cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson's Disease. Many studies aimed at understanding Parkin function, regulation and dysfunction are performed using N-terminal epitope tags. We report here that the use of small tags such as FLAG, cMyc and HA, influence the physical stability and activity of Parkin in and out of cells, perturbing the autoinhibited native state of Parkin, resulting in an active-for-autoubiquitination species. PMID:22496854

  13. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  14. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course.

  15. Activation of endogenous p53 by combined p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment modalities in the murine cell lines B16 and C6

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactivation of p53 by either gene transfer or pharmacologic approaches may compensate for loss of p19Arf or excess mdm2 expression, common events in melanoma and glioma. In our previous work, we constructed the pCLPG retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 through a p53-responsive promoter. The use of this vector to introduce p19Arf into tumor cells that harbor p53wt should yield viral expression of p19Arf which, in turn, would activate the endogenous p53 and result in enhanced vector expression and tumor suppression. Since nutlin-3 can activate p53 by blocking its interaction with mdm2, we explored the possibility that the combination of p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment may provide an additive benefit in stimulating p53 function. Methods B16 (mouse melanoma) and C6 (rat glioma) cell lines, which harbor p53wt, were transduced with pCLPGp19 and these were additionally treated with nutlin-3 or the DNA damaging agent, doxorubicin. Viral expression was confirmed by Western, Northern and immunofluorescence assays. p53 function was assessed by reporter gene activity provided by a p53-responsive construct. Alterations in proliferation and viability were measured by colony formation, growth curve, cell cycle and MTT assays. In an animal model, B16 cells were treated with the pCLPGp19 virus and/or drugs before subcutaneous injection in C57BL/6 mice, observation of tumor progression and histopathologic analyses. Results Here we show that the functional activation of endogenous p53wt in B16 was particularly challenging, but accomplished when combined gene transfer and drug treatments were applied, resulting in increased transactivation by p53, marked cell cycle alteration and reduced viability in culture. In an animal model, B16 cells treated with both p19Arf and nutlin-3 yielded increased necrosis and decreased BrdU marking. In comparison, C6 cells were quite susceptible to either treatment, yet p53 was further activated

  16. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Yang, W.K.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenical acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of the ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-pb inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs on the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTF sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression.

  17. Parkin is activated by PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Kondapalli, Chandana; Gourlay, Robert; Campbell, David G; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Hofmann, Kay; Alessi, Dario R; Knebel, Axel; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2014-05-15

    We have previously reported that the Parkinson's disease-associated kinase PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) is activated by mitochondrial depolarization and stimulates the Parkin E3 ligase by phosphorylating Ser65 within its Ubl (ubiquitin-like) domain. Using phosphoproteomic analysis, we identified a novel ubiquitin phosphopeptide phosphorylated at Ser65 that was enriched 14-fold in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells overexpressing wild-type PINK1 stimulated with the mitochondrial uncoupling agent CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), to activate PINK1, compared with cells expressing kinase-inactive PINK1. Ser65 in ubiquitin lies in a similar motif to Ser65 in the Ubl domain of Parkin. Remarkably, PINK1 directly phosphorylates Ser65 of ubiquitin in vitro. We undertook a series of experiments that provide striking evidence that Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) functions as a critical activator of Parkin. First, we demonstrate that a fragment of Parkin lacking the Ubl domain encompassing Ser65 (ΔUbl-Parkin) is robustly activated by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, but not by non-phosphorylated ubiquitin. Secondly, we find that the isolated Parkin Ubl domain phosphorylated at Ser65 (UblPhospho-Ser65) can also activate ΔUbl-Parkin similarly to ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Thirdly, we establish that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, but not non-phosphorylated ubiquitin or UblPhospho-Ser65, activates full-length wild-type Parkin as well as the non-phosphorylatable S65A Parkin mutant. Fourthly, we provide evidence that optimal activation of full-length Parkin E3 ligase is dependent on PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of both Parkin at Ser65 and ubiquitin at Ser65, since only mutation of both proteins at Ser65 completely abolishes Parkin activation. In conclusion, the findings of the present study reveal that PINK1 controls Parkin E3 ligase activity not only by phosphorylating Parkin at Ser65, but also by phosphorylating ubiquitin at Ser65. We propose

  18. Parkin is activated by PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Kondapalli, Chandana; Gourlay, Robert; Campbell, David G.; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Hofmann, Kay; Alessi, Dario R.; Knebel, Axel; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul M. K.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that the Parkinson's disease-associated kinase PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) is activated by mitochondrial depolarization and stimulates the Parkin E3 ligase by phosphorylating Ser65 within its Ubl (ubiquitin-like) domain. Using phosphoproteomic analysis, we identified a novel ubiquitin phosphopeptide phosphorylated at Ser65 that was enriched 14-fold in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells overexpressing wild-type PINK1 stimulated with the mitochondrial uncoupling agent CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), to activate PINK1, compared with cells expressing kinase-inactive PINK1. Ser65 in ubiquitin lies in a similar motif to Ser65 in the Ubl domain of Parkin. Remarkably, PINK1 directly phosphorylates Ser65 of ubiquitin in vitro. We undertook a series of experiments that provide striking evidence that Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65) functions as a critical activator of Parkin. First, we demonstrate that a fragment of Parkin lacking the Ubl domain encompassing Ser65 (ΔUbl-Parkin) is robustly activated by ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65, but not by non-phosphorylated ubiquitin. Secondly, we find that the isolated Parkin Ubl domain phosphorylated at Ser65 (UblPhospho−Ser65) can also activate ΔUbl-Parkin similarly to ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65. Thirdly, we establish that ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65, but not non-phosphorylated ubiquitin or UblPhospho−Ser65, activates full-length wild-type Parkin as well as the non-phosphorylatable S65A Parkin mutant. Fourthly, we provide evidence that optimal activation of full-length Parkin E3 ligase is dependent on PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of both Parkin at Ser65 and ubiquitin at Ser65, since only mutation of both proteins at Ser65 completely abolishes Parkin activation. In conclusion, the findings of the present study reveal that PINK1 controls Parkin E3 ligase activity not only by phosphorylating Parkin at Ser65, but also by phosphorylating ubiquitin at Ser65

  19. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a hierarchical mechanism of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Matthew Y.; Vranas, Marta; Krahn, Andrea I.; Pundlik, Shayal; Trempe, Jean- François; Fon, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    Parkin and PINK1 function in a common pathway to clear damaged mitochondria. Parkin exists in an auto-inhibited conformation stabilized by multiple interdomain interactions. The binding of PINK1-generated phospho-ubiquitin and the phosphorylation of the ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain of Parkin at Ser65 release its auto-inhibition, but how and when these events take place in cells remain to be defined. Here we show that mutations that we designed to activate Parkin by releasing the Repressor Element of Parkin (REP) domain, or by disrupting the interface between the RING0:RING2 domains, can completely rescue mutations in the Parkin Ubl that are defective in mitochondrial autophagy. Using a FRET reporter assay we show that Parkin undergoes a conformational change upon phosphorylation that can be mimicked by mutating Trp403 in the REP. We propose a hierarchical model whereby pUb binding on mitochondria enables Parkin phosphorylation, which, in turn, leads to REP removal, E3 ligase activation and mitophagy. PMID:28276439

  20. Loss of parkin or PINK1 function increases Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, A Kathrin; Exner, Nicole; Fett, Mareike E; Schlehe, Julia S; Kloos, Karina; Lämmermann, Kerstin; Brunner, Bettina; Kurz-Drexler, Annerose; Vogel, Frank; Reichert, Andreas S; Bouman, Lena; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wurst, Wolfgang; Tatzelt, Jörg; Haass, Christian; Winklhofer, Konstanze F

    2009-08-21

    Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene (PARK2) and PINK1 gene (PARK6) are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. PINK1 deficiency was recently linked to mitochondrial pathology in human cells and Drosophila melanogaster, which can be rescued by parkin, suggesting that both genes play a role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Here we demonstrate that an acute down-regulation of parkin in human SH-SY5Y cells severely affects mitochondrial morphology and function, a phenotype comparable with that induced by PINK1 deficiency. Alterations in both mitochondrial morphology and ATP production caused by either parkin or PINK1 loss of function could be rescued by the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 or by a dominant negative mutant of the fission protein Drp1. Both parkin and PINK1 were able to suppress mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Drp1. Moreover, in Drp1-deficient cells the parkin/PINK1 knockdown phenotype did not occur, indicating that mitochondrial alterations observed in parkin- or PINK1-deficient cells are associated with an increase in mitochondrial fission. Notably, mitochondrial fragmentation is an early phenomenon upon PINK1/parkin silencing that also occurs in primary mouse neurons and Drosophila S2 cells. We propose that the discrepant findings in adult flies can be explained by the time of phenotype analysis and suggest that in mammals different strategies may have evolved to cope with dysfunctional mitochondria.

  1. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  2. Functional interplay between Parkin and Drp1 in mitochondrial fission and clearance.

    PubMed

    Buhlman, Lori; Damiano, Maria; Bertolin, Giulia; Ferrando-Miguel, Rosa; Lombès, Anne; Brice, Alexis; Corti, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease is most often caused by mutations in the genes encoding the cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1. Studies in Drosophila models and mammalian cells have demonstrated that these proteins regulate various aspects of mitochondrial physiology, including organelle transport, dynamics and turnover. How PINK1 and Parkin orchestrate these processes, and whether they always do so within a common pathway remain to be clarified. We have revisited the role of PINK1 and Parkin in mitochondrial dynamics, and explored its relation to the mitochondrial clearance program controlled by these proteins. We show that PINK1 and Parkin promote Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission by mechanisms that are at least in part independent. Parkin-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation was abolished by treatments interfering with the calcium/calmodulin/calcineurin signaling pathway, suggesting that it requires dephosphorylation of serine 637 of Drp1. Parkinson's disease-causing mutations with differential impact on mitochondrial morphology and organelle degradation demonstrated that the pro-fission effect of Parkin is not required for efficient mitochondrial clearance. In contrast, the use of Förster energy transfer imaging microscopy revealed that Drp1 and Parkin are co-recruited to mitochondria in proximity of PINK1 following mitochondrial depolarization, indicating spatial coordination between these events in mitochondrial degradation. Our results also hint at a major role of the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 in Drp1 recruitment and Parkin-dependent mitophagy. Altogether, our observations provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics by Parkin and its relation to the mitochondrial clearance program mediated by the PINK1/Parkin pathway.

  3. MUL1 acts in parallel to the PINK1/parkin pathway in regulating mitofusin and compensates for loss of PINK1/parkin

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jina; Puri, Rajat; Yang, Huan; Lizzio, Michael A; Wu, Chunlai; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Guo, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) genes PINK1 and parkin act in a common pathway that regulates mitochondrial integrity and quality. Identifying new suppressors of the pathway is important for finding new therapeutic strategies. In this study, we show that MUL1 suppresses PINK1 or parkin mutant phenotypes in Drosophila. The suppression is achieved through the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of Mitofusin, which itself causes PINK1/parkin mutant-like toxicity when overexpressed. We further show that removing MUL1 in PINK1 or parkin loss-of-function mutant aggravates phenotypes caused by loss of either gene alone, leading to lethality in flies and degeneration in mouse cortical neurons. Together, these observations show that MUL1 acts in parallel to the PINK1/parkin pathway on a shared target mitofusin to maintain mitochondrial integrity. The MUL1 pathway compensates for loss of PINK1/parkin in both Drosophila and mammals and is a promising therapeutic target for PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01958.001 PMID:24898855

  4. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  5. Neuropsychological Profile of Parkin Mutation Carriers with and without Parkinson Disease: The CORE-PD Study.

    PubMed

    Caccappolo, Elise; Alcalay, Roy N; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Tang, Ming-X; Rakitin, Brian; Rosado, Llency; Louis, Elan D; Comella, Cynthia L; Colcher, Amy; Jennings, Danna; Nance, Martha A; Bressman, Susan; Scott, William K; Tanner, Caroline M; Mickel, Susan F; Andrews, Howard F; Waters, Cheryl; Fahn, Stanley; Cote, Lucien J; Frucht, Steven; Ford, Blair; Rezak, Michael; Novak, Kevin; Friedman, Joseph H; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Marsh, Laura; Hiner, Brad; Siderowf, Andrew D; Ross, Barbara M; Verbitsky, Miguel; Kisselev, Sergey; Ottman, Ruth; Clark, Lorraine N; Marder, Karen S

    2011-01-01

    The cognitive profile of early onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) has not been clearly defined. Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common genetic risk factor for EOPD and may offer information about the neuropsychological pattern of performance in both symptomatic and asymptomatic mutation carriers. EOPD probands and their first-degree relatives who did not have Parkinson's disease (PD) were genotyped for mutations in the parkin gene and administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Performance was compared between EOPD probands with (N = 43) and without (N = 52) parkin mutations. The same neuropsychological battery was administered to 217 first-degree relatives to assess neuropsychological function in individuals who carry parkin mutations but do not have PD. No significant differences in neuropsychological test performance were found between parkin carrier and noncarrier probands. Performance also did not differ between EOPD noncarriers and carrier subgroups (i.e., heterozygotes, compound heterozygotes/homozygotes). Similarly, no differences were found among unaffected family members across genotypes. Mean neuropsychological test performance was within normal range in all probands and relatives. Carriers of parkin mutations, whether or not they have PD, do not perform differently on neuropsychological measures as compared to noncarriers. The cognitive functioning of parkin carriers over time warrants further study.

  6. Neuropsychological profile of parkin mutation carriers with and without Parkinson disease: the CORE-PD study

    PubMed Central

    Caccappolo, Elise; Alcalay, Roy N.; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Tang, Ming-X.; Rakitin, Brian; Rosado, Llency; Louis, Elan D.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Colcher, Amy; Jennings, Danna; Nance, Martha A.; Bressman, Susan; Scott, William K.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Mickel, Susan F.; Andrews, Howard F.; Waters, Cheryl; Fahn, Stanley; Cote, Lucien J.; Frucht, Steven; Ford, Blair; Rezak, Michael; Novak, Kevin; Friedman, Joseph H.; Pfeiffer, Ronald F.; Marsh, Laura; Hiner, Brad; Siderowf, Andrew D.; Ross, Barbara M.; Verbitsky, Miguel; Kisselev, Sergey; Ottman, Ruth; Clark, Lorraine N.; Marder, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The cognitive profile of early onset Parkinson’s disease (EOPD) has not been clearly defined. Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common genetic risk factor for EOPD and may offer information about the neuropsychological pattern of performance in both symptomatic and asymptomatic mutation carriers. Methods EOPD probands and their first-degree relatives who did not have Parkinson’s disease (PD) were genotyped for mutations in the parkin gene and administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Performance was compared between EOPD probands with (N=43) and without (N=52) parkin mutations. The same neuropsychological battery was administered to 217 first-degree relatives to assess neuropsychological function in individuals who carry parkin mutations but do not have PD. Results No significant differences in neuropsychological test performance were found between parkin carrier and non-carrier probands. Performance also did not differ between EOPD non-carriers and carrier subgroups (i.e. heterozygotes, compound heterozygotes/homozygotes). Similarly, no differences were found among unaffected family members across genotypes. Mean neuropsychological test performance was within normal range in all probands and relatives. Conclusions Carriers of parkin mutations, whether or not they have PD, do not perform differently on neuropsychological measures as compared to non-carriers. The cognitive functioning of parkin carriers over time warrants further study. PMID:21092386

  7. Structural insights into Parkin substrate lysine targeting from minimal Miro substrates

    PubMed Central

    Klosowiak, Julian L.; Park, Sungjin; Smith, Kyle P.; French, Michael E.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson’s disease is commonly caused by mutations in the protein kinase PINK1 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, which function together to eliminate damaged mitochondria. PINK1 phosphorylates both Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate ubiquitination of dozens of proteins on the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, the mechanisms by which Parkin recognizes specific proteins for modification remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that the C-terminal GTPase (cGTPase) of the Parkin primary substrate human Miro is necessary and sufficient for efficient ubiquitination. We present several new X-ray crystal structures of both human Miro1 and Miro2 that reveal substrate recognition and ubiquitin transfer to be specific to particular protein domains and lysine residues. We also provide evidence that Parkin substrate recognition is functionally separate from substrate modification. Finally, we show that prioritization for modification of a specific lysine sidechain of the cGTPase (K572) within human Miro1 is dependent on both its location and chemical microenvironment. Activation of Parkin by phosphorylation or by binding of pUb is required for prioritization of K572 for modification, suggesting that Parkin activation and acquisition of substrate specificity are coupled. PMID:27605430

  8. Novel Regulation of Parkin Function Through c-Abl-Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation: Implications for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Syed Z.; Zhou, Qing; Yamamoto, Ayako; Valente, Anthony J.; Ali, Syed F.; Bains, Mona; Roberts, James L.; Kahle, Philipp J.; Clark, Robert A.; Li, Senlin

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are most common cause of autosomal-recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we show that the stress-signaling non-receptor tyrosine-kinase c-Abl links parkin to sporadic forms of PD via tyrosine phosphorylation. Under oxidative and dopaminergic stress, c-Abl was activated in cultured neuronal cells and in striatum of adult C57 mice. Activated c-Abl was found in the striatum of PD patients. Concomitantly, parkin was tyrosine-phosphorylated, causing loss ofit's ubiquitin ligase and cytoprotective activities, and the accumulation of parkin substrates, AIMP2 (p38/JTV-1) and FBP-1. STI-571, a selective c-Abl inhibitor, prevented tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin and restored its E3 ligase activity and cytoprotective function both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major post-translational modification that leads to loss of parkin function and disease progression in sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl offers new therapeutic opportunities for blocking PD progression. PMID:21209200

  9. Methamphetamine oxidatively damages parkin and decreases the activity of 26S proteasome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moszczynska, Anna; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2011-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is toxic to dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals in animals and humans. An early event in METH neurotoxicity is an oxidative stress followed by damage to proteins and lipids. The removal of damaged proteins is accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the impairment of this system can cause neurodegeneration. Whether dysfunction of the UPS contributes to METH toxicity to DAergic terminals has not been determined. The present investigation examined the effects of METH on functions of parkin and proteasome in rat striatal synaptosomes. METH rapidly modified parkin via conjugation with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) to decrease parkin levels and decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome while simultaneously increasing chymotrypsin-like activity and 20S proteasome levels. Prior injections of vitamin E diminished METH-induced changes to parkin and the 26S proteasome as well as long-term decreases in DA and its metabolites' concentrations in striatal tissue. These results suggest that METH causes lipid peroxidation-mediated damage to parkin and the 26S proteasome. As the changes in parkin and 26S occur before the sustained deficits in DAergic markers, an early loss of UPS function may be important in mediating the long-term degeneration of striatal DAergic terminals via toxic accumulation of parkin substrates and damaged proteins. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin; Zeng, Liuwang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders.

  11. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases.

    PubMed

    Riley, B E; Lougheed, J C; Callaway, K; Velasquez, M; Brecht, E; Nguyen, L; Shaler, T; Walker, D; Yang, Y; Regnstrom, K; Diep, L; Zhang, Z; Chiou, S; Bova, M; Artis, D R; Yao, N; Baker, J; Yednock, T; Johnston, J A

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson's disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed 'RING/HECT hybrid' enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin's cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein.

  12. Parkin-phosphoubiquitin complex reveals cryptic ubiquitin-binding site required for RBR ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Chaugule, Viduth K; Condos, Tara E C; Barber, Kathryn R; Johnson, Clare; Toth, Rachel; Sundaramoorthy, Ramasubramanian; Knebel, Axel; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2017-05-01

    RING-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligases are a class of ubiquitin ligases distinct from RING or HECT E3 ligases. An important RBR ligase is Parkin, mutations in which lead to early-onset hereditary Parkinsonism. Parkin and other RBR ligases share a catalytic RBR module but are usually autoinhibited and activated via distinct mechanisms. Recent insights into Parkin regulation predict large, unknown conformational changes during Parkin activation. However, current data on active RBR ligases reflect the absence of regulatory domains. Therefore, it remains unclear how individual RBR ligases are activated, and whether they share a common mechanism. We now report the crystal structure of a human Parkin-phosphoubiquitin complex, which shows that phosphoubiquitin binding induces movement in the 'in-between RING' (IBR) domain to reveal a cryptic ubiquitin-binding site. Mutation of this site negatively affects Parkin's activity. Furthermore, ubiquitin binding promotes cooperation between Parkin molecules, which suggests a role for interdomain association in the RBR ligase mechanism.

  13. The PINK1-Parkin pathway promotes both mitophagy and selective respiratory chain turnover in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vincow, Evelyn S; Merrihew, Gennifer; Thomas, Ruth E; Shulman, Nicholas J; Beyer, Richard P; MacCoss, Michael J; Pallanck, Leo J

    2013-04-16

    The accumulation of damaged mitochondria has been proposed as a key factor in aging and the pathogenesis of many common age-related diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD). Recently, in vitro studies of the PD-related proteins Parkin and PINK1 have found that these factors act in a common pathway to promote the selective autophagic degradation of damaged mitochondria (mitophagy). However, whether Parkin and PINK1 promote mitophagy under normal physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. To address this question, we used a proteomic approach in Drosophila to compare the rates of mitochondrial protein turnover in parkin mutants, PINK1 mutants, and control flies. We found that parkin null mutants showed a significant overall slowing of mitochondrial protein turnover, similar to but less severe than the slowing seen in autophagy-deficient Atg7 mutants, consistent with the model that Parkin acts upstream of Atg7 to promote mitophagy. By contrast, the turnover of many mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) subunits showed greater impairment in parkin than Atg7 mutants, and RC turnover was also selectively impaired in PINK1 mutants. Our findings show that the PINK1-Parkin pathway promotes mitophagy in vivo and, unexpectedly, also promotes selective turnover of mitochondrial RC subunits. Failure to degrade damaged RC proteins could account for the RC deficits seen in many PD patients and may play an important role in PD pathogenesis.

  14. Methamphetamine oxidatively damages parkin and decreases the activity of 26S proteasome in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is toxic to dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals in animals and humans. An early event in METH neurotoxicity is oxidative stress followed by damage to proteins and lipids. The removal of damaged proteins is accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the impairment of this system can cause neurodegeneration. Whether dysfunction of the UPS contributes to METH toxicity to DAergic terminals has not been determined. The present investigation examined the effects of METH on functions of parkin and proteasome in rat striatal synaptosomes. METH rapidly modified parkin via conjugation with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) to decrease parkin levels and decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome while simultaneously increasing chymotrypsin-like activity and 20S proteasome levels. Prior injections of vitamin E diminished METH-induced changes to parkin and the 26S proteasome as well as long-term decreases in DA and its metabolites’ concentrations in striatal tissue. These results suggest that METH causes lipid peroxidation-mediated damage to parkin and the 26S proteasome. As the changes in parkin and 26S occur before the sustained deficits in DAergic markers, an early loss of UPS function may be important in mediating the long-term degeneration of striatal DAergic terminals via toxic accumulation of parkin substrates and damaged proteins. PMID:21166679

  15. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders. PMID:27597885

  16. Structure of phosphorylated UBL domain and insights into PINK1-orchestrated parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Jacob D.; Dunkerley, Karen M.; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PARK2 and PARK6 genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary Parkinson’s disease cases. These genes encode the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin and the protein kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), respectively. Together, parkin and PINK1 regulate the mitophagy pathway, which recycles damaged mitochondria following oxidative stress. Native parkin is inactive and exists in an autoinhibited state mediated by its ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. PINK1 phosphorylation of serine 65 in parkin’s UBL and serine 65 of ubiquitin fully activate ubiquitin ligase activity; however, a structural rationale for these observations is not clear. Here, we report the structure of the phosphorylated UBL domain from parkin. We find that destabilization of the UBL results from rearrangements to hydrophobic core packing that modify its structure. Altered surface electrostatics from the phosphoserine group disrupt its intramolecular association, resulting in poorer autoinhibition in phosphorylated parkin. Further, we show that phosphorylation of both the UBL domain and ubiquitin are required to activate parkin by releasing the UBL domain, forming an extended structure needed to facilitate E2–ubiquitin binding. Together, the results underscore the importance of parkin activation by the PINK1 phosphorylation signal and provide a structural picture of the unraveling of parkin’s ubiquitin ligase potential. PMID:28007983

  17. Preconditioning Involves Selective Mitophagy Mediated by Parkin and p62/SQSTM1

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Eric P.; Hernandez, Genaro; Lee, Pamela; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy-dependent mitochondrial turnover in response to cellular stress is necessary for maintaining cellular homeostasis. However, the mechanisms that govern the selective targeting of damaged mitochondria are poorly understood. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to be essential for the selective clearance of damaged mitochondria. Parkin is expressed in the heart, yet its function has not been investigated in the context of cardioprotection. We previously reported that autophagy is required for cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). In the present study, we used simulated ischemia (sI) in vitro and IPC of hearts to investigate the role of Parkin in mediating cardioprotection ex vivo and in vivo. In HL-1 cells, sI induced Parkin translocation to mitochondria and mitochondrial elimination. IPC induced Parkin translocation to mitochondria in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and in vivo in mice subjected to regional IPC. Mitochondrial depolarization with an uncoupling agent similarly induced Parkin translocation to mitochondria in cells and Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Mitochondrial loss was blunted in Atg5-deficient cells, revealing the requirement for autophagy in mitochondrial elimination. Consistent with previous reports indicating a role for p62/SQSTM1 in mitophagy, we found that depletion of p62 attenuated mitophagy and exacerbated cell death in HL-1 cardiomyocytes subjected to sI. While wild type mice showed p62 translocation to mitochondria and an increase in ubiquitination, Parkin knockout mice exhibited attenuated IPC-induced p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Importantly, ablation of Parkin in mice abolished the cardioprotective effects of IPC. These results reveal for the first time the crucial role of Parkin and mitophagy in cardioprotection. PMID:21687634

  18. Compartmentalized Regulation of Parkin-Mediated Mitochondrial Quality Control in the Drosophila Nervous System In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyun; Tandarich, Lauren C.; Nguyen, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, the normal distribution and selective removal of mitochondria are considered essential for maintaining the functions of the large asymmetric cell and its diverse compartments. Parkin, a E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with familial Parkinson's disease, has been implicated in mitochondrial dynamics and removal in cells including neurons. However, it is not clear how Parkin functions in mitochondrial turnover in vivo, or whether Parkin-dependent events of the mitochondrial life cycle occur in all neuronal compartments. Here, using the live Drosophila nervous system, we investigated the involvement of Parkin in mitochondrial dynamics, distribution, morphology, and removal. Contrary to our expectations, we found that Parkin-deficient animals do not accumulate senescent mitochondria in their motor axons or neuromuscular junctions; instead, they contain far fewer axonal mitochondria, and these displayed normal motility behavior, morphology, and metabolic state. However, the loss of Parkin did produce abnormal tubular and reticular mitochondria restricted to the motor cell bodies. In addition, in contrast to drug-treated, immortalized cells in vitro, mature motor neurons rarely displayed Parkin-dependent mitophagy. These data indicate that the cell body is the focus of Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control in neurons, and argue that a selection process allows only healthy mitochondria to pass from cell bodies to axons, perhaps to limit the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkin has been proposed to police mitochondrial fidelity by binding to dysfunctional mitochondria via PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and targeting them for autophagic degradation. However, it is unknown whether and how the PINK1/Parkin pathway regulates the mitochondrial life cycle in neurons in vivo. Using Drosophila motor neurons, we show that parkin disruption generates an abnormal mitochondrial network in cell

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibition increases functional parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and enhances amyloid clearance and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Lonskaya, Irina; Hebron, Michaeline L; Desforges, Nicole M; Franjie, Alexander; Moussa, Charbel E-H

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective therapies for leukaemia. Alzheimer is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid (plaques) and hyper-phosphorylated Tau (tangles). Here we show that AD animals have high levels of insoluble parkin and decreased parkin-Beclin-1 interaction, while peripheral administration of TKIs, including Nilotinib and Bosutinib, increases soluble parkin leading to amyloid clearance and cognitive improvement. Blocking Beclin-1 expression with shRNA or parkin deletion prevents tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibition-induced amyloid clearance, suggesting that functional parkin-Beclin-1 interaction mediates amyloid degradation. Isolation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in AD mouse brain shows accumulation of parkin and amyloid, consistent with previous results in AD brains, while Bosutinib and Nilotinib increase parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and result in protein deposition in the lysosome. These data suggest that decreased parkin solubility impedes parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and amyloid clearance. We identified two FDA-approved anti-cancer drugs as potential treatment for AD. Two FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs, Bosutinib and Nilotinib, are shown to ameliorate Alzheimer's disease pathology in mouse models by increasing soluble parkin and leading to amyloid clearance and cognitive improvement. PMID:23737459

  20. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  1. Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent protein degradation and rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kishi, Chieko; Ishihara, Naotada; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-06-03

    Upon mitochondrial depolarization, Parkin, a Parkinson disease-related E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria and promotes their degradation by mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy. Here, we report that in addition to mitophagy, Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom40, Tom70, and Omp25 of depolarized mitochondria. By contrast, degradation of the inner membrane and matrix proteins largely depends on mitophagy. Furthermore, Parkin induces rupture of the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria, which also depends on proteasomal activity. Upon induction of mitochondrial depolarization, proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria in the perinuclear region. Neither proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins nor outer membrane rupture is required for mitophagy. These results suggest that Parkin regulates degradation of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane proteins differently through proteasome- and mitophagy-dependent pathways.

  2. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  3. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates beta-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of beta-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of beta-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and beta-catenin-induced cell death.

  4. [Metabolic pathways of OGCP and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-yu; Cao, Li; Tang, Bei-sha; Zhang, Hai-nan; Guo, Ji-feng; Liao, Shu-sheng; Tang, Jian-guang; Yan, Xin-riang; Tan, Li-ming

    2011-03-01

    To study the metabolic pathways of 2-oxoglutarate carrier protein (OGCP)and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. The OGCP metabolic pathways were identified through inhibiting proteasome activities with specific proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors. The isotope pulse-chase experiments were performed to measure the turnover rate of OGCP and to study the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. Proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors inhibited OGCP degradation. The OGCP metabolism had a half-life of about 8-10 h. Overexpression of parkin protein accelerated the OGCP degradation. OGCP degrades through proteasome and lysosome degradation pathways. The degradation of parkin protein can promote the degradation of OGCP.

  5. Inactivation of Pink1 gene in vivo sensitizes dopamine-producing neurons to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and can be rescued by autosomal recessive Parkinson disease genes, Parkin or DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Emdadul; Mount, Matthew P; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Abdel-Messih, Elizabeth; Callaghan, Steve; Mazerolle, Chantal; Kitada, Tohru; Slack, Ruth S; Wallace, Valerie; Shen, Jie; Anisman, Hymie; Park, David S

    2012-06-29

    Mutations in the mitochondrial PTEN-induced kinase 1 (Pink1) gene have been linked to Parkinson disease (PD). Recent reports including our own indicated that ectopic Pink1 expression is protective against toxic insult in vitro, suggesting a potential role for endogenous Pink1 in mediating survival. However, the role of endogenous Pink1 in survival, particularly in vivo, is unclear. To address this critical question, we examined whether down-regulation of Pink1 affects dopaminergic neuron loss following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in the adult mouse. Two model systems were utilized: virally delivered shRNA-mediated knockdown of Pink1 and germ line-deficient mice. In both instances, loss of Pink1 generated significant sensitivity to damage induced by systemic MPTP treatment. This sensitivity was associated with greater loss of dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta and terminal dopamine fiber density in the striatum region. Importantly, we also show that viral mediated expression of two other recessive PD-linked familial genes, DJ-1 and Parkin, can protect dopaminergic neurons even in the absence of Pink1. This evidence not only provides strong evidence for the role of endogenous Pink1 in neuronal survival, but also supports a role of DJ-1 and Parkin acting parallel or downstream of endogenous Pink1 to mediate survival in a mammalian in vivo context.

  6. Parkin is a component of an SCF-like ubiquitin ligase complex and protects postmitotic neurons from kainate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Staropoli, John F; McDermott, Caroline; Martinat, Cécile; Schulman, Brenda; Demireva, Elena; Abeliovich, Asa

    2003-03-06

    Mutations in parkin, which encodes a RING domain protein associated with ubiquitin ligase activity, lead to autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease characterized by midbrain dopamine neuron loss. Here we show that parkin functions in a multiprotein ubiquitin ligase complex that includes the F-box/WD repeat protein hSel-10 and Cullin-1. HSel-10 serves to target the parkin ubiquitin ligase activity to cyclin E, an hSel-10-interacting protein previously implicated in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. Consistent with the notion that cyclin E is a substrate of the parkin ubiquitin ligase complex, parkin deficiency potentiates the accumulation of cyclin E in cultured postmitotic neurons exposed to the glutamatergic excitotoxin kainate and promotes their apoptosis. Furthermore, parkin overexpression attenuates the accumulation of cyclin E in toxin-treated primary neurons, including midbrain dopamine neurons, and protects them from apoptosis.

  7. Olfaction in Parkin heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes: the CORE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, R N; Siderowf, A; Ottman, R; Caccappolo, E; Mejia-Santana, H; Tang, M-X; Rosado, L; Louis, E; Ruiz, D; Waters, C; Fahn, S; Cote, L; Frucht, S; Ford, B; Orbe-Reilly, M; Ross, B; Verbitsky, M; Kisselev, S; Comella, C; Colcher, A; Jennings, D; Nance, M; Bressman, S; Scott, W K; Tanner, C; Mickel, S; Rezak, M; Novak, K E; Friedman, J H; Pfeiffer, R; Marsh, L; Hiner, B; Clark, L N; Marder, K

    2011-01-25

    While Parkinson disease (PD) is consistently associated with impaired olfaction, one study reported better olfaction among Parkin mutation carriers than noncarriers. Whether olfaction differs between Parkin mutation heterozygotes and carriers of 2 Parkin mutations (compound heterozygotes) is unknown. To assess the relationship between Parkin genotype and olfaction in PD probands and their unaffected relatives. We administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) to 44 probands in the Consortium on Risk for Early-Onset Parkinson Disease study with PD onset ≤50 years (10 Parkin mutation heterozygotes, 9 compound heterozygotes, 25 noncarriers) and 80 of their family members (18 heterozygotes, 2 compound heterozygotes, 60 noncarriers). In the probands, linear regression was used to assess the association between UPSIT score (outcome) and Parkin genotype (predictor), adjusting for covariates. Among family members without PD, we compared UPSIT performance in heterozygotes vs noncarriers using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for family membership, age, gender, and smoking. Among probands with PD, compound heterozygotes had higher UPSIT scores (31.9) than heterozygotes (20.1) or noncarriers (19.9) (p < 0.001). These differences persisted after adjustment for age, gender, disease duration, and smoking. Among relatives without PD, UPSIT performance was similar in heterozygotes (32.5) vs noncarriers (32.4), and better than in heterozygotes with PD (p = 0.001). Olfaction is significantly reduced among Parkin mutation heterozygotes with PD but not among their heterozygous relatives without PD. Compound heterozygotes with PD have olfaction within the normal range. Further research is required to assess whether these findings reflect different neuropathology in Parkin mutation heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes.

  8. Parkin dosage mutations have greater pathogenicity in familial PD than simple sequence mutations.

    PubMed

    Pankratz, N; Kissell, D K; Pauciulo, M W; Halter, C A; Rudolph, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Marder, K S; Foroud, T; Nichols, W C

    2009-07-28

    Mutations in both alleles of parkin have been shown to result in Parkinson disease (PD). However, it is unclear whether haploinsufficiency (presence of a mutation in only 1 of the 2 parkin alleles) increases the risk for PD. We performed comprehensive dosage and sequence analysis of all 12 exons of parkin in a sample of 520 independent patients with familial PD and 263 controls. We evaluated whether presence of a single parkin mutation, either a sequence (point mutation or small insertion/deletion) or dosage (whole exon deletion or duplication) mutation, was found at increased frequency in cases as compared with controls. We then compared the clinical characteristics of cases with 0, 1, or 2 parkin mutations. We identified 55 independent patients with PD with at least 1 parkin mutation and 9 controls with a single sequence mutation. Cases and controls had a similar frequency of single sequence mutations (3.1% vs 3.4%, p = 0.83); however, the cases had a significantly higher rate of dosage mutations (2.6% vs 0%, p = 0.009). Cases with a single dosage mutation were more likely to have an earlier age at onset (50% with onset at < or =45 years) compared with those with no parkin mutations (10%, p = 0.00002); this was not true for cases with only a single sequence mutation (25% with onset at < or =45 years, p = 0.06). Parkin haploinsufficiency, specifically for a dosage mutation rather than a point mutation or small insertion/deletion, is a risk factor for familial PD and may be associated with earlier age at onset.

  9. On the existence of category-specific impairments. A reply to Parkin and Stewart.

    PubMed

    Job, R; Miozzo, M; Sartori, G

    1993-08-01

    Parkin and Stewart (this issue) criticize Sartori, Miozzo, and Job's (this issue) demonstration of a category-specific naming impairment for living things when sets of living and non-living things were matched for familiarity, visual complexity, name frequency, and visual similarity. In this paper we discuss the points raised by Parkin and Stewart and argue that they do not undermine our demonstration of a category-specific impairment.

  10. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  11. Formation of parkin aggregates and enhanced PINK1 accumulation during the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Um, Ji Won; Park, Hyun Jung; Song, Jihwan; Jeon, Iksoo; Lee, Gwang; Lee, Phil Hyu; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2010-03-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by a distinct set of motor symptoms. Loss-of-function mutations in PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) or parkin have been linked to early-onset autosomal recessive forms of familial PD. We have recently shown that parkin (an E3 ubiquitin ligase) and PINK1 (a serine/threonine kinase) affect one other's stability, solubility, and tendency to form cytoprotective aggresomes (Um et al., 2009). Here we validated the functional relevance of this mutual interaction under pathologic PD conditions, by investigating the changes of expression and solubility of these factors in response to PD-linked toxins. Consistent with our previous cell culture data, exposure of human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to PD-linked toxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion, 6-hydroxydopamine, or MG132) reduced Nonidet P-40-soluble parkin levels and induced PINK1 accumulation. Consistent with our previous findings from parkin knockout mice, rat models of PD (6-hydroxydopamine-, rotenone-, or MG132-induced PD) were also associated with an increase in soluble and insoluble PINK1 levels as well as enhanced formation of parkin aggregates. These findings suggest that both PINK1 and parkin play important roles in regulating the formation of Lewy bodies during the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial PD.

  12. Exon dosage analysis of parkin gene in Chinese sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qian; Li, Nan; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-09-14

    Parkin gene mutations are by far the most common mutations in both familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and sporadic PD. Approximately, 50% of parkin mutations is exon dosage mutations (i.e., deletions and duplications of entire exons). Here, we first established a MLPA assay for quick detection of parkin exon rearrangements. Then, we studied parkin exon dosage mutations in 755 Chinese sporadic PDdisease patients using the established MLPA assay. We found that there were 25 (3.3%) patients with exon dosage alterations including deletions and duplications, 20 (11.4%) patients with exon rearrangements in 178 early-onset patients, and 5 (0.86%) patients with exon rearrangement mutations in 579 later-onset patients. The percentage of individuals with parkin dosage mutations is more than 33% when the age at onset is less than 30 years old, but less than 7% when the age at onset is more than 30. In these mutations, deletion is the main mutational style, especially in exon 2-5. Our results indicated that exon dosage mutations in parkin gene might be the main cause for sporadic PD, especially in EOP.

  13. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson's disease patients with parkin mutations.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Henning, Franclo; van der Merwe, Lize; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; Bardien, Soraya

    2014-05-02

    Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients' fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD pathogenesis will have important implications for the design of new and more effective therapies.

  14. Parkin loss leads to PARIS-dependent declines in mitochondrial mass and respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Daniel A.; Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Bower, Aaron; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in parkin lead to early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease (PD) and inactivation of parkin is thought to contribute to sporadic PD. Adult knockout of parkin in the ventral midbrain of mice leads to an age-dependent loss of dopamine neurons that is dependent on the accumulation of parkin interacting substrate (PARIS), zinc finger protein 746 (ZNF746), and its transcriptional repression of PGC-1α. Here we show that adult knockout of parkin in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial size, number, and protein markers consistent with a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis. This decrease in mitochondrial mass is prevented by short hairpin RNA knockdown of PARIS. PARIS overexpression in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial number and protein markers and PGC-1α–dependent deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Taken together, these results suggest that parkin loss impairs mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to declining function of the mitochondrial pool and cell death. PMID:26324925

  15. Endogenous digitalis

    PubMed Central

    Bagrov, Alexei Y; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous digitalis-like factors, also called cardiotonic steroids, have been thought for nearly half a century to have important roles in health and disease. The endogenous cardiotonic steroids ouabain and marinobufagenin have been identified in humans, and an effector mechanism has been delineated by which these hormones signal through the sodium/potassium-transporting ATPase. These findings have increased interest in this field substantially. Although cardiotonic steroids were first considered important in the regulation of renal sodium transport and arterial pressure, subsequent work has implicated these hormones in the control of cell growth, apoptosis and fibrosis, among other processes. This Review focuses on the role of endogenous cardiotonic steroids in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension, congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease and pre-eclampsia. We also discuss potential therapeutic strategies that have emerged as a result of the increased understanding of the regulation and actions of cardiotonic steroids. PMID:18542120

  16. Manganese-Induced Toxicity in Normal and Human B Lymphocyte Cell Lines Containing a Homozygous Mutation in Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jerome A.; Ganapathy, Balakrishnan; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to development of juvenile onset of Parkinson’s disease and recent studies have reported that parkin can protect against increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a variety of oxidative and toxic insults. Overexpression of parkin has also been reported to selectively protect dopaminergic neurons from Mn toxicity. Accordingly, in this paper we compare the effect that mutations in parkin have on Mn toxicity and associated apoptotic signals in normal and human B lymphocyte cell lines containing a homozygous mutation in the gene. Results of these studies reveal that Mn toxicity was similar in both control and mutant parkin lymphocyte cells indicating that cell death caused by Mn was not altered in cells devoid of parkin activity. In contrast, Mn did inhibit mitochondrial function to a greater extent in cells devoid of active parkin as indicated by a decrease in ATP production although mitochondrial membrane potential was essentially unaffected. Consistent with inactive parkin influencing the Mn response is the observation of increased activity in the down-stream apoptotic signal, caspase 3. In summary, results reported in this paper demonstrate that mutations in parkin can lead to functional changes in potential signaling processes known to provoke Mn toxicity. The selectivity and magnitude of this response, however, does not necessarily lead to cell death in lymphocytes which are devoid of dopamine. PMID:22841634

  17. Parkin elimination of mitochondria is important for maintenance of lens epithelial cell ROS levels and survival upon oxidative stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Lisa; Khoury, Josef; Kantorow, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cataract is associated with oxidative stress and death of lens epithelial cells (LECs) whose survival is dependent on functional mitochondrial populations. Oxidative stress-induced depolarization/damage of LEC mitochondria results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cell death suggesting the need for a LEC mechanism to remove mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure to prevent ROS release and LEC death. To date, a mechanism(s) for removal of depolarized/damaged LEC mitochondria has yet to be identified and the importance of eliminating oxidative stress-damaged mitochondria to prevent LEC ROS release and death has not been established. Here, we demonstrate that Parkin levels increase in LECs exposed to H2O2-oxidative stress. We establish that Parkin translocates to LEC mitochondria depolarized upon oxidative stress exposure and that Parkin recruits p62/SQSTM1 to depolarized LEC mitochondria. We demonstrate that translocation of Parkin results in the elimination of depolarized/damaged mitochondria and that Parkin clearance of LEC mitochondria is dependent on its ubiquitin ligase activity. Importantly, we demonstrate that Parkin elimination of damaged LEC mitochondria results in reduced ROS levels and increased survival upon oxidative stress exposure. These results establish that Parkin functions to eliminate LEC mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure and that elimination of damaged mitochondria by Parkin is important for LEC homeostasis and survival. The data also suggest that mitochondrial quality control by Parkin could play a role in lens transparency.

  18. N-acetylcysteine prevents rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease in rat: An investigation into the interaction of parkin and Drp1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimmi, Arman; Khosrobakhsh, Farnoosh; Izadpanah, Esmael; Moloudi, Mohammad Raman; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2015-04-01

    There are convincing evidences that oxidative stress has an important role in both the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is shown to have antioxidant properties via fortifying glutathione which is one of the main endogenous antioxidant systems. Therefore our study was aimed to evaluate the effect of NAC in management of Parkinson's disease. To this aim, male Wistar rats (10-12 months) received rotenone 2.5mg/kg/48 h intraperitoneally (ip) to induce a Parkinson's disease model. Pretreatment with NAC (25 and 50mg/kg/48 h ip) was administered 1h before the rotenone injection. Three behavioral tests (rotarod, rearing and bar tests) were performed for motor function assessment. Dopamine levels of dopaminergic areas in rat brain including substantia nigra (SN) and striatum (ST) were assessed using high performance liquid chromatography analysis to measure the loss of dopamine. Western blot analysis was also done for parkin and Drp1 (dynamin related protein-1) proteins quantification in SN and ST. Our results indicated that NAC significantly ameliorated the rotenone-induced motor dysfunction and dopamine loss. Furthermore, NAC was able to prevent the rotenone-induced changes in parkin and Drp1 levels in the both studied areas. In conclusion we found that NAC delayed the Parkinson's disease induction by rotenone and this effect might be related to its proved antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Behavioral and Neurotransmitter Abnormalities in Mice Deficient for Parkin, DJ-1 and Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Hennis, Meghan R.; Seamans, Katherine W.; Marvin, Marian A.; Casey, Bradford H.; Goldberg, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of neurons in the substantia nigra that project to the striatum and release dopamine. The cause of PD remains uncertain, however, evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Although most cases of PD are sporadic, 5-10% of cases are caused by inherited mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 were the first to be linked to recessively inherited Parkinsonism. Surprisingly, mice bearing similar loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 do not show age-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons or depletion of dopamine in the striatum. Although the normal cellular functions of Parkin and DJ-1 are not fully understood, we hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 render cells more sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, we crossed mice deficient for Parkin and DJ-1 with mice deficient for the mitochondrial antioxidant protein Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2) or the cytosolic antioxidant protein Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Aged Parkin-/-DJ-1-/- and Mn-superoxide dismutase triple deficient mice have enhanced performance on the rotorod behavior test. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase triple deficient mice have elevated levels of dopamine in the striatum in the absence of nigral cell loss. Our studies demonstrate that on a Parkin/DJ-1 null background, mice that are also deficient for major antioxidant proteins do not have progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons but have behavioral and striatal dopamine abnormalities. PMID:24386432

  20. Nitric Oxide Induction of Parkin Translocation in PTEN-induced Putative Kinase 1 (PINK1) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Young; Kang, Min-Ji; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Han, Pyung-Lim; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Ha, Ji-Young; Son, Jin H.

    2015-01-01

    The failure to trigger mitophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of familial Parkinson disease that is caused by PINK1 or Parkin mutations. According to the prevailing PINK1-Parkin signaling model, mitophagy is promoted by the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, an essential PINK1-dependent step that occurs via a previously unknown mechanism. Here we determined that critical concentrations of NO was sufficient to induce the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin even in PINK1 deficiency, with apparent increased interaction of full-length PINK1 accumulated during mitophagy, with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Specifically, optimum levels of NO enabled PINK1-null dopaminergic neuronal cells to regain the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, which appeared to be significantly suppressed by nNOS-null mutation. Moreover, nNOS-null mutation resulted in the same mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme deficits as PINK1-null mutation. The involvement of mitochondrial nNOS activation in mitophagy was further confirmed by the greatly increased interactions of full-length PINK1 with nNOS, accompanied by mitochondrial accumulation of phospho-nNOS (Ser1412) during mitophagy. Of great interest is that the L347P PINK1 mutant failed to bind to nNOS. The loss of nNOS phosphorylation and Parkin accumulation on PINK1-deficient mitochondria could be reversed in a PINK1-dependent manner. Finally, non-toxic levels of NO treatment aided in the recovery of PINK1-null dopaminergic neuronal cells from mitochondrial ETC enzyme deficits. In summary, we demonstrated the full-length PINK1-dependent recruitment of nNOS, its activation in the induction of Parkin translocation, and the feasibility of NO-based pharmacotherapy for defective mitophagy and ETC enzyme deficits in Parkinson disease. PMID:25716315

  1. Parkin clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria regulates ROS levels and increases survival of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M Y; Khan, N M; Ahmad, I; Haqqi, T M

    2017-08-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and chondrocyte death are important contributors to the development and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, we determined the expression and role of Parkin in the clearance of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and chondrocyte survival under pathological conditions. Human chondrocytes were from the unaffected area of knee OA cartilage (n = 12) and were stimulated with IL-1β to mimic pathological conditions. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS levels were determined using specific dyes and flow cytometry. Autophagy was determined by Western blotting for ATG5, Beclin1, immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Gene expression was determined by RT-qPCR. siRNA, wild-type and mutant Parkin plasmids were transfected using Amaxa system. Apoptosis was determined by PI staining of chondrocytes and TUNEL assay. IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes showed high levels of ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane damage, accumulation of damaged mitochondria and higher incidence of apoptosis. IL-1β stimulation of chondrocytes with depleted Parkin expression resulted in sustained high levels of ROS, accumulation of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria and enhanced apoptosis. Parkin translocation to depolarized/damaged mitochondria and recruitment of p62/SQSTM1 was required for the elimination of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Importantly we demonstrate that Parkin elimination of depolarized/damaged mitochondria required the Parkin ubiquitin ligase activity and resulted in reduced ROS levels and inhibition of apoptosis in OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Our data demonstrates that Parkin functions to eliminate depolarized/damaged mitochondria in chondrocytes which is necessary for mitochondrial quality control, regulation of ROS levels and chondrocyte survival under pathological conditions

  2. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Merwe, Celia van der; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Merwe, Lize van der; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  3. Parkin, A Top Level Manager in the Cell’s Sanitation Department

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Carolyn A; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang; Richter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Parkin belongs to a class of multiple RING domain proteins designated as RBR (RING, in between RING, RING) proteins. In this review we examine what is known regarding the structure/function relationship of the Parkin protein. Parkin contains three RING domains plus a ubiquitin-like domain and an in-between-RING (IBR) domain. RING domains are rich in cysteine amino acids that act as ligands to bind zinc ions. RING domains may interact with DNA or with other proteins and perform a wide range of functions. Some function as E3 ubiquitin ligases, participating in attachment of ubiquitin chains to signal proteasome degradation; however, ubiquitin may be attached for purposes other than proteasome degradation. It was determined that the C-terminal most RING, RING2, is essential for Parkin to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and a number of substrates have been identified. However, Parkin also participates in a number of other fiunctions, such as DNA repair, microtubule stabilization, and formation of aggresomes. Some functions, such as participation in a multi-protein complex implicated in NMDA activity at the post synaptic density, do not require ubiquitination of substrate molecules. Recent observations of RING proteins suggest their function may be regulated by zinc ion binding. We have modeled the three RING domains of Parkin and have identified a new set of RING2 ligands. This set allows for binding of two rather than just one zinc ion, opening the possibility that the number of zinc ions bound acts as a molecular switch to modulate Parkin function. PMID:21633666

  4. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele.

    PubMed

    Anders, Silke; Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons ('mirror neurons') in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger activity in

  5. Restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and hypersomnia in patients with two parkin mutations.

    PubMed

    Limousin, Nadège; Konofal, Eric; Karroum, Elias; Lohmann, Ebba; Theodorou, Ioannis; Dürr, Alexandra; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2009-10-15

    Parkin gene mutations cause a juvenile parkinsonism. Patients with these mutations may commonly exhibit REM sleep behaviour disorders, but other sleep problems (insomnia, sleepiness, restless legs syndrome) have not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sleep-wake phenotype in patients with two parkin mutations, compared with patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD). Sleep interview and overnight video-polysomnography, followed by multiple sleep latency tests, were assessed in 11 consecutive patients with two parkin mutations (aged 35-60 years, from seven families) and 11 sex-matched patients with iPD (aged 51-65 years). Sleep complaints in the parkin group included insomnia (73% patients versus 45% in the iPD group), restless legs syndrome (45%, versus none in the iPD group, P = 0.04), and daytime sleepiness (45%, versus 54% in the iPD group). Of the parkin patients, 45% had REM sleep without atonia, but only 9% had a definite REM sleep behavior disorder. All sleep measures were similar in the parkin and iPD groups. Two parkin siblings had a central hypersomnia, characterized by mean daytime sleep latencies of 3 min, no sleep onset REM periods, and normal nighttime sleep. Although the patients with two parkin mutations were young, their sleep phenotype paralleled the clinical and polygraphic sleep recording abnormalities reported in iPD, except that restless legs syndrome was more prevalent and secondary narcolepsy was absent.

  6. Nix restores mitophagy and mitochondrial function to protect against PINK1/Parkin-related Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Koentjoro, Brianada; Park, Jin-Sung; Sue, Carolyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic targets are needed to develop neuroprotective treatments for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Mitophagy, the selective autophagic elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria, is essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and is predominantly regulated by the PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathway. Loss of function mutations in Parkin and PINK1 cause an accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, leading to nigral neurodegeneration and early-onset PD with a high penetrance rate. We previously identified an asymptomatic homozygous Parkin mutation carrier who had not developed PD by her eighth decade despite the loss of functional Parkin. Here we discover a putative mechanism that protects her against PD. In contrast to Parkin-related PD patient-derived cells, the asymptomatic carrier cells show preserved mitochondrial function and mitophagy which is mediated by mitochondrial receptor Nip3-like protein X (Nix). Nix-mediated mitophagy was not affected by PINK1 knockdown. Both genetic and pharmacological induction of Nix restores mitophagy in PINK1- and Parkin-related PD patient cell lines, confirming its ability to induce mitophagy in the absence of PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathway. Moreover, Nix over-expression improves mitochondrial ATP production in these patient cells. Our results demonstrate that Nix can serve as an alternative mediator of mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial turnover, identifying Nix as a promising target for neuroprotective treatment in PINK1/Parkin-related PD. PMID:28281653

  7. Structural and Functional Impact of Parkinson Disease-Associated Mutations in the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Fiesel, Fabienne C; Caulfield, Thomas R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Ogaki, Kotaro; Dourado, Daniel F A R; Flores, Samuel C; Ross, Owen A; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN/PARK2 gene that result in loss-of-function of the encoded, neuroprotective E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin cause recessive, familial early-onset Parkinson disease. As an increasing number of rare Parkin sequence variants with unclear pathogenicity are identified, structure-function analyses will be critical to determine their disease relevance. Depending on the specific amino acids affected, several distinct pathomechanisms can result in loss of Parkin function. These include disruption of overall Parkin folding, decreased solubility, and protein aggregation. However pathogenic effects can also result from misregulation of Parkin autoinhibition and of its enzymatic functions. In addition, interference of binding to coenzymes, substrates, and adaptor proteins can affect its catalytic activity too. Herein, we have performed a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of 21 PARK2 missense mutations distributed across the individual protein domains. Using this combined approach, we were able to pinpoint some of the pathogenic mechanisms of individual sequence variants. Similar analyses will be critical in gaining a complete understanding of the complex regulations and enzymatic functions of Parkin. These studies will not only highlight the important residues, but will also help to develop novel therapeutics aimed at activating and preserving an active, neuroprotective form of Parkin.

  8. The PINK1-Parkin pathway is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeehye; Lee, Gina; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2009-01-16

    The two Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, are linked in a common pathway which affects mitochondrial integrity and function. However, it is still not known what this pathway does in the mitochondria. Therefore, we investigated its physiological function in Drosophila. Because Drosophila PINK1 and parkin mutants show changes in mitochondrial morphology in both indirect flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons, we here investigated whether the PINK1-Parkin pathway genetically interacts with the regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission such as Drp1, which promotes mitochondrial fission, and Opa1 or Marf, which induces mitochondrial fusion. Surprisingly, DrosophilaPINK1 and parkin mutant phenotypes were markedly suppressed by overexpression of Drp1 or downregulation of Opa1 or Marf, indicating that the PINK1-Parkin pathway regulates mitochondrial remodeling process in the direction of promoting mitochondrial fission. Therefore, we strongly suggest that mitochondrial fusion and fission process could be a prominent therapeutic target for the treatment of PD.

  9. Drosophila CHIP protects against mitochondrial dysfunction by acting downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Xue, Jin; Ruan, Jingsong; Zhao, Juan; Tang, Beisha; Duan, Ranhui

    2017-08-04

    Mitochondrial kinase PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin function in a common pathway to regulate mitochondrial homeostasis contributing to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. The carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) acts as a heat shock protein 70/heat shock protein 90 cochaperone to mediate protein folding or as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to target proteins for degradation. In this study, overexpression of Drosophila CHIP suppressed a range of Pink1 mutant phenotypes in flies, including abnormal wing posture, thoracic indentation, locomotion defects, muscle degeneration, and loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mitochondrial defects of Pink1 mutant, such as excessive fusion, reduced ATP content, and crista disorganization, were rescued by CHIP but not its ligase-dead mutants. Similar phenotypes and mitochondrial impairment were ameliorated in Parkin mutant flies by wild-type CHIP. Inactivation of CHIP with null fly mutants resulted in mitochondrial defects, such as reduced thoracic ATP content at 3 d old, decreased thoracic mitochondrial DNA content, and defective mitochondrial morphology at 60 d old. CHIP mutants did not exacerbate the phenotypes of Pink1 mutant flies but markedly shortened the life span of Parkin mutant flies. These results indicate that CHIP is involved in mitochondrial integrity and may act downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin.-Chen, J., Xue, J., Ruan, J., Zhao, J., Tang, B., Duan, R. Drosophila CHIP protects against mitochondrial dysfunction by acting downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin. © FASEB.

  10. The relationship between Obsessive-Compulsive symptoms and PARKIN genotype: The CORE-PD study

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, ME; Caccappolo, E; Mejia-Santana, H; Tang, M–X; Rosado, L; Orbe Reilly, M; Ruiz, D; Louis, ED; Comella, C; Nance, M; Bressman, S; Scott, WK; Tanner, C; Waters, C; Fahn, S; Cote, L; Ford, B; Rezak, M; Novak, K; Friedman, JH; Pfeiffer, R; Payami, H; Molho, E; Factor, SA; Nutt, J; Serrano, C; Arroyo, M; Pauciulo, MW; Nichols, WC; Clark, LN; Alcalay, RN; Marder, KS

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have systematically investigated the association between PARKIN genotype and psychiatric co-morbidities of PD. PARKIN-associated PD is characterized by severe nigral dopaminergic neuronal loss, a finding that may have implications for behaviors rooted in dopaminergic circuits such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). Methods The Schedule of Compulsions and Obsessions Patient Inventory (SCOPI) was administered to 104 patients with early-onset PD and 257 asymptomatic first-degree relatives. Carriers of one and two PARKIN mutations were compared to non-carriers. Results Among patients, carriers scored lower than non-carriers in adjusted models (one-mutation: 13.9 point difference, p=0.03; two-mutation: 24.1, p=0.001), where lower scores indicate less OCS. Among asymptomatic relatives, there was a trend towards the opposite: mutation carriers scored higher than non-carriers (one mutation p = 0.05; two mutations p = 0.13). Conclusions First, there was a significant association between PARKIN mutation status and obsessive-compulsive symptom level in both PD and asymptomatics, suggesting that OCS might represent an early non-motor dopamine-dependent feature. Second, irrespective of disease status, heterozygotes were significantly different that non-carriers suggesting that PARKIN heterozygosity may contribute to phenotype. PMID:25393808

  11. ATM mediates spermidine-induced mitophagy via PINK1 and Parkin regulation in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongmei; Qiu, Qian; Gu, Xueyan; Tian, Yihong; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    The ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) protein has recently been proposed to play critical roles in the response to mitochondrial dysfunction by initiating mitophagy. Here, we have used ATM-proficient GM00637 cells and ATM-deficient GM05849 cells to investigate the mitophagic effect of spermidine and to elucidate the role of ATM in spermdine-induced mitophagy. Our results indicate that spermidine induces mitophagy by eliciting mitochondrial depolarization, which triggers the formation of mitophagosomes and mitolysosomes, thereby promoting the accumulation of PINK1 and translocation of Parkin to damaged mitochondria, finally leading to the decreased mitochondrial mass in GM00637 cells. However, in GM05849 cells or GM00637 cells pretreated with the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933, the expression of full-length PINK1 and the translocation of Parkin are blocked, and the colocalization of Parkin with either LC3 or PINK1 is disrupted. These results suggest that ATM drives the initiation of the mitophagic cascade. Our study demonstrates that spermidine induces mitophagy through ATM-dependent activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These findings underscore the importance of a mitophagy regulatory network of ATM and PINK1/Parkin and elucidate a novel mechanism by which ATM influences spermidine-induced mitophagy. PMID:27089984

  12. Parkin functionally interacts with PGC-1α to preserve mitochondria and protect dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lu; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Moullan, Norman; D'Amico, Davide; Auwerx, Johan; Moore, Darren J; Knott, Graham; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2017-02-01

    To understand the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), it is important to determine the functional interactions between factors linked to the disease. Parkin is associated with autosomal recessive early-onset PD, and controls the transcription of PGC-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These two factors functionally interact to regulate the turnover and quality of mitochondria, by increasing both mitophagic activity and mitochondria biogenesis. In cortical neurons, co-expressing PGC-1α and Parkin increases the number of mitochondria, enhances maximal respiration, and accelerates the recovery of the mitochondrial membrane potential following mitochondrial uncoupling. PGC-1α enhances Mfn2 transcription, but also leads to increased degradation of the Mfn2 protein, a key ubiquitylation target of Parkin on mitochondria. In vivo, Parkin has significant protective effects on the survival and function of nigral dopaminergic neurons in which the chronic expression of PGC-1α is induced. Ultrastructural analysis shows that these two factors together control the density of mitochondria and their interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum. These results highlight the combined effects of Parkin and PGC-1α in the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons. These two factors synergistically control the quality and function of mitochondria, which is important for the survival of neurons in Parkinson's disease. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. ATM mediates spermidine-induced mitophagy via PINK1 and Parkin regulation in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongmei; Qiu, Qian; Gu, Xueyan; Tian, Yihong; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-04-19

    The ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) protein has recently been proposed to play critical roles in the response to mitochondrial dysfunction by initiating mitophagy. Here, we have used ATM-proficient GM00637 cells and ATM-deficient GM05849 cells to investigate the mitophagic effect of spermidine and to elucidate the role of ATM in spermdine-induced mitophagy. Our results indicate that spermidine induces mitophagy by eliciting mitochondrial depolarization, which triggers the formation of mitophagosomes and mitolysosomes, thereby promoting the accumulation of PINK1 and translocation of Parkin to damaged mitochondria, finally leading to the decreased mitochondrial mass in GM00637 cells. However, in GM05849 cells or GM00637 cells pretreated with the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933, the expression of full-length PINK1 and the translocation of Parkin are blocked, and the colocalization of Parkin with either LC3 or PINK1 is disrupted. These results suggest that ATM drives the initiation of the mitophagic cascade. Our study demonstrates that spermidine induces mitophagy through ATM-dependent activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These findings underscore the importance of a mitophagy regulatory network of ATM and PINK1/Parkin and elucidate a novel mechanism by which ATM influences spermidine-induced mitophagy.

  14. Triggering of Parkin Mitochondrial Translocation in Mitophagy: Implications for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Nabil; Ito, Yuko; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence based on in vitro studies indicates that mitophagy (selective autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria) is a prosurvival mechanism associated with cellular exposure to various mitochondrial stressors. Very recently, a limited number of publications on animal-based models of alcoholic fatty liver diseases have reported that Parkin-mediated mitophagy may mitigate hepatocyte apoptosis, improve mitochondrial quality and suppress steatosis (lipid accumulation). From this perspective, the authors focus on the mechanisms of Parkin mitochondrial translocation (a key consideration in mitophagy activation) and therapeutic implications of mitophagy in liver disease. DNA repair and other functions of Parkin beyond mitophagy are also briefly discussed. The paper additionally shows original data from the authors’ current research indicating enhanced hepatic mitophagy in ethanol-treated rats, which is associated with Parkin mitochondrial translocation triggered by oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage. Natural or pharmaceutical products that may trigger Parkin mitochondrial translocation in hepatocytes and/or suppress repressors of such translocation could be a potential therapeutic target in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27199746

  15. Phosphorylation by PINK1 Releases the UBL Domain and Initializes the Conformational Opening of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L.; Dourado, Daniel F. A. R.; Flores, Samuel C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 or PARKIN are the most common causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Both gene products, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Parkin, functionally cooperate in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Upon stress, PINK1 activates Parkin and enables its translocation to and ubiquitination of damaged mitochondria to facilitate their clearance from the cell. Though PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser65 is an important initial step, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of Parkin's enzymatic functions remain unclear. Using molecular modeling, we generated a complete structural model of human Parkin at all atom resolution. At steady state, the Ub ligase is maintained inactive in a closed, auto-inhibited conformation that results from intra-molecular interactions. Evidently, Parkin has to undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic activity. As a spark, we have modeled PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation in silico and provide the first molecular dynamics simulation of Parkin conformations along a sequential unfolding pathway that could release its intertwined domains and enable its catalytic activity. We combined free (unbiased) molecular dynamics simulation, Monte Carlo algorithms, and minimal-biasing methods with cell-based high content imaging and biochemical assays. Phosphorylation of Ser65 results in widening of a newly defined cleft and dissociation of the regulatory N-terminal UBL domain. This motion propagates through further opening conformations that allow binding of an Ub-loaded E2 co-enzyme. Subsequent spatial reorientation of the catalytic centers of both enzymes might facilitate the transfer of the Ub moiety to charge Parkin. Our structure-function study provides the basis to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and activity of the neuroprotective Parkin. This may open up new avenues for the development of small molecule Parkin activators through

  16. Parp mutations protect against mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in a PARKIN model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, S; Costa, A C; Celardo, I; Loh, S H Y; Martins, L M

    2016-01-01

    The co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-factor for cellular energy generation in mitochondria as well as for DNA repair mechanisms in the cell nucleus involving NAD+-consuming poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Mitochondrial function is compromised in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) associated with PARKIN mutations. Here, we uncovered alterations in NAD+ salvage metabolism in Drosophila parkin mutants. We show that a dietary supplementation with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide rescues mitochondrial function and is neuroprotective. Further, by mutating Parp in parkin mutants, we show that this increases levels of NAD+ and its salvage metabolites. This also rescues mitochondrial function and suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We conclude that strategies to enhance NAD+ levels by administration of dietary precursors or the inhibition of NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as PARP, that compete with mitochondria for NAD+ could be used to delay neuronal death associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031963

  17. USP30 and parkin homeostatically regulate atypical ubiquitin chains on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Christian N; Baughman, Joshua M; Phu, Lilian; Tea, Joy S; Yu, Christine; Coons, Mary; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Bingol, Baris; Corn, Jacob E

    2015-02-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to Parkinson's disease. Here we investigate the mechanism by which parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, and USP30, a mitochondrion-localized deubiquitylase, regulate mitophagy. We find that mitochondrial damage stimulates parkin to assemble Lys 6, Lys 11 and Lys 63 chains on mitochondria, and that USP30 is a ubiquitin-specific deubiquitylase with a strong preference for cleaving Lys 6- and Lys 11-linked multimers. Using mass spectrometry, we show that recombinant USP30 preferentially removes these linkage types from intact ubiquitylated mitochondria and counteracts parkin-mediated ubiquitin chain formation in cells. These results, combined with a series of chimaera and localization studies, afford insights into the mechanism by which a balance of ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation regulates mitochondrial homeostasis, and suggest a general mechanism for organelle autophagy.

  18. Mutational analysis of parkin and PINK1 in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Janet A.; Houlden, Henry; Melchers, Anna; Islam, Ansha J.; Ding, Jinhui; Li, Abi; Paudel, Reema; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Wood, Nick; Lees, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew B.; Scholz, Sonja W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders with overlapping clinical, biochemical and genetic features. To test the hypothesis that the Parkinson’s disease genes parkin and PINK1 also play a role in the pathogenesis of MSA, we performed a mutational screening study involving 87 pathology-proven MSA cases. In parkin we identified eight sequence variants and four heterozygous deletions, and in PINK1 we identified nine variants of which two silent mutations have not been previously reported (p.Gly189Gly and p.Arg337Arg). The frequencies of the observed variants were not significantly different from previously published control data and none of the possibly pathogenic variants were found in a homozygous state. Our results indicate that genetic variants at the parkin and PINK1 loci do not play a critical role in the pathogenesis of MSA. PMID:20034704

  19. MPTP and DSP-4 susceptibility of substantia nigra and locus coeruleus catecholaminergic neurons in mice is independent of parkin activity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bobby; von Coelln, Rainer; Mandir, Allen S.; Trinkaus, Daniel B.; Farah, Mohamed H.; Lim, Kah Leong; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Beal, M. Flint; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene cause autosomal recessive familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). Parkin-deficient mouse models fail to recapitulate nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration as seen in PD, but produce deficits in dopaminergic neurotransmission and noradrenergic-dependent behavior. Since sporadic PD is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic susceptibilities and environmental factors, we hypothesized that neurotoxic insults from catecholaminergic toxins would render parkin knockout mice more vulnerable to neurodegeneration. Accordingly, we investigated the susceptibility of catecholaminergic neurons in parkin knockout mice to the potent dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) respectively. We report that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in parkin knockout mice do not show increased susceptibility to the parkinsonian neurotoxin, MPTP, in acute, subacute and chronic dose regimens of the neurotoxin. Additionally, parkin knockout mice do not show increased vulnerability to the noradrenergic neurotoxin, DSP-4, regarding levels of norepinephrine in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. These findings suggest that absence of parkin in mice does not increase susceptibility to the loss of catecholaminergic neurons upon exposure to both dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotoxins. PMID:17336077

  20. Chronic Deletion and Acute Knockdown of Parkin Have Differential Responses to Acetaminophen-induced Mitophagy and Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jessica A; Ni, Hong-Min; Haynes, Anna; Manley, Sharon; Li, Yuan; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2015-04-24

    We previously demonstrated that pharmacological induction of autophagy protected against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice by clearing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism for removal of mitochondria by autophagy is unknown. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to be required for mitophagy induction in cultured mammalian cells following mitochondrial depolarization, but its role in vivo is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Parkin-mediated mitophagy in protection against APAP-induced liver injury. We found that Parkin translocated to mitochondria in mouse livers after APAP treatment followed by mitochondrial protein ubiquitination and mitophagy induction. To our surprise, we found that mitophagy still occurred in Parkin knock-out (KO) mice after APAP treatment based on electron microscopy analysis and Western blot analysis for some mitochondrial proteins, and Parkin KO mice were protected against APAP-induced liver injury compared with wild type mice. Mechanistically, we found that Parkin KO mice had decreased activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), increased induction of myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein (Mcl-1) expression, and increased hepatocyte proliferation after APAP treatment in their livers compared with WT mice. In contrast to chronic deletion of Parkin, acute knockdown of Parkin in mouse livers using adenovirus shRNA reduced mitophagy and Mcl-1 expression but increased JNK activation after APAP administration, which exacerbated APAP-induced liver injury. Therefore, chronic deletion (KO) and acute knockdown of Parkin have differential responses to APAP-induced mitophagy and liver injury in mice. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Chronic Deletion and Acute Knockdown of Parkin Have Differential Responses to Acetaminophen-induced Mitophagy and Liver Injury in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica A.; Ni, Hong-Min; Haynes, Anna; Manley, Sharon; Li, Yuan; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that pharmacological induction of autophagy protected against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice by clearing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism for removal of mitochondria by autophagy is unknown. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to be required for mitophagy induction in cultured mammalian cells following mitochondrial depolarization, but its role in vivo is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Parkin-mediated mitophagy in protection against APAP-induced liver injury. We found that Parkin translocated to mitochondria in mouse livers after APAP treatment followed by mitochondrial protein ubiquitination and mitophagy induction. To our surprise, we found that mitophagy still occurred in Parkin knock-out (KO) mice after APAP treatment based on electron microscopy analysis and Western blot analysis for some mitochondrial proteins, and Parkin KO mice were protected against APAP-induced liver injury compared with wild type mice. Mechanistically, we found that Parkin KO mice had decreased activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), increased induction of myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein (Mcl-1) expression, and increased hepatocyte proliferation after APAP treatment in their livers compared with WT mice. In contrast to chronic deletion of Parkin, acute knockdown of Parkin in mouse livers using adenovirus shRNA reduced mitophagy and Mcl-1 expression but increased JNK activation after APAP administration, which exacerbated APAP-induced liver injury. Therefore, chronic deletion (KO) and acute knockdown of Parkin have differential responses to APAP-induced mitophagy and liver injury in mice. PMID:25752611

  2. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  3. Ketoconazole induces apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes through reactive oxygen species-mediated parkin overexpression.

    PubMed

    Won, Kyung Jong; Lee, Kang Pa; Yu, Suyeol; Lee, Donghyen; Lee, Dong-Youb; Lee, Hwan Myung; Kim, Junghwan; Jung, Seung Hyo; Baek, Suji; Kim, Bokyung

    2015-10-01

    Azole antifungals such as ketoconazole are generally known to induce a variety of heart function side effects, e.g., long-QT syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias. However, a clear mechanism for the action of ketoconazole in heart cells has not been reported. In the present study, we assessed the correlation between ketoconazole-induced apoptosis and the alteration of genes in response to ketoconazole in rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte viability was significantly inhibited by treatment with ketoconazole. Ketoconazole also stimulated H2O2 generation and TUNEL-positive apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. DNA microarray technology revealed that 10,571 genes were differentially expressed by more than threefold in ketoconazole-exposed cardiomyocytes compared with untreated controls. Among these genes, parkin, which encodes a component of the multiprotein E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, was predominantly overexpressed among those classified as apoptosis- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related genes. The expression of parkin was also elevated in cardiomyocytes treated with exogenous H2O2. Moreover, cell viability and apoptosis in response to ketoconazole were inhibited in cardiomyocytes treated with ROS inhibitors and transfected with parkin siRNA. From the present findings, we concluded that ketoconazole may increase the expression of parkin via the ROS-mediated pathway, which consequently results in the apoptosis and decreased viability of cardiomyocytes.

  4. Broad activation of the ubiquitin–proteasome system by Parkin is critical for mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Nickie C.; Salazar, Anna M.; Pham, Anh H.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Kolawa, Natalie J.; Graham, Robert L.J.; Hess, Sonja; Chan, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase implicated in Parkinson's disease, promotes degradation of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Using proteomic and cellular approaches, we show that upon translocation to mitochondria, Parkin activates the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) for widespread degradation of outer membrane proteins. This is evidenced by an increase in K48-linked polyubiquitin on mitochondria, recruitment of the 26S proteasome and rapid degradation of multiple outer membrane proteins. The degradation of proteins by the UPS occurs independently of the autophagy pathway, and inhibition of the 26S proteasome completely abrogates Parkin-mediated mitophagy in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and mouse cells. Although the mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2 are rapid degradation targets of Parkin, we find that degradation of additional targets is essential for mitophagy. These results indicate that remodeling of the mitochondrial outer membrane proteome is important for mitophagy, and reveal a causal link between the UPS and autophagy, the major pathways for degradation of intracellular substrates. PMID:21296869

  5. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5.

    PubMed

    Nezich, Catherine L; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I; Youle, Richard J

    2015-08-03

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy.

  6. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-03

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A dimeric PINK1-containing complex on depolarized mitochondria stimulates Parkin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Okatsu, Kei; Uno, Midori; Koyano, Fumika; Go, Etsu; Kimura, Mayumi; Oka, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2013-12-20

    Parkinsonism typified by sporadic Parkinson disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1), a mitochondrial Ser/Thr protein kinase, or PARKIN, a ubiquitin-protein ligase, cause familial parkinsonism. The accumulation and autophosphorylation of PINK1 on damaged mitochondria results in the recruitment of Parkin, which ultimately triggers quarantine and/or degradation of the damaged mitochondria by the proteasome and autophagy. However, the molecular mechanism of PINK1 in dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) has not been fully elucidated. Here we show by fluorescence-based techniques that the PINK1 complex formed following a decrease in ΔΨm is composed of two PINK1 molecules and is correlated with intermolecular phosphorylation of PINK1. Disruption of complex formation by the PINK1 S402A mutation weakened Parkin recruitment onto depolarized mitochondria. The most disease-relevant mutations of PINK1 inhibit the complex formation. Taken together, these results suggest that formation of the complex containing dyadic PINK1 is an important step for Parkin recruitment onto damaged mitochondria.

  8. Mitophagy of damaged mitochondria occurs locally in distal neuronal axons and requires PINK1 and Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Ghazaleh; Schlehe, Julia S.; LaVoie, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    To minimize oxidative damage to the cell, malfunctioning mitochondria need to be removed by mitophagy. In neuronal axons, mitochondrial damage may occur in distal regions, far from the soma where most lysosomal degradation is thought to occur. In this paper, we report that PINK1 and Parkin, two Parkinson’s disease–associated proteins, mediate local mitophagy of dysfunctional mitochondria in neuronal axons. To reduce cytotoxicity and mimic physiological levels of mitochondrial damage, we selectively damaged a subset of mitochondria in hippocampal axons. Parkin was rapidly recruited to damaged mitochondria in axons followed by formation of LC3-positive autophagosomes and LAMP1-positive lysosomes. In PINK1−/− axons, damaged mitochondria did not accumulate Parkin and failed to be engulfed in autophagosomes. Similarly, initiation of mitophagy was blocked in Parkin−/− axons. Our findings demonstrate that the PINK1–Parkin-mediated pathway is required for local mitophagy in distal axons in response to focal damage. Local mitophagy likely provides rapid neuroprotection against oxidative stress without a requirement for retrograde transport to the soma. PMID:25154397

  9. Novel parkin mutations detected in patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Giroud-Benitez, José L; Akyol, Ali; Barbosa, Egberto; Schaap, Onno; van der Linde, Herma C; Martignoni, Emilia; Lopiano, Leonardo; Lamberti, Paolo; Fincati, Emiliana; Antonini, Angelo; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Montagna, Pasquale; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Marini, Paolo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Marconi, Roberto; Dalla Libera, Alessio; Trianni, Giorgio; Guidi, Marco; De Gaetano, Antonio; Boff Maegawa, Gustavo; De Leo, Antonino; Gallai, Virgilio; de Rosa, Giulia; Vanacore, Nicola; Meco, Giuseppe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Oostra, Ben A; Heutink, Peter; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2005-04-01

    A multiethnic series of patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOP) was studied to assess the frequency and nature of parkin/PARK2 gene mutations and to investigate phenotype-genotype relationships. Forty-six EOP probands with an onset age of < 45 years, and 14 affected relatives were ascertained from Italy, Brazil, Cuba, and Turkey. The genetic screening included direct sequencing and exon dosage using a new, cost-effective, real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Mutations were found in 33% of the indexes overall, and in 53% of those with family history compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Fifteen parkin alterations (10 exon deletions and five point mutations) were identified, including four novel mutations: Arg402Cys, Cys418Arg, IVS11-3C > G, and exon 8-9-10 deletion. Homozygous mutations, two heterozygous mutations, and a single heterozygous mutation were found in 8, 6, and 1 patient, respectively. Heterozygous exon deletions represented 28% of the mutant alleles. The patients with parkin mutations showed significantly earlier onset, longer disease duration, more frequently symmetric onset, and slower disease progression than the patients without mutations, in agreement with previous studies. This study confirms the frequent involvement of parkin and the importance of genetic testing in the diagnostic work-up of EOP.

  10. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5

    PubMed Central

    Nezich, Catherine L.; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy. PMID:26240184

  11. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Mi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Yong-ho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5’ adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1) ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2) intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3) 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR). HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA) plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins. PMID:26784190

  12. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF(hSel-10) ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  13. Dysregulation of Parkin-mediated mitophagy in thyroid Hürthle cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junguee; Ham, Sujin; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Soung Jung; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seong Eun; Chang, Joon Young; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Jin Man; Sul, Hae Joung; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Jo, Young Suk; Kim, Koon Soon; Shong, Young Kee; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Chung, Jong Kyeong; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Shong, Minho

    2015-11-01

    Abnormal accumulation of defective mitochondria is the hallmark of oncocytes, which are frequently observed in thyroid Hürthle cell lesions. Autophagy is an essential cellular catabolic mechanism for the degradation of dysfunctional organelles and has been implicated in several human diseases. It is yet unknown how autophagic turnover of defective mitochondria in Hürthle cell tumors is regulated. We characterized the expression patterns of molecular markers including Beclin1, LC3, PINK1 and Parkin, which are required for autophagy or mitophagy, in human oncocytic lesions of the thyroid. To undertake mechanistic studies, we investigated autophagy and mitophagy using XTC.UC1 cells, the only in vitro model of Hürthle cell tumors. Beclin1 and LC3 were highly expressed in oncocytes of Hürthle cell tumors. XTC.UC1 showed autophagic responses to starvation and rapamycin treatment, whereas they displayed ineffective activation of mitophagy, which is triggered by the coordinated action of PINK1 and Parkin in response to CCCP. This resulted in a decreased turnover of abnormal mitochondria. The mechanisms underlying defective mitophagy and mitochondrial turnover were investigated by genetic analysis of the PARK2 gene in XTC.UC1 and Hürthle cell tumor tissues. XTC.UC1 and several tumors harbored the V380L mutation, resulting in dysfunctional autoubiquitination and decreased E3 ligase activity. Consistently, oncocytes in Hürthle cell tumors displayed comparable expression of PINK1 but decreased Parkin expression in comparison to normal thyrocytes. The introduction of wild-type Parkin sensitized XTC.UC1 to death induced by CCCP. This study provides a possible etiological basis for oncocytic formation in heterogeneous Hürthle cell tumors through insufficient mitophagy leading to ineffective turnover of aberrant mitochondria caused by dysfunctional Parkin-mediated pathways of mitochondria quality control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  14. Evaluation of PARKIN gene variants in West Bengal Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Jaya; Jana, Arpita; Ghosh, Epsita; Banerjee, Tapas K; Chakraborty, Durga P; Rao, Vadlamudi R

    2015-09-01

    Little information is available regarding the molecular pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) among the Bengalee population in West Bengal, India. This study was undertaken to determine the contribution of Parkin variants in well-defined ethnically identical Bengalee population of India and further to describe the clinical spectrum associated with these mutations. A total of 150 unrelated PD patients and 150 controls were recruited for the study. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in all the 12 exons of the gene along with flanking splice junctions by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Eleven nucleotide variants including two novel changes were detected. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parkin protein expression of the novel mutation, Val186Ile (found in heterozygous condition in one patient only) was almost 2.7 folds lower than the controls and other PD patients. Molecular characterization of polymorphisms Ser167Asn and Val380Leu depicted that homozygous Ser167 and Val380 are significantly associated with the disease. We did not find any linkage disequilibrium among the SNPs, the low r(2) for every pair of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) indicated that these SNPs cannot be tagged by each other. Another novel intronic change, IVS8+48C>T was present in almost equally in PD patients and controls. Among the ethnically defined Bengalee population of West Bengal, occurrence of Parkin mutation is 4% (6/150) of the PD patient pool supported with decreased folds of expression of CSF PARKIN protein. Parkin polymorphisms, Ser167 and Val380 are risk factors for the progression of the disease, and their frequency is greatly influenced by ethnic origin.

  15. Genome Screen to Identify Susceptibility Genes for Parkinson Disease in a Sample without parkin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Nichols, William C.; Uniacke, Sean K.; Halter, Cheryl; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Cliff; Conneally, P. Michael; Foroud, Tatiana

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscular rigidity, and postural instability, as well as by a clinically significant response to treatment with levodopa. Mutations in the α-synuclein gene have been found to result in autosomal dominant PD, and mutations in the parkin gene produce autosomal recessive juvenile-onset PD. We have studied 203 sibling pairs with PD who were evaluated by a rigorous neurological assessment based on (a) inclusion criteria consisting of clinical features highly associated with autopsy-confirmed PD and (b) exclusion criteria highly associated with other, non-PD pathological diagnoses. Families with positive LOD scores for a marker in an intron of the parkin gene were prioritized for parkin-gene testing, and mutations in the parkin gene were identified in 22 families. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, these families were not included in subsequent genome-screen analysis. Thus, a total of 160 multiplex families without evidence of a parkin mutation were used in multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis to identify PD-susceptibility genes. Two models of PD affection status were considered: model I included only those individuals with a more stringent diagnosis of verified PD (96 sibling pairs from 90 families), whereas model II included all examined individuals as affected, regardless of their final diagnostic classification (170 sibling pairs from 160 families). Under model I, the highest LOD scores were observed on chromosome X (LOD score 2.1) and on chromosome 2 (LOD score 1.9). Analyses performed with all available sibling pairs (model II) found even greater evidence of linkage to chromosome X (LOD score 2.7) and to chromosome 2 (LOD score 2.5). Evidence of linkage was also found to chromosomes 4, 5, and 13 (LOD scores >1.5). Our findings are consistent with those of other linkage studies that have reported linkage to chromosomes 5 and X. PMID:12058349

  16. Involvement of PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy in ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Limin; Wang, Jianfeng; Chen, Aijie; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Shao, Longquan

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in biological materials, the neurotoxicity caused by these particles has raised serious concerns. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the toxic effect of ZnO NPs on brain cells remain unclear. Mitochondrial damage has been reported to be a factor in the toxicity of ZnO NPs. PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy is a newly emerging additional function of autophagy that selectively degrades impaired mitochondria. Here, a PINK1 gene knockdown BV-2 cell model was established to determine whether PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy was involved in ZnO NP-induced toxicity in BV-2 cells. The expression of total parkin, mito-parkin, cyto-parkin, and PINK1 both in wild type and PINK1−/− BV-2 cells was evaluated using Western blot analysis after the cells were exposed to 10 μg/mL of 50 nm ZnO NPs for 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. The findings suggested that the downregulation of PINK1 resulted in a significant reduction in the survival rate after ZnO NP exposure compared with that of control cells. ZnO NPs were found to induce the transportation of parkin from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria, implying the involvement of mitophagy in ZnO NP-induced toxicity. The deletion of the PINK1 gene inhibited the recruitment of parkin to the mitochondria, causing failure of the cell to trigger mitophagy. The present study demonstrated that apart from autophagy, PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy plays a protective role in ZnO NP-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:28331313

  17. PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and stimulates Parkin E3 ligase activity by phosphorylating Serine 65

    PubMed Central

    Kondapalli, Chandana; Kazlauskaite, Agne; Zhang, Ning; Woodroof, Helen I.; Campbell, David G.; Gourlay, Robert; Burchell, Lynn; Walden, Helen; Macartney, Thomas J.; Deak, Maria; Knebel, Axel; Alessi, Dario R.; Muqit, Miratul M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Missense mutations in PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) cause autosomal-recessive inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). We have exploited our recent discovery that recombinant insect PINK1 is catalytically active to test whether PINK1 directly phosphorylates 15 proteins encoded by PD-associated genes as well as proteins reported to bind PINK1. We have discovered that insect PINK1 efficiently phosphorylates only one of these proteins, namely the E3 ligase Parkin. We have mapped the phosphorylation site to a highly conserved residue within the Ubl domain of Parkin at Ser65. We show that human PINK1 is specifically activated by mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) depolarization, enabling it to phosphorylate Parkin at Ser65. We further show that phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65 leads to marked activation of its E3 ligase activity that is prevented by mutation of Ser65 or inactivation of PINK1. We provide evidence that once activated, PINK1 autophosphorylates at several residues, including Thr257, which is accompanied by an electrophoretic mobility band-shift. These results provide the first evidence that PINK1 is activated following Δψm depolarization and suggest that PINK1 directly phosphorylates and activates Parkin. Our findings indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65 and/or PINK1 at Thr257 represent the first biomarkers for examining activity of the PINK1-Parkin signalling pathway in vivo. Our findings also suggest that small molecule activators of Parkin that mimic the effect of PINK1 phosphorylation may confer therapeutic benefit for PD. PMID:22724072

  18. HSP72 Is a Mitochondrial Stress Sensor Critical for Parkin Action, Oxidative Metabolism, and Insulin Sensitivity in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Brian G.; Ribas, Vicente; Le, Jamie A.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Phun, Jennifer; Zhou, Zhenqi; Soleymani, Teo; Daraei, Pedram; Sitz, Daniel; Vergnes, Laurent; Wanagat, Jonathan; Reue, Karen; Febbraio, Mark A.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased heat shock protein (HSP) 72 expression in skeletal muscle prevents obesity and glucose intolerance in mice, although the underlying mechanisms of this observation are largely unresolved. Herein we show that HSP72 is a critical regulator of stress-induced mitochondrial triage signaling since Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate mitophagy, was unable to ubiquitinate and control its own protein expression or that of its central target mitofusin (Mfn) in the absence of HSP72. In wild-type cells, we show that HSP72 rapidly translocates to depolarized mitochondria prior to Parkin recruitment and immunoprecipitates with both Parkin and Mfn2 only after specific mitochondrial insult. In HSP72 knockout mice, impaired Parkin action was associated with retention of enlarged, dysmorphic mitochondria and paralleled by reduced muscle respiratory capacity, lipid accumulation, and muscle insulin resistance. Reduced oxygen consumption and impaired insulin action were recapitulated in Parkin-null myotubes, confirming a role for the HSP72-Parkin axis in the regulation of muscle insulin sensitivity. These data suggest that strategies to maintain HSP72 may provide therapeutic benefit to enhance mitochondrial quality and insulin action to ameliorate complications associated with metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:24379352

  19. HSP72 is a mitochondrial stress sensor critical for Parkin action, oxidative metabolism, and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Drew, Brian G; Ribas, Vicente; Le, Jamie A; Henstridge, Darren C; Phun, Jennifer; Zhou, Zhenqi; Soleymani, Teo; Daraei, Pedram; Sitz, Daniel; Vergnes, Laurent; Wanagat, Jonathan; Reue, Karen; Febbraio, Mark A; Hevener, Andrea L

    2014-05-01

    Increased heat shock protein (HSP) 72 expression in skeletal muscle prevents obesity and glucose intolerance in mice, although the underlying mechanisms of this observation are largely unresolved. Herein we show that HSP72 is a critical regulator of stress-induced mitochondrial triage signaling since Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate mitophagy, was unable to ubiquitinate and control its own protein expression or that of its central target mitofusin (Mfn) in the absence of HSP72. In wild-type cells, we show that HSP72 rapidly translocates to depolarized mitochondria prior to Parkin recruitment and immunoprecipitates with both Parkin and Mfn2 only after specific mitochondrial insult. In HSP72 knockout mice, impaired Parkin action was associated with retention of enlarged, dysmorphic mitochondria and paralleled by reduced muscle respiratory capacity, lipid accumulation, and muscle insulin resistance. Reduced oxygen consumption and impaired insulin action were recapitulated in Parkin-null myotubes, confirming a role for the HSP72-Parkin axis in the regulation of muscle insulin sensitivity. These data suggest that strategies to maintain HSP72 may provide therapeutic benefit to enhance mitochondrial quality and insulin action to ameliorate complications associated with metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

  20. Parkin regulates Eg5 expression by Hsp70 ubiquitination-dependent inactivation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Aneja, Ritu; Sun, Xiaodong; Xie, Songbo; Wang, Hongxia; Wu, Xiaojing; Dong, Jin-Tang; Li, Minggang; Joshi, Harish C; Zhou, Jun

    2008-12-19

    Eg5 is a motor protein of the kinesin family that is critical for spindle assembly during mitosis and has recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. It is largely unknown how Eg5 expression is regulated in cells. In this study, we present the first evidence that the cellular Eg5 level is down-regulated by Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase well known for its role in the development of Parkinson disease. Our data show that Parkin does not trigger Eg5 protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Instead, Parkin represses Eg5 gene transcription by blocking c-Jun binding to the activator protein 1 site present in the Eg5 promoter. Our data further show that Parkin inactivates c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of c-Jun. The inactivation of JNK is further mediated by multiple monoubiquitination of Hsp70. Importantly, both the ubiquitination of Hsp70 and the subsequent inactivation of the JNK-c-Jun pathway are crucial for Parkin to down-regulate Eg5 expression. These results thus uncover a novel function for Parkin in modulating the expression of Eg5 through the Hsp70-JNK-c-Jun signaling pathway.

  1. Proteomic analysis of increased Parkin expression and its interactants provides evidence for a role in modulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Davison, Eleanor J; Pennington, Kyla; Hung, Chao-Chun; Peng, Jianhe; Rafiq, Rumana; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H; Ardley, Helen C; Banks, Rosamonde E; Robinson, Philip A

    2009-09-01

    Parkin is an ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3), mutations of which cause juvenile onset - autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease, and result in reduced enzymic activity. In contrast, increased levels are protective against mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, the mechanism of which is largely unknown. In this study, 2-DE and MS proteomic techniques were utilised to investigate the effects of increased Parkin levels on protein expression in whole cell lysates using in an inducible Parkin expression system in HEK293 cells, and also to isolate potential interactants of Parkin using tandem affinity purification and MS. Nine proteins were significantly differentially expressed (+/-2-fold change; p<0.05) using 2-DE analysis. MS revealed the identity of these proteins to be ACAT2, HNRNPK, HSPD1, PGK1, PRDX6, VCL, VIM, TPI1, and IMPDH2. The first seven of these were reduced in expression. Western blot analysis confirmed the reduction in one of these proteins (HNRNPK), and that its levels were dependent on 26S proteasomal activity. Tandem affinity purification/MS revealed 14 potential interactants of Parkin; CKB, DBT, HSPD1, HSPA9, LRPPRC, NDUFS2, PRDX6, SLC25A5, TPI1, UCHL1, UQCRC1, VCL, YWHAZ, YWHAE. Nine of these are directly involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism and glycolysis; four were also identified in the 2-DE study (HSP60, PRDX6, TPI1, and VCL). This study provides further evidence for a role for Parkin in regulating mitochondrial activity within cells.

  2. S-Nitrosylation of parkin as a novel regulator of p53-mediated neuronal cell death in sporadic Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene encoding parkin, a neuroprotective protein with dual functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor of p53, are linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that oxidative posttranslational modification of parkin by environmental toxins may contribute to sporadic PD. Results We first demonstrated that S-nitrosylation of parkin decreased its activity as a repressor of p53 gene expression, leading to upregulation of p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation as well as gel-shift assays showed that parkin bound to the p53 promoter, and this binding was inhibited by S-nitrosylation of parkin. Additionally, nitrosative stress induced apoptosis in cells expressing parkin, and this death was, at least in part, dependent upon p53. In primary mesencephalic cultures, pesticide-induced apoptosis was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In a mouse model of pesticide-induced PD, both S-nitrosylated (SNO-)parkin and p53 protein levels were increased, while administration of a NOS inhibitor mitigated neuronal death in these mice. Moreover, the levels of SNO-parkin and p53 were simultaneously elevated in postmortem human PD brain compared to controls. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that S-nitrosylation of parkin, leading to p53-mediated neuronal cell death, contributes to the pathophysiology of sporadic PD. PMID:23985028

  3. Parkin disease in a Brazilian kindred: Manifesting heterozygotes and clinical follow-up over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naheed L; Horta, Wagner; Eunson, Louise; Graham, Elizabeth; Johnson, Janel O; Chang, Shannon; Davis, Mary; Singleton, Andrew; Wood, Nicholas W; Lees, Andrew J

    2005-04-01

    We report on a large Brazilian kindred with young-onset parkinsonism due to either a homozygous or heterozygous mutation in parkin. A total of 6 members were affected: 5 were homozygous and 1 heterozygous for a deletion in exon 4. Two other heterozygotes also had extrapyramidal signs. All affected subjects showed characteristic features of parkin disease with foot dystonia and an excellent response to levodopa complicated by motor fluctuations and dyskinesia within 3 years of therapy. Careful clinical follow-up over 10 years showed the phenotype was similar in all the homozygotes with asymmetrical limb bradykinesia and early walking difficulties. Some acceleration of disability was observed in some of the cases as they entered the third decade of illness, but dementia was absent.

  4. USP30 deubiquitylates mitochondrial Parkin substrates and restricts apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin-Rui; Martinez, Aitor; Lane, Jon D; Mayor, Ugo; Clague, Michael J; Urbé, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in the orchestration of cell death pathways. Here, we show that the control of ubiquitin dynamics at mitochondria contributes to the regulation of apoptotic cell death. The unique mitochondrial deubiquitylase, USP30, opposes Parkin-dependent ubiquitylation of TOM20, and its depletion enhances depolarization-induced cell death in Parkin-overexpressing cells. Importantly, USP30 also regulates BAX/BAK-dependent apoptosis, and its depletion sensitizes cancer cells to BH3-mimetics. These results provide the first evidence for a fundamental role of USP30 in determining the threshold for mitochondrial cell death and suggest USP30 as a potential target for combinatorial anti-cancer therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  6. Counteracting PINK/Parkin Deficiency in the Activation of Mitophagy: A Potential Therapeutic Intervention for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nardin, Alice; Schrepfer, Emilie; Ziviani, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) related genes PINK1, a protein kinase [1], and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase [2], operate within the same pathway [3-5], which controls, via specific elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria, the quality of the organelle network [6]. Parkin translocates to impaired mitochondria and drives their elimination via autophagy, a process known as mitophagy [6]. PINK1 regulates Parkin translocation through a not yet completely understood mechanism [7, 8]. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mitofusin (MFN), VDAC, Fis1 and TOM20 were found to be targets for Parkin mediated ubiquitination [9-11]. By adding ubiquitin molecules to its targets expressed on mitochondria, Parkin tags and selects dysfunctional mitochondria for clearance, contributing to maintain a functional and healthy mitochondrial network. Abnormal accumulation of misfolded proteins and unfunctional mitochondria is a characteristic hallmark of PD pathology. Therefore a therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of misfolded proteins and potentiate the ubiquitin-proteosome system (UPS) could be instrumental to ameliorate the progression of the disease. Recently, much effort has been put to identify specific de-ubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) that oppose Parkin in the ubiquitination of its targets. Similar to other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and acetylation, ubiquitination is also a reversible modification, mediated by a large family of DUBs [12]. DUBs inhibitors or activators can affect cellular response to stimuli that induce mitophagy via ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins MFN, VDAC, Fis1 and TOM20. In this respect, the identification of a Parkin-opposing DUB in the regulation of mitophagy, might be instrumental to develop specific isopeptidase inhibitors or activators that can modulate the fundamental biological process of mitochondria clearance and impact on cell survival. PMID:26517048

  7. A comprehensive computational study on pathogenic mis-sense mutations spanning the RING2 and REP domains of Parkin protein.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ria; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-04-30

    Various mutations in PARK2 gene, which encodes the protein parkin, are significantly associated with the onset of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson (ARJP) in neuronal cells. Parkin is a multi domain protein, the N-terminal part contains the Ubl and the C-terminal part consists of four zinc coordinating domains, viz., RING0, RING1, in between ring (IBR) and RING2. Disease mutations are spread over all the domains of Parkin, although mutations in some regions may affect the functionality of Parkin more adversely. The mutations in the RING2 domain are seen to abolish the neuroprotective E3 ligase activity of Parkin. In this current work, we carried out detailed in silico analysis to study the extent of pathogenicity of mutations spanning the Parkin RING2 domain and the adjoining REP region by SIFT, Mutation Accessor, PolyPhen2, SNPs and GO, GV/GD and I-mutant. To study the structural and functional implications of these mutations on RING2-REP domain of Parkin, we studied the solvent accessibility (SASA/RSA), hydrophobicity, intra-molecular hydrogen bonding profile and domain analysis by various computational tools. Finally, we analysed the interaction energy profiles of the mutants and compared them to the wild type protein using Discovery studio 2.5. By comparing the various analyses it could be safely concluded that except P437L and A379V mutations, all other mutations were potentially deleterious affecting various structural aspects of RING2 domain architecture. This study is based purely on computational approach which has the potential to identify disease mutations and the information could further be used in treatment of diseases and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial proteolytic stress induced by loss of mortalin function is rescued by Parkin and PINK1

    PubMed Central

    Burbulla, L F; Fitzgerald, J C; Stegen, K; Westermeier, J; Thost, A-K; Kato, H; Mokranjac, D; Sauerwald, J; Martins, L M; Woitalla, D; Rapaport, D; Riess, O; Proikas-Cezanne, T; Rasse, T M; Krüger, R

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial chaperone mortalin was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of its reduced levels in the brains of PD patients and disease-associated rare genetic variants that failed to rescue impaired mitochondrial integrity in cellular knockdown models. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mortalin-related neurodegeneration, we dissected the cellular surveillance mechanisms related to mitochondrial quality control, defined the effects of reduced mortalin function at the molecular and cellular levels and investigated the functional interaction of mortalin with Parkin and PINK1, two PD-related proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that reduced mortalin function leads to: (1) activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), (2) increased susceptibility towards intramitochondrial proteolytic stress, (3) increased autophagic degradation of fragmented mitochondria and (4) reduced mitochondrial mass in human cells in vitro and ex vivo. These alterations caused increased vulnerability toward apoptotic cell death. Proteotoxic perturbations induced by either partial loss of mortalin or chemical induction were rescued by complementation with native mortalin, but not disease-associated mortalin variants, and were independent of the integrity of autophagic pathways. However, Parkin and PINK1 rescued loss of mortalin phenotypes via increased lysosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance and required intact autophagic machinery. Our results on loss of mortalin function reveal a direct link between impaired mitochondrial proteostasis, UPR(mt) and PD and show that effective removal of dysfunctional mitochondria via either genetic (PINK1 and Parkin overexpression) or pharmacological intervention (rapamycin) may compensate mitochondrial phenotypes. PMID:24743735

  9. Defining the ends of Parkin exon 4 deletions in two different families with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clarimon, Jordi; Johnson, Janel; Dogu, Okan; Horta, Wagner; Khan, Naheed; Lees, Andrew J; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew

    2005-02-05

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP, PARK2) is characterized by an early onset parkinsonism, often presenting with dystonia as an early feature. Mutations in Parkin are a relatively common cause of AR-JP and are estimated to be present in approximately 30% of familial young onset Parkinson disease (PD) [Abbas et al. (1999); Hum Mol Genet 8:567-574]. These mutations include exon rearrangements (deletions and duplications), point mutations, and small deletions. Similar genomic mutations have been described in unrelated patients, thereby indicating independent mutational events or ancient founder effects. We have identified homozygous deletion mutations of exon 4 in Parkin in two unrelated families, one from Brazil and the other from Turkey [Dogu et al. (2004); Mov Dis 9:812-816; Khan et al., Mov Dis, in press]. We have performed molecular analysis of the deletion breakpoints and this data indicates these mutations originated independently. We present here data demonstrating that the mutation responsible for disease in the Brazilian kindred consists of two separate deletions (1,069 and 1,750 bp) surrounding and including exon 4. The deletion removing parkin exon 4 identified in the Turkish family extended 156,203 bp. In addition to demonstrating that disease in these families is not caused by a single founder mutation, these data show that there is no common fragile site between these mutational events.

  10. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  11. High nigral iron deposition in LRRK2 and Parkin mutation carriers using R2* relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Sharman, Michael; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Valabregue, Romain; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Poupon, Fabrice; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Siebner, Hartwig; Klebe, Stephan; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Lehéricy, Stephane

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate iron deposition in the basal ganglia and thalamus in symptomatic and asymptomatic leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and Parkin-associated Parkinson's disease (PD), using R2* relaxometry rate. Twenty subjects with genetic PD (four symptomatic and two asymptomatic Parkin subjects, nine symptomatic and five asymptomatic LRRK2 subjects) were compared with 20 patients with idiopathic PD (IPD) and 20 healthy subjects. Images were obtained at 3 teslas, using multi-echo T2 and T2* sequences. R2 and R2* values were calculated in the substantia nigra (SN), the striatum, the globus pallidus, and the thalamus. The R2* values in the SN were increased in IPD and mutation-carrying patients as compared with controls and in mutation-carrying patients as compared with IPD. Asymptomatic mutation carriers showed higher R2* values than controls and did not differ from IPD patients. No changes were seen in the other structures or in R2 values. These results are consistent with increased iron load in LRRK2- and Parkin-mutation carriers. The increased R2* in asymptomatic PD-mutation carriers suggests that iron deposition occurs early during the preclinical phase of the disease. R2* measurements may be used as markers for investigating nigrostriatal damage in preclinical mutation-carrying patients. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. PINK1, Parkin, and Mitochondrial Quality Control: What can we Learn about Parkinson’s Disease Pathobiology?

    PubMed Central

    Truban, Dominika; Hou, Xu; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical description of Parkinson’s disease (PD) will embrace its two century anniversary in 2017. For the past 30 years, mitochondrial dysfunction has been hypothesized to play a central role in the pathobiology of this devastating neurodegenerative disease. The identifications of mutations in genes encoding PINK1 (PTEN-induced kinase 1) and Parkin (E3 ubiquitin ligase) in familial PD and their functional association with mitochondrial quality control provided further support to this hypothesis. Recent research focused mainly on their key involvement in the clearance of damaged mitochondria, a process known as mitophagy. It has become evident that there are many other aspects of this complex regulated, multifaceted pathway that provides neuroprotection. As such, numerous additional factors that impact PINK1/Parkin have already been identified including genes involved in other forms of PD. A great pathogenic overlap amongst different forms of familial, environmental and even sporadic disease is emerging that potentially converges at the level of mitochondrial quality control. Tremendous efforts now seek to further detail the roles and exploit PINK1 and Parkin, their upstream regulators and downstream signaling pathways for future translation. This review summarizes the latest findings on PINK1/Parkin-directed mitochondrial quality control, its integration and cross-talk with other disease factors and pathways as well as the implications for idiopathic PD. In addition, we highlight novel avenues for the development of biomarkers and disease-modifying therapies that are based on a detailed understanding of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. PMID:27911343

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways of mitophagy during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianghong; Yuan, Du; Sun, Qian; Xu, Li; Lee, Emma; Lewis, Anthony J; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Rosengart, Matthew R

    2017-10-01

    During sepsis and shock states, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs. Consequently, adaptive mechanisms, such as fission, fusion, and mitophagy, are induced to eliminate damaged portions or entire dysfunctional mitochondria. The regulatory PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways are strongly induced by mitochondrial depolarization, although a direct link between loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and mitophagy has not been identified. Mitochondria also buffer Ca(2+), and their buffering capacity is dependent on ΔΨ Here, we characterize a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) I in the regulation of these mechanisms. Loss of ΔΨ with either pharmacologic depolarization or LPS leads to Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial recruitment and activation of CaMKI that precedes the colocalization of PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1. CaMKI is required and serves as both a PINK1 and Parkin kinase. The mechanisms operate in both immune and nonimmune cells and are induced in in vivo models of endotoxemia, sepsis, and hemorrhagic shock. These data support the idea that CaMKI links mitochondrial stress with the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 mechanisms of mitophagy.-Zhang, X., Yuan, D., Sun, Q., Xu, L., Lee, E., Lewis, A. J., Zuckerbraun, B. S., Rosengart, M. R. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the PINK1/Parkin and DJ-1 pathways of mitophagy during sepsis. © FASEB.

  14. VCP is essential for mitochondrial quality control by PINK1/Parkin and this function is impaired by VCP mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Chul; Tresse, Emilie; Kolaitis, Regina M.; Molliex, Amandine; Thomas, Ruth E.; Alami, Nael H.; Wang, Bo; Joshi, Aashish; Smith, Rebecca B.; Ritson, Gillian P.; Winborn, Brett J.; Moore, Jennifer; Lee, Joo-Yong; Yao, Tso-Pang; Pallanck, Leo; Kundu, Mondira; Taylor, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in VCP cause multisystem degeneration impacting the nervous system, muscle, and/or bone. Patients may present with ALS, Parkinsonism, frontotemporal dementia, myopathy, Paget’s disease or a combination of these. The disease mechanism is unknown. We developed a Drosophila model of VCP mutation-dependent degeneration. The phenotype is reminiscent of PINK1 and parkin mutants, including a pronounced mitochondrial defect. Indeed, VCP interacts genetically with the PINK1/parkin pathway in vivo. Paradoxically, VCP complements PINK1 deficiency but not parkin deficiency. The basis of this paradox is resolved by mechanistic studies in vitro showing that VCP recruitment to damaged mitochondria requires Parkin-mediated ubiquitination of mitochondrial targets. VCP recruitment coincides temporally with mitochondrial fission, and VCP is required for proteasome-dependent degradation of Mitofusins in vitro and in vivo. Further, VCP and its adaptor Npl4/Ufd1 are required for clearance of damaged mitochondria via the PINK1/Parkin pathway, and this is impaired by pathogenic mutations in VCP. PMID:23498974

  15. Differentiating symptomatic Parkin mutations carriers from patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease: contribution of automated segmentation neuroimaging method.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Basar; Bayram, Ali; Arslan, Ali Bilgin; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Dursun, Burcu; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat; Lohmann, Ebba

    2012-06-01

    Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are the predominant cause of autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Characteristic features include: early onset symptoms with slow clinical course, good response to low doses of levodopa, and frequently treatment-induced dyskinesia. Studies using a voxel-based morphometry approach showed a decrease in the gray matter volume of the basal ganglia in mutation carriers during the symptomatic stages. A bilateral, presumably compensatory increase of basal ganglia gray matter value was recently demonstrated in asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers. Behavioral disorders including: anxiety, psychosis, panic attacks, depression, disturbed sexual, behavioral and obsessive-compulsive disorders have been reported in these patients. A total of 28 Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients consisting of 10 Young-Onset without Parkin mutations (YOPD), 9 Young-Onset with Parkin mutations (YOPD-p), 9 Late-Onset without Parkin mutations (LOPD) and 32 healthy control subjects were studied with an automated volumetric assessment method to quantify subcortical atrophy. Patients but not controls also underwent a neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric assessment. Results revealed a reduction of bilateral caudate nuclei volumes in YOPD-p patients compared to the YOPD patients while there were no statistically significant differences between other groups. YOPD-p patients showed similar results to other patient groups on neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological evaluation measures. YOPD-p and YOPD patients showed a different pattern of volume changes in basal ganglia. Despite its relatively benign clinical course, carrying the Parkin mutation seems to be associated with greater atrophy in subcortical structures. Failure of compensatory mechanisms, different mutation types and pathophysiologic processes may underlie this diverse pattern of subcortical brain changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Different dynamic movements of wild-type and pathogenic VCPs and their cofactors to damaged mitochondria in a Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoko; Fukushi, Junpei; Hori, Seiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Okatsu, Kei; Kakiyama, Yukie; Kawawaki, Junko; Kakizuka, Akira; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    VCP/p97 is a hexameric ring-shaped AAA(+) ATPase that participates in various ubiquitin-associated cellular functions. Mis-sense mutations in VCP gene are associated with the pathogenesis of two inherited diseases: inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and front-temporal dementia (IBMPFD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These pathogenic VCPs have higher affinities for several cofactors, including Npl4, Ufd1 and p47. In Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control systems, VCP migrates to damaged mitochondria (e.g., those treated with uncouplers) to aid in the degradation of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and to eliminate mitochondria. We showed that endogenous Npl4 and p47 also migrate to mitochondria after uncoupler treatment, and Npl4, Ufd1 or p47 silencing causes defective mitochondria clearance after uncoupler treatment. Moreover, pathogenic VCPs show impaired migration to mitochondria, and the exogenous pathogenic VCP expression partially inhibits Npl4 and p47 localization to mitochondria. These results suggest that the increased affinities of pathogenic VCPs for these cofactors cause the impaired movement of pathogenic VCPs. In adult flies, exogenous expression of wild-type VCP, but not pathogenic VCPs, reduces the number of abnormal mitochondria in muscles. Failure of pathogenic VCPs to function on damaged mitochondria may be related to the pathogenesis of IBMPFD and ALS.

  17. Endogenous Klebsiella pneumoniae endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenpeng; Zhou, Haijiang; Li, Chunsheng

    2014-10-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia is a common human pathogen, and endogenous endophthalmitis is a vision-threatening infection presentedwith pain, redness, decreased vision acuity, and intraocular inflammation. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is uncommon and usually happens in patients with immunosuppression conditions. Diabetes is a predisposing risk factor, and liver abscess is a major source of Klebsiella pneumonia endogenous endophthalmitis (KPEE). Here, we report a case of KPEE in a patient who lost his vision in one eye after treatment.

  18. Are endogenous feline leukemia viruses really endogenous?

    PubMed

    Stewart, H; Jarrett, O; Hosie, M J; Willett, B J

    2011-10-15

    Full length endogenous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviruses exist within the genomes of many breeds of domestic cat raising the possibility that they may also exist in a transmissible exogenous form. Such viruses would share receptor usage with the recombinant FeLV-B subgroup, a viral subgroup that arises in vivo by recombination between exogenous subgroup A virus (FeLV-A) and endogenous FeLV. Accordingly, all isolates of FeLV-B made to date have contained a "helper" FeLV-A, consistent with their recombinatorial origin. In order to assess whether endogenous viruses are transmitted between cats, we examined primary isolates of FeLV for which the viral subgroup had been determined for the presence of a subgroup B virus that lacked an FeLV-A. Here we describe the identification of two primary field isolates of FeLV (2518 and 4314) that appeared to contain subgroup B virus only by classical interference assays, raising the possibility of between-host transmission of endogenous FeLV. Sequencing of the env gene and U3 region of the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) confirmed that both viral genomes contained endogenous viral env genes. However the viral 3' LTRs appeared exogenous in origin with a putative 3' recombination breakpoint residing at the 3' end of the env gene. Further, the FeLV-2518 virions also co-packaged a truncated FeLV-A genome containing a defective env gene, termed FeLV-2518(A) whilst no helper subgroup A viral genome was detected in virions of FeLV-4314. The acquisition of an exogenous LTR by the endogenous FeLV in 4314 may have allowed a recombinant FeLV variant to outgrow an exogenous FeLV-A virus that was presumably present during first infection. Given time, a similar evolution may also occur within the 2518 isolate. The data suggest that endogenous FeLVs may be mobilised by acquisition of exogenous LTRs yielding novel viruses that type biologically as FeLV-B. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PINK1 and Parkin control localized translation of respiratory chain component mRNAs on mitochondria outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao; Klinkenberg, Michael; Sun, Yaping; Auburger, Georg; Guo, Su; Lu, Bingwei

    2015-01-06

    Mitochondria play essential roles in many aspects of biology, and their dysfunction has been linked to diverse diseases. Central to mitochondrial function is oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), accomplished by respiratory chain complexes (RCCs) encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. How RCC biogenesis is regulated in metazoans is poorly understood. Here we show that Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated genes PINK1 and Parkin direct localized translation of certain nuclear-encoded RCC (nRCC) mRNAs. Translationally repressed nRCC mRNAs are localized in a PINK1/Tom20-dependent manner to mitochondrial outer membrane, where they are derepressed and activated by PINK1/Parkin through displacement of translation repressors, including Pumilio and Glorund/hnRNP-F, a Parkin substrate, and enhanced binding of activators such as eIF4G. Inhibiting the translation repressors rescued nRCC mRNA translation and neuromuscular-degeneration phenotypes of PINK1 mutant, whereas inhibiting eIF4G had opposite effects. Our results reveal previously unknown functions of PINK1/Parkin in RNA metabolism and suggest new approaches to mitochondrial restoration and disease intervention.

  20. A Rab5 endosomal pathway mediates Parkin-dependent mitochondrial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Hammerling, Babette C.; Najor, Rita H.; Cortez, Melissa Q.; Shires, Sarah E.; Leon, Leonardo J.; Gonzalez, Eileen R.; Boassa, Daniela; Phan, Sébastien; Thor, Andrea; Jimenez, Rebecca E.; Li, Hong; Kitsis, Richard N.; Dorn II, Gerald W.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Ellisman, Mark H.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2017-01-01

    Damaged mitochondria pose a lethal threat to cells that necessitates their prompt removal. The currently recognized mechanism for disposal of mitochondria is autophagy, where damaged organelles are marked for disposal via ubiquitylation by Parkin. Here we report a novel pathway for mitochondrial elimination, in which these organelles undergo Parkin-dependent sequestration into Rab5-positive early endosomes via the ESCRT machinery. Following maturation, these endosomes deliver mitochondria to lysosomes for degradation. Although this endosomal pathway is activated by stressors that also activate mitochondrial autophagy, endosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance is initiated before autophagy. The autophagy protein Beclin1 regulates activation of Rab5 and endosomal-mediated degradation of mitochondria, suggesting cross-talk between these two pathways. Abrogation of Rab5 function and the endosomal pathway results in the accumulation of stressed mitochondria and increases susceptibility to cell death in embryonic fibroblasts and cardiac myocytes. These data reveal a new mechanism for mitochondrial quality control mediated by Rab5 and early endosomes. PMID:28134239

  1. Effects of cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces human parkinsonism, in parkin knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Menéndez, J; Casarejos, M J; Solano, R M; Gallego, E; Sánchez, M; Mena, M A; García de Yebenes, J

    2005-08-01

    Cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces parkinsonism in humans, induces behavioural changes such as alopecia, buco-lingual dyskinesia and reduction of motor activity in female parkin knock out (PK-KO) mice but not in wild-type (WT) controls. PK-KO mice have high striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine metabolism in spite of low reduced tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Cinnarizine, which blocks dopamine receptors and increases dopamine release, further increased dopamine metabolism. PK-KO mice increased GSH levels as a compensatory mechanism against enhanced free radical production related to acceleration of dopamine turnover. Neuronal markers, such as beta-tubulin slightly increased in PK-KO and furthermore with cinnarizine. Astroglial markers were decreased in PK-KO mice, and this effect was potentiated by cinnarizine, suggesting abnormal glia in these animals. Microglia was hyperactivated in PK-KO midbrain, suggesting inflammation in these animals. Proapoptotic proteins were increased by cinnarizine and, to a lesser extent, in PK-KO mice. Our data indicate that mutation of parkin is a risk factor for drug-induced parkinsonism.

  2. Syntaxin-17 delivers PINK1/parkin-dependent mitochondrial vesicles to the endolysosomal system

    PubMed Central

    McLelland, Gian-Luca

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are considered autonomous organelles, physically separated from endocytic and biosynthetic pathways. However, recent work uncovered a PINK1/parkin-dependent vesicle transport pathway wherein oxidized or damaged mitochondrial content are selectively delivered to the late endosome/lysosome for degradation, providing evidence that mitochondria are indeed integrated within the endomembrane system. Given that mitochondria have not been shown to use canonical soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) machinery for fusion, the mechanism by which mitochondrial-derived vesicles (MDVs) are targeted to the endosomal compartment has remained unclear. In this study, we identify syntaxin-17 as a core mitochondrial SNARE required for the delivery of stress-induced PINK1/parkin-dependent MDVs to the late endosome/lysosome. Syntaxin-17 remains associated with mature MDVs and forms a ternary SNARE complex with SNAP29 and VAMP7 to mediate MDV–endolysosome fusion in a manner dependent on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) tethering complex. Syntaxin-17 can be traced to the last eukaryotic common ancestor, hinting that the removal of damaged mitochondrial content may represent one of the earliest vesicle transport routes in the cell. PMID:27458136

  3. Parkin Protects Against LRRK2 G2019S Mutant-induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee-Hoe; Mok, Shaun Z.S.; Koh, Cherlyn; Ouyang, Xuezhi; Fivaz, Marc L.; Tan, Eng-King; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Yu, Fengwei; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinas e 2 (LRRK2) gene are currently recognized as the most common genetic cause of parkinsonism. Among the large number of LRRK2 mutations identified to date, the G2019S variant is the most common. In Asia however, another LRRK2 variant, G2385R, appears to occur more frequently. To better understand the contribution of different LRRK2 variants towards disease pathogenesis, we generated transgenic Drosophila over-expressing various human LRRK2 alleles, including wild type, G2019S, Y1699C and G2385R LRRK2. We found that transgenic flies harboring G2019S, Y1699C or G2385R LRRK2 variant, but not the wild type protein, exhibit late-onset loss of DA neurons in selected clusters that is accompanied by locomotion deficits. Further, LRRK2 mutant flies also display reduced lifespan and increased sensitivity to rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. Importantly, co-expression of human parkin in LRRK2 G2019S-expressing flies provides significant protection against DA neurodegeneration that occurs with age or in response to rotenone. Taken together, our results suggest a potential link between LRRK2, parkin and mitochondria in the pathogenesis of LRRK2-related parkinsonism. PMID:19741132

  4. Possible human endogenous cryogens.

    PubMed

    Shido, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi

    2011-06-01

    Anapyrexia, which is a regulated fall in core temperature, is beneficial for animals and humans when the oxygen supply is limited, e.g., hypoxic, ischemic, or histotoxic hypoxia, since at low body temperature the tissues require less oxygen due to Q(10). Besides hypoxia, anapyrexia can be induced various exogenous and endogenous substances, named cryogens. However, there are only a few reports investigating endogenous cryogens in mammals. We have experienced one patient who suffered from severe hypothermia. The patient seemed to be excessively producing endogenous peptidergic cryogenic substances the molecular weight of which may be greater than 30 kDa. In animal studies, the patient's cryogen appeared to affect metabolic functions, including thermogenic threshold temperatures, and then to produce hypothermia. Since endogenous cryogenic substances may be regarded as useful tool in human activities, e.g., during brain hypothermia therapy or staying in a space station or spaceship, further studies may be needed to identify human endogenous cryogens.

  5. Declines in Drp1 and parkin expression underlie DNA damage-induced changes in mitochondrial length and neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Garden, Gwenn A; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Wyles, Cody; Babazadeh, Nasim; Sopher, Bryce; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Morrison, Richard S

    2013-01-23

    Maintaining proper mitochondrial length is essential for normal mitochondrial function in neurons. Mitochondrial fragmentation has been associated with neuronal cell death caused by a variety of experimental toxic stressors. Despite the fact that oxidative stress is a hallmark of neurodegenerative conditions and aging and the resulting activation of p53 is believed to contribute to the neuropathology, little is still known regarding changes in mitochondrial morphology in p53-dependent neuronal death. Therefore, we specifically addressed the relationship between genotoxic stress, p53 activation, and the regulation of mitochondrial morphology in neurons. In cultured postnatal mouse cortical neurons, treatment with the DNA-damaging agent camptothecin (CPT) resulted in elongated mitochondria, in contrast to fragmented mitochondria observed upon staurosporine and glutamate treatment. In fibroblasts, however, CPT resulted in fragmented mitochondria. CPT treatment in neurons suppressed expression of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin. The presence of elongated mitochondria and the declines in Drp1 and parkin expression occurred before the commitment point for apoptosis. The CPT-induced changes in Drp1 and parkin were not observed in p53-deficient neurons, while p53 overexpression alone was sufficient to reduce the expression of the two proteins. Elevating Drp1 or parkin expression before CPT treatment enhanced neuronal viability and restored a normal pattern of mitochondrial morphology. The present findings demonstrate that genotoxic stress in neurons results in elongated mitochondria in contrast to fission induced by other forms of stress, and p53-dependent declines in Drp1 and parkin levels contribute to altered mitochondrial morphology and cell death.

  6. The endoplasmic reticulum/mitochondria interface: a subcellular platform for the orchestration of the functions of the PINK1-Parkin pathway?

    PubMed

    Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Corti, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of both idiopathic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Mutations in the PARK2 and PARK6 genes, coding for the cytosolic E3 ubiquitin protein ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1 [phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1], lead to clinically similar early-onset Parkinsonian syndromes. PINK1 and Parkin cooperate within a conserved pathway to preserve mitochondrial quality through the regulation of a variety of processes, including mitochondrial dynamics, transport, bioenergetics, biogenesis and turnover. The molecular mechanisms behind the orchestration of this plethora of functions remain poorly understood. In the present review, we emphasize the functional overlap between the PINK1-Parkin pathway and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria interface, a subcellular compartment critically involved in neurodegeneration. We discuss how this compartment may constitute a hub for the spatiotemporal organization of the activities of the PINK1-Parkin pathway.

  7. Cinnamon Treatment Upregulates Neuroprotective Proteins Parkin and DJ-1 and Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-related beneficial proteins such as Parkin and DJ-1 in astrocytes during neurodegenerative insults may have therapeutic efficacy in PD. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material throughout the world. Here we have explored a novel use of cinnamon in upregulating Parkin and DJ-1 and protecting dopaminergic neurons in MPTP mouse model of PD. Recently we have delineated that oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder produces sodium benzoate (NaB) in blood and brain of mice. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β decreased the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in mouse astrocytes. However, cinnamon metabolite NaB abrogated IL-1β-induced loss of these proteins. Inability of TNF-α to produce nitric oxide (NO) and decrease the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in wild type (WT) astrocytes, failure of IL-1β to reduce Parkin/DJ-1 in astrocytes isolated from iNOS (−/−) mice, and decrease in Parkin/DJ-1 in WT astrocytes by NO donor DETA-NONOate suggest that NO is a negative regulator of Parkin/DJ-1. Furthermore, suppression of IL-1β-induced expression of iNOS in astrocytes by NaB and reversal of NaB-mediated protection of Parkin/DJ-1 by DETA-NONOate in astrocytes indicate that NaB protects Parkin/DJ-1 in activated astrocytes via suppressing iNOS. Similarly MPTP intoxication also increased the level of iNOS and decreased the level of Parkin/DJ-1 in vivo in the nigra. However, oral treatment of MPTP-intoxicated mice with cinnamon powder and NaB reduced the expression of iNOS and protected Parkin/DJ-1 in the nigra. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions by cinnamon in MPTP-intoxicated mice. These results suggest that cinnamon may be beneficial for PD patients. PMID:24946862

  8. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the physiology of endogenous pyrogen (EP), the fever-producing factor of cellular origin. Included are: its hormone-like role, its molecular nature, bioassay procedures, cellular production and mechanisms of EP action. (SA)

  9. Tissue- and Cell-Specific Mitochondrial Defect in Parkin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Ferrando-Miguel, Rosa; Gouarne, Caroline; Paoli, Marc Giraudon; Pruss, Rebecca; Auchère, Françoise; L'Hermitte-Stead, Caroline; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Brice, Alexis; Corti, Olga; Lombès, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Parkin, encoded by PARK2 gene, is a major cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. In Drosophila and mammalian cell models Parkin has been shown in to play a role in various processes essential to maintenance of mitochondrial quality, including mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and degradation. However, the relevance of altered mitochondrial quality control mechanisms to neuronal survival in vivo is still under debate. We addressed this issue in the brain of PARK2−/− mice using an integrated mitochondrial evaluation, including analysis of respiration by polarography or by fluorescence, respiratory complexes activity by spectrophotometric assays, mitochondrial membrane potential by rhodamine 123 fluorescence, mitochondrial DNA content by real time PCR, and oxidative stress by total glutathione measurement, proteasome activity, SOD2 expression and proteins oxidative damage. Respiration rates were lowered in PARK2−/− brain with high resolution but not standard respirometry. This defect was specific to the striatum, where it was prominent in neurons but less severe in astrocytes. It was present in primary embryonic cells and did not worsen in vivo from 9 to 24 months of age. It was not associated with any respiratory complex defect, including complex I. Mitochondrial inner membrane potential in PARK2−/− mice was similar to that of wild-type mice but showed increased sensitivity to uncoupling with ageing in striatum. The presence of oxidative stress was suggested in the striatum by increased mitochondrial glutathione content and oxidative adducts but normal proteasome activity showed efficient compensation. SOD2 expression was increased only in the striatum of PARK2−/− mice at 24 months of age. Altogether our results show a tissue-specific mitochondrial defect, present early in life of PARK2−/− mice, mildly affecting respiration, without prominent impact on mitochondrial membrane potential, whose underlying mechanisms remain to be

  10. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  11. Altered protein expression pattern in skin fibroblasts from parkin-mutant early-onset Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Pacelli, Consiglia; Ferretta, Anna; Mazzeo, Maria Fiorella; Scacco, Salvatore; Papa, Francesco; Gaballo, Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Claudia; De Mari, Michele; Papa, Sergio; Cocco, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder caused primarily by selective degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. In this work the proteomes extracted from primary fibroblasts of two unrelated, hereditary cases of PD patients, with different parkin mutations, were compared with the proteomes extracted from commercial adult normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and primary fibroblasts from the healthy mother of one of the two patients. The results show that the fibroblasts from the two different cases of parkin-mutant patients display analogous alterations in the expression level of proteins involved in different cellular functions, like cytoskeleton structure-dynamics, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress response, protein and RNA processing.

  12. Melatonin rescues zebrafish embryos from the parkinsonian phenotype restoring the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Casado, María E; Lima, Elena; García, José A; Doerrier, Carolina; Aranda, Paula; Sayed, Ramy Ka; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies reporting mitochondrial impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) involve knockout or knockdown models to inhibit the expression of mitochondrial-related genes, including parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 ones. Melatonin has significant neuroprotective properties, which have been related to its ability to boost mitochondrial bioenergetics. The meaning and molecular targets of melatonin in PD are yet unclear. Zebrafish are an outstanding model of PD because they are vertebrates, their dopaminergic system is comparable to the nigrostriatal system of humans, and their brains express the same genes as mammals. The exposure of 24 hpf zebrafish embryos to MPTP leads to a significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and the induction of sncga gene, responsible for enhancing γ-synuclein accumulation, which is related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, MPTP inhibited the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1 expression, impeding the normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network to remove the damaged mitochondria. This situation remains over time, and removing MPTP from the treatment did not stop the neurodegenerative process. On the contrary, mitochondria become worse during the next 2 days without MPTP, and the embryos developed a severe motor impairment that cannot be rescued because the mitochondrial-related gene expression remained inhibited. Melatonin, added together with MPTP or added once MPTP was removed, prevented and recovered, respectively, the parkinsonian phenotype once it was established, restoring gene expression and normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 loop and also the normal motor activity of the embryos. The results show, for the first time, that melatonin restores brain function in zebrafish suffering with Parkinson-like disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Health and endogenous growth.

    PubMed

    van Zon, A; Muysken, J

    2001-03-01

    The focus of endogenous growth theory on human capital formation and the physical embodiment of knowledge in people, suggests the integration of the growth supporting character of health production and the growth generating services of human capital accumulation in an endogenous growth framework. We show that a slow down in growth may be explained by a preference for health that is positively influenced by a growing income per head, or by an ageing population. Growth may virtually disappear for countries with high rates of decay of health, low productivity of the health-sector, or high rates of discount.

  14. Rescue of mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts using drug loaded PMPC-PDPA polymersomes and tubular polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Yealland, G; Battaglia, G; Bandmann, O; Mortiboys, H

    2016-09-06

    Mutations in parkin cause autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and mitochondrial defects. A recent drug screen identified a class of steroid-like hydrophobic compounds able to rescue mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts. Whilst these possess therapeutic potential, the size and high hydrophobicity of some may limit their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier from systemic circulation, something that could be improved by novel drug formulations. In the present study, the steroid-like compounds Ursolic Acid (UA) and Ursocholanic Acid (UCA) were successfully encapsulated within nanoscopic polymersomes formed by poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine)-poly(2-di-isopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and separated into spherical and tubular morphologies to assess the effects of nanoparticle mediated delivery on drug efficacy. Following incubation with either morphology, parkin-mutant fibroblasts demonstrated time and concentration dependent increases in intracellular ATP levels, resembling those resulting from treatment with nascent UA and UCA formulated in 0.1% DMSO, as used in the original drug screen. Empty PMPC-PDPA polymersomes did not alter physiological measures related to mitochondrial function or induce cytotoxicity. In combination with other techniques such as ligand functionalisation, PMPC-PDPA nanoparticles of well-defined morphology may prove a promising platform for tailoring the pharmacokinetic profile and organ specific bio-distribution of highly hydrophobic compounds. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative high frequency of the c.255delA parkin gene mutation in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, E; Tolosa, E; Pastor, P; Marti, M; Valldeoriola, F; Campdelacreu, J; Oliva, R

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To search for the presence of parkin gene mutations in Spanish patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and characterise the phenotype associated with these mutations. Methods: Thirty seven PD patients with either early onset or autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance were selected for genetic study. Results: Mutations were identified in seven index patients (19%). Homozygous mutations were detected in six patients and a heterozygous mutation in one. The age at onset was lower in patients with mutations than in patients without mutations. Dystonia at onset was present in two patients with parkin gene mutations. The disease began in two patients with postural tremor in the upper limbs mimicking essential tremor. Four patients exhibited a long term response to dopamine agonists. The c.255delA mutation was identified in four unrelated families. This is a frameshift mutation leading to protein truncation. Conclusions: Parkin gene mutations are present in Spanish patients with early onset and/or an autosomal recessive parkinsonism. The c.255delA is the most frequent mutation found, suggesting a relative high prevalence in the Spanish population. PMID:12397156

  16. Label free fragment screening using surface plasmon resonance as a tool for fragment finding - analyzing parkin, a difficult CNS target.

    PubMed

    Regnström, Karin; Yan, Jiangli; Nguyen, Lan; Callaway, Kari; Yang, Yanli; Diep, Linnea; Xing, Weimei; Adhikari, Anirban; Beroza, Paul; Hom, Roy K; Riley, Brigit; Rudolph, Don; Jobling, Michael F; Baker, Jeanne; Johnston, Jennifer; Konradi, Andrei; Bova, Michael P; Artis, Dean R; Artis, Rick D

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is rarely used as a primary High-throughput Screening (HTS) tool in fragment-based approaches. With SPR instruments becoming increasingly high-throughput it is now possible to use SPR as a primary tool for fragment finding. SPR becomes, therefore, a valuable tool in the screening of difficult targets such as the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin. As a prerequisite for the screen, a large number of SPR tests were performed to characterize and validate the active form of Parkin. A set of compounds was designed and used to define optimal SPR assay conditions for this fragment screen. Using these conditions, more than 5000 pre-selected fragments from our in-house library were screened for binding to Parkin. Additionally, all fragments were simultaneously screened for binding to two off target proteins to exclude promiscuous binding compounds. A low hit rate was observed that is in line with hit rates usually obtained by other HTS screening assays. All hits were further tested in dose responses on the target protein by SPR for confirmation before channeling the hits into Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and other hit-confirmation assays.

  17. PINK1 and Parkin cooperatively protect neurons against constitutively active TRP channel-induced retinal degeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Ren, S; Jiang, Y; Wang, T

    2016-04-07

    Calcium has an important role in regulating numerous cellular activities. However, extremely high levels of intracellular calcium can lead to neurotoxicity, a process commonly associated with degenerative diseases. Despite the clear role of calcium cytotoxicity in mediating neuronal cell death in this context, the pathological mechanisms remain controversial. We used a well-established Drosophila model of retinal degeneration, which involves the constitutively active TRP(P365) channels, to study calcium-induced neurotoxicity. We found that the disruption of mitochondrial function was associated with the degenerative process. Further, increasing autophagy flux prevented cell death in Trp(P365) mutant flies, and this depended on the PINK1/Parkin pathway. In addition, the retinal degeneration process was also suppressed by the coexpression of PINK1 and Parkin. Our results provide genetic evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction has a key role in the pathology of cellular calcium neurotoxicity. In addition, the results demonstrated that maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis via PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control can potentially alleviate cell death in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Prevention of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas in rats pre-inoculated with endogenous rat retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.C.; Demarais, J.T.; Djurickovic, D.B.; Huebner, R.J.

    1981-04-01

    Weanling Fischer 344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of a 1000-fold concentrated preparation of endogenous nontransforming rat retrovirus. Ten days later, the rats were each given a single subcutaneous injection of 3-methylcholanthrene. The rats inoculated with the endogenous rat retrovirus were significantly protected against the development of cancer, whereas uninoculated rats and rats given one of several murine tetroviruses or baboon retrovirus were not protected.

  19. Sorafenib targets the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes and ATP synthase to activate the PINK1-Parkin pathway and modulate cellular drug response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Conggang; Liu, Zeyu; Bunker, Eric; Ramirez, Adrian; Lee, Schuyler; Peng, Yinghua; Tan, Aik-Choon; Eckhardt, S Gail; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong

    2017-09-08

    Sorafenib (Nexavar) is a broad-spectrum multikinase inhibitor that proves effective in treating advanced renal-cell carcinoma and liver cancer. Despite its well-characterized mechanism of action on several established cancer-related protein kinases, sorafenib causes variable responses among human tumors, although the cause for this variation is unknown. In an unbiased screening of an oncology drug library, we found that sorafenib activates recruitment of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin to damaged mitochondria. We show that sorafenib inhibits the activity of both complex II/III of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. Dual inhibition of these complexes, but not inhibition of each individual complex, stabilizes the serine-threonine protein kinase PINK1 on the mitochondrial outer membrane and activates Parkin. Unlike the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, which activates the mitophagy response, sorafenib treatment triggers PINK1/Parkin-dependent cellular apoptosis, which is attenuated upon Bcl-2 overexpression. In summary, our results reveal a new mechanism of action for sorafenib as a mitocan and suggest that high Parkin activity levels could make tumor cells more sensitive to sorafenib's actions, providing one possible explanation why Parkin may be a tumor suppressor gene. These insights could be useful in developing new rationally designed combination therapies with sorafenib. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Parkin-mediated K63-polyubiquitination targets ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 for degradation by the autophagy-lysosome system.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Jeanne E; Sha, Di; Li, Lian; Chin, Lih-Shen

    2015-05-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a key neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme which is mutated in Parkinson disease (PD) and in childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder with optic atrophy. Furthermore, reduced UCH-L1 protein levels are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, whereas up-regulation of UCH-L1 protein expression is found in multiple types of cancer. However, very little is known about how UCH-L1 protein level is regulated in cells. Here, we report that UCH-L1 is a novel interactor and substrate of PD-linked E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase parkin. We find that parkin mediates K63-linked polyubiquitination of UCH-L1 in cooperation with the Ubc13/Uev1a E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex and promotes UCH-L1 degradation by the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Targeted disruption of parkin gene expression in mice causes a significant decrease in UCH-L1 ubiquitination with a concomitant increase in UCH-L1 protein level in brain, supporting an in vivo role of parkin in regulating UCH-L1 ubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal a direct link between parkin-mediated ubiquitin signaling and UCH-L1 regulation, and they have important implications for understanding the roles of these two proteins in health and disease.

  1. Folic acid supplementation rescues anomalies associated with knockdown of parkin in dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons in Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Saurabh; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Yadav, Amarish Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella

    2015-05-08

    parkin loss associated early-onset of Parkinson's disease, involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as the plausible decisive molecular mechanisms in disease pathogenesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction involves several up/down regulation of gene products, one of which being p53 is found to be elevated. Elevated p53 is involved in mitochondrial mediated apoptosis of neuronal cells in Parkinson's patients who are folate deficient as well. The present study therefore attempts to examine the effect of Folic acid (FA) supplementation in alleviation of anomalies associated with parkin knockdown using RNAi approach, specific to Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Drosophila model system. Here we show that FA supplementation provide protection against parkin RNAi associated discrepancies, thereby improves locomotor ability, reduces mortality and oxidative stress, and partially improves Zn levels. Further, metabolic active cell status and ATP levels were also found to be improved thereby indicating improved mitochondrial function. To corroborate FA supplementation in mitochondrial functioning further, status of p53 and spargel was checked by qRT-PCR. Here we show that folic acid supplementation enrich mitochondrial functioning as depicted from improved spargel level and lowered p53 level, which was originally vice versa in parkin knockdown flies cultured in standard media. Our data thus support the potential of folic acid in alleviating the behavioural defects, oxidative stress, augmentation of zinc and ATP levels in parkin knock down flies. Further, folic acid role in repressing mitochondrial dysfunction is encouraging to further explore its possible mechanistic role to be utilized as potential therapeutics for Parkinson's disease.

  2. [Provoking endogenous psychoses].

    PubMed

    Trostorff, S V

    1988-05-01

    For six forms of endogenous psychosis, causal agencies were sought to establish endogenous, physical, and mental provocation. Endocrine causes were found most frequently, 17.5%, in mixed bipolar disorders, followed by cycloid psychoses, 8.5%, which in this respect appear to be closer to the mixed bipolar psychoses, than the unipolar forms at 4.4%. Among the physical causes, the difference in affective psychoses is not particularly great. Cycloid psychoses head the list at 9%. Among the mental causes, pure phase psychoses account for the greatest number, 12.7%, by a wide margin. The three unsystematic forms of schizophrenia revealed a slender link with their causes. Clear distinctions among the causes of the six forms were thus demonstrated.

  3. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of rats: a sensitive directed to the photoreceptor system for phototaxis of the proto- assay method for endogenous...spinal heating and cooling and photobiologists. The remainder of the book is devoted to the eye. intracerebroventricular injections of monoamines and...photobehavior and vision discussed, such as histamine /antihistamines, cough remedies, of invertebrates. h i e nd slep-aids and laxatives. The few citations

  4. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  5. Endogeneity in High Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Most papers on high-dimensional statistics are based on the assumption that none of the regressors are correlated with the regression error, namely, they are exogenous. Yet, endogeneity can arise incidentally from a large pool of regressors in a high-dimensional regression. This causes the inconsistency of the penalized least-squares method and possible false scientific discoveries. A necessary condition for model selection consistency of a general class of penalized regression methods is given, which allows us to prove formally the inconsistency claim. To cope with the incidental endogeneity, we construct a novel penalized focused generalized method of moments (FGMM) criterion function. The FGMM effectively achieves the dimension reduction and applies the instrumental variable methods. We show that it possesses the oracle property even in the presence of endogenous predictors, and that the solution is also near global minimum under the over-identification assumption. Finally, we also show how the semi-parametric efficiency of estimation can be achieved via a two-step approach. PMID:25580040

  6. Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Parkin-Dependent Recruitment of Linear Ubiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC) to Mitochondria and Attenuation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohsin; Syed, Gulam Hussain; Kim, Seong-Jun; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppresses innate immune signaling to establish persistent infection. Although HBV is a DNA virus, its pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) can be sensed by RIG-I and activates MAVS to mediate interferon (IFN) λ synthesis. Despite of the activation of RIG-I-MAVS axis by pgRNA, the underlying mechanism explaining how HBV infection fails to induce interferon-αβ (IFN) synthesis remained uncharacterized. We demonstrate that HBV induced parkin is able to recruit the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC) to mitochondria and abrogates IFN β synthesis. Parkin interacts with MAVS, accumulates unanchored linear polyubiquitin chains on MAVS via LUBAC, to disrupt MAVS signalosome and attenuate IRF3 activation. This study highlights the novel role of parkin in antiviral signaling which involves LUBAC being recruited to the mitochondria. These results provide avenues of investigations on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in innate immunity. PMID:27348524

  7. Early-life exposure to methylmercury in wildtype and pdr-1/parkin knockout C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Slaughter, James C.; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We examined the impact of early-life exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) on Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) pdr-1 mutants, addressing gene-environment interactions. We tested the hypothesis that early-life exposure to MeHg and knockout (KO) of pdr-1 (mammalian: parkin/PARK2) exacerbates MeHg toxicity and damage to the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. pdr-1KO worms showed increased lethality and decreased lifespan following MeHg exposure. Mercury (Hg) content, measured with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) was increased in pdr-1KO worms compared to wildtype (N2) controls. 2′7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA) assay revealed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both strains following MeHg exposure; however, while N2 worms showed an increase in skn-1 transcript levels following MeHg exposure, there was no difference in skn-1 induction in pdr-1KO worms. Dopamine-dependent behavioral analysis revealed an effect of MeHg on N2 wildtype worms, but no effect on pdr-1KO worms. Taken together, these results suggest that pdr-1KO worms are more sensitive to MeHg than wildtype worms, but MeHg does not exacerbate behavioral changes related to the absence of pdr-1. PMID:23609499

  8. Molecular analysis of the PArkin co-regulated gene and association with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabrielle R; Sim, Marcus L-J; Brody, Kate M; Taylor, Juliet M; McLachlan, Robert I; O'Bryan, Moira K; Delatycki, Martin B; Lockhart, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the potential role of PArkin co-regulated gene (PACRG) in human male infertility. Case-control study. Academic reproductive biology department. Blood samples were obtained from 610 patients and 156 normal control subjects. Genomic DNA was used as template for polymerase chain reaction amplification of the PACRG promoter and coding exons. The amplified fragments were tested for DNA sequence variations by direct sequencing and restriction enzyme analysis. Gene structure and sequence alterations of PACRG in infertile male patients. The structure of PACRG was determined to comprise 5 coding exons, generating a single transcript in the testis which encoded a predicted protein of 257 amino acids. No pathogenic mutations were identified; however, a variant in the promoter of PACRG was shown to be significantly associated with azoospermia, but not oligospermia, in the case-control cohort. Mutation of PACRG was not identified as a cause of male infertility, but variation in the promoter was demonstrated to be a risk factor associated with azoospermia. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endogenic nortestosterone in cattle?

    PubMed

    de Brabander, H F; van Hende, J; Batjoens, P; Hendriks, L; Raus, J; Smets, F; Pottie, G; van Ginkel, L; Stephany, R W

    1994-12-01

    When residues of nortestosterone (NT) were found in the urine of cattle, racehorses or bodybuilders, exogenic administration was thought to be proven. In previous literature, no records were found of the endogenic presence of this molecule. In the horse-racing world, Houghton and Courthot found that NT is normally present in the urine of the stallion. Belgian and Dutch researchers found that NT is also present in the urine and edible parts of the intact boar. Vandenbroeck et al. (1991) suggested the endogenous presence of NT (in the beta form) in the pregnant cow. Meyer (1992) reported the presence of NT (in the alpha form) in relatively high amounts in the urine of the cow peri-partum and the neo-natal calf. These observations may have important consequences for veterinary meat inspection in the EU. Therefore, in Belgium a large scale experiment was set up in co-operation with the EU Community Reference Laboratory (RIVM). In this paper the present state of the results in this area is presented. A large number of urine samples (> 50) of pregnant non-treated cows were collected and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 4 different laboratories. Further samples (> 100) were taken, but only analysed in one laboratory. The results proved clearly that NT may indeed be detectable in the alpha form in the urine of pregnant cows, from at least 2 months, but most probably from 4-5 months before partus.

  10. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Liu, Y.; Barnes, J. J.; Boyce, J. W.; Day, J. M. D.; Elardo, S. M.; Hui, H.; Magna, T.; Ni, P.; Tartese, R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The chapter will begin with an introduction that defines magmatic volatiles (e.g., H, F, Cl, S) versus geochemical volatiles (e.g., K, Rb, Zn). We will discuss our approach of understanding both types of volatiles in lunar samples and lay the ground work for how we will determine the overall volatile budget of the Moon. We will then discuss the importance of endogenous volatiles in shaping the "Newer Views of the Moon", specifically how endogenous volatiles feed forward into processes such as the origin of the Moon, magmatic differentiation, volcanism, and secondary processes during surface and crustal interactions. After the introduction, we will include a re-view/synthesis on the current state of 1) apatite compositions (volatile abundances and isotopic compositions); 2) nominally anhydrous mineral phases (moderately to highly volatile); 3) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar pyroclastic glass beads; 4) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar basalts; 5) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of melt inclusions; and finally 6) experimental constraints on mineral-melt partitioning of moderately to highly volatile elements under lunar conditions. We anticipate that each section will summarize results since 2007 and focus on new results published since the 2015 Am Min review paper on lunar volatiles [9]. The next section will discuss how to use sample abundances of volatiles to understand the source region and potential caveats in estimating source abundances of volatiles. The following section will include our best estimates of volatile abundances and isotopic compositions (where permitted by available data) for each volatile element of interest in a number of important lunar reservoirs, including the crust, mantle, KREEP, and bulk Moon. The final section of the chapter will focus upon future work, outstanding questions

  11. Expression and localization of the Parkin co-regulated gene in mouse CNS suggests a role in ependymal cilia function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabrielle R; Tan, Jacqueline T; Brody, Kate M; Taylor, Juliet M; Delatycki, Martin B; Lockhart, Paul J

    2009-08-21

    Parkin Co-Regulated Gene (PACRG) is a gene that shares a bi-directional promoter with the Parkinson's disease associated gene parkin. The functional role of PACRG is not well understood, although the gene has been associated with parkinsonian syndromes and more recently with eukaryotic cilia and flagella. We investigated the expression of Pacrg in the mouse brain by in situ hybridization and observed robust expression of Pacrg in the cells associated with the lateral, third and fourth ventricle, in addition to the aqueduct of Sylvius and choroid plexus. For all regions of Pacrg expression identified, strong expression was observed in the newborn period and this was maintained into adulthood. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Pacrg was a component of the ependymal cells and cilia lining the ventricles. Based on our results and the previous association of PACRG homologues with cilia and flagella, we propose that Pacrg is a component of the ependymal cilia and may play an important role in motile cilia development and/or function in the CNS.

  12. Elimination of paternal mitochondria in mouse embryos occurs through autophagic degradation dependent on PARKIN and MUL1

    PubMed Central

    Rojansky, Rebecca; Cha, Moon-Yong; Chan, David C

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of mitochondria is their maternal mode of inheritance. However, little is understood about the cellular mechanism through which paternal mitochondria, delivered from sperm, are eliminated from early mammalian embryos. Autophagy has been implicated in nematodes, but whether this mechanism is conserved in mammals has been disputed. Here, we show that cultured mouse fibroblasts and pre-implantation embryos use a common pathway for elimination of mitochondria. Both situations utilize mitophagy, in which mitochondria are sequestered by autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. The E3 ubiquitin ligases PARKIN and MUL1 play redundant roles in elimination of paternal mitochondria. The process is associated with depolarization of paternal mitochondria and additionally requires the mitochondrial outer membrane protein FIS1, the autophagy adaptor P62, and PINK1 kinase. Our results indicate that strict maternal transmission of mitochondria relies on mitophagy and uncover a collaboration between MUL1 and PARKIN in this process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17896.001 PMID:27852436

  13. Predictors of parkin mutations in early-onset Parkinson disease: the consortium on risk for early-onset Parkinson disease study.

    PubMed

    Marder, Karen S; Tang, Ming X; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Rosado, Llency; Louis, Elan D; Comella, Cynthia L; Colcher, Amy; Siderowf, Andrew D; Jennings, Danna; Nance, Martha A; Bressman, Susan; Scott, William K; Tanner, Caroline M; Mickel, Susan F; Andrews, Howard F; Waters, Cheryl; Fahn, Stanley; Ross, Barbara M; Cote, Lucien J; Frucht, Steven; Ford, Blair; Alcalay, Roy N; Rezak, Michael; Novak, Kevin; Friedman, Joseph H; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Marsh, Laura; Hiner, Brad; Neils, Gregory D; Verbitsky, Miguel; Kisselev, Sergey; Caccappolo, Elise; Ottman, Ruth; Clark, Lorraine N

    2010-06-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common genetic cause of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). Results from a multicenter study of patients with PD systematically sampled by age at onset have not been reported to date. To determine risk factors associated with carrying parkin mutations. Cross-sectional observational study. Thirteen movement disorders centers. A total of 956 patients with early-onset PD, defined as age at onset younger than 51 years. Presence of heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous parkin mutations. Using a previously validated interview, 14.7% of patients reported a family history of PD in a first-degree relative. Sixty-four patients (6.7%) had parkin mutations (3.9% heterozygous, 0.6% homozygous, and 2.2% compound heterozygous). Copy number variation was present in 52.3% of mutation carriers (31.6% of heterozygous, 83.3% of homozygous, and 81.0% of compound heterozygous). Deletions in exons 3 and 4 and 255delA were common among Hispanics (specifically Puerto Ricans). Younger age at onset (<40 years) (odds ratio [OR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-8.8; P = .001), Hispanic race/ethnicity (OR compared with white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.7; P = .009), and family history of PD in a first-degree relative (OR compared with noncarriers, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.3; P = .002) were associated with carrying any parkin mutation (heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous). Hispanic race/ethnicity was associated with carrying a heterozygous mutation (OR compared with white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.2; P = .03) after adjustment for covariates. Age at onset, Hispanic race/ethnicity, and family history of PD are associated with carrying any parkin mutation (heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous) and heterozygous mutations alone. The increased odds of carrying a parkin mutation among Hispanics warrants further study.

  14. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  15. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network 'purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  16. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network `purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  17. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  18. Endogenous formation of dimethylamine.

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, S H; DaCosta, K A; Fox, J G

    1985-01-01

    choline was not the sole precursor for DMA formation and that gut bacteria are not essential for the formation of DMA. Hence in mammals there must be endogenous pathways that are capable of forming DMA; however, these endogenous mechanisms remain unidentified. PMID:4091797

  19. Endogenous prion protein attenuates experimentally induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary R; Keenan, Catherine M; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2011-11-01

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is expressed in the enteric nervous system and lamina propria, its function(s) in the gut is unknown. Because PrP(C) may exert a cytoprotective effect in response to various physiologic stressors, we hypothesized that PrP(C) expression levels might modulate the severity of experimental colitis. We evaluated the course of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in hemizygous Tga20 transgenic mice (approximately sevenfold overexpression of PrP(C)), Prnp(-/-) mice, and wild-type mice. On day 7, colon length, disease severity, and histologic activity indices were determined. Unlike DSS-treated wild-type and Prnp(-/-) animals, PrP(C) overexpressing mice were resistant to colitis induction, exhibited much milder histopathologic features, and did not exhibit weight loss or colonic shortening. In keeping with these results, pro-survival molecule expression and/or phosphorylation levels were elevated in DSS-treated Tga20 mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine production and pSTAT3 levels were reduced. In contrast, DSS-treated Prnp(-/-) mice exhibited increased BAD protein expression and a cytokine expression profile predicted to favor inflammation and differentiation. PrP(C) expression from both the endogenous Prnp locus or the Tga20 transgene was increased in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Considered together, these findings demonstrate that PrP(C) has a previously unrecognized cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory function within the murine colon.

  20. Identification of receptors for pig endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Thomas A; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Templin, Christian; Quinn, Gary; Farhadian, Shelli F; Wood, James C; Oldmixon, Beth A; Suling, Kristen M; Ishii, Jennifer K; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Salomon, Daniel R; Weiss, Robin A; Patience, Clive

    2003-05-27

    Xenotransplantation of porcine tissues has the potential to treat a wide variety of major health problems including organ failure and diabetes. Balanced against the potential benefits of xenotransplantation, however, is the risk of human infection with a porcine microorganism. In particular, the transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is a major concern [Chapman, L. E. & Bloom, E. T. (2001) J. Am. Med. Assoc. 285, 2304-2306]. Here we report the identification of two, sequence-related, human proteins that act as receptors for PERV-A, encoded by genes located on chromosomes 8 and 17. We also describe homologs from baboon and porcine cells that also are active as receptors. Conversely, activity could not be demonstrated with a syntenic murine receptor homolog. Sequence analysis indicates that PERV-A receptors [human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR)-1, HuPAR-2, baboon PERV-A receptor 2, and porcine PERV-A receptor] are multiple membrane-spanning proteins similar to receptors for other gammaretroviruses. Expression is widespread in human tissues including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but their biological functions are unknown. The identification of the PERV-A receptors opens avenues of research necessary for a more complete assessment of the retroviral risks of pig to human xenotransplantation.

  1. Intramembrane protease PARL defines a negative regulator of PINK1- and PARK2/Parkin-dependent mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Cathrin; Lorenz, Holger; Hehn, Beate; Lemberg, Marius K

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARK2/Parkin are a main risk factor for familial Parkinson disease. While the physiological mechanism of their activation is unclear, these proteins have been shown in tissue culture cells to serve as a key trigger for autophagy of depolarized mitochondria. Here we show that ablation of the mitochondrial rhomboid protease PARL leads to retrograde translocation of an intermembrane space-bridging PINK1 import intermediate. Subsequently, it is rerouted to the outer membrane in order to recruit PARK2, which phenocopies mitophagy induction by uncoupling agents. Consistent with a role of this retrograde translocation mechanism in neurodegenerative disease, we show that pathogenic PINK1 mutants which are not cleaved by PARL affect PINK1 kinase activity and the ability to induce PARK2-mediated mitophagy. Altogether we suggest that PARL is an important intrinsic player in mitochondrial quality control, a system substantially impaired in Parkinson disease as indicated by reduced removal of damaged mitochondria in affected patients.

  2. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  3. Endogenous Metabolism of Azotobacter agilis

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, J. M.; Charba, J. F.; Foust, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Sobek, J. M. (University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette), J. F. Charba, and W. N. Foust. Endogenous metabolism of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:687–695. 1966—Ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, cellular carbohydrate, and the cold trichloroacetic acid and acidic alcohol fractions of the cell do not appear to function as endogenous reserves for Azotobacter agilis. The immediate endogenous reserve of cells grown on glucose, acetate, or succinate was poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB). Viability of the cells during starvation was dependent upon the initial levels of PHB and the growth substrate. Cells with high initial PHB levels survived longer than cells with lower levels. Cells from succinate-grown cultures had lower PHB levels than cells from glucose-grown cultures, but were capable of maintaining their viability longer. Cellular protein may also serve as a secondary endogenous reserve substrate for this organism. PMID:5922542

  4. Role of mitophagy regulated by Parkin/DJ-1 in remote ischemic postconditioning-induced mitigation of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Xia, Z-Y; Lei, S-Q; Leng, Y; Xue, R

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the role of mitophagy controlled by Parkin/DJ-1 in remote ischemic post conditioning-induced mitigation of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Ninety adult male rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups including a sham operation group (S) and ischemia-reperfusion group (I/R). Focal cerebral I/R was induced by right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). I/R+remote ischemic postconditioning (I/R+RIPoC), I/R+RIPoC+ mitophagy inhibitor Mdivi-1 (I/R+RIPoC+M), and I/R+RIPoC+ normal saline (I/R+RIPoC+NS) groups all received 3 cycles of 10 minutes reperfusion followed by 10 minutes ischemia in bilateral femoral arteries at the beginning of cerebral reperfusion. I/R+RIPoC+M received mitochondrial division inhibitor (Mdivi-1) before ischemia and after 24h of reperfusion, neurological deficit scores (NDSs) were measured and rats were then sacrificed. Brain was removed and size of the infarct was determined. Apoptosis index and LC3-II/I ratio, Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression, SOD activity, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content in cerebral ischemic penumbra were studied. Linear correlation between Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression and LC3-II/I ratio and cerebral infarct size were analyzed. In experimental groups the NDSs, percentage of cerebral infarct size, apoptosis index, LC3-II/I ratio, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content significantly increased and Parkin/DJ-1 proteins were up-regulated (p<0.05). In I/R+RIPoC and I/R+RIPoC+NS groups, NDSs, percentage of cerebral infarct size, apoptosis index, MDA and 15-F2t-Isoprostane content decreased significantly while LC3-II/I ratio and SOD activity increased compared to I/R group. Parkin/DJ-1 proteins were up-regulated in I/R+RIPoC, I/R+RIPoC+NS and I/R+RIPoC+M groups (p<0.05). LC3-II/I ratio and SOD activity significantly decreased (p<0.05). Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression didn't changed in I/R+RIPoC+M group (p>0.05). The Parkin/DJ-1 proteins expression were positively correlated with LC3-II/I ratio

  5. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  6. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-05

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses.

  7. Antibody SPC-54 provides acute in vivo blockage of the murine protein C system.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Laurent; Fernández, José A; Griffin, John H

    2013-04-01

    Multiple protective effects of pharmacological activated protein C (APC) are reported in several organ pathologies. To help evaluate the endogenous murine PC system, we characterized a rat monoclonal anti-mouse PC antibody, SPC-54, which inhibited the amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of murine APC by>95%. SPC-54 blocked active site titration of purified APC using the active site titrant, biotinylated FPR-chloromethylketone, showing that SPC-54 blocks access to APC's active site to inhibit all enzymatic activity. A single injection of SPC-54 (10mg/kg) neutralized circulating PC in mice for at least 7days, and immunoblotting and immuno-precipitation with protein G-agarose confirmed that SPC-54 in vivo was bound to PC in plasma. Pre-infusion of SPC-54 in tissue factor-induced murine acute thromboembolism experiments caused a major decrease in mean survival time compared to controls (7min vs. 42.5min, P=0.0016). SPC-54 decreased lung perfusion in this model by 54% when monitored by vascular perfusion methodologies using infrared fluorescence of Evans blue dye. In LD50 endotoxemia murine models, SPC-54 infused at 7hr after endotoxin administration increased mortality from 42% to 100% (P<0.001). In summary, monoclonal antibody SPC-54 ablates in vitro and in vivo APC protective functions and enzymatic activity. The ability of SPC-54 to block the endogenous PC/APC system provides a powerful tool to understand better the role of the endogenous PC system in murine injury models and in cell bioassays and also to neutralize the enzymatic activities of murine APC in any assay system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibody SPC-54 provides acute in vivo blockage of the murine protein C system

    PubMed Central

    Burnier, Laurent; Fernández, José A; Griffin, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple protective effects of pharmacological activated protein C (APC) are reported in several organ pathologies. To help evaluate the endogenous murine PC system, we characterized a rat monoclonal anti-mouse PC antibody, SPC-54, which inhibited the amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of murine APC by > 95%. SPC-54 blocked active site titration of purified APC using the active site titrant, biotinylated FPR-chloromethylketone, showing that SPC-54 blocks access to APC’s active site to inhibit all enzymatic activity. A single injection of SPC-54 (10 mg/kg) neutralized circulating PC in mice for at least 7 days, and immunoblotting and immuno-precipitation with protein G-agarose confirmed that SPC-54 in vivo was bound to PC in plasma. Pre-infusion of SPC-54 in tissue factor-induced murine acute thromboembolism experiments caused a major decrease in mean survival time compared to controls (7 min vs. 42.5 min, P = 0.0016). SPC-54 decreased lung perfusion in this model by 54 % when monitored by vascular perfusion methodologies using infrared fluorescence of Evans blue dye. In LD50 endotoxemia murine models, SPC-54 infused at 7 hr after endotoxin administration increased mortality from 42 % to 100 % (P < 0.001). In summary, monoclonal antibody SPC-54 ablates in vitro and in vivo APC protective functions and enzymatic activity. The ability of SPC-54 to block the endogenous PC/APC system provides a powerful tool to understand better the role of the endogenous PC system in murine injury models and in cell bioassays and also to neutralize the enzymatic activities of murine APC in any assay system. PMID:23385154

  9. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to endogenous galactose-specific tumor cell lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Raz, A; Meromsky, L; Carmi, P; Karakash, R; Lotan, D; Lotan, R

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 5D7, was obtained after immunization of syngeneic mice with B16 melanoma cell extracts enriched for endogenous lectin activity and screening for inhibition of lectin-mediated hemagglutination. Binding of this antibody to affinity-purified B16 melanoma galactoside-specific lectin was revealed by solid-phase radioimmunoassay and binding to the surface of viable B16 cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Inhibition of lectin activity and cell surface labeling by 5D7 antibody were also found with several types of cultured human and murine cells including melanoma, sarcoma and carcinoma. This monoclonal antibody should be useful for evaluating the role of tumor cell surface lectins in intercellular interactions and metastasis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6084591

  11. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  12. Language Deficits as a Preclinical Window into Parkinson's Disease: Evidence from Asymptomatic Parkin and Dardarin Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    García, Adolfo M; Sedeño, Lucas; Trujillo, Natalia; Bocanegra, Yamile; Gomez, Diana; Pineda, David; Villegas, Andrés; Muñoz, Edinson; Arias, William; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2017-02-01

    The worldwide spread of Parkinson's disease (PD) calls for sensitive and specific measures enabling its early (or, ideally, preclinical) detection. Here, we use language measures revealing deficits in PD to explore whether similar disturbances are present in asymptomatic individuals at risk for the disease. We administered executive, semantic, verb-production, and syntactic tasks to sporadic PD patients, genetic PD patients with PARK2 (parkin) or LRRK2 (dardarin) mutation, asymptomatic first-degree relatives of the latter with similar mutations, and socio-demographically matched controls. Moreover, to detect sui generis language disturbances, we ran analysis of covariance tests using executive functions as covariate. The two clinical groups showed impairments in all measures, most of which survived covariation with executive functions. However, the key finding concerned asymptomatic mutation carriers. While these subjects showed intact executive, semantic, and action-verb production skills, they evinced deficits in a syntactic test with minimal working memory load. We propose that this sui generis disturbance may constitute a prodromal sign anticipating eventual development of PD. Moreover, our results suggest that mutations on specific genes (PARK2 and LRRK2) compromising basal ganglia functioning may be subtly related to language-processing mechanisms. (JINS, 2017, 23, 150-158).

  13. Temporal dynamics of PARK2/parkin and OPTN/optineurin recruitment during the mitophagy of damaged mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yvette C; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2015-01-01

    Damaged mitochondria are selectively degraded via autophagy in a regulated pathway known as mitophagy. Parkinson disease-linked proteins PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1) and PARK2 (parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin protein ligase) are recruited to the outer mitochondrial membrane upon mitochondrial damage, leading to the PARK2-mediated ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins. Here, we discuss our recent work demonstrating that OPTN (optineurin) is recruited to damaged mitochondria, serving as an autophagy receptor for autophagosome formation around mitochondria. Using high-resolution live-cell imaging, we find that OPTN is recruited to ubiquitinated mitochondria downstream of PARK2, and induces autophagosome assembly around mitochondria via its LC3-interacting region. Mutations in OPTN are linked to both glaucoma and ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), and an ALS-associated E478G mutation in OPTN's ubiquitin binding domain leads to defective mitophagy and accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Importantly, our results highlight a role for mitophagy defects in ALS pathogenesis, and demonstrate that defects in the same pathway for mitochondrial homeostasis are causal for both familial Parkinson disease and ALS.

  14. Parkin and PINK1 Patient iPSC-Derived Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Exhibit Mitochondrial Dysfunction and α-Synuclein Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sun Young; Kishinevsky, Sarah; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Graziotto, John; Mrejeru, Ana; Mosharov, Eugene V; Puspita, Lesly; Valiulahi, Parvin; Sulzer, David; Milner, Teresa A; Taldone, Tony; Krainc, Dimitri; Studer, Lorenz; Shim, Jae-Won

    2016-10-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra; however, the mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD remains unclear. A subset of familial PD is linked to mutations in PARK2 and PINK1, which lead to dysfunctional mitochondria-related proteins Parkin and PINK1, suggesting that pathways implicated in these monogenic forms could play a more general role in PD. We demonstrate that the identification of disease-related phenotypes in PD-patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons depends on the type of differentiation protocol utilized. In a floor-plate-based but not a neural-rosette-based directed differentiation strategy, iPSC-derived mDA neurons recapitulate PD phenotypes, including pathogenic protein accumulation, cell-type-specific vulnerability, mitochondrial dysfunction, and abnormal neurotransmitter homeostasis. We propose that these form a pathogenic loop that contributes to disease. Our study illustrates the promise of iPSC technology for examining PD pathogenesis and identifying therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Memory processes in endogenous depression].

    PubMed

    Radziwiłłowicz, W; Radziwiłłowicz, P

    1998-01-01

    The thesis aims to answer the questions about the profile of mental ability in endogenous depression and to decide whether self-estimation of depressive symptoms influences the results achieved by patients in memory tests. Fifty six patients suffering from endogenous depression have been examined. The following methods have been applied: Mini Mental State Examination, Benton Visual Retention Test, Beck Depression Inventory, hold tests: Vocabulary, Information, Comprehension and Digit Span of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, DCS Weidlich. General status of cognitive functions correlates with the profile of specific kinds of memory results, particularly with delayed memory. Self-estimation of depressive symptoms intensity is mostly influenced by memory capacity, visuomotorial factor, functions of perception and lingual factor. High correlation between verbal and non verbal learning shows uniform influence of depression on the process of learning.

  16. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  17. Endogenous neuromodulation at infralow frequencies.

    PubMed

    Othmer, Siegfried; Othmer, Susan F; Kaiser, David A; Putman, John

    2013-12-01

    Neuromodulation in the bioelectrical domain is an attractive option for the remediation of functionally based deficits. Most of the interest to date has focused on exogenous methods, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transient direct current stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Much less attention has been given to endogenous methods of exploiting latent brain plasticity. These have reached a level of sophistication and maturity that invites attention. Over the last 7 years, the domain of infralow frequencies has been exploited productively for the enhancement of neuroregulation. The principal mechanism is putatively the renormalization of functional connectivity of our resting-state networks. The endogeneous techniques are particularly attractive for the pediatric population, where they can be utilized before dysfunctional patterns of brain behavior become consolidated and further elaborated into clinical syndromes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. On Endogenous Competitive Business Cycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    a competitive monetary econonty that does not experience any exogenous shocks - whether origi- nating from the external environment or from policy ...deterministic cycles will be shown to appear in a purely endogenous fashion under laisser faire. Markets will be assumed to clear in the Walrasian sense...there will be is the condition that older agents have a higher marginal propensity to consume leisure. Finally, monetary policy by means of nominal

  19. Exogenic and endogenic Europa minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Brand, H. E. A.; Wilson, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) identified a significant `non-ice' component upon the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Current explanations invoke both endogenic and exogenic origins for this material. It has long been suggested that magnesium and sodium sulfate minerals could have leached from the rock below a putative ocean (endogenic) 1 and that sulfuric acid hydrate minerals could have been radiologically produced from ionised sulfur originally from Io's volcanoes (exogenic) 2. However, a more recent theory proposes that the `non-ice' component could be radiation damaged NaCl leached from Europa's speculative ocean 3. What if the minerals are actually from combination of both endogenic and exogenic sources? To investigate this possibility we have focused on discovering new minerals that might form in the combination of the latter two cases, that is a mixture of leached sulfates hydrates with radiologically produced sulfuric acid. To this end we have explored a number of solutions in the MgSO4-H2SO4-H2O and Na2SO4-H2SO4-H2O systems, between 80 and 280 K with synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction. We report a number of new materials formed in this these ternary systems. This suggests that it should be considered that the `non-ice' component of the Europa's surface could be a material derived from endogenic and exogenic components. 1 Kargel, J. S. Brine volcanism and the interior structures of asteroids and icy satellites. Icarus 94, 368-390 (1991). 2 Carlson, R. W., Anderson, M. S., Mehlman, R. & Johnson, R. E. Distribution of hydrate on Europa: Further evidence for sulfuric acid hydrate. Icarus 177, 461-471, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.03.026 (2005). 3 Hand, K. P. & Carlson, R. W. Europa's surface color suggests an ocean rich with sodium chloride. Geophysical Research Letters, 2015GL063559, doi:10.1002/2015gl063559 (2015).

  20. Inoculation of newborn SWR/J females with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus can produce transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Panthier, J J; Condamine, H; Jacob, F

    1988-02-01

    Endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia proviruses that were not present in the parental stock are acquired by the progeny of some SWR/J X RF/J hybrid females. We have made a stock of an ecotropic murine leukemia virus produced by such a hybrid female and inoculated newborn SWR/J females with it. We show that upon crossing of the inoculated females to SWR/J males, some of their progeny acquire ecotropic proviruses. Although most of these proviruses appear to be distributed in somatic tissues in a mosaic way, some are transmitted through the germ line. Thus an exogenous infection is able to mimic the phenomenon observed in SWR/J X RF/J hybrid mice. Available evidence suggests that this infection occurs during oogenesis in the recipient female. Our results document the conversion of an exogenous infectious ecotropic murine leukemia virus to an endogenous provirus without any manipulation of either eggs or embryos.

  1. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Peng, Ming-Yieh; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs when organisms are hematogenously disseminated in to the eye from a distant focus of infection. The most common isolated organisms that cause endogenous endophthalmitis are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Previous reports on endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter species are limited. We present the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri bacteremia and renal abscesses.

  2. Chronic overload of SEPT4, a parkin substrate that aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, causes behavioral alterations but not neurodegeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism (PARK2), the pathogenetic process from the loss of function of a ubiquitin ligase parkin to the death of dopamine neurons remains unclear. A dominant hypothesis attributes the neurotoxicity to accumulated substrates that are exempt from parkin-mediated degradation. Parkin substrates include two septins; SEPT4/CDCrel-2 which coaggregates with α-synuclein as Lewy bodies in Parkinson’s disease, and its closest homolog SEPT5/CDCrel-1/PNUTL1 whose overload with viral vector can rapidly eliminate dopamine neurons in rats. However, chronic effects of pan-neural overload of septins have never been examined in mammals. To address this, we established a line of transgenic mice that express the largest gene product SEPT454kDa via the prion promoter in the entire brain. Results Histological examination and biochemical quantification of SEPT4-associated proteins including α-synuclein and the dopamine transporter in the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons found no significant difference between Sept4Tg/+ and wild-type littermates. Thus, the hypothetical pathogenicity by the chronic overload of SEPT4 alone, if any, is insufficient to trigger neurodegenerative process in the mouse brain. Intriguingly, however, a systematic battery of behavioral tests revealed unexpected abnormalities in Sept4Tg/+ mice that include consistent attenuation of voluntary activities in distinct behavioral paradigms and altered social behaviors. Conclusions Together, these data indicate that septin dysregulations commonly found in postmortem human brains with Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders may be responsible for a subset of behavioral abnormalities in the patients. PMID:23938054

  3. Chronic overload of SEPT4, a parkin substrate that aggregates in Parkinson's disease, causes behavioral alterations but not neurodegeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamakado, Hodaka; Morita, Takao; Hattori, Satoko; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2013-08-11

    In autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinsonism (PARK2), the pathogenetic process from the loss of function of a ubiquitin ligase parkin to the death of dopamine neurons remains unclear. A dominant hypothesis attributes the neurotoxicity to accumulated substrates that are exempt from parkin-mediated degradation. Parkin substrates include two septins; SEPT4/CDCrel-2 which coaggregates with α-synuclein as Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease, and its closest homolog SEPT5/CDCrel-1/PNUTL1 whose overload with viral vector can rapidly eliminate dopamine neurons in rats. However, chronic effects of pan-neural overload of septins have never been examined in mammals. To address this, we established a line of transgenic mice that express the largest gene product SEPT4(54kDa) via the prion promoter in the entire brain. Histological examination and biochemical quantification of SEPT4-associated proteins including α-synuclein and the dopamine transporter in the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons found no significant difference between Sept4(Tg/+) and wild-type littermates. Thus, the hypothetical pathogenicity by the chronic overload of SEPT4 alone, if any, is insufficient to trigger neurodegenerative process in the mouse brain. Intriguingly, however, a systematic battery of behavioral tests revealed unexpected abnormalities in Sept4(Tg/+) mice that include consistent attenuation of voluntary activities in distinct behavioral paradigms and altered social behaviors. Together, these data indicate that septin dysregulations commonly found in postmortem human brains with Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders may be responsible for a subset of behavioral abnormalities in the patients.

  4. Glucosylceramides stimulate mitogenesis in aged murine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, N L; Uchida, Y; Brown, B E; Elias, P M; Holleran, W M

    1998-04-01

    Glucosylceramides (GlcCer) and ceramides (Cer) appear to have opposite effects on epidermal growth and differentiation. Whereas Cer inhibit mitosis and induce terminal differentiation and apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes, GlcCer is mitogenic in young murine epidermis. Using a recently described murine model of chronologic senescence we explored whether GlcCer is mitogenic in aged epidermis. Epidermal GlcCer content increases following topical applications of either conduritol-B epoxide (CBE), an inhibitor of GlcCer hydrolysis, or exogenous GlcCer in a penetration-enhancing vehicle. During chronologic aging in the hairless mouse, baseline epidermal DNA synthesis rates remain normal until 18 mo, but decline significantly at 24 mo. Topical CBE stimulates a 1.5- to 1.9-fold increase in epidermal DNA synthesis in all age groups (i.e., 1-2, 18, and 24 mo). Although the CBE induced increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in 24 mo old animals is significant (p < 0.01), it is not sufficient to reach the absolute levels reached in similarly treated, younger mouse epidermis. Moreover, topical GlcCer induced mitogenesis is both dose dependent and hexose specific in young (1-2 mo old) animals, and remains effective in aged (< or = 24 mo old) animals. Furthermore, the CBE induced increase in DNA synthesis in aged epidermis is sufficient to produce epidermal hyperplasia. Finally, although an increased GlcCer:Cer ratio can alter stratum corneum barrier function and membrane structure, neither stratum corneum function nor extracellular membrane structure change under these experimental conditions, and therefore the mitogenic effects of increased epidermal GlcCer cannot be attributed to effects on the stratum corneum. These results show that: (i) elevations in endogenous GlcCer are mitogenic for aged as well as young murine epidermis; (ii) topical GlcCer is also mitogenic when delivered in an enhancing vehicle; and (iii) despite the putative importance of epidermal DNA synthesis

  5. Endogenous Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Orville; Smith, D. D.; Pope, Leodocia M.; Olson, K. E.

    1969-01-01

    When young cells of Azotobacter vinelandii are impinged on membrane filters, washed free of carbon substrate, and placed on a mineral salts basal medium, the culture will proceed to encyst although at a slower rate than if n-butanol were supplied as a substrate. The endogenous cysts are depleted in polyβ-hydroxybutyrate and have a narrower intine but show an increased resistance to desiccation and are susceptible to lysis by chelating agents. Membrane-supported cells reveal details of the encystment process such as the formation of a zone within the capsule prior to exine formation and the early deposition of exine structures. Images PMID:5344107

  6. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  7. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  8. Endogenous fertility, mortality and growth.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, K; Cipriani, G P

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model that illustrates the joint determination of population and development. "Economic and demographic outcomes are determined jointly in a choice-theoretic model of fertility, mortality and capital accumulation.... In addition to choosing savings and births, parents may reduce (infant) deaths by incurring expenditures on health-care which is also provided by the government. A generalised production technology accounts for long-run endogenous growth with short-run transitional dynamics. The analysis yields testable time series and cross-section implications which accord with the empirical evidence on the relationship between demography and development."

  9. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  10. Endogenous retroviruses in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Jugo, Begoña Marina

    2014-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements that are present in a wide range of vertebrates. Although the study of ERVs has been carried out mainly in humans and model organisms, recently, domestic animals have become important, and some species have begun to be analyzed to gain further insight into ERVs. Due to the availability of complete genomes and the development of new computer tools, ERVs can now be analyzed from a genome-wide viewpoint. In addition, more experimental work is being carried out to analyze the distribution, expression and interplay of ERVs within a host genome. Cats, cattle, chicken, dogs, horses, pigs and sheep have been scrutinized in this manner, all of which are interesting species in health and economic terms. Furthermore, several studies have noted differences in the number of endogenous retroviruses and in the variability of these elements among different breeds, as well as their expression in different tissues and the effects of their locations, which, in some cases, are near genes. These findings suggest a complex, intriguing relationship between ERVs and host genomes. In this review, we summarize the most important in silico and experimental findings, discuss their implications and attempt to predict future directions for the study of these genomic elements.

  11. HMGB1: Endogenous Danger Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klune, John R; Dhupar, Rajeev; Cardinal, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Tsung, Allan

    2008-01-01

    While foreign pathogens and their products have long been known to activate the innate immune system, the recent recognition of a group of endogenous molecules that serve a similar function has provided a framework for understanding the overlap between the inflammatory responses activated by pathogens and injury. These endogenous molecules, termed alarmins, are normal cell constituents that can be released into the extracellular milieu during states of cellular stress or damage and subsequently activate the immune system. One nuclear protein, High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), has received particular attention as fulfilling the functions of an alarmin by being involved in both infectious and non-infectious inflammatory conditions. Once released, HMGB1 signals through various receptors to activate immune cells involved in the immune process. Although initial studies demonstrated HMGB1 as a late mediator of sepsis, recent findings indicate HMGB1 to have an important role in models of non-infectious inflammation, such as autoimmunity, cancer, trauma, and ischemia reperfusion injury. Furthermore, in contrast to its pro-inflammatory functions, there is evidence that HMGB1 also has restorative effects leading to tissue repair and regeneration. The complex functions of HMGB1 as an archetypical alarmin are outlined here to review our current understanding of a molecule that holds the potential for treatment in many important human conditions. PMID:18431461

  12. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cao, María; Iduma, Paola; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Blanco, Julià; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are retroviruses that infected human genome millions of years ago and have persisted throughout human evolution. About 8% of our genome is composed of HERVs, most of which are nonfunctional because of epigenetic control or deactivating mutations. However, a correlation between HERVs and human cancer has been described and many tumors, such as melanoma, breast cancer, germ cell tumors, renal cancer or ovarian cancer, express HERV proteins, mainly HERV-K (HML6) and HERV-K (HML2). Although the causative role of HERVs in cancer is controversial, data from animal models demonstrated that endogenous retroviruses are potentially oncogenic. HERV protein expression in human cells generates an immune response by activating innate and adaptive immunities. Some HERV-derived peptides have antigenic properties. For example, HERV-K (HML-6) encodes the HER-K MEL peptide recognized by CD8+ lymphocytes. In addition, HERVs are two-edged immunomodulators. HERVs show immunosuppressive activity. The presence of genomic retroviral elements in host-cell cytosol may activate an interferon type I response. Therefore, targeting HERVs through cellular vaccines or immunomodulatory drugs combined with checkpoint inhibitors is attracting interest because they could be active in human tumors. PMID:28154780

  13. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  14. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  15. Rescue of endogenous 30S retroviral sequences from mouse cells by baboon type C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, S A; Rapp, U R; Benveniste, R E; Sen, A; Todaro, G J

    1978-01-01

    Mus musculus SC-1 cells were infected with M7 baboon type C virus. The progeny of this infection included viral pseudotypes that contained M7 helper virus and endogenous 30S retrovirus-associated sequences derived from SC-1 cells (RAS). The RAS sequences are unrelated by nucleic acid hybridization criteria to previously described types of murine retroviruses and do not code for known murine viral structural proteins. The RAS genome is present in multiple copies in the DNA of laboratory (M. musculus) and Asian (M. caroli and M. cervicolor) mice, is expressed in the RNA of uninfected mouse cells, and can be efficiently rescued by type C, but not type B, viruses. RAS is closely related to 30S virus-associated RNA in NIH/3T3 and BALB/c JLSV-9 cells and may be analogous to the defective 30S RNA sequences found in rats. PMID:207887

  16. Activation of endogenous antioxidants as a common therapeutic strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases: A lesson learnt from DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2015-12-01

    This review aims at presenting a new concept pertaining to the development of antioxidants, namely, to evolve from disease-oriented therapy to mechanism-oriented therapy. Using as our illustrative example is DJ-1, a homodimeric protein that is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, including the brain, and is found in the matrix and the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. DJ-1 is known to be an endogenous antioxidant against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, of which oxidative stress plays a causal role. Interestingly, the mechanistic targets of DJ-1 as an antioxidant, including Daxx, Nrf2, thioredoxin, glutathione, α-synuclein, PTEN/PI3K/Akt, and Pink/Parkin are also associated with those oxidative stress-related diseases. Furthermore, activators of DJ-1 are available in the form of mortalin, phenylbutyrate and quinone oxidoreductase 1. It follows that activation of DJ-1 as a common endogenous antioxidant provides a new strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases. Since clinical trials on exogenous application of the known antioxidants have basically failed, an alternative approach would logically be to activate the endogenous antioxidants that are already present in the appropriate cellular locale where elevated oxidative stress is the culprit for the disease. At the same time, since oxidative stress is a common denominator among cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, development of antioxidant therapy should target the reduction in reactive oxygen species. Instead of focusing on disease-oriented therapy, pharmaceutical companies should concentrate on developing agents and dosing schemes for effective activation of the endogenous antioxidants that are associated with a multitude of oxidative stress-related diseases (mechanism-oriented therapy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  18. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Parola, P; Vogelaers, D; Roure, C; Janbon, F; Raoult, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers.

  19. Role of endogenous insulin gene enhancer protein ISL-1 in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Si-qi; Jiang, Hai-bo; Li, Yan-xiu; Li, Hai-bo; Xu, Hui-zhuo; Wu, Zhen-kai; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the role of insulin gene enhancer protein ISL-1 (Islet-1) in angiogenesis and regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vitro and in vivo. Methods siRNA targeting Islet-1 was transfected to human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVECs). The expression of Islet-1 and VEGF in the cultured cells was measured using real-time PCR and immunoblotting. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide; thiazolyl blue (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of HUVECs affected by Islet-1. Wound healing and Transwell assays were conducted to assess the motility of HUVECs. The formation of capillary-like structures was examined using growth factor–reduced Matrigel. siRNA targeting Islet-1 was intravitreally injected into the murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Retinal neovascularization was evaluated with angiography using fluorescein-labeled dextran and then quantified histologically. Real-time PCR and immunoblotting were used to determine whether local Islet-1 silencing affected the expression of Islet-1 and VEGF in murine retinas. Results The expression of Islet-1 and VEGF in HUVECs was knocked down by siRNA. Reduced endogenous Islet-1 levels in cultured cells greatly inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formation in HUVECs in vitro. Retinal neovascularization following injection of Islet-1 siRNA was significantly reduced compared with that of the contralateral control eye. Histological analysis indicated that the neovascular nuclei protruding into the vitreous cavity were decreased. Furthermore, the Islet-1 and VEGF expression levels were downregulated in murine retinas treated with siRNA against Islet-1. Conclusions Reducing the expression of endogenous Islet-1 inhibits proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vascular endothelial cells in vitro and suppresses retinal angiogenesis in vivo. Endogenous Islet-1 regulates angiogenesis via VEGF. PMID:27994436

  20. ARHGAP18: an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, limiting tip formation and stabilizing junctions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Garry HK; Lay, Angelina J; Ting, Ka Ka; Zhao, Yang; Coleman, Paul R; Powter, Elizabeth E; Formaz-Preston, Ann; Jolly, Christopher J; Bower, Neil I; Hogan, Benjamin M; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S; Vadas, Mathew A; Gamble, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the vascular network requires a tightly controlled balance of pro-angiogenic and stabilizing signals. Perturbation of this balance can result in dysregulated blood vessel morphogenesis and drive pathologies including cancer. Here, we have identified a novel gene, ARHGAP18, as an endogenous negative regulator of angiogenesis, limiting pro-angiogenic signaling and promoting vascular stability. Loss of ARHGAP18 promotes EC hypersprouting during zebrafish and murine retinal vessel development and enhances tumor vascularization and growth. Endogenous ARHGAP18 acts specifically on RhoC and relocalizes to the angiogenic and destabilized EC junctions in a ROCK dependent manner, where it is important in reaffirming stable EC junctions and suppressing tip cell behavior, at least partially through regulation of tip cell genes, Dll4, Flk-1 and Flt-4. These findings highlight ARHGAP18 as a specific RhoGAP to fine tune vascular morphogenesis, limiting tip cell formation and promoting junctional integrity to stabilize the angiogenic architecture. PMID:25425145

  1. Endogenous Fluorescence Signatures in Living Pluripotent Stem Cells Change with Loss of Potency

    PubMed Central

    Squirrell, Jayne M.; Fong, Jimmy J.; Ariza, Carlos A.; Mael, Amber; Meyer, Kassondra; Shevde, Nirupama K.; Roopra, Avtar; Lyons, Gary E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of stem cells is limited by the non-uniformity of their phenotypic state. Thus it would be advantageous to noninvasively monitor stem cell status. Driven by this challenge, we employed multidimensional multiphoton microscopy to quantify changes in endogenous fluorescence occurring with pluripotent stem cell differentiation. We found that global and cellular-scale fluorescence lifetime of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and murine embryonic stem cells (mESC) consistently decreased with differentiation. Less consistent were trends in endogenous fluorescence intensity with differentiation, suggesting intensity is more readily impacted by nuances of species and scale of analysis. What emerges is a practical and accessible approach to evaluate, and ultimately enrich, living stem cell populations based on changes in metabolism that could be exploited for both research and clinical applications. PMID:22952742

  2. Endogenous pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators: a new pharmacologic genus.

    PubMed

    Serhan, C N; Chiang, N

    2008-03-01

    Complete resolution of an acute inflammatory response and its return to homeostasis are essential for healthy tissues. Here, we overview ongoing efforts to characterize cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the resolution of self-limited inflammation. Systematic temporal analyses of evolving inflammatory exudates using mediator lipidomics-informatics, proteomics, and cellular trafficking with murine resolving exudates demonstrate novel endogenous pathways of local-acting mediators that share both anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties. In murine systems, resolving-exudate leukocytes switch their phenotype to actively generate new families of mediators from major omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA termed resolvins and protectins. Recent advances on their biosynthesis and actions are reviewed with a focus on the E-series resolvins (RvE1, RvE2), D series resolvins (RvD1, RvD2) and the protectins including neuroprotectin D1/protectin D1 (NPD1/PD1) as well as their aspirin-triggered epimeric forms. Members of each new family demonstrate potent stereo-specific actions, joining the lipoxins as endogenous local signals that govern resolution and endogenous anti-inflammation mechanisms. In addition to their origins and roles in resolution biology in the immune system, recent findings indicate that these new mediator families also display potent protective actions in lung, kidney, and eye as well as enhance microbial clearance. Thus, these endogenous agonists of resolution pathways constitute a novel genus of chemical mediators that possess pro-resolving, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic as well as host-directed antimicrobial actions. These may be useful in the design of new therapeutics and treatments for diseases with the underlying trait of uncontrolled inflammation and redox organ stress.

  3. Endogenic cratering distribution on the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grudewicz, E. B.

    1973-01-01

    Medium-resolution Lunar Orbiter V photographs are used for counting and measuring endogenic craters in the Hyginus Rille floor. A Poisson-type crater distribution consisting of the smaller craters, and a Gaussian-type endogenic size-frequency distribution are established on a diameter vs frequency diagram of the craters.

  4. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  5. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  6. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  7. Remote ischemic postconditioning: harnessing endogenous protection in a murine model of vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Badruzzaman; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Vaibhav, Kumar; Giri, Shailendra; Wang, Philip; Waller, Jennifer L; Ergul, Adviye; Dhandapani, Krishnan M; Fagan, Susan C; Hess, David C

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC; PERconditioning) during acute stroke confers neuroprotection, possibly due to increased cerebral blood flow (CBF). Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a growing threat to public health without any known treatment. The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model is regarded as the most valid model for VCI. We hypothesized that RLIC (postconditioning; RIPostC) will augment CBF during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and prevent cognitive impairment in the BCAS model. BCAS using customized microcoil was performed in C57/B6 male mice to establish CCH. A week after the BCAS surgery, mice were treated with RIPostC-therapy once daily for 2 weeks. CBF was measured with laser speckle contrast imager at different time points. Cognitive testing was performed at 4-week post-BCAS, and brain tissue was harvested for biochemistry. BCAS led to chronic hypoperfusion resulting into impaired cognitive function as tested by novel object recognition (NOR). Histological examinations revealed that BCAS triggered inflammatory responses and caused frequent vacuolization and cell death. BCAS also increased the generation and accumulation of amyloid beta protein (Aβ), resulting into the loss of white matter (WM) and myelin basic protein (MBP). RIPostC-therapy showed both acute increase as well as sustained improvement in CBF even after the cessation of therapy for a week. RIPostC improved cognitive function, inhibited inflammatory responses, prevented the cell death, reduced the generation and accumulation of Aβ, and protected WM integrity. RIPostC is effective in the BCAS model and could be an attractive low-cost conventional therapy for aged individuals with VCI. The mechanisms by which RIPostC improves CBF and attenuates tissue damage need to be investigated in the future.

  8. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  9. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  10. Xenotransplantation and pig endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Magre, Saema; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Bartosch, Birke

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human patients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and virological factors considered with regard to xenotransplantation. Among the issues reviewed are the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology and the immunological hindrances with regard to the various types of rejection and attempts at abrogating rejection. Advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection by creating genetically modified pigs that are more suited to the human microenvironment are also discussed. Finally, with regard to virology, possible zoonotic infections emanating from pigs are reviewed, with special emphasis on the pig endogenous retrovirus (PERV). An in depth account of PERV studies, comprising their discovery as well as recent knowledge of the virus, is given. To date, all retrospective studies on patients with pig xenografts have shown no evidence of PERV transmission, however, many factors make us interpret these results with caution. Although the lack of PERV infection in xenograft recipients up to now is encouraging, more basic research and controlled animal studies that mimic the pig to human xenotransplantation setting more closely are required for safety assessment.

  11. Preservation media analysis for ex vivo measurements of endogenous UV fluorescence of liver fibrosis in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Perez-Garcia, Adolfo; Aleman-García, Nathalie; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Sánchez-Pérez, Celia; Franco, Walfre; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín.

    2017-02-01

    Non-subjective, minimally-invasive, and quantifying techniques may support development and evaluation of a fibrosis regression treatment. The build-up of extracellular matrix in liver fibrosis may result on changes of the endogenous fluorescence of tissue. In this work, we evaluate the fluorescence excitation/emission matrix in the UV range for several bulk samples of murine hepatic tissue preserved in different media. Chemical changes on tissue, caused by formaldehyde preservation, alter the endogenous fluorescence spectra. To avoid these drawbacks, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium were used. PBS buffer showed to be the less harmful and cost-effective preservation medium to study the endogenous fluorescence in fibrotic tissue.

  12. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  13. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 interacts with Parkin, DJ-1 and PINK-1 in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Venderova, Katerina; Kabbach, Ghassan; Abdel-Messih, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yi; Parks, Robin J; Imai, Yuzuru; Gehrke, Stephan; Ngsee, Johnny; Lavoie, Matthew J; Slack, Ruth S; Rao, Yong; Zhang, Zhuohua; Lu, Bingwei; Haque, M Emdadul; Park, David S

    2009-11-15

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are the most common genetic cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its physiological and pathological functions are unknown. Therefore, we generated several independent Drosophila lines carrying WT or mutant human LRRK2 (mutations in kinase, COR or LRR domains, resp.). Ectopic expression of WT or mutant LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons caused their significant loss accompanied by complex age-dependent changes in locomotor activity. Overall, the ubiquitous expression of LRRK2 increased lifespan and fertility of the flies. However, these flies were more sensitive to rotenone. LRRK2 expression in the eye exacerbated retinal degeneration. Importantly, in double transgenic flies, various indices of the eye and dopaminergic survival were modified in a complex fashion by a concomitant expression of PINK1, DJ-1 or Parkin. This evidence suggests a genetic interaction between these PD-relevant genes.

  14. Novel Endogenous Type D Retroviral Particles Expressed at High Levels in a SCID Mouse Thymic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ristevski, Sika; Purcell, Damian F. J.; Marshall, John; Campagna, Daniella; Nouri, Sara; Fenton, Simon P.; McPhee, Dale A.; Kannourakis, George

    1999-01-01

    A xenograft model of the human disease Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) was investigated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Transplantation of human LCH biopsy material into SCID mice resulted in the generation of mouse tumors resembling lymphomas. A thymoma cell line (ThyE1M6) was generated from one of these mice and found to display significant levels of Mg2+-dependent reverse transcriptase activity. Electron microscopy revealed particles with type D retroviral morphology budding from ThyE1M6 cells at a high frequency, whereas control cultures were negative. Reverse transcription-PCR of virion RNA with degenerate primers for conserved regions of various mouse, human, and primate retroviruses amplified novel sequences related to primate type D retroviruses, murine intracisternal A particles, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, and murine long interspersed nuclear elements but not other retroviral classes. We demonstrate that these sequences represent a novel group of endogenous retroviruses expressed at low levels in mice but expressed at high levels in the ThyE1M6 cell line. Furthermore, we propose that the activation of endogenous retroviral elements may be associated with a high incidence of thymomas in SCID mice. PMID:10233925

  15. ES cell potency fluctuates with endogenous retrovirus activity

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlan, Todd S.; Gifford, Wesley D.; Driscoll, Shawn; Lettieri, Karen; Rowe, Helen M.; Bonanomi, Dario; Firth, Amy; Singer, Oded; Trono, Didier; Pfaff, Samuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst stage embryos and are believed to be functionally equivalent to the inner cell mass, which lacks the ability to produce all extraembryonic tissues. Here we report the identification of a rare transient cell population within mouse ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell cultures that express high levels of transcripts found in two-cell (2C) embryos in which the blastomeres are totipotent. We genetically tagged these 2C-like ES cells and show that they lack the ICM pluripotency proteins Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog and have acquired the ability to contribute to both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. We show that nearly all ES cells cycle in and out of this privileged state, which we find is partially controlled by histone modifying enzymes. Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatic analyses revealed that a significant number of 2C-transcripts are initiated from long terminal repeats derived from murine endogenous retroviruses, suggesting this foreign sequence has helped to drive cell fate regulation in placental mammals. PMID:22722858

  16. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  17. Computational design and application of endogenous promoters for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Joosten, Leo A B; Takahashi, Nozomi; Arntz, Onno J; Glück, Anton; Bennink, Miranda B; van den Berg, Wim B; van de Loo, Fons A J

    2009-11-01

    The promoter regions of genes that are differentially regulated in the synovial membrane during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represent attractive candidates for application in transcriptionally targeted gene therapy. In this study, we applied an unbiased computational approach to define proximal-promoters from a gene expression profiling study of murine experimental arthritis. Synovium expression profiles from progressing stages of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were classified into six distinct groups using k-means clustering. Using an algorithm based on local over-representation and comparative genomics, we identified putatively functional transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS) in TATA-dependent proximal-promoters. Applying a filter based on spacing between TATA box and transcription start site (TSS) combined with the presence of over-represented nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), AP-1, or CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) sites, 382 candidate murine and human promoters were reduced to 66, corresponding to 45 genes. In vitro, 9 out of 10 computationally defined promoter regions conferred cytokine-inducible expression in murine cells and human synovial fibroblasts. Under these conditions, the serum amyloid A3 (Saa3) promoter showed the strongest transcriptional induction and strength. We applied this promoter for driving therapeutically efficacious levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Il1rn) in a disease-regulated fashion. These results demonstrate the value of bioinformatics for guiding the selection of endogenous promoters for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy.

  18. Endogenous Retroviruses and Breast Carcinoma Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Upregulation of a selective set of HERV-K10 elements by steroid hormones. In murine IAP family, active IAP expressions in plasmacytomas and normal...genes in established mouse plasmacytomas . Mol. Cell. Biol. 13: 7439- 7446. 35. Mietz, J.A., Fewell, J.W., and Kuff, E.L. 1992. Selective activation of

  19. Murine Gammaretrovirus Group G3 Was Not Found in Swedish Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Mattsson Ulfstedt, Johan; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Bölin Wiener, Agnes; Golbob, Sultan; Öhrmalm, Christina; Matousek, Michael; Zachrisson, Olof; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Blomberg, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background The recent report of gammaretroviruses of probable murine origin in humans, called xenotropic murine retrovirus related virus (XMRV) and human murine leukemia virus related virus (HMRV), necessitated a bioinformatic search for this virus in genomes of the mouse and other vertebrates, and by PCR in humans. Results Three major groups of murine endogenous gammaretroviruses were identified. The third group encompassed both exogenous and endogenous Murine Leukemia Viruses (MLVs), and most XMRV/HMRV sequences reported from patients suffering from myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Two sensitive real-time PCRs for this group were developed. The predicted and observed amplification range for these and three published XMRV/HMRV PCRs demonstrated conspicuous differences between some of them, partly explainable by a recombinatorial origin of XMRV. Three reverse transcription real-time PCRs (RTQPCRs), directed against conserved and not overlapping stretches of env, gag and integrase (INT) sequences of XMRV/HMRV were used on human samples. White blood cells from 78 patients suffering from ME/CFS, of which 30 patients also fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia (ME/CFS/FM) and in 7 patients with fibromyalgia (FM) only, all from the Gothenburg area of Sweden. As controls we analyzed 168 sera from Uppsala blood donors. We controlled for presence and amplifiability of nucleic acid and for mouse DNA contamination. To score as positive, a sample had to react with several of the XMRV/HMRV PCRs. None of the samples gave PCR reactions which fulfilled the positivity criteria. Conclusions XMRV/HMRV like proviruses occur in the third murine gammaretrovirus group, characterized here. PCRs developed by us, and others, approximately cover this group, except for the INT RTQPCR, which is rather strictly XMRV specific. Using such PCRs, XMRV/HMRV could not be detected in PBMC and plasma samples from Swedish patients suffering from ME/CFS/FM, and in

  20. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  1. Endogenous Optical Signals Reveal Changes of Elastin and Collagen Organization During Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Thimm, Terra N; Squirrell, Jayne M; Liu, Yuming; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-10-01

    Components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have recently been shown to influence stem cell specification. However, it has been challenging to assess the spatial and temporal dynamics of stem cell-ECM interactions because most methodologies utilized to date require sample destruction or fixation. We examined the efficacy of utilizing the endogenous optical signals of two important ECM proteins, elastin (Eln), through autofluorescence, and type I collagen (ColI), through second harmonic generation (SHG), during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation. After finding favorable overlap between antibody labeling and the endogenous fluorescent signal of Eln, we used this endogenous signal to map temporal changes in Eln and ColI during murine embryoid body differentiation and found that Eln increases until day 9 and then decreases slightly by day 12, while Col1 steadily increases over the 12-day period. Furthermore, we combined endogenous fluorescence imaging and SHG with antibody labeling of cardiomyocytes to examine the spatial relationship between Eln and ColI accumulation and cardiomyocyte differentiation. Eln was ubiquitously present, with enrichment in regions with cardiomyocyte differentiation, while there was an inverse correlation between ColI and cardiomyocyte differentiation. This work provides an important first step for utilizing endogenous optical signals, which can be visualized in living cells, to understand the relationship between the ECM and cardiomyocyte development and sets the stage for future studies of stem cell-ECM interactions and dynamics relevant to stem cells as well as other cell and tissue types.

  2. Is endogenous glycerol a determinant of stratum corneum hydration in humans?

    PubMed

    Choi, Eung Ho; Man, Mao-Qiang; Wang, Fusheng; Zhang, Xinjiang; Brown, Barbara E; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2005-08-01

    Although stratum corneum (SC) hydration has been primarily of concern to the cosmetic industry, it serves an important biosensor function. In murine models, not only deiminated products of filaggrin-derived amino acids ("NMF") but also endogenous glycerol from circulation into the epidermis via aquaporin 3 channel and from triglyceride turnover in sebaceous glands (SG) are important determinants. We assessed here whether endogenous glycerol could also be linked to SC hydration in humans. SG-enriched sites are more hydrated than SG-impoverished sites, and SC hydration correlates with both sebum production and SC glycerol content, but the correlation is more significant for SC glycerol content than for sebum content. Moreover, gender-related differences in sebum content are not associated with altered SC hydration. SC hydration is also linked to SC glycerol content in SG-impoverished sites, suggesting a role for non-SG-derived (? from circulation) glycerol in SC hydration. Finally, short-term water immersion produces a parallel decline in SC hydration and SC glycerol content, with glycerol levels returning to normal over several hours. These results suggest that endogenous glycerol of both circulatory and SG origin comprises an H2O-extractable pool that influences SC hydration in humans. These results also provide a rationale for the development of glycerol-containing therapeutic moisturizers.

  3. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells.

  4. In vivo regulation of replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection by endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Remick, D G; Freeman, P T; Hurley, M C; Fantone, J C; Engleberg, N C

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) in modulation of growth of Legionella pneumophila in the lung was assessed using a murine model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection. Intratracheal inoculation of mice with L. pneumophila resulted in induction of endogenous TNF-alpha, which preceded clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Inhibition of endogenous TNF-alpha activity, via in vivo administration of TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody, or inhibition of endogenous RNIs, via administration of the nitric oxide (NO) synthetase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), resulted in enhanced growth of L. pneumophila in the lung at > or = 3 days postinfection (when compared with untreated L. pneumophila-infected mice). Because of the similar kinetics of enhanced pulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in mice treated in vivo with either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or NMMA, the immunomodulatory effect of NO on endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung was assessed. Administration of NMMA to L. pneumophila-infected mice resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung during replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo. However, administration of exogenous TNF-alpha to NMMA-treated mice failed to significantly enhance clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Results of these studies indicate that both endogenous NO and TNF-alpha facilitate resolution of replicative L. pneumophila lung infections and that regulation of L. pneumophila replication by TNF-alpha is mediated, at least in part, by NO. PMID:7642253

  5. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  6. Endogenous versus Exogenous Origins of Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier

    Are large biological extinctions such as the Cretaceous/Tertiary KT boundary due to a meteorite, extreme volcanic activity or self-organized critical extinction cascades? Are commercial successes due to a progressive reputation cascade or the result of a well orchestrated advertisement? Determining the chain of causality for Xevents in complex systems requires disentangling interwoven exogenous and endogenous contributions with either no clear signature or too many signatures. Here, I review several efforts carried out with collaborators which suggest a general strategy for understanding the organizations of several complex systems under the dual effect of endogenous and exogenous fluctuations. The studied examples are: internet download shocks, book sale shocks, social shocks, financial volatility shocks, and financial crashes. Simple models are offered to quantitatively relate the endogenous organization to the exogenous response of the system. Suggestions for applications of these ideas to many other systems are offered.

  7. Analysis of the Human Endogenous Coregulator Complexome

    PubMed Central

    Malovannaya, Anna; Lanz, Rainer B.; Jung, Sung Yun; Bulynko, Yaroslava; Le, Nguyen T.; Chan, Doug W.; Ding, Chen; Shi, Yi; Yucer, Nur; Krenciute, Giedre; Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Chunshu; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Qin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Summary Elucidation of endogenous cellular protein-protein interactions and their networks is most desirable for biological studies. Here we report our study of endogenous human coregulator protein complex networks obtained from integrative mass spectrometry-based analysis of 3,290 affinity purifications. By preserving weak protein interactions during complex isolation and utilizing high levels of reciprocity in the large dataset we identified many unreported protein associations, such as a transcriptional network formed by ZMYND8, ZNF687 and ZNF592. Furthermore, our work revealed a tiered interplay within networks that share common proteins, providing a conceptual organization of a cellular proteome composed of minimal endogenous modules (MEMOs), functional uniCOREs and regulatory complex-complex interaction networks (CCIs). This resource will effectively fill a void in linking correlative genomic studies with an understanding of transcriptional regulatory protein functions within the proteome for formulation and testing of new hypotheses. PMID:21620140

  8. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    PubMed

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [(11)C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  9. Animal spirits, competitive markets, and endogenous growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a simple model with an endogenous discount rate and linear technology to investigate whether a competitive equilibrium has a higher balanced growth path (BGP) than the social planning solution and whether the BGP is determinate or indeterminate. The implications are as follows. To start with, people with an instinct to compare themselves with others possess an endogenous discount rate. In turn, this instinct affects the economic growth rate in a competitive market economy. The competitive market economy also sometimes achieves higher economic growth than a social planning economy. However, the outcomes of market economy occasionally fluctuate because of the presence of the self-fulfilling prophecy or animal spirits.

  10. An endogenous model of the credit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianmin; Sui, Xin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an endogenous credit network model of firm-bank agents is constructed. The model describes the endogenous formation of firm-firm, firm-bank and bank-bank credit relationships. By means of simulations, the model is capable of showing some obvious similarities with empirical evidence found by other scholars: the upper-tail of firm size distribution can be well fitted with a power-law; the bank size distribution can be lognormally distributed with a power-law tail; the bank in-degrees of the interbank credit network as well as the firm-bank credit network fall into two-power-law distributions.

  11. Tobacco/Nicotine and Endogenous Brain Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yue; Domino, Edward F.

    2008-01-01

    Smoking is a major public health problem with devastating health consequences. Although many cigarette smokers are able to quit, equal numbers of others cannot! Standard medications to assist in smoking cessation, such as nicotine replacement therapies and bupropion, are ineffective in many remaining smokers. Recent developments in the neurobiology of nicotine dependence have identified several neurotransmitter systems that may contribute to the process of smoking maintenance and relapse. These include: especially dopamine, but also norepinephrine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, acetylcholine, endogenous opioids, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and endocannabinoids. The present review examines the limited contribution of the endogenous opioid system to the complex effects of nicotine/tobacco smoking. PMID:18215788

  12. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus.

  13. Genomic Flexibility of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Derek; Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; He, Shirley; King, Steven R.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Gitlin, Scott D.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) proviruses are scattered throughout the human genome, but as no infectious HERV-K virus has been detected to date, the mechanism by which these viruses replicated and populated the genome remains unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that, in addition to the RNA genomes that canonical retroviruses package, modern HERV-K viruses can contain reverse-transcribed DNA (RT-DNA) genomes. Indeed, reverse transcription of genomic HERV-K RNA into the DNA form is able to occur in three distinct times and locations: (i) in the virus-producing cell prior to viral release, yielding a DNA-containing extracellular virus particle similar to the spumaviruses; (ii) within the extracellular virus particle itself, transitioning from an RNA-containing particle to a DNA-containing particle; and (iii) after entry of the RNA-containing virus into the target cell, similar to canonical retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus and HIV. Moreover, using a resuscitated HERV-K virus construct, we show that both viruses with RNA genomes and viruses with DNA genomes are capable of infecting target cells. This high level of genomic flexibility historically could have permitted these viruses to replicate in various host cell environments, potentially assisting in their many integration events and resulting in their high prevalence in the human genome. Moreover, the ability of modern HERV-K viruses to proceed through reverse transcription and package RT-DNA genomes suggests a higher level of replication competency than was previously understood, and it may be relevant in HERV-K-associated human diseases. IMPORTANCE Retroviral elements comprise at least 8% of the human genome. Of all the endogenous retroviruses, HERV-K viruses are the most intact and biologically active. While a modern infectious HERV-K has yet to be found, HERV-K activation has been associated with cancers, autoimmune diseases, and HIV-1 infection. Thus, determining how this

  14. Endogenous MOV10 inhibits the retrotransposition of endogenous retroelements but not the replication of exogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The identification of cellular factors that regulate the replication of exogenous viruses and endogenous mobile elements provides fundamental understanding of host-pathogen relationships. MOV10 is a superfamily 1 putative RNA helicase that controls the replication of several RNA viruses and whose homologs are necessary for the repression of endogenous mobile elements. Here, we employ both ectopic expression and gene knockdown approaches to analyse the role of human MOV10 in the replication of a panel of exogenous retroviruses and endogenous retroelements. Results MOV10 overexpression substantially decreased the production of infectious retrovirus particles, as well the propagation of LTR and non-LTR endogenous retroelements. Most significantly, RNAi-mediated silencing of endogenous MOV10 enhanced the replication of both LTR and non-LTR endogenous retroelements, but not the production of infectious retrovirus particles demonstrating that natural levels of MOV10 suppress retrotransposition, but have no impact on infection by exogenous retroviruses. Furthermore, functional studies showed that MOV10 is not necessary for miRNA or siRNA-mediated mRNA silencing. Conclusions We have identified novel specificity for human MOV10 in the control of retroelement replication and hypothesise that MOV10 may be a component of a cellular pathway or process that selectively regulates the replication of endogenous retroelements in somatic cells. PMID:22727223

  15. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  16. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  17. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  18. Identification and classification of feline endogenous retroviruses in the cat genome using degenerate PCR and in silico data analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Jo, Haiin; Choi, Minkyeung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and classify endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in the cat genome. Pooled DNA from five domestic cats was subjected to degenerate PCR with primers specific to the conserved retroviral pro/pol region. The 59 amplified retroviral sequences were used for in silico analysis of the cat genome (Felis_catus-6.2). We identified 219 ERV γ and β elements from cat genome contigs, which were classified into 42 ERV γ and 4 β families and further analysed. Among them, 99 γ and 5 β ERV elements contained the complete retroviral structure. Furthermore, we identified 757 spuma-like ERV elements based on the sequence homology to murine (Mu)ERV-L and human (H)ERV-L. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed genome-scale analysis examining Felis catus endogenous retroviruses (FcERV) and providing advanced insights into their structural characteristics, localization in the genome, and diversity.

  19. An endogenous, systemic RNAi pathway in plants.

    PubMed

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Brosnan, Christopher A; Schott, Gregory; Wang, Yu; Jay, Florence; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Himber, Christophe; Voinnet, Olivier

    2010-05-19

    Recent work on metazoans has uncovered the existence of an endogenous RNA-silencing pathway that functionally recapitulates the effects of experimental RNA interference (RNAi) used for gene knockdown in organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila. The endogenous short interfering (si)RNA involved in this pathway are processed by Dicer-like nucleases from genomic loci re-arranged to form extended inverted repeats (IRs) that produce perfect or near-perfect dsRNA molecules. Although such IR loci are commonly detected in plant genomes, their genetics, evolution and potential contribution to plant biology through endogenous silencing have remained largely unexplored. Through an exhaustive analysis performed using Arabidopsis, we provide here evidence that at least two such endogenous IRs are genetically virtually indistinguishable from the transgene constructs commonly used for RNAi in plants. We show how these loci can be useful probes of the cellular mechanism and fluidity of RNA-silencing pathways in plants, and provide evidence that they may arise and disappear on an ecotype scale, show highly cell-specific expression patterns and respond to various stresses. IR loci thus have the potential to act as molecular sensors of the local environments found within distinct ecological plant niches. We further show that the various siRNA size classes produced by at least one of these IR loci are functionally loaded into cognate effector proteins and mediate both post-transcriptional gene silencing and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) of endogenous as well as exogenous targets. Finally, and as previously reported during plant experimental RNAi, we provide evidence that endogenous IR-derived siRNAs of all size classes are not cell-autonomous and can be transported through graft junctions over long distances, in target tissues where they are functional, at least in mediating RdDM. Collectively, these results define the existence of a bona fide, endogenous and

  20. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-08-22

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  1. Transplanted human bone marrow progenitor subtypes stimulate endogenous islet regeneration and revascularization.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Broughton, Heather C; Levac, Krysta D; Allan, David A; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted murine bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells recruit to the injured pancreas and induce endogenous beta cell proliferation to improve islet function. To enrich for analogous human progenitor cell types that stimulate islet regeneration, we purified human BM based on high-aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi)), an enzymatic function conserved in hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor lineages. We investigated the contributions of ALDH(hi) mixed progenitor cells or culture-expanded, ALDH-purified multipotent stromal cell (MSC) subsets to activate endogenous programs for islet regeneration after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. Intravenous injection of uncultured BM ALDH(hi) cells improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet size and vascularization, without increasing total islet number. Augmented proliferation within regenerated endogenous islets and associated vascular endothelium indicated the induction of islet-specific proliferative and pro-angiogenic programs. Although cultured MSC from independent human BM samples showed variable capacity to improve islet function, and prolonged expansion diminished hyperglycemic recovery, transplantation of ALDH-purified regenerative MSC reduced hyperglycemia and augmented total beta cell mass by stimulating the formation of small beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without evidence of increased islet vascularization or Ngn3(+) endocrine precursor activation. Thus, endogenous islet recovery after progenitor cell transplantation can occur via distinct regenerative mechanisms modulated by subtypes of progenitor cells administered. Further, understanding of how these islet regenerative and pro-angiogenic programs are activated by specific progenitor subsets may provide new approaches for combination cellular therapies to combat diabetes.

  2. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix is sensed by PINK1 to induce PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitophagy of polarized mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok Min; Youle, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Defective mitochondria exert deleterious effects on host cells. To manage this risk, mitochondria display several lines of quality control mechanisms: mitochondria-specific chaperones and proteases protect against misfolded proteins at the molecular level, and fission/fusion and mitophagy segregate and eliminate damage at the organelle level. An increase in unfolded proteins in mitochondria activates a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) to increase chaperone production, while the mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase PARK2/Parkin, whose mutations cause familial Parkinson disease, remove depolarized mitochondria through mitophagy. It is unclear, however, if there is a connection between those different levels of quality control (QC). Here, we show that the expression of unfolded proteins in the matrix causes the accumulation of PINK1 on energetically healthy mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial translocation of PARK2, mitophagy and subsequent reduction of unfolded protein load. Also, PINK1 accumulation is greatly enhanced by the knockdown of the LONP1 protease. We suggest that the accumulation of unfolded proteins in mitochondria is a physiological trigger of mitophagy.

  3. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-03

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression.

  4. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Viallet, François; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Dürr, Alexandra; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berg, Daniela; Bettella, Francesco; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Dong, Jing; Durif, Frank; Edkins, Sarah; Escott-Price, Valentina; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michèle; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Kilarski, Laura L.; Jansen, Iris E.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Lubbe, Steven; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez, María; Mätzler, Walter; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Owen, Michael J.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Shulman, Joshua; Sidransky, Ellen; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wurster, Isabel; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  5. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  6. Tacrolimus prevents murine cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are immunosuppressants frequently used in human organ transplantation. Tacrolimus is also reported to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. Here, we report that tacrolimus prevented the death from cerebral malaria of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57BL/6J mice, but not their death from malaria due to the high parasitaemia and severe anaemia. The mycophenolate mofetil-treated mice showed higher mortality from cerebral malaria and succumbed to malaria earlier than tacrolimus-treated littermates. Tacrolimus attenuated the infiltration of mononuclear cells including pathogenic CD8(+) T cells into the brain. It appears to prevent murine cerebral malaria through the inhibition of cerebral infiltration of CD8(+) T cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Murine models of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Christopher; Levine, Joel; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2003-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology limited to the large intestine. The disease is prevalent in industrial societies and is associated with specific ethnic populations. A number of murine models, each focused on distinct aspects of the disease process, were developed over the past 20 years to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of UC. These models have been and remain our best resource for the study of the disorder as a result of their homology to human UC and the ease in which they can be manipulated and examined. This review examines and distills what has been leamed from these models and how this information is related back to human UC.

  8. Murine model of TB meningitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Datta; Abbas, Ali; Kashyap, Raj Pal Singh; Gupta, Pushpa

    2016-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are the most severe forms of extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) due to high levels of mortality and neurological morbidity. Limited studies are available on CNS-TB animal-model development, despite the steady rise in cerebral-TB cases in India over the past decade. This study describes the development of a murine model of CNS-TB using a clinical strain (C3) isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of CNS-TB patients. Groups of mice were infected intravenously with an MTB C3 strain isolated from the CSF of CNS-TB patients in order to mimic the dynamics of actual infection. Brain and lung tissue were evaluated for bacterial burden, as well as histopathology and surrogate markers of TB infection at 30- and 50-days post-infection. Mice infected intravenously with MTB C3 strains showed progressive development of CNS disease, with high bacillary burden in the lungs during the initial stage (30days), which eventually disseminated to the brain at a later stage (50days). All C3-infected mice showed elevated levels of mycobacterial antigens and antibodies, as well as increased T cell adenosine deaminase activity in brain homogenates, which explicitly correlated with mycobacterial load in the brain and chronic brain pathology. High mortality rates (60%) were associated with mice infected with the C3 strain as compared to those of controls. Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future. Copyright © 2016.

  9. Genome Structure and Thymic Expression of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ching-Hung; Steiner, Lisa A.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for previously unknown genes that are required for lymphocyte development in zebrafish, a retroviral sequence was identified in a subtracted thymus cDNA library and in genomic DNA libraries. The provirus is 11.2 kb and contains intact open reading frames for the gag, pol, and env genes, as well as nearly identical flanking long terminal repeat sequences. As determined by in situ hybridization, the thymus appears to be a major tissue for retroviral expression in both larval and adult fish. Several viral transcripts were found by Northern blotting in the adult thymus. The provirus was found at the same genomic locus in sperm from four fish, suggesting that it is an endogenous retrovirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is closest to, yet distinct from, the cluster of murine leukemia virus-related retroviruses, suggesting that this virus represents a new group of retroviruses. PMID:14694121

  10. "Reverse genomics" and human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Markovitz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Over millions of years, actively replicating retroviruses entered the human genome and through time became a stable and substantial part of the inherited genetic material. A remarkable 8% of the human genome is accounted for by endogenous retroviruses, whose biological importance has not yet been elucidated. In studying the RNA of these endogenous retroviruses in the blood of living human subjects with HIV infection, we have discovered a whole new family of these viruses that had been hidden in the centromeres of specific human chromosomes. These retroviruses have specific sequences that can elucidate their chromosome of origin. As centromeres represent the most substantial remaining frontier of human genomics, these viral sequences can provide a "bar-code" that can be used to study the role of centromeres in biology and in disease. This work also highlights the efficacy of using "reverse genomics" to understand and annotate the human genome.

  11. The Cannabinoid Acids, Analogs and Endogenous Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid acids are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds some of which are endogenous molecules and others that are metabolites of phytocannabinoids. The prototypic endogenous substance is N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAgly) that is closely related in structure to the cannabinoid agonist anandamide. The most studied phytocannabinoid is Δ9–THC-11-oic acid, the principal metabolite of Δ9–THC. Both types of acids have in common several biological actions such as low affinity for CB1, anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic properties. This suggests that there may be similarities in their mechanism of action, a point that is discussed in this review. Also presented are reports on analogs of the acids that provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic agents, such as ajulemic acid. PMID:24731541

  12. Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, S J; Chung, Y M; Liu, J H

    1998-06-01

    To report two young healthy women who developed endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after undergoing surgically induced abortion. Case reports. In two eyes of two patients, a diagnosis of Candida endophthalmitis was established by typical fundus appearance, positive vaginal culture, and, in one case, positive vitreous culture. After vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B injection, one eye of one patient had a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/200, whereas one eye of one patient, who had systemic corticosteroid treatment before the correct diagnosis, developed recurrent retinal detachment and a best-corrected visual acuity of counting fingers. Induced abortion may cause endogenous Candida endophthalmitis in young healthy pregnant women. Systemic corticosteroid treatment may increase the risk of endophthalmitis.

  13. Endogenous gas gangrene after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zelić, M; Kunisek, L; Mendrila, D; Gudelj, M; Abram, M; Uravić, M

    2011-01-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall is rare, and it is usually associated with organ perforation, immunosuppression or gastrointestinal malignancies. In this paper we present a case of fulminant, endogenous gas gangrene in a 58-year old diabetic female with arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis, following uneventful laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She developed gas gangrene of the abdominal wall 12-hours after cholecystectomy and died 24-hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in spite of treatment.

  14. Adjustment of endogenous concentrations in pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Wolfsegger, Martin J

    2014-12-01

    Estimating pharmacokinetic parameters in the presence of an endogenous concentration is not straightforward as cross-reactivity in the analytical methodology prevents differentiation between endogenous and dose-related exogenous concentrations. This article proposes a novel intuitive modeling approach which adequately adjusts for the endogenous concentration. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out based on a two-compartment population pharmacokinetic (PK) model fitted to real data following intravenous administration. A constant and a proportional error model were assumed. The performance of the novel model and the method of straightforward subtraction of the observed baseline concentration from post-dose concentrations were compared in terms of terminal half-life, area under the curve from 0 to infinity, and mean residence time. Mean bias in PK parameters was up to 4.5 times better with the novel model assuming a constant error model and up to 6.5 times better assuming a proportional error model. The simulation study indicates that this novel modeling approach results in less biased and more accurate PK estimates than straightforward subtraction of the observed baseline concentration and overcomes the limitations of previously published approaches.

  15. [Endogenous persistent hypoglicemia of adult: case report].

    PubMed

    Costa, Raquel R; Maia, Frederico F R; Araújo, Levimar R

    2007-02-01

    Persistent Hyperinsulinemic Endogenous hypoglycemia in adults is, in most cases, due to Insulinoma. Nesidioblastosis, a peculiar functional hyperinsulinemia from hypertrophic beta cells, has been described mainly in newborns. This article describes a 34-year-old patient who presented hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglycemia clinical and laboratorial situation (Fasting glycemia: 54 mg/dl / Reference Interval (RI): 60-99 mg/dl; Serum insulin: 70.9 mcU/ml / RI: < 29.1 mcU/ml; e C peptide: 7.1 ng/ml / RI: 1.1-5.0 ng/ml). It was suspected Insulinoma. Because of the lack of typical images in radiologic exams (ultrasonography and computerized tomography) it had been decided to do laparotomy, but it was not found any macroscopic pancreatic tumor. Histological and histochemistry examination of a distal pancreatic segment showed alteration suitable to nesidioblastosis. The patient presented clinical stability during the next two months, however, after that, there was a recurrence of a hypoglycemia crisis, refractory to Octreotide administration. It was done "octreoscan", which showed expanded nesidioblastosis, being done extensive partial pancreatectomy. Octreotide was used again, with a good control of the hypoglycemia crisis. As it is an uncommon diagnosis in an adult, the objective of this article is to describe the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects in cases of hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglicemia.

  16. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  17. Induction of Neurorestoration From Endogenous Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji Hea; Seo, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Yong; Lee, Min-Young; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in the subventricular zone lining the ventricles of the adult brain. The resident stem/progenitor cells can be stimulated in vivo by neurotrophic factors, hematopoietic growth factors, magnetic stimulation, and/or physical exercise. In both animals and humans, the differentiation and survival of neurons arising from the subventricular zone may also be regulated by the trophic factors. Since stem/progenitor cells present in the adult brain and the production of new neurons occurs at specific sites, there is a possibility for the treatment of incurable neurological diseases. It might be feasible to induce neurogenesis, which would be particularly efficacious in the treatment of striatal neurodegenerative conditions such as Huntington's disease, as well as cerebrovascular diseases such as ischemic stroke and cerebral palsy, conditions that are widely seen in the clinics. Understanding of the molecular control of endogenous NSC activation and progenitor cell mobilization will likely provide many new opportunities as therapeutic strategies. In this review, we focus on endogenous stem/progenitor cell activation that occurs in response to exogenous factors including neurotrophic factors, hematopoietic growth factors, magnetic stimulation, and an enriched environment. Taken together, these findings suggest the possibility that functional brain repair through induced neurorestoration from endogenous stem cells may soon be a clinical reality.

  18. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  19. [Serous central chorioretinopathy and endogenous hypercortisolemia].

    PubMed

    Kapetanios, A D; Donati, G; Bouzas, E; Mastorakos, G; Pournaras, C J

    1998-05-01

    The exact pathogenic mechanism of the accumulation of subretinal fluid at the posterior pole of the fundus in cases of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is not well established. Recently, it was reported that CSC is more frequent among patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome. Thus, it has been suggested that glucocorticoids might be involved in the pathogenesis of CSC. Subsequently, additional observations, have confirmed the relationship between glucocorticoids and CSC. We present preliminary data on the endogenous cortisol secretion in patients with CSC. Sixteen patients (14 men and 2 women, 35-65 years of age) suffering from CSC, not exposed to exogenous glucocorticoids and without clinical and/or biological stigmata of endogenous Cushing's syndrome, have been examined. Twenty four hour urinary free cortisol (24 h-UFC) secretion was measured within one week of their CSC episode. Twenty four hour urinary free cortisol of age and sex matched controls were also measured. Twenty four hour urinary free cortisol was 188.20 nmol/l +/- 34.1 for the patients suffering from CSC and 115.3 nmol/l +/- 63.4 for the control group (p < 0.05). These results give additional evidence that glucocorticoids may play a role in the pathogenesis of CSC. However, given the substantial variability of urinary free cortisol levels, as indicated by the increased SD, additional number of patients should be examined.

  20. Recovery of hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons from acute toxicant exposure is dependent upon protein synthesis and associated with an increase in parkin and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 expression.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew; Behrouz, Bahareh; Sunryd, Johan; Pappas, Samuel S; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Huebner, Marianne; Lookingland, Keith J; Goudreau, John L

    2012-06-01

    Hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons remain unaffected in Parkinson disease (PD) while there is significant degeneration of midbrain nigrostriatal dopamine (NSDA) neurons. A similar pattern of susceptibility is observed in acute and chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse and rotenone rat models of degeneration. It is not known if the resistance of TIDA neurons is a constitutive or induced cell-autonomous phenotype for this unique subset of DA neurons. In the present study, treatment with a single injection of MPTP (20 mg/kg; s.c.) was employed to examine the response of TIDA versus NSDA neurons to acute injury. An acute single dose of MPTP caused an initial loss of DA from axon terminals of both TIDA and NSDA neurons, with recovery occurring solely in TIDA neurons by 16 h post-treatment. Initial loss of DA from axon terminals was dependent on a functional dopamine transporter (DAT) in NSDA neurons but DAT-independent in TIDA neurons. The active metabolite of MPTP, 1-methyl, 4-phenylpyradinium (MPP+), reached higher concentration and was eliminated slower in TIDA compared to NSDA neurons, which indicates that impaired toxicant bioactivation or distribution is an unlikely explanation for the observed resistance of TIDA neurons to MPTP exposure. Inhibition of protein synthesis prevented TIDA neuron recovery, suggesting that the ability to recover from injury was dependent on an induced, rather than a constitutive cellular mechanism. Further, there were no changes in total tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression following MPTP, indicating that up-regulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis does not account for TIDA neuronal recovery. Differential candidate gene expression analysis revealed a time-dependent increase in parkin and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) expression (mRNA and protein) in TIDA neurons during recovery from injury. Parkin expression was also found to increase with incremental

  1. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  2. Increased sensitivity of histidinemic mice to UVB radiation suggests a crucial role of endogenous urocanic acid in photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Barresi, Caterina; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Mlitz, Veronika; Kezic, Sanja; Kammeyer, Arthur; Ghannadan, Minoo; Posa-Markaryan, Katja; Selden, Clare; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2011-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA) is produced by the enzyme histidase and accumulates in the stratum corneum of the epidermis. In this study, we investigated the photoprotective role of endogenous UCA in the murine skin using histidinemic mice, in which the gene encoding histidase is mutated. Histidase was detected by immunohistochemistry in the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum of the normal murine skin but not in the histidinemic skin. The UCA content of the stratum corneum and the UVB absorption capacity of aqueous extracts from the stratum corneum were significantly reduced in histidinemic mice as compared with wild-type mice. When the shaved back skin of adult mice was irradiated with 250 mJ cm(-2) UVB, histidinemic mice accumulated significantly more DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers than did wild-type mice. Furthermore, UVB irradiation induced significantly higher levels of markers of apoptosis in the epidermis of histidinemic mice. Topical application of UCA reversed the UVB-photosensitive phenotype of histidinemic mice and increased UVB photoprotection of wild-type mice. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence for an important contribution of endogenous UCA to the protection of the epidermis against the damaging effects of UVB radiation.

  3. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  4. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  5. Unique Spectrum of Activity of Prosimian TRIM5α against Exogenous and Endogenous Retroviruses▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rahm, Nadia; Yap, Melvyn; Snoeck, Joke; Zoete, Vincent; Muñoz, Miguel; Radespiel, Ute; Zimmermann, Elke; Michielin, Olivier; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Ciuffi, Angela; Telenti, Amalio

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses, the genus of retrovirus that includes HIV-1, rarely endogenize. Some lemurs uniquely possess an endogenous lentivirus called PSIV (“prosimian immunodeficiency virus”). Thus, lemurs provide the opportunity to study the activity of host defense factors, such as TRIM5α, in the setting of germ line invasion. We characterized the activities of TRIM5α proteins from two distant lemurs against exogenous retroviruses and a chimeric PSIV. TRIM5α from gray mouse lemur, which carries PSIV in its genome, exhibited the narrowest restriction activity. One allelic variant of gray mouse lemur TRIM5α restricted only N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV), while a second variant restricted N-MLV and, uniquely, B-tropic MLV (B-MLV); both variants poorly blocked PSIV. In contrast, TRIM5α from ring-tailed lemur, which does not contain PSIV in its genome, revealed one of the broadest antiviral activities reported to date against lentiviruses, including PSIV. Investigation into the antiviral specificity of ring-tailed lemur TRIM5α demonstrated a major contribution of a 32-amino-acid expansion in variable region 2 (v2) of the B30.2/SPRY domain to the breadth of restriction. Data on lemur TRIM5α and the prediction of ancestral simian sequences hint at an evolutionary scenario where antiretroviral specificity is prominently defined by the lineage-specific expansion of the variable loops of B30.2/SPRY. PMID:21345948

  6. Human endogenous retrovirus type I-related viruses have an apparently widespread distribution within vertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J; Herniou, E; Cook, J; Waugh O'Neill, R; Tristem, M

    1997-01-01

    Retroviruses from lower vertebrate hosts have been poorly characterized to date. Few sequences have been isolated, and those which have been reported are all highly divergent when compared to the retroviruses known to be harbored by mammals and birds. Here we show that retroviruses with significant homology to the human endogenous retrovirus type I (HERV-I) are present within the genomes of fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals and that they may well be widespread within many vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences strongly supported the inclusion of viruses from each of these vertebrate classes into one monophyletic group. This analysis also demonstrated that the HERV-I-related viruses are more closely related to retroviruses belonging to the murine leukemia virus genus than to members of the other retroviral genera. The presence of HERV-I-related retroviruses in so many disparate vertebrate hosts suggests that other endogenous human retroviruses may also have a much wider distribution than is currently appreciated. PMID:8985368

  7. Endogenous biotin as a marker of adrenocortical cells with steroidogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed

    2011-04-10

    Interpretation of adrenal cortex phenotypes is greatly facilitated by simultaneous examination of multiple markers at single cell resolution. However, the availability of multiple appropriate antibodies can be rate limiting, while their cognate antigens are often subject to variable accessibility. Specific markers not subject to these constraints thus have obvious utility. Here we report that endogenous biotin, when detected in fixed, frozen tissue sections using fluorescent streptavidin, is a specific marker of apparently all cells with steroidogenic potential in the murine adrenal cortex. While streptavidin stains presteroidogenic and mature cortical cells, it does not label the adrenal capsule, medulla or vascular endothelium. Developmental profiles reveal adrenal endogenous biotin labeling from E13.5 through adulthood. Comparisons with zonal markers, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-remodeled tissue, transgenic Shh-nLacZ or Gli1-nLacZ animals, and Shh mutant embryos further demonstrate the utility of this approach. Fluorescent streptavidin applied using a simple one-step staining protocol thus provides a potent counterstain for use in adrenal analyses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Endogenous biotin as a marker of adrenocortical cells with steroidogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of adrenal cortex phenotypes is greatly facilitated by simultaneous examination of multiple markers at single cell resolution. However the availability of multiple appropriate antibodies can be rate limiting, while their cognate antigens are often subject to variable accessibility. Specific markers not subject to these constraints thus have obvious utility. Here we report that endogenous biotin, when detected in fixed, frozen tissue sections using fluorescent streptavidin, is a specific marker of apparently all cells with steroidogenic potential in the murine adrenal cortex. While streptavidin stains presteroidogenic and mature cortical cells, it does not label the adrenal capsule, medulla or vascular endothelium. Developmental profiles reveal adrenal endogenous biotin labeling from E13.5 through adulthood. Comparisons with zonal markers, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-remodeled tissue, transgenic Shhn-LacZ or Gli1-nLacZ animals, and Shh mutant embryos further demonstrate the utility of this approach. Fluorescent streptavidin applied using a simple one-step staining protocol thus provides a potent counterstain for use in adrenal analyses. PMID:21256921

  9. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  10. Impact of endogenous nitric oxide on microglial cell energy metabolism and labile iron pool

    PubMed Central

    Chénais, Benoît; Morjani, Hamid; Drapier, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    Microglial activation is common in several neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we used the murine BV-2 microglial cell line stimulated with γ-interferon and lipopolysaccharide to gain new insights into the effects of endogenously produced NO on mitochondrial respiratory capacity, iron regulatory protein activity, and redox-active iron level. Using polarographic measurement of respiration of both intact and digitonin-permeabilized cells, and spectrophotometric determination of individual respiratory chain complex activity, we showed that in addition to the reversible inhibition of cytochrome-c oxidase, long-term endogenous NO production reduced complex I and complex II activities in an irreversible manner. As a consequence, the cellular ATP level was decreased in NO-producing cells, whereas ATPase activity was unaffected. We show that NO up-regulates RNA-binding of iron regulatory protein 1 in microglial cells, and strongly reduces the labile iron pool. Together these results point to a contribution of NO derived from inflammatory microglia to the misregulation of energy-producing reactions and iron metabolism, often associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12065670

  11. Role of nitric oxide in murine conventional outflow physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason Y. H.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Bertrand, Jacques; Read, A. Thomas; Marando, Catherine M.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for glaucoma. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) decreases IOP by increasing outflow facility, but whether endogenous NO production contributes to the physiological regulation of outflow facility is unclear. Outflow facility was measured by pressure-controlled perfusion in ex vivo eyes from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or transgenic mice expressing human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) superimposed on the endogenously expressed murine eNOS (eNOS-GFPtg). In WT mice, exogenous NO delivered by 100 μM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) increased outflow facility by 62 ± 28% (SD) relative to control eyes perfused with the inactive SNAP analog N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP; n = 5, P = 0.016). In contrast, in eyes from eNOS-GFPtg mice, SNAP had no effect on outflow facility relative to NAP (−9 ± 4%, P = 0.40). In WT mice, the nonselective NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10 μM) decreased outflow facility by 36 ± 13% (n = 5 each, P = 0.012), but 100 μM l-NAME had no detectable effect on outflow facility (−16 ± 5%, P = 0.22). An eNOS-selective inhibitor (cavtratin, 50 μM) decreased outflow facility by 19 ± 12% in WT (P = 0.011) and 39 ± 25% in eNOS-GFPtg (P = 0.014) mice. In the conventional outflow pathway of eNOS-GFPtg mice, eNOS-GFP expression was localized to endothelial cells lining Schlemm's canal and the downstream vessels, with no apparent expression in the trabecular meshwork. These results suggest that endogenous NO production by eNOS within endothelial cells of Schlemm's canal or downstream vessels contributes to the physiological regulation of aqueous humor outflow facility in mice, representing a viable strategy to more successfully lower IOP in glaucoma. PMID:26040898

  12. RNA activation of haploinsufficient Foxg1 gene in murine neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred distinct gene hemizygosities are specifically linked to epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia and neuro-degeneration. Radical repair of these gene deficits via genome engineering is hardly feasible. The same applies to therapeutic stimulation of the spared allele by artificial transactivators. Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) offer an alternative, appealing approach. As a proof-of-principle, here we tested this approach on the Rett syndrome-linked, haploinsufficient, Foxg1 brain patterning gene. We selected a set of artificial small activating RNAs (saRNAs) upregulating it in neocortical precursors and their derivatives. Expression of these effectors achieved a robust biological outcome. saRNA-driven activation (RNAa) was limited to neural cells which normally express Foxg1 and did not hide endogenous gene tuning. saRNAs recognized target chromatin through a ncRNA stemming from it. Gene upregulation required Ago1 and was associated to RNApolII enrichment throughout the Foxg1 locus. Finally, saRNA delivery to murine neonatal brain replicated Foxg1-RNAa in vivo. PMID:27995975

  13. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  14. Attenuation of experimental autoimmune hepatitis by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids: involvement of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Venkatesh L; Hegde, Shweta; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Hofseth, Lorne J; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2008-07-01

    Immune-mediated liver diseases including autoimmune and viral hepatitis are a major health problem worldwide. Natural cannabinoids such as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) effectively modulate immune cell function, and they have shown therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis. Intraperitoneal administration of THC after ConA challenge inhibited hepatitis as shown by significant decrease in liver enzymes and reduced liver tissue injury. Furthermore, THC treatment resulted in significant suppression of crucial inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. It is noteworthy that THC treatment in ConA-injected mice led to significant increase in absolute number of Forkhead helix transcription factor p3+ T regulatory cells in liver. We were surprised to find that select cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) agonists were not able to block hepatitis either independently or in combination. However, CB1/CB2 mixed agonists were able to efficiently attenuate hepatitis similar to THC. The modulatory effect of THC in ConA-induced hepatitis was reversed by both CB1 and CB2 antagonists. We also observed that endogenous cannabinoid anandamide was able to reduce hepatitis by suppressing cytokine levels. In addition, deficiency or inhibition of endocannabinoid hydrolyzing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which leads to increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids, resulted in decreased liver injury upon ConA challenge. Our data demonstrate that targeting cannabinoid receptors using exogenous or endogenous cannabinoids and use of FAAH inhibitors may constitute novel therapeutic modalities to treat immune-mediated liver inflammation.

  15. Increased immunoglobulin G, but not M, binding to endogenous retroviral antigens in HIV-1 infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A; Johansson, B; Rabinayaran, D; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J

    2000-12-01

    The modes of interaction between products of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences and the immune system are largely unknown. In HIV infected persons, an exogenous retrovirus adds further complexity to the situation. Therefore, 14 synthetic peptides with sequences derived from conserved regions of various endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and from related exogenous retroviruses were used to search for IgG and IgM antibodies that bind to such antigens in 15 HIV-1 seropositive and 17 seronegative immunosuppressed patients. IgG binding to three peptides, namely, the C-terminal half of murine leukemia virus (MLV) capsid protein, the conserved portion of HERV-H transmembrane protein, and the Pol region of human mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like (HML3) sequence, was observed in both groups. Binding was, however, more frequent and more firm in HIV-1 positive samples (P<0.0001, Wilcoxon rank sum test). IgM binding to the same peptides showed no significant differentiation between the two groups of patients. Binding to both immunoglobulin isotypes was sometimes variable over time in both groups. No correlation of either IgG or IgM peptide binding with progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals was observed. Inhibition studies using analogous endogenous and exogenous retroviral peptides, including HIV-1, demonstrated specificity of the IgG antibodies for a narrow range of MLV- and MMTV-like retroviral antigens, and excluded cross-reactivity of antibodies to HIV-1 as a cause of these observations. Thus, unlike IgG, IgM binding to retroviral antigens was ubiquitous. It is suggested that anti-HERV IgM belong to a class of natural antibodies and might serve as primers in the mediation of humoral immune responses to more or less related exogenous retroviruses. Increased IgG binding in HIV-1 infected individuals could result from such priming, or reflect higher HERV antigen expression.

  16. Independent effects of endogenous and exogenous spatial cueing: inhibition of return at endogenously attended target locations.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez, Juan; Decaix, Caroline; Siéroff, Eric; Chokron, Sylvie; Milliken, Bruce; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is thought to reflect a bias against returning attention to previously attended locations. According to this view, IOR should occur only if attention is withdrawn from the target location prior to target appearance. In the present study, endogenous attention and exogenous cueing were manipulated orthogonally. IOR was observed both when a target appeared at an unexpected location, and when a target appeared at the expected location. A similar pattern of results was obtained in a reanalysis of data from a study with Neglect patients. These results suggest that IOR is independent of endogenous orienting.

  17. Triacylglycerol composition of human endogenous lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajos, S; Katalin, R; László, T; Miklós, M; István, K; László, R

    1995-01-01

    The intact triacylglycerol profiles for VLDL and LDL of healthy and primary hypertriglyceridemic patients were obtained by high temperature capillary gas chromatography. The data were treated by the methods of computerized analysis. Marked individual heterogeneity was found. This can be explained by either genetic polymorphism or multiple lipoprotein triacylglycerol pools within one density class. Suspecting genetic polymorphism and determination type IV (familial hypertriglyceridemia) seems to be a pure overproduction of endogenous VLDL, while in type II B (familial combined hyperlipidemia) an altered mechanism of triacyglycerol synthesis can be supposed.

  18. Diverging patterns with endogenous labor migration.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, P; Rustichini, A

    1998-05-05

    "The standard neoclassical model cannot explain persistent migration flows and lack of cross-country convergence when capital and labor are mobile. Here we present a model where both phenomena may take place.... Our model is based on the Arrow-Romer approach to endogenous growth theory. We single out the importance of a (however weak) scale effect from the size of the workforce.... The main conclusion of this simple model is that lack of convergence, or even divergence, among countries is possible, even with perfect capital mobility and labor mobility."

  19. Copper and endogenous mediators of estradiol action.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1988-04-29

    Divalent copper increases by severalfold specific estradiol binding in rat uterine cytosol at 37 degrees C. Two endogenous substances have now been isolated from the cytosol one of which sharply inhibits the copper effect while the other sharply promotes it. The inhibitor is thermostable, it is adsorbed by dextran coated charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with water. The promoter is thermolabile at 60 degrees C, it is not readily adsorbed by the charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with KCl. The two substances are thought to be mediators of estradiol action.

  20. Distribution of endogenous retroviruses in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Rodríguez-Zárate, Clara J; Isberg, Sally R; Damayanti, Chandramaya Siska; Miles, Lee G; Chansue, Nantarika; Moran, Chris; Melville, Lorna; Gongora, Jaime

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in crocodilians (Crocodylia) is limited, and their distribution among extant species is unclear. Here we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of these retroelements in 20 species of crocodilians by studying the pro-pol gene. The results showed that crocodilian ERVs (CERVs) cluster into two major clades (CERV 1 and CERV 2). CERV 1 clustered as a sister group of the genus Gammaretrovirus, while CERV 2 clustered distantly with respect to all known ERVs. Interestingly, CERV 1 was found only in crocodiles (Crocodylidae). The data generated here could assist future studies aimed at identifying orthologous and paralogous ERVs among crocodilians.

  1. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  2. Cell-intrinsic regulation of murine dendritic cell function and survival by prereceptor amplification of glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Annelise; Blois, Sandra M; Sivakumaran, Shivajanani; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Henderson, Stephen; Flutter, Barry; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Stewart, Paul M; Lavery, Gareth G; Bennett, Clare; Curnow, S John; Chakraverty, Ronjon

    2013-11-07

    Although the inhibitory effects of therapeutic glucocorticoids (GCs) on dendritic cells (DCs) are well established, the roles of endogenous GCs in DC homeostasis are less clear. A critical element regulating endogenous GC concentrations involves local conversion of inactive substrates to active 11-hydroxyglucocorticoids, a reduction reaction catalyzed within the endoplasmic reticulum by an enzyme complex containing 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH). In this study, we found that this GC amplification pathway operates both constitutively and maximally in steady state murine DC populations and is unaffected by additional inflammatory stimuli. Under physiologic conditions, 11βHSD1-H6PDH increases the sensitivity of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) to GC-induced apoptosis and restricts the survival of this population through a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Upon CpG activation, the effects of enzyme activity are overridden, with pDCs becoming resistant to GCs and fully competent to release type I interferon. CD8α(+) DCs are also highly proficient in amplifying GC levels, leading to impaired maturation following toll-like receptor-mediated signaling. Indeed, pharmacologic inhibition of 11βHSD1 synergized with CpG to enhance specific T-cell responses following vaccination targeted to CD8α(+) DCs. In conclusion, amplification of endogenous GCs is a critical cell-autonomous mechanism for regulating the survival and functions of DCs in vivo.

  3. Insertional Polymorphisms of Endogenous Feline Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alfred L.; Nash, William G.; Menninger, Joan C.; Murphy, William J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The number, chromosomal distribution, and insertional polymorphisms of endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) were determined in four domestic cats (Burmese, Egyptian Mau, Persian, and nonbreed) using fluorescent in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid mapping. Twenty-nine distinct enFeLV loci were detected across 12 of the 18 autosomes. Each cat carried enFeLV at only 9 to 16 of the loci, and many loci were heterozygous for presence of the provirus. Thus, an average of 19 autosomal copies of enFeLV were present per cat diploid genome. Only five of the autosomal enFeLV sites were present in all four cats, and at only one autosomal locus, B4q15, was enFeLV present in both homologues of all four cats. A single enFeLV occurred in the X chromosome of the Burmese cat, while three to five enFeLV proviruses occurred in each Y chromosome. The X chromosome and nine autosomal enFeLV loci were telomeric, suggesting that ectopic recombination between nonhomologous subtelomeres may contribute to enFeLV distribution. Since endogenous FeLVs may affect the infectiousness or pathogenicity of exogenous FeLVs, genomic variation in enFeLVs represents a candidate for genetic influences on FeLV leukemogenesis in cats. PMID:15767400

  4. Mindfulness Meditation Modulates Pain Through Endogenous Opioids.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Haggai; Maron-Katz, Adi; Ben Simon, Eti; Flusser, Yuval; Hendler, Talma; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Brill, Silviu

    2016-07-01

    Recent evidence supports the beneficial effects of mindfulness meditation on pain. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. We used an opioid blocker to examine whether mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia involves endogenous opioids. Fifteen healthy experienced mindfulness meditation practitioners participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Participants rated the pain and unpleasantness of a cold stimulus prior to and after a mindfulness meditation session. Participants were then randomized to receive either intravenous naloxone or saline, after which they meditated again, and rated the same stimulus. A (3) × (2) repeated-measurements analysis of variance revealed a significant time effect for pain and unpleasantness scores (both P <.001) as well as a significant condition effect for pain and unpleasantness (both P <.2). Post hoc comparisons revealed that pain and unpleasantness scores were significantly reduced after natural mindfulness meditation and after placebo, but not after naloxone. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the pain scores following naloxone vs placebo and participants' mindfulness meditation experience. These findings show, for the first time, that meditation involves endogenous opioid pathways, mediating its analgesic effect and growing resilient with increasing practice to external suggestion. This finding could hold promising therapeutic implications and further elucidate the fine mechanisms involved in human pain modulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Insulin in Endogenous Hypertriglyceridemia*

    PubMed Central

    Reaven, Gerald M.; Lerner, Roger L.; Stern, Michael P.; Farquhar, John W.

    1967-01-01

    Dietary carbohydrate accentuation of endogenous triglyceride production has been studied in 33 patients. A broad and relatively continuous spectrum of steady-state plasma triglyceride concentrations was produced in 31 of the 33 subjects during 3 wk of a high carbohydrate (fat-free) liquid formula diet. Two patients developed plasma triglyceride concentrations in excess of 2000 mg/100 ml, and these were the only patients we have studied in which carbohydrate induction of hypertriglyceridemia seemed to be associated with a defect in endogenous plasma triglyceride removal mechanisms. In the remaining 31 patients the degree of hypertriglyceridemia was highly correlated with the insulin response elicited by the ingestion of the high carbohydrate formula (P < 0.005). No significant correlation existed between fasting plasma triglyceride concentration and either plasma glucose or free fatty acid concentrations after the high carbohydrate diet, nor was the degree of hypertriglyceridemia related to degree of obesity. It is suggested that hypertriglyceridemia in most subjects results from an increase in hepatic triglyceride secretion rate secondary to exaggerated postprandial increases in plasma insulin concentration. Images PMID:6061748

  6. Revisiting tolerance from the endogenous morphine perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M; Esch, Tobias

    2009-09-01

    Tolerance represents a dynamic mechanism that can be used to temper various regulatory processes regardless of whether they mediate excitation or inhibition. Tolerance operationally directs state-dependent attenuation of the action of endogenous and exogenous morphine. For example, tolerance ensures that immuno-inhibition induced by morphine does not compromise a requisite functional system over an extended period of time. In the nervous system, tolerance to inhibitory action insures that excitatory tone is resumed. Thus, desensitization sets in and allows various essential processes to be operational once again. Clearly, the temporal rebound of diverse immune and nervous processes involved with opiate actions provides a self-contained operational mechanism to ensure survival of the organism. Furthermore, love and/or pleasure, and satiety, are complex neurobiological phenomena linked to limbic brain reward circuitry. These processes are critically dependent on oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine, endogenous morphine and serotoninergic signaling. Naturally rewarding and/or pleasurable activities are usually governed by beneficial biological behaviors like eating, sex, and reproduction. It is our contention that critically important tolerance mechanisms extend to behaviors mediated by CNS reward systems. In other words, we become satisfied with sex, food, pleasure for the moment and disinterest creeps in until the "urges" return.

  7. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  8. Isolation and Differentiation of Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rios, Francisco J; Touyz, Rhian M; Montezano, Augusto C

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in inflammation, wound healing, and tissue repair. Infiltrated monocytes differentiate into different macrophage subtypes with protective or pathogenic activities in vascular lesions. In the heart and vascular tissues, pathological activation promotes cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling and there is increasing evidence that macrophages play important mechanisms in this environment. Primary murine macrophages can be obtained from: bone marrow by different treatments (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-GM-CSF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor-M-CSF or supernatant of murine fibroblast L929), peritoneal cavity (resident or thioglycolate elicit macrophages), from the lung (alveolar macrophages) or from adipose tissue. In this chapter we describe some protocols to obtain primary murine macrophages and how to identify a pure macrophage population or activation phenotypes using different markers.

  9. Live imaging of endogenous PSD-95 using ENABLED: a conditional strategy to fluorescently label endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Dale A; Tillo, Shane E; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V; Guo, Caiying; Mao, Tianyi; Zhong, Haining

    2014-12-10

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416698-15$15.00/0.

  10. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  11. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  12. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, W.Y.; Klinken, S.P. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD ); Hartley, J.W.; Morse, H.C. III ); Ruscetti, S.K. )

    1989-02-01

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages.

  13. Effects of endogenous D-alanine synthesis and autoinhibition of Bacillus anthracis germination on in vitro and in vivo infections.

    PubMed

    McKevitt, Matthew T; Bryant, Katie M; Shakir, Salika M; Larabee, Jason L; Blanke, Steven R; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, C Rick; Ballard, Jimmy D

    2007-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis transitions from a dormant spore to a vegetative bacillus through a series of structural and biochemical changes collectively referred to as germination. The timing of germination is important during early steps in infection and may determine if B. anthracis survives or succumbs to responsive macrophages. In the current study experiments determined the contribution of endogenous D-alanine production to the efficiency and timing of B. anthracis spore germination under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Racemase-mediated production of endogenous D-alanine by B. anthracis altered the kinetics for initiation of germination over a range of spore densities and exhibited a threshold effect wherein small changes in spore number resulted in major changes in germination efficiency. This threshold effect correlated with D-alanine production, was prevented by an alanine racemase inhibitor, and required L-alanine. Interestingly, endogenous production of inhibitory levels of D-alanine was detected under experimental conditions that did not support germination and in a germination-deficient mutant of B. anthracis. Racemase-dependent production of D-alanine enhanced survival of B. anthracis during interaction with murine macrophages, suggesting a role for inhibition of germination during interaction with these cells. Finally, in vivo experiments revealed an approximately twofold decrease in the 50% lethal dose of B. anthracis spores administered in the presence of D-alanine, indicating that rates of germination may be directly influenced by the levels of this amino acid during early stages of disease.

  14. Endogenous toll-like receptor ligands and their biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors, recognize and respond to conserved components of microbes and play a crucial role in both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to binding exogenous ligands derived from pathogens, TLRs interact with endogenous molecules released from damaged tissues or dead cells and regulate many sterile inflammation processes. Putative endogenous TLR ligands include proteins and peptides, polysaccharides and proteoglycan, nucleic acids and phospholipids, which are cellular components, particularly extracellular matrix degradation products. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endogenous ligand-mediated TLR signalling is involved in pathological conditions such as tissue injury, repair and regeneration; autoimmune diseases and tumorigenesis. The ability of TLRs to recognize endogenous stimulators appears to be essential to their function in regulating non-infectious inflammation. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLR ligands and discuss the biological significance of TLR signalling triggered by endogenous ligands in several sterile inflammation conditions. PMID:20629986

  15. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  16. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tang, W Joyce; Fernandez, Javier; Sohn, Joel J; Amemiya, Chris T

    2015-03-30

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi and is an important structural molecule [1, 2]. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin; however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  18. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  19. Involvement of Endogenous Retroviruses in Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    For millions of years, vertebrates have been continuously exposed to infection by retroviruses. Ancient retroviral infection of germline cells resulted in the formation and accumulation of inherited retrovirus sequences in host genomes. These inherited retroviruses are referred to as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), and recent estimates have revealed that a significant portion of animal genomes is made up of ERVs. Although various host factors have suppressed ERV activation, both positive and negative functions have been reported for some ERVs in normal and abnormal physiological conditions, such as in disease states. Similar to other complex diseases, ERV activation has been observed in prion diseases, and this review will discuss the potential involvement of ERVs in prion diseases. PMID:25437206

  20. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  1. Neuronal hypersynchronization, creativity and endogenous psychoses.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J

    2001-06-01

    I have investigated a neuronal hypersynchronism, currently included under the general subject of epilepsy, and termed interictal activity. I suggest that it is a physiological activity of the mammalian brain and propose it be termed Hyperia. After a thorough study of the extraordinary psychic manifestations of this neuronal hypersynchronism shown by mystics and artists, I have reviewed several scientific publications bearing on my hypothesis. I conclude by elaborating on a variety of cerebral hypersynchronous functions whose cause I consider to be physiological. Such behaviour is a common basis for extraordinary psychic manifestations found not only in mystics and artists, but also in patients suffering from endogenous psychoses, especially Bipolar Disorder. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  2. Handling stress may confound murine gut microbiota studies.

    PubMed

    Allen-Blevins, Cary R; You, Xiaomeng; Hinde, Katie; Sela, David A

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates interactions between human milk composition, particularly sugars (human milk oligosaccharides or HMO), the gut microbiota of human infants, and behavioral effects. Some HMO secreted in human milk are unable to be endogenously digested by the human infant but are able to be metabolized by certain species of gut microbiota, including Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species sensitive to host stress (Bailey & Coe, 2004). Exposure to gut bacteria like B. infantisduring critical neurodevelopment windows in early life appears to have behavioral consequences; however, environmental, physical, and social stress during this period can also have behavioral and microbial consequences. While rodent models are a useful method for determining causal relationships between HMO, gut microbiota, and behavior, murine studies of gut microbiota usually employ oral gavage, a technique stressful to the mouse. Our aim was to develop a less-invasive technique for HMO administration to remove the potential confound of gavage stress. Under the hypothesis that stress affects gut microbiota, particularly B. infantis, we predicted the pups receiving a prebiotic solution in a less-invasive manner would have the highest amount of Bifidobacteria in their gut. This study was designed to test two methods, active and passive, of solution administration to mice and the effects on their gut microbiome. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice housed in a specific-pathogen free facility received increasing doses of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) solution or deionized, distilled water. Gastrointestinal (GI) tracts were collected from five dams, six sires, and 41 pups over four time points. Seven fecal pellets from unhandled pups and two pellets from unhandled dams were also collected. Qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to quantify and compare the amount of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Our results demonstrate

  3. Handling stress may confound murine gut microbiota studies

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Blevins, Cary R.; You, Xiaomeng; Hinde, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates interactions between human milk composition, particularly sugars (human milk oligosaccharides or HMO), the gut microbiota of human infants, and behavioral effects. Some HMO secreted in human milk are unable to be endogenously digested by the human infant but are able to be metabolized by certain species of gut microbiota, including Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species sensitive to host stress (Bailey & Coe, 2004). Exposure to gut bacteria like B. infantisduring critical neurodevelopment windows in early life appears to have behavioral consequences; however, environmental, physical, and social stress during this period can also have behavioral and microbial consequences. While rodent models are a useful method for determining causal relationships between HMO, gut microbiota, and behavior, murine studies of gut microbiota usually employ oral gavage, a technique stressful to the mouse. Our aim was to develop a less-invasive technique for HMO administration to remove the potential confound of gavage stress. Under the hypothesis that stress affects gut microbiota, particularly B. infantis, we predicted the pups receiving a prebiotic solution in a less-invasive manner would have the highest amount of Bifidobacteria in their gut. Methods This study was designed to test two methods, active and passive, of solution administration to mice and the effects on their gut microbiome. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice housed in a specific-pathogen free facility received increasing doses of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) solution or deionized, distilled water. Gastrointestinal (GI) tracts were collected from five dams, six sires, and 41 pups over four time points. Seven fecal pellets from unhandled pups and two pellets from unhandled dams were also collected. Qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to quantify and compare the amount of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes

  4. Dynamic option pricing with endogenous stochastic arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Mauricio; Montalva, Rodrigo; Pellicer, Rely; Villena, Marcelo

    2010-09-01

    Only few efforts have been made in order to relax one of the key assumptions of the Black-Scholes model: the no-arbitrage assumption. This is despite the fact that arbitrage processes usually exist in the real world, even though they tend to be short-lived. The purpose of this paper is to develop an option pricing model with endogenous stochastic arbitrage, capable of modelling in a general fashion any future and underlying asset that deviate itself from its market equilibrium. Thus, this investigation calibrates empirically the arbitrage on the futures on the S&P 500 index using transaction data from September 1997 to June 2009, from here a specific type of arbitrage called “arbitrage bubble”, based on a t-step function, is identified and hence used in our model. The theoretical results obtained for Binary and European call options, for this kind of arbitrage, show that an investment strategy that takes advantage of the identified arbitrage possibility can be defined, whenever it is possible to anticipate in relative terms the amplitude and timespan of the process. Finally, the new trajectory of the stock price is analytically estimated for a specific case of arbitrage and some numerical illustrations are developed. We find that the consequences of a finite and small endogenous arbitrage not only change the trajectory of the asset price during the period when it started, but also after the arbitrage bubble has already gone. In this context, our model will allow us to calibrate the B-S model to that new trajectory even when the arbitrage already started.

  5. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  6. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  7. Endogenous fluorescence emission of the ovary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzinger, Urs; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Brewer, Molly A.

    2005-03-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate among the gynecologic cancers. Early detection would significantly improve survival and quality of life of women at increased risk to develop ovarian cancer. We have constructed a device to investigate endogenous signals of the ovarian tissue surface in the UV C to visible range and describe our initial investigation of the use of optical spectroscopy to characterize the condition of the ovary. We have acquired data from more than 33 patients. A table top spectroscopy system was used to collect endogenous fluorescence with a fiberoptic probe that is compatible with endoscopic techniques. Samples were broken into five groups: Normal-Low Risk (for developing ovarian cancer) Normal-High Risk, Benign, and Cancer. Rigorous statistical analysis was applied to the data using variance tests for direct intensity versus diagnostic group comparisons and principal component analysis (PCA) to study the variance of the whole data set. We conclude that the diagnostically most useful excitation wavelengths are located in the UV. Furthermore, our results indicate that UV B and C are most useful. A safety analysis indicates that UV-C imaging can be conducted at exposure levels below safety thresholds. We found that fluorescence excited in the UV-C and UV-B range increases from benign to normal to cancerous tissues. This is in contrast to the emission created with UV-A excitation which decreased in the same order. We hypothesize that an increase of protein production and a decrease of fluorescence contributions of the extracellular matrix could explain this behavior. Variance analysis also identified fluctuation of fluorescence at 320/380 which is associated with collagen cross link residues. Small differences were observed between the group at high risk and normal risk for ovarian cancer. High risk samples deviated towards the cancer group and low risk samples towards benign group.

  8. tirant, a newly discovered active endogenous retrovirus in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Akkouche, Abdou; Rebollo, Rita; Burlet, Nelly; Esnault, Caroline; Martinez, Sonia; Viginier, Barbara; Terzian, Christophe; Vieira, Cristina; Fablet, Marie

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have the ability to become permanently integrated into the genomes of their host, and they are generally transmitted vertically from parent to progeny. With the exception of gypsy, few endogenous retroviruses have been identified in insects. In this study, we describe the tirant endogenous retrovirus in a subset of Drosophila simulans natural populations. By focusing on the envelope gene, we show that the entire retroviral cycle (transcription, translation, and retrotransposition) can be completed for tirant within one population of this species.

  9. Commonly dysregulated genes in murine APL cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenlin; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Holt, Matthew S.; Link, Daniel C.; Watson, Mark A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify genes that are commonly dysregulated in a murine model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we first defined gene expression patterns during normal murine myeloid development; serial gene expression profiling studies were performed with primary murine hematopoietic progenitors that were induced to undergo myeloid maturation in vitro with G-CSF. Many genes were reproducibly expressed in restricted developmental “windows,” suggesting a structured hierarchy of expression that is relevant for the induction of developmental fates and/or differentiated cell functions. We compared the normal myeloid developmental transcriptome with that of APL cells derived from mice expressing PML-RARα under control of the murine cathepsin G locus. While many promyelocyte-specific genes were highly expressed in all APL samples, 116 genes were reproducibly dysregulated in many independent APL samples, including Fos, Jun, Egr1, Tnf, and Vcam1. However, this set of commonly dysregulated genes was expressed normally in preleukemic, early myeloid cells from the same mouse model, suggesting that dysregulation occurs as a “downstream” event during disease progression. These studies suggest that the genetic events that lead to APL progression may converge on common pathways that are important for leukemia pathogenesis. PMID:17008535

  10. Murine typhus in child, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E; Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E; Sulú Uicab, Justo Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    A case of murine typhus in Yucatan was diagnosed in a child with nonspecific signs and symptoms. The finding of Rickettsia typhi increases the number of Rickettsia species identified in Yucatan and shows that studies are needed to determine the prevalence and incidence of rickettsioses in Mexico.

  11. Functional characterization of syncytin-A, a newly murine endogenous virus envelope protein. Implication for its fusion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaoxue; Pan, Ji'an; Gong, Rui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Shuli; Feng, Huixing; Qiu, Gang; Guo, Deyin; Tien, Po; Xiao, Gengfu

    2007-01-05

    Trophoblast fusion in placenta is an important event for preservation of a healthy pregnancy. This process takes place throughout the pregnancy and is crucial for the formation of syncytiotrophoblast layer. Syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 are strong candidate regulators of fusion from retroviral origin. Syncytin-A and syncytin-B are other candidates from retroviral origin in Muridae. The active role of syncytin in driving fusion of trophoblast has been identified, but its fusion mechanism is still unclear. As an intact retroviral envelope protein, syncytin-A shares similar structure profiling with other viral envelope fusion proteins, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). In this paper, we showed that SynA 1 + 2 of syncytin-A (residues 445-536, including predicted NHR, CHR, and a natural linker) could form trimer and exhibited significant alpha-helix structure and high thermo-stability. Limited proteolysis result identified a stable protease-resistant core of SynA 1 + 2, which was in good agreement with computational modeling data. NHR and CHR could interact with each other in vitro, too. Different from the previous studies, the disulfide-bonded linker was apparently vital to the stability of fusion core structure. By biological assays, NHR was shown to be inhibitive to cell-cell fusion, with IC(50) value about 5.4 microm, but CHR seemed to have no inhibitory activity even at 50 microm. From both biochemical and functional data, we first gave an explanation how syncytin-A mediated cell fusion. The insight into the mechanism of syncytin-A-mediated cell-cell fusion may provide a crucial clue to placental cytotrophoblast morphogenesis.

  12. Activation and regulation of endogenous retroviral genes in the human pituitary gland and related endocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Buslei, Rolf; Strissel, Pamela L; Henke, Christine; Schey, Regina; Lang, Nadine; Ruebner, Matthias; Stolt, Claus C; Fabry, Ben; Buchfelder, Michael; Strick, Reiner

    2015-02-01

    Adenohypophysis (AH) hormone-producing cells represent the origin of diverse groups of pituitary adenomas (PA). Deregulation of hypothalamic hormone receptors, growth factors and cAMP signalling have been implicated in the aetiology of PA. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are derived from past exogenous retroviral infections and represent more than 8% of the human genome. Some ERV genes encode open reading frames and produce functional proteins, for example, the ERVW-1 envelope gene Syncytin-1, essential for placentogenesis, but also deregulated in human tumours. Data concerning ERV expression in the AH and related endocrine tumours are missing. Syncytin-1 protein was analysed in normal AH (n = 15) and compared with five PA subtypes (n = 117) by immunohistochemistry. Absolute gene expression of 20 ERV functional envelope genes and ERVW-5 gag was measured. PA tissues were examined for Syncytin-1 and the cAMP signalling marker phospho-CREB-Ser133 using immunohistochemistry. Isolated primary human PA cells were treated with different hormones. Murine embryonic and adult pituitary gland ERV expressions were compared with human AH. Syncytin-1 protein colocalized with corticotropic cells of AH. In contrast, all PA demonstrated significant Syncytin-1 protein overexpression, supporting deregulation. All other ERV genes showed significant up-regulations in different PA subtypes. Phospho-CREB-Ser133 and Syncytin-1 colocalized in PA cells. Cultivated primary PA cells with ACTH or CRH induced their respective receptors and ERV genes. Syncytin-A/-B, murine orthologues to human Syncytin-1/-2, localized to embryonic and adult pituitary glands demonstrating functional mammalian conservation. Deregulated ERV genes may contribute to PA development via cAMP signalling. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  13. Cell-Derived Nanoparticles are Endogenous Modulators of Sepsis With Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Natalia; Xia, Brent T; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Klinger, Matthias; Gemoll, Timo; Habermann, Jens K; Whitacre, Brynne E; Seitz, Aaron P; Kalies, Kathrin; Caldwell, Charles C

    2017-09-01

    Cell-derived nanoparticles (CDNPs) containing cytosolic proteins and RNAs/DNAs can be isolated from stressed eukaryotic cells. Previously, CDNPs isolated from cultured cells exerted immunomodulatory activities in different infections. Here, we sought to elucidate the role of CDNPs using a murine model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). We hypothesized that CDNPs influence the immune response at the site of infection, where severe cellular stress occurs. We observed early CDNP accumulation in the peritoneum after 4 h and continued CDNP presence 24 h after CLP. To determine whether CDNPs influence the host response to sepsis, we isolated CDNPs from a murine fibroblast cell line stressed by nutrient-deprivation, and injected them into septic mice. CDNP-treated mice demonstrated decreased peritoneal interleukin 6 levels and an approximately 2-log lower bacterial load compared with control mice 24 h after CLP. Additionally, a 20% CFU reduction was observed when incubating CDNPs with Pseudomona aeroginosa, indicating that CDNPs are bactericidal. To identify CDNP-responsive cells, CFSE-labeled CDNPs were injected into mice at the time of CLP. We observed that CDNPs were preferentially ingested by F4/80 macrophages, and to a lesser degree, associated with inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. Strikingly, CDNP-ingesting cells demonstrated elevated CD11b and MHCII expression compared with control cells. Altogether, our data indicate that CDNPs enhance the immune response at the site of infection and promote bacterial clearance, by direct bacterial killing and increasing phagocyte activation. Thus, CDNPs represent a novel, unexplored endogenous sepsis modulator with therapeutic potential.

  14. Dietary glucarate-mediated reduction of sensitivity of murine strains to chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walaszek, Z; Hanausek-Walaszek, M; Webb, T E

    1986-10-01

    Serum beta-glucuronidase activity is shown to differ quantitatively in the following strains of mice, listed in order of increasing activity: C3H, C57BL/6 less than BALB/c, DBA/2, ICR less than SENCAR, A/He. The level of the enzyme in the murine strains is shown to correlate with the urinary excretion of 17-ketosteroids, which in turn reflects the endogenous level of androgens. Dietary calcium D-glucarate, an in vivo beta-glucuronidase inhibitor, reduced the steady state level of both beta-glucuronidase and 17-ketosteroid excretion in the highly susceptible A/He and SENCAR strains to that of strains known to be resistant to chemical carcinogenesis. Sensitivity of the A/He strain is significantly reduced by dietary calcium glucarate, which is shown to inhibit DNA binding and the induction of pulmonary adenomas by benzo[a]pyrene.

  15. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  16. Nrf2 regulates mass accrual and the antioxidant endogenous response in bone differently depending on the sex and age

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Gretel Gisela; Cregor, Meloney; McAndrews, Kevin; Morales, Cynthya Carolina; McCabe, Linda Doyle; McCabe, George P.; Peacock, Munro; Burr, David; Weaver, Connie; Bellido, Teresita

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important pathogenic mechanism underling the loss of bone mass and strength with aging and other conditions leading to osteoporosis. The transcription factor erythroid 2-related factor2 (Nrf2) plays a central role in activating the cellular response to ROS. Here, we examined the endogenous response of bone regulated by Nrf2, and its relationship with bone mass and architecture in the male and female murine skeleton. Young (3 month-old) and old (15 month-old) Nrf2 knockout (KO) mice of either sex exhibited the expected reduction in Nrf2 mRNA expression compared to wild type (WT) littermates. Nrf2 deletion did not lead to compensatory increase in Nrf1 or Nrf3, other members of this transcription factor family; and instead, Nrf1 expression was lower in KO mice. Compared to the respective WT littermate controls, female KO mice, young and old, exhibited lower expression of both detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes; young male KO mice, displayed lower expression of detoxifying enzymes but not antioxidant enzymes; and old male KO mice showed no differences in either detoxifying or antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, old male WT mice exhibited lower Nrf2 levels, and consequently lower expression of both detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, compared to old female WT mice. These endogenous antioxidant responses lead to delayed rate of bone acquisition in female KO mice and higher bone acquisition in male KO mice as quantified by DXA and μCT, demonstrating that Nrf2 is required for full bone accrual in the female skeleton but unnecessary and even detrimental in the male skeleton. Therefore, Nrf2 regulates the antioxidant endogenous response and bone accrual differently depending on sex and age. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that target Nrf2 could be developed to enhance the endogenous antioxidant response in a sex- and age-selective manner. PMID:28152064

  17. 5-Lipoxygenase-mediated endogenous DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wenying; Lee, Seon Hwa; Williams, Michelle V; Blair, Ian A

    2009-06-19

    Lipoxygenases (LOs) convert polyunsaturated fatty acids into lipid hydroperoxides. Homolytic decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides gives rise to endogenous genotoxins such as 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal, which cause the formation of mutagenic DNA adducts. Chiral lipidomics analysis was employed to show that a 5-LO-derived lipid hydroperoxide was responsible for endogenous DNA-adduct formation. The study employed human lymphoblastoid CESS cells, which expressed both 5-LO and the required 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). The major lipid peroxidation product was 5(S)-hydroperoxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid, which was analyzed as its reduction product, 5(S)-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5(S)-HETE)). Concentrations of 5(S)-HETE increased from 0.07 +/- 0.01 to 45.50 +/- 4.05 pmol/10(7) cells upon stimulation of the CESS cells with calcium ionophore A23187. There was a concomitant increase in the 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal-derived DNA-adduct, heptanone-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (HepsilondGuo) from 2.41 +/- 0.35 to 6.31 +/- 0.73 adducts/10(7) normal bases. Biosynthesis of prostaglandins, 11(R)-hydroxy-5,8,12,14-(Z,Z,E,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid, and 15(R,S)-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-(Z,Z,Z,E)-eicosatetraenoic acid revealed that there was cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in the CESS cells. Western blot analysis revealed that COX-1 was expressed by the cells, but there was no COX-2 or 15-LO-1. FLAP inhibitor reduced HepsilondGuo-adducts and 5(S)-HETE to basal levels. In contrast, aspirin, which had no effect on 5(S)-HETE, blocked the formation of prostaglandins, 15-HETE, and 11-HETE but did not inhibit HepsilondGuo-adduct formation. These data showed that 5-LO was the enzyme responsible for the generation of the HepsilondGuo DNA-adduct in CESS cells.

  18. Strategies for endogenous spinal cord repair: HPMA hydrogel to recruit migrating endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Oregel, Karlos; Wiggins, Laurent; Valera, Remelyn; Bosnoyan, Kathrin; Agbo, Chioma; Awosika, Oluwole; Zhao, Paul M; de Vellis, Jean; Woerly, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Injury to the spinal cord disrupts ascending and descending axonal pathways and causes tissue damage with a subsequent limited cellular regeneration. Successful treatment would encompass the restoration of the cytoarchitecture, homeostasis and function all in dear need. Transplantation-based treatments using exogenous cells are the most favoured approach. Yet, with the advent of the stem cell concept and continuous progress in the field it became clear that the endogenous potential for repair is greater than previously thought. As an alternative to neural grafting, we and other researchers have aimed at understanding what are the elements needed for a successful repair with self progenitors that would give rise to the cell types needed to restore function of the central nervous system. Some studies involve both scaffolds and cell grafts. Here we describe studies on spinal cord repair using what we call "endogenous tissue engineering for regenerative medicine". The approach involves a hydrogel that mimics the natural milieu where endogenous pre-existing and newly formed cells populate the gel progressively allowing for the integration of CNS self populations leading to a successful recovery of function. Highlight aspects learned from this type of studies are that: Endogenous reconstruction of the injured spinal cord is possible by using the adequate support. The contribution of nestin-expressing progenitors to spinal cord regeneration is continuous and substantial both, in the reconstructed segment as well as, along the distal and caudal segments of the reconstructed spinal cord. Most of these cells appear to have been in a quiescent state until the injury occurred and only a small fraction of these neural progenitors was produced via cell proliferation. The hydrogel combined with exercise was necessary and sufficient to restore locomotor function in cats that underwent spinal transaction followed by reconstructive surgery. This recovery of function was first seen

  19. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Helen B.; de Kretser, David M.; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. Experimental design C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Results Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Conclusions Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. PMID:28301516

  20. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Helen B; de Kretser, David M; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer.

  1. On the Endogeneity of the Mean-Variance Efficient Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, R. A.; O'Connell, Paul G. J.

    2002-01-01

    Explains that the endogeneity of the efficient frontier in the mean-variance model of portfolio selection is commonly obscured in portfolio selection literature and in widely used textbooks. Demonstrates endogeneity and discusses the impact of parameter changes on the mean-variance efficient frontier and on the beta coefficients of individual…

  2. Endogenous opioid peptides in regulation of innate immunity cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A

    2011-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides comprise a group of bioregulatory factors involved in regulation of functional activity of various physiological systems of an organism. One of most important functions of endogenous opioids is their involvement in the interaction between cells of the nervous and immune systems. Summary data on the effects of opioid peptides on regulation of functions of innate immunity cells are presented.

  3. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  4. Optimized endogenous post-stratification in forest inventories

    Treesearch

    Paul L. Patterson

    2012-01-01

    An example of endogenous post-stratification is the use of remote sensing data with a sample of ground data to build a logistic regression model to predict the probability that a plot is forested and using the predicted probabilities to form categories for post-stratification. An optimized endogenous post-stratified estimator of the proportion of forest has been...

  5. A case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae causing bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Elvy, J; Hanspal, I; Simcock, P

    2008-11-01

    This report describes a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, an occupational zoonotic pathogen, which was successfully treated with intravenous penicillin G followed by oral linezolid. This is believed to be the first report of E rhusiopathiae causing endogenous endophthalmitis.

  6. Lunularic acid, a common endogenous growth inhibitor of liverworts.

    PubMed

    Pryce, R J

    1971-12-01

    By gas-liquid chromotography and thin layer chromatography, an endogenous growth inhibitor of Lunularia cruciata has been detected in seven other representatives of the class of liverworts. All liverworts so far examined have been found to contain lunularic acid. Evidence for the identity of the previously isolated, but unidentified, endogenous growth inhibitor of Marchantia polymorpha and lunularic acid is presented.

  7. Explaining Cigarette Smoking: An Endogenous-Exogenous Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, Jack

    Kruglanski's endogenous-exogenous partition, when applied to reasons given by smokers for smoking cigarettes, distinguishes two types of actions: (1) endogenous reasons implying that the behavior of consuming the cigarette is the goal of the action and the actor is positive toward the behavior, and (2) exogenous reasons implying that the behavior…

  8. Do Endogenous and Exogenous Action Control Compete for Perception?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Heinemann, Alexander; Kiesel, Andrea; Thomaschke, Roland; Janczyk, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Human actions are guided either by endogenous action plans or by external stimuli in the environment. These two types of action control seem to be mediated by neurophysiologically and functionally distinct systems that interfere if an endogenously planned action suddenly has to be performed in response to an exogenous stimulus. In this case, the…

  9. Role of endogenous thiols in protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, O.

    Aminothiols represent the most important group of radioprotective compounds. The most effective compounds administered at an optimal dose and time before irradiation are able to provide a protection in mice with a dose reduction factor (DRF) of about 2-2.5. The working mechanism can partly be explained as a scavenging process of radicals induced in water and partly as a chemical repair process of injured DNA. The endogenous aminothiol which has far-out the highest intracellular concentration is glutathione (GSH). The importance of intracellular GSH in determining cellular radiosensitivity has been shown by irradiating cells that had very low GSH levels. Such cells appear to have a high radiosensitivity, especially in hypoxic conditions. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that induction of a high GSH level (100-200% above the normal level) provides only a small protection. In vitro experiments with DNA indicate that thiols with a high positive charge condense in the vicinity of DNA and are effective protectors, whereas thiols with a negative charge are kep away from it and are poor protectors. In comparison with the most effective exogenous aminothiols like cysteamine and WR1065, GSH is not an effective radioprotector. Putative explanations for this relatively poor protective ability of GSH are presented.

  10. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C; Meik, J M; Dashevsky, D; Card, D C; Castoe, T A; Schaack, S

    2014-09-22

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome: surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    de Santibañes, Martín; Cristiano, Agustín; Mazza, Oscar; Grossenbacher, Luis; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Sánchez Clariá, Rodrigo; Sivori, Enrique; García Mónaco, Ricardo; Pekolj, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglicemia syndrome (EHHS) can be caused by an insulinoma, or less frequently, by nesidioblastosis in the pediatric population, also known as non insulinoma pancreatic hypoglycemic syndrome (NIPHS) in adults. The aim of this paper is to show the strategy for the surgical treatment of ehhs. A total of 19 patients with a final diagnosis of insulinoma or NIPHS who were treated surgically from january 2007 until june 2012 were included. We describe the clinical presentation and preoperative work-up. Emphasis is placed on the surgical technique, complications and long-term follow-up. All patients had a positive fasting plasma glucose test. Preoperative localization of the lesions was possible in 89.4% of cases. The most frequent surgery was distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation (9 cases). Three patients with insulinoma presented with synchronous metastases, which were treated with simultaneous surgery. There was no perioperative mortality and morbidity was 52.6%. Histological analysis revealed that 13 patients (68.4%) had benign insulinoma, 3 malignant insulinoma with liver metastases and 3 with a final diagnosis of SHPNI. Median follow-up was 20 months. All patients diagnosed with benign insulinoma or NIPHS had symptom resolution. The surgical treatment of EHHS achieves excellent long-term results in the control of hypoglucemic symptoms. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Endogenous System Microbes as Treatment Process ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Monitoring the efficacy of treatment strategies to remove pathogens in decentralized systems remains a challenge. Evaluating log reduction targets by measuring pathogen levels is hampered by their sporadic and low occurrence rates. Fecal indicator bacteria are used in centralized systems to indicate the presence of fecal pathogens, but are ineffective decentralized treatment process indicators as they generally occur at levels too low to assess log reduction targets. System challenge testing by spiking with high loads of fecal indicator organisms, like MS2 coliphage, has limitations, especially for large systems. Microbes that are endogenous to the decentralized system, occur in high abundances and mimic removal rates of bacterial, viral and/or parasitic protozoan pathogens during treatment could serve as alternative treatment process indicators to verify log reduction targets. To identify abundant microbes in wastewater, the bacterial and viral communities were examined using deep sequencing. Building infrastructure-associated bacteria, like Zoogloea, were observed as dominant members of the bacterial community in graywater. In blackwater, bacteriophage of the order Caudovirales constituted the majority of contiguous sequences from the viral community. This study identifies candidate treatment process indicators in decentralized systems that could be used to verify log removal during treatment. The association of the presence of treatment process indic

  13. Stem cell stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration.

    PubMed

    Weil, Brian R; Canty, John M

    2013-08-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodelling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted over the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone-marrow- and peripheral-blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischaemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the pre-clinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  14. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  15. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C.; Meik, J. M.; Dashevsky, D.; Card, D. C.; Castoe, T. A.; Schaack, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. PMID:25080342

  16. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  17. Endogenous Retroviruses: With Us and Against Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Rosenkrantz, Jimi L.; Carbone, Lucia; Chavez, Shawn L.

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian genomes are scattered with thousands of copies of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), mobile genetic elements that are relics of ancient retroviral infections. After inserting copies into the germ line of a host, most ERVs accumulate mutations that prevent the normal assembly of infectious viral particles, becoming trapped in host genomes and unable to leave to infect other cells. While most copies of ERVs are inactive, some are transcribed and encode the proteins needed to generate new insertions at novel loci. In some cases, old copies are removed via recombination and other mechanisms. This creates a shifting landscape of ERV copies within host genomes. New insertions can disrupt normal expression of nearby genes via directly inserting into key regulatory elements or by containing regulatory motifs within their sequences. Further, the transcriptional silencing of ERVs via epigenetic modification may result in changes to the epigenetic regulation of adjacent genes. In these ways, ERVs can be potent sources of regulatory disruption as well as genetic innovation. Here, we provide a brief review of the association between ERVs and gene expression, especially as observed in pre-implantation development and placentation. Moreover, we will describe the roles ERVs may play in somatic tissues, mostly in the context of human disease, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we discuss the recent discovery that some ERVs may have been pressed into the service of their host genomes to aid in the innate immune response to exogenous viral infections.

  18. Stem Cell Stimulation of Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Brian R.; Canty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodeling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted during the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone marrow- and peripheral blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the preclinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair, and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischemic heart disease patients. PMID:23577634

  19. Endogenic modification of impact craters on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of internally modified impact craters on Mercury's surface may be used to evaluate the possibility of Mercurian volcanism. Such craters are similar to the floor-fractured and mare-filled craters observed on the moon. Mariner-10 images show that most such craters occur, as on the moon, near plains-filled basins. Color-ratio images have indicated that some Mercurian craters manifest red plains materials on their floors. These features may be associated with lava analogous to mare basalts in some lunar craters, or with compositionally distinct subsurface material preserved within the impact crater. Several basins manifest photometric contrasts between basin exteriors and basin-filling plains. Dark haloes are observed around some impact craters superimposed on the interior plains. This suggests the excavation of compositionally distinct material. Some possible endogenic features are discerned, despite the poor surface resolution, such as irregular rimless depressions. It is felt that volcanism may have occurred on Mercury, and that in some areas it may be similar to that of the lunar Mare Australe region.

  20. Preconditioning chemotherapy with cisplatin enhances the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Huang, Xiang; Huang, Guichun; Chen, Yitian; Chen, Longbang; Song, Haizhu

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that preconditioning chemotherapy could eliminate the suppressive factors in antitumor immune response, thereby leading to the full release of the efficacy of the subsequent immunotherapy. In this study, a single subtoxic dose (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) of cisplatin was chosen as the preconditioning chemotherapy in combination with cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells (4×10(6), intravenously) to treat the murine B16 melanoma xenografts. It was found that cisplatin pretreatment could enhance the antitumor activity of CIK cells. To explore the potential mechanisms underlying the efficacy-enhancing effect of cisplatin, the in vivo trafficking and distribution of the infused CIK cells were traced. It was found that cisplatin could augment the homing ability of CIK cells into the tumor, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs), and spleen tissues. The endogenous effector cells, CD3(+) T lymphocytes also had an increased accumulation in the tumor and TDLNs after cisplatin precondition. Moreover, cisplatin could also modulate the percentages of myeloid cells, thus encouraging immune responses by increasing the percentages of dendritic cells and relieving the immunosuppression by preferentially eliminating the myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In conclusion, our findings suggested that cisplatin preconditioning chemotherapy could enhance the antitumor activity of CIK cells in a murine melanoma model, and this efficacy-enhancing effect was attributed to the augmented homing ability of exogenous and endogenous effector cells and the modulation of the myeloid cells.

  1. Endogenous ethanol--its metabolic, behavioral and biomedical significance.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky YuM

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is constantly formed endogenously from acetaldehyde, and level of the former can be measured in both human beings and animals. Acetaldehyde can be generated in situ from the metabolism of pyruvate, threonine, deoxyribose-5-phosphate, phosphoethanolamine, alanine and presumably from other substrates. The levels of blood and tissue endogenous ethanol change as a function of various physiologic and experimental conditions such as starvation, aging, stress, cooling, adrenalectomy, etc. and are regulated by many exogenous compounds such as antimetabolites, derivatives of amino acids, lithium salts, disulfiram, cyanamide, etc. Under free choice alcohol selection situations, the levels of endogenous ethanol in rat blood and alcohol preference by the animals are negatively correlated. Similar negative correlations have been found between the levels of blood endogenous ethanol and the frequency of delirium in alcoholic patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal. Endogenous ethanol and acetaldehyde can therefore be regarded as compounds which fulfil substrate, regulatory and modulator functions.

  2. Endogenous Electric Fields May Guide Neocortical Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Local field potentials and the underlying endogenous electric fields (EFs) are traditionally considered to be epiphenomena of structured neuronal network activity. Recently, however, externally applied EFs have been shown to modulate pharmacologically evoked network activity in rodent hippocampus. In contrast, very little is known about the role of endogenous EFs during physiological activity states in neocortex. Here we used the neocortical slow oscillation in vitro as a model system to show that weak sinusoidal and naturalistic EFs enhance and entrain physiological neocortical network activity with an amplitude threshold within the range of in vivo endogenous field strengths. Modulation of network activity by positive and negative feedback fields based on the network activity in real-time provide direct evidence for a feedback loop between neuronal activity and endogenous EF. This significant susceptibility of active networks to EFs that only cause small changes in membrane potential in individual neurons suggests that endogenous EFs could guide neocortical network activity. PMID:20624597

  3. Stress-Induced Neurogenic Inflammation in Murine Skin Skews Dendritic Cells Towards Maturation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Ricarda Alcira; Handjiski, Bori; Blois, Sandra Maria; Hagen, Evelin; Paus, Ralf; Arck, Petra Clara

    2008-01-01

    The skin continuously serves as a biosensor of multiple exogenous stressors and integrates the resulting responses with an individual’s central and peripheral endogenous response systems to perceived stress; it also acts to protect against external challenges such as wounding and infection. We have previously shown in mice that stress induces nerve growth factor- and substance P-dependent neurogenic inflammation, which includes the prominent clustering of MHC class II+ cells. Because the contribution of dendritic cells (DCs) in response to stress is not well understood, we examined the role of DCs in neurogenic inflammation in murine skin using a well-established murine stress model. We show that sound stress increases the number of intradermal langerin+ and CD11c+ DCs and induces DC maturation, as indicated by the up-regulated expression of CD11c, MHC class II, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Blocking of ICAM-1/leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 interactions significantly abrogated the stress-induced numeric increase, maturation, and migration of dermal DCs in vivo and also reduced stress-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and endothelial cell expression of ICAM-1. In conclusion, stress exposure causes a state of immune alertness in the skin. Such adaptation processes may ensure protection from possible infections on wounding by stressors, such as attack by predators. However, present-day stressors have changed and such adaptations appear redundant and may overrun skin homeostasis by inducing immune dermatoses. PMID:18832583

  4. Sensitivity of PCR Assays for Murine Gammaretroviruses and Mouse Contamination in Human Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li Ling; Lin, Lin; Bell, David S.; Levine, Susan; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2012-01-01

    Gammaretroviruses related to murine leukemia virus (MLV) have variously been reported to be present or absent in blood from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients and healthy controls. Using subjects from New York State, we have investigated by PCR methods whether MLV-related sequences can be identified in nucleic acids isolated from whole blood or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or following PBMC culture. We have also passaged the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP following incubation with plasma from patients and controls and assayed nucleic acids for viral sequences. We have used 15 sets of primers that can effectively amplify conserved regions of murine endogenous and exogenous retrovirus sequences. We demonstrate that our PCR assays for MLV-related gag sequences and for mouse DNA contamination are extremely sensitive. While we have identified MLV-like gag sequences following PCR on human DNA preparations, we are unable to conclude that these sequences originated in the blood samples. PMID:22629404

  5. Human and murine APOBEC3s restrict replication of koala retrovirus by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takayuki; Ha, Dat; Galvez, Felipe; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Fan, Hung

    2015-08-08

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is an endogenous and exogenous retrovirus of koalas that may cause lymphoma. As for many other gammaretroviruses, the KoRV genome can potentially encode an alternate form of Gag protein, glyco-gag. In this study, a convenient assay for assessing KoRV infectivity in vitro was employed: the use of DERSE cells (initially developed to search for infectious xenotropic murine leukemia-like viruses). Using infection of DERSE and other human cell lines (HEK293T), no evidence for expression of glyco-gag by KoRV was found, either in expression of glyco-gag protein or changes in infectivity when the putative glyco-gag reading frame was mutated. Since glyco-gag mediates resistance of Moloney murine leukemia virus to the restriction factor APOBEC3, the sensitivity of KoRV (wt or putatively mutant for glyco-gag) to restriction by murine (mA3) or human APOBEC3s was investigated. Both mA3 and hA3G potently inhibited KoRV infectivity. Interestingly, hA3G restriction was accompanied by extensive G → A hypermutation during reverse transcription while mA3 restriction was not. Glyco-gag status did not affect the results. These results indicate that the mechanisms of APOBEC3 restriction of KoRV by hA3G and mA3 differ (deamination dependent vs. independent) and glyco-gag does not play a role in the restriction.

  6. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Li-li; Wu, Hao; Cui, Wen-peng; Zhou, Wen-hua; Luo, Ping; Sun, Jing; Yuan, Hang; Miao, Li-ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic) animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN. PMID:23844375

  7. Murine Toxicity of Agrobacterium tumefaciens1

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Pat B.; Huisingh, Donald

    1968-01-01

    Eleven strains of the crown gall organism, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, tested by intraperitoneal injection into mice, were lethal within 48 hr. Five other species had some lethal strains. The lethal effect of A. tumefaciens appeared to be the result of a toxic rather than an infectious process, since histopathological anomalies were not found in mice injected with live cultures and since heat-killed cultures were lethal. The murine toxin disappeared when A. tumefaciens was grown at 36 C and reappeared when the organism was subsequently incubated below 30 C. The murine toxin itself was not inactivated by exposure to 100 C for 30 min. The toxin was associated with the cells and was not excreted into the medium. Centrifugal fractionation revealed that the toxin was associated with the smaller cells in 3-day stationary-phase cultures. These data suggested a possible relationship between toxin production and the production of the agents responsible for the initiation of plant tumors. PMID:5643064

  8. Murine typhus: an unrecognized suburban vectorborne disease.

    PubMed

    Civen, Rachel; Ngo, Van

    2008-03-15

    Murine typhus, an acute febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi, is distributed worldwide. Mainly transmitted by the fleas of rodents, it is associated with cities and ports where urban rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus) are abundant. In the United States, cases are concentrated in suburban areas of Texas and California. Contrary to the classic rat-flea-rat cycle, the most important reservoirs of infection in these areas are opossums and cats. The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, has been identified as the principal vector. In Texas, murine typhus cases occur in spring and summer, whereas, in California, cases have been documented in summer and fall. Most patients present with fever, and many have rash and headache. Serologic testing with the indirect immunofluorescence assay is the preferred diagnostic method. Doxycycline is the antibiotic of choice and has been shown to shorten the course of illness.

  9. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  10. Endogenous neurotrophins and plasticity following spinal deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Matt S

    2012-05-01

    Neurons intrinsic to the spinal cord dorsal horn receive input from various classes of long-distance projection systems. Two of the best known of these are primary afferent and descending monoaminergic axons. Together with intrinsic interneurons, activity in these axonal populations shapes the early part of the sensory experience before it is transmitted to supraspinal structures via ascending projection axons. Injury to dorsal roots, which contain the centrally projecting branches of primary afferent axons, results in their permanent disconnection from the spinal cord, as well as sensory dysfunction such as pain. In animals, experimental dorsal root injuries affecting a small number of roots produce dynamic behavioural changes, providing evidence for the now familiar concept that sensory processing at the level of the spinal cord is not hard-wired. Changes in behaviour following rhizotomy suggest changes in spinal sensory circuitry, and we and others have shown that the density of spinal serotonergic axons as well as processes of inhibitory interneurons increases following rhizotomy. Intact primary afferent axons are less apt to sprout into denervated territory. Recent work from our group has asked (1) what is the stimulus that induces sprouting of serotonergic (and other) axons and (2) what prevents spared primary afferent axons from occupying the territory of those lost to injury. This article will review the evidence that a single factor upregulated by dorsal root injury, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), underpins both serotonergic sprouting and a lack of primary afferent plasticity. BDNF also differentially modulates some of the behavioural consequences of dorsal root injury: antagonizing endogenous BDNF improves spontaneous mechanosensory recovery but prevents recovery from rhizotomy-induced hypersensitivity to cold. These findings reinforce the notion that in disease states as complex and variable as spinal cord injury, single pharmacological

  11. Recombination between feline leukemia virus subgroup B or C and endogenous env elements alters the in vitro biological activities of the viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, R; Ghosh, A K; Kumar, D V; Bachman, B A; Shibata, D; Roy-Burman, P

    1991-01-01

    An important question in feline leukemia virus (FeLV) pathogenesis is whether, as in murine leukemia virus infection, homologous recombination between the infecting FeLV and the noninfectious endogenous FeLV-like proviruses serves as a significant base for the generation of proximal pathogens. To begin an analysis of this issue, several recombinant FeLVs were produced by using two different approaches: (i) the regions of the viral envelope (env) gene of a cloned FeLV (subgroup B virus [FeLV-B], Gardner-Arnstein strain) and those of two different endogenous proviral loci were exchanged to create specific FeLV chimeras, and (ii) vectors containing endogenous env and molecularly cloned infectious FeLV-C (Sarma strain) DNA sequences were coexpressed by transfection in nonfeline cells to facilitate recombination. The results of these combined approaches showed that up to three-fourths of the envelope glycoprotein (gp70), beginning from the N-terminal end, could be replaced by endogenous FeLV sequences to produce biologically active chimeric FeLVs. The in vitro replication efficiency or cell tropism of the recombinants appeared to be influenced by the amount of gp70 sequences replaced by the endogenous partner as well as by the locus of origin of the endogenous sequences. Additionally, a characteristic biological effect, aggregation of feline T-lymphoma cells (3201B cell line), was found to be specifically induced by replicating FeLV-C or FeLV-C-based recombinants. Multiple crossover sites in the gp70 protein selected under the conditions used for coexpression were identified. The results of induced coexpression were also supported by rapid generation of FeLV recombinants when FeLV-C was used to infect the feline 3201B cell line that constitutively expresses high levels of endogenous FeLV-specific mRNAs. Furthermore, a large, highly conserved open reading frame in the pol gene of an endogenous FeLV provirus was identified. This observation, particularly in reference to

  12. RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of an endogenous type C virus of mice: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Hizi, A; Yaniv, A

    1980-06-01

    An RNA-dependent DNA polymerase was isolated from purified virions of endogenous oncornaviruses released by the MOPC-315 murine myeloma cell line. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified enzyme was found to consist of two major polypeptides with molecular weights of about 28,000 and 26,500. The active enzyme had a molecular weight of approximately 56,000, as calculated from its sedimentation on glycerol density gradients, indicating that it is probably a dimer of the two subunit polypeptides. The isolated MOPC-315 virus polymerase exhibited all three activities known to be found in the DNA polymerase from oncornaviruses, namely, an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and an RNase H. The RNA-dependent polymerase activity showed a prounced preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+, whereas the DNA-dependent and RNase H reactions were catalyzed by these two cations to an almost equal extent. The purified polymerase was found to be immunologically related to the polymerase of Rauscher murine leukemia virus.

  13. RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of an endogenous type C virus of mice: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Hizi, A; Yaniv, A

    1980-01-01

    An RNA-dependent DNA polymerase was isolated from purified virions of endogenous oncornaviruses released by the MOPC-315 murine myeloma cell line. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified enzyme was found to consist of two major polypeptides with molecular weights of about 28,000 and 26,500. The active enzyme had a molecular weight of approximately 56,000, as calculated from its sedimentation on glycerol density gradients, indicating that it is probably a dimer of the two subunit polypeptides. The isolated MOPC-315 virus polymerase exhibited all three activities known to be found in the DNA polymerase from oncornaviruses, namely, an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and an RNase H. The RNA-dependent polymerase activity showed a prounced preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+, whereas the DNA-dependent and RNase H reactions were catalyzed by these two cations to an almost equal extent. The purified polymerase was found to be immunologically related to the polymerase of Rauscher murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6155478

  14. Distributed state simulation of endogenous processes in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Andrew J; Jassby, David

    2007-08-01

    Distributed state-type simulations (based on modeling of individual bacteria as they move through a reactor system) predicted a greater sensitivity of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) performance to endogenous degradation than did conventional, "lumped"-type simulations (based on average biomass compositions). Recent research has indicated that the variable hydraulic residence times experienced by individual microbial storage product accumulating bacteria in systems with completely mixed reactors tend to produce populations with diverse microbial storage product contents (distributed states). Endogenous degradation in EBPR systems is of particular interest because the polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) responsible for EBPR rely on the accumulation of three different storage products that may be endogenously degraded. Simulations indicated that as endogenous degradation rates of microbial storage products were increased, EBPR performance decreased more rapidly according to the distributed approach than according to the lumped approach. State profile analysis demonstrated that as these rates increased, the population fraction with depleted storage products also increased, and this tended to increase the error in calculated biokinetic rates by the lumped approach. Simulations based on recently reported endogenous rate coefficients also suggested large differences between distributed and lumped predictions of EBPR performance. These results demonstrated that endogenous decay processes may play a more important role in EBPR than predicted by the lumped approach. This suggests a need for further research to determine endogenous process rates, and for incorporation of this information to distributed-type simulators, as this should lead to improved accuracy of EBPR simulations. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Syncytin-A and syncytin-B, two fusogenic placenta-specific murine envelope genes of retroviral origin conserved in Muridae

    PubMed Central

    Dupressoir, Anne; Marceau, Geoffroy; Vernochet, Cécile; Bénit, Laurence; Kanellopoulos, Colette; Sapin, Vincent; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we and others have identified two human endogenous retroviruses that entered the primate lineage 25–40 million years ago and that encode highly fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins (syncytin-1 and -2), possibly involved in the formation of the placenta syncytiotrophoblast layer generated by trophoblast cell fusion at the materno–fetal interface. A systematic in silico search throughout mouse genome databases presently identifies two fully coding envelope genes, present as unique copies and unrelated to any known murine endogenous retrovirus, that we named syncytin-A and -B. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrates placenta-specific expression for both genes, with increasing transcript levels in this organ from 9.5 to 14.5 days postcoitum. In situ hybridization of placenta cryosections further localizes these transcripts in the syncytiotrophoblast-containing labyrinthine zona. Consistently, we show that both genes can trigger cell–cell fusion in ex vivo transfection assays, with distinct cell type specificities suggesting different receptor usage. Genes orthologous to syncytin-A and -B and disclosing a striking conservation of their coding status are found in all Muridae tested (mouse, rat, gerbil, vole, and hamster), dating their entry into the rodent lineage ≈20 million years ago. Together, these data strongly argue for a critical role of syncytin-A and -B in murine syncytiotrophoblast formation, thus unraveling a rather unique situation where two pairs of endogenous retroviruses, independently acquired by the primate and rodent lineages, would have been positively selected for a convergent physiological role. PMID:15644441

  16. Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention on cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Hopfinger, Joseph B; West, Vicki M

    2006-06-01

    Sensory processing is affected by both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of attention, although how these mechanisms interact in the brain has remained unclear. In the present study, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate how multiple stages of information processing in the brain are affected when endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are concurrently engaged. We found that the earliest stage of cortical visual processing, the striate-cortex-generated C1, was immune to attentional modulation, even when endogenous and exogenous attention converged on a common location. The earliest stage of processing to be affected in this experiment was the late phase of the extrastriate-cortex-generated P1 component, which was dominated by exogenous attention. Processing at this stage was enhanced by exogenous attention, regardless of where endogenous attention had been oriented. Endogenous attention, however, dominated a later, higher-order stage of processing indexed by an enhancement of the P300 that was unaffected by exogenous attention. Critically, between these early and late stages, an interaction was found wherein endogenous and exogenous attention produced distinct, and overlapping, effects on information processing. At the same time that exogenous attention was producing an extended enhancement of the late-P1, endogenous attention was enhancing the occipital-parietal N1 component. These results provide neurophysiological support for theories suggesting that endogenous and exogenous mechanisms represent two attention systems that can affect information processing in the brain in distinct ways. Furthermore, these data provide new evidence regarding the precise stages of neural processing that are, and are not, affected when endogenous and exogenous attentions interact.

  17. Analysis of alpha hemoglobin stabilizing protein overexpression in murine β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Nasimuzzaman, Md; Khandros, Eugene; Wang, Xiaomei; Kong, Yi; Zhao, Huifen; Weiss, David; Rivella, Stefano; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Persons, Derek A.

    2013-01-01

    Excess free α-globin is cytotoxic and contributes to the pathophysiology of β-thalassemia. Alpha hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that binds free α-globin to promote its folding and inhibit its ability to produce damaging reactive oxygen species. Reduced AHSP levels correlate with increased severity of β-thalassemia in some human cohorts, but causal mechanistic relationships are not established for these associations. We used transgenic and lentiviral gene transfer methods to investigate whether supraphysiologic AHSP levels could mitigate the severity of β-thalassemia intermedia by providing an increased sink for the excess pool of α-globin chains. We tested wild-type AHSP and two mutant versions with amino acid substitutions that confer 3- or 13-fold higher affinity for α-globin. Erythroid overexpression of these AHSP proteins up to 11-fold beyond endogenous levels had no major effects on hematologic parameters in β-thalassemic animals. Our results demonstrate that endogenous AHSP is not limiting for α-globin detoxification in a murine model of β-thalassemia. PMID:20815047

  18. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  19. Strategies for the photo-control of endogenous protein activity.

    PubMed

    Brechun, Katherine E; Arndt, Katja M; Woolley, G Andrew

    2016-11-28

    Photo-controlled or 'optogenetic' effectors interfacing with endogenous protein machinery allow the roles of endogenous proteins to be probed. There are two main approaches being used to develop optogenetic effectors: (i) caging strategies using photo-controlled conformational changes, and (ii) protein relocalization strategies using photo-controlled protein-protein interactions. Numerous specific examples of these approaches have been reported and efforts to develop general methods for photo-control of endogenous proteins are a current focus. The development of improved screening and selection methods for photo-switchable proteins would advance the field.

  20. Detection of endogenous boldenone in the entire male horses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Yiu, Kenneth C H; Tang, Francis P W; Dehennin, Louis; Plou, Philippe; Bonnaire, Yves; Wan, Terence S M

    2004-09-05

    Boldenone (1,2-dehydrotestosterone) is a common veterinary anabolic agent. Its structure is very similar to testosterone. Testosterone is endogenous in the horse, whereas there has been no report concerning the detection of endogenous boldenone. This paper reports the direct observation of sulphate conjugate of boldenone in equine urine from entires. The detection procedures involved solid-phase extraction, immunoaffinity column (IAC) purification, and then LC-MS-MS analysis on a Q-ToF instrument. The identification of boldenone sulphate has provided direct evidence for the endogenous nature of boldenone in entire male horses. Quantification data for the normal level of boldenone in Hong Kong racehorses will also be discussed.

  1. tirant, a Newly Discovered Active Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Akkouche, Abdou; Rebollo, Rita; Burlet, Nelly; Esnault, Caroline; Martinez, Sonia; Viginier, Barbara; Terzian, Christophe; Vieira, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have the ability to become permanently integrated into the genomes of their host, and they are generally transmitted vertically from parent to progeny. With the exception of gypsy, few endogenous retroviruses have been identified in insects. In this study, we describe the tirant endogenous retrovirus in a subset of Drosophila simulans natural populations. By focusing on the envelope gene, we show that the entire retroviral cycle (transcription, translation, and retrotransposition) can be completed for tirant within one population of this species. PMID:22278247

  2. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  3. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  4. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage.

  5. Hyperpolarized 13C dehydroascorbate as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M

    2011-11-15

    Reduction and oxidation (redox) chemistry is involved in both normal and abnormal cellular function, in processes as diverse as circadian rhythms and neurotransmission. Intracellular redox is maintained by coupled reactions involving NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and vitamin C, as well as their corresponding oxidized counterparts. In addition to functioning as enzyme cofactors, these reducing agents have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the toxic products of oxidative metabolism seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Despite this strong relationship between redox and human disease, methods to interrogate a redox pair in vivo are limited. Here we report the development of [1-(13)C] dehydroascorbate [DHA], the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy. In murine models, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-(13)C] vitamin C within the liver, kidneys, and brain, as well as within tumor in a transgenic prostate cancer mouse. This result is consistent with what has been previously described for the DHA/Vitamin C redox pair, and points to a role for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA in characterizing the concentrations of key intracellular reducing agents, including GSH. More broadly, these findings suggest a prognostic role for this new redox sensor in determining vulnerability of both normal and abnormal tissues to ROS.

  6. Cas9-dependent endogenous gene regulation is required for bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Timothy R; Weiss, David S

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems are known to mediate bacterial defence against foreign nucleic acids. We recently demonstrated a non-canonical role for a CRISPR-Cas system in controlling endogenous gene expression, which had not previously been appreciated. In the present article, we describe the studies that led to this discovery, beginning with an unbiased genome-wide screen to identify virulence genes in the intracellular pathogen Francisella novicida. A gene annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, but which we now know encodes the Cas protein Cas9, was identified as one of the most critical to the ability of F. novicida to replicate and survive during murine infection. Subsequent studies revealed a role for this protein in evasion of the host innate immune response. Specifically, Cas9 represses the expression of a BLP (bacterial lipoprotein) that could otherwise be recognized by TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), a host protein involved in initiating an antibacterial pro-inflammatory response. By repressing BLP levels, Cas9 mediates evasion of TLR2, promoting bacterial virulence. Finally, we described the molecular mechanism by which Cas9 functions in complex with two small RNAs to target the mRNA encoding the BLP for degradation. This work greatly broadened the paradigm for CRISPR-Cas function, highlighting a role in gene regulation that could be conserved in numerous bacteria, and elucidating its integral contribution to bacterial pathogenesis.

  7. Transmission of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Produced from Different Recipient Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Cho, Yeondong; Yang, Jae Myung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young bong

    2016-01-01

    Humanized pigs have been developed to reduce the incidence of immune rejection in xenotransplantation, but significant concerns remain, such as transmission of viral zoonosis. Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV), which exist in the genome of pigs, are produced as infectious virions from all porcine cells and cause zoonosis. Here, we examined the possibility of zoonosis of hosts under conditions of immune suppression or xenotransplantation of cells producing host-adapted viruses. Upon transplantation of PERV-producing porcine cells into mice, no transmission of PERV was detected, whereas, transmission of PERV from mice transplanted with mouse-adapted PERV-producing cells was detected. In addition, the frequency of PERV transmission was increased in CsA treated mice transplanted with PERV-producing murine cells, compared with PERV-producing porcine cells. Transmission of PERV to host animals did not affect weight but immune responses, in particular, the number of T cells from PERV-transmitted mice, were notably reduced. The observed risk of PERV zoonosis highlights the requirement for thorough evaluation of viral zoonosis under particular host conditions, such as immunosuppressive treatment and transplantation with host-adapted virus-producing cells. PMID:27832080

  8. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  9. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2015-04-16

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA(-/-) and uPA(-/-) mice but increased in PAI-1(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA(-/-), but not uPA(-/-), mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA(-/-)mice but not in tPA(-/-) mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S(481)A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA(-/-), and uPA(-/-) mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S(481)A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  11. Autofluorescence properties of murine embryonic stem cells during spontaneous differentiation phases.

    PubMed

    Santin, Giada; Paulis, Marianna; Vezzoni, Paolo; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Bottiroli, Giovanni; Croce, Anna C

    2013-11-01

    The autofluorescence (AF) analysis allows in vivo, real-time assessment of cell functional activities, depending on the presence of biomolecules strictly involved in metabolic reactions and acting as endogenous fluorophores. Pluripotent stem cells during differentiation are known to undergo changes in their morphofunctional properties, with particular reference to bioenergetic metabolic signatures involving endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavins, lipofuscin-like lipopigments. Since the development of regenerative therapies based on pluripotent cells requires a careful monitoring of the successful maturation into the desired phenotype, aim of our work is to evaluate the AF potential to assess the differentiation phases in a murine stem cell model. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintained with and without leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), embryoid bodies (EBs), and EB-derived cells undergoing spontaneous differentiation toward the hematopoietic lineage have been used as a sample models. Cell AF properties have been characterized upon 366-nm excitation, under living conditions and in the absence of exogenous markers. Imaging, microspectrofluorometric techniques, and spectral fitting analysis based on the spectral parameters of each endogenous fluorophore have been applied to estimate their contribution to the whole cell AF emission spectra. Specific cytochemical labeling has been performed to validate AF data. Depending on the differentiation phases, cells undergo changes in morphology, AF distribution patterns, and AF emission spectral profiles. These latter reflect variations in the single endogenous fluorophore contribution to the overall emission. The coenzyme NAD(P)H accounts for up to 80% of the whole spectral area. The free form prevails on the bound one, and their changes have been investigated in terms of NAD(P)Hbound/free and redox ratios. These values vary in agreement with a slow metabolic activity and prevailing glycolytic metabolism in the

  12. Murine amniotic fluid stem cells contribute mesenchymal but not epithelial components to reconstituted mammary ducts.

    PubMed

    Klemmt, Petra A B; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2010-07-07

    Amniotic fluid harbors cells indicative of all three germ layers, and pluripotent fetal amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSs) are considered potentially valuable for applications in cellular therapy and tissue engineering. We investigated whether it is possible to direct the cell fate of AFSs in vivo by transplantation experiments into a particular microenvironment, the mammary fat pad. This microenvironment provides the prerequisites to study stem cell function and the communication between mesenchymal and epithelial cells. On clearance of the endogenous epithelium, the ductal tree can be reconstituted by the transfer of exogenously provided mammary stem cells. Analogously, exogenously provided stem cells from other tissues can be investigated for their potential to contribute to mammary gland regeneration. We derived pluripotent murine AFSs, measured the expression of stem cell markers, and confirmed their in vitro differentiation potential. AFSs were transplanted into cleared and non cleared fat pads of immunocompromised mice to evaluate their ability to assume particular cell fates under the instructive conditions of the fat-pad microenvironment and the hormonal stimulation during pregnancy. Transplantation of AFSs into cleared fat pads alone or in the presence of exogenous mammary epithelial cells caused their differentiation into stroma and adipocytes and replaced endogenous mesenchymal components surrounding the ducts in co-transplantation experiments. Similarly, transplantation of AFSs into fat pads that had not been previously cleared led to AFS-derived stromal cells surrounding the elongating endogenous ducts. AFSs expressed the marker protein α-SMA, but did not integrate into the myoepithelial cell layer of the ducts in virgin mice. With pregnancy, a small number of AFS-derived cells were present in acinar structures. Our data demonstrate that the microenvironmental cues of the mammary fat pad cause AFSs to participate in mammary gland regeneration by

  13. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    Unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and invitro passaged N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses were molecularly cloned. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated the the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in the pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map.

  14. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    The authors molecularly cloned unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and in vitro passage N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated that the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map).

  15. Spatiotemporal expression of endogenous TLR4 ligands leads to inflammation and bone erosion in mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kiyeko, Gaëlle Wambiekele; Hatterer, Eric; Herren, Suzanne; Di Ceglie, Irene; van Lent, Peter L; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression of endogenous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands (e.g., Tenascin-C, S100A8/A9, citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) immune complexes) has been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their roles in RA pathogenesis are not well understood. Here, we investigated the expression kinetics and role of endogenous TLR4 ligands in the murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Tenascin-C was upregulated in blood early in CIA, and correlated positively with the clinical score at day 56. Levels of S100A8/A9 increased starting from day 28, peaking at day 42, and correlated positively with joint inflammation. Levels of anti-cFb antibodies increased during the late phase of CIA and correlated positively with both joint inflammation and cartilage damage. Blockade of TLR4 activation at the time of the first TLR4 ligand upregulation prevented clinical and histological signs of arthritis. A TLR4-dependent role was also observed for Tenascin-C and cFb immune complexes in osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Taken together, our data suggests that the pathogenic contribution of TLR4 in promoting joint inflammation and bone erosion during CIA occurs via various TLR4 ligands arising at different stages of disease. The data also suggests that Blockade of TLR4 with monoclonal antibodies is a promising strategy in RA treatment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Endogenous spar tin, mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia, has a complex subcellular localization suggesting diverse roles in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Robay, Dimitri; Patel, Heema; Simpson, Michael A.; Brown, Nigel A.; Crosby, Andrew H. . E-mail: acrosby@sgul.ac.uk

    2006-09-10

    Mutation of spartin (SPG20) underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disorder principally defined by the degeneration of upper motor neurons. Using a polyclonal antibody against spartin to gain insight into the function of the endogenous molecule, we show that the endogenous molecule is present in two main isoforms of 85 kDa and 100 kDa, and 75 kDa and 85 kDa in human and murine, respectively, with restricted subcellular localization. Immunohistochemical studies on human and mouse embryo sections and in vitro cell studies indicate that spartin is likely to possess both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. The nuclear expression of spartin closely mirrors that of the snRNP (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein) marker {alpha}-Sm, a component of the spliceosome. Spartin is also enriched at the centrosome within mitotic structures. Notably we show that spartin protein undergoes dynamic positional changes in differentiating human SH-SY5Y cells. In undifferentiated non-neuronal cells, spartin displays a nuclear and diffuse cytosolic profile, whereas spartin transiently accumulates in the trans-Golgi network and subsequently decorates discrete puncta along neurites in terminally differentiated neuroblastic cells. Investigation of these spartin-positive vesicles reveals that a large proportion colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle marker synaptotagmin. Spartin is also enriched in synaptic-like structures and in synaptic vesicle-enriched fraction.

  17. Effective genetic vaccination with a widely shared endogenous retroviral tumor antigen requires CD40 stimulation during tumor rejection phase.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Cingarlini, Sara; Apolloni, Elisa; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; De Santo, Carmela; Macino, Beatrice; Marin, Oriano; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-12-15

    Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) products are recognized by T lymphocytes in mice and humans. As these Ags are preferentially expressed by neoplastic tissues, they might represent an ideal target for active immunization by genetic vaccination. However, i.m. inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding mouse gp70 or p15E, two products of the env gene of an endogenous murine leukemia virus, elicited a weak Ag-specific T lymphocyte response and resulted in partial protection from challenge with mouse tumors possessing these Ags. Depletion experiments showed that CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T lymphocytes were crucial for the antitumor activity of the vaccines. Systemic administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb increased the therapeutic potential of genetic vaccination, but only when given during the tumor rejection phase and not at the time of immunization. This effect correlated with a dramatic increase in the number of ERV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Adjuvant activity of CD40 agonists thus seems to be relevant to enhance the CD8(+) T cell-dependent response in tumor-bearing hosts, suggesting that sustaining tumor-specific T lymphocyte survival in subjects undergoing vaccination might be a key event in the successful vaccination with weak tumor Ags.

  18. Endogenous opioids regulate expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a new paradigm for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Rahn, Kristen A; Turel, Anthony P; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2009-11-01

    Preclinical investigations utilizing murine experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), as well as clinical observations in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), may suggest alteration of endogenous opioid systems in MS. In this study we used the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) to invoke a continuous (High Dose NTX, HDN) or intermittent (Low Dose NTX, LDN) opioid receptor blockade in order to elucidate the role of native opioid peptides in EAE. A mouse model of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE was employed in conjunction with daily treatment of LDN (0.1 mg/kg, NTX), HDN (10 mg/kg NTX), or vehicle (saline). No differences in neurological status (incidence, severity, disease index), or neuropathological assessment (activated astrocytes, demyelination, neuronal injury), were noted between MOG-induced mice receiving HDN or vehicle. Over 33% of the MOG-treated animals receiving LDN did not exhibit behavioral signs of disease, and the severity and disease index of the LDN-treated mice were markedly reduced from cohorts injected with vehicle. Although all LDN animals demonstrated neuropathological signs of EAE, LDN-treated mice without behavioral signs of disease had markedly lower levels of activated astrocytes and demyelination than LDN- or vehicle-treated animals with disease. These results imply that endogenous opioids, evoked by treatment with LDN and acting in the rebound period from drug exposure, are inhibitory to the onset and progression of EAE, and suggest that clinical studies of LDN are merited in MS and possibly in other autoimmune disorders.

  19. Isolating Exogenous and Endogenous Modes of Temporal Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Michael A.; Klein, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The differential allocation of information processing resources over time, here termed "temporal attention," may be achieved by relatively automatic "exogenous" or controlled "endogenous" mechanisms. Over 100 years of research has confounded these theoretically distinct dimensions of temporal attention. The current…

  20. Isolating Exogenous and Endogenous Modes of Temporal Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Michael A.; Klein, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The differential allocation of information processing resources over time, here termed "temporal attention," may be achieved by relatively automatic "exogenous" or controlled "endogenous" mechanisms. Over 100 years of research has confounded these theoretically distinct dimensions of temporal attention. The current…

  1. Association of endogenous substrate with solubilized bovine brain sialidase.

    PubMed

    Schengrund, C L; Repman, M A

    1986-01-01

    Nonidet P40 solubilized up to 90% of the sialidase, active towards added ganglioside substrate, that was associated with the total membrane fraction prepared from gray matter of bovine brains. Solubilized sialidase acted upon endogenous substrate (sialic acid containing compounds solubilized with the enzyme), hydrolyzing approximately 50% of the readily available sialosyl residues within 20 min. During a 2-hr reaction time 80% of the polysialylated gangliosides solubilized with the enzyme were acted upon. A 20-min lag was observed before sialidase acted upon added ganglioside substrate. The lag could be reduced to less than 2 min when the enzyme was allowed to act on endogenous substrate prior to exposure to exogenous substrate, suggesting that the solubilized enzyme acted preferentially on endogenous substrate. A protease inhibitor prevented much of the 86% loss of activity towards added substrate that was seen when the enzyme was stored at 4 degrees C for 6 days; activity towards endogenous substrate decreased only 34%.

  2. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood-brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates.

  3. Remarkable diversity of endogenous viruses in a crustacean genome.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa.

  4. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  5. Remarkable Diversity of Endogenous Viruses in a Crustacean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  6. Treatment response in Kawasaki disease is associated with sialylation levels of endogenous but not therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shohei; Shimizu, Chisato; Franco, Alessandra; Touma, Ranim; Kanegaye, John T; Choudhury, Biswa P; Naidu, Natasha N; Kanda, Yutaka; Hoang, Long T; Hibberd, Martin L; Tremoulet, Adriana H; Varki, Ajit; Burns, Jane C

    2013-01-01

    Although intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is highly effective in Kawasaki disease (KD), mechanisms are not understood and 10-20% of patients are treatment-resistant, manifesting a higher rate of coronary artery aneurysms. Murine models suggest that α2-6-linked sialic acid (α2-6Sia) content of IVIG is critical for suppressing inflammation. However, pro-inflammatory states also up-regulate endogenous levels of β-galactoside:α2-6 sialyltransferase-I (ST6Gal-I), the enzyme that catalyzes addition of α2-6Sias to N-glycans. We asked whether IVIG failures correlated with levels of α2-6Sia on infused IVIG or on the patient's own endogenous IgG. We quantified levels of α2-6Sia in infused IVIG and endogenous IgG from 10 IVIG-responsive and 10 resistant KD subjects using multiple approaches. Transcript levels of ST6GAL1, in patient whole blood and B cell lines were evaluated by RT-PCR. Plasma soluble (s)ST6Gal-I levels were measured by ELISA. There was no consistent difference in median sialylation levels of infused IVIG between groups. However, α2-6Sia levels in endogenous IgG, ST6GAL1 transcript levels, and ST6Gal-I protein in serum from IVIG-resistant KD subjects were lower than in responsive subjects at both pre-treatment and one-year time points (p <0.001, respectively). Our data indicate sialylation levels of therapeutic IVIG are unrelated to treatment response in KD. Rather, lower sialylation of endogenous IgG and lower blood levels of ST6GALI mRNA and ST6Gal-I enzyme predict therapy resistance. These differences were stable over time, suggesting a genetic basis. Because IVIG-resistance increases risk of coronary artery aneurysms, our findings have important implications for the identification and treatment of such individuals.

  7. Murine Toxicity of Cochliobolus carbonum1

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Pat B.; Nelson, R. R.; Harris, B. S. H.

    1968-01-01

    Seventeen wild-type strains of the phytopathogenic fungus Cochliobolus carbonum, tested by intraperitoneal injection into mice, were lethal within 48 hr. The lethal effect appeared to be a toxic rather than an infectious process, because death occurred within 3 hr after injection of two of the isolates and heat-killed cultures were lethal. Assays of ascospore progeny from two crosses involving three isolates indicated that the toxic metabolites were under genetic control and quantitative regulation. Studies of the toxicological, cultural, and chemical characteristics of these three strains indicated that more than one murine toxin was present. PMID:16349821

  8. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model