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Sample records for endogenous murine parkin

  1. Parkin loss of function contributes to RTP801 elevation and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Romaní-Aumedes, J; Canal, M; Martín-Flores, N; Sun, X; Pérez-Fernández, V; Wewering, S; Fernández-Santiago, R; Ezquerra, M; Pont-Sunyer, C; Lafuente, A; Alberch, J; Luebbert, H; Tolosa, E; Levy, O A; Greene, L A; Malagelada, C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PARK2 gene are associated with an autosomal recessive form of juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). These mutations affect parkin solubility and impair its E3 ligase activity, leading to a toxic accumulation of proteins within susceptible neurons that results in a slow but progressive neuronal degeneration and cell death. Here, we report that RTP801/REDD1, a pro-apoptotic negative regulator of survival kinases mTOR and Akt, is one of such parkin substrates. We observed that parkin knockdown elevated RTP801 in sympathetic neurons and neuronal PC12 cells, whereas ectopic parkin enhanced RTP801 poly-ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In parkin knockout mouse brains and in human fibroblasts from AR-JP patients with parkin mutations, RTP801 levels were elevated. Moreover, in human postmortem PD brains with mutated parkin, nigral neurons were highly positive for RTP801. Further consistent with the idea that RTP801 is a substrate for parkin, the two endogenous proteins interacted in reciprocal co-immunoprecipitates of cell lysates. A potential physiological role for parkin-mediated RTP801 degradation is indicated by observations that parkin protects neuronal cells from death caused by RTP801 overexpression by mediating its degradation, whereas parkin knockdown exacerbates such death. Similarly, parkin knockdown enhanced RTP801 induction in neuronal cells exposed to the Parkinson's disease mimetic 6-hydroxydopamine and increased sensitivity to this toxin. This response to parkin loss of function appeared to be mediated by RTP801 as it was abolished by RTP801 knockdown. Taken together these results indicate that RTP801 is a novel parkin substrate that may contribute to neurodegeneration caused by loss of parkin expression or activity. PMID:25101677

  2. Transcriptional repression of p53 by parkin and impairment by mutations associated with autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Cristine Alves; Sunyach, Claire; Giaime, Emilie; West, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Safe, Stephen; Abou-Sleiman, Patrick M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Goldberg, Mathew S.; Shen, Jie; Checler, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the ubiquitin ligase parkin account for most autosomal recessive forms of juvenile Parkinson’s disease (AR-JP). Several studies have suggested that parkin possesses DNA-binding and transcriptional activity. We report here that parkin is a p53 transcriptional repressor. First, parkin prevented 6-hydroxydopamine-induced caspase-3 activation in a p53-dependent manner. Concomitantly, parkin reduced p53 expression and activity, an effect abrogated by familial parkin mutations known to either abolish or preserve its ligase activity. ChIP experiments indicate that overexpressed and endogenous parkin interact physically with the p53 promoter and that pathogenic mutations abolish DNA binding to and promoter transactivation of p53. Parkin lowered p53 mRNA levels and repressed p53 promoter transactivation through its Ring1 domain. Conversely, parkin depletion enhanced p53 expression and mRNA levels in fibroblasts and mouse brains, and increased cellular p53 activity and promoter transactivation in cells. Finally, familial parkin missense and deletion mutations enhanced p53 expression in human brains affected by AR-JP. This study reveals a ubiquitin ligase-independent function of parkin in the control of transcription and a functional link between parkin and p53 that is altered by AR-JP mutations. PMID:19801972

  3. Noncanonical MicroRNAs and Endogenous siRNAs in Lytic Infection of Murine Gammaherpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Zhang, Weixiong

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA) are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68). In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs). Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68. PMID:23110115

  4. Ubiquitin ligase parkin promotes Mdm2-arrestin interaction but inhibits arrestin ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Song, Xiufeng; Kook, Seunghyi; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous mutations in E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin were shown to associate with familial Parkinson's disease. Here we show that parkin binds arrestins, versatile regulators of cell signaling. Arrestin-parkin interaction was demonstrated by coimmuno-precipitation of endogenous proteins from brain tissue, and shown to be direct using purified proteins. Parkin binding enhances arrestin interactions with another E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2, apparently by shifting arrestin conformational equilibrium to the basal state preferred by Mdm2. Although Mdm2 was reported to ubiquitinate arrestins, parkin-dependent increase in Mdm2 binding dramatically reduces the ubiquitination of both non-visual arrestins, basal and stimulated by receptor activation, without affecting receptor internalization. Several disease-associated parkin mutations differentially affect the stimulation of Mdm2 binding. All parkin mutants tested effectively suppress arrestin ubiquitination, suggesting that bound parkin shields arrestin lysines targeted by Mdm2. Parkin binding to arrestins along with its effects on arrestin interaction with Mdm2 and ubiquitination is a novel function of this protein with implications for Parkinson's disease pathology. PMID:21466165

  5. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  6. AF-6 is a positive modulator of the PINK1/parkin pathway and is deficient in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Haskin, Joseph; Szargel, Raymonde; Shani, Vered; Mekies, Lucy N.; Rott, Ruth; Lim, Grace G. Y.; Lim, Kah-Leong; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Wolosker, Herman; Engelender, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Parkin E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity and its role in mitochondria homeostasis are thought to play a role in Parkinson's disease (PD). We now report that AF-6 is a novel parkin interacting protein that modulates parkin ubiquitin-ligase activity and mitochondrial roles. Parkin interacts with the AF-6 PDZ region through its C-terminus. This leads to ubiquitination of cytosolic AF-6 and its degradation by the proteasome. On the other hand, endogenous AF-6 robustly increases parkin translocation and ubiquitin-ligase activity at the mitochondria. Mitochondrial AF-6 is not a parkin substrate, but rather co-localizes with parkin and enhances mitochondria degradation through PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy. On the other hand, several parkin and PINK1 juvenile disease-mutants are insensitive to AF-6 effects. AF-6 is present in Lewy bodies and its soluble levels are strikingly decreased in the caudate/putamen and substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients, suggesting that decreased AF-6 levels may contribute to the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria in the disease. The identification of AF-6 as a positive modulator of parkin translocation to the mitochondria sheds light on the mechanisms involved in PD and underscores AF-6 as a novel target for future therapeutics. PMID:23393160

  7. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  8. Parkin Regulation and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hang, Liting; Yao, Tso-Pang; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Parkin is a unique, multifunctional ubiquitin ligase whose various roles in the cell, particularly in neurons, are widely thought to be protective. The pivotal role that Parkin plays in maintaining neuronal survival is underscored by our current recognition that Parkin dysfunction represents not only a predominant cause of familial parkinsonism but also a formal risk factor for the more common, sporadic form of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Accordingly, keen research on Parkin over the past decade has led to an explosion of knowledge regarding its physiological roles and its relevance to PD. However, our understanding of Parkin is far from being complete. Indeed, surprises emerge from time to time that compel us to constantly update the paradigm of Parkin function. For example, we now know that Parkin’s function is not confined to mere housekeeping protein quality control (QC) roles but also includes mitochondrial homeostasis and stress-related signaling. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggest a role for Parkin in several other major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Yet, it remains truly amazing to note that a single enzyme could serve such multitude of functions and cellular roles. Clearly, its activity has to be tightly regulated. In this review, we shall discuss this and how dysregulated Parkin function may precipitate neuronal demise in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26793099

  9. Nucleotide sequence analysis establishes the role of endogenous murine leukemia virus DNA segments in formation of recombinant mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A S

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of 363 nucleotides near the 3' end of the pol gene and 564 nucleotides from the 5' terminus of the env gene in an endogenous murine leukemia viral (MuLV) DNA segment, cloned from AKR/J mouse DNA and designated as A-12, was obtained. For comparison, the nucleotide sequence in an analogous portion of AKR mink cell focus-forming (MCF) 247 MuLV provirus was also determined. Sequence features unique to MCF247 MuLV DNA in the 3' pol and 5' env regions were identified by comparison with nucleotide sequences in analogous regions of NFS -Th-1 xenotropic and AKR ecotropic MuLV proviruses. These included (i) an insertion of 12 base pairs encoding four amino acids located 60 base pairs from the 3' terminus of the pol gene and immediately preceding the env gene, (ii) the deletion of 12 base pairs (encoding four amino acids) and the insertion of 3 base pairs (encoding one amino acid) in the 5' portion of the env gene, and (iii) single base substitutions resulting in 2 MCF247 -specific amino acids in the 3' pol and 23 in the 5' env regions. Nucleotide sequence comparison involving the 3' pol and 5' env regions of AKR MCF247 , NFS xenotropic, and AKR ecotropic MuLV proviruses with the cloned endogenous MuLV DNA indicated that MCF247 proviral DNA sequences were conserved in the cloned endogenous MuLV proviral segment. In fact, total nucleotide sequence identity existed between the endogenous MuLV DNA and the MCF247 MuLV provirus in the 3' portion of the pol gene. In the 5' env region, only 4 of 564 nucleotides were different, resulting in three amino acid changes between AKR MCF247 MuLV DNA and the endogenous MuLV DNA present in clone A-12. In addition, nucleotide sequence comparison indicated that Moloney-and Friend-MCF MuLVs were also highly related in the 3' pol and 5' env regions to the cloned endogenous MuLV DNA. These results establish the role of endogenous MuLV DNA segments in generation of recombinant MCF viruses. PMID:6328017

  10. Expression of human tyrosine kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor amplifies signaling through endogenous murine epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Sue-A-Quan, A; Mills, G B; Skorecki, K L

    1993-12-15

    Recent findings have suggested that certain ligand-dependent responses to EGF may be propagated in a manner that is not dependent on the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R, Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538) or, alternatively, that these responses may occur through the interaction of the human tyrosine kinase-deficient EGF-R with an as yet unidentified kinase (Selva, E., Raden, D. L., and Davis, R. J. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2250-2254). These conclusions represent a significant departure from our current understanding of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore we examined the effect of expression of tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF receptor in murine NIH-3T3-2.2 cells on the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP-2) kinase. In parental cells (NIH-3T3-2.2) that express low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, there was no demonstrable EGF-dependent coupling to MAP-2 kinase. In NIH-3T3-2.2 cells transfected with tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R, there was unexpected EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase. Analysis of the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R in these cells revealed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF-R. A low level of endogenous murine EGF-R present in these cells were also phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and displayed autokinase activity. Similar results were obtained using an unrelated cell line (B82L cells), in which EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase was previously attributed to signal propagation through a tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R (Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538). Taken together, these results suggest that the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R are able to amplify the response to activation of low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, thus leading to EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase in cells

  11. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  12. Angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cultured murine proximal tubular cells is mediated by endogenous transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Mueller, E; Stahl, R A; Ziyadeh, F N

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies by our group have demonstrated that angiotensin II (ANG II), as a single factor in serum-free medium, induces cellular hypertrophy of a cultured murine proximal tubular cell line (MCT). The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that this growth effect was mediated by activation of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Exogenous TGF-beta 1 (1 ng/ml) mimicked the growth effects observed with 10(-8) M ANG II (inhibition of DNA synthesis and induction of cellular hypertrophy). A neutralizing anti-TGF-beta antibody attenuated the ANG II-induced increase in de novo protein and total RNA synthesis as well as total protein content. This antibody also abolished the ANG II-mediated inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent MCT cells. Control IgG or an unrelated antibody had no effect. A bioassay for TGF-beta using mink lung epithelial cells revealed that MCT cells treated with ANG II released active TGF-beta into the cell culture supernatant. Northern blot analysis and semi-quantitative cDNA amplification demonstrated increases in steady-state levels for TGF-beta 1 mRNA after ANG II stimulation of MCT cells, but not in a syngeneic murine mesangial cell line. Our data indicate that the ANG II-induced hypertrophy in MCT cells is mediated by synthesis and activation of endogenous TGF-beta. It is intriguing to speculate that TGF-beta may play a role in the early tubular cell hypertrophy and the subsequent interstitial scarring observed in several models of chronic renal injury that are characterized by increased activity of intrarenal ANG II. Images PMID:7690779

  13. Endogenous biosynthesis of thromboxane and prostacyclin in 2 distinct murine models of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Cyrus, T; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2000-12-01

    Thromboxane A(2) is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist; prostacyclin is a potent platelet inhibitor and vasodilator. Altered biosynthesis of these eicosanoids is a feature of human hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. This study examined whether in 2 murine models of atherosclerosis their levels are increased and correlated with the evolution of the disease. Urinary 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha), metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, respectively, were assayed in apoliprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice on chow and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice on chow and a Western-type diet. Atherosclerosis lesion area was measured by en face method. Both eicosanoids increased in apoE-deficient mice on chow and in LDLR-deficient mice on a high-fat diet, but not in LDLR-deficient mice on chow by the end of the study. Aspirin suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation, serum thromboxane B(2), and 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2), and significantly reduced the excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha) in these animals. This study demonstrates that thromboxane as well as prostacyclin biosynthesis is increased in 2 murine models of atherogenesis and is secondary to increased in vivo platelet activation. Assessment of their generation in these models may afford the basis for future studies on the functional role of these eicosanoids in the evolution and progression of atherosclerosis. (Blood. 2000;96:3823-3826)

  14. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  15. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA Damage Responsive Murine Endogenous Retrovirus of GLN Family Involved in Cell Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Qi, Xinming; Gong, Likun; Xing, Guozhen; Chen, Min; Miao, Lingling; Yao, Jun; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Furihata, Chie; Luan, Yang; Ren, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512), whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs), but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs). Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV). However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions. PMID:22514700

  16. Frequent Infection of Human Cancer Xenografts with Murine Endogenous Retroviruses in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Asif; Terry, Anne; Gilroy, Kathryn; Kilbey, Anna; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Bell, Margaret; Mason, Susan; Blyth, Karen; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of human cancer xenografts in mice with murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) is a long-standing observation, but the likelihood of infection in vivo and its biological consequences are poorly understood. We therefore conducted a prospective study in commonly used xenograft recipient strains. From BALB/c nude mice engrafted with MCF7 human mammary carcinoma cells, we isolated a virus that was virtually identical to Bxv1, a locus encoding replication-competent xenotropic MLV (XMLV). XMLV was detected in 9/17 (53%) independently isolated explants. XMLV was not found in primary leukemias or in THP1 leukemia cells grown in Bxv1-negative NSG (NOD/SCID/γCnull) mice, although MCF7 explants harbored replication-defective MLV proviruses. To assess the significance of infection for xenograft behavior in vivo, we examined changes in growth and global transcription in MCF7 and the highly susceptible Raji Burkitt lymphoma cell line chronically infected with XMLV. Raji cells showed a stronger transcriptional response that included up-regulation of chemokines and effectors of innate antiviral immunity. In conclusion, the risk of de novo XMLV infection of xenografts is high in Bxv1 positive mice, while infection can have positive or negative effects on xenograft growth potential with significant consequences for interpretation of many xenograft studies. PMID:25912714

  17. Is PARKIN parkinsonism a cancer predisposition syndrome?

    PubMed

    Schüle, Birgitt; Byrne, Christie; Rees, Linda; Langston, J William

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN gene (chromosome 6q25-27) were first described in 1998 in families with "juvenile" autosomal recessive parkinsonism. More than 180 causative variants in the PARKIN gene have been identified; point mutations and copy number variants (i.e., exon deletions or duplications) occur at nearly equal frequencies.(1) PARKIN is one of the largest genes in the human genome (1.3 Mb) and contains a chromosomal fragile site (CFS) FRA6E (6q26) between exons 2 and 8. This is of interest regarding the etiology of cancer because CFSs are prone to spontaneous breaks leading to chromosome alterations. Therefore, it is not surprising that PARKIN mutations have also been found in various cancer cell lines and primary tumors.(2,3) Mutations in PARKIN show decreased PARKIN E3 ligase function with resultant accumulation of cyclin E, creating the potential for mitotic instability in dividing cells.

  18. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  19. Endogenous murine leukemia virus-encoded proteins in radiation leukemias of BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, E.; Pierotti, M.; DeLeo, A.B.; O'Donnell, P.V.; Fleissner, E.

    1982-02-01

    To explore the role of endogenous retroviruses in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in the mouse, we have examined virus-encoded proteins in nine BALB/c leukemias by pulsechase labeling procedures and serological typing with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. The major gag precursor protein, Pr65/sup gag/, was observed in all cases, but only three leukemias expressed detectable amounts of the glycosylated gag species, gP95/sup gag/, or its precursor, Pr75/sup gag/. No evidence was found for synthesis of gag-host fusion proteins. None of the leukemias released infectious xenotropic or dualtropic virus, but all nine expressed at least one env protein with xenotropic properties. In two instances a monoclonal antibody, 35/56, which is specific for the NuLV G/sub IX/ antigen, displayed a distinctive reactivity with this class of env protein, although this antibody is unreactive with replicating xenotropic viruses. An ecotropic/xenotropic recombinant env protein with the same 35/56 phenotype was observed in a leukemia induced by a strongly leukemogenic virus isolated from a BALB/c radiation leukemia.

  20. Parkin Somatic Mutations Link Melanoma and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lotan; Srour, Shani; Gartner, Jared; Kapitansky, Oxana; Qutob, Nouar; Dror, Shani; Golan, Tamar; Dayan, Roy; Brener, Ronen; Ziv, Tamar; Khaled, Mehdi; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Samuels, Yardena; Levy, Carmit

    2016-06-20

    Epidemiological studies suggest a direct link between melanoma and Parkinson's disease (PD); however, the underlying molecular basis is unknown. Since mutations in Parkin are the major driver of early-onset PD and Parkin was recently reported to play a role in cancer development, we hypothesized that Parkin links melanoma and PD. By analyzing whole exome/genome sequencing of Parkin from 246 melanoma patients, we identified five non-synonymous mutations, three synonymous mutations, and one splice region variant in Parkin in 3.6% of the samples. In vitro analysis showed that wild-type Parkin plays a tumor suppressive role in melanoma development resulting in cell-cycle arrest, reduction of metabolic activity, and apoptosis. Using a mass spectrometry-based analysis, we identified potential Parkin substrates in melanoma and generated a functional protein association network. The activity of mutated Parkin was assessed by protein structure modeling and examination of Parkin E3 ligase activity. The Parkin-E28K mutation impairs Parkin ubiquitination activity and abolishes its tumor suppressive effect. Taken together, our analysis of genomic sequence and in vitro data indicate that Parkin is a potential link between melanoma and Parkinson's disease. Our findings suggest new approaches for early diagnosis and treatment against both diseases.

  1. Rearrangement and expression of endogenous immunoglobulin genes occur in many murine B cells expressing transgenic membrane IgM.

    PubMed

    Stall, A M; Kroese, F G; Gadus, F T; Sieckmann, D G; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1988-05-01

    Transgenic mice carrying immunoglobulin genes coding for mu heavy chain and kappa light chain have been used to study the mechanisms involved in allelic and isotypic exclusion. We report here that individual cells from transgenic mice carrying a functionally rearranged mu heavy chain gene (capable of generating both membrane and secreted forms of IgM) can rearrange an endogenous mu heavy chain gene and simultaneously produce both transgenic and endogenous IgM. These "double-producing" cells express both endogenous and transgenic IgM in the cytoplasm (detected by immunohistology) and on the cell surface (detected by multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis). In addition, they secrete mixed IgM molecules containing both transgenic and endogenous mu heavy chains (detected in serum by radioimmune assay). The transgenic mice studied also have relatively large numbers of cells that produce endogenous immunoglobulin in the absence of detectable transgenic immunoglobulin ("endogenous-only cells"). The mechanisms that generate double-producing cells and endogenous-only cells appear to be under genetic control because the frequencies of these B-cell populations are characteristic for a given transgenic line. Thus, our findings indicate that more is involved in triggering allelic exclusion than the simple presence or absence of membrane mu heavy chains (as has been previously postulated).

  2. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  3. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  4. Mechanism of phospho-ubiquitin-induced PARKIN activation.

    PubMed

    Wauer, Tobias; Simicek, Michal; Schubert, Alexander; Komander, David

    2015-08-20

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase PARKIN (encoded by PARK2) and the protein kinase PINK1 (encoded by PARK6) are mutated in autosomal-recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and work together in the disposal of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy. PINK1 is stabilized on the outside of depolarized mitochondria and phosphorylates polyubiquitin as well as the PARKIN ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain. These phosphorylation events lead to PARKIN recruitment to mitochondria, and activation by an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of Pediculus humanus PARKIN in complex with Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (phosphoUb), revealing the molecular basis for PARKIN recruitment and activation. The phosphoUb binding site on PARKIN comprises a conserved phosphate pocket and harbours residues mutated in patients with AR-JP. PhosphoUb binding leads to straightening of a helix in the RING1 domain, and the resulting conformational changes release the Ubl domain from the PARKIN core; this activates PARKIN. Moreover, phosphoUb-mediated Ubl release enhances Ubl phosphorylation by PINK1, leading to conformational changes within the Ubl domain and stabilization of an open, active conformation of PARKIN. We redefine the role of the Ubl domain not only as an inhibitory but also as an activating element that is restrained in inactive PARKIN and released by phosphoUb. Our work opens up new avenues to identify small-molecule PARKIN activators. PMID:26161729

  5. Mechanism of phospho-ubiquitin induced PARKIN activation

    PubMed Central

    Wauer, Tobias; Simicek, Michal; Schubert, Alexander; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary The E3 ubiquitin ligase PARKIN (encoded by PARK2) and the protein kinase PINK1 (encoded by PARK6) are mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and work together in the disposal of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy1–3. PINK1 is stabilised on the outside of depolarised mitochondria, and phosphorylates poly-ubiquitin (polyUb)4–8 as well as the PARKIN Ub-like (Ubl) domain9,10. These phosphorylation events lead to PARKIN recruitment to mitochondria, and activation by an unknown allosteric mechanism4–12. Here we present the crystal structure of Pediculus humanus PARKIN in complex with Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (phosphoUb), revealing the molecular basis for PARKIN recruitment and activation. The phosphoUb binding site on PARKIN comprises a conserved phosphate pocket and harbours residues mutated in AR-JP patients. PhosphoUb binding leads to straightening of a helix in the RING1 domain, and the resulting conformational changes release the Ubl domain from the PARKIN core; this activates PARKIN. Moreover, phosphoUb-mediated Ubl release enhances Ubl phosphorylation by PINK1, leading to conformational changes within the Ubl domain and stabilisation of an open, active conformation of PARKIN. We redefine the role of the Ubl domain not only as an inhibitory13 but also as an activating element that is restrained in inactive PARKIN and released by phosphoUb. Our work opens new avenues to identify small molecule PARKIN activators. PMID:26161729

  6. Pathologic and Therapeutic Implications for the Cell Biology of Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Charan, Rakshita A.; LaVoie, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the E3 ligase parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is believed that parkin dysfunction may also contribute to idiopathic PD. Since its discovery, parkin has been implicated in supporting multiple neuroprotective pathways, many revolving around the maintenance of mitochondrial health quality control and governance of cell survival. Recent advances across the structure, biochemistry, and cell biology of parkin have provided great insights into the etiology of parkin-linked and idiopathic PD and may ultimately generate novel therapeutic strategies to slow or halt disease progression. This review describes the various pathways in which parkin acts and the mechanisms by which parkin may be targeted for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25697646

  7. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  8. Attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b ligands during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis does not compromise murine lung repair.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, BreAnne; Henneke, Ingrid; Hezel, Stefanie; Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Chao, Cho-Ming; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Jones, Matthew; Goth, Kerstin; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Königshoff, Melanie; Herold, Susanne; Rizvanov, Albert A; Günther, Andreas; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) mediate organ repair. Lung epithelial cell overexpression of Fgf10 postbleomycin injury is both protective and therapeutic, characterized by increased survival and attenuated fibrosis. Exogenous administration of FGF7 (palifermin) also showed prophylactic survival benefits in mice. The role of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis is still elusive. This study reports the expression of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands, receptors, and signaling targets in wild-type mice following bleomycin lung injury. In addition, the impact of attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b-ligands following bleomycin-induced fibrosis was tested by using a doxycycline (dox)-based inducible, soluble, dominant-negative form of the Fgfr2b receptor. Double-transgenic (DTG) Rosa26(rtTA/+);tet(O)solFgfr2b mice were validated for the expression and activity of soluble Fgfr2b (failure to regenerate maxillary incisors, attenuated recombinant FGF7 signal in the lung). As previously reported, no defects in lung morphometry were detected in DTG (+dox) mice exposed from postnatal days (PN) 1 through PN105. Female single-transgenic (STG) and DTG mice were subjected to various levels of bleomycin injury (1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 U/kg). Fgfr2b ligands were attenuated either throughout injury (days 0-11; days 0-28) or during later stages (days 6-28 and 14-28). No significant changes in survival, weight, lung function, confluent areas of fibrosis, or hydroxyproline deposition were detected in DTG mice. These results indicate that endogenous Fgfr2b ligands do not significantly protect against bleomycin injury, nor do they expedite the resolution of bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:25820524

  9. Attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b ligands during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis does not compromise murine lung repair

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, BreAnne; Henneke, Ingrid; Hezel, Stefanie; Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Chao, Cho-Ming; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Jones, Matthew; Goth, Kerstin; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Königshoff, Melanie; Herold, Susanne; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Günther, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) mediate organ repair. Lung epithelial cell overexpression of Fgf10 postbleomycin injury is both protective and therapeutic, characterized by increased survival and attenuated fibrosis. Exogenous administration of FGF7 (palifermin) also showed prophylactic survival benefits in mice. The role of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis is still elusive. This study reports the expression of endogenous Fgfr2b ligands, receptors, and signaling targets in wild-type mice following bleomycin lung injury. In addition, the impact of attenuating endogenous Fgfr2b-ligands following bleomycin-induced fibrosis was tested by using a doxycycline (dox)-based inducible, soluble, dominant-negative form of the Fgfr2b receptor. Double-transgenic (DTG) Rosa26rtTA/+;tet(O)solFgfr2b mice were validated for the expression and activity of soluble Fgfr2b (failure to regenerate maxillary incisors, attenuated recombinant FGF7 signal in the lung). As previously reported, no defects in lung morphometry were detected in DTG (+dox) mice exposed from postnatal days (PN) 1 through PN105. Female single-transgenic (STG) and DTG mice were subjected to various levels of bleomycin injury (1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 U/kg). Fgfr2b ligands were attenuated either throughout injury (days 0–11; days 0–28) or during later stages (days 6–28 and 14–28). No significant changes in survival, weight, lung function, confluent areas of fibrosis, or hydroxyproline deposition were detected in DTG mice. These results indicate that endogenous Fgfr2b ligands do not significantly protect against bleomycin injury, nor do they expedite the resolution of bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:25820524

  10. Dual Function of Phosphoubiquitin in E3 Activation of Parkin.

    PubMed

    Walinda, Erik; Morimoto, Daichi; Sugase, Kenji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding parkin, an auto-inhibited E3 ubiquitin ligase that functions in the clearance of damaged mitochondria, are the most common cause of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism. The mechanism regulating parkin activation remains poorly understood. Here we show, by using isothermal titration calorimetry, solution NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy, that parkin can bind ubiquitin and phosphomimetic ubiquitin by recognizing the canonical hydrophobic patch and C terminus of ubiquitin. The affinity of parkin for both phosphomimetic and unmodified ubiquitin is markedly enhanced upon removal of the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of parkin. This suggests that the agonistic binding of ubiquitin to parkin in trans is counterbalanced by the antagonistic activity of the parkin UBL domain in cis Intriguingly, UBL binding is enthalpy-driven, whereas ubiquitin binding is driven by an increase in the total entropy of the system. These thermodynamic differences are explained by different chemistry in the ubiquitin- and UBL-binding pockets of parkin and, as shown by molecular dynamics simulations, are not a consequence of changes in protein conformational entropy. Indeed, comparison of conformational fluctuations reveals that the RING1-IBR element becomes considerably more rigid upon complex formation. A model of parkin activation is proposed in which E2∼Ub binding triggers large scale diffusional motion of the RING2 domain toward the ubiquitin-stabilized RING1-IBR assembly to complete formation of the active parkin-E2∼Ub transfer complex. Thus, ubiquitin plays a dual role in parkin activation by competing with the inhibitory UBL domain and stabilizing the active form of parkin. PMID:27284007

  11. Identification and Molecular Characterization of Parkin in Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xuelian; Kim, Tae Im; Lee, Ji-Yun; Dai, Fuhong; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis habitating in the bile duct of mammals causes clonorchiasis endemic in East Asian countries. Parkin is a RING-between-RING protein and has E3-ubiquitin ligase activity catalyzing ubiquitination and degradation of substrate proteins. A cDNA clone of C. sinensis was predicted to encode a polypeptide homologous to parkin (CsParkin) including 5 domains (Ubl, RING0, RING1, IBR, and RING2). The cysteine and histidine residues binding to Zn2+ were all conserved and participated in formation of tertiary structural RINGs. Conserved residues were also an E2-binding site in RING1 domain and a catalytic cysteine residue in the RING2 domain. Native CsParkin was determined to have an estimated molecular weight of 45.7 kDa from C. sinensis adults by immunoblotting. CsParkin revealed E3-ubiquitin ligase activity and higher expression in metacercariae than in adults. CsParkin was localized in the locomotive and male reproductive organs of C. sinensis adults, and extensively in metacercariae. Parkin has been found to participate in regulating mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in mammalian cells. From these results, it is suggested that CsParkin play roles in energy metabolism of the locomotive organs, and possibly in protein metabolism of the reproductive organs of C. sinensis. PMID:25748711

  12. Identification and molecular characterization of Parkin in Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuelian; Kim, Tae Im; Lee, Ji-Yun; Dai, Fuhong; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2015-02-01

    Clonorchis sinensis habitating in the bile duct of mammals causes clonorchiasis endemic in East Asian countries. Parkin is a RING-between-RING protein and has E3-ubiquitin ligase activity catalyzing ubiquitination and degradation of substrate proteins. A cDNA clone of C. sinensis was predicted to encode a polypeptide homologous to parkin (CsParkin) including 5 domains (Ubl, RING0, RING1, IBR, and RING2). The cysteine and histidine residues binding to Zn(2+) were all conserved and participated in formation of tertiary structural RINGs. Conserved residues were also an E2-binding site in RING1 domain and a catalytic cysteine residue in the RING2 domain. Native CsParkin was determined to have an estimated molecular weight of 45.7 kDa from C. sinensis adults by immunoblotting. CsParkin revealed E3-ubiquitin ligase activity and higher expression in metacercariae than in adults. CsParkin was localized in the locomotive and male reproductive organs of C. sinensis adults, and extensively in metacercariae. Parkin has been found to participate in regulating mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in mammalian cells. From these results, it is suggested that CsParkin play roles in energy metabolism of the locomotive organs, and possibly in protein metabolism of the reproductive organs of C. sinensis. PMID:25748711

  13. Parkin-mediated responses against infection and wound involve TSPO-VDAC complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong Hyang; Chung, Chang Geon; Shim, Hyun-Jung; Jeon, Keun Hye; Yu, Seong-Woon; Lee, Sung Bae

    Parkin, an E3 ubuquitin ligase associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), has recently been implicated in mediating innate immunity. However, molecular details regarding parkin-mediated immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we identified mitochondrial TSPO-VDAC complex to genetically interact with parkin in mediating responses against infection and wound in Drosophila. The loss-of-function mutation in parkin results in defective immune response against bacterial infection. Additionally, parkin mutant larvae showed hypersensitivity against wound regardless of bacterial infection. Interestingly, the combinatorial trans-heterozygotic mutations in parkin and TSPO, or parkin and VDAC showed similar lethal tendency with parkin homozygous mutants. Furthermore, knockdown of TSPO alone also resulted in defective responses to infection and wound analogously to parkin mutants. Taken together, we propose that parkin cooperates with TSPO-VDAC complex to mediate responses against infection and wound.

  14. Activation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Thomas R; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-04-01

    The PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homologue-induced putative kinase 1)/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control pathway mediates the clearance of damaged organelles, but appears to be disrupted in Parkinson's disease (PD) [Springer and Kahle (2011) Autophagy 7, 266-278]. Upon mitochondrial stress, PINK1 activates the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Parkin through phosphorylation of the Ub-like (UBL) domain of Parkin and of the small modifier Ub itself at a conserved residue [Sauvé and Gehring (2014) Cell Res. 24, 1025-1026]. Recently resolved partial crystal structures of Parkin showed a 'closed', auto-inhibited conformation, consistent with its notoriously weak enzymatic activity at steady state [Wauer and Komander (2013) EMBO J. 32, 2099-2112; Riley et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1982; Trempe et al. (2013) Science 340, 1451-1455; Spratt et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1983]. It has thus become clear that Parkin must undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic functions. Recent published findings derived from X-ray structures and molecular modelling present a complete structural model of human Parkin at an all-atom resolution [Caulfield et al. (2014) PLoS Comput. Biol. 10, e1003935]. The results of the combined in silico simulations-based and experimental assay-based study indicates that PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation of Parkin is required for its activation and triggering of 'opening' conformations. Indeed, the obtained structures showed a sequential release of Parkin's intertwined domains and allowed docking of an Ub-charged E2 coenzyme, which could enable its enzymatic activity. In addition, using cell-based screening, select E2 enzymes that redundantly, cooperatively or antagonistically regulate Parkin's activation and/or enzymatic functions at different stages of the mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) process were identified [Fiesel et al. (2014) J. Cell Sci. 127, 3488-3504]. Other work that aims to pin-point the particular

  15. Parkin and relatives: the RBR family of ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio; Lucas, J Ignasi; Gradilla, Ana-Citlali; Ferrús, Alberto

    2004-05-19

    Mutations in the parkin gene cause autosomal-recessive juvenile parkinsonism. Parkin encodes a ubiquitin-protein ligase characterized by having the RBR domain, composed of two RING fingers plus an IBR/DRIL domain. The RBR family is defined as the group of genes whose products contain an RBR domain. RBR family members exist in all eukaryotic species for which significant sequence data is available, including animals, plants, fungi, and several protists. The integration of comparative genomics with structural and functional data allows us to conclude that RBR proteins have multiple roles, not only in protein quality control mechanisms, but also as indirect regulators of transcription. A recently formulated hypothesis, based on a case of gene fusion, suggested that RBR proteins may be often part of cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complexes. Recent data on Parkin protein agrees with that hypothesis. We discuss the involvement of RBR proteins in several neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

  16. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is efficacious in Parkin disease.

    PubMed

    Romito, Luigi M A; Contarino, Maria F; Ghezzi, Daniele; Franzini, Angelo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Albanese, Alberto

    2005-02-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease. We have analysed the genetic status of a series of consecutive parkinsonian patients implanted for STN HFS and compared the outcome of five carrying mutations in the parkin gene with that of the non-parkin group. All patients obtained sustained control of PD symptoms and achieved functional improvement; in the parkin group the UPDRS motor score improved by 56.4%, the levodopa equivalent daily dosage was reduced by 75.5%. Postoperative medications were reduced more in parkin than in non-parkin patients. We confirm that the current inclusion criteria for STN HFS do not exclude patients carrying mutations in the parkin gene; their clinical outcome is comparable to that of the non-parkin group.

  17. Parkin cooperates with GDNF/RET signaling to prevent dopaminergic neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Meka, Durga Praveen; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Nidadavolu, Prakash; Mohammadi, Behnam; Motori, Elisa; Ponna, Srinivas Kumar; Aboutalebi, Helia; Bassal, Mahmoud; Annamneedi, Anil; Finckh, Barbara; Miesbauer, Margit; Rotermund, Natalie; Lohr, Christian; Tatzelt, Jörg; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Kramer, Edgar R

    2015-05-01

    Parkin and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor RET have both been independently linked to the dopaminergic neuron degeneration that underlies Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that there is genetic crosstalk between parkin and the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in two different mouse models of PD. Mice lacking both parkin and RET exhibited accelerated dopaminergic cell and axonal loss compared with parkin-deficient animals, which showed none, and RET-deficient mice, in which we found moderate degeneration. Transgenic expression of parkin protected the dopaminergic systems of aged RET-deficient mice. Downregulation of either parkin or RET in neuronal cells impaired mitochondrial function and morphology. Parkin expression restored mitochondrial function in GDNF/RET-deficient cells, while GDNF stimulation rescued mitochondrial defects in parkin-deficient cells. In both cases, improved mitochondrial function was the result of activation of the prosurvival NF-κB pathway, which was mediated by RET through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that parkin and the RET signaling cascade converge to control mitochondrial integrity and thereby properly maintain substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons and their innervation in the striatum. The demonstration of crosstalk between parkin and RET highlights the interplay in the protein network that is altered in PD and suggests potential therapeutic targets and strategies to treat PD. PMID:25822020

  18. Disruption of the autoinhibited state primes the E3 ligase parkin for activation and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atul; Aguirre, Jacob D; Condos, Tara EC; Martinez-Torres, R Julio; Chaugule, Viduth K; Toth, Rachel; Sundaramoorthy, Ramasubramanian; Mercier, Pascal; Knebel, Axel; Spratt, Donald E; Barber, Kathryn R; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The PARK2 gene is mutated in 50% of autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) cases. It encodes parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase of the RBR family. Parkin exists in an autoinhibited state that is activated by phosphorylation of its N-terminal ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain and binding of phosphoubiquitin. We describe the 1.8 Å crystal structure of human parkin in its fully inhibited state and identify the key interfaces to maintain parkin inhibition. We identify the phosphoubiquitin-binding interface, provide a model for the phosphoubiquitin–parkin complex and show how phosphorylation of the Ubl domain primes parkin for optimal phosphoubiquitin binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the addition of phosphoubiquitin leads to displacement of the Ubl domain through loss of structure, unveiling a ubiquitin-binding site used by the E2∼Ub conjugate, thus leading to active parkin. We find the role of the Ubl domain is to prevent parkin activity in the absence of the phosphorylation signals, and propose a model for parkin inhibition, optimization for phosphoubiquitin recruitment, release of inhibition by the Ubl domain and engagement with an E2∼Ub conjugate. Taken together, this model provides a mechanistic framework for activating parkin. PMID:26254304

  19. Phospho-ubiquitin: upending the PINK-Parkin-ubiquitin cascade.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria with decreased membrane potential are characterized by defects in protein import into the matrix and impairments in high-efficiency synthesis of ATP. These low-quality mitochondria are marked with ubiquitin for selective degradation. Key factors in this mechanism are PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, a mitochondrial kinase) and Parkin (a ubiquitin ligase), disruption of which has been implicated in predisposition to Parkinson's disease. Previously, the clearance of damaged mitochondria had been thought to be the end result of a simple cascading reaction of PINK1-Parkin-ubiquitin. However, in the past year, several research groups including ours unexpectedly revealed that Parkin regulation is mediated by PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of ubiquitin. These results overturned the simple hierarchy that posited PINK1 and ubiquitin as the upstream and downstream factors of Parkin, respectively. Although ubiquitylation is well-known as a post-translational modification, it has recently become clear that ubiquitin itself can be modified, and that this modification unexpectedly converts ubiquitin to a factor that functions in retrograde signalling.

  20. The KM-parkin-DB: A Sub-set MutationView Database Specialized for PARK2 (PARKIN) Variants.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyama, Susumu; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously isolated PARKIN (PARK2) as a gene responsible for a unique sort of Parkinson disease, namely Autosomal Recessive Juvenile Parkinsonism (ARJP). In this study, we surveyed all the available literature describing PARK2 gene/Parkin protein mutations found in Parkinson disease patients. Only carefully evaluated data were deposited in the graphical database MutationView (http://mutview.dmb.med.keio.ac.jp) to construct KM-parkin-DB, an independent sub-set database. Forty-four articles were selected for data curation regarding clinical information such as ethnic origins, manifested symptoms, onset age, and hereditary patterns as well as mutation details including base changes and zygosity. A total of 366 cases were collected from 39 ethnic origins and 96 pathogenic mutations were found. PARK2 gene mutations were found also in some general Parkinson disease patients. The majority (63%) of mutations in PARK2 were restricted to two particular domains (UBL and RING1) of the Parkin protein. In these domains, two major mutations, a large deletion (DelEx3) and a point mutation (p.Arg275Trp), were located. PMID:25907632

  1. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Baek; Kim, Jung Jin; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Qin, Bo; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Ham, Hyoungjun; Evans, Debra; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Min; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Billadeau, Daniel D; Wang, Liewei; Giaime, Emilie; Shen, Jie; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Jen, Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate the degradation of several key mitotic regulators independent of APC/C. We demonstrate that ordered progression through mitosis is orchestrated by two distinct E3 ligases through the shared use of Cdc20 and Cdh1. Furthermore, Parkin is phosphorylated and activated by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) during mitosis. Parkin deficiency results in overexpression of its substrates, mitotic defects, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. These results suggest that the Parkin-Cdc20/Cdh1 complex is an important regulator of mitosis.

  3. Versatile members of the DNAJ family show Hsp70 dependent anti-aggregation activity on RING1 mutant parkin C289G

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Kuiper, E. F. Elsiena; Pandey, Abhinav; Braakman, Ineke; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and several mutations in different genes have been identified to contribute to the disease. A loss of function parkin RING1 domain mutant (C289G) is associated with autosomal-recessive juvenile-onset Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and displays altered solubility and sequesters into aggregates. Single overexpression of almost each individual member of the Hsp40 (DNAJ) family of chaperones efficiently reduces parkin C289G aggregation and requires interaction with and activity of endogenously expressed Hsp70 s. For DNAJB6 and DNAJB8, potent suppressors of aggregation of polyglutamine proteins for which they rely mainly on an S/T-rich region, it was found that the S/T-rich region was dispensable for suppression of parkin C289G aggregation. Our data implies that different disease-causing proteins pose different challenges to the protein homeostasis system and that DNAJB6 and DNAJB8 are highly versatile members of the DNAJ protein family with multiple partially non-overlapping modes of action with respect to handling disease-causing proteins, making them interesting potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27713507

  4. Spatial Parkin Translocation and Degradation of Damaged Mitochondria Via Mitophagy in Live Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Zakaria, Hesham Mostafa; Simone, Anthony; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are essential for neuronal survival and function. Proper degradation of aged and damaged mitochondria through mitophagy is a key cellular pathway for mitochondrial quality control. Recent studies have indicated that PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathways ensure mitochondrial integrity and function [1–8]. Translocation of Parkin to damaged mitochondria induces mitophagy in many non-neuronal cell types [9–16]. However, evidence showing Parkin translocation in primary neurons is controversial [9,15,17,18], leaving unanswered questions as to how and where Parkin-mediated mitophagy occurs in neurons. Here, we report the unique process of dissipating mitochondrial Δψm-induced and Parkin-mediated mitophagy in mature cortical neurons. Compared with non-neuronal cells, neuronal mitophagy is a much slower and compartmentally restricted process, coupled with reduced anterograde mitochondrial transport. Parkin-targeted mitochondria are accumulated in the somatodendritic regions where mature lysosomes are predominantly located. Time-lapse imaging shows dynamic formation and elimination of Parkin- and LC3-ring like structures surrounding depolarized mitochondria through the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in the soma. Knocking down Parkin in neurons impairs the elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria. Thus, our study provides neuronal evidence for dynamic and spatial Parkin-mediated mitophagy, which will help us understand whether altered mitophagy contributes to pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative diseases characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired transport. PMID:22342752

  5. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser(65))--which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)--and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser(65). How Ser(65)-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65)) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser(65) by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), thereby promoting Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser(65). Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser(65) in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65). Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65), leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser(65)-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), which could aid in the development of Parkin

  6. Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome in response to mitochondrial depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Shireen A.; Raman, Malavika; Guarani-Pereira, Virginia; Sowa, Mathew E.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Harper, J. Wade

    2013-01-01

    The PARKIN (PARK2) ubiquitin ligase and its regulatory kinase PINK1 (PARK6), often mutated in familial early onset Parkinson’s Disease (PD), play central roles in mitochondrial homeostasis and mitophagy.1–3 While PARKIN is recruited to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) upon depolarization via PINK1 action and can ubiquitylate Porin, Mitofusin, and Miro proteins on the MOM,1,4–11 the full repertoire of PARKIN substrates – the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome - remains poorly defined. Here we employ quantitative diGLY capture proteomics12,13 to elucidate the ubiquitylation site-specificity and topology of PARKIN-dependent target modification in response to mitochondrial depolarization. Hundreds of dynamically regulated ubiquitylation sites in dozens of proteins were identified, with strong enrichment for MOM proteins, indicating that PARKIN dramatically alters the ubiquitylation status of the mitochondrial proteome. Using complementary interaction proteomics, we found depolarization-dependent PARKIN association with numerous MOM targets, autophagy receptors, and the proteasome. Mutation of PARKIN’s active site residue C431, which has been found mutated in PD patients, largely disrupts these associations. Structural and topological analysis revealed extensive conservation of PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylation sites on cytoplasmic domains in vertebrate and D. melanogaster MOM proteins. These studies provide a resource for understanding how the PINK1-PARKIN pathway re-sculpts the proteome to support mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:23503661

  7. NAC1, A POZ/BTB protein interacts with Parkin and may contribute to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Korutla, L; Furlong, H A; Mackler, S A

    2014-01-17

    Loss-of-function in the Parkin protein is thought to play a part in causing neuronal cell death in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study explores the effect of Parkin degradation, via the overexpression of nucleus accumbens 1 (NAC1), on cell viability. It was found that NAC1 and Parkin are co-localized within the cell and interact with one another, leading to a decrease in Parkin levels. Moreover, NAC1 down-regulates Parkin by presenting it for ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation, which causes a decrease in proteasomal activity in neuronal cells. Consequently, this decrease in proteasomal activity leads to an increase in the cells' susceptibility to proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity. It was also found that Parkin and NAC1 are key proteins found to be present mainly in the cytoplasm and are co-localized in neurons of Parkinson's disease patients. Interestingly, mutation in the POZ/BTB domain (Q23L) of NAC1 disrupts the co-localization and interaction of NAC1 with Parkin and it further abrogates the proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity. We further observed that co-transfection of the mutant form of NAC1 with Parkin reversed the proteasome activity and 20S proteasome protein levels. These results indicate a novel interaction between NAC1 and Parkin that leads to neuronal cell death, a main characteristic in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  9. Comparison between in vitro radiosensitivity and in vivo radioresponse of murine tumor cell lines. I: Parameters of in vitro radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular glutathione levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Hardy, P.A.; Hill, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that differences in the initial low-dose region of the radiation survival curves for human tumor cells might explain the differences in clinical response of tumors to fractionated radiation treatment. In this study, which is described in two companion papers, we investigated this hypothesis directly using animal model systems. In the present paper we determined in vitro radiation survival curves for eight murine tumor cell lines of varying histopathological type and: (a) measured survival at the 2 Gy and 8 Gy dose levels, (b) fitted parameters to the linear quadratic and two component multi-target equation models of cellular survival and (c) calculated mean inactivation doses. We found that the choice of the data fitting procedure affected the absolute value, relative ranking, and power to discriminate between the cell lines of these calculated parameters. A detailed statistical study indicated that the measured surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was the best discriminant of intrinsic radiosensitivity between the eight tumor cell lines. When these same cell lines were assayed for intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, no correlation was found between levels of GSH and the SF2 value. Determining the SF2 value may be the method of choice to describe the low-dose region of the radiation survival curve, as it precludes the necessity of choosing a model to fit the survival data, it has excellent discriminatory powers, and it represents the survival in the radiotherapeutically relevant region of the in vitro radiation survival curve. Furthermore, as demonstrated in the companion paper, it correlates with cell survival in the tumors following 10 fractions of 2 Gy given in vivo.

  10. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course. PMID:11402119

  11. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Yang, D M

    1989-01-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base-pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-bp inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs of the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTR sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression. Further analyses using chimeric LTR constructs located the presence of a strong negative regulatory element within the region containing the 5' portion of the enhancer and the immediate upstream sequences in the MuLV-related LTRs. Images PMID:2542587

  12. Parkin is transcriptionally regulated by ATF4: evidence for an interconnection between mitochondrial stress and ER stress.

    PubMed

    Bouman, L; Schlierf, A; Lutz, A K; Shan, J; Deinlein, A; Kast, J; Galehdar, Z; Palmisano, V; Patenge, N; Berg, D; Gasser, T; Augustin, R; Trümbach, D; Irrcher, I; Park, D S; Wurst, W; Kilberg, M S; Tatzelt, J; Winklhofer, K F

    2011-05-01

    Loss of parkin function is responsible for the majority of autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Here, we show that parkin is not only a stress-protective, but also a stress-inducible protein. Both mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induce an increase in parkin-specific mRNA and protein levels. The stress-induced upregulation of parkin is mediated by ATF4, a transcription factor of the unfolded protein response (UPR) that binds to a specific CREB/ATF site within the parkin promoter. Interestingly, c-Jun can bind to the same site, but acts as a transcriptional repressor of parkin gene expression. We also present evidence that mitochondrial damage can induce ER stress, leading to the activation of the UPR, and thereby to an upregulation of parkin expression. Vice versa, ER stress results in mitochondrial damage, which can be prevented by parkin. Notably, the activity of parkin to protect cells from stress-induced cell death is independent of the proteasome, indicating that proteasomal degradation of parkin substrates cannot explain the cytoprotective activity of parkin. Our study supports the notion that parkin has a role in the interorganellar crosstalk between the ER and mitochondria to promote cell survival under stress, suggesting that both ER and mitochondrial stress can contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

  13. Loss of parkin or PINK1 function increases Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, A Kathrin; Exner, Nicole; Fett, Mareike E; Schlehe, Julia S; Kloos, Karina; Lämmermann, Kerstin; Brunner, Bettina; Kurz-Drexler, Annerose; Vogel, Frank; Reichert, Andreas S; Bouman, Lena; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wurst, Wolfgang; Tatzelt, Jörg; Haass, Christian; Winklhofer, Konstanze F

    2009-08-21

    Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene (PARK2) and PINK1 gene (PARK6) are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. PINK1 deficiency was recently linked to mitochondrial pathology in human cells and Drosophila melanogaster, which can be rescued by parkin, suggesting that both genes play a role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Here we demonstrate that an acute down-regulation of parkin in human SH-SY5Y cells severely affects mitochondrial morphology and function, a phenotype comparable with that induced by PINK1 deficiency. Alterations in both mitochondrial morphology and ATP production caused by either parkin or PINK1 loss of function could be rescued by the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 or by a dominant negative mutant of the fission protein Drp1. Both parkin and PINK1 were able to suppress mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Drp1. Moreover, in Drp1-deficient cells the parkin/PINK1 knockdown phenotype did not occur, indicating that mitochondrial alterations observed in parkin- or PINK1-deficient cells are associated with an increase in mitochondrial fission. Notably, mitochondrial fragmentation is an early phenomenon upon PINK1/parkin silencing that also occurs in primary mouse neurons and Drosophila S2 cells. We propose that the discrepant findings in adult flies can be explained by the time of phenotype analysis and suggest that in mammals different strategies may have evolved to cope with dysfunctional mitochondria.

  14. Loss of Parkin or PINK1 Function Increases Drp1-dependent Mitochondrial Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, A. Kathrin; Exner, Nicole; Fett, Mareike E.; Schlehe, Julia S.; Kloos, Karina; Lämmermann, Kerstin; Brunner, Bettina; Kurz-Drexler, Annerose; Vogel, Frank; Reichert, Andreas S.; Bouman, Lena; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wurst, Wolfgang; Tatzelt, Jörg; Haass, Christian; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.

    2009-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene (PARK2) and PINK1 gene (PARK6) are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. PINK1 deficiency was recently linked to mitochondrial pathology in human cells and Drosophila melanogaster, which can be rescued by parkin, suggesting that both genes play a role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Here we demonstrate that an acute down-regulation of parkin in human SH-SY5Y cells severely affects mitochondrial morphology and function, a phenotype comparable with that induced by PINK1 deficiency. Alterations in both mitochondrial morphology and ATP production caused by either parkin or PINK1 loss of function could be rescued by the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 or by a dominant negative mutant of the fission protein Drp1. Both parkin and PINK1 were able to suppress mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Drp1. Moreover, in Drp1-deficient cells the parkin/PINK1 knockdown phenotype did not occur, indicating that mitochondrial alterations observed in parkin- or PINK1-deficient cells are associated with an increase in mitochondrial fission. Notably, mitochondrial fragmentation is an early phenomenon upon PINK1/parkin silencing that also occurs in primary mouse neurons and Drosophila S2 cells. We propose that the discrepant findings in adult flies can be explained by the time of phenotype analysis and suggest that in mammals different strategies may have evolved to cope with dysfunctional mitochondria. PMID:19546216

  15. The Parkinson’s disease genes Fbxo7 and Parkin interact to mediate mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Victoria S; Nelson, David E; Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Delgado-Camprubi, Marta; Ivatt, Rachael M; Pogson, Joe H; Randle, Suzanne J; Wray, Selina; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry; Abramov, Andrey Y; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Whitworth, Alexander J; Laman, Heike; Plun-Favreau, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that two autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease genes, PINK1 (PARK6) and Parkin (PARK2), co-operate to mediate the autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria (mitophagy). Mutations in the F-box domain containing protein Fbxo7 (PARK15) also cause early onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that Fbxo7 participates in mitochondrial maintenance through direct interaction with PINK1 and Parkin and plays a role in Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Cells with reduced Fbxo7 expression show deficiencies in Parkin mitochondrial translocation, ubiquitination of mitofusin 1 and mitophagy. In Drosophila, ectopic overexpression of Fbxo7 rescued loss of Parkin supporting a functional relationship between the two proteins. Parkinson’s disease-causing mutations in Fbxo7 interfere with this process, emphasising the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis. PMID:23933751

  16. Mitochondrial Contagion Induced by Parkin Deficiency in Drosophila Hearts and Its Containment by Suppressing Mitofusin

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Poonam; Song, Moshi; Chen, Yun; Burelle, Yan; Dorn, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Dysfunctional Parkin-mediated mitophagic culling of senescent or damaged mitochondria is a major pathological process underlying Parkinson disease and a potential genetic mechanism of cardiomyopathy. Despite epidemiological associations between Parkinson disease and heart failure, the role of Parkin and mitophagic quality control in maintaining normal cardiac homeostasis is poorly understood. Objective We used germline mutants and cardiac-specific RNA interference to interrogate Parkin regulation of cardiomyocyte mitochondria and examine functional crosstalk between mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila heart tubes. Methods and Results Transcriptional profiling of Parkin knockout mouse hearts revealed compensatory upregulation of multiple related E3 ubiquitin ligases. Because Drosophila lack most of these redundant genes, we examined heart tubes of parkin knockout flies and observed accumulation of enlarged hollow donut mitochondria with dilated cardiomyopathy, which could be rescued by cardiomyocyte-specific Parkin expression. Identical abnormalities were induced by cardiomyocyte-specific Parkin suppression using 2 different inhibitory RNAs. Parkin-deficient cardiomyocyte mitochondria exhibited dysmorphology, depolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation without calcium cycling abnormalities, pointing to a primary mitochondrial defect. Suppressing cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fusion in Parkin-deficient fly heart tubes completely prevented the cardiomyopathy and corrected mitochondrial dysfunction without normalizing mitochondrial dysmorphology, demonstrating a central role for mitochondrial fusion in the cardiomyopathy provoked by impaired mitophagy. Conclusions Parkin deficiency and resulting mitophagic disruption produces cardiomyopathy in part by contamination of the cardiomyocyte mitochondrial pool through fusion between improperly retained dysfunctional/senescent and normal mitochondria. Limiting mitochondrial contagion by

  17. Parkin is a lipid-responsive regulator of fat uptake in mice and mutant human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye-Young; Stevens, Mark V.; Akter, M. Hasina; Rusk, Sarah E.; Huang, Robert J.; Cohen, Alexandra; Noguchi, Audrey; Springer, Danielle; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Eggerman, Tomas L.; Suen, Der-Fen; Youle, Richard J.; Amar, Marcelo; Remaley, Alan T.; Sack, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that abnormalities in lipid biology contribute to degenerative brain diseases. Consistent with this, emerging epidemiologic evidence links lipid alterations with Parkinson disease (PD), and disruption of lipid metabolism has been found to predispose to α-synuclein toxicity. We therefore investigated whether Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase found to be defective in patients with early onset PD, regulates systemic lipid metabolism. We perturbed lipid levels by exposing Parkin+/+ and Parkin–/– mice to a high-fat and -cholesterol diet (HFD). Parkin–/– mice resisted weight gain, steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance. In wild-type mice, the HFD markedly increased hepatic Parkin levels in parallel with lipid transport proteins, including CD36, Sr-B1, and FABP. These lipid transport proteins were not induced in Parkin–/– mice. The role of Parkin in fat uptake was confirmed by increased oleate accumulation in hepatocytes overexpressing Parkin and decreased uptake in Parkin–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts and patient cells harboring complex heterozygous mutations in the Parkin-encoding gene PARK2. Parkin conferred this effect, in part, via ubiquitin-mediated stabilization of the lipid transporter CD36. Reconstitution of Parkin restored hepatic fat uptake and CD36 levels in Parkin–/– mice, and Parkin augmented fat accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. These results demonstrate that Parkin is regulated in a lipid-dependent manner and modulates systemic fat uptake via ubiquitin ligase–dependent effects. Whether this metabolic regulation contributes to premature Parkinsonism warrants investigation. PMID:21865652

  18. Novel Regulation of Parkin Function Through c-Abl-Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation: Implications for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Syed Z.; Zhou, Qing; Yamamoto, Ayako; Valente, Anthony J.; Ali, Syed F.; Bains, Mona; Roberts, James L.; Kahle, Philipp J.; Clark, Robert A.; Li, Senlin

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are most common cause of autosomal-recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we show that the stress-signaling non-receptor tyrosine-kinase c-Abl links parkin to sporadic forms of PD via tyrosine phosphorylation. Under oxidative and dopaminergic stress, c-Abl was activated in cultured neuronal cells and in striatum of adult C57 mice. Activated c-Abl was found in the striatum of PD patients. Concomitantly, parkin was tyrosine-phosphorylated, causing loss ofit's ubiquitin ligase and cytoprotective activities, and the accumulation of parkin substrates, AIMP2 (p38/JTV-1) and FBP-1. STI-571, a selective c-Abl inhibitor, prevented tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin and restored its E3 ligase activity and cytoprotective function both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major post-translational modification that leads to loss of parkin function and disease progression in sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl offers new therapeutic opportunities for blocking PD progression. PMID:21209200

  19. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin; Zeng, Liuwang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders. PMID:27597885

  20. Structural insights into Parkin substrate lysine targeting from minimal Miro substrates.

    PubMed

    Klosowiak, Julian L; Park, Sungjin; Smith, Kyle P; French, Michael E; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M; Rice, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease is commonly caused by mutations in the protein kinase PINK1 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, which function together to eliminate damaged mitochondria. PINK1 phosphorylates both Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate ubiquitination of dozens of proteins on the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, the mechanisms by which Parkin recognizes specific proteins for modification remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that the C-terminal GTPase (cGTPase) of the Parkin primary substrate human Miro is necessary and sufficient for efficient ubiquitination. We present several new X-ray crystal structures of both human Miro1 and Miro2 that reveal substrate recognition and ubiquitin transfer to be specific to particular protein domains and lysine residues. We also provide evidence that Parkin substrate recognition is functionally separate from substrate modification. Finally, we show that prioritization for modification of a specific lysine sidechain of the cGTPase (K572) within human Miro1 is dependent on both its location and chemical microenvironment. Activation of Parkin by phosphorylation or by binding of pUb is required for prioritization of K572 for modification, suggesting that Parkin activation and acquisition of substrate specificity are coupled. PMID:27605430

  1. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders. PMID:27597885

  2. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders.

  3. USP8 regulates mitophagy by removing K6-linked ubiquitin conjugates from parkin

    PubMed Central

    Durcan, Thomas M; Tang, Matthew Y; Pérusse, Joëlle R; Dashti, Eman A; Aguileta, Miguel A; McLelland, Gian-Luca; Gros, Priti; Shaler, Thomas A; Faubert, Denis; Coulombe, Benoit; Fon, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Park2 gene, encoding the E3 ubiquitin-ligase parkin, are responsible for a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin-mediated ubiquitination is critical for the efficient elimination of depolarized dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy). As damaged mitochondria are a major source of toxic reactive oxygen species within the cell, this pathway is believed to be highly relevant to the pathogenesis of PD. Little is known about how parkin-mediated ubiquitination is regulated during mitophagy or about the nature of the ubiquitin conjugates involved. We report here that USP8/UBPY, a deubiquitinating enzyme not previously implicated in mitochondrial quality control, is critical for parkin-mediated mitophagy. USP8 preferentially removes non-canonical K6-linked ubiquitin chains from parkin, a process required for the efficient recruitment of parkin to depolarized mitochondria and for their subsequent elimination by mitophagy. This work uncovers a novel role for USP8-mediated deubiquitination of K6-linked ubiquitin conjugates from parkin in mitochondrial quality control. PMID:25216678

  4. Covalent ISG15 conjugation positively regulates the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of parkin

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunju; Yoo, Lang; Hyun, Minju; Shin, Woo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in aggregates called Lewy bodies. Several mutated genes have been found in familial PD patients, including SNCA (α-synuclein), PARK2 (parkin), PINK1, PARK7 (DJ-1), LRRK2 and ATP13A2. Many pathogenic mutations of PARK2, which encodes the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin, result in loss of function, leading to accumulation of parkin substrates and consequently contributing to dopaminergic cell death. ISG15 is a member of the ubiquitin-like modifier family and is induced by stimulation with type I interferons. Similar to ubiquitin and ubiquitination, covalent conjugation of ISG15 to target proteins (ISGylation) regulates their biochemical properties. In this study, we identified parkin as a novel target of ISGylation specifically mediated by the ISG15-E3 ligase HERC5. In addition, we identified two ISGylation sites, Lys-349 and Lys-369, in the in-between-ring domain of parkin. ISGylation of these sites promotes parkin's ubiquitin E3 ligase activity by suppressing the intramolecular interaction that maintains its autoinhibited conformation and increases its cytoprotective effect. In conclusion, covalent ISG15 conjugation is a novel mode of modulating parkin activity, and alteration in this pathway may be associated with PD pathogenesis. PMID:27534820

  5. Structural insights into Parkin substrate lysine targeting from minimal Miro substrates

    PubMed Central

    Klosowiak, Julian L.; Park, Sungjin; Smith, Kyle P.; French, Michael E.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson’s disease is commonly caused by mutations in the protein kinase PINK1 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, which function together to eliminate damaged mitochondria. PINK1 phosphorylates both Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate ubiquitination of dozens of proteins on the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, the mechanisms by which Parkin recognizes specific proteins for modification remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that the C-terminal GTPase (cGTPase) of the Parkin primary substrate human Miro is necessary and sufficient for efficient ubiquitination. We present several new X-ray crystal structures of both human Miro1 and Miro2 that reveal substrate recognition and ubiquitin transfer to be specific to particular protein domains and lysine residues. We also provide evidence that Parkin substrate recognition is functionally separate from substrate modification. Finally, we show that prioritization for modification of a specific lysine sidechain of the cGTPase (K572) within human Miro1 is dependent on both its location and chemical microenvironment. Activation of Parkin by phosphorylation or by binding of pUb is required for prioritization of K572 for modification, suggesting that Parkin activation and acquisition of substrate specificity are coupled. PMID:27605430

  6. Behavioral phenotyping of Parkin-deficient mice: looking for early preclinical features of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rial, Daniel; Castro, Adalberto A; Machado, Nuno; Garção, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Silva, Henrique B; Tomé, Angelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Corti, Olga; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin-/-) to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin-/- mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination), anxiety (elevated plus-maze), depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension) and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole). However, parkin-/- mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin-/- mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD. PMID:25486126

  7. Proteasome Inhibition Promotes Parkin-Ubc13 Interaction and Lysine 63-Linked Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Xiao-Hui; Henry-Basil, Adeline; Sim, Roy W. X.; Tan, Jeanne M. M.; Chai, Chou; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which normally identifies and degrades unwanted intracellular proteins, is thought to underlie neurodegeneration. Supporting this, mutations of Parkin, a ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Remarkably, Parkin can protect neurons against a wide spectrum of stress, including those that promote proteasome dysfunction. Although the mechanism underlying the preservation of proteasome function by Parkin is hitherto unclear, we have previously proposed that Parkin-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination (which is usually uncoupled from the proteasome) may serve to mitigate proteasomal stress by diverting the substrate load away from the machinery. By means of linkage-specific antibodies, we demonstrated here that proteasome inhibition indeed promotes K63-linked ubiquitination of proteins especially in Parkin-expressing cells. Importantly, we further demonstrated that the recruitment of Ubc13 (an E2 that mediates K63-linked polyubiquitin chain formation exclusively) by Parkin is selectively enhanced under conditions of proteasomal stress, thus identifying a mechanism by which Parkin could promote K63-linked ubiquitin modification in cells undergoing proteolytic stress. This mode of ubiquitination appears to facilitate the subsequent clearance of Parkin substrates via autophagy. Consistent with the proposed protective role of K63-linked ubiquitination in times of proteolytic stress, we found that Ubc13-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to cell death induced by proteasome inhibitors compared to their wild type counterparts. Taken together, our study suggests a role for Parkin-mediated K63 ubiquitination in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis, especially during periods when the proteasome is burdened or impaired. PMID:24023840

  8. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  9. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Haylett, William; Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation.

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Haylett, William; Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  11. DMXAA causes tumor site-specific vascular disruption in murine non-small cell lung cancer, and like the endogenous non-canonical cyclic dinucleotide STING agonist, 2'3'-cGAMP, induces M2 macrophage repolarization.

    PubMed

    Downey, Charlene M; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A; Jirik, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2'3'-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  12. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  13. Parkinson's Disease-Related Proteins PINK1 and Parkin Repress Mitochondrial Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, Diana; Sugiura, Ayumu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angélique; Laplante, Annie; Rondeau, Christiane; Chemali, Magali; Fazel, Ali; Bergeron, John J; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Burelle, Yan; Gagnon, Etienne; McBride, Heidi M; Desjardins, Michel

    2016-07-14

    Antigen presentation is essential for establishing immune tolerance and for immune responses against infectious disease and cancer. Although antigen presentation can be mediated by autophagy, here we demonstrate a pathway for mitochondrial antigen presentation (MitAP) that relies on the generation and trafficking of mitochondrial-derived vesicles (MDVs) rather than on autophagy/mitophagy. We find that PINK1 and Parkin, two mitochondrial proteins linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), actively inhibit MDV formation and MitAP. In absence of PINK1 or Parkin, inflammatory conditions trigger MitAP in immune cells, both in vitro and in vivo. MitAP and the formation of MDVs require Rab9 and Sorting nexin 9, whose recruitment to mitochondria is inhibited by Parkin. The identification of PINK1 and Parkin as suppressors of an immune-response-eliciting pathway provoked by inflammation suggests new insights into PD pathology. PMID:27345367

  14. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson's disease patients with parkin mutations.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Henning, Franclo; van der Merwe, Lize; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; Bardien, Soraya

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients' fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD pathogenesis will have important implications for the design of new and more effective therapies.

  15. PKA Regulates PINK1 Stability and Parkin Recruitment to Damaged Mitochondria through Phosphorylation of MIC60.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Shiori; Uno, Midori; Tani, Naoki; Shimazaki, Shunta; Ebara, Natsumi; Kato, Hiroki; Kosako, Hidetaka; Oka, Toshihiko

    2016-05-01

    A mitochondrial kinase, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), selectively recruits the ubiquitin ligase Parkin to damaged mitochondria, which modifies mitochondria by polyubiquitination, leading to mitochondrial autophagy. Here, we report that treatment with an adenylate cyclase agonist or expression of protein kinase A (PKA) impairs Parkin recruitment to damaged mitochondria and decreases PINK1 protein levels. We identified a mitochondrial membrane protein, MIC60 (also known as mitofilin), as a PKA substrate. Mutational and mass spectrometric analyses revealed that the Ser528 residue of MIC60 undergoes PKA-dependent phosphorylation. MIC60 transiently interacts with PINK1, and MIC60 downregulation leads to a reduction in PINK1 and mislocalization of Parkin. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of MIC60 fail to restore the defect in Parkin recruitment in MIC60-knocked down cells, whereas a phosphorylation-deficient MIC60 mutant facilitates the mitochondrial localization of Parkin. Our findings indicate that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of MIC60 negatively regulates mitochondrial clearance that is initiated by PINK1 and Parkin. PMID:27153535

  16. Parkin loss leads to PARIS-dependent declines in mitochondrial mass and respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Daniel A.; Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Bower, Aaron; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in parkin lead to early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease (PD) and inactivation of parkin is thought to contribute to sporadic PD. Adult knockout of parkin in the ventral midbrain of mice leads to an age-dependent loss of dopamine neurons that is dependent on the accumulation of parkin interacting substrate (PARIS), zinc finger protein 746 (ZNF746), and its transcriptional repression of PGC-1α. Here we show that adult knockout of parkin in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial size, number, and protein markers consistent with a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis. This decrease in mitochondrial mass is prevented by short hairpin RNA knockdown of PARIS. PARIS overexpression in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial number and protein markers and PGC-1α–dependent deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Taken together, these results suggest that parkin loss impairs mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to declining function of the mitochondrial pool and cell death. PMID:26324925

  17. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  18. Dyrk1A phosphorylates parkin at Ser-131 and negatively regulates its ubiquitin E3 ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2015-08-01

    Mutations of parkin are associated with the occurrence of autosomal recessive familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin acts an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which ubiquitinates target proteins and subsequently regulates either their steady-state levels through the ubiquitin-proteasome system or biochemical properties. In this study, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of parkin by searching for new regulatory factors. After screening human fetal brain using a yeast two hybrid assay, we found dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) as a novel binding partner of parkin. We also observed that parkin interacts and co-localizes with Dyrk1A in mammalian cells. In addition, Dyrk1A directly phosphorylated parkin at Ser-131, causing the inhibition of its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Moreover, Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation reduced the binding affinity of parkin to its ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzyme and substrate, which could be the underlying inhibitory mechanism of parkin activity. Furthermore, Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation inhibited the neuroprotective action of parkin against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest that Dyrk1A acts as a novel functional modulator of parkin. Parkin phosphorylation by Dyrk1A suppresses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of PD under PD-inducing pathological conditions. Mutations of parkin are linked to autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). According to its functional relevance in abnormal protein aggregation and neuronal cell death, a number of post-translational modifications regulate the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of parkin. Here we propose a novel inhibitory mechanism of parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase through dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A)-mediated phosphorylation as well as its neuroprotective action against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death

  19. Parkin regulates mitophagy and mitochondrial function to protect against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica A.; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease claims two million lives per year. We previously reported that autophagy protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis by removing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanisms for removal of these mitochondria are unknown. Parkin is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that is recruited to damaged mitochondria to initiate ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and subsequent mitochondrial degradation by mitophagy. In addition to its role in mitophagy, Parkin has been shown to have other roles in maintaining mitochondrial function. We investigated whether Parkin protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis using wild-type (WT) and Parkin knockout (KO) mice treated with alcohol by the acute-binge and Gao-binge (chronic plus acute-binge) models. We found that Parkin protected against liver injury in both alcohol models, likely because of Parkin's role in maintaining a population of healthy mitochondria. Alcohol caused greater mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in Parkin KO livers compared with WT livers. After alcohol treatment, Parkin KO mice had severely swollen and damaged mitochondria that lacked cristae, which were not seen in WT mice. Furthermore, Parkin KO mice had decreased mitophagy, β-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and cytochrome c oxidase activity after acute alcohol treatment compared with WT mice. Interestingly, liver mitochondria seemed able to adapt to alcohol treatment, but Parkin KO mouse liver mitochondria had less capacity to adapt to Gao-binge treatment compared with WT mouse liver mitochondria. Overall, our findings indicate that Parkin is an important mediator of protection against alcohol-induced mitochondrial damage, steatosis, and liver injury. PMID:26159696

  20. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Merwe, Celia van der; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Merwe, Lize van der; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  1. Structural and Functional Impact of Parkinson Disease-Associated Mutations in the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Fiesel, Fabienne C; Caulfield, Thomas R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Ogaki, Kotaro; Dourado, Daniel F A R; Flores, Samuel C; Ross, Owen A; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN/PARK2 gene that result in loss-of-function of the encoded, neuroprotective E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin cause recessive, familial early-onset Parkinson disease. As an increasing number of rare Parkin sequence variants with unclear pathogenicity are identified, structure-function analyses will be critical to determine their disease relevance. Depending on the specific amino acids affected, several distinct pathomechanisms can result in loss of Parkin function. These include disruption of overall Parkin folding, decreased solubility, and protein aggregation. However pathogenic effects can also result from misregulation of Parkin autoinhibition and of its enzymatic functions. In addition, interference of binding to coenzymes, substrates, and adaptor proteins can affect its catalytic activity too. Herein, we have performed a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of 21 PARK2 missense mutations distributed across the individual protein domains. Using this combined approach, we were able to pinpoint some of the pathogenic mechanisms of individual sequence variants. Similar analyses will be critical in gaining a complete understanding of the complex regulations and enzymatic functions of Parkin. These studies will not only highlight the important residues, but will also help to develop novel therapeutics aimed at activating and preserving an active, neuroprotective form of Parkin.

  2. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons (‘mirror neurons’) in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger

  3. The PINK1-Parkin pathway is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeehye; Lee, Gina; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2009-01-16

    The two Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, are linked in a common pathway which affects mitochondrial integrity and function. However, it is still not known what this pathway does in the mitochondria. Therefore, we investigated its physiological function in Drosophila. Because Drosophila PINK1 and parkin mutants show changes in mitochondrial morphology in both indirect flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons, we here investigated whether the PINK1-Parkin pathway genetically interacts with the regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission such as Drp1, which promotes mitochondrial fission, and Opa1 or Marf, which induces mitochondrial fusion. Surprisingly, DrosophilaPINK1 and parkin mutant phenotypes were markedly suppressed by overexpression of Drp1 or downregulation of Opa1 or Marf, indicating that the PINK1-Parkin pathway regulates mitochondrial remodeling process in the direction of promoting mitochondrial fission. Therefore, we strongly suggest that mitochondrial fusion and fission process could be a prominent therapeutic target for the treatment of PD.

  4. Triggering of Parkin Mitochondrial Translocation in Mitophagy: Implications for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Nabil; Ito, Yuko; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence based on in vitro studies indicates that mitophagy (selective autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria) is a prosurvival mechanism associated with cellular exposure to various mitochondrial stressors. Very recently, a limited number of publications on animal-based models of alcoholic fatty liver diseases have reported that Parkin-mediated mitophagy may mitigate hepatocyte apoptosis, improve mitochondrial quality and suppress steatosis (lipid accumulation). From this perspective, the authors focus on the mechanisms of Parkin mitochondrial translocation (a key consideration in mitophagy activation) and therapeutic implications of mitophagy in liver disease. DNA repair and other functions of Parkin beyond mitophagy are also briefly discussed. The paper additionally shows original data from the authors’ current research indicating enhanced hepatic mitophagy in ethanol-treated rats, which is associated with Parkin mitochondrial translocation triggered by oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage. Natural or pharmaceutical products that may trigger Parkin mitochondrial translocation in hepatocytes and/or suppress repressors of such translocation could be a potential therapeutic target in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27199746

  5. ATM mediates spermidine-induced mitophagy via PINK1 and Parkin regulation in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongmei; Qiu, Qian; Gu, Xueyan; Tian, Yihong; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    The ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) protein has recently been proposed to play critical roles in the response to mitochondrial dysfunction by initiating mitophagy. Here, we have used ATM-proficient GM00637 cells and ATM-deficient GM05849 cells to investigate the mitophagic effect of spermidine and to elucidate the role of ATM in spermdine-induced mitophagy. Our results indicate that spermidine induces mitophagy by eliciting mitochondrial depolarization, which triggers the formation of mitophagosomes and mitolysosomes, thereby promoting the accumulation of PINK1 and translocation of Parkin to damaged mitochondria, finally leading to the decreased mitochondrial mass in GM00637 cells. However, in GM05849 cells or GM00637 cells pretreated with the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933, the expression of full-length PINK1 and the translocation of Parkin are blocked, and the colocalization of Parkin with either LC3 or PINK1 is disrupted. These results suggest that ATM drives the initiation of the mitophagic cascade. Our study demonstrates that spermidine induces mitophagy through ATM-dependent activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These findings underscore the importance of a mitophagy regulatory network of ATM and PINK1/Parkin and elucidate a novel mechanism by which ATM influences spermidine-induced mitophagy. PMID:27089984

  6. Parkin expression profile in dopamine d3 receptor knock-out mice brains.

    PubMed

    D'Agata, Velia; Tiralongo, Adriana; Castorina, Alessandro; Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Drago, Filippo

    2009-02-01

    Patients affected by autosomic recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) exhibit parkin gene mutations with brain decrease in dopamine D2/D3 binding sites. To date, there are no data indicating whether the reduction in dopamine D3 receptors (DRD3) may be associated with the expression of specific parkin variants. In the present study we investigated parkin expression profile in DRD3 knock-out mice brains. RT-PCR analysis was performed to assess qualitative changes in parkin isoforms' distribution pattern and in exons' expression both in wild type controls and dopamine D3 receptor's knock-out mice. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify single exons mRNA. Results demonstrated that exons 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, were more expressed in wild type compared to dopamine D3 receptor KO mice brains while some other (3, 9, 10) were lower expressed. The expression levels of exons 5, 11 and 12 did not change in both animal groups. Our analysis was confirmed by western blot, which showed that parkin protein levels were influenced by the absence of DRD3.

  7. Triggering of Parkin Mitochondrial Translocation in Mitophagy: Implications for Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Eid, Nabil; Ito, Yuko; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence based on in vitro studies indicates that mitophagy (selective autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria) is a prosurvival mechanism associated with cellular exposure to various mitochondrial stressors. Very recently, a limited number of publications on animal-based models of alcoholic fatty liver diseases have reported that Parkin-mediated mitophagy may mitigate hepatocyte apoptosis, improve mitochondrial quality and suppress steatosis (lipid accumulation). From this perspective, the authors focus on the mechanisms of Parkin mitochondrial translocation (a key consideration in mitophagy activation) and therapeutic implications of mitophagy in liver disease. DNA repair and other functions of Parkin beyond mitophagy are also briefly discussed. The paper additionally shows original data from the authors' current research indicating enhanced hepatic mitophagy in ethanol-treated rats, which is associated with Parkin mitochondrial translocation triggered by oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage. Natural or pharmaceutical products that may trigger Parkin mitochondrial translocation in hepatocytes and/or suppress repressors of such translocation could be a potential therapeutic target in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27199746

  8. Parkin overexpression ameliorates hippocampal long-term potentiation and β-amyloid load in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoqi; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Guoqi; Zhuang, YingHan; Suo, Haiyun; Wang, Pan; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Huang, Yufang; Yu, Mei; Bian, MinJuan; Sheng, Zhejin; Fei, Jian; Song, Houyan; Behnisch, Thomas; Huang, Fang

    2014-02-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a severe decline of memory performance. A widely studied AD mouse model is the APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) strain, as mice exhibit amyloid plaques as well as impaired memory capacities. To test whether restoring synaptic plasticity and decreasing β-amyloid load by Parkin could represent a potential therapeutic target for AD, we crossed APP/PS1 transgenic mice with transgenic mice overexpressing the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and analyzed offspring properties. Overexpression of Parkin in APP/PS1 transgenic mice restored activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and rescued behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, overexpression of Parkin was associated with down-regulation of APP protein expression, decreased β-amyloid load and reduced inflammation. Our data suggest that Parkin could be a promising target for AD therapy.

  9. Phosphorylation by PINK1 Releases the UBL Domain and Initializes the Conformational Opening of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L.; Dourado, Daniel F. A. R.; Flores, Samuel C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 or PARKIN are the most common causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Both gene products, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Parkin, functionally cooperate in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Upon stress, PINK1 activates Parkin and enables its translocation to and ubiquitination of damaged mitochondria to facilitate their clearance from the cell. Though PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser65 is an important initial step, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of Parkin's enzymatic functions remain unclear. Using molecular modeling, we generated a complete structural model of human Parkin at all atom resolution. At steady state, the Ub ligase is maintained inactive in a closed, auto-inhibited conformation that results from intra-molecular interactions. Evidently, Parkin has to undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic activity. As a spark, we have modeled PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation in silico and provide the first molecular dynamics simulation of Parkin conformations along a sequential unfolding pathway that could release its intertwined domains and enable its catalytic activity. We combined free (unbiased) molecular dynamics simulation, Monte Carlo algorithms, and minimal-biasing methods with cell-based high content imaging and biochemical assays. Phosphorylation of Ser65 results in widening of a newly defined cleft and dissociation of the regulatory N-terminal UBL domain. This motion propagates through further opening conformations that allow binding of an Ub-loaded E2 co-enzyme. Subsequent spatial reorientation of the catalytic centers of both enzymes might facilitate the transfer of the Ub moiety to charge Parkin. Our structure-function study provides the basis to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and activity of the neuroprotective Parkin. This may open up new avenues for the development of small molecule Parkin activators through

  10. Parp mutations protect against mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in a PARKIN model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, S; Costa, A C; Celardo, I; Loh, S H Y; Martins, L M

    2016-01-01

    The co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-factor for cellular energy generation in mitochondria as well as for DNA repair mechanisms in the cell nucleus involving NAD+-consuming poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Mitochondrial function is compromised in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) associated with PARKIN mutations. Here, we uncovered alterations in NAD+ salvage metabolism in Drosophila parkin mutants. We show that a dietary supplementation with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide rescues mitochondrial function and is neuroprotective. Further, by mutating Parp in parkin mutants, we show that this increases levels of NAD+ and its salvage metabolites. This also rescues mitochondrial function and suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We conclude that strategies to enhance NAD+ levels by administration of dietary precursors or the inhibition of NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as PARP, that compete with mitochondria for NAD+ could be used to delay neuronal death associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031963

  11. Bit-by-bit autophagic removal of parkin-labelled mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Yi; Yang, Wei Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain mitochondrial integrity through mitophagy, an autophagic process by which dysfunctional mitochondria are selectively sequestered into double-layered membrane structures, termed phagophores, and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Here we show that small fragments of parkin-labelled mitochondria at omegasome-marked sites are engulfed by autophagic membranes one at a time. Using a light-activation scheme to impair long mitochondrial tubules, we demonstrate that sites undergoing bit-by-bit mitophagy display preferential ubiquitination, and are situated where parkin-labelled mitochondrial tubules and endoplasmic reticulum intersect. Our observations suggest contact regions between the endoplasmic reticulum and impaired mitochondria are initiation sites for local LC3 recruitment and mitochondrial remodelling that support bit-by-bit, parkin-mediated mitophagy. These results help in understanding how cells manage to fit large and morphologically heterogeneous mitochondria into micron-sized autophagic membranes during mitophagy.

  12. Parkin Binds to α/β Tubulin and Increases their Ubiquitination and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Zhao, Jinghui; Feng, Jian

    2007-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain, toxins known to cause Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and rotenone, also strongly depolymerize microtubules and increase tubulin degradation. Microtubules are polymers of tubulin α/β heterodimers, whose correct folding requires coordinated actions of cellular chaperonins and co-factors. Misfolded tubulin monomers are highly toxic and quickly degraded through a hitherto unknown mechanism. Here we report that parkin, a protein-ubiquitin E3 ligase linked to PD, was tightly bound to microtubules in taxol-mediated microtubule co-assembly assays. In lysates from the rat brain or transfected HEK293 cells, α-tubulin and β-tubulin were strongly co-immunoprecipitated with parkin at 4°C in the presence of colchicine, a condition where tubulin exits as α/β heterodimers. At the subcellular level, parkin exhibited punctate immunostaining along microtubules in rat brain sections, cultured primary neurons, glial cells and cell lines. This pattern of subcellular localization was abolished in cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing drug colchicine. The binding between parkin and tubulin apparently led to increased ubiquitination and accelerated degradation of α- and β-tubulins in HEK293 cells. Similarly ubiquitinated tubulins were also observed in rat brain lysates. Furthermore, parkin mutants found in PD patients did not ubiquitinate or degrade either tubulin. Taken together, our results show that parkin is a novel tubulin-binding protein, as well as a microtubule-associated protein (MAP). Its ability to enhance the ubiquitination and degradation of misfolded tubulins may play a significant role in protecting neurons from toxins that cause PD. PMID:12716939

  13. parkin-induced defects in neurophysiology and locomotion are generated by metabolic dysfunction and not oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amanda; Briggs, Laura; Chatwin, Griff F.J.; Emery, Elizabeth; Tomlins, Rose; Oswald, Matt; Middleton, C. Adam; Evans, Gareth J.O.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Elliott, Christopher J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by movement disorders, including bradykinesia. Analysis of inherited, juvenile PD, identified several genes linked via a common pathway to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that the larva of the Drosophila parkin mutant faithfully models the locomotory and metabolic defects of PD and is an excellent system for investigating their inter-relationship. parkin larvae displayed a marked bradykinesia that was caused by a reduction in both the frequency of peristalsis and speed of muscle contractions. Rescue experiments confirmed that this phenotype was due to a defect in the nervous system and not in the muscle. Furthermore, recordings of motoneuron activity in parkin larvae revealed reduced bursting and a striking reduction in evoked and miniature excitatory junction potentials, suggesting a neuronal deficit. This was supported by our observations in parkin larvae that the resting potential was depolarized, oxygen consumption and ATP concentration were drastically reduced while lactate was increased. These findings suggest that neuronal mitochondrial respiration is severely compromised and there is a compensatory switch to glycolysis for energy production. parkin mutants also possessed overgrown neuromuscular synapses, indicative of oxidative stress, which could be rescued by overexpression of parkin or scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Surprisingly, scavengers of ROS did not rescue the resting membrane potential and locomotory phenotypes. We therefore propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in parkin mutants induces Parkinsonian bradykinesia via a neuronal energy deficit and resulting synaptic failure, rather than as a consequence of downstream oxidative stress. PMID:22215442

  14. parkin-induced defects in neurophysiology and locomotion are generated by metabolic dysfunction and not oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amanda; Briggs, Laura; Chatwin, Griff F J; Emery, Elizabeth; Tomlins, Rose; Oswald, Matt; Middleton, C Adam; Evans, Gareth J O; Sweeney, Sean T; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2012-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by movement disorders, including bradykinesia. Analysis of inherited, juvenile PD, identified several genes linked via a common pathway to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that the larva of the Drosophila parkin mutant faithfully models the locomotory and metabolic defects of PD and is an excellent system for investigating their inter-relationship. parkin larvae displayed a marked bradykinesia that was caused by a reduction in both the frequency of peristalsis and speed of muscle contractions. Rescue experiments confirmed that this phenotype was due to a defect in the nervous system and not in the muscle. Furthermore, recordings of motoneuron activity in parkin larvae revealed reduced bursting and a striking reduction in evoked and miniature excitatory junction potentials, suggesting a neuronal deficit. This was supported by our observations in parkin larvae that the resting potential was depolarized, oxygen consumption and ATP concentration were drastically reduced while lactate was increased. These findings suggest that neuronal mitochondrial respiration is severely compromised and there is a compensatory switch to glycolysis for energy production. parkin mutants also possessed overgrown neuromuscular synapses, indicative of oxidative stress, which could be rescued by overexpression of parkin or scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Surprisingly, scavengers of ROS did not rescue the resting membrane potential and locomotory phenotypes. We therefore propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in parkin mutants induces Parkinsonian bradykinesia via a neuronal energy deficit and resulting synaptic failure, rather than as a consequence of downstream oxidative stress. PMID:22215442

  15. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-01

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms.

  16. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Mi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5' adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1) ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2) intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3) 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR). HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA) plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins. PMID:26784190

  17. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5

    PubMed Central

    Nezich, Catherine L.; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy. PMID:26240184

  18. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  19. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Mi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-16

    Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5' adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1) ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2) intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3) 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR). HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA) plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins.

  20. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Mi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Yong-ho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5’ adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1) ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2) intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3) 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR). HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA) plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins. PMID:26784190

  1. Dysregulation of Parkin-mediated mitophagy in thyroid Hürthle cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junguee; Ham, Sujin; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Soung Jung; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seong Eun; Chang, Joon Young; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Jin Man; Sul, Hae Joung; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Jo, Young Suk; Kim, Koon Soon; Shong, Young Kee; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Chung, Jong Kyeong; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Shong, Minho

    2015-11-01

    Abnormal accumulation of defective mitochondria is the hallmark of oncocytes, which are frequently observed in thyroid Hürthle cell lesions. Autophagy is an essential cellular catabolic mechanism for the degradation of dysfunctional organelles and has been implicated in several human diseases. It is yet unknown how autophagic turnover of defective mitochondria in Hürthle cell tumors is regulated. We characterized the expression patterns of molecular markers including Beclin1, LC3, PINK1 and Parkin, which are required for autophagy or mitophagy, in human oncocytic lesions of the thyroid. To undertake mechanistic studies, we investigated autophagy and mitophagy using XTC.UC1 cells, the only in vitro model of Hürthle cell tumors. Beclin1 and LC3 were highly expressed in oncocytes of Hürthle cell tumors. XTC.UC1 showed autophagic responses to starvation and rapamycin treatment, whereas they displayed ineffective activation of mitophagy, which is triggered by the coordinated action of PINK1 and Parkin in response to CCCP. This resulted in a decreased turnover of abnormal mitochondria. The mechanisms underlying defective mitophagy and mitochondrial turnover were investigated by genetic analysis of the PARK2 gene in XTC.UC1 and Hürthle cell tumor tissues. XTC.UC1 and several tumors harbored the V380L mutation, resulting in dysfunctional autoubiquitination and decreased E3 ligase activity. Consistently, oncocytes in Hürthle cell tumors displayed comparable expression of PINK1 but decreased Parkin expression in comparison to normal thyrocytes. The introduction of wild-type Parkin sensitized XTC.UC1 to death induced by CCCP. This study provides a possible etiological basis for oncocytic formation in heterogeneous Hürthle cell tumors through insufficient mitophagy leading to ineffective turnover of aberrant mitochondria caused by dysfunctional Parkin-mediated pathways of mitochondria quality control.

  2. Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 and Parkin in diabetic heart: Role of mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Liu, Jiankang; Long, Jiangang

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Diabetes-associated cardiac pathophysiology is recognized to be due to reasons including metabolic consequences on the myocardium. The heart is a highly energy-demanding tissue, with mitochondria supplying over 90% of adenosine triphosphate. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes-related cardiac pathogenesis has been studied. Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin, initially identified to be associated with the pathogenesis of a familiar form of Parkinson's disease, have recently been recognized to play a critical role in mediating cardiomyocytes' adaption to stresses. Extensive studies have suggested PINK1 and Parkin as key regulators of mitophagy. In the present review article, we will first summarize the new findings on PINK1/Parkin acting in cardioprotection, and then discuss the potential role of PINK1/Parkin in diabetic heart by mediating mitophagy. PMID:25969707

  3. AMBRA1 is able to induce mitophagy via LC3 binding, regardless of PARKIN and p62/SQSTM1

    PubMed Central

    Strappazzon, F; Nazio, F; Corrado, M; Cianfanelli, V; Romagnoli, A; Fimia, G M; Campello, S; Nardacci, R; Piacentini, M; Campanella, M; Cecconi, F

    2015-01-01

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated by mitophagy, a selective form of autophagy whose dysfunction associates with neurodegenerative diseases. PINK1, PARKIN and p62/SQTMS1 have been shown to regulate mitophagy, leaving hitherto ill-defined the contribution by key players in ‘general' autophagy. In basal conditions, a pool of AMBRA1 – an upstream autophagy regulator and a PARKIN interactor – is present at the mitochondria, where its pro-autophagic activity is inhibited by Bcl-2. Here we show that, upon mitophagy induction, AMBRA1 binds the autophagosome adapter LC3 through a LIR (LC3 interacting region) motif, this interaction being crucial for regulating both canonical PARKIN-dependent and -independent mitochondrial clearance. Moreover, forcing AMBRA1 localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane unleashes a massive PARKIN- and p62-independent but LC3-dependent mitophagy. These results highlight a novel role for AMBRA1 as a powerful mitophagy regulator, through both canonical or noncanonical pathways. PMID:25215947

  4. HSP72 Is a Mitochondrial Stress Sensor Critical for Parkin Action, Oxidative Metabolism, and Insulin Sensitivity in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Brian G.; Ribas, Vicente; Le, Jamie A.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Phun, Jennifer; Zhou, Zhenqi; Soleymani, Teo; Daraei, Pedram; Sitz, Daniel; Vergnes, Laurent; Wanagat, Jonathan; Reue, Karen; Febbraio, Mark A.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased heat shock protein (HSP) 72 expression in skeletal muscle prevents obesity and glucose intolerance in mice, although the underlying mechanisms of this observation are largely unresolved. Herein we show that HSP72 is a critical regulator of stress-induced mitochondrial triage signaling since Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate mitophagy, was unable to ubiquitinate and control its own protein expression or that of its central target mitofusin (Mfn) in the absence of HSP72. In wild-type cells, we show that HSP72 rapidly translocates to depolarized mitochondria prior to Parkin recruitment and immunoprecipitates with both Parkin and Mfn2 only after specific mitochondrial insult. In HSP72 knockout mice, impaired Parkin action was associated with retention of enlarged, dysmorphic mitochondria and paralleled by reduced muscle respiratory capacity, lipid accumulation, and muscle insulin resistance. Reduced oxygen consumption and impaired insulin action were recapitulated in Parkin-null myotubes, confirming a role for the HSP72-Parkin axis in the regulation of muscle insulin sensitivity. These data suggest that strategies to maintain HSP72 may provide therapeutic benefit to enhance mitochondrial quality and insulin action to ameliorate complications associated with metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:24379352

  5. S-Nitrosylation of parkin as a novel regulator of p53-mediated neuronal cell death in sporadic Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene encoding parkin, a neuroprotective protein with dual functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor of p53, are linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that oxidative posttranslational modification of parkin by environmental toxins may contribute to sporadic PD. Results We first demonstrated that S-nitrosylation of parkin decreased its activity as a repressor of p53 gene expression, leading to upregulation of p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation as well as gel-shift assays showed that parkin bound to the p53 promoter, and this binding was inhibited by S-nitrosylation of parkin. Additionally, nitrosative stress induced apoptosis in cells expressing parkin, and this death was, at least in part, dependent upon p53. In primary mesencephalic cultures, pesticide-induced apoptosis was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In a mouse model of pesticide-induced PD, both S-nitrosylated (SNO-)parkin and p53 protein levels were increased, while administration of a NOS inhibitor mitigated neuronal death in these mice. Moreover, the levels of SNO-parkin and p53 were simultaneously elevated in postmortem human PD brain compared to controls. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that S-nitrosylation of parkin, leading to p53-mediated neuronal cell death, contributes to the pathophysiology of sporadic PD. PMID:23985028

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  7. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  8. Evidence for a common biological pathway linking three Parkinson's disease-causing genes: parkin, PINK1 and DJ-1.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Celia; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Zahra; Christoffels, Alan; Loos, Ben; Bardien, Soraya

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Autosomal recessive, early-onset cases of PD are predominantly caused by mutations in the parkin, PINK1 and DJ-1 genes. Animal and cellular models have verified a direct link between parkin and PINK1, whereby PINK1 phosphorylates and activates parkin at the outer mitochondrial membrane, resulting in removal of dysfunctional mitochondria via mitophagy. Despite the overwhelming evidence for this interaction, few studies have been able to identify a link for DJ-1 with parkin or PINK1. The aim of this review is to summarise the functions of these three proteins, and to analyse the existing evidence for direct and indirect interactions between them. DJ-1 is able to rescue the phenotype of PINK1-knockout Drosophila models, but not of parkin-knockouts, suggesting that DJ-1 may act in a parallel pathway to that of the PINK1/parkin pathway. To further elucidate a commonality between these three proteins, bioinformatics analysis established that Miro (RHOT1) interacts with parkin and PINK1, and HSPA4 interacts with all three proteins. Furthermore, 30 transcription factors were found to be common amongst all three proteins, with many of them being involved in transcriptional regulation. Interestingly, expression of these proteins and their associated transcription factors are found to be significantly down-regulated in PD patients compared to healthy controls. In summary, this review provides insight into common pathways linking three PD-causing genes and highlights some key questions, the answers to which may provide critical insight into the disease process.

  9. Counteracting PINK/Parkin Deficiency in the Activation of Mitophagy: A Potential Therapeutic Intervention for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nardin, Alice; Schrepfer, Emilie; Ziviani, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) related genes PINK1, a protein kinase [1], and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase [2], operate within the same pathway [3-5], which controls, via specific elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria, the quality of the organelle network [6]. Parkin translocates to impaired mitochondria and drives their elimination via autophagy, a process known as mitophagy [6]. PINK1 regulates Parkin translocation through a not yet completely understood mechanism [7, 8]. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mitofusin (MFN), VDAC, Fis1 and TOM20 were found to be targets for Parkin mediated ubiquitination [9-11]. By adding ubiquitin molecules to its targets expressed on mitochondria, Parkin tags and selects dysfunctional mitochondria for clearance, contributing to maintain a functional and healthy mitochondrial network. Abnormal accumulation of misfolded proteins and unfunctional mitochondria is a characteristic hallmark of PD pathology. Therefore a therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of misfolded proteins and potentiate the ubiquitin-proteosome system (UPS) could be instrumental to ameliorate the progression of the disease. Recently, much effort has been put to identify specific de-ubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) that oppose Parkin in the ubiquitination of its targets. Similar to other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and acetylation, ubiquitination is also a reversible modification, mediated by a large family of DUBs [12]. DUBs inhibitors or activators can affect cellular response to stimuli that induce mitophagy via ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins MFN, VDAC, Fis1 and TOM20. In this respect, the identification of a Parkin-opposing DUB in the regulation of mitophagy, might be instrumental to develop specific isopeptidase inhibitors or activators that can modulate the fundamental biological process of mitochondria clearance and impact on cell survival. PMID:26517048

  10. Loss of pdr-1/parkin influences Mn homeostasis through altered ferroportin expression in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chen, Pan; Bornhorst, Julia; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Schumacher, Fabian; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to the essential metal manganese (Mn) can result in an irreversible condition known as manganism that shares similar pathophysiology with Parkinson’s disease (PD), including dopaminergic (DAergic) cell loss that leads to motor and cognitive impairments. However, the mechanisms behind this neurotoxicity and its relationship with PD remain unclear. Many genes confer risk for autosomal recessive, early-onset PD, including the parkin/PARK2 gene that encodes for the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin. Using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an invertebrate model that conserves the DAergic system, we previously reported significantly increased Mn accumulation in pdr-1/parkin mutants compared to wildtype (WT) animals. For the current study, we hypothesize that this enhanced accumulation is due to alterations in Mn transport in the pdr-1 mutants. While no change in mRNA expression of the major Mn importer proteins (smf-1-3) was found in pdr-1 mutants, significant downregulation in mRNA levels of the putative Mn exporter ferroportin (fpn-1.1) was observed. Using a strain overexpressing fpn-1.1 in worms lacking pdr-1, we show evidence for attenuation of several endpoints of Mn-induced toxicity, including survival, metal accumulation, mitochondrial copy number and DAergic integrity, compared to pdr-1 mutants alone. These changes suggest a novel role of pdr-1 in modulating Mn export through altered transporter expression, and provides further support of metal dyshomeostasis as a component of Parkinsonism pathophysiology. PMID:25769119

  11. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  12. Parkin induces upregulation of 40S ribosomal protein SA and posttranslational modification of cytokeratins 8 and 18 in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Dae-Geun; Kim, Yoon Suk; Jung, Byung Chul; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-12-01

    Parkin was originally identified as a protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Recently, numerous research studies have suggested that parkin acts as a tumor suppressor. In accordance with these studies, we previously reported that overexpression of parkin in HeLa cells induced growth inhibition. To elucidate possible mechanisms by which parkin may inhibit cell growth, HeLa cells were infected with adenoviruses expressing either the parkin gene or adenovirus alone for 72 h and a total proteomic analysis was performed using 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS. We identified three proteins whose expression changed between the two groups: the 40S ribosomal protein SA (RPSA) was downregulated in parkin virus-infected cells, and cytokeratins 8 and 18 exhibited an acid shift in pI value without a change in molecular weight, suggesting that these proteins became phosphorylated in parkin virus-infected cells. The changes in these three proteins were first observed at 60 h postinfection and were most dramatic at 72 h postinfection. Because upregulation of RPSA and dephosphorylation of cytokeratins 8/18 have been linked with tumor progression, these data suggest that parkin may inhibit cell growth, at least in part, by decreasing RPSA expression and inducing phosphorylation of cytokeratin 8/18. PMID:23990477

  13. Different dynamic movements of wild-type and pathogenic VCPs and their cofactors to damaged mitochondria in a Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoko; Fukushi, Junpei; Hori, Seiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Okatsu, Kei; Kakiyama, Yukie; Kawawaki, Junko; Kakizuka, Akira; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    VCP/p97 is a hexameric ring-shaped AAA(+) ATPase that participates in various ubiquitin-associated cellular functions. Mis-sense mutations in VCP gene are associated with the pathogenesis of two inherited diseases: inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and front-temporal dementia (IBMPFD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These pathogenic VCPs have higher affinities for several cofactors, including Npl4, Ufd1 and p47. In Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control systems, VCP migrates to damaged mitochondria (e.g., those treated with uncouplers) to aid in the degradation of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and to eliminate mitochondria. We showed that endogenous Npl4 and p47 also migrate to mitochondria after uncoupler treatment, and Npl4, Ufd1 or p47 silencing causes defective mitochondria clearance after uncoupler treatment. Moreover, pathogenic VCPs show impaired migration to mitochondria, and the exogenous pathogenic VCP expression partially inhibits Npl4 and p47 localization to mitochondria. These results suggest that the increased affinities of pathogenic VCPs for these cofactors cause the impaired movement of pathogenic VCPs. In adult flies, exogenous expression of wild-type VCP, but not pathogenic VCPs, reduces the number of abnormal mitochondria in muscles. Failure of pathogenic VCPs to function on damaged mitochondria may be related to the pathogenesis of IBMPFD and ALS.

  14. PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy play a protective role in manganese induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Mi, Lan; Wang, Ting; Yuan, Lan; Li, Xue-Hui; Dong, Li-Sha; Zhao, Peng; Fu, Juan-Ling; Yao, Bi-Yun; Zhou, Zong-Can

    2016-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) as an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered to cause manganism. Mitophagy is thought to play a key role in elimination the injured mitochondria. The goal of this paper was to explore whether the PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy is activated and its role in Mn-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. Here, we investigated effects of MnCl2 on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP/ΔΨm) and apoptosis by FACS and examined PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy by western-blotting and the co-localization of mitochondria and acidic lysosomes. Further, we explore the role of mitophagy in Mn-induced apoptosis by inhibition the mitophagy by knockdown Parkin level. Results show that MnCl2 dose-dependently caused ΔΨm decrease, ROS generation and apoptosis of dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Mn could induce mitophagy and PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathway was activated in SH-SY5Y cells. Transient transfection of Parkin siRNA knockdown the expressing level of parkin inhibited Mn-induced mitophagy and aggravated apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Mn may induce PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy, which may exert significant neuro-protective effect against Mn-induced dopaminergic neuronal cells apoptosis.

  15. Drosophila ref(2)P is required for the parkin-mediated suppression of mitochondrial dysfunction in pink1 mutants.

    PubMed

    de Castro, I P; Costa, A C; Celardo, I; Tufi, R; Dinsdale, D; Loh, S H Y; Martins, L M

    2013-10-24

    Autophagy is a critical regulator of organellar homeostasis, particularly of mitochondria. Upon the loss of membrane potential, dysfunctional mitochondria are selectively removed by autophagy through recruitment of the E3 ligase Parkin by the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and subsequent ubiquitination of mitochondrial membrane proteins. Mammalian sequestrome-1 (p62/SQSTM1) is an autophagy adaptor, which has been proposed to shuttle ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation downstream of Parkin. Here, we show that loss of ref(2)P, the Drosophila orthologue of mammalian P62, results in abnormalities, including mitochondrial defects and an accumulation of mitochondrial DNA with heteroplasmic mutations, correlated with locomotor defects. Furthermore, we show that expression of Ref(2)P is able to ameliorate the defects caused by loss of Pink1 and that this depends on the presence of functional Parkin. Finally, we show that both the PB1 and UBA domains of Ref(2)P are crucial for mitochondrial clustering. We conclude that Ref(2)P is a crucial downstream effector of a pathway involving Pink1 and Parkin and is responsible for the maintenance of a viable pool of cellular mitochondria by promoting their aggregation and autophagic clearance.

  16. [CK2beta promotes Pink1/Parkin-mediated MIRO1 degradation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenliang; Qin, Siyue; Jiang, Chang'an

    2014-12-01

    PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related protein, has two isoforms, the mitochondria-localized full-length isoform PINK1FL and the cytoplasm-localized short isoform PINK1-cyto. Studies have suggested that PINK1FL can selectively accumulate at the surface of damaged mitochondria and cooperate with another Parkinson's Disease-related protein PARKIN to trigger the degradation of MIRO1, a mitochondria trafficking regulator. The functions of PINK1-cyto are, however, not yet clear. To investigate the functions of PINK1-cyto, we expressed different proteins in cultured HEK293 cells by transfecting it with different plasmids, and detected the protein levels by Western blot after expressing for 24 h. We found that in cultured HEK293 cells, PINK1-cyto could also cooperate with PARKIN degrade MIRO1 in the presence of CK23, and the regulatory subunit of Casein Kinase II. Interestingly, this function of CK2P was not dependent on CK2alpha, the catalytic subunit of Casein Kinase II. We also found that CK2P could promote the direct interaction between PINK1-cyto and MIRO1 by immunocoprecipitation analysis. This result suggested that in addition to CK2alpha, CK2beta could also form a kinase complex. PMID:25868250

  17. Effects of cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces human parkinsonism, in parkin knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Menéndez, J; Casarejos, M J; Solano, R M; Gallego, E; Sánchez, M; Mena, M A; García de Yebenes, J

    2005-08-01

    Cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces parkinsonism in humans, induces behavioural changes such as alopecia, buco-lingual dyskinesia and reduction of motor activity in female parkin knock out (PK-KO) mice but not in wild-type (WT) controls. PK-KO mice have high striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine metabolism in spite of low reduced tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Cinnarizine, which blocks dopamine receptors and increases dopamine release, further increased dopamine metabolism. PK-KO mice increased GSH levels as a compensatory mechanism against enhanced free radical production related to acceleration of dopamine turnover. Neuronal markers, such as beta-tubulin slightly increased in PK-KO and furthermore with cinnarizine. Astroglial markers were decreased in PK-KO mice, and this effect was potentiated by cinnarizine, suggesting abnormal glia in these animals. Microglia was hyperactivated in PK-KO midbrain, suggesting inflammation in these animals. Proapoptotic proteins were increased by cinnarizine and, to a lesser extent, in PK-KO mice. Our data indicate that mutation of parkin is a risk factor for drug-induced parkinsonism. PMID:15993444

  18. Syntaxin-17 delivers PINK1/parkin-dependent mitochondrial vesicles to the endolysosomal system.

    PubMed

    McLelland, Gian-Luca; Lee, Sydney A; McBride, Heidi M; Fon, Edward A

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are considered autonomous organelles, physically separated from endocytic and biosynthetic pathways. However, recent work uncovered a PINK1/parkin-dependent vesicle transport pathway wherein oxidized or damaged mitochondrial content are selectively delivered to the late endosome/lysosome for degradation, providing evidence that mitochondria are indeed integrated within the endomembrane system. Given that mitochondria have not been shown to use canonical soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) machinery for fusion, the mechanism by which mitochondrial-derived vesicles (MDVs) are targeted to the endosomal compartment has remained unclear. In this study, we identify syntaxin-17 as a core mitochondrial SNARE required for the delivery of stress-induced PINK1/parkin-dependent MDVs to the late endosome/lysosome. Syntaxin-17 remains associated with mature MDVs and forms a ternary SNARE complex with SNAP29 and VAMP7 to mediate MDV-endolysosome fusion in a manner dependent on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) tethering complex. Syntaxin-17 can be traced to the last eukaryotic common ancestor, hinting that the removal of damaged mitochondrial content may represent one of the earliest vesicle transport routes in the cell. PMID:27458136

  19. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  20. Melatonin rescues zebrafish embryos from the parkinsonian phenotype restoring the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Casado, María E; Lima, Elena; García, José A; Doerrier, Carolina; Aranda, Paula; Sayed, Ramy Ka; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies reporting mitochondrial impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) involve knockout or knockdown models to inhibit the expression of mitochondrial-related genes, including parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 ones. Melatonin has significant neuroprotective properties, which have been related to its ability to boost mitochondrial bioenergetics. The meaning and molecular targets of melatonin in PD are yet unclear. Zebrafish are an outstanding model of PD because they are vertebrates, their dopaminergic system is comparable to the nigrostriatal system of humans, and their brains express the same genes as mammals. The exposure of 24 hpf zebrafish embryos to MPTP leads to a significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and the induction of sncga gene, responsible for enhancing γ-synuclein accumulation, which is related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, MPTP inhibited the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1 expression, impeding the normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 network to remove the damaged mitochondria. This situation remains over time, and removing MPTP from the treatment did not stop the neurodegenerative process. On the contrary, mitochondria become worse during the next 2 days without MPTP, and the embryos developed a severe motor impairment that cannot be rescued because the mitochondrial-related gene expression remained inhibited. Melatonin, added together with MPTP or added once MPTP was removed, prevented and recovered, respectively, the parkinsonian phenotype once it was established, restoring gene expression and normal function of the parkin/PINK1/DJ-1/MUL1 loop and also the normal motor activity of the embryos. The results show, for the first time, that melatonin restores brain function in zebrafish suffering with Parkinson-like disease.

  1. Rescue of mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts using drug loaded PMPC-PDPA polymersomes and tubular polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Yealland, G; Battaglia, G; Bandmann, O; Mortiboys, H

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in parkin cause autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and mitochondrial defects. A recent drug screen identified a class of steroid-like hydrophobic compounds able to rescue mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts. Whilst these possess therapeutic potential, the size and high hydrophobicity of some may limit their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier from systemic circulation, something that could be improved by novel drug formulations. In the present study, the steroid-like compounds Ursolic Acid (UA) and Ursocholanic Acid (UCA) were successfully encapsulated within nanoscopic polymersomes formed by poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine)-poly(2-di-isopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and separated into spherical and tubular morphologies to assess the effects of nanoparticle mediated delivery on drug efficacy. Following incubation with either morphology, parkin-mutant fibroblasts demonstrated time and concentration dependent increases in intracellular ATP levels, resembling those resulting from treatment with nascent UA and UCA formulated in 0.1% DMSO, as used in the original drug screen. Empty PMPC-PDPA polymersomes did not alter physiological measures related to mitochondrial function or induce cytotoxicity. In combination with other techniques such as ligand functionalisation, PMPC-PDPA nanoparticles of well-defined morphology may prove a promising platform for tailoring the pharmacokinetic profile and organ specific bio-distribution of highly hydrophobic compounds. PMID:27412236

  2. Rescue of mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts using drug loaded PMPC-PDPA polymersomes and tubular polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Yealland, G; Battaglia, G; Bandmann, O; Mortiboys, H

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in parkin cause autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and mitochondrial defects. A recent drug screen identified a class of steroid-like hydrophobic compounds able to rescue mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts. Whilst these possess therapeutic potential, the size and high hydrophobicity of some may limit their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier from systemic circulation, something that could be improved by novel drug formulations. In the present study, the steroid-like compounds Ursolic Acid (UA) and Ursocholanic Acid (UCA) were successfully encapsulated within nanoscopic polymersomes formed by poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine)-poly(2-di-isopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and separated into spherical and tubular morphologies to assess the effects of nanoparticle mediated delivery on drug efficacy. Following incubation with either morphology, parkin-mutant fibroblasts demonstrated time and concentration dependent increases in intracellular ATP levels, resembling those resulting from treatment with nascent UA and UCA formulated in 0.1% DMSO, as used in the original drug screen. Empty PMPC-PDPA polymersomes did not alter physiological measures related to mitochondrial function or induce cytotoxicity. In combination with other techniques such as ligand functionalisation, PMPC-PDPA nanoparticles of well-defined morphology may prove a promising platform for tailoring the pharmacokinetic profile and organ specific bio-distribution of highly hydrophobic compounds.

  3. PINK1 and Parkin cooperatively protect neurons against constitutively active TRP channel-induced retinal degeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Ren, S; Jiang, Y; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has an important role in regulating numerous cellular activities. However, extremely high levels of intracellular calcium can lead to neurotoxicity, a process commonly associated with degenerative diseases. Despite the clear role of calcium cytotoxicity in mediating neuronal cell death in this context, the pathological mechanisms remain controversial. We used a well-established Drosophila model of retinal degeneration, which involves the constitutively active TRPP365 channels, to study calcium-induced neurotoxicity. We found that the disruption of mitochondrial function was associated with the degenerative process. Further, increasing autophagy flux prevented cell death in TrpP365 mutant flies, and this depended on the PINK1/Parkin pathway. In addition, the retinal degeneration process was also suppressed by the coexpression of PINK1 and Parkin. Our results provide genetic evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction has a key role in the pathology of cellular calcium neurotoxicity. In addition, the results demonstrated that maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis via PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control can potentially alleviate cell death in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27054334

  4. Receptors on lymphocytes for endogenous splenic glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, M G; Parish, C R

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that lymphocytes carry cell surface receptors for sulphated polysaccharides (SPS), and SPS recognition may play a role in lymphocyte migration and positioning in vivo. This paper describes attempts to isolate and characterize the endogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of murine spleen and determine whether splenic lymphocytes carry cell surface receptors for these GAGs. A procedure was devised for isolating GAGs from murine spleen in good yield and high purity and the GAG preparation was then radiolabelled for subsequent binding studies. It was found that the splenic GAGs bound to murine splenocytes in a saturable, rapid and reversible manner with only a small subpopulation of the splenic GAG preparation being involved in binding. This reactive species was chondroitinase ABC-resistant and nitrous acid-sensitive, indicative of a heparan sulphate/heparin-like molecule. Furthermore, using immunofluorescent flow cytometry studies it was demonstrated that the majority of spleen cells have receptors for these GAGs. Subsequent ion-exchange fractionation and SDS-PAGE analysis of chondroitinase ABC-resistant GAGs confirmed that the splenic GAG recognized by splenocytes was a heparan sulphate/heparin molecule of approximately 20,000 MW with a binding affinity to splenocytes of approximately 5 X 10(-8) M. Additional binding inhibition studies indicated two possible binding sites for splenic GAGs on the splenocyte surface, one being fully inhibited by a range of SPS such as heparin (both coagulant and anticoagulant forms), pentosan sulphate, fucoidan, dextran sulphate, lambda- and iota-carrageenan, and the second being partially inhibited by kappa-carrageenan. The possible relevance of these heparan sulphate/heparin receptors on splenocytes to lymphocyte positioning in vivo is discussed. Images Figure 6 PMID:2541072

  5. Carnosic acid protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death through upregulation of parkin pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Parkin is a Parkinson's disease (PD)-linked gene that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). This study explored whether carnosic acid (CA) from rosemary protects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity via upregulation of parkin in vivo and in vitro. We found that the reduction in proteasomal activity by 6-OHDA was attenuated in SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with 1 μM CA. Immunoblots showed that CA reversed the induction of ubiquitinated protein and the reduction of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin protein in 6-OHDA-treated SH-SY5Y cells and rats. Moreover, in a transgenic OW13 Caenorhabditis elegans model of PD that expresses human α-synuclein in muscle cells, CA reduced α-synuclein accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. In cells pretreated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, CA no longer reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated induction of cleavage of caspase 3 and poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and no longer reversed the suppression of proteasome activity. When parkin expression was silenced by use of small interfering RNA, the ability of CA to inhibit apoptosis and induce proteasomal activity was significantly reduced. The reduction in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by CA was associated with the induction of parkin, which in turn upregulated the UPS and then decreased cell death. PMID:27091487

  6. Mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis are activated following PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Davor; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H V; Gegg, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is implicated with the changes in α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1, which then recruits parkin, resulting in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins. These can then be bound by the autophagic proteins p62/SQSTM1 and LC3, resulting in degradation of mitochondria by mitophagy. Mutations in PINK1 and parkin genes are a cause of familial PD. We found a significant increase in the expression of p62/SQSTM1 mRNA and protein following mitophagy induction in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. p62 protein not only accumulated on mitochondria, but was also greatly increased in the cytosol. Increased p62/SQSMT1 expression was prevented in PINK1 knock-down cells, suggesting increased p62 expression was a consequence of mitophagy induction. The transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB, which play roles in mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis, respectively, can regulate p62/SQSMT1. We report that both Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus following mitophagy induction and that the increase in p62 mRNA levels was significantly impaired in cells with Nrf2 or TFEB knockdown. TFEB translocation also increased expression of itself and lysosomal proteins such as glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin D following mitophagy induction. We also report that cells with increased TFEB protein have significantly higher PGC-1α mRNA levels, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in increased mitochondrial content. Our data suggests that TFEB is activated following mitophagy to maintain autophagy-lysosome pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, strategies to increase TFEB may improve both the clearance of α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Damaged mitochondria are degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway and is termed mitophagy. Following mitophagy induction, the transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus, inducing

  7. Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Parkin-Dependent Recruitment of Linear Ubiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC) to Mitochondria and Attenuation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohsin; Syed, Gulam Hussain; Kim, Seong-Jun; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppresses innate immune signaling to establish persistent infection. Although HBV is a DNA virus, its pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) can be sensed by RIG-I and activates MAVS to mediate interferon (IFN) λ synthesis. Despite of the activation of RIG-I-MAVS axis by pgRNA, the underlying mechanism explaining how HBV infection fails to induce interferon-αβ (IFN) synthesis remained uncharacterized. We demonstrate that HBV induced parkin is able to recruit the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC) to mitochondria and abrogates IFN β synthesis. Parkin interacts with MAVS, accumulates unanchored linear polyubiquitin chains on MAVS via LUBAC, to disrupt MAVS signalosome and attenuate IRF3 activation. This study highlights the novel role of parkin in antiviral signaling which involves LUBAC being recruited to the mitochondria. These results provide avenues of investigations on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in innate immunity. PMID:27348524

  8. Can overexpression of parkin provide a novel strategy for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Ayse; Kirik, Deniz

    2008-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective degeneration of the dopamine producing neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no clinically applicable therapy for treating or preventing Parkinsonian neurodegeneration. Great effort is put behind the development of novel therapeutic approaches that aim to alter the natural progression of the disease. For example, a disease-modifying strategy based on the use of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family of ligands have yielded successful results in animal models and later in initial clinical trials. More recently, identification of the gene mutations underlying the familial forms of the disease opened new frontiers in tackling the underlying neuropathological changes seen in PD brains. Overexpression of parkin, in particular, emerged as a powerful approach with complementary effects to those described with use of neurotrophic factors. In light of the fact that the mechanism of disease in the affected patient population might be significantly variable, the ability to intervene the disease process at multiple levels should be seen as a key point in devising effective treatments.

  9. [Endogenous venous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Porembskaya, O Ya; Khmelniker, S M; Shaidakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Widely incorporated into vascular surgery pharmacological thrombolysis in treatment for deep vain thrombosis is fraught with a series of unsolved problems requiring further consideration. In spite of aggressive nature of treatment in a series of cases pharmacological thrombolysis sometimes turns out ineffective. Along with it, the results of experimental studies suggest a possibility of accelerating resorption of thrombotic masses and inhibiting remodelling of the venous wall by means of influencing effector cells of endogenous thrombolysis. A detailed study of the mechanisms of thrombolysis would make it possible to formulate strict criteria for carrying out pharmacological thrombolysis and to increase its efficacy. PMID:26355926

  10. [Genetics of endogenous psychoses].

    PubMed

    Zerbin-Rüdin, E

    1979-01-01

    As the endogeneous psychoses do not show a Mendelian mode of inheritance, empirical risk figures have to be calculated. They are heterogeneous and nurture as well as nature have a share in the manifestation of illness. The genetic basis of the schizophrenias is demonstrated by twin and adoption studies. The concordance rate in monozygotic twins is four times the rate in dizygotic twins. Schizophrenia is to be found in the biological families of schizophrenic adoptees but not in the adoptive families. However, despite their genetic identity, monozygotic twins do not show 100% concordance but 60% only. Nongenetic factors must be considered. Obviously they are nonspecific and vary between individuals. The same principles apply to the affective psychoses. At present research is most interested in the problem of heterogeneity. Do pure depressive and manic-depressive disease form one genetic entity, or two different ones, or have they in common part of their genetic basis? Some remarks on genetic counselling are made.

  11. Clueless, a protein required for mitochondrial function, interacts with the PINK1-Parkin complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sen, Aditya; Kalvakuri, Sreehari; Bodmer, Rolf; Cox, Rachel T

    2015-06-01

    Loss of mitochondrial function often leads to neurodegeneration and is thought to be one of the underlying causes of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise events linking mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death remain elusive. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin (Park), either of which, when mutated, are responsible for early-onset PD, mark individual mitochondria for destruction at the mitochondrial outer membrane. The specific molecular pathways that regulate signaling between the nucleus and mitochondria to sense mitochondrial dysfunction under normal physiological conditions are not well understood. Here, we show that Drosophila Clueless (Clu), a highly conserved protein required for normal mitochondrial function, can associate with Translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) 20, Porin and PINK1, and is thus located at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Previously, we found that clu genetically interacts with park in Drosophila female germ cells. Here, we show that clu also genetically interacts with PINK1, and our epistasis analysis places clu downstream of PINK1 and upstream of park. In addition, Clu forms a complex with PINK1 and Park, further supporting that Clu links mitochondrial function with the PINK1-Park pathway. Lack of Clu causes PINK1 and Park to interact with each other, and clu mutants have decreased mitochondrial protein levels, suggesting that Clu can act as a negative regulator of the PINK1-Park pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that Clu directly modulates mitochondrial function, and that Clu's function contributes to the PINK1-Park pathway of mitochondrial quality control.

  12. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  13. Ethanol-induced mitophagy in liver is associated with activation of the PINK1-Parkin pathway triggered by oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Eid, Nabil; Ito, Yuko; Horibe, Akio; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cytoprotective mechanism against mitochondrial damaging agents. Studies demonstrating morphological evidence for the involvement of the PINK1-Parkin pathway in the hepatocyte mitophagic response to ethanol toxicity, and potential links to apoptosis and mitochondrial alterations such as spheroid formation are still lacking. We addressed these unresolved issues using a rat model of binge alcohol exposure. Adult rats were injected with ethanol (5g/kg) and liver samples were taken at 0, 3, 6, and 24 hours after ethanol administration and processed for light and electron microscopic studies. Ethanol induced a low level of hepatocyte apoptosis, peaking at 3 h and decreasing significantly by 24 h. In contrast, there was enhanced formation of mitophagic vacuoles in the majority of normal hepatocytes of ethanol-treated rats (ETRs), which peaked at 6 h and was maintained up to 24 h based on electron microscopy and TUNEL/LC3 double labelling. Moreover, enhanced mitophagy in ETR hepatocytes was confirmed by increased LC3 puncta formation, and co-localization of Parkin and LC3 with mitochondrial and lysosomal markers. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the localization of PINK1 and Parkin to damaged mitochondria of ETR hepatocytes, which was consistent with co-localization of Parkin with 8-OHdG, a marker of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed enhanced formation of mitochondrial spheroids in ETR hepatocytes. These data are the first direct morphological evidence linking PINK1-Parkin pathway activation to the enhanced mitophagic response of hepatocytes to ethanol toxicity. Ethanol-induced hepatic mitophagy may be a prosurvival mechanism, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26935412

  14. Folic acid supplementation rescues anomalies associated with knockdown of parkin in dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons in Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Saurabh; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Yadav, Amarish Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella

    2015-05-01

    parkin loss associated early-onset of Parkinson's disease, involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as the plausible decisive molecular mechanisms in disease pathogenesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction involves several up/down regulation of gene products, one of which being p53 is found to be elevated. Elevated p53 is involved in mitochondrial mediated apoptosis of neuronal cells in Parkinson's patients who are folate deficient as well. The present study therefore attempts to examine the effect of Folic acid (FA) supplementation in alleviation of anomalies associated with parkin knockdown using RNAi approach, specific to Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Drosophila model system. Here we show that FA supplementation provide protection against parkin RNAi associated discrepancies, thereby improves locomotor ability, reduces mortality and oxidative stress, and partially improves Zn levels. Further, metabolic active cell status and ATP levels were also found to be improved thereby indicating improved mitochondrial function. To corroborate FA supplementation in mitochondrial functioning further, status of p53 and spargel was checked by qRT-PCR. Here we show that folic acid supplementation enrich mitochondrial functioning as depicted from improved spargel level and lowered p53 level, which was originally vice versa in parkin knockdown flies cultured in standard media. Our data thus support the potential of folic acid in alleviating the behavioural defects, oxidative stress, augmentation of zinc and ATP levels in parkin knock down flies. Further, folic acid role in repressing mitochondrial dysfunction is encouraging to further explore its possible mechanistic role to be utilized as potential therapeutics for Parkinson's disease. PMID:25824034

  15. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  16. Endogenous Metabolism of Azotobacter agilis

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, J. M.; Charba, J. F.; Foust, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Sobek, J. M. (University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette), J. F. Charba, and W. N. Foust. Endogenous metabolism of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:687–695. 1966—Ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, cellular carbohydrate, and the cold trichloroacetic acid and acidic alcohol fractions of the cell do not appear to function as endogenous reserves for Azotobacter agilis. The immediate endogenous reserve of cells grown on glucose, acetate, or succinate was poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB). Viability of the cells during starvation was dependent upon the initial levels of PHB and the growth substrate. Cells with high initial PHB levels survived longer than cells with lower levels. Cells from succinate-grown cultures had lower PHB levels than cells from glucose-grown cultures, but were capable of maintaining their viability longer. Cellular protein may also serve as a secondary endogenous reserve substrate for this organism. PMID:5922542

  17. ENDOGENOUS RESPIRATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, H. H.

    1962-01-01

    Ramsey, H. H. (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 83:507–514. 1962.—The endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the medium used to grow the cell suspension. Within wide ranges, the concentration of glucose in the medium has no effect upon subsequent endogenous respiration of the cells, but the concentration of amino acids in the medium, within certain limits, has a very marked effect. The total carbohydrate content of the cells does not decrease during endogenous respiration. As endogenous respiration proceeds, ammonia appears in the supernatant, and the concentration of glutamic acid in the free amino acid pool decreases. Organisms grown in the presence of labeled glutamic acid liberate labeled CO2 when allowed to respire without added substrate. The principal source of this CO2 is the free glutamate in the metabolic pool; its liberation is not suppressed by exogenous glucose or glutamate. With totally labeled cells, the free pool undergoes a rapid, but not total, depletion and remains at a low level for a long time. Activity of the protein fraction declines with time and shows the largest net decrease of all fractions. Exogenous glucose does not inhibit the release of labeled CO2 by totally labeled cells. Other amino acids in the free pool which can serve as endogenous substrates are aspartic acid and, to much lesser extents, glycine and alanine. The results indicate that both free amino acids and cellular protein may serve as endogenous substrates of S. aureus. PMID:14490204

  18. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. PMID:26820249

  19. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  20. Skeletal Fragility in Endogenous Hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Delgado, Adriano; Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of endogenous hypercortisolism, and fragility fractures may be the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Fractures involve more frequently the vertebrae and may occur in 30-50% of the patients exposed to glucocorticoid excess, in close relationship with severity and duration of hypercortisolism. Although improvement of bone mineral density was reported after resolution of hypercortisolism, there are patients with persistently high fracture risk after the cure of hypercortisolism, and other patients in whom the resolution of hypercortisolism may take a long time, implying a multistep therapeutic approach. Since vertebral fractures tend to occur early during the natural history of disease, a skeletal-specific approach should be undertaken in these patients; however, the cost-effectiveness of this approach is still largely unknown since data on effectiveness and safety of bone-active drugs in endogenous hypercortisolism are scarce. PMID:27210111

  1. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2013.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-sixth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2013 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses.

  2. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  3. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  4. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  5. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  6. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  7. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  8. Time-Lapse Video Microscopy for Assessment of EYFP-Parkin Aggregation as a Marker for Cellular Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pestell, Timothy G; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse video microscopy can be defined as the real time imaging of living cells. This technique relies on the collection of images at different time points. Time intervals can be set through a computer interface that controls the microscope-integrated camera. This kind of microscopy requires both the ability to acquire very rapid events and the signal generated by the observed cellular structure during these events. After the images have been collected, a movie of the entire experiment is assembled to show the dynamic of the molecular events of interest. Time-lapse video microscopy has a broad range of applications in the biomedical research field and is a powerful and unique tool for following the dynamics of the cellular events in real time. Through this technique, we can assess cellular events such as migration, division, signal transduction, growth, and death. Moreover, using fluorescent molecular probes we are able to mark specific molecules, such as DNA, RNA or proteins and follow them through their molecular pathways and functions. Time-lapse video microscopy has multiple advantages, the major one being the ability to collect data at the single-cell level, that make it a unique technology for investigation in the field of cell biology. However, time-lapse video microscopy has limitations that can interfere with the acquisition of high quality images. Images can be compromised by both external factors; temperature fluctuations, vibrations, humidity and internal factors; pH, cell motility. Herein, we describe a protocol for the dynamic acquisition of a specific protein, Parkin, fused with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in order to track the selective removal of damaged mitochondria, using a time-lapse video microscopy approach. PMID:27168174

  9. The discovery of endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robin A

    2006-01-01

    When endogenous retroviruses (ERV) were discovered in the late 1960s, the Mendelian inheritance of retroviral genomes by their hosts was an entirely new concept. Indeed Howard M Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis enunciated in 1964 was not generally accepted, and reverse transcriptase was yet to be discovered. Nonetheless, the evidence that we accrued in the pre-molecular era has stood the test of time, and our hypothesis on ERV, which one reviewer described as 'impossible', proved to be correct. Here I recount some of the key observations in birds and mammals that led to the discovery of ERV, and comment on their evolution, cross-species dispersion, and what remains to be elucidated. PMID:17018135

  10. Endogenous Retroviruses and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Yuri; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Humans share about 99% of their genomic DNA with chimpanzees and bonobos; thus, the differences between these species are unlikely to be in gene content but could be caused by inherited changes in regulatory systems. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise ∼ 5% of the human genome. The LTRs of ERVs contain many regulatory sequences, such as promoters, enhancers, polyadenylation signals and factor-binding sites. Thus, they can influence the expression of nearby human genes. All known human-specific LTRs belong to the HERV-K (human ERV) family, the most active family in the human genome. It is likely that some of these ERVs could have integrated into regulatory regions of the human genome, and therefore could have had an impact on the expression of adjacent genes, which have consequently contributed to human evolution. This review discusses possible functional consequences of ERV integration in active coding regions. PMID:18629260

  11. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  12. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  13. Epigenetic Upregulation of Endogenous VEGF-A Reduces Myocardial Infarct Size in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Musthafa, Haja; Laidinen, Svetlana; Dragneva, Galina; Laham-Karam, Nihay; Honkanen, Sanna; Paakinaho, Anne; Laakkonen, Johanna P.; Gao, Erhe; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Liimatainen, Timo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    “Epigenetherapy” alters epigenetic status of the targeted chromatin and modifies expression of the endogenous therapeutic gene. In this study we used lentiviral in vivo delivery of small hairpin RNA (shRNA) into hearts in a murine infarction model. shRNA complementary to the promoter of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) was able to upregulate endogenous VEGF-A expression. Histological and multiphoton microscope analysis confirmed the therapeutic effect in the transduced hearts. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed in vivo that the infarct size was significantly reduced in the treatment group 14 days after the epigenetherapy. Importantly, we show that promoter-targeted shRNA upregulates all isoforms of endogenous VEGF-A and that an intact hairpin structure is required for the shRNA activity. In conclusion, regulation of gene expression at the promoter level is a promising new treatment strategy for myocardial infarction and also potentially useful for the upregulation of other endogenous genes. PMID:24587164

  14. Population aging and endogenous economic growth.

    PubMed

    Prettner, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the consequences of population aging for long-run economic growth perspectives. Our framework incorporates endogenous growth models and semi-endogenous growth models as special cases. We show that (1) increases in longevity have a positive impact on per capita output growth, (2) decreases in fertility have a negative impact on per capita output growth, (3) the positive longevity effect dominates the negative fertility effect in case of the endogenous growth framework, and (4) population aging fosters long-run growth in the endogenous growth framework, while its effect depends on the relative change between fertility and mortality in the semi-endogenous growth framework.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00148-012-0441-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  15. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  16. Determinants of the source of cytomegalovirus in murine renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Klotman, M E; Henry, S C; Hamilton, J D

    1987-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus is present in a latent state in renal allografts and may be reactivated in recipients. While human and murine strains are alike in that a primary infection occurs in seronegative recipients of a kidney from a seropositive donor, they may differ when the recipient is seropositive. In a murine transplant model, superinfection of a seropositive recipient with a second strain is unusual. Reports in human transplantation indicate that superinfection of a seropositive recipient does occur, however the frequency is unknown. Our studies examine the potential importance of specific viral strains in host and recipient, the contribution of prior humoral immunity in the recipient, and the technical ability to identify distinctive strains of virus in the presence of each other. Our results indicate that reversal of the viral strains in donor or recipient animals does not alter our previous observation that reactivation of the endogenous recipient viral strain predominates as the infecting strain in the posttransplant period. Further, the presence of antibody in nearly all donors and recipients confirms that all animals were originally infected prior to transplantation. Finally, we demonstrated the technical ability to detect one virus in the presence of the other, thus excluding this variable as possibly confounding. We conclude that the endogenous, latent recipient strain of cytomegalovirus in the murine model is preferentially reactivated in the posttransplant interval.

  17. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  18. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  19. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells.

  20. Isolation and partial identification of eight endogenous G1 inhibitors of JB-1 ascites tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Barfod, N M

    1982-06-01

    Eight endogenous G1 inhibitors of the proliferation of JB-1 ascites tumor cells have been isolated and characterized. The activity of the inhibitors has been analyzed on synchronized JB-1 (murine plasmacytoma) and L1A2 (murine sarcoma) cells in vitro using flow cytometry. The purified inhibitors have been tested for in vivo activity on partially synchronized JB-1 and L1A2 ascites tumors in situ. Four of the inhibitors exhibited a high degree of cell specificity (chalone-like inhibitors) and were chemically related, whereas the other four showed no cell specificity. In most extractions, the amount of cell-specific activity is more than 50% of the total G1-inhibitory activity. Most of the inhibitors are low-molecular-weight peptides and glycopeptides.

  1. Frequent disruption of the Nf1 gene by a novel murine AIDS virus-related provirus in BXH-2 murine myeloid lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, B C; Shaughnessy, J D; Largaespada, D A; Bedigian, H G; Buchberg, A M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1995-01-01

    Evi-2, a common site of viral integration in BXH-2 myeloid lymphomas, is located within a large intron of the Nf1 tumor suppressor gene. Viral integration at Evi-2 appears to induce disease by disrupting normal Nf1 expression. During our attempts to characterize the nature of the proviruses located at Evi-2, we found that approximately half of the proviruses were defective nonecotropic proviruses (A. M. Buchberg, H. G. Bedigian, N. A. Jenkins, and N. G. Copeland, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:4658-4666, 1990). This was surprising, since most proviruses characterized at other BXH-2 common integration sites are full-length ecotropic viruses. In the studies described here, we found that this defective provirus carries two large deletions, one in pol and one in env, and is structurally related to another murine retrovirus, the murine AIDS retrovirus. By using oligonucleotide probes specific for this defective provirus, designated MRV, we showed that MRV-related proviruses are carried as endogenous germ line proviruses in most inbred strains. In addition, we identified the endogenous MRV provirus that gives rise to the defective proviruses identified at Evi-2. We present a model that accounts for the positive selection of MRV proviruses at Evi-2, which may allow selective identification of common viral integration sites harboring tumor suppressor genes. PMID:7474134

  2. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  3. Expression of LINE-1 retroposons is essential for murine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Pittoggi, Carmine; Sciamanna, Ilaria; Mattei, Elisabetta; Spadafora, Corrado

    2006-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, reverse transcriptase (RT) activities are encoded by a variety of endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposable elements. We previously found that mouse preimplantation embryos are endowed with an endogenous RT activity. Inhibition of that activity by the non nucleosidic inhibitor nevirapine or by microinjection of anti-RT antibody caused early embryonic developmental arrest. Those experiments indicated that RT is required for early development, but did not identify the responsible coding elements. We now show that microinjection of morpholino-modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting the 5' end region of active LINE-1 retrotransposons in murine zygotes irreversibly arrests preimplantation development at the two- and four-cell stages; the overall level of functional RT is concomitantly downregulated in arrested embryos. Furthermore, we show that the induction of embryo developmental arrest is associated with a substantial reprogramming of gene expression. Together, these results support the conclusion that expression of LINE-1 retrotransposons is required for early embryo preimplantation development.

  4. Overview of endogenous and synthetic melanocortin peptides.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K R; Todorovic, A; Proneth, B; Haskell-Luevano, C

    2006-01-01

    The melanocortin system consists of five seven-transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled (GPCRs) receptors (MC1R-MC5R), the endogenous agonists a-, B- and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and the endogenous antagonists Agouti and Agouti-related protein (AGRP). Melanocortin agonists are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and weight omeostasis in mammals. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) have been performed on the endogenous melanocortin receptor agonists and antagonists that have identified ligand amino acid residues implicated as important for receptor binding and stimulation. Knowledge of putative ligand-receptor interactions may help to design molecules as therapeutic agents for the treatment of physiological diseases. PMID:16914082

  5. Analysis of the Human Endogenous Coregulator Complexome

    PubMed Central

    Malovannaya, Anna; Lanz, Rainer B.; Jung, Sung Yun; Bulynko, Yaroslava; Le, Nguyen T.; Chan, Doug W.; Ding, Chen; Shi, Yi; Yucer, Nur; Krenciute, Giedre; Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Chunshu; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Qin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Summary Elucidation of endogenous cellular protein-protein interactions and their networks is most desirable for biological studies. Here we report our study of endogenous human coregulator protein complex networks obtained from integrative mass spectrometry-based analysis of 3,290 affinity purifications. By preserving weak protein interactions during complex isolation and utilizing high levels of reciprocity in the large dataset we identified many unreported protein associations, such as a transcriptional network formed by ZMYND8, ZNF687 and ZNF592. Furthermore, our work revealed a tiered interplay within networks that share common proteins, providing a conceptual organization of a cellular proteome composed of minimal endogenous modules (MEMOs), functional uniCOREs and regulatory complex-complex interaction networks (CCIs). This resource will effectively fill a void in linking correlative genomic studies with an understanding of transcriptional regulatory protein functions within the proteome for formulation and testing of new hypotheses. PMID:21620140

  6. Endogenous RNAi pathways in C. elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Allison C; Fischer, Sylvia E J; Kim, John K

    2014-01-01

    In addition to several hundred microRNAs, C. elegans produces thousands of other small RNAs targeting coding genes, pseudogenes, transposons, and other noncoding RNAs. Here we review what is currently known about these endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), providing an overview of their biogenesis, their associated protein factors, and their effects on mRNA dynamics and chromatin structure. Additionally, we describe how the molecular actions of these classes of endogenous small RNAs connect to their physiological roles in the organism. PMID:24816713

  7. Animal spirits, competitive markets, and endogenous growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a simple model with an endogenous discount rate and linear technology to investigate whether a competitive equilibrium has a higher balanced growth path (BGP) than the social planning solution and whether the BGP is determinate or indeterminate. The implications are as follows. To start with, people with an instinct to compare themselves with others possess an endogenous discount rate. In turn, this instinct affects the economic growth rate in a competitive market economy. The competitive market economy also sometimes achieves higher economic growth than a social planning economy. However, the outcomes of market economy occasionally fluctuate because of the presence of the self-fulfilling prophecy or animal spirits.

  8. Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Hiroshi; Huang, Ngan F.; Rollins, Mark D.; Cooke, John P.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects about 10 million individuals, and is also prevalent worldwide. Medical therapies for symptomatic relief are limited. Surgical or endovascular interventions are useful for some individuals, but long-term results are often disappointing. As a result, there is a need for developing new therapies to treat PAD. The murine hindlimb ischemia preparation is a model of PAD, and is useful for testing new therapies. When compared to other models of tissue ischemia such as coronary or cerebral artery ligation, femoral artery ligation provides for a simpler model of ischemic tissue. Other advantages of this model are the ease of access to the femoral artery and low mortality rate. In this video, we demonstrate the methodology for the murine model of unilateral hindimb ischemia. The specific materials and procedures for creating and evaluating the model will be described, including the assessment of limb perfusion by laser Doppler imaging. This protocol can also be utilized for the transplantation and non-invasive tracking of cells, which is demonstrated by Huang et al.1. PMID:19229179

  9. Murine model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C G; Tan, Joanne T M; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2013-05-28

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans.

  10. Feedback Response to Selective Depletion of Endogenous Carbon Monoxide in the Blood.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Minegishi, Saika; Yumura, Aki; Negi, Shigeru; Taketani, Shigeru; Amagase, Yoko; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Urushidani, Tetsuro; Sugiura, Yukio; Kano, Koji

    2016-04-27

    The physiological roles of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) have not been fully understood because of the difficulty in preparing a loss-of-function phenotype of this molecule. Here, we have utilized in vivo CO receptors, hemoCDs, which are the supramolecular 1:1 inclusion complexes of meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphinatoiron(II) with per-O-methylated β-cyclodextrin dimers. Three types of hemoCDs (hemoCD1, hemoCD2, and hemoCD3) that exhibit different CO-affinities have been tested as CO-depleting agents in vivo. Intraperitoneally administered hemoCD bound endogenous CO within the murine circulation, and was excreted in the urine along with CO in an affinity-dependent manner. The sufficient administration of hemoCD that has higher CO-affinity than hemoglobin (Hb) produced a pseudoknockdown state of CO in the mouse in which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was markedly induced in the liver, causing the acceleration of endogenous CO production to maintain constant CO-Hb levels in the blood. The contents of free hemin and bilirubin in the blood plasma of the treated mice significantly increased upon removal of endogenous CO by hemoCD. Thus, a homeostatic feedback model for the CO/HO-1 system was proposed as follows: HemoCD primarily removes CO from cell-free CO-Hb. The resulting oxy-Hb is quickly oxidized to met-Hb by oxidant(s) such as hydrogen peroxide in the blood plasma. The met-Hb readily releases free hemin that directly induces HO-1 in the liver, which metabolizes the hemin into iron, biliverdin, and CO. The newly produced CO binds to ferrous Hb to form CO-Hb as an oxidation-resistant state. Overall, the present system revealed the regulatory role of CO for maintaining the ferrous/ferric balance of Hb in the blood.

  11. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  12. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state.

  13. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  14. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state. PMID:24949960

  15. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR. PMID:24882143

  16. Characterization of Endogenous Ethanol in the Mammal.

    PubMed

    McManus, I R; Contag, A O; Olson, R E

    1960-01-01

    Ethanol has been isolated from the tissues of several animal species in amounts ranging from 23 to 145 micromole/100 gm of tissue. Intestinal bacterial flora appear to be excluded as a source of this ethanol. Radioactivity from pyruvate-2-C(14) appeared in ethanol after incubation with liver slices; this finding indicates an endogenous synthesis.

  17. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  18. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  19. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  20. Genome Structure and Thymic Expression of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ching-Hung; Steiner, Lisa A.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for previously unknown genes that are required for lymphocyte development in zebrafish, a retroviral sequence was identified in a subtracted thymus cDNA library and in genomic DNA libraries. The provirus is 11.2 kb and contains intact open reading frames for the gag, pol, and env genes, as well as nearly identical flanking long terminal repeat sequences. As determined by in situ hybridization, the thymus appears to be a major tissue for retroviral expression in both larval and adult fish. Several viral transcripts were found by Northern blotting in the adult thymus. The provirus was found at the same genomic locus in sperm from four fish, suggesting that it is an endogenous retrovirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is closest to, yet distinct from, the cluster of murine leukemia virus-related retroviruses, suggesting that this virus represents a new group of retroviruses. PMID:14694121

  1. Characterization and partial nucleotide sequence of endogenous type C retrovirus segments in human chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Repaske, R; O'Neill, R R; Steele, P E; Martin, M A

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-six different murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related clones have been isolated from a human DNA library and characterized by restriction enzyme mapping and reciprocal nucleic acid hybridization reactions. The sequence of approximately 2,600 nucleotides, spanning more than 4.0 kilobases, of one of the MuLV-related cloned human DNAs was also determined. The deduced amino acid sequence permitted the alignment of this prototype cloned human DNA segment with the p12 gag, p30 gag, p10 gag, and pol regions of Moloney MuLV. A majority of the endogenous type C retrovirus-related segments present in human DNA are approximately 6.0 kilobases in size and appear to contain a deletion of env sequences. Images PMID:6298769

  2. [Effect of female sex steroids on levels of endogenous ethanol].

    PubMed

    Garber, M R; Kovalenko, A E

    1988-01-01

    The authors presented the results of a study of the effect of female sex steroids on the level of endogenous ethanol. The time course of endogenous ethanol during the menstrual cycle was investigated. The concentration of endogenous ethanol was compared in the groups of women receiving and not receiving hormonal contraceptives. An increase in sex steroids during the menstrual cycle was accompanied by a decrease in the level of endogenous ethanol. The use of hormonal contraceptives caused an increase in the background concentration of endogenous ethanol. A possible effect of endogenous and exogenous female sex steroids on different levels of regulation of ethanol metabolism was assumed.

  3. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  4. PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance contributes to proteasome activation during slow-twitch muscle atrophy via NFE2L1 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Norihiko; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Shigeto; Soma, Sanae; Ezaki, Junji; Trejo, Juan Alejandro Oliva; Takeda-Ezaki, Mitsue; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Tada, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masaaki; Tanaka, Keiji; Kominami, Eiki; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ueno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is thought to result from hyperactivation of intracellular protein degradation pathways, including autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome system. However, the precise contributions of these pathways to muscle atrophy are unclear. Here, we show that an autophagy deficiency in denervated slow-twitch soleus muscles delayed skeletal muscle atrophy, reduced mitochondrial activity, and induced oxidative stress and accumulation of PARK2/Parkin, which participates in mitochondrial quality control (PARK2-mediated mitophagy), in mitochondria. Soleus muscles from denervated Park2 knockout mice also showed resistance to denervation, reduced mitochondrial activities, and increased oxidative stress. In both autophagy-deficient and Park2-deficient soleus muscles, denervation caused the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Denervation induced proteasomal activation via NFE2L1 nuclear translocation in control mice, whereas it had little effect in autophagy-deficient and Park2-deficient mice. These results suggest that PARK2-mediated mitophagy plays an essential role in the activation of proteasomes during denervation atrophy in slow-twitch muscles. PMID:24451648

  5. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Viallet, François; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Dürr, Alexandra; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berg, Daniela; Bettella, Francesco; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Dong, Jing; Durif, Frank; Edkins, Sarah; Escott-Price, Valentina; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michèle; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Kilarski, Laura L.; Jansen, Iris E.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Lubbe, Steven; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez, María; Mätzler, Walter; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Owen, Michael J.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Shulman, Joshua; Sidransky, Ellen; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wurster, Isabel; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  6. Characterization of a Novel Murine Retrovirus Mixture That Facilitates Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Lauren M.; Jude, Brooke A.; Ter-Grigorov, Victor S.; Hartley, Janet W.; Morse III, Herbert C.; Trainin, Zeev; Toder, Vladimir; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2002-01-01

    A new virus previously arose in BALB/c females mated repeatedly to C57BL/6 (B6) males and then injected with fixed, activated B6 male spleen cells (V. S. Ter-Grigorov, O. Krifuks, E. Liubashevsky, A. Nyska, Z. Trainin, and V. Toder, Nat. Med. 3:37-41, 1997). In the present study, BALB/cJ mice inoculated with virus-containing plasma from affected mice developed splenomegaly, which was caused by increased numbers of Sca-1+ Lin− hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their differentiated progeny. Biological and molecular analyses of a new virus revealed a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs). These MuLVs comprised ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-forming (MCF) virus classes and are termed Rauscher-like MuLVs because they bear numerous similarities to the ecotropic and MCF viruses of the Rauscher MuLV complex but do not include a spleen focus-forming virus. The ecotropic virus component alone transferred some disease characteristics, while MCF virus alone did not. Thus, we have described a novel virus mixture, termed Rauscher-like MuLV, that causes an increase in hematopoiesis due to activation of pluripotent HSC. Experiments using mice and a protocol that replicated the pregnancy and immunization strategy of the original experiment demonstrated that endogenous BALB/c mouse ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs are activated by these treatments. Emv1 was expressed in the spleens of multiparous mice but not in those of virgin mice, and Bxv1Emv1-pseudotyped MuLVs were recovered following injection of fixed, activated B6 cells. Thus, multiple pregnancies and allostimuli appear to have provided the signals required for activation of and recombination among endogenous viruses and could have resulted in generation of the Rauscher-like MuLV mixture. PMID:12414952

  7. [Concentration of endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation].

    PubMed

    Burov, Iu V; Treskov, V G; Kampov-Polevoĭ, A B; Kovalenko, A E; Rodionov, A P

    1983-11-01

    Trials with patients suffering from stage II chronic alcoholism and normal test subjects as well as experiments made on male C57BL mice (with genetically determined alcoholic motivation) and CBA mice (with genetically determined alcoholic aversion) and random-bred male rats with different levels of initial alcoholic motivation have shown the presence of reverse proportional dependence between blood plasma endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation.

  8. HERVd: database of human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Václav

    2002-01-01

    The human endogenous retroviruses database (HERVd) is maintained at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and is accessible via the World Wide Web at http://herv.img.cas.cz. The HERVd provides complex information on and analysis of retroviral elements found in the human genome. It can be used for searches of individual HERV families, identification of HERV parts, graphical output of HERV structures, comparison of HERVs and identification of retrovirus integration sites.

  9. Endogenous Retroviruses in the Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Welkin E

    2015-11-01

    Endogenous retroviruses comprise millions of discrete genetic loci distributed within the genomes of extant vertebrates. These sequences, which are clearly related to exogenous retroviruses, represent retroviral infections of the deep past, and their abundance suggests that retroviruses were a near-constant presence throughout the evolutionary history of modern vertebrates. Endogenous retroviruses contribute in myriad ways to the evolution of host genomes, as mutagens and as sources of genetic novelty (both coding and regulatory) to be acted upon by the twin engines of random genetic drift and natural selection. Importantly, the richness and complexity of endogenous retrovirus data can be used to understand how viruses spread and adapt on evolutionary timescales by combining population genetics and evolutionary theory with a detailed understanding of retrovirus biology (gleaned from the study of extant retroviruses). In addition to revealing the impact of viruses on organismal evolution, such studies can help us better understand, by looking back in time, how life-history traits, as well as ecological and geological events, influence the movement of viruses within and between populations. PMID:26958910

  10. Endogenous growth of persistently active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stevenson, David

    1993-12-01

    LAVA lakes and active strombolian vents have persisted at some volcanoes for periods exceeding the historic record. They liberate prodigious amounts of volatiles and thermal energy but erupt little lava, a paradox that raises questions about how volcanoes grow. Although long-lasting surface manifestations can be sustained by convective exchange of magma with deeper reservoirs, residence times of magmas beneath several basaltic volcanoes are & sim10-100 years1,2, indicating that where surface activity continues for more than 100-1,000 years, the reservoirs are replenished by new magma. Endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) through dyke intrusion and cumulate formation is a well-understood consequence of the steady supply of mantle-derived magma3,4. As we show here, inferred heat losses from the Halemaumau lava lake indicate a period of dominantly endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano during the nineteenth century. Moreover, heat losses and degassing rates for several other volcanoes, including Stromboli, also indicate cryptic influxes of magma that far exceed visible effluxes of lavas. We propose that persistent activity at Stromboli, and at other volcanoes in different tectonic settings, is evidence of endogenous growth, involving processes similar to those at Kilauea.

  11. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  12. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  13. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  14. Unique spectrum of activity of prosimian TRIM5alpha against exogenous and endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Nadia; Yap, Melvyn; Snoeck, Joke; Zoete, Vincent; Muñoz, Miguel; Radespiel, Ute; Zimmermann, Elke; Michielin, Olivier; Stoye, Jonathan P; Ciuffi, Angela; Telenti, Amalio

    2011-05-01

    Lentiviruses, the genus of retrovirus that includes HIV-1, rarely endogenize. Some lemurs uniquely possess an endogenous lentivirus called PSIV ("prosimian immunodeficiency virus"). Thus, lemurs provide the opportunity to study the activity of host defense factors, such as TRIM5α, in the setting of germ line invasion. We characterized the activities of TRIM5α proteins from two distant lemurs against exogenous retroviruses and a chimeric PSIV. TRIM5α from gray mouse lemur, which carries PSIV in its genome, exhibited the narrowest restriction activity. One allelic variant of gray mouse lemur TRIM5α restricted only N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV), while a second variant restricted N-MLV and, uniquely, B-tropic MLV (B-MLV); both variants poorly blocked PSIV. In contrast, TRIM5α from ring-tailed lemur, which does not contain PSIV in its genome, revealed one of the broadest antiviral activities reported to date against lentiviruses, including PSIV. Investigation into the antiviral specificity of ring-tailed lemur TRIM5α demonstrated a major contribution of a 32-amino-acid expansion in variable region 2 (v2) of the B30.2/SPRY domain to the breadth of restriction. Data on lemur TRIM5α and the prediction of ancestral simian sequences hint at an evolutionary scenario where antiretroviral specificity is prominently defined by the lineage-specific expansion of the variable loops of B30.2/SPRY. PMID:21345948

  15. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  16. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  17. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  18. Differential zinc transport into testis and brain of cadmium-sensitive and -resistant murine strains.

    PubMed

    King, L M; Banks, W A; George, W J

    2000-01-01

    Recently, we showed that murine strain differences to the testicular toxicity of cadmium (Cd) are the result of variable transport of Cd across the blood-testis barrier. Because Cd is a nonessential trace element, it must be using the transporter for an endogenous substance. The objectives for this study were to determine the natural ligand for the transport system used by Cd to enter testis and brain, and to determine whether the transport of that natural ligand also differs among Cd-sensitive and -resistant murine strains. Because zinc (Zn) and Cd are cations of similar size and charge, and because Cd has been shown to inhibit Zn uptake in a variety of systems, we hypothesized that Cd was using Zn transporters to enter tissues. In this study we characterized Zn transport into the testis and brain of Cd-sensitive and -resistant murine strains. We found that the transport of 65Zn into testis and brain of Cd-resistant A/J mice was significantly reduced compared with that in Cd-sensitive 129/J mice. In 129/J mice, unlabeled CdCl2 significantly reduced 65Zn transport by 56% in testes and by 47% in brain. Pretreatment with Zn had no significant effect on 109Cd transport rates into testes or brain of 129/J or A/J mice, but did reduce the percentage of the injected 109Cd dose in testes of 129/J mice by 44% within 60 minutes. From these results we can conclude that Cd is using transport systems that normally function to regulate Zn levels in testes and brain. Murine strain resistance to the testicular effects of Cd is associated with a concomitant attenuation of the Zn transport system in testis.

  19. Endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity increases in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Laux, Alexis; Berthet, Amandine; Porras, Gregory; Canron, Marie-Hélène; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Li, Qin; Qin, Chuan; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Giros, Bruno; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Vital, Anne; Goumon, Yannick; Bezard, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Morphine is endogenously synthesized in the central nervous system and endogenous dopamine is thought to be necessary for endogenous morphine formation. As Parkinson's disease results from the loss of dopamine and is associated with central pain, we considered how endogenous morphine is regulated in the untreated and l-DOPA-treated parkinsonian brain. However, as the cellular origin and overall distribution of endogenous morphine remains obscure in the pathological adult brain, we first characterized the distribution of endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactive cells in the rat striatum. We then studied changes in the endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity of medium spiny neurons in normal, Parkinson's disease-like and l-DOPA-treated Parkinson's disease-like conditions in experimental (rat and monkey) and human Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an unexpected dramatic upregulation of neuronal endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity and levels in experimental and human Parkinson's disease, only partially normalized by l-DOPA treatment. Our data suggest that endogenous morphine formation is more complex than originally proposed and that the parkinsonian brain experiences a dramatic upregulation of endogenous morphine immunoreactivity. The functional consequences of such endogenous morphine upregulation are as yet unknown, but based upon the current knowledge of morphine signalling, we hypothesize that it is involved in fatigue, depression and pain symptoms experienced by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  20. Endogenous formation of morphine in human cells.

    PubMed

    Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Jürgen; Brandsch, Matthias; Dräger, Birgit; Zenk, Meinhart H

    2004-09-28

    Morphine is a plant (opium poppy)-derived alkaloid and one of the strongest known analgesic compounds. Studies from several laboratories have suggested that animal and human tissue or fluids contain trace amounts of morphine. Its origin in mammals has been believed to be of dietary origin. Here, we address the question of whether morphine is of endogenous origin or derived from exogenous sources. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids present in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and human pancreas carcinoma cells (DAN-G) were identified by GC/tandem MS (MS/MS) as norlaudanosoline (DAN-G), reticuline (DAN-G and SH-SY5Y), and morphine (10 nM, SH-SY5Y). The stereochemistry of reticuline was determined to be 1-(S). Growth of the SH-SY5Y cell line in the presence of (18)O(2) led to the [(18)O]-labeled morphine that had the molecular weight 4 mass units higher than if grown in (16)O(2), indicating the presence of two atoms of (18)O per molecule of morphine. Growth of DAN-G cells in an (18)O(2) atmosphere yielded norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline, both labeled at only two of the four oxygen atoms. This result clearly demonstrates that all three alkaloids are of biosynthetic origin and suggests that norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline are endogenous precursors of morphine. Feeding of [ring-(13)C(6)]-tyramine, [1-(13)C, N-(13)CH(3)]-(S)-reticuline and [N-CD(3)]-thebaine to the neuroblastoma cells led each to the position-specific labeling of morphine, as established by GC/MS/MS. Without doubt, human cells can produce the alkaloid morphine. The studies presented here serve as a platform for the exploration of the function of "endogenous morphine" in the neurosciences and immunosciences.

  1. Pert analysis of endogenous retroviruses induced from K-BALB mouse cells treated with 5-iododeoxyuridine: a potential strategy for detection of inducible retroviruses from vaccine cell substrates.

    PubMed

    Khan, A S; Sears, J F

    2001-01-01

    The activation of an endogenous, infectious retrovirus in a cell substrate that is used for the production of biologics is an important safety concern, especially in the case of live, viral vaccines, where there are minimal purification and inactivation steps in order to preserve high vaccine potency. Extensive analysis has been done to evaluate various chemical agents for the induction of endogenous retroviruses in murine and avian cells; however, similar studies have not been done with cells of other species, especially human and non-human primates, that are used in vaccine production. To develop a strategy for optimal induction and sensitive detection of endogenous, infectious retroviruses in currently used or potential vaccine cell substrates, we have initially investigated the use of a state-of-the-art, highly-sensitive, product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay for evaluating the kinetics of retrovirus induction and replication in 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdU)-treated K-BALB mouse cells, where endogenous retrovirus activation has previously been described. In general, the overall kinetics of virus production were similar to those of previous studies in that two peaks of RT activity were seen on long-term culture of IdU-treated K-BALB cells; however, retrovirus activation was detected earlier under our induction conditions and with greater sensitivity using the PERT assay, where 1-10 virions were detected in 1 microl equivalent of the test sample, without concentration. Furthermore, the PERT activity corresponded to the presence of infectious, murine leukaemia viruses (MuLVs) induced from K-BALB cells. Based upon these results, a strategy is proposed using the PERT assay for detection of inducible, endogenous retroviruses in vaccine cell substrates.

  2. Endogenous Synthesis of Coenzyme Q in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2007-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) functions in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as a lipophilic antioxidant. There is increasing interest in the use of Q as a nutritional supplement. Although the physiological significance of Q is extensively investigated in eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to human, the eukaryotic Q biosynthesis pathway is best characterized in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At least ten genes (COQ1-COQ10) have been shown to be required for Q biosynthesis and function in respiration. This review highlights recent knowledge about the endogenous synthesis of Q in eukaryotes, with emphasis on S. cerevisiae as a model system. PMID:17482885

  3. Human endogenous retroviruses: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robin A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of proviral DNA into host chromosomal DNA as an obligatory step in the replication cycle of retroviruses is a natural event of genetic recombination between virus and host. When integration occurs in cells of the germ line, it results in mendelian inheritance of viral sequences that we call endogenous retroviruses (ERV) and HERV for humans. HERVs and host often establish a symbiotic relationship, especially in the placenta and in pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but HERVs occasionally have deleterious consequences for the host. This special issue of APMIS features the fascinating relationships between HERV and humans in health and disease. PMID:26818257

  4. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  5. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  6. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  7. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, W.Y.; Klinken, S.P. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD ); Hartley, J.W.; Morse, H.C. III ); Ruscetti, S.K. )

    1989-02-01

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages.

  8. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  9. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  10. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27492052

  11. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  13. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs.

    PubMed

    Aimone, Jason A; Iannaccone, Laurence R; Makowsky, Michael D; Rubin, Jared

    2013-10-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game-one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  14. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  15. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue. PMID:27292833

  16. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  17. Parental representations of neurotic and endogenous depressives.

    PubMed

    Parker, G; Kiloh, L; Hayward, L

    1987-01-01

    Low parental care and parental overprotection have been incriminated as risk factors to depression in adult life. The relevance of these parental characteristics to broad depressive 'types' with their varying imputed aetiologies was assessed by having 26 patients with endogenous depression (ED) and 40 with neurotic depression (ND) complete the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) self-report measure. In comparison to their controls, the EDs did not differ on the parental care and overprotection scales. The NDs, by contrast, were more likely than their controls to report their parents as uncaring and overprotective. A PBI care scale score of less than 10 was particularly discriminating, being reported by 3.8% of the EDs and 37.5% of the NDs. While findings support the binary view of depression in terms of broad imputed aetiological factors, several response biases which might influence the findings are considered. PMID:2959703

  18. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  19. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakova, Elena V.; Haller, Steven T.; Kennedy, David J.; Isachkina, Alina N.; Budny, George V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Piecha, Grzegorz; Nikitina, Elena R.; Malhotra, Deepak; Fedorova, Olga V.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Previous reports demonstrated that digitalis-like cardiotonic steroids (CTS) contribute to the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. The goal of the present study was to define the nature of CTS in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in partially nephrectomized (PNx) rats. Methods. In patients with CKD and in healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of marinobufagenin (MBG) and endogenous ouabain (EO) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase activity in the absence and in the presence of 3E9 anti-MBG monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Digibind. Levels of MBG and EO were also determined in sham-operated Sprague–Dawley rats and in rats following 4 weeks of PNx. Results. In 25 patients with CKD plasma, MBG but not EO was increased (0.86 ± 0.07 versus 0.28 ± 0.02 nmol/L, P < 0.01) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase was inhibited (1.24 ± 0.10 versus 2.80 ± 0.09 μmol Pi/mL/h, P < 0.01) as compared to that in 19 healthy subjects. Ex vivo, 3E9 mAb restored Na/K-ATPase in erythrocytes from patients with CKD but did not affect Na/K-ATPase from control subjects. Following chromatographic fractionation of uremic versus normal plasma, a competitive immunoassay based on anti-MBG mAb detected a 3-fold increase in the level of endogenous material having retention time similar to that seen with MBG. A similar pattern of CTS changes was observed in uremic rats. As compared to sham-operated animals, PNx rats exhibited 3-fold elevated levels of MBG but not that of EO. Conclusions. In chronic renal failure, elevated levels of a bufadienolide CTS, MBG, contribute to Na/K-ATPase inhibition and may represent a potential target for therapy. PMID:21292813

  20. Immune evasion by murine melanoma mediated through CC chemokine receptor-10.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Cardones, Adela R; Finkelstein, Steven E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Klaunberg, Brenda A; Nestle, Frank O; Castillo, S Sianna; Dennis, Phillip A; Hwang, Sam T

    2003-11-01

    Human melanoma cells frequently express CC chemokine receptor (CCR)10, a receptor whose ligand (CCL27) is constitutively produced by keratinocytes. Compared with B16 murine melanoma, cells rendered more immunogenic via overexpression of luciferase, B16 cells that overexpressed both luciferase and CCR10 resisted host immune responses and readily formed tumors. In vitro, exposure of tumor cells to CCL27 led to rapid activation of Akt, resistance to cell death induced by melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent protection from apoptosis induced by Fas cross-linking. In vivo, cutaneous injection of neutralizing antibodies to endogenous CCL27 blocked growth of CCR10-expressing melanoma cells. We propose that CCR10 engagement by locally produced CCL27 allows melanoma cells to escape host immune antitumor killing mechanisms (possibly through activation of PI3K/Akt), thereby providing a means for tumor progression. PMID:14581607

  1. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  2. Strategies for endogenous spinal cord repair: HPMA hydrogel to recruit migrating endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Oregel, Karlos; Wiggins, Laurent; Valera, Remelyn; Bosnoyan, Kathrin; Agbo, Chioma; Awosika, Oluwole; Zhao, Paul M; de Vellis, Jean; Woerly, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Injury to the spinal cord disrupts ascending and descending axonal pathways and causes tissue damage with a subsequent limited cellular regeneration. Successful treatment would encompass the restoration of the cytoarchitecture, homeostasis and function all in dear need. Transplantation-based treatments using exogenous cells are the most favoured approach. Yet, with the advent of the stem cell concept and continuous progress in the field it became clear that the endogenous potential for repair is greater than previously thought. As an alternative to neural grafting, we and other researchers have aimed at understanding what are the elements needed for a successful repair with self progenitors that would give rise to the cell types needed to restore function of the central nervous system. Some studies involve both scaffolds and cell grafts. Here we describe studies on spinal cord repair using what we call "endogenous tissue engineering for regenerative medicine". The approach involves a hydrogel that mimics the natural milieu where endogenous pre-existing and newly formed cells populate the gel progressively allowing for the integration of CNS self populations leading to a successful recovery of function. Highlight aspects learned from this type of studies are that: Endogenous reconstruction of the injured spinal cord is possible by using the adequate support. The contribution of nestin-expressing progenitors to spinal cord regeneration is continuous and substantial both, in the reconstructed segment as well as, along the distal and caudal segments of the reconstructed spinal cord. Most of these cells appear to have been in a quiescent state until the injury occurred and only a small fraction of these neural progenitors was produced via cell proliferation. The hydrogel combined with exercise was necessary and sufficient to restore locomotor function in cats that underwent spinal transaction followed by reconstructive surgery. This recovery of function was first seen

  3. INTESTINAL EXCRETION OF ENDOGENOUS ZINC IN GUATEMALAN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The intestine is the major route of excretion of endogenous zinc and has a key role in maintaining zinc homeostasis. Phytate has been reported to increase these losses. Objective: To determine the rate of excretion of endogenous zinc in school-aged children in a poor rural community for ...

  4. Do Endogenous and Exogenous Action Control Compete for Perception?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Heinemann, Alexander; Kiesel, Andrea; Thomaschke, Roland; Janczyk, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Human actions are guided either by endogenous action plans or by external stimuli in the environment. These two types of action control seem to be mediated by neurophysiologically and functionally distinct systems that interfere if an endogenously planned action suddenly has to be performed in response to an exogenous stimulus. In this case, the…

  5. On the Endogeneity of the Mean-Variance Efficient Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, R. A.; O'Connell, Paul G. J.

    2002-01-01

    Explains that the endogeneity of the efficient frontier in the mean-variance model of portfolio selection is commonly obscured in portfolio selection literature and in widely used textbooks. Demonstrates endogeneity and discusses the impact of parameter changes on the mean-variance efficient frontier and on the beta coefficients of individual…

  6. Social Interactions with Endogenous Associations. NBER Working Paper No. 13038

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a model of social interactions with endogenous association. People are assumed to invest in relationships to maximize their utility. Even in a linear-in-means model, when associations are endogenous, the effect of macro-group composition on behavior is non-linear and varies across individuals. We also show that larger groups…

  7. Retrovirus Packaging Cells Expressing the Mus dunni Endogenous Virus Envelope Facilitate Transduction of CHO and Primary Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgamot, Greg; Rasko, John E. J.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1998-01-01

    Mus dunni endogenous virus (MDEV) infects a wide variety of cell types from many different species. To take advantage of this broad host range, we have constructed packaging cells (PD223) that produce virions bearing the MDEV envelope. PD223 cells are able to package Moloney murine leukemia virus-based vectors at a titer of 4 × 105 infectious units per ml in the absence of contaminating replication-competent retrovirus. Vectors packaged by PD223 cells are able to transduce CHO cells, which are resistant to transduction by many retroviruses, at ≥25-fold higher efficiency than vectors having other pseudotypes. A vector packaged by PD223 was found to be among the most efficient for transducing primary baboon and human CD34+ cells. PMID:9811768

  8. Are endogenous cardenolides controlled by atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwarjeet S; Gao, Yonglin; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous cardenolides are digoxin-like substances and ouabain-like substances that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and mood disorders in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Regulatory signals for endogenous cardenolides are still unknown. These endogenous compounds are believed to be produced by the adrenal gland in the periphery and the hypothalamus in the central nervous system, and constitute part of an hormonal axis that may regulate the catalytic activity of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. A review of literature suggests that there is great overlap in physiological environments that are associated with either elevations or reductions in the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endogenous cardenolides. This suggests that these two factors may share a common regulatory signal or perhaps that ANP may be involved in the regulation of endogenous cardenolides. PMID:27241248

  9. Endogenous ethanol--its metabolic, behavioral and biomedical significance.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky YuM

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is constantly formed endogenously from acetaldehyde, and level of the former can be measured in both human beings and animals. Acetaldehyde can be generated in situ from the metabolism of pyruvate, threonine, deoxyribose-5-phosphate, phosphoethanolamine, alanine and presumably from other substrates. The levels of blood and tissue endogenous ethanol change as a function of various physiologic and experimental conditions such as starvation, aging, stress, cooling, adrenalectomy, etc. and are regulated by many exogenous compounds such as antimetabolites, derivatives of amino acids, lithium salts, disulfiram, cyanamide, etc. Under free choice alcohol selection situations, the levels of endogenous ethanol in rat blood and alcohol preference by the animals are negatively correlated. Similar negative correlations have been found between the levels of blood endogenous ethanol and the frequency of delirium in alcoholic patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal. Endogenous ethanol and acetaldehyde can therefore be regarded as compounds which fulfil substrate, regulatory and modulator functions.

  10. Retinal photodamage by endogenous and xenobiotic agents.

    PubMed

    Wielgus, Albert R; Roberts, Joan E

    2012-01-01

    The human eye is constantly exposed to sunlight and artificial lighting. Light transmission through the eye is fundamental to its unique biological functions of directing vision and circadian rhythm and therefore light absorbed by the eye must be benign. However, exposure to the very intense ambient radiation can pose a hazard particularly if the recipient is over 40 years of age. There are age-related changes in the endogenous (natural) chromophores (lipofuscin, A2E and all-trans-retinal derivatives) in the human retina that makes it more susceptible to visible light damage. Intense visible light sources that do not filter short blue visible light (400-440 nm) used for phototherapy of circadian imbalance (i.e. seasonal affective disorder) increase the risk for age-related light damage to the retina. Moreover, many drugs, dietary supplements, nanoparticles and diagnostic dyes (xenobiotics) absorb ocular light and have the potential to induce photodamage to the retina, leading to transient or permanent blinding disorders. This article will review the underlying reasons why visible light in general and short blue visible light in particular dramatically raises the risk of photodamage to the human retina.

  11. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C.; Meik, J. M.; Dashevsky, D.; Card, D. C.; Castoe, T. A.; Schaack, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. PMID:25080342

  12. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C; Meik, J M; Dashevsky, D; Card, D C; Castoe, T A; Schaack, S

    2014-09-22

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. PMID:25080342

  13. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  14. Endogenous neural noise and stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, Lauren; Kitajo, Keiichi; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2007-06-01

    We discuss the relationship of endogenous neural noise (ENN) to performance of behavioral tasks and to information processing in the brain. Spontaneous neural activity is closely linked to development and perception, and is correlated with behavior. Some of this activity is probably related to internal processing of task- and goal-relevant information, but some is simply noise. Two previous studies have reported correlations between performance on behavioral tasks and measures of neural noise and have characterized these relationships as intrinsic stochastic resonance (SR). We argue that neither of these studies demonstrated intrinsic SR, and discuss several alternative ways of measuring ENN in humans from EEG or MEG records. Using one of these, random-phase power in the 30-50 Hz range 1 sec before the onset of the signal, we demonstrate a kind of intrinsic SR that optimizes detection of weak visual signals. Minimum response time was obtained when this EEG measure of ENN was in a middle decile. No other measure of ENN was related either to response time or to an unbiased measure of detection accuracy (e.g., d'). A discussion of the implications of these findings for the study of intrinsic SR concludes the paper.

  15. Spontaneous endogenous hypermelatoninemia: a new disease?

    PubMed

    Duman, Ozgur; Durmaz, Erdem; Akcurin, Sema; Serteser, Mustafa; Haspolat, Senay

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, a major photoperiod-dependent hormone, regulates circadian rhythms and biological rhythms and acts as a prominent sleep promoter. Symptoms related to hypermelatoninemia have been reported in individuals supplemented with melatonin. However, spontaneous endogenous hypermelatoninemia has not been reported previously. A 6-year-old girl previously diagnosed with Shapiro's syndrome was admitted to our hospital on several occasions during a 1-year period with complaints of altered consciousness, syncope, hypothermia and episodes of sweating. The episodes occurred daily and during sleep and lasted for 1-6 h. During these episodes, she sweated profusely and felt faint and her skin was pale and cool. Other complaints included recurrent abdominal pain, urge incontinence and myopia. She was shown to have hypermelatoninemia (>1,000 pg/ml, normal range 0-150 pg/ml) during these episodes. The duration of her attacks decreased with phototherapy and she was successfully treated with propranolol. To our knowledge, this is the first case of hypermelatoninemia without any detectable organic pathology. We did not determine the exact mechanism of hypermelatoninemia in this patient; however, it might have been related to irregular control of pinealocytes by the suprachiasmatic nucleus or related pathways. Hypermelatoninemia should be considered in patients with spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis, and also in patients with Shapiro's syndrome. PMID:21041995

  16. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  17. Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, S J; Chung, Y M; Liu, J H

    1998-06-01

    Reported, in this article, are the cases of two young women who developed endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion. Both women experienced transient fever, chills, and abdominal pain after the abortion and were given antibiotics. The diagnosis of endophthalmitis was established on the basis of typical fundus appearance, positive vaginal culture, and (in one case) positive vitreous culture. In the first woman, who received vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B injection, the affected eye had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/200. In the second woman, who was given systemic corticosteroid treatment before the correct diagnosis was reached, recurrent retinal detachment developed and the best corrected visual acuity was counting fingers. It appears that Candida organisms harbored in the genital tract are directly inoculated into the venous system during induced abortion. Once in the blood, if sufficient fungal load is present, Candida albicans tends to localize in the choroid and to spread toward the retina and vitreous cavity. The immunosuppressive effect of corticosteroids further increases the risk of endophthalmitis. PMID:9645729

  18. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

    PubMed

    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  19. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  20. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  1. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  2. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  3. Murine models of human wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  4. Glucocorticoid-mediated immunomodulation: hydrocortisone enhances immunosuppressive endogenous retroviral protein (p15E) expression in mouse immune cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fiegl, M; Strasser-Wozak, E; Geley, S; Gsur, A; Drach, J; Kofler, R

    1995-01-01

    To define glucocorticoid (GC)-regulated genes contributing to the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of GC, previous work from our laboratory revealed up-regulation of transcripts from endogenous type B mouse mammary tumour virus (Mtv) and type C murine leukaemia virus (Emv) loci by high dose GC treatment of P388D1 macrophage-like cells. This study demonstrates enhancement of expression from Mtv and Emv loci in P388D1 cells by more physiological hydrocortisone concentrations (1 microM), and shows direct transcriptional mode of regulation by blocking GC-mediated signal transduction at different levels. Furthermore, we found up-regulation of Emv mRNA steady-state levels in murine lymphoid lineage cells (T-like EL4 and BW5147 cells; B-like X63 cells) upon GC treatment. The Emv transcripts shown by us to be GC-up-regulated encode for the transmembrane envelope protein TM/p15E which is highly conserved in several retroviruses. TM/p15E and the p15E-like products found in humans exert immunosuppressive effects in different test systems. Thus, our findings raise the possibility that immunomodulation by GC might be mediated in part by enhanced expression of p15E(-like) products. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7648710

  5. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  6. Syncytin-A and syncytin-B, two fusogenic placenta-specific murine envelope genes of retroviral origin conserved in Muridae

    PubMed Central

    Dupressoir, Anne; Marceau, Geoffroy; Vernochet, Cécile; Bénit, Laurence; Kanellopoulos, Colette; Sapin, Vincent; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we and others have identified two human endogenous retroviruses that entered the primate lineage 25–40 million years ago and that encode highly fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins (syncytin-1 and -2), possibly involved in the formation of the placenta syncytiotrophoblast layer generated by trophoblast cell fusion at the materno–fetal interface. A systematic in silico search throughout mouse genome databases presently identifies two fully coding envelope genes, present as unique copies and unrelated to any known murine endogenous retrovirus, that we named syncytin-A and -B. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrates placenta-specific expression for both genes, with increasing transcript levels in this organ from 9.5 to 14.5 days postcoitum. In situ hybridization of placenta cryosections further localizes these transcripts in the syncytiotrophoblast-containing labyrinthine zona. Consistently, we show that both genes can trigger cell–cell fusion in ex vivo transfection assays, with distinct cell type specificities suggesting different receptor usage. Genes orthologous to syncytin-A and -B and disclosing a striking conservation of their coding status are found in all Muridae tested (mouse, rat, gerbil, vole, and hamster), dating their entry into the rodent lineage ≈20 million years ago. Together, these data strongly argue for a critical role of syncytin-A and -B in murine syncytiotrophoblast formation, thus unraveling a rather unique situation where two pairs of endogenous retroviruses, independently acquired by the primate and rodent lineages, would have been positively selected for a convergent physiological role. PMID:15644441

  7. Minority Aging and Endogenous Pain Facilitatory Processes

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W.; Goodin, Burel R.; McNew, Myriah; Gossett, Ethan W.; Bradley, Laurence A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study was to examine the relationships among age, ethnicity, and endogenous pain facilitation using temporal summation (TS) responses to mechanical and heat stimuli. Design The present study assessed hyperalgesia and pain facilitation to thermal and mechanical stimuli at the knee and distal sites in 98 pain-free men and women. Participants were drawn from two ethnic (African-Americans, AA; and non-Hispanic whites, NHW) and age groups (19-35 and 45-85). Results Significant main effects of ethnicity were demonstrated for both mechanical and heat modalities (all p’s≤0.05), suggesting that AA participants, relative to NHW counterparts, demonstrated enhanced hyperalgesia. Age differences (older > younger) in hyperalgesia were found in mechanical pain ratings only. Results indicated that mechanical pain ratings significantly increased from first to maximal pain as a function of both age group and ethnicity (all p’s≤0.05), and a significant ethnicity by age interaction for TS of mechanical pain was found at the forearm (p<0.05) and trended towards significance at the knee (p=0.071). Post-hoc tests suggested that results were primarily driven by the older AA participants, who demonstrated the greatest mechanical TS. Additionally, evidence of differences in heat TS due to both ethnicity alone (all p’s≤0.05) and minority aging was also found. Conclusions This study provides evidence suggesting that older AAs demonstrate enhanced pain facilitatory processes, which is important because this group may be at increased risk for development of chronic pain. These results underscore the necessity of testing pain modulatory mechanisms when addressing questions related to pain perception and minority aging. PMID:26814250

  8. Endogenous opioids: The downside of opposing stress

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Rita J.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Our dynamic environment regularly exposes us to potentially life-threatening challenges or stressors. To answer these challenges and maintain homeostasis, the stress response, an innate coordinated engagement of central and peripheral neural systems is initiated. Although essential for survival, the inappropriate initiation of the stress response or its continuation after the stressor is terminated has pathological consequences that have been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and medical diseases. Substantial individual variability exists in the pathological consequences of stressors. A theme of this Special Issue is that elucidating the basis of individual differences in resilience or its flipside, vulnerability, will greatly advance our ability to prevent and treat stress-related diseases. This can be approached by studying individual differences in “pro-stress” mediators such as corticosteroids or the hypothalamic orchestrator of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor. More recently, the recognition of endogenous neuromodulators with “anti-stress” activity that have opposing actions or that restrain stress-response systems suggests additional bases for individual differences in stress pathology. These “anti-stress” neuromodulators offer alternative strategies for manipulating the stress response and its pathological consequences. This review uses the major brain norepinephrine system as a model stress-response system to demonstrate how co-regulation by opposing pro-stress (corticotropin-releasing factor) and anti-stress (enkephalin) neuromodulators must be fine-tuned to produce an adaptive response to stress. The clinical consequences of tipping this fine-tuned balance in the direction of either the pro- or anti-stress systems are emphasized. Finally, that each system provides multiple points at which individual differences could confer stress vulnerability or resilience is discussed. PMID:25506603

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions. PMID:24586439

  10. Functional epialleles at an endogenous human centromere.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Kristin A; Sullivan, Lori L; Matheny, Justyne E; Strome, Erin D; Merrett, Stephanie L; Ferris, Alyssa; Sullivan, Beth A

    2012-08-21

    Human centromeres are defined by megabases of homogenous alpha-satellite DNA arrays that are packaged into specialized chromatin marked by the centromeric histone variant, centromeric protein A (CENP-A). Although most human chromosomes have a single higher-order repeat (HOR) array of alpha satellites, several chromosomes have more than one HOR array. Homo sapiens chromosome 17 (HSA17) has two juxtaposed HOR arrays, D17Z1 and D17Z1-B. Only D17Z1 has been linked to CENP-A chromatin assembly. Here, we use human artificial chromosome assembly assays to show that both D17Z1 and D17Z1-B can support de novo centromere assembly independently. We extend these in vitro studies and demonstrate, using immunostaining and chromatin analyses, that in human cells the centromere can be assembled at D17Z1 or D17Z1-B. Intriguingly, some humans are functional heterozygotes, meaning that CENP-A is located at a different HOR array on the two HSA17 homologs. The site of CENP-A assembly on HSA17 is stable and is transmitted through meiosis, as evidenced by inheritance of CENP-A location through multigenerational families. Differences in histone modifications are not linked clearly with active and inactive D17Z1 and D17Z1-B arrays; however, we detect a correlation between the presence of variant repeat units of D17Z1 and CENP-A assembly at the opposite array, D17Z1-B. Our studies reveal the presence of centromeric epialleles on an endogenous human chromosome and suggest genomic complexities underlying the mechanisms that determine centromere identity in humans.

  11. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  12. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  13. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  14. Bilirubin acts as an endogenous regulator of inflammation by disrupting adhesion molecule-mediated leukocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Megan E.; Zucker, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that bilirubin, which is generated during the physiological breakdown of heme, exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects. Previous work by our group suggests that bilirubin is able to suppress inflammatory responses by preventing the migration of leukocytes into target tissues through disruption of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent cell signaling. As VCAM-1 is an important mediator of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. As anticipated, bilirubin-treated animals manifested significantly less colonic injury and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into colon tissues. We further observed that bilirubin administration was associated with a reduced number of eosinophils and monocytes in the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia, regardless of whether mice received DSS. These findings suggest that bilirubin impairs the normal migration of eosinophils into intestinal tissues, as supported by in vitro experiments showing that bilirubin blocks the VCAM-1-dependent movement of Jurkat cells across human endothelial cell monolayers. Taken together, our findings support that bilirubin ameliorates DSS-induced colitis and disrupts the physiological trafficking of leukocytes to the intestine by preventing transmigration across the vascular endothelium, potentially through the inhibition VCAM-1-mediated signaling. Our findings raise the possibility that bilirubin functions as an endogenous regulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:26925435

  15. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  16. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  17. Endogenous allergen upregulation: transgenic vs. traditionally bred crops.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Ladics, Gregory S

    2011-10-01

    The safety assessment for transgenic food crops currently includes an evaluation of the endogenous allergy potential (via serum IgE screening) when the non-transgenic counterpart is a commonly allergenic food. The value of this analysis in the safety assessment of transgenic crops, especially with reference to recent requests to quantify individual allergen concentrations in raw commodities, is examined. We conclude that the likelihood of upregulating an endogenous allergen due to transgenesis is no greater than from traditional breeding which has a history of safety and is largely unregulated. The potential consequences of upregulating an endogenous allergen are also unclear.

  18. Murine amniotic fluid stem cells contribute mesenchymal but not epithelial components to reconstituted mammary ducts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amniotic fluid harbors cells indicative of all three germ layers, and pluripotent fetal amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSs) are considered potentially valuable for applications in cellular therapy and tissue engineering. We investigated whether it is possible to direct the cell fate of AFSs in vivo by transplantation experiments into a particular microenvironment, the mammary fat pad. This microenvironment provides the prerequisites to study stem cell function and the communication between mesenchymal and epithelial cells. On clearance of the endogenous epithelium, the ductal tree can be reconstituted by the transfer of exogenously provided mammary stem cells. Analogously, exogenously provided stem cells from other tissues can be investigated for their potential to contribute to mammary gland regeneration. Methods We derived pluripotent murine AFSs, measured the expression of stem cell markers, and confirmed their in vitro differentiation potential. AFSs were transplanted into cleared and non cleared fat pads of immunocompromised mice to evaluate their ability to assume particular cell fates under the instructive conditions of the fat-pad microenvironment and the hormonal stimulation during pregnancy. Results Transplantation of AFSs into cleared fat pads alone or in the presence of exogenous mammary epithelial cells caused their differentiation into stroma and adipocytes and replaced endogenous mesenchymal components surrounding the ducts in co-transplantation experiments. Similarly, transplantation of AFSs into fat pads that had not been previously cleared led to AFS-derived stromal cells surrounding the elongating endogenous ducts. AFSs expressed the marker protein α-SMA, but did not integrate into the myoepithelial cell layer of the ducts in virgin mice. With pregnancy, a small number of AFS-derived cells were present in acinar structures. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the microenvironmental cues of the mammary fat pad cause AFSs to

  19. Endogenous Protease Activation of ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Johnson, John P.; Bridges, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous serine proteases have been reported to control the reabsorption of Na+ by kidney- and lung-derived epithelial cells via stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In this study we investigated the effects of aprotinin on ENaC single channel properties using transepithelial fluctuation analysis in the amphibian kidney epithelium, A6. Aprotinin caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition (84 ± 10.5%) in the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport (INa) with a time constant of 18 min and half maximal inhibition constant of 1 μM. Analysis of amiloride analogue blocker–induced fluctuations in INa showed linear rate–concentration plots with identical blocker on and off rates in control and aprotinin-inhibited conditions. Verification of open-block kinetics allowed for the use of a pulse protocol method (Helman, S.I., X. Liu, K. Baldwin, B.L. Blazer-Yost, and W.J. Els. 1998. Am. J. Physiol. 274:C947–C957) to study the same cells under different conditions as well as the reversibility of the aprotinin effect on single channel properties. Aprotinin caused reversible changes in all three single channel properties but only the change in the number of open channels was consistent with the inhibition of INa. A 50% decrease in INa was accompanied by 50% increases in the single channel current and open probability but an 80% decrease in the number of open channels. Washout of aprotinin led to a time-dependent restoration of INa as well as the single channel properties to the control, pre-aprotinin, values. We conclude that protease regulation of INa is mediated by changes in the number of open channels in the apical membrane. The increase in the single channel current caused by protease inhibition can be explained by a hyperpolarization of the apical membrane potential as active Na+ channels are retrieved. The paradoxical increase in channel open probability caused by protease inhibition will require further

  20. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  1. Ketoconazole and endogenous Cushing's syndrome. Effective but tricky to use.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare but serious disease. Ketoconazole was effective in over 50% of cases in non-comparative series in a total of 800 patients. However, ketoconazole is hepatotoxic and interacts with many other drugs. PMID:27152395

  2. Expression and function of endogenous retroviruses in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Although the expression of endogenous retroviruses in the placenta of numerous species was observed a long time ago, their physiological function during gestation was demonstrated only very recently. Expression of retroviral envelope proteins, also called syncytins, in the placenta allows generation of the multinuclear syncytiotrophoblast as an outer cellular layer of the placenta by fusion of the trophoblast cells. This fusion process is crucial for the development of the placenta and for successful pregnancy. It is still unclear whether the immunosuppressive properties of the transmembrane envelope protein of the endogenous retroviruses expressed in the placenta contribute to immunosuppression to prevent the rejection of the semiallotransplant embryo. The presence of placenta cells expressing retroviral envelope proteins surrounded by immune cells deep in the maternal tissue supports an immunosuppressive function. It is important to emphasize that during evolution different species utilized ('enslaved') different endogenous retroviruses and that two or more endogenous retroviruses are involved in placentogenesis in each species.

  3. A Detailed Analysis of the Murine TAP Transporter Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burgevin, Anne; Saveanu, Loredana; Kim, Yohan; Barilleau, Émilie; Kotturi, Maya; Sette, Alessandro; van Endert, Peter; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) supplies cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Its specificity therefore influences the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC molecules. Compared to human TAP, murine TAP's binding specificity has not been characterized as well, even though murine systems are widely used for basic studies of antigen processing and presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a detailed experimental analysis of murine TAP binding specificity by measuring the binding affinities of 323 peptides. Based on this experimental data, a computational model of murine TAP specificity was constructed. The model was compared to previously generated data on human and murine TAP specificities. In addition, the murine TAP specificities for known epitopes and random peptides were predicted and compared to assess the impact of murine TAP selectivity on epitope selection. Conclusions/Significance Comparisons to a previously constructed model of human TAP specificity confirms the well-established differences for peptide substrates with positively charged C-termini. In addition these comparisons show that several residues at the N-terminus of peptides which strongly influence binding to human TAP showed little effect on binding to murine TAP, and that the overall influence of the aminoterminal residues on peptide affinity for murine TAP is much lower than for the human transporter. Murine TAP also partly prefers different hydrophobic amino acids than human TAP in the carboxyterminal position. These species-dependent differences in specificity determined in vitro are shown to correlate with the epitope repertoire recognized in vivo. The quantitative model of binding specificity of murine TAP developed herein should be useful for interpreting epitope mapping and immunogenicity data obtained in humanized mouse models. PMID:18545702

  4. The endogenous opioid system in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillman, M A; Sandyk, R

    1986-04-01

    The various neurotransmitter systems postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome(GTS) are described with special reference to the endogenous opioid system(EOS). Malfunction of the opioid system is proposed as the underlying disturbance in this disease causing secondary dysfunction of the other systems. Furthermore, the various symptoms of the illness are examined also in terms of dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system.

  5. Method for the Purification of Endogenous Unanchored Polyubiquitin Chains.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel; Strachan, Jo; Krishna, Varun Gopala; Shaw, Barry; Tooth, David J; Searle, Mark S; Oldham, Neil J; Layfield, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Unanchored polyubiquitin chains are endogenous non-substrate linked ubiquitin polymers which have emerging roles in the control of cellular physiology. We describe an affinity purification method based on an isolated ubiquitin-binding domain, the ZnF_UBP domain of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP5, which permits the selective purification of mixtures of endogenous unanchored polyubiquitin chains that are amenable to downstream molecular analyses. Further, we present methods for detection of unanchored polyubiquitin chains in purified fractions. PMID:27613037

  6. Treatment Response in Kawasaki Disease Is Associated with Sialylation Levels of Endogenous but Not Therapeutic Intravenous Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Shohei; Shimizu, Chisato; Franco, Alessandra; Touma, Ranim; Kanegaye, John T.; Choudhury, Biswa P.; Naidu, Natasha N.; Kanda, Yutaka; Hoang, Long T.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Varki, Ajit; Burns, Jane C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is highly effective in Kawasaki disease (KD), mechanisms are not understood and 10-20% of patients are treatment-resistant, manifesting a higher rate of coronary artery aneurysms. Murine models suggest that α2-6-linked sialic acid (α2-6Sia) content of IVIG is critical for suppressing inflammation. However, pro-inflammatory states also up-regulate endogenous levels of β-galactoside:α2-6 sialyltransferase-I (ST6Gal-I), the enzyme that catalyzes addition of α2-6Sias to N-glycans. We asked whether IVIG failures correlated with levels of α2-6Sia on infused IVIG or on the patient’s own endogenous IgG. Methods We quantified levels of α2-6Sia in infused IVIG and endogenous IgG from 10 IVIG-responsive and 10 resistant KD subjects using multiple approaches. Transcript levels of ST6GAL1, in patient whole blood and B cell lines were evaluated by RT-PCR. Plasma soluble (s)ST6Gal-I levels were measured by ELISA. Results There was no consistent difference in median sialylation levels of infused IVIG between groups. However, α2-6Sia levels in endogenous IgG, ST6GAL1 transcript levels, and ST6Gal-I protein in serum from IVIG-resistant KD subjects were lower than in responsive subjects at both pre-treatment and one-year time points (p <0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our data indicate sialylation levels of therapeutic IVIG are unrelated to treatment response in KD. Rather, lower sialylation of endogenous IgG and lower blood levels of ST6GALI mRNA and ST6Gal-I enzyme predict therapy resistance. These differences were stable over time, suggesting a genetic basis. Because IVIG-resistance increases risk of coronary artery aneurysms, our findings have important implications for the identification and treatment of such individuals. PMID:24324693

  7. Remarkable diversity of endogenous viruses in a crustacean genome.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa.

  8. Remarkable diversity of endogenous viruses in a crustacean genome.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  9. Remarkable Diversity of Endogenous Viruses in a Crustacean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  10. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  11. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  12. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  13. Methylcellulose media for plaque assay of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Horikawa, Y; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1982-09-01

    When ecotropic murine leukemia virus was assayed by a methylcellulose-XC cell procedure, plaque titers showed less test-to-test variation, more uniform dose-response curves, and larger plaque sizes, as compared with results of the conventional liquid overlay-XC cell test system. This assay therefore seems to be reliable and useful for the titration of ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

  14. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  15. Expression of Fas ligand in murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Guo, M W; Xu, J P; Mori, E; Sato, E; Saito, S; Mori, T

    1997-05-01

    Corresponding to the expression of Fas in the ovarian oocytes as previously reported (Guo et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994; 203:1438-1446; Mori et al., JSIR 1995; 9:49-50), the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) in the ovarian follicle was found to be restricted in the area of granulosa cells by the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) technique coupled with Southern blot hybridization analysis showed that the highest level of FasL mRNA was demonstrated in murine ovaries and granulosa cells 1 day after the administration of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG), while the level of FasL mRNA became very weak on the day 5, respectively. The observed gradual decrease in FasL mRNA could not be attributed to a generalized degradation of cellular RNA during atresia, as evidenced by the presence of constitutive expression of elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) mRNA in murine ovaries and granulosa cells treated with PMSG. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis with a FasL-specific probe confirmed that FasL was specifically localized in the granulosa cells of most follicles and its expression was regulated by PMSG administration. FasL localized in granulosa cells might possibly play an important role in the formation of the ovarian atretic follicles, most likely depending on PMSG administration. PMID:9196798

  16. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  17. Immunosuppression by Murine Sarcoma Virus (Moloney)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. P.; Hook, W. A.; Turner, W.; Chirigos, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Infection of mice with the murine sarcoma virus (Moloney) markedly suppressed the humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigen injected 10 days after infection, when tumor size was maximal, and on day 26, when primary tumors had partially regressed. Humoral antibody response was also inhibited when antigen was injected at the time secondary tumors and metastases were evident. No significant suppression of humoral antibody was seen when mice were injected with sheep erythrocyte antigen 5 days after virus infection. Inhibition of the cellular immune response of murine sarcoma virus (Moloney)-infected mice, as measured by the increased survival time of skin grafts, was also determined. Mice that were infected 5 days prior to grafting demonstrated prolonged survival of grafts, suggesting a suppression of cellular immunity. These mice had a graft survival time 14 days greater than noninfected controls. No significant prolongation of graft survival was seen in mice grafted at the times of maximum primary tumor growth, of primary tumor regression, or when secondary tumors had appeared. PMID:16557730

  18. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.05). These results imply that oral benzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  19. The tryptophan-derived endogenous arylhydrocarbon receptor ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) is a nanomolar UVA-photosensitizer in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joshua D.; Cabello, Christopher M.; Qiao, Shuxi; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous UVA-chromophores may act as sensitizers of oxidative stress underlying cutaneous photoaging and photocarcinogenesis, but the molecular identity of non-DNA key chromophores displaying UVA-driven photodyamic activity in human skin remains largely undefined. Here we report that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), a tryptophan photoproduct and endogenous high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, acts as a nanomolar photosensitizer potentiating UVA-induced oxidative stress irrespective of AhR ligand activity. In human HaCaT and primary epidermal keratinocytes, photodynamic induction of apoptosis was elicited by the combined action of solar simulated UVA and FICZ, whereas exposure to the isolated action of UVA or FICZ did not impair viability. In a human epidermal tissue reconstruct, FICZ/UVA-cotreatment caused pronounced phototoxicity inducing keratinocyte cell death, and FICZ photodynamic activity was also substantiated in a murine skin exposure model. Array analysis revealed pronounced potentiation of cellular heat shock, ER stress, and oxidative stress response gene expression observed only upon FICZ/UVA-cotreatment. FICZ photosensitization caused intracellular oxidative stress, and comet analysis revealed introduction of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive oxidative DNA lesions suppressible by antioxidant cotreatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the endogenous AhR ligand FICZ displays nanomolar photodynamic activity representing a molecular mechanism of UVA-induced photooxidative stress potentially operative in human skin. PMID:25431849

  20. Low doses of paraquat and polyphenols prolong life span and locomotor activity in knock-down parkin Drosophila melanogaster exposed to oxidative stress stimuli: implication in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Ramirez, Leonardo; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-01-10

    Previous studies have shown that polyphenols might be potent neuroprotective agents in Drosophila melanogaster wild type Canton-S acutely or chronically treated with paraquat (PQ), a selective toxin for elimination of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons by oxidative stress (OS), as model of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study reports for the first time that knock-down (K-D) parkin Drosophila melanogaster (TH-GAL4; UAS-RNAi-parkin) chronically exposed to PQ (0.1-0.25 mM), FeSO(4) (Fe, 0.1mM), deferoxamine (DFO, 0.01 mM) alone or (0.1mM) PQ in combination with polyphenols propyl gallate (PG, 0.1mM) and epigallocathecin gallate (EGCG, 0.1, 0.5mM) showed significantly higher life span and locomotor activity than untreated K-D flies or treated with (1, 5, 20mM) PQ alone. Whilst gallic acid (GA, 0.1, 0.5mM) alone or in the presence of PQ provoked no effect on K-D flies, epicathecin (EC, 0.5mM) only showed a positive effect on prolonging K-D flies' life span. It is shown that PG (and EGCG) protected protocerebral posterolateral 1 (PPL1) DAergic neurons against PQ. Interestingly, the protective effect of low PQ concentrations, DFO and iron might be explained by a phenomenon known as "hormesis." However, pre-fed K-D flies with (0.1mM) PQ for 7 days and then exposed to (0.25 mM) for additional 8 days affect neither survival nor climbing of K-D Drosophila compared to flies treated with (0.25 mM) PQ alone. Remarkably, K-D flies treated with 0.1mM PQ (7 days) and then with (0.25 mM) PQ plus PG (8 days) behaved almost as flies treated with (0.25 mM) PQ. Taken these data suggest that antioxidant supplements that synergistically act with low pro-oxidant stimuli to prolong and increase locomotor activity become inefficient once a threshold of OS has been reached in K-D flies. Our present findings support the notion that genetically altered Drosophila melanogaster as suitable model to study genetic and environmental factors as causal and/or modulators in the development of autosomal

  1. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Koles, Kate; Yeh, Anna R.; Rodal, Avital A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins) that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway) and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex) in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues. PMID:26700726

  2. Murine erythropoietin gene: cloning, expression, and human gene homology.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, C B; Mitsock, L D

    1986-01-01

    The gene for murine erythropoietin (EPO) was isolated from a mouse genomic library with a human EPO cDNA probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis permitted the identification of the murine EPO coding sequence and the prediction of the encoded amino acid sequence based on sequence conservation between the mouse and human EPO genes. Both the coding DNA and the amino acid sequences were 80% conserved between the two species. Transformation of COS-1 cells with a mammalian cell expression vector containing the murine EPO coding region resulted in secretion of murine EPO with biological activity on both murine and human erythroid progenitor cells. The transcription start site for the murine EPO gene in kidneys was determined. This permitted tentative identification of the transcription control region. The region included 140 base pairs upstream of the cap site which was over 90% conserved between the murine and human genes. Surprisingly, the first intron and much of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences were also substantially conserved between the genes of the two species. Images PMID:3773894

  3. The Search for Endogenous Activators of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest aspect, this review is an attempt to describe the major ligand classes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A grander objective is to provide models that may help define the physiological activator or “endogenous ligand” of the AHR. We begin by presenting evidence that supports a developmental function for the AHR. This is followed by proposing mechanisms by which an endogenous ligand and consequent AHR activation might be important during normal physiology and development. With this background, we then present a survey of the known xenobiotic, endogenous, dietary and “un-conventional” activators of the AHR. When possible, this includes information about their induction potency, receptor binding affinity and potential for exposure. Because of the essential function of the AHR in embryonic development, we discuss the candidacy of each of these compounds as physiologically important activators. PMID:18076143

  4. Recognition of Endogenous Nucleic Acids by the Innate Immune System.

    PubMed

    Roers, Axel; Hiller, Björn; Hornung, Veit

    2016-04-19

    Recognition of DNA and RNA by endosomal and cytosolic sensors constitutes a central element in the detection of microbial invaders by the innate immune system. However, the capacity of these sensors to discriminate between microbial and endogenous nucleic acids is limited. Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that endogenous DNA or RNA species can engage nucleic-acid-sensing pattern-recognition receptors that can trigger or sustain detrimental pathology. Here, we review principles of how the activation of innate sensors by host nucleic acids is prevented in the steady state and discuss four important determinants of whether a nucleic-acid-driven innate response is mounted. These include structural features of the ligand being sensed, the subcellular location and quantity of pathogen-derived or endogenous nucleic acids, and the regulation of sensor-activation thresholds. Furthermore, we emphasize disease mechanisms initiated by failure to discriminate self from non-self in nucleic acid detection.

  5. Expression of baboon endogenous virus in exogenously infected baboon cells.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, G; Foote, L; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S

    1979-04-01

    Strains of low-passage, fetal diploid, baboon (Papio cynocephalus) fibroblasts were susceptible to exogenous infection with three independent isolates of baboon endogenous virus, as measured by an immunofluorescence assay specific for viral p28. Infectivity of the M7 strain of baboon endogenous virus for baboon cells of fetal skin muscle origin was equivalent to that for human and dog cells in that similar, linear, single-hit titration patterns were obtained. The assay for supernatant RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, however, showed that baboon cells produced only low levels of virus after infection compared with the production by heterologous cells. The results showed that baboon endogenous virus was capable of penetrating baboon cells and that viral genes were expressed in infected cells. Replication of complete infectious virus was restricted, however, indicating that in this primate system homologous cells differentially regulated the expression of viral genes.

  6. Endogenous Lentiviral Elements in the Weasel Family (Mustelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses provide molecular fossils for studying the ancient evolutionary history of retroviruses. Here, we report our independent discovery and analysis of endogenous lentiviral insertions (Mustelidae endogenous lentivirus [MELV]) within the genomes of weasel family (Mustelidae). Genome-scale screening identified MELV elements in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) genome (MELVmpf). MELVmpf exhibits a typical lentiviral genomic organization. Phylogenetic analyses position MELVmpf basal to either primate lentiviruses or feline immunodeficiency virus. Moreover, we verified the presence of MELV insertions in the genomes of several species of the Lutrinae and Mustelinae subfamilies but not the Martinae subfamily, suggesting that the invasion of MELV into the Mustelidae genomes likely took place between 8.8 and 11.8 Ma. The discovery of MELV in weasel genomes extends the host range of lentiviruses to the Caniformia (order Carnivora) and provides important insights into the prehistoric diversity of lentiviruses. PMID:22522310

  7. Purification and analysis of endogenous human RNA exosome complexes

    PubMed Central

    Domanski, Michal; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J.; Molloy, Kelly R.; Ketaren, Natalia E.; Stokes, David L.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    As a result of its importance in key RNA metabolic processes, the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex has been the focus of intense study for almost two decades. Research on exosome subunit assembly, cofactor and substrate interaction, enzymatic catalysis and structure have largely been conducted using complexes produced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in bacteria. Here, we examine different populations of endogenous exosomes from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and test their enzymatic activity and structural integrity. We describe methods to prepare EXOSC10-containing, enzymatically active endogenous human exosomes at suitable yield and purity for in vitro biochemistry and negative stain transmission electron microscopy. This opens the door for assays designed to test the in vitro effects of putative cofactors on human exosome activity and will enable structural studies of preparations from endogenous sources. PMID:27402899

  8. Endogenous cardiac stem cells for the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Tania; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies hold promise for regenerating the myocardium after injury. Recent data obtained from phase I clinical trials using endogenous cardiovascular progenitors isolated directly from the heart suggest that cell-based treatment for heart patients using stem cells that reside in the heart provides significant functional benefit and an improvement in patient outcome. Methods to achieve improved engraftment and regeneration may extend this therapeutic benefit. Endogenous cardiovascular progenitors have been tested extensively in small animals to identify cells that improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the relative lack of large animal models impedes translation into clinical practice. This review will exclusively focus on the latest research pertaining to humans and large animals, including both endogenous and induced sources of cardiovascular progenitors. PMID:24426784

  9. Endogenous lentiviral elements in the weasel family (Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Endogenous retroviruses provide molecular fossils for studying the ancient evolutionary history of retroviruses. Here, we report our independent discovery and analysis of endogenous lentiviral insertions (Mustelidae endogenous lentivirus [MELV]) within the genomes of weasel family (Mustelidae). Genome-scale screening identified MELV elements in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) genome (MELVmpf). MELVmpf exhibits a typical lentiviral genomic organization. Phylogenetic analyses position MELVmpf basal to either primate lentiviruses or feline immunodeficiency virus. Moreover, we verified the presence of MELV insertions in the genomes of several species of the Lutrinae and Mustelinae subfamilies but not the Martinae subfamily, suggesting that the invasion of MELV into the Mustelidae genomes likely took place between 8.8 and 11.8 Ma. The discovery of MELV in weasel genomes extends the host range of lentiviruses to the Caniformia (order Carnivora) and provides important insights into the prehistoric diversity of lentiviruses.

  10. Residential water demand with endogenous pricing: The Canadian Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Arnaud; Renzetti, Steven; Villeneuve, Michel

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we show that the rate structure endogeneity may result in a misspecification of the residential water demand function. We propose to solve this endogeneity problem by estimating a probabilistic model describing how water rates are chosen by local communities. This model is estimated on a sample of Canadian local communities. We first show that the pricing structure choice reflects efficiency considerations, equity concerns, and, in some cases, a strategy of price discrimination across consumers by Canadian communities. Hence estimating the residential water demand without taking into account the pricing structures' endogeneity leads to a biased estimation of price and income elasticities. We also demonstrate that the pricing structure per se plays a significant role in influencing price responsiveness of Canadian residential consumers.

  11. Identification, characterization and comparative genomics of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Polavarapu, Nalini; Bowen, Nathan J; McDonald, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background Retrotransposons, the most abundant and widespread class of eukaryotic transposable elements, are believed to play a significant role in mutation and disease and to have contributed significantly to the evolution of genome structure and function. The recent sequencing of the chimpanzee genome is providing an unprecedented opportunity to study the functional significance of these elements in two closely related primate species and to better evaluate their role in primate evolution. Results We report here that the chimpanzee genome contains at least 42 separate families of endogenous retroviruses, nine of which were not previously identified. All but two (CERV 1/PTERV1 and CERV 2) of the 42 families of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses were found to have orthologs in humans. Molecular analysis (PCR and Southern hybridization) of CERV 2 elements demonstrates that this family is present in chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla and old-world monkeys but absent in human, orangutan and new-world monkeys. A survey of endogenous retroviral positional variation between chimpanzees and humans determined that approximately 7% of all chimpanzee-human INDEL variation is associated with endogenous retroviral sequences. Conclusion Nine families of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses have been transpositionally active since chimpanzees and humans diverged from a common ancestor. Seven of these transpositionally active families have orthologs in humans, one of which has also been transpositionally active in humans since the human-chimpanzee divergence about six million years ago. Comparative analyses of orthologous regions of the human and chimpanzee genomes have revealed that a significant portion of INDEL variation between chimpanzees and humans is attributable to endogenous retroviruses and may be of evolutionary significance. PMID:16805923

  12. SNIPER peptide-mediated degradation of endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuelai; Wang, Yu Tian

    2015-03-02

    Rapid and reversible methods for altering the function of endogenous proteins are not only indispensable tools for probing complex biological systems, but may potentially drive the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases. Genetic approaches have provided insights into protein function, but are limited in speed, reversibility and spatiotemporal control. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a peptide-based method (SNIPER: Selective Native Protein Eradication) to degrade any given endogenous protein at the post-translational level by harnessing chaperone-mediated autophagy, a major intracellular protein degradation pathway. This unit presents a typical strategy in the design and validation of a protein-knockdown peptide.

  13. The first full-length endogenous hepadnaviruses: identification and analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Yang, Huijuan; Bai, Weiya; Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Jing; Xie, Youhua

    2012-09-01

    In silico screening of metazoan genome data identified multiple endogenous hepadnaviral elements in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) genome, most notably two elements comprising about 1.3 × and 1.0 × the full-length genome. Phylogenetic and molecular dating analyses show that endogenous budgerigar hepatitis B viruses (eBHBV) share an ancestor with extant avihepadnaviruses and infiltrated the budgerigar genome millions of years ago. Identification of full-length genomes with preserved key features like ε signals could enable resurrection of ancient BHBV. PMID:22718817

  14. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  15. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  16. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  17. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  18. Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 4 Is an Endogenous Negative Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Ben; Zhao, Yi-Chao; Gao, Ling-Chen; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Xu, Long-Wei; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Ji, Qing-Qi; Lin, Nan; Pu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of the ubiquitin proteasome system components ubiquitin ligases and proteasome plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. However, little is known about the role of another ubiquitin proteasome system component, the deubiquitinating enzymes, in cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we revealed a crucial role of ubiquitin specific protease 4 (USP4), a deubiquitinating enzyme prominently expressed in the heart, in attenuating pathological cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. USP4 levels were consistently decreased in human failing hearts and in murine hypertrophied hearts. Adenovirus-mediated gain- and loss-of-function approaches indicated that deficiency of endogenous USP4 promoted myocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II in vitro, whereas restoration of USP4 significantly attenuated the prohypertrophic effect of angiotensin II. To corroborate the role of USP4 in vivo, we generated USP4 global knockout mice and mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of USP4. Consistent with the in vitro study, USP4 depletion exacerbated the hypertrophic phenotype and cardiac dysfunction in mice subjected to pressure overload, whereas USP4 transgenic mice presented ameliorated pathological cardiac hypertrophy compared with their control littermates. Molecular analysis revealed that USP4 deficiency augmented the activation of the transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-(JNK1/2)/P38 signaling in response to hypertrophic stress, and blockage of TAK1 activation abolished the pathological effects of USP4 deficiency in vivo. These findings provide the first evidence for the involvement of USP4 in cardiac hypertrophy, and shed light on the therapeutic potential of targeting USP4 in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy.

  19. Endogenous Retrovirus Insertion in the KIT Oncogene Determines White and White spotting in Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    David, Victor A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S.; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Connelly, Catherine J.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Ryugo, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:25085922

  20. Endogenous retrovirus insertion in the KIT oncogene determines white and white spotting in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Connelly, Catherine J; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryugo, David K

    2014-10-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:25085922

  1. Endogenous retrovirus insertion in the KIT oncogene determines white and white spotting in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Connelly, Catherine J; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryugo, David K

    2014-08-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively.

  2. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  3. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-06-10

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdc(scid) and Il2rg(null) alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation.

  4. Accumulation and breakdown of RNA-deficient intracellular virus particles in interferon-treated NIH 3T3 cells chronically producing Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Aboud, M; Hassan, Y

    1983-01-01

    Interferon treatment of NIH 3T3 cells chronically infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus inhibited about 95% of virus release. This inhibition was accompanied by a three- to twofold accumulation of intracellular virions. However, this accumulation could be demonstrated only be exogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay or radioactive labeling of the assembled viral proteins. It could not be shown by the endogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay, which depended on endogenous viral RNA, or by labeling the encapsidated viral RNA. It was therefore evident that most of the intracellular virions accumulated in interferon-treated cells were RNA deficient. Hybridization analysis revealed that these virions were deficient of genomic viral RNA, whereas size analysis by gel electrophoresis suggested that the deficiency of 4S RNA normally packaged in Moloney murine leukemia virus was even stronger. Our data also suggested that this RNA deficiency was not due to degradation of the encapsidated RNA, but more likely to a defect in virus assembly. RNA-lacking intracellular virions were unstable; they were found to collapse before being released. PMID:6187933

  5. An embryonic stage–specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ϵ-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:21321362

  6. Novel microbial virulence factor triggers murine lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2013-03-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected "neutrophil-recruiting" chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis.

  7. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  8. RELIABLE ASSAYS FOR DETERMINING ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy women from 18-38 years old (N=25) fasted for several hours and twice donated blood and milk (postpartum 2-7 weeks and 3-4 months) for the EPA's Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis study, a pilot for the National Children's Study (NCS). Endogenous components were chosen...

  9. Isolating Exogenous and Endogenous Modes of Temporal Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Michael A.; Klein, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The differential allocation of information processing resources over time, here termed "temporal attention," may be achieved by relatively automatic "exogenous" or controlled "endogenous" mechanisms. Over 100 years of research has confounded these theoretically distinct dimensions of temporal attention. The current report seeks to ameliorate this…

  10. Endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Neumaier, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus was investigated by using extracellular recording and radioligand binding techniques in the hippocampal slice preparation. Synaptic conductances from endogenously released opioid peptides have been difficult to detect. This problem was approach by designing a novel assay of opioid peptide release, in which release was detected by measuring binding competition between endogenous opioids and added radioligand. Membrane depolarization displaced ({sup 3}H)-diprenorphine binding in a transient, calcium-dependent, and peptidase-sensitive manner. Autoradiographic localization of the sites of ({sup 3}H)-diprenorphine binding displacement showed that significant opioid peptide release and receptor occupancy occurred in each major subregion of the hippocampal slices. This assay method can not be used to define optimal electrical stimulation conditions for releasing endogenous opioids. The binding displacement method was extended to the study of the sigma receptor. Depolarization of hippocampal slices was found to reduce the binding of the sigma-selective radioligand ({sup 3}H)-ditolylguanidine in a transient and calcium-dependent manner with no apparent direct effects on sigma receptor affinity.

  11. Endogenous Depression in the Elderly: Prevalence and Agreement among Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined agreement among diagnoses made according to 5 definitions of endogenous depression in 99 depressed elders. Poor to fair agreement was generally demonstrated, except for Research Diagnostic Criteria and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which demonstrated excellent agreement. Mostly, demographic and clinical variables…

  12. Evolutionary Systems Theory, Universities, and Endogenous Regional Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Universities today are increasingly being viewed in terms of serving the purpose of economic development. This paper postulates that their chief purpose is to advance knowledge and that in doing so they effectuate regional economic growth and development through processes specified in the endogenous economic growth model. To achieve this purpose…

  13. [Exploration of the Essence of "Endogenous Turbidity" in Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin-rong; Tang, Nong; Ji, Yun-xi; Zhang, Yao-zhong; Jiang, Li; Huang, Gui-hua; Xie, Sheng; Li, Liu-mei; Song, Chun-hui; Ling, Jiang-hong

    2015-08-01

    The essence of endogenous turbidity in Chinese medicine (CM) is different from cream, fat, phlegm, retention, damp, toxicity, and stasis. Along with the development of modern scientific technologies and biology, researches on the essence of endogenous turbidity should keep pace with the time. Its material bases should be defined and new connotation endowed at the microscopic level. The essence of turbidity lies in abnormal functions of zang-fu organs. Sugar, fat, protein, and other nutrient substances cannot be properly decomposed, but into semi-finished products or intermediate metabolites. They are inactive and cannot participate in normal material syntheses and decomposition. They cannot be transformed to energy metabolism, but also cannot be synthesized as executive functioning of active proteins. If they cannot be degraded by autophagy-lysosome or ubiquitin-prosome into glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and other basic nutrients to be used again, they will accumulate inside the human body and become endogenous turbidity. Therefore, endogenous turbidity is different from final metabolites such as urea, carbon dioxide, etc., which can transform vital qi. How to improve the function of zang-fu organs, enhance its degradation by autophagy-lysosome or ubiquitin-prosome is of great significance in normal operating of zang-fu organs and preventing the emergence and progress of related diseases.

  14. [Exploration of the Essence of "Endogenous Turbidity" in Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin-rong; Tang, Nong; Ji, Yun-xi; Zhang, Yao-zhong; Jiang, Li; Huang, Gui-hua; Xie, Sheng; Li, Liu-mei; Song, Chun-hui; Ling, Jiang-hong

    2015-08-01

    The essence of endogenous turbidity in Chinese medicine (CM) is different from cream, fat, phlegm, retention, damp, toxicity, and stasis. Along with the development of modern scientific technologies and biology, researches on the essence of endogenous turbidity should keep pace with the time. Its material bases should be defined and new connotation endowed at the microscopic level. The essence of turbidity lies in abnormal functions of zang-fu organs. Sugar, fat, protein, and other nutrient substances cannot be properly decomposed, but into semi-finished products or intermediate metabolites. They are inactive and cannot participate in normal material syntheses and decomposition. They cannot be transformed to energy metabolism, but also cannot be synthesized as executive functioning of active proteins. If they cannot be degraded by autophagy-lysosome or ubiquitin-prosome into glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and other basic nutrients to be used again, they will accumulate inside the human body and become endogenous turbidity. Therefore, endogenous turbidity is different from final metabolites such as urea, carbon dioxide, etc., which can transform vital qi. How to improve the function of zang-fu organs, enhance its degradation by autophagy-lysosome or ubiquitin-prosome is of great significance in normal operating of zang-fu organs and preventing the emergence and progress of related diseases. PMID:26485920

  15. English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) protect endogenous antioxidants in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ellagic acid monomers, polymeric tannins and related phenolic compounds isolated from English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) have been reported to inhibit LDL oxidation ex vivo and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress in animal models. To determine whether dietary and endogenous antioxidants are pres...

  16. A population of endogenous pararetrovirus genomes in carrizo citrange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomes of three related endogenous pararetroviruses (EPRVs) were obtained by 454 sequencing of nucleic acid extracts from ‘Carrizo’citrange, used as a citrus rootstock. Numerous homologous sequences have been found in the sweet orange genome. The new EPRVs are most closely related to...

  17. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-11-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy.There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  18. Improving access to endogenous DNA in ancient bones and teeth

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Peter B.; Margaryan, Ashot; Schroeder, Hannes; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske; Allentoft, Morten E.

    2015-01-01

    Poor DNA preservation is the most limiting factor in ancient genomic research. In the majority of ancient bones and teeth, endogenous DNA molecules represent a minor fraction of the whole DNA extract, rendering shot-gun sequencing inefficient for obtaining genomic data. Based on ancient human bone samples from temperate and tropical environments, we show that an EDTA-based enzymatic ‘pre-digestion’ of powdered bone increases the proportion of endogenous DNA several fold. By performing the pre-digestion step between 30 min and 6 hours on five bones, we observe an asymptotic increase in endogenous DNA content, with a 2.7-fold average increase reached at 1 hour. We repeat the experiment using a brief pre-digestion (15 or 30 mins) on 21 ancient bones and teeth from a variety of archaeological contexts and observe an improvement in 16 of these. We here advocate the implementation of a brief pre-digestion step as a standard procedure in ancient DNA extractions. Finally, we demonstrate on 14 ancient teeth that by targeting the outer layer of the roots we obtain up to 14 times more endogenous DNA than when using the inner dentine. Our presented methods are likely to increase the proportion of ancient samples that are suitable for genome-scale characterization. PMID:26081994

  19. Conceptual Understanding of Multiplicative Properties through Endogenous Digital Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Andre

    2012-01-01

    This study purposed to determine the effect of an endogenously designed instructional game on conceptual understanding of the associative and distributive properties of multiplication. Additional this study sought to investigate if performance on measures of conceptual understanding taken prior to and after game play could serve as predictors of…

  20. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  1. Health and Wages: Panel Data Estimates Considering Selection and Endogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackle, Robert; Himmler, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper complements previous studies on the effects of health on wages by addressing the problems of unobserved heterogeneity, sample selection, and endogeneity in one comprehensive framework. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), we find the health variable to suffer from measurement error and a number of tests provide…

  2. Role of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ryeom, Sandra; Folkman, Judah

    2009-03-01

    New blood vessel growth via angiogenesis is a fundamental process in both physiological and pathological conditions. Physiological angiogenesis is critical during embryogenesis and placental development, whereas pathological angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression of many diseases, most notably tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis is well accepted to be regulated by a balance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors produced both by tumor cells and surrounding stromal cells. For many years, investigation of antiangiogenic therapies for cancer has focused on the proangiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor; its receptors; or downstream signaling pathways. However, more recently with the identification of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, studies have turned toward understanding the role of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins in preventing disease progression. Clinical clues have suggested that specific populations may have dysregulated angiogenesis due to differential expression of endogenous angiogenesis regulators. For example, individuals with Down syndrome may possess a systemic antiangiogenic state with a significantly decreased incidence of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Our work suggests that endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors may be the master regulators controlling progression of angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as vascular anomalies and cancer. The molecular regulation of angiogenesis is not yet fully understood; however, the Down syndrome population may give us insights toward novel therapies for controlling angiogenesis in disease.

  3. Optical Control of Mammalian Endogenous Transcription and Epigenetic States

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Alexandro; Hsu, Patrick D.; Heidenreich, Matthias; Cong, Le; Platt, Randall J.; Scott, David A.; Church, George M.; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of gene expression enables cellular programming, homeostasis, and environmental adaptation in living systems. Dissection of causal gene functions in cellular and organismal processes therefore necessitates approaches that enable spatially and temporally precise modulation of gene expression. Recently, a variety of microbial and plant-derived light-sensitive proteins have been engineered as optogenetic actuators, enabling high precision spatiotemporal control of many cellular functions1-11. However, versatile and robust technologies that enable optical modulation of transcription in the mammalian endogenous genome remain elusive. Here, we describe the development of Light-Inducible Transcriptional Effectors (LITEs), an optogenetic two-hybrid system integrating the customizable TALE DNA-binding domain12-14 with the light-sensitive cryptochrome 2 protein and its interacting partner CIB1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. LITEs do not require additional exogenous chemical co-factors, are easily customized to target many endogenous genomic loci, and can be activated within minutes with reversibility3,4,6,7,15. LITEs can be packaged into viral vectors and genetically targeted to probe specific cell populations. We have applied this system in primary mouse neurons, as well as in the brain of awake mice in vivo to mediate reversible modulation of mammalian endogenous gene expression as well as targeted epigenetic chromatin modifications. The LITE system establishes a novel mode of optogenetic control of endogenous cellular processes and enables direct testing of the causal roles of genetic and epigenetic regulation in normal biological processes and disease states. PMID:23877069

  4. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy. There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  5. Endogenous mitigation of H2S inside of the landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Shen, Dongsheng; Du, Yao; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang

    2016-02-01

    Vast quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emitted from landfill sites require urgent disposal. The current study focused on source control and examined the migration and conversion behavior of sulfur compounds in two lab-scale simulated landfills with different operation modes. It aimed to explore the possible strategies and mechanisms for H2S endogenous mitigation inside of landfills during decomposition. It was found that the strength of H2S emissions from the landfill sites was dependent on the municipal solid waste (MSW) degradation speed and vertical distribution of sulfide. Leachate recirculation can shorten both the H2S influence period and pollution risk to the surrounding environment. H2S endogenous mitigation may be achieved by chemical oxidation, biological oxidation, adsorption, and/or precipitation in different stages. Migration and conversion mainly affected H2S release behavior during the initial stabilization phase in the landfill. Microbial activities related to sulfur, nitrogen, and iron can further promote H2S endogenous mitigation during the high reducing phase. Thus, H2S endogenous mitigation can be effectively enhanced via control of the aforementioned processes.

  6. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U-{sup 14}C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production.

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  8. Endogenous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis after leg trauma.

    PubMed

    Larson, Katie E; Carrillo-Marquez, Maria

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of endogenous endophthalmitis in a 13-year-old boy with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. The patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain after intermittent anisocoria was noted on examination, leading to a diagnosis of endophthalmitis with a chorodial abscess.

  9. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand deficiency enhances survival in murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Katharina; Stollhof, Laura; Poetschke, Christian; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Diedrich, Stephan; Maier, Stefan; Bröker, Barbara M; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Background Apart from inducing apoptosis in tumor cells, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) influences inflammatory reactions. Murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) represents a model of diffuse peritonitis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that administration of exogenous TRAIL not only induces apoptosis in neutrophils but also enhances survival in this model. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of genetic TRAIL deficiency on the course of CASP. Methods Peritonitis was induced in 6- to 8-week-old female TRAIL−/− mice as well as in wild-type mice. The sepsis severity score and survival of mice were monitored. Bacterial loads in blood as well as in the lymphoid organs were examined. Additionally, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was determined. Results As early as 8 hours postinduction of CASP, TRAIL−/− mice were significantly more affected by sepsis than wild-type mice, as measured by the sepsis severity score. However, during the further course of sepsis, TRAIL deficiency led to significantly decreased sepsis severity scores, resulting in an enhanced overall survival in TRAIL−/− mice. The better survival of TRAIL−/− mice was accompanied by a decreased bacterial load within the blood. In marked contrast, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was highly increased in TRAIL−/− mice 20 hours after induction of CASP. Conclusion Hence, exogenous and endogenous TRAIL is protective during the early phase of sepsis, while endogenous TRAIL appears to be detrimental in the later course of this disease. PMID:27366100

  10. Nitrergic signalling via interstitial cells of Cajal regulates motor activity in murine colon.

    PubMed

    Lies, Barbara; Beck, Katharina; Keppler, Jonas; Saur, Dieter; Groneberg, Dieter; Friebe, Andreas

    2015-10-15

    In the enteric nervous systems, NO is released from nitrergic neurons as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. NO acts via NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), which is found in different gastrointestinal (GI) cell types including smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). The precise mechanism of nitrergic signalling through these two cell types to regulate colonic spontaneous contractions is not fully understood yet. In the present study we investigated the impact of endogenous and exogenous NO on colonic contractile motor activity using mice lacking nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC) globally and specifically in SMCs and ICC. Longitudinal smooth muscle of proximal colon from wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mouse strains exhibited spontaneous contractile activity ex vivo. WT and smooth muscle-specific guanylyl cyclase knockout (SMC-GCKO) colon showed an arrhythmic contractile activity with varying amplitudes and frequencies. In contrast, colon from global and ICC-specific guanylyl cyclase knockout (ICC-GCKO) animals showed a regular contractile rhythm with constant duration and amplitude of the rhythmic contractions. Nerve blockade (tetrodotoxin) or specific blockade of NO signalling (L-NAME, ODQ) did not significantly affect contractions of GCKO and ICC-GCKO colon whereas the arrhythmic contractile patterns of WT and SMC-GCKO colon were transformed into uniform motor patterns. In contrast, the response to electric field-stimulated neuronal NO release was similar in SMC-GCKO and global GCKO. In conclusion, our results indicate that basal enteric NO release acts via myenteric ICC to influence the generation of spontaneous contractions whereas the effects of elevated endogenous NO are mediated by SMCs in the murine proximal colon.

  11. Characterization and expression of a murine gene homologous to human EPA/TIMP: a virus-induced gene in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Gewert, D R; Coulombe, B; Castelino, M; Skup, D; Williams, B R

    1987-01-01

    A genomic clone encompassing the entire coding region of a murine gene homologous to human erythroid potentiating activity/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (EPA/TIMP) was isolated and sequenced. Based on alignment with human EPA/TIMP cDNAs we deduce a structure comprising five exons and four introns extending over 4.3 kb of DNA. In mouse and hamster cell lines transcription from this gene and interferon genes is induced by Newcastle Disease virus (NDV). Examination of the 5'-flanking sequences of the gene reveals a set of repeated elements with structural similarity to those previously described as inducer-responsive elements in the human IFN-beta 1 gene. The 4.3-kb DNA fragment encompassing the homologous murine EPA/TIMP gene was transfected into human T98G cells and transfectants tested for NDV inducibility. In contrast to the endogenous human gene, the integrated murine EPA/TIMP gene was NDV-inducible and TIMP activity was detectable in the cell culture fluid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:3034603

  12. Inhibition of cellular respiration by endogenously produced carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Lam, Francis; Hagen, Thilo; Moncada, Salvador

    2006-06-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) interacts with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. This interaction has been shown to have important physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is also known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase in vitro; however, it is not clear whether endogenously produced CO can inhibit cellular respiration and, if so, what the significance of this might be. In this study, we show that exogenous CO inhibits respiration in a moderate but persistent manner in HEK293 cells under ambient (21%) oxygen concentrations (K(i) = 1.44 microM). This effect of CO was increased (K(i) = 0.35 microM) by incubation in hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen). Endogenous CO, generated by HEK293 cells transfected with the inducible isoform of haem oxygenase (haem oxygenase-1; HO-1), also inhibited cellular respiration moderately (by 12%) and this was accompanied by inhibition (23%) of cytochrome c oxidase activity. When the cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions during HO-1 induction, the inhibitory effect of CO on cell respiration was markedly increased to 70%. Furthermore, endogenously produced CO was found to be responsible for the respiratory inhibition that occurs in RAW264.7 cells activated in hypoxic conditions with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, in the presence of N-(iminoethyl)-L-ornithine to prevent the synthesis of NO. Our results indicate that CO contributes significantly to the respiratory inhibition in activated cells, particularly under hypoxic conditions. Inhibition of cell respiration by endogenous CO through its interaction with cytochrome c oxidase might have an important role in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.

  13. Relevance of tryptophan and tyrosine availability in endogenous and 'non-endogenous' depressives treated with imipramine or clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Reisby, N; Ortmann, J; Elley, J; Krautwald, O

    1981-09-01

    This study was performed on 65 depressed in-patients who were included in previously reported trials of imipramine and clomipramine. Before and during treatment, blood samples were collected for estimation of the availability of tryptophan and tyrosine by measurement of their plasma ratios to competing amino acids, and for determination of plasma steady-state concentrations of imipramine, clomipramine and their demethylated metabolites. The patients were classified as endogenous or 'non-endogenous' depressives by means of diagnostic rating scales, and therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by means of the Hamilton rating scales. Neither imipramine nor clomipramine increased the availability of tryptophan or tyrosine. Three biochemical regions were defined: a low region including mostly patients with subnormal availability of both tryptophan and tyrosine, a medium region, and a high region including mostly patients with supernormal precursor availabilities. Endogenous depressives showed about the same biochemical distribution as controls whereas there tended to be a proportionately higher number of 'non-endogenous' depressives within the low region. Patients in the low region, irrespective of diagnostic classification, improved faster and more on imipramine than patients in the medium and high regions with comparable plasma drug levels. Patients on clomipramine tended to show a relationship between precursor availabilities and clinical response but no definite conclusion could be drawn from these data. The results suggest that determination of the pre-treatment tryptophan and tyrosine availability may be superior to diagnostic classification in predicting response to imipramine. The possible mode of action of tricyclic antidepressants is briefly discussed. PMID:6456290

  14. Endogenous dendritic cells from the tumor microenvironment support T-ALL growth via IGF1R activation.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Todd A; Cardenas, Kim T; Lancaster, Jessica N; Hu, Zicheng; Selden, Hilary J; Jasso, Guadalupe J; Balasubramanyam, Sadhana; Chan, Kathy; Li, LiQi; Chen, Xi; Marcogliese, Andrea N; Davé, Utpal P; Love, Paul E; Ehrlich, Lauren I R

    2016-02-23

    Primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells require stromal-derived signals to survive. Although many studies have identified cell-intrinsic alterations in signaling pathways that promote T-ALL growth, the identity of endogenous stromal cells and their associated signals in the tumor microenvironment that support T-ALL remains unknown. By examining the thymic tumor microenvironments in multiple murine T-ALL models and primary patient samples, we discovered the emergence of prominent epithelial-free regions, enriched for proliferating tumor cells and dendritic cells (DCs). Systematic evaluation of the functional capacity of tumor-associated stromal cells revealed that myeloid cells, primarily DCs, are necessary and sufficient to support T-ALL survival ex vivo. DCs support T-ALL growth both in primary thymic tumors and at secondary tumor sites. To identify a molecular mechanism by which DCs support T-ALL growth, we first performed gene expression profiling, which revealed up-regulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfrb) and insulin-like growth factor I receptor (Igf1r) on T-ALL cells, with concomitant expression of their ligands by tumor-associated DCs. Both Pdgfrb and Igf1r were activated in ex vivo T-ALL cells, and coculture with tumor-associated, but not normal thymic DCs, sustained IGF1R activation. Furthermore, IGF1R signaling was necessary for DC-mediated T-ALL survival. Collectively, these studies provide the first evidence that endogenous tumor-associated DCs supply signals driving T-ALL growth, and implicate tumor-associated DCs and their mitogenic signals as auspicious therapeutic targets. PMID:26862168

  15. Endogenous glucocorticoids protect against TNF-alpha-induced increases in anxiety-like behavior in virally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, MN; Macdougall, MG; Hu, F; Pace, TWW; Raison, CL; Miller, AH

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to immune challenges such as viral infection. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines induce behavioral alterations including changes in locomotor/exploratory activity. Accordingly, we examined proinflammatory cytokines and open-field behavior in virally infected mice rendered glucocorticoid deficient by adrenalectomy (ADX). Mice were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and open-field behavior (36 h post-infection) and plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 (42 h post-infection) were assessed. Compared to sham-ADX-MCMV-infected animals, ADX-MCMV-infected mice exhibited significant reductions in total distance moved, number of center entries, and time spent in center. These behavioral alterations were accompanied by significantly higher plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6, both of which were correlated with degree of behavioral change. To examine the role of TNF-alpha in these behavioral alterations, open-field behavior was compared in wild-type (WT) and TNF-R1-knockout (KO), ADX-MCMV-infected mice. TNF-R1-KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated decreases in number of rearings, number of center entries and time spent in center, but not distance moved, which correlated with plasma IL-6. Given the potential role of brain cytokines in these findings, mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 was assessed in various brain regions. Although MCMV induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine mRNA throughout the brain (especially in ADX animals), no remarkable differences were found between WT and TNF-R1-KO mice. These results demonstrate that endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to viral infection and their impact on locomotor/exploratory activity. Moreover, TNF-alpha appears to mediate cytokine-induced changes in open-field behaviors, especially those believed to reflect anxiety. PMID:17389906

  16. Intervention of Proliferation and Differentiation of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in the Neurodegenerative Process of Huntington's Disease Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mazurová, Yvona; Gunčová, Ivana; Látr, Ivan; Rudolf, Emil

    2011-06-01

    The evidence for the existence of neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain, including humans is now widely accepted. Despite the fact that adult neural stem cells appear to be very promising, a wide range of their unrevealed properties, abilities but also limitations under physiological and especially pathological conditions still need to be investigated and explained. Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by successive degeneration of relatively well-defined neuronal population. Moreover, the most affected region, the caudate nucleus, is adjacent to the subependymal zone (SEZ) neurogenic region. Therefore, the possibility to harness the endogenous neural stem cell capacity for repairing, or at least restricting, the fatal neurodegenerative process in HD patients using promoted neurogenesis in the adult SEZ represent the exciting new possibility in clinical management of this disorder. On the other hand, many questions have to be answered before neuronal replacement therapies using endogenous precursors become a reality, particularly in relation to neurodegenerative diseases. Fundamental for all experimental, functional and future clinical studies is detailed morphological description of structures involved in the process of neurogenesis. The objectives of this review are to describe neurogenesis in the adult murine and human brain (with particular emphasis to morphological aspects of this process) and to determine to what extent it is affected in animal models of HD and in the human HD brain. Due to very limited evidence referring to the impact of striatal pathology of HD phenotype on the adult neurogenesis in the SEZ, some results gained from our studies on two rat models of HD, i.e. the neurotoxic lesion and transgenic HD rats, and on human HD brains are discussed.

  17. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  18. Mechanism of induction of class I major histocompatibility antigen expression by murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Faller, D V; Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C

    1988-03-01

    Alterations in expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on tumor cells clearly correlate with the tumorgenicity and metastatic potential of those cells. These changes in the biological behavior of the tumor cells are presumably secondary to resulting changes in their susceptibility to immune recognition and destruction. Murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) exert regulatory effects on class I genes of the MHC locus. MuLV infection results in substantial increases in cell surface expression of all three class I MHC antigens. These viral effects on MHC antigen expression profoundly influence immune-mediated interaction with the infected cells, as assessed by cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition and killing. Control of class I MHC and beta-2 microglobulin genes by MuLV takes place via a trans-acting molecular mechanism. MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular MHC genes, transfected xenogeneic class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to a bacterial reporter gene. These findings indicate that MuLV exerts its effects on MHC expression via a trans mechanism. The MuLV-responsive sequences on the MHC genes appear to lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for those genes.

  19. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  20. CrxOS maintains the self-renewal capacity of murine embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryota; Yamasaki, Tokiwa; Nagai, Yoko; Wu, Jinzhan; Kajiho, Hiroaki; Yokoi, Tadashi; Noda, Eiichiro; Nishina, Sachiko; Niwa, Hitoshi; Azuma, Noriyuki; Katada, Toshiaki; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells maintain pluripotency by self-renewal. Several homeoproteins, including Oct3/4 and Nanog, are known to be key factors in maintaining the self-renewal capacity of ES cells. However, other genes required for the mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Here we report the identification by in silico analysis of a homeobox-containing gene, CrxOS, that is specifically expressed in murine ES cells and is essential for their self-renewal. ES cells mainly express the short isoform of endogenous CrxOS. Using a polyoma-based episomal expression system, we demonstrate that overexpression of the CrxOS short isoform is sufficient for maintaining the undifferentiated morphology of ES cells and stimulating their proliferation. Finally, using RNA interference, we show that CrxOS is essential for the self-renewal of ES cells, and provisionally identify foxD3 as a downstream target gene of CrxOS. To our knowledge, ours is the first delineation of the physiological role of CrxOS in ES cells.

  1. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A.; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M.; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W.; Cang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele–alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  2. Computer-assisted annotation of murine Sertoli cell small RNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ortogero, Nicole; Hennig, Grant W; Langille, Chad; Ro, Seungil; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode a large number of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) that play regulatory roles during development and adulthood by affecting gene expression. Several sncRNA species, including microRNAs (miRNAs), piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), are abundantly expressed in the testis and required for normal testicular development and spermatogenesis. To evaluate global changes in sncRNA expression, the next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based sncRNA transcriptomic analysis has become routine, because it allows rapid determination of the small RNA transcriptome of a particular testicular cell type. However, annotation of small RNA NGS reads can be challenging due to the volume of reads obtained, which is usually in the millions. Therefore, we developed a computer-assisted sncRNA annotation protocol that could identify not only known sncRNAs but also previously uncharacterized ones. Using this protocol, we annotated NGS reads of a Sertoli cell sncRNA library, and we report to our knowledge the first comprehensive annotation of the sncRNA transcriptome of immature murine Sertoli cells. Moreover, the computer-assisted sncRNA annotation pipeline that we report is applicable for annotating NGS reads derived from other cell types and/or sequencing platforms.

  3. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W; Cang, Yong

    2015-07-21

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele-alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  4. Recombinant Murine Growth Hormone Particles are More Immunogenic with Intravenous than Subcutaneous Administration

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Merry; Torres, Raul M.; Kedl, Ross M.; Randolph, Theodore W.; Carpenter, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation and mitigation of the risk of immunogenicity to protein aggregates and particles in therapeutic protein products remains a primary concern for drug developers and regulatory agencies. In order to investigate how the presence of protein particles and the route of administration influence the immunogenicity of a model therapeutic protein, we measured the immune response in mice to injections of formulations of recombinant murine growth hormone (rmGH) that contained controlled levels of protein particles. Mice were injected twice over six weeks with rmGH formulations via the subcutaneous (SQ), intraperitoneal (IP) or intravenous (IV) routes. In addition to soluble, monomeric rmGH, the samples prepared contained either nanoparticles of rmGH or both nano- and micro-particles of rmGH. The appearance of anti-rmGH IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgG3 titers following the second injection of both preparations implies that multiple mechanisms contributed to the immune response. No dependence of the immune response on particle size and distribution was observed. The immune response measured after the second injection was most pronounced when IV administration was used. Despite producing high anti-rmGH titers mice appeared to retain the ability to properly regulate and use endogenous growth hormone. PMID:25133276

  5. RNA-primed initiation of Moloney murine leukemia virus plus strands by reverse transcriptase in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Finston, W I; Champoux, J J

    1984-01-01

    A 190-base-pair DNA-RNA hybrid containing the Moloney murine leukemia virus origin of plus-strand DNA synthesis was constructed and used as a source of template-primer for the reverse transcriptase in vitro. Synthesis was shown to initiate precisely at the known plus-strand origin. The observation that some of the origin fragments retained ribonucleotide residues on their 5' ends suggests that the primer for chain initiation is an RNA molecule left behind by RNase H during the degradation of the RNA moiety of the DNA-RNA hybrid. If the RNase H is responsible for creating the correct primer terminus, then it must possess a specific endonucleolytic activity capable of recognizing the sequence in the RNA where plus strands are initiated. The 16-base RNase A-resistant fragment which spans the plus-strand origin can also serve as a source of the specific plus-strand primer RNA. Evidence is presented that some of the plus-strand origin fragments synthesized in the endogenous reaction contain 5' ribonucleotides, suggesting that specific RNA primers for plus-strand initiation may be generated during reverse transcription in vivo as well. Images PMID:6202882

  6. Heterogeneity of Matrin 3 in the developing and aging murine central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rayaprolu, Sruti; D'Alton, Simon; Crosby, Keith; Moloney, Christina; Howard, John; Duffy, Colin; Cabrera, Mariela; Siemienski, Zoe; Hernandez, Abigail R; Gallego-Iradi, Carolina; Borchelt, David R; Lewis, Jada

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the MATR3 gene encoding the nucleotide binding protein Matrin 3 have recently been identified as causing a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) and more rarely causing distal myopathy. Translating the identification of MATR3 mutations into an understanding of disease pathogenesis and the creation of mouse models requires a complete understanding of normal Matrin 3 levels and distribution in vivo. Consequently, we examined the levels of murine Matrin 3 in body tissues and regions of the central nervous system (CNS). We observed a significant degree of variability in Matrin 3 protein levels among different tissues of adult animals, with the highest levels found in reproductive organs and the lowest in muscle. Within the adult CNS, Matrin 3 levels were lowest in spinal cord. Further, we found that Matrin 3 declines significantly in CNS through early development and young adulthood before stabilizing. As previously reported, antibodies to Matrin 3 primarily stain nuclei, but the intensity of staining was not uniform in all nuclei. The low levels of Matrin 3 in spinal cord and muscle could mean that that these tissues are particularly vulnerable to alterations in Matrin 3 function. Our study is the first to characterize endogenous Matrin 3 in rodents across the lifespan, providing the groundwork for deciphering disease mechanisms and developing mouse models of MATR3-linked ALS. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2740-2752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878116

  7. Murine GPRC6A Mediates Cellular Responses to L-Amino Acids, but Not Osteocalcin Variants

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Patricia; Harley, Elizabeth; Lu, Yao; Stewart, Gregory D.; Fabb, Stewart; Diepenhorst, Natalie; Cremers, Béatrice; Rouillon, Marie-Hélène; Wehrle, Isabelle; Geant, Anne; Lamarche, Gwladys; Leach, Katie; Charman, William N.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Langmead, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotyping of Gprc6a KO mice has shown that this promiscuous class C G protein coupled receptor is variously involved in regulation of metabolism, inflammation and endocrine function. Such effects are described as mediated by extracellular calcium, L-amino acids, the bone-derived peptide osteocalcin (OCN) and the male hormone testosterone, introducing the concept of a bone-energy-metabolism-reproduction functional crosstalk mediated by GPRC6A. However, whilst the calcium and L-amino acid-sensing properties of GPRC6A are well established, verification of activity of osteocalcin at both human and mouse GPRC6A in vitro has proven somewhat elusive. This study characterises the in vitro pharmacology of mouse GPRC6A in response to its putative ligands in both recombinant and endogenous GPRC6A-expressing cells. Using cell signalling, and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin release assays, our results confirm that basic L-amino acids act as agonists of the murine GPRC6A receptor in both recombinant cells and immortalised entero-endocrine and pancreatic β-cells. In contrast, our studies do not support a role for OCN as a direct ligand for mouse GPRC6A, suggesting that the reported in vivo effects of OCN that require GPRC6A may be indirect, rather than via direct activation of the receptor. PMID:26785252

  8. Polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Kong, W P; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    To investigate polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses, we analyzed in vitro translation reactions programmed by in vitro-derived transcripts from an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the DA strain of Theiler's virus. To help identify the proteinases that carried out the processing, we modified the DA cDNA clone transcription template by linearization with different restriction endonucleases that generate templates of different lengths or by constructing linker insertion or deletion mutations or both in putative proteinase-coding regions. Protein 3C carried out most of the cleavages of the polyprotein, as is true for the other picornaviruses that have been studied. A second proteinase also appeared active at the LP12A-2B junction. A protein of slightly faster mobility than the leader protein was seen with translation of transcripts derived from DA cDNA but not GDVII cDNA. This protein may be synthesized from an alternative initiation site in the DA leader-coding region out of phase with the polyprotein reading frame. Our findings are relevant to ongoing investigations of the abnormal virus expression seen in DA virus late demyelinating disease, since polyprotein processing is critical in regulating picornaviral gene expression. Images PMID:2555559

  9. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  11. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  12. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  13. Quantitative investigation of murine cytomegalovirus nucleocapsid interaction.

    PubMed

    Buser, Christopher; Fleischer, Frank; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively investigate the role of the M97 protein for viral morphogenesis in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected fibroblast cells. For this purpose, a statistical analysis is performed for the spatial distribution of nuclear B-capsids (devoid of DNA, containing the scaffold) and C-capsids (filled with DNA). Cell nuclei infected with either wild-type or an M97 deletion mutant were compared. Univariate and multivariate point process characteristics (like Ripley's K-function, the L-function and the nearest neighbour distance distribution function) are investigated in order to describe and quantify the effects that the deletion of M97 causes to the process of DNA packaging into nucleocapsids. The estimation of the function L(r) -r reveals that with respect to the wild type there is an increased frequency of point pairs at a very short distance (less than approximately 100 nm) for both the B-capsids as well as for the C-capsids. For the M97 deletion mutant type this is no longer true. Here only the C-capsids show such a clustering behaviour, whereas for B-capsids it is almost nonexistant. Estimations of functionals such as the nearest neighbour distance distribution function confirmed these results. Thereby, a quantification is provided for the effect that the deletion of M97 leads to a loss of typical nucleocapsid clustering in MCMV-infected nuclei. PMID:17910700

  14. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  15. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  16. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  17. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy.

  18. Competition between endogenous and exogenous orienting of visual attention.

    PubMed

    Berger, Andrea; Henik, Avishai; Rafal, Robert

    2005-05-01

    The relation between reflexive and voluntary orienting of visual attention was investigated with 4 experiments: a simple detection task, a localization task, a saccade toward the target task, and a target identification task in which discrimination difficulty was manipulated. Endogenous and exogenous orienting cues were presented in each trial and their validity was manipulated orthogonally to examine whether attention mechanisms are mediated by separate systems and whether they have additive and independent effects on visual detection and discrimination. The results showed that each orienting mechanism developed its typical and independent effect in every case except for the difficult identification task. A theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between endogenous and exogenous orienting of attention is proposed, tested, and confirmed.

  19. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E; Hol, Elly M; van Strien, Miriam E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions.

  20. Endogenous Auxin and Ethylene in Pellia (Bryophyta) 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.; Harrison, Marcia A.; Taylor, Jane; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid and ethylene in bryophyte tissue was tentatively demonstrated using gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and double-standard isotope dilution techniques. Rapidly elongating stalks (or setae) of Pellia epiphylla (L.) Corda sporophytes contain approximately 2.5 to 2.9 micrograms per gram fresh weight of putative free IAA. Ethylene released by setae increases during growth from 0.027 to 0.035 nanoliter per seta per hour. Application of 5 microliters per liter ethylene inhibits auxin-stimulated elongation growth of this tissue, a result which suggests that both endogenously produced compounds act in tandem as natural growth modulators. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663227

  1. The endogenous opioid system: a common substrate in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Trigo, José Manuel; Martin-García, Elena; Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits that involve several neurotransmitters. One of the neurochemical systems that plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction is the endogenous opioid system (EOS). Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within these reward circuits. Chronic exposure to the different prototypical drugs of abuse, including opioids, alcohol, nicotine, psychostimulants and cannabinoids has been reported to produce significant alterations within the EOS, which seem to play an important role in the development of the addictive process. In this review, we will describe the adaptive changes produced by different drugs of abuse on the EOS, and the current knowledge about the contribution of each component of this neurobiological system to their addictive properties.

  2. Endogenous RNAi and adaptation to environment in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grishok, Alla

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of short RNAs to the control of repetitive elements are well documented in animals and plants. Here, the role of endogenous RNAi and AF10 homolog ZFP-1 in the adaptation of C. elegans to the environment is discussed. First, modulation of insulin signaling through regulation of transcription of the PDK-1 kinase (Mansisidor et al., PLoS Genetics, 2011) is reviewed. Second, an siRNA-based natural selection model is proposed in which variation in endogenous siRNA pools between individuals is subject to natural selection similarly to DNA-based genetic variation. The value of C. elegans for the research of siRNA-based epigenetic variation and adaptation is highlighted. PMID:24058837

  3. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory. PMID:25553430

  5. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  6. [Proposal of endogenous anticholinergic hypothesis in Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Akita, Ryo; Tani, Masayuki; Tomioka, Hiroi; Kitajima, Yuka; Yokoyama, Sachiko; Azuma, Kazunari; Ikuse, Daisuke; Akashi, Norinao; Yuda, Hajime; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2013-06-01

    We previously speculated that anticholinergic activity (AA) endogenously appeared in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and accelerated AD pathology. In this article we introduce manuscripts supporting the endogenous appearance of AA in AD and the acceleration of AD pathology. We speculate that acethylcholine (ACh) not only is related to cognitive functions but also regulates the inflammatory system. Therefore in AD, in which the ACh system is down-regulated, the hyperactivity of the inflammatory system may be caused and among cyctokines, substances having anticholinergic properties may appear. We also refer to a case in which serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) disappeared with the prescription of memantine (an antidementia agent that has the property of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker) and speculate that because the hyperactivity of the inflammatory system occurs by way of the hyperactivity of NMDA receptor, memantine could abolish the AA.

  7. Diet-induced obese mice retain endogenous leptin action.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, Nickki; Mahbod, Parinaz; Rivero, Belen; Norman, Lee Ann; Gertler, Arieh; D'Alessio, David A; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by hyperleptinemia and decreased response to exogenous leptin. This has been widely attributed to the development of leptin resistance, a state of impaired leptin signaling proposed to contribute to the development and persistence of obesity. To directly determine endogenous leptin activity in obesity, we treated lean and obese mice with a leptin receptor antagonist. The antagonist increased feeding and body weight (BW) in lean mice, but not in obese models of leptin, leptin receptor, or melanocortin-4 receptor deficiency. In contrast, the antagonist increased feeding and BW comparably in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, an increase associated with decreased hypothalamic expression of Socs3, a primary target of leptin. These findings demonstrate that hyperleptinemic DIO mice retain leptin suppression of feeding comparable to lean mice and counter the view that resistance to endogenous leptin contributes to the persistence of DIO in mice.

  8. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E.; Hol, Elly M.; van Strien, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  9. THE PRESENCE OF ENDOGENOUS PYROGEN IN NORMAL RABBIT TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Snell, E. S.; Atkins, Elisha

    1965-01-01

    Saline extracts of homogenized, uninfected, rabbit tissues produced febrile responses when injected intravenously into rabbits. Extracts of muscle, lung, and heart evoked fevers that were similar to those induced by leucocyte pyrogen; extracts of spleen, liver, and kidney caused more sustained fevers. The minimal pyrogenic dose appeared to be between 1.5 and 3 gm wet weight of tissue. Evidence is presented that neither Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin nor polymorphonuclear leucocytes (circulating or sequestered in the tissues) can be implicated as the source of pyrogen in tissue extracts. It seems likely, therefore, that a pyrogenic material of truly endogenous origin is widely distributed in tissues. Tissue pyrogen appears to be a large molecule which is relatively resistant to treatment with acid but not with alkali. Possible pathological roles for this endogenous agent (or agents) are briefly indicated. PMID:14319400

  10. Endogenous CO dynamics monitoring in breath by tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Andrian I.; Stepanov, Eugene V.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Skrupskii, Vladimir A.

    1996-04-01

    High sensitive CO gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as a real time monitor of endogenous carbon monoxide in a set of breath physiology experiments. The measurements of the CO content dynamics in exhaled air with 10 ppb sensitivity were attended with detection of carbon dioxide and O2 in breath, lung ventilation parameters, heart rate and blood analysis using conventional techniques. Variations of endogenous CO in human breath caused by hyperoxia, hypoxia, hyperventilation as well as sport loading were studied in real time. Scattering of the CO variation time constants was observed for different tested persons. Possible reasons for this scattering related with the organisms' physiology peculiarities are discussed.

  11. Salusin-β as a powerful endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Tani, Yuji; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Salusin-β is an endogenous parasympathomimetic peptide, predominantly localized to the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary. Subcutaneously administered salusin-β (50 nmol/mouse) significantly increased water intake but did not affect locomotor activity or food intake. The salusin-β-induced increase in water intake was completely abrogated by pretreatment with muscarinic antagonist, atropine sulphate. In contrast, intracerebroventricular injection of salusin-β, at lower doses (10–100 fmol/mouse) caused a long-lasting decrease in water intake and locomotor activity throughout the entire dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Pre-injection of intracerebroventricular anti-salusin-β IgG completely abrogated the central salusin-β mediated suppression of water intake and locomotor activity. These results demonstrate contrasting actions of salusin-β in the control of water intake via the central and peripheral systems and highlight it as a potent endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide. PMID:26869388

  12. Murine norovirus infection does not cause major disruptions in the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Murine norovirus (MNV) is the most common gastrointestinal pathogen of research mice and can alter research outcomes in biomedical mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite indications that an altered microbiota is a risk factor for IBD, the response of the murine intestinal microbiota to MNV infection has not been examined. Microbiota disruption caused by MNV infection could introduce the confounding effects observed in research experiments. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of MNV infection on the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice. Results The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed over time in both outbred Swiss Webster and inbred C57BL/6 mice following MNV infection. Mice were infected with both persistent and non-persistent MNV strains and tissue-associated or fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA-encoding gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in infected mice at the phylum and family level showed no major differences to uninfected controls, both in tissue-associated samples and feces, and also over time following infection, demonstrating that the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice is highly resistant to disruption following MNV infection. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the intestinal microbiota following MNV infection and demonstrates that acute or persistent MNV infection is not associated with major disruptions of microbial communities in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24451302

  13. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  14. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-08-14

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection.

  15. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  16. [The immunological mechanisms of the tissue lesions in endogenous uveitis].

    PubMed

    Todea, V

    1994-01-01

    The endogenous uveitis is essentially an immunologic disease, although it has a very variable immunology. During the immune response are implied the reactions of tardive hypersensibility (by immune complexes), hypersensibility through antibodies produced intraocularly or transported by the overall circulation and rarely, immediate hypersensibility reaction. The absence of lymphatics in the eye and of the antigenic cells in the tissues which limit the anterior chamber, implies an active, deviated immunity response, denoted by the term ACAID. PMID:8060956

  17. Pseudogene-derived endogenous siRNAs and their function.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Ling; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogenes were once considered genomic fossils, but recent studies indicate that they may function as gene regulators through the generation of endogenous small interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), antisense RNAs, and decoys for microRNAs. In this review, we summarize pseudogene study methods, emphasizing relevant publicly available resources, and we describe a systematic pipeline to identify pseudogene-derived esiRNAs and their targets, which can lead to a deeper understanding of pseudogene function.

  18. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  19. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  20. Myelin regeneration in multiple sclerosis: targeting endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Rowitch, David H; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M

    2011-10-01

    Regeneration of myelin sheaths (remyelination) after central nervous system demyelination is important to restore saltatory conduction and to prevent axonal loss. In multiple sclerosis, the insufficiency of remyelination leads to the irreversible degeneration of axons and correlated clinical decline. Therefore, a regenerative strategy to encourage remyelination may protect axons and improve symptoms in multiple sclerosis. We highlight recent studies on factors that influence endogenous remyelination and potential promising pharmacological targets that may be considered for enhancing central nervous system remyelination.

  1. Behavioral fractality in marine copepods: Endogenous rhythms versus exogenous stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuront, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The presence of endogenous rhythms in the swimming behavior of five common species of copepods (i.e. minute marine crustaceans) was investigated through comparisons of the scaling properties of their three-dimensional trajectories and cumulative probability distribution functions of move lengths recorded during the day and at night. Beside clear inter-specific differences in their behavioral scaling properties, the five species exhibited an increase in path tortuosity at night, consistent with an increase in food foraging activity. Given the absence of food under all experimental conditions, this suggests the presence of an endogenous swimming rhythm consistent with the widely reported pattern of ascent at dusk resulting in copepods entering the food-rich surface layer at night. The impact of the stress exerted on swimming behavior by changes in the light regime (i.e. light and dark conditions respectively experienced at night and during the day) and the related copepod behavioral adaptivity was also investigated. The low and high fractal dimensions respectively observed during daytime in the dark and during night-time under conditions of simulated daytime indicate that these organisms have the ability to adjust the complexity of their swimming path depending on exogenous factors, independent of their actual endogenous rhythms. The scaling exponents of the cumulative probability distribution function of move lengths exhibit a significant decrease during daylight hours under simulated night-time conditions and during the night under simulated daytime conditions, suggesting an increase in the stress levels experienced by the five species considered. It is finally shown that the stress exerted on endogenous behavioral diel variability by exogenous cues has a species-specific effect on copepods.

  2. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  3. Two-Stage Bayesian Model Averaging in Endogenous Variable Models.

    PubMed

    Lenkoski, Alex; Eicher, Theo S; Raftery, Adrian E

    2014-01-01

    Economic modeling in the presence of endogeneity is subject to model uncertainty at both the instrument and covariate level. We propose a Two-Stage Bayesian Model Averaging (2SBMA) methodology that extends the Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) estimator. By constructing a Two-Stage Unit Information Prior in the endogenous variable model, we are able to efficiently combine established methods for addressing model uncertainty in regression models with the classic technique of 2SLS. To assess the validity of instruments in the 2SBMA context, we develop Bayesian tests of the identification restriction that are based on model averaged posterior predictive p-values. A simulation study showed that 2SBMA has the ability to recover structure in both the instrument and covariate set, and substantially improves the sharpness of resulting coefficient estimates in comparison to 2SLS using the full specification in an automatic fashion. Due to the increased parsimony of the 2SBMA estimate, the Bayesian Sargan test had a power of 50 percent in detecting a violation of the exogeneity assumption, while the method based on 2SLS using the full specification had negligible power. We apply our approach to the problem of development accounting, and find support not only for institutions, but also for geography and integration as development determinants, once both model uncertainty and endogeneity have been jointly addressed.

  4. ENDOGENOUS CARDIOTONIC STEROIDS AND SALT-SENSITIVE HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga V.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Bagrov, Alexei Y.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS), also called digitalis like factors, have been postulated to play important roles in pathogenesis of hypertension for nearly half of a century. For the past 50 years biomedical scientists have been in quest of an unidentified factor or hormone that both increases blood pressure and renal sodium excretion; this “natriuretic hormone” was, in fact, postulated to interact with the Na/K-ATPase. Recent discoveries have led to the identification of steroid molecules which are present in humans, rodents and amphibians, and which, in a complex manner, interact with each other and with the other systems that regulate renal salt handling and contribute to the salt-sensitivity of blood pressure. Recent findings include the specific identification of endogenous cardenolide (endogenous ouabain) and bufadienolide (marinobufagenin) CTS in humans along with the delineation of mechanisms by which CTS can signal through the Na/K-ATPase. Although CTS were first considered important in the regulation of renal sodium transport and arterial pressure, more recent work implicates these hormones in the central regulation of blood pressure and regulation of cell growth, and development of cardiovascular and renal fibrosis in particular. PMID:20347967

  5. Control of RFM strain endogenous retrovirus in RFM mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Tennant, R W; Otten, J A; Wang, T W; Liou, R S; Brown, A; Yang, W K

    1983-01-01

    RFM/Un mice express an endogenous type C retrovirus throughout their life span in many tissues; primary or established embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not express a virus but can be induced by exposure to 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. All of our sources yielded a single ecotropic virus (RFV) which appeared to be related more closely to the endogenous N-tropic virus (WN1802N) of BALB/c mice than to Gross leukemia virus on the basis of two-dimensional gel electropherograms of virion proteins. No xenotropic or recombinant viruses were isolated by cocultivation techniques. RFV is N-tropic, and RFM/Un cells possess the Fv-1n allele, as indicated by restriction of B-tropic virus and susceptibility to Gross strain N-tropic virus. However, RFM cells are highly resistant to RFV and other endogenous N-tropic viruses. This resistance is expressed by two-hit titration kinetics and by inhibition of viral linear duplex DNA formation. This is similar to the effects of the Fv-1 locus, but preliminary work has shown no apparent genetic linkage between the two restrictions. The relative strength of the restriction, the presence of a single class of ecotropic virus, and the absence of recombinant viruses suggest that in RFM mice virus is expressed only in cells in which it is induced and not by cell-to-cell transmission.

  6. Endogenous Cardioprotective Agents: Role in Pre and Postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Penna, Claudia; Granata, Riccarda; Tocchetti, Carlo Gabriele; Gallo, Maria Pia; Alloatti, Giuseppe; Pagliaro, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death, chronic illness and disability in Western countries. The most common cause of CVD derives from the harmful effects of acute myocardial ischemia and subsequent reperfusion injury. Cardioprotection against acute ischemia/ reperfusion injury is made possible by the "conditioning protocols." Conditioning is obtained by applying a few periods of brief ischemia and reperfusion in the event of prolonged (index) ischemia that may cause myocardial infarction. Whilst the conditioning stimulus is applied before the index ischemia in ischemic pre-conditioning, it is applied after the event in post-conditioning. Pre and post- conditioning stimuli can be applied in a different/remote organ (remote pre- and post-conditioning); in this case conditioning stimulus can also be applied during the index event, in the so called remote per-conditioning. All these endogenous cardioprotective strategies recruit endogenous cytoprotective agents and factors that elicit specific cardioprotective pathways. Here, we discuss many of these cardioprotective factors compared to literature and highlight their main characteristics and mechanisms of action. Enphasis is given to endogenous cardioprotective agents acting or not on surface receptors, including chromogranin A derivatives, ghrelin-associated peptides, growth factors and cytokines, and to microvesicles and exosomes. Moreover the cardioprotective effects of gasotransmitters nitric oxide, hydrogen sulphide and carbon monoxide are reviewed. The possible clinical translation of these knowledge for future successful therapies is briefly and critically discussed.

  7. Circulating Hepcidin-25 Is Reduced by Endogenous Estrogen in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lehtihet, Mikael; Bonde, Ylva; Beckman, Lena; Berinder, Katarina; Hoybye, Charlotte; Rudling, Mats; Sloan, John H.; Konrad, Robert J.; Angelin, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepcidin reduces iron absorption by binding to the intestinal iron transporter ferroportin, thereby causing its degradation. Although short-term administration of testosterone or growth hormone (GH) has been reported to decrease circulating hepcidin levels, little is known about how hepcidin is influenced in human endocrine conditions associated with anemia. Research design and methods We used a sensitive and specific dual–monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay to measure hepcidin-25 in patients (a) during initiation of in vitro fertilization when endogenous estrogens were elevated vs. suppressed, (b) with GH deficiency before and after 12 months substitution treatment, (c) with hyperthyroidism before and after normalization, and (d) with hyperprolactinemia before and after six months of treatment with a dopamine agonist. Results In response to a marked stimulation of endogenous estrogen production, median hepcidin levels decreased from 4.85 to 1.43 ng/mL (p < 0.01). Hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia, or GH substitution to GH-deficient patients did not influence serum hepcidin-25 levels. Conclusions In humans, gonadotropin-stimulated endogenous estrogen markedly decreases circulating hepcidin-25 levels. No clear and stable correlation between iron biomarkers and hepcidin-25 was seen before or after treatment of hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia or growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26866603

  8. Determination of endogenous faecal phosphorus loss in goats.

    PubMed

    Tayo, Grace Oluwatoyin; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang; Sun, Zhi Hong; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuan She; Han, Xue Feng

    2009-04-01

    Four black Liuyang wether goats were fed with corn stover and concentrate formulated to contain four levels of dietary phosphorus (P), including 0.129, 0.140, 0.162 and 0.180% of P. In a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment the endogenous faecal P loss was determined by the regression technique and the substitution method. Treatment effects on faecal and urinary P output, apparent P digestibility and P retention, and saliva P secretion were not significant. A linear relationship was observed between apparent faecal digestible P (Y, g/kg DMI) and P intake (X, g/kg DMI), which was described by the equation: Y = 0.4799 X -0.9209, r2 = 0.9869, (p < 0.05). The true P digestibility determined by the regression technique and the substitution method amounted to 48.0 and 48.9%, respectively; the recorded endogenous faecal P losses were 0.92 and 0.93 g/kg DMI, respectively. The study demonstrated the potential of the regression method as well as the substitution method for estimation of true P digestibility and endogenous faecal P losses in goats.

  9. Two-Stage Bayesian Model Averaging in Endogenous Variable Models.

    PubMed

    Lenkoski, Alex; Eicher, Theo S; Raftery, Adrian E

    2014-01-01

    Economic modeling in the presence of endogeneity is subject to model uncertainty at both the instrument and covariate level. We propose a Two-Stage Bayesian Model Averaging (2SBMA) methodology that extends the Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) estimator. By constructing a Two-Stage Unit Information Prior in the endogenous variable model, we are able to efficiently combine established methods for addressing model uncertainty in regression models with the classic technique of 2SLS. To assess the validity of instruments in the 2SBMA context, we develop Bayesian tests of the identification restriction that are based on model averaged posterior predictive p-values. A simulation study showed that 2SBMA has the ability to recover structure in both the instrument and covariate set, and substantially improves the sharpness of resulting coefficient estimates in comparison to 2SLS using the full specification in an automatic fashion. Due to the increased parsimony of the 2SBMA estimate, the Bayesian Sargan test had a power of 50 percent in detecting a violation of the exogeneity assumption, while the method based on 2SLS using the full specification had negligible power. We apply our approach to the problem of development accounting, and find support not only for institutions, but also for geography and integration as development determinants, once both model uncertainty and endogeneity have been jointly addressed. PMID:24223471

  10. Endogenous Cardiotonic Steroids: Physiology, Pharmacology, and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagrov, Alexei Y.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Fedorova, Olga V.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS), also called digitalis-like factors, have been postulated to play important roles in health and disease for nearly half a century. Recent discoveries, which include the specific identification of endogenous cardenolide (endogenous ouabain) and bufadienolide (marinobufagenin) CTS in humans along with the delineation of an alternative mechanism by which CTS can signal through the Na+/K+-ATPase, have increased the interest in this field substantially. Although CTS were first considered important in the regulation of renal sodium transport and arterial pressure, more recent work implicates these hormones in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and fibrosis, the modulation of immunity and of carbohydrate metabolism, and the control of various central nervous functions and even behavior. This review focuses on the physiological interactions between CTS and other regulatory systems that may be important in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension, preeclampsia, end-stage renal disease, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. Based on our increasing understanding of the regulation of CTS as well as the molecular mechanisms of these hormone increases, we also discuss potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:19325075

  11. Drawing a fine line on endogenous retroelement activity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Diaz, Nathaly; Friedli, Marc; Trono, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroelements (EREs) are essential motors of evolution yet require careful control to prevent genomic catastrophes, notably during the vulnerable phases of epigenetic reprogramming that occur immediately after fertilization and in germ cells. Accordingly, a variety of mechanisms restrict these mobile genetic units. Previous studies have revealed the importance of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) and their cofactor, KAP1, in the early embryonic silencing of endogenous retroviruses and so-called SVAs, but the implication of this transcriptional repression system in the control of LINE-1, the only known active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome, was thought to be marginal. Two recent studies straighten the record by revealing that the KRAB/KAP system is key to the control of L1 in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and go further in demonstrating that DNA methylation and KRAB/KAP1-induced repression contribute to this process in an evolutionally dynamic fashion. These results shed light on the delicate equilibrium between higher vertebrates and endogenous retroelements, which are not just genetic invaders calling for strict control but rather a constantly renewed and nicely exploitable source of evolutionary potential. PMID:26442176

  12. Endogenous hepadnaviruses in the genome of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and the evolution of avian hepadnaviruses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Holmes, Edward C

    2012-07-01

    Endogenous hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses [HBVs]) were recently discovered in the genomes of passerine birds. We mined six additional avian genomes and discovered multiple copies of endogenous HBVs in the budgerigar (order Psittaciformes), designated eBHBV. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that the endogenous hepadnaviruses are more diverse than their exogenous counterparts and that the endogenous and exogenous hepadnaviruses form distinct lineages even when sampled from the same avian order, indicative of multiple genomic integration events. PMID:22553337

  13. Endogenous Hepadnaviruses in the Genome of the Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and the Evolution of Avian Hepadnaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses [HBVs]) were recently discovered in the genomes of passerine birds. We mined six additional avian genomes and discovered multiple copies of endogenous HBVs in the budgerigar (order Psittaciformes), designated eBHBV. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that the endogenous hepadnaviruses are more diverse than their exogenous counterparts and that the endogenous and exogenous hepadnaviruses form distinct lineages even when sampled from the same avian order, indicative of multiple genomic integration events. PMID:22553337

  14. Regulated expression of human CD4 rescues helper T cell development in mice lacking expression of endogenous CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1993-01-01

    During T cell development, precursor thymocytes that co-express the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins give rise to mature progeny expressing one of these molecules to the exclusion of the other. Continued expression of only CD4 is the hallmark of mature helper T cells, whereas cytotoxic T cells express CD8 and extinguish CD4. The differentiation program that generates the two T cell subsets is likely to be intimately tied to regulation of expression of these cell surface molecules. We now describe the use of a murine CD4 enhancer in the generation of transgenic mice expressing physiologic levels of human CD4. The transgene is appropriately regulated during T cell development and includes the necessary cis-acting sequences for extinguishing expression in the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, in mice whose endogenous CD4 gene is inactivated, the transgenic human CD4 mediates rescue of the CD4 lineage and restoration of normal helper cell functions. The generation of these mice exemplifies a general approach for developing reliable animal models for the human immune system. Images PMID:8467804

  15. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  16. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  17. Adhesion: a confounding bias in murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fang; Fu, Zhiren; Wang, Quanxing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common postsurgical phenomenon among the human population. This complication also occurs in murine transplant models. In this study, we investigated the impact of adhesion on murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation by using sodium hyaluronate (SH) as an anti-adhesive agent. Our study revealed that SH administration produced no significant effect on histological change, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 expression, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, or neutrophil and macrophage counts. Our findings suggest that SH was biocompatible and non-immunogenic. Later, we observed that adhesion not only affected the survival of the graft without mediating rejection, but was closely related to the severity of rejection as manifested by larger and more severe adhesion formation in total-allomismatched and MHC class II-allomismatched murine cardiac allografts. Therefore, we inferred that using the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model may lead to an exaggerated p-value in statistical significance testing which could mislead experimenters in considering that the results are more significant than the fact. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that proves that adhesion was a confounding bias in the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model and highlights the possibilities for improvement in future use. PMID:26550450

  18. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  19. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-11-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  20. Endogenous technological and demographic change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Ertsen, Maurits; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-05-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  1. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  2. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  3. The purification and properties of cancer procoagulant from murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, W R

    1992-04-30

    The protease, cancer procoagulant, was isolated from three murine metastatic tumors and was purified to apparent homogeneity (SDS-PAGE) from Lewis lung cells by the sequence of (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DE-53 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephacryl 200 chromatography. The murine tumor enzyme has a molecular weight of 68,000 and Ca2+ is required for procoagulant and proteolytic activity; thus, the murine enzyme is very similar to that isolated from rabbit tumors. Two peptidyl chromogenic substrates of cancer procoagulant were discovered, facilitating kinetic and inhibition studies with the enzyme. The peptide substrate structures and the results of inhibition studies suggest that cancer procoagulant is thrombin-like in specificity but is a thiol protease.

  4. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  5. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Endogenous technological and demographic change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many ancient civilizations such as the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions. Even contemporary societies such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin, Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Skeptics of hydroclimatic determinism have often cautioned against the use of hydroclimatic change as the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions by suggesting that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity. We here develop a simple overlapping generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. It models technological change not as an exogenous random sequence of events but as an endogenous process (as is widely accepted in contemporary literature) that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the endogenous diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, individuals' patience in terms of its present consumption versus future consumption, the production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of these factors. The population growth rate is modeled to decline once consumption per capita crosses a ';survival' threshold. The model demonstrates that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but only to a certain extent in many cases. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water society, leading to an exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require that the rate of success of investment in technological advancement is high. In other more realistic cases of technological success, we find that endogenous technology change has an effect delaying the peak of population before it starts to decline. While the model is a rather simple model of societal growth, it is capable of replicating (not to scale) patterns of technological

  8. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  9. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  10. A comparative assessment of endogenous water institutional change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Ersten, Maurits

    2013-04-01

    This paper builds the theory of endogenous institutional change, first proposed by Greif and Laitin (2004), for water scarce regions in context of water institutions. The current emphasis on environmental change, including hydrological change, largely ignores the adaptation of human societies to change. Humans have mostly been considered as boundary conditions or parameters of the dynamics of hydrological change and are not considered as conduits of feedbacks. Nonetheless, the dynamical representation of hydrological change with feedbacks between various components of a system is assuring since it is reminiscent of processual ecological anthropology(Orlove, 1980), except that individual decision making is absent. This paper proposes to consider selected dryland basins of the world, to conceptualize proxies of water relevant socio-economic organisation, such as spatial scales of upstream-downstream cooperation in water use, synthesized over time and then proposes a comparative assessment to test regularities predicted by an extension of river game theory (Ambec and Ehlers, 2008; van der Brink et al, 2012) to endogenous institutional change. References: Orlove, B. S. (1980). Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 9 (1980), pp. 235-273. Greif. A. and D. D. Laitin (2004). A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change. American Political Science Review, Vol. 98, No. 4 November 2004. Ambec, S. and L. Ehlers (2008). Sharing a river amongst satiable agents. Games and Economic Behavior, 64, 35-50. Van der Brink, G. van der Laan and N. Moes (2012). Fair agreements for sharing international rivers with multiple springs and externalities. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 63, 388-403.

  11. Trafficking of an endogenous potassium channel in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Cheng, Yvonne; Dou, Ying; Goonesekara, Charitha; David, Jens-Peter; Steele, David F.; Huang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The roles of several small GTPases in the expression of an endogenous potassium current, Ito,f, in adult rat ventricular myocytes have been investigated. The results indicate that forward trafficking of newly synthesized Kv4.2, which underlies Ito,f in these cells, requires both Rab1 and Sar1 function. Expression of a Rab1 dominant negative (DN) reduced Ito,f current density by roughly one-half relative to control, mCherry-transfected myocytes. Similarly, expression of a Sar1DN nearly halved Ito,f current density. Rab11 is not essential to trafficking of Kv4.2, as expression of a Rab11DN had no effect on Ito,f over the time frames investigated here. In a process dependent on intact endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport, however, overexpression of wild-type Rab11 resulted in a doubling of Ito,f density; block of ER-to-Golgi traffic by Brefeldin A completely abrogated the effect. Also implicated in the trafficking of Kv4.2 are Rab5 and Rab4. Rab5DN expression increased endogenous Ito,f by two- to threefold, nonadditively with inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis. And, in a phenomenon similar to that previously reported for myoblast-expressed Kv1.5, Rab4DN expression roughly doubled endogenous peak transient currents. Colocalization experiments confirmed the involvement of Rab4 in postinternalization trafficking of Kv4.2. There was little role evident for the lysosome in the degradation of internalized Kv4.2, as overexpression of neither wild-type nor DN isoforms of Rab7 had any effect on Ito,f. Instead, degradation may depend largely on the proteasome; the proteasome inhibitor MG132 significantly increased Ito,f density. PMID:22914645

  12. Visualization of an endogenous retinoic acid gradient across embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2013-04-18

    In vertebrate development, the body plan is determined by primordial morphogen gradients that suffuse the embryo. Retinoic acid (RA) is an important morphogen involved in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of structures, including the hindbrain and paraxial mesoderm. RA diffuses over long distances, and its activity is spatially restricted by synthesizing and degrading enzymes. However, gradients of endogenous morphogens in live embryos have not been directly observed; indeed, their existence, distribution and requirement for correct patterning remain controversial. Here we report a family of genetically encoded indicators for RA that we have termed GEPRAs (genetically encoded probes for RA). Using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer we engineered the ligand-binding domains of RA receptors to incorporate cyan-emitting and yellow-emitting fluorescent proteins as fluorescence resonance energy transfer donor and acceptor, respectively, for the reliable detection of ambient free RA. We created three GEPRAs with different affinities for RA, enabling the quantitative measurement of physiological RA concentrations. Live imaging of zebrafish embryos at the gastrula and somitogenesis stages revealed a linear concentration gradient of endogenous RA in a two-tailed source-sink arrangement across the embryo. Modelling of the observed linear RA gradient suggests that the rate of RA diffusion exceeds the spatiotemporal dynamics of embryogenesis, resulting in stability to perturbation. Furthermore, we used GEPRAs in combination with genetic and pharmacological perturbations to resolve competing hypotheses on the structure of the RA gradient during hindbrain formation and somitogenesis. Live imaging of endogenous concentration gradients across embryonic development will allow the precise assignment of molecular mechanisms to developmental dynamics and will accelerate the application of approaches based on morphogen gradients to tissue engineering and

  13. Prostanoids inhibit release of endogenous norepinephrine from rat isolated trachea.

    PubMed

    Racké, K; Bähring, J; Langer, C; Bräutigam, M; Wessler, I

    1992-11-01

    Prostanoids, of epithelial origin, are known as modulators of several processes in the airways. The present study examined whether prostanoids are involved in the local control of sympathetic neurotransmission. The release of endogenous norepinephrine from rat isolated tracheae was evoked by electrical field stimulation (3 Hz, 540 pulses) in the presence of yohimbine, desipramine, and tyrosine. In different series of experiments, indomethacin (3 mumol/L) increased the evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine by 70 to 80%. In the presence of indomethacin, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and several prostanoid receptor agonists inhibited the evoked release of norepinephrine in a concentration-dependent manner, maximally by 60 to 70%. According to the concentration producing 35% inhibition of norepinephrine release (half-maximal effect), the following rank order of potencies was observed (EC35): nocloprost (8 nmol/L), sulprostone (30 nmol/L), PGE2 (308 nmol/L), iloprost (2 mumol/L), and U46619 (> 10 mumol/L). The EP1 receptor antagonist AH 6809 (3 mumol/L) had no effect on the evoked norepinephrine release and did not affect the inhibitory effect of 1 mumol/L of sulprostone. In the absence of indomethacin, the inhibitory effect of PGE2 was similar to that observed in the presence of indomethacin. After removal of the epithelium, the evoked norepinephrine release was markedly reduced. However, no significant effect of indomethacin was observed in epithelium-denuded tracheae. In conclusion, norepinephrine release in the rat trachea is inhibited via prostaglandin receptors that have the pharmacologic characteristics of the EP3 subtype. Endogenous eicosanoids, most likely of epithelial origin, are involved in the local control of the release of norepinephrine. PMID:1443867

  14. Endogenous Bioactive Lipids and the Regulation of Conventional Outflow Facility

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhou; Woodward, David F.; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Summary Perturbation of paracrine signaling within the human conventional outflow pathway influences tissue homeostasis and outflow function. For example, exogenous introduction of the bioactive lipids, sphingosine-1-phosphate, anandamide or prostaglandin F2α, to conventional outflow tissues alters the rate of drainage of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork, and into Schlemm’s canal. This review summarizes recent data that characterizes endogenous bioactive lipids, their receptors and associated signaling partners in the conventional outflow tract. We also discuss the potential of targeting such signaling pathways as a strategy for the development of therapeutics to treat ocular hypertension and glaucoma. PMID:19381354

  15. Endogenous RNA viruses of plants in insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from RNA viruses with no DNA stage are rare, especially those where the parental viruses possess single-strand positive-sense (ssRNA+) genomes. Here we provide evidence that EVEs that share a sequence similarity to ssRNA+viruses of plants are integrated into the genomes of a number of insects, including mosquito, fruit flies, bees, ant, silkworm, pea aphid, Monarch butterfly, and wasps. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis places these EVEs as divergent relatives of the Virgaviridae and three currently unclassified plant viral species. PMID:22410578

  16. Imaging of endogenous RNA using genetically encoded probes.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takeaki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    Imaging of RNAs in single cells revealed their localized transcription and specific function. Such information cannot be obtained from bulk measurements. This unit contains a protocol of an imaging method capable of visualizing endogenous RNAs bound to genetically encoded fluorescent probes in single living cells. The protocol includes methods of design and construction of the probes, their characterization, and imaging a target RNA in living cells. The methods for RNA imaging are generally applicable to many kinds of RNAs and may allow for elucidating novel functions of localized RNAs and understanding their dynamics in living cells. Curr. Protoc. Chem. Biol. 3:27-37 © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of the endogenous glucocorticoid hypothesis of denervation atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Max, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects are studied of the oral administration of RU38486, a potent selective glucocorticoid antagonist, on muscle weight, non-collagen protein content, and selected enzyme activities (choline acetyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamine synthetase) following denervation of rat skeletal muscle. Neither decreases in muscle weight, protein content, and choline acetyltransferase activity, nor increases in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogernase and glutamine synthetase were affected by RU38486. These data do not support the hypothesis that denervation atrophy results from enhanced sensitivity of muscle to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  18. Regulation of endothelial VCAM-1 expression in murine cardiac grafts. Roles for TNF and IL4.

    PubMed Central

    Bergese, S.; Pelletier, R.; Vallera, D.; Widmer, M.; Orosz, C.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo mechanisms of vascular endothelial activation and VCAM-1 expression were studied in murine heterotopic cardiac grafts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that cardiac allograft endothelia develop reactivity with MECA-32 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and M/K-2 (anti-VCAM-1) MAb within 3 days of transplantation, whereas cardiac isografts develop MECA-32 reactivity but no M/K-2 reactivity. Additional studies demonstrated that a single treatment of cardiac isograft recipients with the anti-CD3 MAb 145-2C11 induces VCAM-1 expression on isograft microvascular endothelia within 24 hours. We have used this experimental system to identify the cytokines responsible for expression of VCAM-1 and MECA-32 MAb reactivity on graft vascular endothelia. We report that the expression of VCAM-1 on isograft endothelia that was induced with anti-CD3 MAb was blocked by simultaneous treatment with either pentoxifylline, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR-Fc), anti-IL4 MAb, or soluble IL4R, but not by anti-IFN-gamma MAb. Alternatively, a similar pattern of isograft endothelial VCAM-1 expression was stimulated in the absence of anti-CD3 MAbs with a single injection of human recombinant TNF-alpha, or with recombinant murine IL4 provided as IL4/anti-IL4 MAb complexes. In addition, the IL4-induced VCAM-1 expression was completely blocked by a single intravenous treatment of the isograft recipients with TNFR:Fc. This suggests that high concentrations of TNF-alpha can stimulate endothelial VCAM-1 expression, but these concentrations are apparently not achieved in cardiac isografts. In the absence of an inducing agent such as anti-CD3 MAb, the stimulation of VCAM-1 expression with exogenous IL4 may reflect functional interaction between endogenous TNF and exogenous IL4, as suggested by the blocking experiments with TNFR:Fc. Although cardiac isograft endothelia normally develop reactivity with MECA-32 MAb within 3 days of transplantation, treatment of cardiac isograft

  19. Extracellular purine metabolism and signaling of CD73-derived adenosine in murine Treg and Teff cells.

    PubMed

    Romio, Michael; Reinbeck, Benjamin; Bongardt, Sabine; Hüls, Sandra; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    CD73-derived adenosine acts as potent inhibitor of inflammation, and regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to express CD73 as a novel marker. This study explored the role of endogenously formed adenosine in modulating NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine release from murine Treg and effector T cells (Teff) including key enzymes/purinergic receptors of extracellular ATP catabolism. Stimulating murine splenocytes and CD4(+) T cells with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 significantly upregulated activated NF-κB in CD73(-/-) T cells (wild type: 4.36 ± 0.21; CD73(-/-): 6.58 ± 0.75; n = 4; P = 0.029). This was associated with an augmented release of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Similar changes were observed with the CD73 inhibitor APCP (50 μM) on NF-κB and IFN-γ in wild-type CD4(+) T-cells. Treatment of stimulated CD4(+) T-cells with adenosine (25 μM) potently reduced IFN-γ release which is mediated by adenosine A2a receptors (A2aR). AMP (50 μM) also reduced cytokine release which was not inhibited by APCP. In Teff, A2aR activation (CGS21680) potently inhibited the release of IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), CCL3, and CCL4. However, in Treg, CGS21680 did not alter cytokine/chemokine release. In summary, CD73-derived adenosine tonically inhibits active NF-κB in CD4(+) T-cells, thereby modulating the release of a broad spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Downregulation of P2X7 and upregulation of CD73 in Treg after antigenic stimulation may be an important mechanism to maintain the ability of Treg to generate immunosuppressive adenosine.

  20. Guanylate cyclase C limits systemic dissemination of a murine enteric pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guanylate Cyclase C (GC-C) is an apically-oriented transmembrane receptor that is expressed on epithelial cells of the intestine. Activation of GC-C by the endogenous ligands guanylin or uroguanylin elevates intracellular cGMP and is implicated in intestinal ion secretion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intestinal barrier function, as well as the susceptibility of the intestine to inflammation. Our aim was to determine if GC-C is required for host defense during infection by the murine enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium of the family Enterobacteriacea. Methods GC-C+/+ control mice or those having GC-C genetically ablated (GC-C−/−) were administered C. rodentium by orogastric gavage and analyzed at multiple time points up to post-infection day 20. Commensal bacteria were characterized in uninfected GC-C+/+ and GC-C−/− mice using 16S rRNA PCR analysis. Results GC-C−/− mice had an increase in C. rodentium bacterial load in stool relative to GC-C+/+. C. rodentium infection strongly decreased guanylin expression in GC-C+/+ mice and, to an even greater degree, in GC-C−/− animals. Fluorescent tracer studies indicated that mice lacking GC-C, unlike GC-C+/+ animals, had a substantial loss of intestinal barrier function early in the course of infection. Epithelial cell apoptosis was significantly increased in GC-C−/− mice following 10 days of infection and this was associated with increased frequency and numbers of C. rodentium translocation out of the intestine. Infection led to significant liver histopathology in GC-C−/− mice as well as lymphocyte infiltration and elevated cytokine and chemokine expression. Relative to naïve GC-C+/+ mice, the commensal microflora load in uninfected GC-C−/− mice was decreased and bacterial composition was imbalanced and included outgrowth of the Enterobacteriacea family. Conclusions This work demonstrates the novel finding that GC-C signaling is an essential component of host defense during

  1. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  2. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  3. Intergenerational redistribution in a small open economy with endogenous fertility.

    PubMed

    Kolmar, M

    1997-08-01

    The literature comparing fully funded (FF) and pay-as-you-go (PAYG) financed public pension systems in small, open economies stresses the importance of the Aaron condition as an empirical measure to decide which system can be expected to lead to a higher long-run welfare. A country with a PAYG system has a higher level of utility than a country with a FF system if the growth rate of total wage income exceeds the interest rate. Endogenizing population growth makes one determinant of the growth rate of wage incomes endogenous. The author demonstrates why the Aaron condition ceases to be a good indicator in this case. For PAYG-financed pension systems, claims can be calculated according to individual contributions or the number of children in a family. Analysis determined that for both structural determinants there is no interior solution of the problem of intergenerational utility maximization. Pure systems are therefore always welfare maximizing. Moreover, children-related pension claims induce a fiscal externality which tends to be positive. The determination of the optimal contribution rate shows that the Aaron condition is generally a misleading indicator for the comparison of FF and PAYG-financed pension systems.

  4. Presynaptic Control of Corticostriatal Synapses by Endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABAB receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABAA, and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABAB receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABAB receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  5. Human neuromelanin: an endogenous microglial activator for dopaminergic neuron death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zecca, Luigi; Wilson, Belinda; Ren, RW; Wang, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that neuroinflammation caused by over-activation of microglial in the substantia nigra is critical in the pathogenesis of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing data demonstrates that environmental factors such as rotenone, paraquat play pivotal roles in the death of dopaminergic neurons. Here, potential role and mechanism of neuromelanin (NM), a major endogenous component in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, on microglial activation and associated dopaminergic neurotoxicity were investigated. Using multiple well-established primary mesencephalic cultures, we tested whether human NM (HNM) could activate microglia, thereby provoking dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrated that in primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, HNM caused dopaminergic neuronal damage characterized by the decreased dopamine uptake and reduced numbers and shorted dendrites of dopaminergic neurons. HNM-induced degeneration was relatively selective to dopaminergic neurons since the other types of neurons determined by either gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake and total neuronal numbers after staining showed smaller decrease. We demonstrated that HNM produced modest dopaminergic neurotoxicity in neuron-enriched cultures; in contrast, much greater neurotoxicity was observed in the presence of microglia. HNM-induced microglial activation was shown by morphological changes and production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. These results suggest that HNM, once released from damaged dopaminergic neurons, can be an potent endogenous activator involved in the reactivation of microglia, which may mediate disease progression. Thus, inhibition of reactive microglia can be a useful strategy for PD therapy. PMID:23276965

  6. Endogenous change: on cooperation and water in ancient history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.

    2013-04-01

    We propose and test the theory of endogenous change based on historical reconstructions of two ancient civilizations, Indus and Hohokam, in two water scarce basins, the Indus basin in the Indian subcontinent and the Lower Colorado basin in Southwestern United States. The endogenous institutional change sees changes in institutions as a sequence of equilibria brought about by changes in "quasi-parameters" such as rainfall, population density, soil and land use induced water resource availability. In the historical reconstructions of ancient civilizations, institutions are proximated by the scale of cooperation be it in the form of the extent of trade, sophisticated irrigation network, a centrally planned state or a loosely held state with a common cultural identity. The "quasi-parameters" either change naturally or are changed by humans and the changes affect the stability of cooperative structures over time. However, human influenced changes in the quasi-parameters itself are conditioned on the scale of existing cooperative structures. We thus provide insights into the quantitative dimensions of water access by ancient populations and its co-evolution with the socioeconomic and sociopolitical organization of the human past. We however do not suggest that water manipulation was the single most significant factor in stimulating social development and complexity - clearly this has been shown as highly reductionist, even misleading. The paper cautiously contributes to proximate prediction of hydrological change by attempting to understand the complexity of coupled human-hydrological systems.

  7. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: (1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, (2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and (3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: (1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, (2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and (3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  8. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  9. Endogenous cannabinoid system as a modulator of food intake.

    PubMed

    Cota, D; Marsicano, G; Lutz, B; Vicennati, V; Stalla, G K; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2003-03-01

    The ability of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) to increase hunger has been noticed for centuries, although intensive research on its molecular mode of action started only after the characterization of its main psychoactive component Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the late 1960s. Despite the public concern related to the abuse of marijuana and its derivatives, scientific studies have pointed to the therapeutic potentials of cannabinoid compounds and have highlighted their ability to stimulate appetite, especially for sweet and palatable food. Later, the discovery of specific receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) suggested the existence of an endogenous cannabinoid system, providing a physiological basis for biological effects induced by marijuana and other cannabinoids. Epidemiological reports describing the appetite-stimulating properties of cannabinoids and the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cannabinoid action have proposed a central role of the cannabinoid system in obesity. The aim of this review is to provide an extensive overview on the role of this neuromodulatory system in feeding behavior by summarizing the most relevant data obtained from human and animal studies and by elucidating the interactions of the cannabinoid system with the most important neuronal networks and metabolic pathways involved in the control of food intake. Finally, a critical evaluation of future potential therapeutical applications of cannabinoid antagonists in the therapy of obesity and eating disorders will be discussed.

  10. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, M F

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: 1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, 2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and 3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: 1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, 2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and 3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature. PMID:11538627

  11. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  12. Discovery and characterization of an endogenous CXCR4 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zirafi, Onofrio; Kim, Kyeong-Ae; Ständker, Ludger; Mohr, Katharina B; Sauter, Daniel; Heigele, Anke; Kluge, Silvia F; Wiercinska, Eliza; Chudziak, Doreen; Richter, Rudolf; Moepps, Barbara; Gierschik, Peter; Vas, Virag; Geiger, Hartmut; Lamla, Markus; Weil, Tanja; Burster, Timo; Zgraja, Andreas; Daubeuf, Francois; Frossard, Nelly; Hachet-Haas, Muriel; Heunisch, Fabian; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Pérez-Castells, Javier; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Schneider, Marion; Shorter, James; Telenti, Amalio; Hocher, Berthold; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Bonig, Halvard; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan

    2015-05-01

    CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling controls multiple physiological processes and its dysregulation is associated with cancers and inflammatory diseases. To discover as-yet-unknown endogenous ligands of CXCR4, we screened a blood-derived peptide library for inhibitors of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains. This approach identified a 16 amino acid fragment of serum albumin as an effective and highly specific CXCR4 antagonist. The endogenous peptide, termed EPI-X4, is evolutionarily conserved and generated from the highly abundant albumin precursor by pH-regulated proteases. EPI-X4 forms an unusual lasso-like structure and antagonizes CXCL12-induced tumor cell migration, mobilizes stem cells, and suppresses inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, the peptide is abundant in the urine of patients with inflammatory kidney diseases and may serve as a biomarker. Our results identify EPI-X4 as a key regulator of CXCR4 signaling and introduce proteolysis of an abundant precursor protein as an alternative concept for chemokine receptor regulation. PMID:25921529

  13. Endogenous cortisol levels influence exposure therapy in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Michael, Tanja

    2014-09-01

    Previous research in patients with phobia showed that the administration of glucocorticoids reduces fear in phobic situations and enhances exposure therapy. Glucocorticoids underlie a daily cycle with a peak in the morning and low levels during the evening and night. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure is more effective when conducted in the morning when endogenous cortisol levels are high. Sixty patients meeting DSM IV criteria for specific phobia (animal type) were randomly assigned to one-session exposure treatment either at 08.00 a.m. (high cortisol group) or at 06.00 p.m. (low cortisol group). Participants returned for a posttreatment assessment one week after therapy and a follow-up assessment three months after therapy. Both groups showed good outcome, but patients treated in the morning exhibited significantly less fear of spiders in the behavioral approach test (BAT) and a trend for lower scores on the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) than patients treated in the evening. This effect was present at posttreatment and follow-up. Our findings indicate that exposure therapy is more effective in the morning than in the evening. We suggest that this may be due to higher endogenous cortisol levels in the morning group that enhance extinction memory.

  14. Spatial models of political competition with endogenous political parties.

    PubMed

    Laver, Michael; Schilperoord, Michel

    2007-09-29

    Two important human action selection processes are the choice by citizens of parties to support in elections and the choice by party leaders of policy 'packages' offered to citizens in order to attract this support. Having reviewed approaches analysing these choices and the reasons for doing this using the methodology of agent-based modelling, we extend a recent agent-based model of party competition to treat the number and identity of political parties as an output of, rather than an input to, the process of party competition. Party birth is modelled as an endogenous change of agent type from citizen to party leader, which requires describing citizen dissatisfaction with the history of the system. Endogenous birth and death of parties transforms into a dynamic system even in an environment where all agents have otherwise non-responsive adaptive rules. A key parameter is the survival threshold, with lower thresholds leaving citizens on average less dissatisfied. Paradoxically, the adaptive rule most successful for party leaders in winning votes makes citizens on average less happy than under other policy-selection rules.

  15. Coevolution of endogenous Betaretroviruses of sheep and their host

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, F.; Varela, M.; Spencer, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    Sheep betaretroviruses offer a unique model system to study the complex interaction between retroviruses and their host. Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a pathogenic exogenous retrovirus and the causative agent of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. The sheep genome contains at least 27 copies of endogenous retroviruses (enJSRVs) highly related to JSRV. enJSRVs have played several roles in the evolution of the domestic sheep as they are able to block the JSRV replication cycle and play a critical role in sheep conceptus development and placental morphogenesis. Available data strongly suggest that some dominant negative enJSRV proviruses (i.e. able to block JSRV replication) have been positively selected during evolution. Interestingly, viruses escaping the transdominant enJSRV loci have recently emerged (less than 200 years ago). Thus, endogenization of these retroviruses may still be occurring today. Therefore, sheep provide an exciting and unique system to study retrovirus-host coevolution. (Part of a Multi-author Review) PMID:18818869

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization of nucleic acid with endogenously bound manganese.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Patricia; Kaushik, Monu; Richter, Diane; Vogel, Marc; Suess, Beatrix; Corzilius, Björn

    2015-09-01

    We report the direct dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of (13)C nuclei of a uniformly [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled, paramagnetic full-length hammerhead ribozyme (HHRz) complex with Mn(2+) where the enhanced polarization is fully provided by the endogenously bound metal ion and no exogenous polarizing agent is added. A (13)C enhancement factor of ε = 8 was observed by intra-complex DNP at 9.4 T. In contrast, "conventional" indirect and direct DNP experiments were performed using AMUPol as polarizing agent where we obtained a (1)H enhancement factor of ε ≈ 250. Comparison with the diamagnetic (Mg(2+)) HHRz complex shows that the presence of Mn(2+) only marginally influences the (DNP-enhanced) NMR properties of the RNA. Furthermore two-dimensional correlation spectra ((15)N-(13)C and (13)C-(13)C) reveal structural inhomogeneity in the frozen, amorphous state indicating the coexistence of several conformational states. These demonstrations of intra-complex DNP using an endogenous metal ion as well as DNP-enhanced MAS NMR of RNA in general yield important information for the development of new methods in structural biology. PMID:26219517

  17. Endogenous ouabain in renal Na(+) handling and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Manunta, Paolo; Messaggio, Elisabetta; Casamassima, Nunzia; Gatti, Guido; Carpini, Simona Delli; Zagato, Laura; Hamlyn, John M

    2010-12-01

    The Na(+) pump and its Endogenous modulator Ouabain (EO) can be considered as an ancestral enzymatic system, conserved among species ranging from Drosophila to humans, related to Na handling. In this review, we examine how EO is linked with vascular function in hypertension and if it impacts the pathogenesis of heart and renal failure. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of endogenous ouabain-linked hypertension involves the sodium pump/sodium-calcium exchanger duet. Biosynthesis of EO occurs in adrenal glands and is under the control of angiotensin II, ACTH and epinephrine. Elevated concentrations of EO and in the sub-nanomolar concentration range were found to stimulate proliferation and differentiation of cardiac and smooth muscle cells. They may have a primary role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and failure. Experimental data suggest that the Na/K-ATPase α(2)-catalytic subunit causes EO-induced vasoconstriction. Finally, maneuvers that promote Na depletion, as diuretic therapy or reduced Na intake, raise the EO levels. Taken together, these findings suggest a key role for EO in body Na homeostasis.

  18. Studies on endogenous circulating calcium entry blocker and stimulator

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, P.K.T.; Yang, M.C.M.

    1986-03-01

    Several synthetic compounds have been studied extensively for their calcium entry blockade and stimulation in smooth muscles. It is hypothesized that there should be endogenous substances which control calcium entry into cells. We recently investigated the effect of some vasoactive hormones on calcium entry. Our studies on rat tail artery helical strip showed that the in vitro vasoconstriction produced by arginine vasopressin (AVP) decreased stepwise with decreasing concentration of both calcium. After exposure of the tail artery to calcium-free Ringer's solution for 1 minute or longer, the tissue lost its ability to respond to AVP. Subsequent addition of calcium to the medium produced immediate contraction. Measurements of low affinity lanthanum resistant pool of calcium with /sup 45/Ca showed that AVP increased calcium uptake by tail artery in a dose-dependent manner. In another study rat tail artery helical strip indicated that the vasorelaxing action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related to an inhibition of calcium uptake. AVP or 60 mM potassium chloride increased the low affinity lanthanum resistant pool of calcium in rate tail artery and PTH inhibited the increase. In conclusion, AVP and PTH may behave like endogenous calcium entry stimulator and inhibitor respectively in vascular tissues.

  19. Endogenous triacylglycerol utilization by the isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Savino, E A

    1988-03-01

    The isolated atria from 24 h fasted rats, either in the presence of glucose or in a substrate-free medium containing 2-deoxyglucose, mobilized the endogenous triacylglycerol (TG) to a greater extent than those from fed rats. The TG of the fasted atria had almost disappeared at the end of the 90 min incubation in the substrate-free plus 2-deoxyglucose medium, whereas in those from fed rats a mobilization-resistant portion of about 40% of the TG pool remained. This finding coincided with a lower decay of the contractile and pacemaker activities in the atria from fasted rats. Insulin abolished the TG mobilization in the atria from fed rats in the presence of glucose, but it was ineffective in the fasted atria. These data suggest that the endogenous-TG and glucose share in supporting the atrial functions, that insulin is involved in the control of TG consumption only in the fed state and that the greater TG mobilization in the fasted atria, at least partly, meets the energy requirements of the tissue.

  20. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  1. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well. PMID:23992420

  2. Effects of endogenous antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on macrophage phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Repollet, E.; Opava-Stitzer, S.; Tiffany, S.; Schwartz, A.

    1983-07-01

    Although several studies have indicated that antidiuretic hormone (ADH) enhances the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in shock syndromes, it remains unknown what influence ADH exerts upon the individual phagocytic components of this system. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of endogenous ADH on the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage cells. As a phagocytic stimuli, fluorescent methacrylate microbeads were injected intraperitoneally into Brattleboro (ADH deficient) and normal Long Evans rats in the presence and absence of exogenous ADH. Peritoneal cells were harvested 19-22 hr after the administration of the microbeads and the percent phagocytosis was determined in macrophage cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Our results indicate that the percentage of peritoneal macrophages ingesting the fluorescent methacrylate microbeads was significantly reduced in the absence of ADH (Brattleboro rats: 5.4 +/- 0.6% versus Long Evans rats: 16.8 +/- 2.3%; p less than 0.001). In addition, our data demonstrate that exogenous administration of ADH significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in Brattleboro (14.7 +/- 2.2%) and normal Long Evans (49.6 +/- 4.5%) rats. These data suggest, for the first time, that endogenous ADH might play a modulatory role in the phagocytic activity of a specific component of the RES, namely, the macrophage cell.

  3. Endogenous repair after spinal cord contusion injuries in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M S; Bresnahan, J C; Komon, J; Tovar, C A; Van Meter, M; Anderson, D K; Faden, A I; Hsu, C Y; Noble, L J; Salzman, S; Young, W

    1997-12-01

    Contusion injuries of the rat thoracic spinal cord were made using a standardized device developed for the Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS). Lesions of different severity were studied for signs of endogenous repair at times up to 6 weeks following injury. Contusion injuries produced a typical picture of secondary damage resulting in the destruction of the cord center and the chronic sparing of a peripheral rim of fibers which varied in amount depending upon the injury magnitude. It was noted that the cavities often developed a dense cellular matrix that became partially filled with nerve fibers and associated Schwann cells. The amount of fiber and Schwann cell ingrowth was inversely related to the severity of injury and amount of peripheral fiber sparing. The source of the ingrowing fibers was not determined, but many of them clearly originated in the dorsal roots. In addition to signs of regeneration, we noted evidence for the proliferation of cells located in the ependymal zone surrounding the central canal at early times following contusion injuries. These cells may contribute to the development of cellular trabeculae that provide a scaffolding within the lesion cavity that provides the substrates for cellular infiltration and regeneration of axons. Together, these observations suggest that the endogenous reparative response to spinal contusion injury is substantial. Understanding the regulation and restrictions on the repair processes might lead to better ways in which to encourage spontaneous recovery after CNS injury. PMID:9417825

  4. The role of endogenous H2S in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Gouliaev, Anja; Aalling, Mathilde; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the endogenous gas hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule of considerable biological potential and has been suggested to be involved in a vast number of physiological processes. In the vascular system, H2S is synthesized from cysteine by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) and 3- mercaptopyruvate sulfuresterase (3MST) and CSE in the endothelial cells. In pulmonary and systemic arteries, H2S induces relaxation and/or contraction dependent on the concentration of H2S, type of vessel and species. H2S relaxes SMC through a direct effect on KATP-channels or Kv-channels causing hyperpolarization and closure of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels followed by a reduction in intracellular calcium. H2S also relaxes SMC through the release of endothelium- derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. H2S contracts SMC through a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) availability by reacting with NO forming a nitrosothiol compound and through an inhibitory effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) as well as a reduction in SMC cyclic AMP concentration. Evidence supports a role for H2S in oxygen sensing. Furthermore, reduced endogenous H2S production may also play a role in ischemic heart diseases and hypertension, and treatment with H2S donors and cysteine analogues may be beneficial in treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Silent no more: Endogenous small RNA pathways promote gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wedeles, Christopher J; Wu, Monica Z; Claycomb, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous small RNA pathways related to RNA interference (RNAi) play a well-documented role in protecting host genomes from the invasion of foreign nucleic acids. In C. elegans, the PIWI type Argonaute, PRG-1, through an association with 21U-RNAs, mediates a genome surveillance process by constantly scanning the genome for potentially deleterious invading elements. Upon recognition of foreign nucleic acids, PRG-1 initiates a cascade of cytoplasmic and nuclear events that results in heritable epigenetic silencing of these transcripts and their coding genomic loci. If the PRG-1/21U-RNA genome surveillance pathway has the capacity to target most of the C. elegans transcriptome, what mechanisms exist to protect endogenous transcripts from being silenced by this pathway? In this commentary, we discuss three recent publications that implicate the CSR-1 small RNA pathway in the heritable activation of germline transcripts, propose a model as to why not all epialleles behave similarly, and touch on the practical implications of these findings.

  6. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: 1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, 2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and 3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: 1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, 2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and 3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  7. Endogenous patterns of mechanical stress are required for branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterning of cell behaviors establishes the regional differences within tissues that collectively develop branched organs into their characteristic treelike shapes. Here we show that the pattern of branching morphogenesis of three-dimensional (3D) engineered epithelial tissues is controlled in part by gradients of endogenous mechanical stress. We used microfabrication to build model mammary epithelial tissues of defined geometry that branched in a stereotyped pattern when induced with growth factors. Branches initiated from sites of high mechanical stress within the tissues, as predicted numerically and measured directly using 3D traction force microscopy. Branch sites were defined by activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), inhibition of which disrupted morphogenesis. Stress, FAK activation, and branching were all altered by manipulating cellular contractility, matrix stiffness, intercellular cohesion and tissue geometry. These data suggest that the pattern and magnitude of mechanical stress across epithelial tissues cooperate with biochemical signals to specify branching pattern. Insight, innovation, integration Morphogenesis is ultimately a physical process wherein tissues are sculpted into their final three-dimensional (3D) patterns. Mechanical stresses from the microenvironment can also play regulatory roles, but their influence on pattern is difficult to ascertain in 3D systems in vivo. Here we integrate 3D microscale engineered tissues with insight from biological mechanics to understand the role of endogenous mechanical stresses in patterning tissue development. The innovation lies in the use of numerical modeling to design experiments that can predict the stress distribution and resulting morphogenesis of model tissues. PMID:20717570

  8. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  9. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  10. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    PubMed

    Much, Christian; Auchynnikava, Tania; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2016-06-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  11. Elevations of Endogenous Kynurenic Acid Produce Spatial Working Memory Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Chess, Amy C.; Simoni, Michael K.; Alling, Torey E.; Bucci, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a tryptophan metabolite that is synthesized and released by astrocytes and acts as a competitive antagonist of the glycine site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors at high concentrations and as a noncompetitive antagonist of the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at low concentrations. The discovery of increased cortical KYNA levels in schizophrenia prompted the hypothesis that elevated KYNA concentration may underlie the working memory dysfunction observed in this population that has been attributed to altered glutamatergic and/or cholinergic transmission. The present study investigated the effect of elevated endogenous KYNA on spatial working memory function in rats. Increased KYNA levels were achieved with intraperitoneal administration of kynurenine (100 mg/kg), the precursor of KYNA synthesis. Rats were treated with either kynurenine or a vehicle solution prior to testing in a radial arm maze task at various delays. Elevations of endogenous KYNA resulted in increased errors in the radial arm maze. In separate experiments, assessment of locomotor activity in an open field and latency to retrieve food reward from one of the maze arms ruled out the possibility that deficits in the maze were attributable to altered locomotor activity or motivation to consume food. These results provide evidence that increased KYNA levels produce spatial working memory deficits and are among the first to demonstrate the influence of glia-derived molecules on cognitive function. The implications for psychopathological conditions such as schizophrenia are discussed. PMID:16920787

  12. Endogenous allergens in the regulatory assessment of genetically engineered crops.

    PubMed

    Graf, Lynda; Hayder, Hikmat; Mueller, Utz

    2014-11-01

    A scientific approach to the assessment of foods derived from genetically engineered (GE) crops is critical to maintaining objectivity and public confidence in regulatory decisions. Principles developed at the international level support regulators and enable robust and transparent safety assessments. A comparison of key constituents in the GE crop with a suitable comparator is an important element of an assessment. In Europe, endogenous allergens would be included in the comparative analysis, however this approach has been hindered by technical limitations on the ability to accurately measure identified allergenic proteins. Over recent years, improved proteomic methods have enabled researchers to focus on major allergenic proteins in conventional food crops, as information on natural variability is largely lacking. Emerging data for soybean indicate that variability in levels of major allergens already in the food supply is broad. This raises questions about the biological interpretation of differences between a GE plant and its conventional counterpart, in particular, whether any conclusions about altered allergenicity could be inferred. This paper discusses the scientific justification for requiring proteomic analysis of endogenous allergens as part of the evaluation. Ongoing scientific review and corresponding international discussion are integral to ensuring that data requirements address legitimate risk assessment questions.

  13. Recombinant soluble interleukin-4 (IL-4) receptor acts as an antagonist of IL-4 in murine cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, A; Schröppel, K; Will, A; Enssle, K H; Lauffer, L; Röllinghoff, M

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the soluble interleukin-4 receptor (sIL-4R) as a potential antagonist of interleukin-4 (IL-4) in an infectious disease. It is shown that antigen-triggered proliferation and cytokine secretion of Leishmania major-specific, cloned Th2 cells in vitro can be inhibited dose dependently by recombinant murine, but not control human, sIL-4R. In vivo, we found that endogenous synthesis of IL-4 mRNA is upregulated during the first week of infection, while an increase of IL-4R mRNA occurred later after infection of BALB/c mice with L. major. To interfere successfully with the IL-4 ligand-receptor interaction, we therefore chose to treat infected BALB/c mice with recombinant sIL-4R during the onset (e.g., days 0 to 7) of the immune response. Treatment with murine, but not with human, sIL-4R during the first week of infection rendered BALB/c mice clinically resistant to L. major, led to a 7- to 12-fold reduction of the parasite load in spleen and lymph nodes at 7 weeks of infection, shifted the pattern of cytokines towards a Th1 type, and provided durable resistance against reinfection. Thus, it could be demonstrated that the balance among sIL-4R, membrane-bound IL-4R, and their ligand IL-4 can be modulated in vivo, thereby modifying the antiparasitic immune response. These results suggest a therapeutic value of sIL-4R in diseases in which neutralization of IL-4 is desirable. Images PMID:7927664

  14. Expression of human HLA-B27 transgene alters susceptibility to murine Theiler's virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Nickerson, C; Patick, A K; David, C S

    1991-04-15

    Infection of certain strains of mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in persistence of virus and an immune-mediated primary demyelination in the central nervous system that resembles multiple sclerosis. Because susceptibility/resistance to demyelination in B10 congeneic mice maps strongly to class I MHC genes (D region) we tested whether expression of a human class I MHC gene (HLA-B27) would alter susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination. Transgenic HLA-B27 mice were found to co-express human and endogenous mouse class I MHC genes by flow microfluorimetry analysis of PBL. In the absence of the human transgene, H-2stf, or v mice but not H-2b mice had chronic demyelination and persistence of virus at 45 days after infection. No difference in degree of demyelination, meningeal inflammation, or virus persistence was seen between transgenic HLA-B27 and nontransgenic littermate mice of H-2f or H-2v haplotype. In contrast, H-2s (HLA-B27+) mice showed a dramatic decrease in extent of demyelination and number of virus-Ag+ cells in the spinal cord compared with H-2s (HLA-B27-) littermate mice. In addition, none of the eight H-2s mice homozygous for HLA-B27 gene had spinal cord lesions even though infectious virus was isolated chronically from their central nervous system. Expression of HLA-B27 transgene did not interfere with the resistance to demyelination normally observed in B10 (H-2b) mice. These experiments demonstrate that expression of a human class I MHC gene can modulate a virus-induced demyelinating disease process in the mouse.

  15. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase1 Is an Organ-Specific Mediator of End Organ Damage in a Murine Model of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Schmitz, Christine; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; von Leitner, Robin; Klinke, Anna; Atzler, Dorothee; Krebs, Christian; Wieboldt, Hartwig; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Meinertz, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Böger, Rainer H.; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Background The endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and overall mortality. Moreover, elevated ADMA plasma concentrations are associated with the extent of hypertension. However, data from small-sized clinical trials and experimental approaches using murine transgenic models have revealed conflicting results regarding the impact of ADMA and its metabolizing enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Therefore, we investigated the role of ADMA and DDAH1 in hypertension-induced end organ damage using the uninephrectomized, deoxycorticosterone actetate salt, and angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in human DDAH1 (hDDAH1) overexpressing and wild-type (WT) mice. ADMA plasma concentrations differed significantly between hDDAH1 and WT mice at baseline, but did not significantly change during the induction of hypertension. hDDAH1 overexpression did not protect against hypertension-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy. In addition, the hypertension-induced impairment of the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic segments ex vivo was not significantly attenuated by hDDAH1 overexpression. However, hDDAH1 mice displayed an attenuated hypertensive inflammatory response in renal tissue, resulting in less hypertensive renal injury. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that hDDAH1 organ-specifically modulates the inflammatory response in this murine model of hypertension. The lack of protection in cardiac and aortic tissues may be due to DDAH1 tissue selectivity and/or the extent of hypertension by the used combined model. However, our study underlines the potency of hDDAH1 overexpression in modulating inflammatory processes as a crucial step in the pathogenesis of hypertension, which needs further experimental and clinical investigation. PMID:23110194

  16. Inhibition by RNA of RNase H Activity Associated with Reverse Transcriptase in Rauscher Murine Leukemia Virus Cores

    PubMed Central

    Sarngadharan, M. G.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Gallo, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    We reported earlier that core preparations of Rauscher murine leukemia virus, when separated on an isopycnic sucrose gradient, did not contain detectable levels of RNase H activity, while retaining high levels of reverse transcriptase activity. We reexamined this phenomenon, and the earlier observation was found to be reproducible. However, when doubly banded preparations of viral cores were solubilized and reverse transcriptase was isolated by ion-exchange chromatography, a coincident peak of a nuclease activity with the specificity of RNase H was observed, which indicated that RNase H was selectively inhibited in the core fractions. By direct activity measurements using the purified reverse transcriptase-RNase H from cores, this endogenous inhibitor has been identified as the viral RNA. Viral 70S RNA strongly inhibited RNase H activity purified either from whole virions or from prefractionated cores. Other RNAs tested that had inhibitory effects were yeast tRNA, polyadenylic acid, and polyguanylic acid. Polyuridylic acid and polyadenylic acid were moderately inhibitory, and polycytidylic acid did not inhibit the RNase H. A rabbit anti-reverse transcriptase immunoglobulin G inhibited both the reverse transcriptase and RNase H activities of the enzyme purified from cores. These data provide a rational explanation for the failure to detect RNase H activity in core preparations of Rauscher murine leukemia virus. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the idea that the RNase H and reverse transcriptase activities purified from cores reside on the same protein molecule. Possible biological implications of the observed inhibition of RNase H by RNA is discussed. PMID:81312

  17. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity.

  18. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity. PMID:19769960

  19. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 13 regulates Na+ channels and conduction velocity in murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Hennessey, Jessica A.; Kirkton, Robert D.; Wang, Chaojian; Graham, Victoria; Puranam, Ram S.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Bursac, Nenad; Pitt, Geoffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), a subfamily of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) that are incapable of functioning as growth factors, are intracellular modulators of Na+ channels and have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Although certain FHFs have been found in embryonic heart, they have not been reported in adult heart, and they have not been shown to regulate endogenous cardiac Na+ channels nor participate in cardiac pathophysiology. Objective We tested whether FHFs regulate Na+ channels in murine heart. Methods and Results We demonstrated that isoforms of FGF13 are the predominant FHFs in adult mouse ventricular myocytes. FGF13 binds directly to, and co-localizes with the Na 1.5 Na+ V channel in the sarcolemma of adult mouse ventricular myocytes. Knockdown of FGF13 in adult mouse ventricular myocytes revealed a loss-of-function of NaV1.5: reduced Na+ current (INa) density, decreased Na+ channel availability, and slowed INa recovery from inactivation. Cell surface biotinylation experiments showed a ~45% reduction in NaV1.5 protein at the sarcolemma after FGF13 knockdown, whereas no changes in whole-cell NaV1.5 protein nor mRNA level were observed. Optical imaging in neonatal rat ventricular myocyte monolayers demonstrated slowed conduction velocity and a reduced maximum capture rate after FGF13 knockdown. Conclusion These findings show that FHFs are potent regulators of Na+ channels in adult ventricular myocytes and suggest that loss-of-function mutations in FHFs may underlie a similar set of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies that result from NaV1.5 loss-of-function mutations. PMID:21817159

  20. A novel murine T-cell receptor targeting NY-ESO-1.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Shannon F; Parkhurst, Maria R; Hong, Young; Zheng, Zhili; Feldman, Steven A; Rao, Mahadev; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Beard, Rachel E; Xu, Hui; Black, Mary A; Robbins, Paul F; Schrump, David A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Cancer testis antigens, such as NY-ESO-1, are expressed in a variety of prevalent tumors and represent potential targets for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy. DNA encoding a murine anti-NY-ESO-1 TCR gene (mTCR) was isolated from immunized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and inserted into a γ-retroviral vector. Two mTCR vectors were produced and used to transduce human PBL. Transduced cells were cocultured with tumor target cell lines and T2 cells pulsed with the NY-ESO-1 peptide, and assayed for cytokine release and cell lysis activity. The most active TCR construct was selected for production of a master cell bank for clinical use. mTCR-transduced PBL maintained TCR expression in short-term and long-term culture, ranging from 50% to 90% efficiency 7-11 days after stimulation and 46%-82% 10-20 days after restimulation. High levels of interferon-γ secretion were observed (1000-12000 pg/mL), in tumor coculture assays and recognition of peptide-pulsed cells was observed at 0.1 ng/mL, suggesting that the new mTCR had high avidity for antigen recognition. mTCR-transduced T cells also specifically lysed human tumor targets. In all assays, the mTCR was equivalent or better than the comparable human TCR. As the functional activity of TCR-transduced cells may be affected by the formation of mixed dimers, mTCRs, which are less likely to form mixed dimers with endogenous hTCRs, may be more effective in vivo. This new mTCR targeted to NY-ESO-1 represents a novel potential therapeutic option for adoptive cell-transfer therapy for a variety of malignancies.

  1. The Effect of Mir-451 Upregulation on Erythroid Lineage Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Obeidi, Narges; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Masoud; Nikougoftar Zarif, Mahin; Kouhkan, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding regulatory RNAs that control mRNAs post-transcriptionally. Several mouse stem cells miRNAs are cloned differentially regulated in different hematopoietic lineages, suggesting their possible role in hematopoietic lineage differentiation. Recent studies have shown that specific miRNAs such as Mir-451 have key roles in erythropoiesis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were infected with lentiviruses containing pCDH-Mir-451. Erythroid differentiation was assessed based on the expression level of transcriptional factors (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chains (α, β, γ , ε and ζ) genes using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and presence of erythroid surface antigens (TER-119 and CD235a) using flow cytometery. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assay was also on days 14thand 21thafter transduction. Results Mature Mir-451 expression level increased by 3.434-fold relative to the untreated mESCs on day 4 after transduction (P<0.001). Mir-451 up-regulation correlated with the induction of transcriptional factor (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chain (α, β, γ, ε and ζ) genes in mESCs (P<0.001) and also showed a strong correlation with presence of CD235a and Ter- 119 markers in these cells (13.084and 13.327-fold increse, respectively) (P<0.05). Moreover, mESCs treated with pCDH-Mir-451 showed a significant raise in CFU-erythroid (CFU-E) colonies (5.2-fold) compared with untreated control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Our results showed that Mir-451 up-regulation strongly induces erythroid differentiation and maturation of mESCs. Overexpression of Mir-451 may have the potential to produce artificial red blood cells (RBCs) without the presence of any stimulatory cytokines. PMID:27540521

  2. A Murine Closed-chest Model of Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Chan; Boehm, Olaf; Meyer, Rainer; Hoeft, Andreas; Knüfermann, Pascal; Baumgarten, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Surgical trauma by thoracotomy in open-chest models of coronary ligation induces an immune response which modifies different mechanisms involved in ischemia and reperfusion. Immune response includes cytokine expression and release or secretion of endogenous ligands of innate immune receptors. Activation of innate immunity can potentially modulate infarct size. We have modified an existing murine closed-chest model using hanging weights which could be useful for studying myocardial pre- and postconditioning and the role of innate immunity in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. This model allows animals to recover from surgical trauma before onset of myocardial ischemia. Volatile anesthetics have been intensely studied and their preconditioning effect for the ischemic heart is well known. However, this protective effect precludes its use in open chest models of coronary artery ligation. Thus, another advantage could be the use of the well controllable volatile anesthetics for instrumentation in a chronic closed-chest model, since their preconditioning effect lasts up to 72 hours. Chronic heart diseases with intermittent ischemia and multiple hit models are other possible applications of this model. For the chronic closed-chest model, intubated and ventilated mice undergo a lateral blunt thoracotomy via the 4th intercostal space. Following identification of the left anterior descending a ligature is passed underneath the vessel and both suture ends are threaded through an occluder. Then, both suture ends are passed through the chest wall, knotted to form a loop and left in the subcutaneous tissue. After chest closure and recovery for 5 days, mice are anesthetized again, chest skin is reopened and hanging weights are hooked up to the loop under ECG control. At the end of the ischemia/reperfusion protocol, hearts can be stained with TTC for infarct size assessment or undergo perfusion fixation to allow morphometric studies in addition to histology and

  3. [Evaluation of the endogenous intoxication syndrome in food toxic infections].

    PubMed

    Marzhokhova, M Iu; Zhelikhazheva, Zh M

    2009-01-01

    To study the endogenous intoxication syndrome in patients with food toxic infections is essential in revealing the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this disease. For this, the authors measured the level of low and average molecular weight, as well as their protein component--oligopeptides in plasma, red blood cells, and urine in the course of the disease. There were increased levels of the study parameters, which depended on the stage and degree of a pathological process. The determination of the level of low and average molecular weight and oligopeptides in plasma, red blood cells, and urine may serve as a marker of the intoxication syndrome; the level of the study parameters may be used as additional criteria for the severity of the process, the prediction of disease development and comorbidity, and as a criterion for recovery completeness.

  4. Natural mutagenesis of human genomes by endogenous retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Iskow, Rebecca C.; McCabe, Michael T.; Mills, Ryan E.; Torene, Spencer; Pittard, W. Stephen; Neuwald, Andrew F.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Vertino, Paula M.; Devine, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Two abundant classes of mobile elements, namely Alu and L1 elements, continue to generate new retrotransposon insertions in human genomes. Estimates suggest that these elements have generated millions of new germline insertions in individual human genomes worldwide. Unfortunately, current technologies are not capable of detecting most of these young insertions, and the true extent of germline mutagenesis by endogenous human retrotransposons has been difficult to examine. Here, we describe new technologies for detecting these young retrotransposon insertions and demonstrate that such insertions indeed are abundant in human populations. We also found that new somatic L1 insertions occur at high frequencies in human lung cancer genomes. Genome-wide analysis suggests that altered DNA methylation may be responsible for the high levels of L1 mobilization observed in these tumors. Our data indicate that transposon-mediated mutagenesis is extensive in human genomes, and is likely to have a major impact on human biology and diseases. PMID:20603005

  5. Endogenous opioids: a proximate reward mechanism for kin selection?

    PubMed

    D'Amato, F R; Pavone, F

    1993-07-01

    The kin selection theory predicts that individuals would behave differently toward one another, depending on their genetic relatedness. Proximate mechanisms have been postulated to exist helping the individual to discriminate what is good or bad for him. Opioids have been discovered to be involved in the mediation of reinforcement, in particular they underlay social emotion. In this study it is shown that pain sensitivity decreased in male mice interacting with siblings following 2 months of separation; this analgesic response was antagonized by naloxone administration. Interaction with unknown and unrelated subjects did not change the nociceptive threshold. These results suggest that interacting with kin is an adaptive situation reinforced, at the neural level, by the release of endogenous opioids.

  6. Pluripotency and the endogenous retrovirus HERVH: Conflict or serendipity?

    PubMed

    Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Wang, Jichang; Singh, Manvendra; Mager, Dixie L; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-01-01

    Remnants of ancient retroviral infections during evolution litter all mammalian genomes. In modern humans, such endogenous retroviral (ERV) sequences comprise at least 8% of the genome. While ERVs and other types of transposable elements undoubtedly contribute to the genomic "junk yard", functions for some ERV sequences have been demonstrated, with growing evidence that ERVs can be important players in gene regulatory processes. Here we focus on one particular large family of human ERVs, termed HERVH, which several recent studies suggest has a key regulatory role in human pluripotent stem cells. Remarkably, this is not the first instance of an ERV controlling pluripotency. We speculate as to why this convergent evolution might have come about, suggesting that it may reflect selection on the virus to extend the time available for transposition. Alternatively it may reflect serendipity alone. PMID:26735931

  7. Human endogenous retrovirus K10 encodes a functional integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Y; Ayukawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanda, T; Yoshiike, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned a human endogenous retrovirus K1O DNA fragment encoding integrase and expressed it as a fusion protein with Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. Integrase activities were measured in vitro by using a double-stranded oligonucleotide as a substrate mimicking viral long terminal repeats (LTR). The fusion protein was highly active for both terminal cleavage and strand transfer in the presence of Mn2+ on the K1O LTR substrate. It was also active on both Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR substrates, whereas Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrases were active only on their corresponding LTR substrates. The results strongly suggest that K1O encodes a functional integrase with relaxed substrate specificity. PMID:8627815

  8. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  9. Serratia marcescens endogenous endophthalmitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Memon, Muhammad; Raman, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A systemically well 66-year-old white Caucasian man presented to the urgent care department with a short history of progressive pain and blurring of vision in his left eye. He denied a history of trauma, intraocular surgery or use of illicit drugs. He was diagnosed with endogenous endophthalmitis. Vitreous biopsy grew Serratia marcescens, a Gram negative bacteria. In spite of extensive investigation, there was no obvious source of infection. He had an indwelling urine catheter for prostate hypertrophy, but urine culture was negative. There was no evidence of immunocompromise. He was treated with systemic as well as intravitreal antibiotics. In spite of appropriate treatment, the patient lost vision. S. marcescens endophthalmitis, seen even in immunocompetent people, carries a poor visual prognosis. PMID:26791115

  10. Excretion of artifactual endogenous digitalis-like factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    Radioimmunoassays have been used to detect digoxin-like immunoreactive factors (DLF) in the plasma and urine of hypertensive patients and rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension. DLF, partially purified from DOCA-HS urine by antidigoxin antibody immunoaffinity chromatography, was found to have a molecular weight <2000. When DOCA-HS rats were switched to the low-sodium chow, DLF excretion dropped precipitously. No measurable DLF was detected in the plasma of rats eating either chow. However, >95% of the urinary DLF could be attributed to a contaminant in the standard laboratory chow. These data document the importance of excluding nonspecific compounds and exogenous sources of DLF when sensitive radioligand and biologic assays are used to detect endogenous inhibitors of the sodium pump.

  11. Endogenous siRNAs, regulators of internal affairs

    PubMed Central

    Piatek, Monica J; Werner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous short interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) have recently emerged as versatile regulators of gene expression. They derive from double stranded intrinsic transcripts and are processed by Dicer and associate with Argonaute proteins. In Caenorhabditis elegans, endo-siRNAs are known as 22G and 26G RNAs and are involved in genome protection and gene regulation. Drosophila melanogaster endo-siRNAs are produced with the help of specific Dicer and Argonaute isoforms and play an essential role in transposon control and the protection from viral infections. Biological functions of endo-siRNAs in vertebrates include repression of transposable elements, chromatin organisation as well as gene regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. PMID:25110021

  12. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena; Wurzbacher, Christian; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-time PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.

  13. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF ENDOGENOUS PEROXIDASE IN THYROID FOLLICULAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Judy M.; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1970-01-01

    Endogenous peroxidase activity in rat thyroid follicular cells is demonstrated cytochemically. Following perfusion fixation of the thyroid gland, small blocks of tissue are incubated in a medium containing substrate for peroxidase, before being postfixed in osmium tetroxide, and processed for electron microscopy. Peroxidase activity is found in thyroid follicular cells in the following sites: (a) the perinuclear cisternae, (b) the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, (c) the inner few lamellae of the Golgi complex, (d) within vesicles, particularly those found apically, and (e) associated with the external surfaces of the microvilli that project apically from the cell into the colloid. In keeping with the radioautographic evidence of others and the postulated role of thyroid peroxidase in iodination, it is suggested that the microvillous apical cell border is the major site where iodination occurs. However, that apical vesicles also play a role in iodination cannot be excluded. The in vitro effect of cyanide, aminotriazole, and thiourea is also discussed. PMID:4190069

  14. Genome-wide reexamination of endogenous retroviruses in Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Jugo, Begoña M

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of retroviral infections that are present in a large number of vertebrate genomes. Based on the proposal that the rat could act as a reservoir of retroviruses, rat ERVs were analysed in silico using a whole-genome approach. To enrich the detected ERV groups, we applied an upgraded approach based on the hidden Markov model. We found 2637 elements that were classified into the following groups: 9 groups of Class I; 15 of Class II, 7 of them previously described; 1 of Class III; and 3 groups whose classification was unclear but were distantly related to Class I. Sixteen ERV groups seemed to be specific to rat. The high number of rat-specific groups might be related to the contact of rats with retroviruses and their role as a reservoir. In addition, the env gene of the more extended groups seemed to be undetectable.

  15. Endogenous coresidence and program incidence: South Africa's Old Age Pension.

    PubMed

    Hamoudi, Amar; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-07-01

    We investigate whether living arrangements respond to an arguably exogenous shift in the distribution of power in family economic decision-making. In the early 1990s, the South African Old Age Pension was expanded to cover most black South Africans above a sex-specific age cut-off resulting in a substantial increase in the income of older South Africans and potentially their say in the economic decisions of their families. Beneficiaries of the program are more likely to coreside with adults who have less human capital as measured by height and education. Since height and education are fixed for adults, this cannot be an effect of the pension income but reflects selective changes in living arrangements resulting from the pension. The findings highlight the endogeneity of living arrangements and illustrate the potential value of moving beyond theory and data that are confined to a spatially determined definition of the household.

  16. Serratia marcescens endogenous endophthalmitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Memon, Muhammad; Raman, Vasant

    2016-01-20

    A systemically well 66-year-old white Caucasian man presented to the urgent care department with a short history of progressive pain and blurring of vision in his left eye. He denied a history of trauma, intraocular surgery or use of illicit drugs. He was diagnosed with endogenous endophthalmitis. Vitreous biopsy grew Serratia marcescens, a Gram negative bacteria. In spite of extensive investigation, there was no obvious source of infection. He had an indwelling urine catheter for prostate hypertrophy, but urine culture was negative. There was no evidence of immunocompromise. He was treated with systemic as well as intravitreal antibiotics. In spite of appropriate treatment, the patient lost vision. S. marcescens endophthalmitis, seen even in immunocompetent people, carries a poor visual prognosis.

  17. Endogenously determined cycles: empirical evidence from livestock industries.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Michael P; Huffaker, Ray; Marsh, Thomas L

    2012-04-01

    This paper applies the techniques of phase space reconstruction and recurrence quantification analysis to investigate U.S. livestock cycles in relation to recent literature on the business cycle. Results are presented for pork and cattle cycles, providing empirical evidence that the cycles themselves have slowly diminished. By comparing the evolution of production processes for the two livestock cycles we argue that the major cause for this moderation is largely endogenous. The analysis suggests that previous theoretical models relying solely on exogenous shocks to create cyclical patterns do not fully capture changes in system dynamics. Specifically, the biological constraint in livestock dynamics has become less significant while technology and information are relatively more significant. Concurrently, vertical integration of the supply chain may have improved inventory management, all resulting in a small, less deterministic, cyclical effect.

  18. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Group E and Its Involvement in Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Christelle; Vallet, Sophie; Brooks, Wesley H.; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus group E (HERV-E) elements are stably integrated into the human genome, transmitted vertically in a Mendelian manner, and are endowed with transcriptional activity as alternative promoters or enhancers. Such effects are under the control of the proviral long terminal repeats (LTR) that are organized into three HERV-E phylogenetic subgroups, namely LTR2, LTR2B, and LTR2C. Moreover, HERV-E expression is tissue-specific, and silenced by epigenetic constraints that may be disrupted in cancer, autoimmunity, and human placentation. Interest in HERV-E with regard to these conditions has been stimulated further by concerns regarding the capacity of HERV-E elements to modify the expression of neighboring genes and/or to produce retroviral proteins, including immunosuppressive env peptides, which in turn may induce (auto)-antibody (Ab) production. Finally, better understanding of HERV-E elements may have clinical applications for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:25785516

  19. Unusual productions of endogenous alcohol: report of two autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Moriya, F; Ishizu, H; Miyaishi, S

    1991-10-01

    We experienced two autopsy cases in which endogenous alcohol productions by saprogens had been unusual. Case 1 is a victim found in a mountain stream 3 to 4 weeks after his death. Since ethanol and n-propanol concentrations in the right intrathoracic bloody fluid, pericardial sac fluid, and blood in the right side of the heart were 0.41 mg/g and 0.052 mg/g, 0.42 mg/g and 0.032 mg/g, and 0.45 mg/g and 0.025 mg/g, respectively. The ethanol detected in those specimens appeared to have been produced postmortem. The femoral muscle and urine, however, contained very little n-propanol though the ethanol levels were 0.21 mg/g and 0.05 mg/g, respectively. Thus, we judged the victim might have died soon after drinking a little alcohol. Case 2 is a victim who was stabbed in the abdomen (liver) with a knife and died due to hemorrhagic shock after 26.5 hours in spite of a peritoneotomy. It was probable that metabolic activities of the liver had decreased significantly after getting a wound. Almost 1 mg/g of ethanol and little n-propanol were detected in the heart blood. In the intraabdominal bloody fluid, however, 2.45 mg/g of ethanol and 0.079 mg/g of n-propanol were detected. n-Propanol level in the bloody fluid is equal to that in severely decomposed body and indicates that a large amount of ethanol was endogenously produced. It may be considered that the unusual ethanol production was caused by the severe peritonitis after the operation.

  20. Endogenous nociceptin modulates diet preference independent of motivation and reward.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Miwako; Cagniard, Barbara; Murphy, Niall P

    2009-04-20

    Previous studies show that the opioid peptide nociceptin stimulates food intake. Here, we studied nociceptin receptor knockout (NOP KO) mice in various behavioral paradigms designed to differentiate psychological and physiological loci at which endogenous nociceptin might control feeding. When presented a choice under food restriction, NOP KO mice displayed reduced preference for high sucrose diet, but lower intake of high fat diet under no-choice conditions. These responses were absent under ad libitum feeding conditions. Conditioned place preference to high fat diet under food-deprived conditions was unaltered in NOP KO mice, suggesting no difference in reward responses. Furthermore, operant food self-administration under a variety of conditions showed no genotype-dependent differences, suggesting no differences in the motivational properties of food. Taste reactivity to sucrose was unchanged in NOP KO mice, though NOP KO mice had altered aversive reactions to quinine solutions under ad libitum feeding, suggesting minor differences in the affective impact of palatable and unpalatable tastants. Although NOP KO mice re-fed following food-deprivation showed normal increases in plasma glucose and insulin, multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the relationship between these measures, body weight and plasma leptin was substantially disrupted in NOP KO, particularly in fasted mice. Additionally, the typical positive relationship between body weight and plasma leptin was considerably weaker in NOP KO mice. Together, these findings suggest that endogenous nociceptin differentially modulates diet preference depending on macronutrient content and homeostatic state, independently of the motivating, rewarding or orosensory properties of food, but may involve metabolic or postingestive processes. PMID:19138695

  1. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2014-08-01

    Ancient civilizations may have dispersed or collapsed under extreme dry conditions. There are indications that the same may hold for modern societies. However, hydroclimatic change cannot be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water-scarce regions. This paper focuses on technological change as a factor that may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. We study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, and model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on many factors intrinsic to coupled human-water dynamics. We do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but assume that it results from societal actions. While the proposed model is a rather simple model of a coupled human-water system, it is shown to be capable of replicating patterns of technological, population, production and consumption per capita changes. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity, but typically it does so only to a certain extent. In general we find that endogenous technology change under increasing water scarcity helps to delay the peak of population size before it inevitably starts to decline. We also analyze the case when water remains constant over time and find that co-evolutionary trajectories can never grow at a constant rate; rather the rate itself grows with time. Thus our model does not predict a co-evolutionary trajectory of a socio-hydrological system where technological innovation harmoniously provides for a growing population. It allows either for an explosion or an eventual dispersal of population. The latter occurs only under increasing water scarcity. As a result, we draw the conclusion that declining consumption per capita despite technological advancement and increase in aggregate production may serve as a useful predictor of upcoming

  2. Hypobromous acid, a powerful endogenous electrophile: Experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; de Souza, Aguinaldo Robinson

    2015-05-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is an inorganic acid produced by the oxidation of the bromide anion (Br(-)). The blood plasma level of Br(-) is more than 1,000-fold lower than that of chloride anion (Cl(-)). Consequently, the endogenous production of HOBr is also lower compared to hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Nevertheless, there is much evidence of the deleterious effects of HOBr. From these data, we hypothesized that the reactivity of HOBr could be better associated with its electrophilic strength. Our hypothesis was confirmed, since HOBr was significantly more reactive than HOCl when the oxidability of the studied compounds was not relevant. For instance: anisole (HOBr, k2=2.3×10(2)M(-1)s(-1), HOCl non-reactive); dansylglycine (HOBr, k2=7.3×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), HOCl, 5.2×10(2)M(-1)s(-1)); salicylic acid (HOBr, k2=4.0×10(4)M(-1)s(-1), non-reactive); 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (HOBr, k2=5.9×10(4)M(-1)s(-1), HOCl, k2=1.1×10(1)M(-1)s(-1)); uridine (HOBr, k2=1.3×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), HOCl non-reactive). The compounds 4-bromoanisole and 5-bromouridine were identified as the products of the reactions between HOBr and anisole or uridine, respectively, i.e. typical products of electrophilic substitutions. Together, these results show that, rather than an oxidant, HOBr is a powerful electrophilic reactant. This chemical property was theoretically confirmed by measuring the positive Mulliken and ChelpG charges upon bromine and chlorine. In conclusion, the high electrophilicity of HOBr could be behind its well-established deleterious effects. We propose that HOBr is the most powerful endogenous electrophile. PMID:25771434

  3. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  4. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  5. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  6. Nilotinib exacerbates diabetes mellitus by decreasing secretion of endogenous insulin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikiyo; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Chong, Yong; Maki, Toshinobu; Akashi, Koichi; Kamimura, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in accelerated phase with pre-existing severe type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hemorrhagic gastric ulcers who was successfully treated with nilotinib. We first considered second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of this patient, as they elicit a superior response compared with imatinib. We next selected nilotinib, rather than dasatinib, since the increased risk of bleeding associated with dasatinib represented a greater risk of fatality than aggravation of T2D with nilotinib. After improvement of hemorrhagic gastric ulcers and T2D with exogenous insulin therapy, we began nilotinib administration; insulin dose was increased to maintain her glucose levels whereas urine C-peptide level decreased. Conversely, when nilotinib was discontinued due to liver dysfunction, the dosage of injected insulin was decreased and urine C-peptide levels increased. After re-starting nilotinib, the required dose of insulin gradually increased again, and urine C-peptide level decreased, indicating that nilotinib may have impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient obtained a complete cytogenetic response after 3 months of nilotinib treatment. Her T2D has since been well controlled by insulin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that nilotinib treatment for patients with severe T2D may induce a reversible decrease in endogenous insulin secretion, although the precise underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We highly recommend sufficient screening and early intervention with exogenous insulin therapy for diabetic CML patients who receive nilotinib.

  7. Relationship between endogenous 3-methylhistidine excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Mendez, J; Buskirk, E R; Cohn, S H

    1981-03-01

    Fourteen healthy men (aged 20-30 yr) consumed two isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets in the sequence of a 4-day meat diet (MD) followed by a 7-day meal-free diet (MFD). Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion during the MD (513 +/- 21 mumol . day-1, mean +/- SE) was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than day 3 of the MFD (230 +/- 10 mumol . day-1), after which the mean daily 3MH output was constant with a mean coefficient of variation of 4.5%. There was no change in fat-free body mass (FFBM) determined by densitometry at the start (62.3 +/- 1.8 kg) and the end (62.2 +/- 1.9 kg) of the 11-day dietary period. Mean muscle mass (MM) calculated from measurements of total-body potassium and nitrogen was 23.4 +/- 1.3 kg. Endogenous 3MH excretion was related more closely to MM (r = 0.91, P less than 0.001) than to FFBM measured by densitometry (r = 0.81, P less than 0.001). Only a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.33, P less than 0.05) was observed between 3MH and the nonmuscle component of FFBM. Urinary creatinine output also was correlated significantly with 3MH (r = 0.87; P less than 0.001) and MM (r = 0.79; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that because endogenous 3MH is significantly related to MM in man, it can be used as a marker to study in vivo total-body muscle protein degradation provided that the necessary dietary restrictions are observed.

  8. Stable expression of lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase in cultured preadipocytes impairs adipogenesis program independently of endogenous prostanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Mohammad Salim; Chowdhury, Abu Asad; Rahman, Mohammad Sharifur; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Shono, Fumiaki; Yokota, Kazushige

    2012-02-15

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) expressed preferentially in adipocytes is responsible for the synthesis of PGD{sub 2} and its non-enzymatic dehydration products, PGJ{sub 2} series, serving as pro-adipogenic factors. However, the role of L-PGDS in the regulation of adipogenesis is complex because of the occurrence of several derivatives from PGD{sub 2} and their distinct receptor subtypes as well as other functions such as a transporter of lipophilic molecules. To manipulate the expression levels of L-PGDS in cultured adipocytes, cultured preadipogenic 3T3-L1 cells were transfected stably with a mammalian expression vector having cDNA encoding murine L-PGDS oriented in the sense direction. The isolated cloned stable transfectants with L-PGDS expressed higher levels of the transcript and protein levels of L-PGDS, and synthesized PGD{sub 2} from exogenous arachidonic acid at significantly higher levels. By contrast, the synthesis of PGE{sub 2} remained unchanged, indicating no influence on the reactions of cyclooxygenase (COX) and PGE synthase. Furthermore, the ability of those transfectants to synthesize {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2} increased more greatly during the maturation phase. The sustained expression of L-PGDS in cultured stable transfectants hampered the storage of fats during the maturation phase of adipocytes, which was accompanied by the reduced gene expression of adipocyte-specific markers reflecting the down-regulation of the adipogenesis program. The suppressed adipogenesis was not rescued by either exogenous aspirin or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists including troglitazone and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2}. Taken together, the results indicate the negative regulation of the adipogenesis program by the enhanced expression of L-PGDS through a cellular mechanism involving the interference of the PPAR{gamma} signaling pathway without the contribution of endogenous pro-adipogenic prostanoids

  9. The 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD95 independently signal murine hepatocyte apoptosis and subsequent liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Leist, M.; Gantner, F.; Künstle, G.; Bohlinger, I.; Tiegs, G.; Bluethmann, H.; Wendel, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of either the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R1) or CD95 (Fas/Apo-1) causes apoptosis of cells and liver failure in mice, and has been associated with human liver disorders. The aim of this study was first to clarify the association between CD95 activation, hepatocyte apoptosis, and fulminant liver failure. Next, we investigated whether TNF-R1 and CD95 operate independently of each other in the induction of hepatocyte apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using both mice and primary liver cell cultures deficient in either TNF-R1 or functional CD95, the induction of apoptosis and hepatocyte death following activation of TNF-R1 or CD95 were studied in vitro and in various in vivo models of acute liver failure. RESULTS: In vivo or in vitro stimulation of CD95 caused apoptosis of wild-type (wt) murine hepatocytes which had not been sensitized by blocking transcription. Time course studies showed that DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation preceded, respectively, membrane lysis in vitro and necrosis in vivo. Similar results were obtained after CD95 activation in hepatocytes or livers lacking TNF-R1. Conversely, hepatocytotoxicity due to endogenous or exogenous TNF was not affected in animals or liver cell cultures lacking the expression of functional CD95. CONCLUSIONS: TNF-R1 and CD95 are independent and differentially regulated triggers of murine apoptotic liver failure. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 9 PMID:8900539

  10. Flanking regulatory sequences of the locus encoding the murine GDNF receptor, c-ret, directs lac Z (beta-galactosidase) expression in developing somatosensory system.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, M; Waxman, S G; Wood, J N; Pachnis, V

    2001-11-01

    RET forms the catalytic component within the receptor complex that transmits signals from the GDNF family of neurotrophic factors. To study the mechanisms regulating the cell-type specific expression of this gene, we have cloned and characterised the murine c-ret locus. A cosmid contig comprising approximately 60 kb of the mouse genome encompassing the entire structural gene and flanking sequences have been isolated and the transcription initiation site identified and promoter characterised. The murine c-ret promoter lacks a TATA initiation motif and has GC enriched DNA sequences reminiscent of CpG islands. Analysis of transgenic mice lines bearing the Lac Z (beta-galactosidase) reporter gene under the control of 5' flanking sequences show modularity in the organisation of cis-regulatory domains within the locus. Cloned 5' flanking sequences comprise a distal regulatory domain directing Lac Z expression at the primitive streak, lateral mesoderm and facial ganglia and a proximal sensory neurones specific regulatory domain inducing Lac Z expression primarily within the developing somatosensory system. The spatial and temporal progression of transgene expression precisely recapitulates endogenous gene expression in developing sensory ganglia including its induction in postnatal Isolectin B4 binding nociceptive neurones. PMID:11747074

  11. The effect of kynurenic acid on the synthesis of selected cytokines by murine splenocytes – in vitro and ex vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Siwicki, Andrzej K.; Wójcik, Roman M.; Turski, Waldemar A.; Kaczorek, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a secondary product of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, known mainly as an endogenous neuroprotectant, shows also immunotropic properties. Some quantities of KYNA are present in food and are effectively absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Since the spleen is an important target of dietary immunomodulators, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of exogenous KYNA on murine splenocytes. Splenocytes isolated from adult BALB/c mice were used in the study. Firstly, the effect of increasing KYNA concentrations (0-5 mM) on the viability, and proliferative and cytokine response (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) of murine splenocytes under in vitro conditions was determined. Then, proliferative and cytokine responses were determined in cells derived from animals receiving kynurenic acid in drinking water at concentrations of 2.5, 25, or 250 mg/l for 7-14 days. Cytokine levels were measured using commercial immunoassay (ELISA) kits, and cell viability and proliferation was determined with MTT reduction assay. Exogenous KYNA was characterised by a low level of cytotoxicity towards murine splenocytes, and was well tolerated by the animals receiving it in drinking water. As expected, it exhibited anti-inflammatory action towards the activated splenocytes, under both in vitro and ex vivo conditions. Surprisingly, however, KYNA itself influenced the activity of resting, non-stimulated cells, exerting an immunostimulant effect in vitro, and an immunosuppressive effect under ex vivo conditions. The obtained results indicate not only anti-inflammatory, but also more complex, immunomodulating properties of KYNA, which require more detailed investigation. PMID:27095921

  12. In Vivo Expansion of Endogenous Regulatory T Cell Populations Induces Long-Term Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    El Beidaq, Asmaa; Link, Christopher W M; Hofmann, Katharina; Frehse, Britta; Hartmann, Karin; Bieber, Katja; Martin, Stefan F; Ludwig, Ralf J; Manz, Rudolf A

    2016-09-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) of murine skin serves as a model of allergic contact dermatitis. Hapten-specific CD8 T cells and neutrophils represent the major effector cells driving this inflammatory reaction whereas Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) control the severity of inflammation. However, whether in vivo expansion of endogenous Tregs can downregulate CHS-mediated inflammation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we addressed this issue by using injection of an IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb JES6-1 complex (IL-2/JES6-1) as a means of Treg induction in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene-induced CHS. IL-2/JES6-1 injection before or after hapten sensitization led to a considerable reduction of skin inflammation, even when rechallenged up to 3 wk after the last treatment. Conversely, Treg depletion re-established the CHS response in IL-2/JES6-1-treated mice. IL-2/JES6-1 injection resulted in increased frequencies of natural and peripheral Tregs in spleen and draining lymph nodes (LNs), elevated IL-10 and TGF-β production by CD4 T cells, reduced CD86 expression by dendritic cells, and led to lower numbers of hapten-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T effector cells in LNs. Neutrophil and CD8 T cell infiltration was reduced in inflamed ear tissue, whereas CTLA-4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg frequencies were augmented. Adoptive transfer of LN cells of sensitized mice into recipients treated with IL-2/JES6-1 showed impaired CHS. Our results show that in vivo Treg expansion results in a prolonged CHS suppression, a sustained reduction of hapten-specific CD8 T cells, and a decrease in effector cell influx in inflamed tissue. PMID:27439515

  13. Endogenous c-Myc is essential for p53-induced apoptosis in response to DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phesse, T J; Myant, K B; Cole, A M; Ridgway, R A; Pearson, H; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Vousden, K H; Sears, R; Vassilev, L T; Clarke, A R; Sansom, O J

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that C-MYC may be an excellent therapeutic cancer target and a number of new agents targeting C-MYC are in preclinical development. Given most therapeutic regimes would combine C-MYC inhibition with genotoxic damage, it is important to assess the importance of C-MYC function for DNA damage signalling in vivo. In this study, we have conditionally deleted the c-Myc gene in the adult murine intestine and investigated the apoptotic response of intestinal enterocytes to DNA damage. Remarkably, c-Myc deletion completely abrogated the immediate wave of apoptosis following both ionizing irradiation and cisplatin treatment, recapitulating the phenotype of p53 deficiency in the intestine. Consistent with this, c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes did not upregulate p53. Mechanistically, this was linked to an upregulation of the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which targets p53 for degradation in c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes. Further, low level overexpression of c-Myc, which does not impact on basal levels of apoptosis, elicited sustained apoptosis in response to DNA damage, suggesting c-Myc activity acts as a crucial cell survival rheostat following DNA damage. We also identify the importance of MYC during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in several other tissues, including the thymus and spleen, using systemic deletion of c-Myc throughout the adult mouse. Together, we have elucidated for the first time in vivo an essential role for endogenous c-Myc in signalling DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the control of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.

  14. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  15. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans. PMID:26779669

  16. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  17. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23292717

  19. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  20. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extrace