Science.gov

Sample records for endogenous neurotransmitter inhibition

  1. Endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Neumaier, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus was investigated by using extracellular recording and radioligand binding techniques in the hippocampal slice preparation. Synaptic conductances from endogenously released opioid peptides have been difficult to detect. This problem was approach by designing a novel assay of opioid peptide release, in which release was detected by measuring binding competition between endogenous opioids and added radioligand. Membrane depolarization displaced ({sup 3}H)-diprenorphine binding in a transient, calcium-dependent, and peptidase-sensitive manner. Autoradiographic localization of the sites of ({sup 3}H)-diprenorphine binding displacement showed that significant opioid peptide release and receptor occupancy occurred in each major subregion of the hippocampal slices. This assay method can not be used to define optimal electrical stimulation conditions for releasing endogenous opioids. The binding displacement method was extended to the study of the sigma receptor. Depolarization of hippocampal slices was found to reduce the binding of the sigma-selective radioligand ({sup 3}H)-ditolylguanidine in a transient and calcium-dependent manner with no apparent direct effects on sigma receptor affinity.

  2. Neurotransmitters

    NASA Video Gallery

    Our nerve cells (neurons) communicate with each other using little chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters are transferred from one neuron to the next within a space c...

  3. Common Drugs Inhibit Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1)-Mediated Neurotransmitter Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, Kelli H.; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level. PMID:24688079

  4. Re-examining how complexin inhibits neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Trimbuch, Thorsten; Xu, Junjie; Flaherty, David; Tomchick, Diana R; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Complexins play activating and inhibitory functions in neurotransmitter release. The complexin accessory helix inhibits release and was proposed to insert into SNARE complexes to prevent their full assembly. This model was supported by ‘superclamp’ and ‘poor-clamp’ mutations that enhanced or decreased the complexin-I inhibitory activity in cell–cell fusion assays, and by the crystal structure of a superclamp mutant bound to a synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complex. NMR studies now show that the complexin-I accessory helix does not insert into synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complexes in solution, and electrophysiological data reveal that superclamp mutants have slightly stimulatory or no effects on neurotransmitter release, whereas a poor-clamp mutant inhibits release. Importantly, increasing or decreasing the negative charge of the complexin-I accessory helix inhibits or stimulates release, respectively. These results suggest a new model whereby the complexin accessory helix inhibits release through electrostatic (and perhaps steric) repulsion enabled by its location between the vesicle and plasma membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02391.001 PMID:24842998

  5. Different types of retinal inhibition have distinct neurotransmitter release properties

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Dotson, Johnnie M.; Klein, Justin S.; Mazade, Reece E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release varies between neurons due to differences in presynaptic mechanisms such as Ca2+ sensitivity and timing. Retinal rod bipolar cells respond to brief dim illumination with prolonged glutamate release that is tuned by the differential release of GABA and glycine from amacrine cells in the inner retina. To test if differences among types of GABA and glycine release are due to inherent amacrine cell release properties, we directly activated amacrine cell neurotransmitter release by electrical stimulation. We found that the timing of electrically evoked inhibitory currents was inherently slow and that the timecourse of inhibition from slowest to fastest was GABAC receptors > glycine receptors > GABAA receptors. Deconvolution analysis showed that the distinct timing was due to differences in prolonged GABA and glycine release from amacrine cells. The timecourses of slow glycine release and GABA release onto GABAC receptors were reduced by Ca2+ buffering with EGTA-AM and BAPTA-AM, but faster GABA release on GABAA receptors was not, suggesting that release onto GABAA receptors is tightly coupled to Ca2+. The differential timing of GABA release was detected from spiking amacrine cells and not nonspiking A17 amacrine cells that form a reciprocal synapse with rod bipolar cells. Our results indicate that release from amacrine cells is inherently asynchronous and that the source of nonreciprocal rod bipolar cell inhibition differs between GABA receptors. The slow, differential timecourse of inhibition may be a mechanism to match the prolonged rod bipolar cell glutamate release and provide a way to temporally tune information across retinal pathways. PMID:25568157

  6. [Neurophysiological and neurotransmitter mechanisms of behavior inhibition in normal and pathological conditions].

    PubMed

    Shul'gina, G I

    2010-01-01

    The data concerning neurophysiological and neurotransmitter mechanisms of two principal kinds of inhibition of behavior is carried out: the inborn genetically determined inhibition and that developed in the course of training. On the basis of the experiments performed by the author and the literature on general neurophysiology the conclusion is made that development of inhibition of behavior during training (i.e. internal inhibition, including "latent inhibition") is determined by the relative strengthening of inhibitory hyperpolarization processes either locally (in a conditioned stimulus analyzer) or globally in the brain cortex and other brain structures during intensification of the inhibitory state (profound inhibition of a reflex and sleep). The main neurotransmitter in development of internal inhibition is gamma-aminobutyric acid. Inhibition of behavior without preliminary training arises either during the action of superstrong stimuli, (exceeding the maximum value inhibition) or during interaction of two and more active systems. A stronger one of these two systems suppresses another one (external inhibition, dominant inhibition, "freezing", "prepulse inhibition", etc.). These kinds of inhibition develop on the background of EEG activation, which suggests participation in their realization of reticular structures and corresponding neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, noradrenalin, dopamine and serotonin). Behavior pathology causes a break of the balanced interaction between the excitation and inhibition in the central nervous system. This affects both genetically determined forms of behavior inhibition and the learned internal inhibition.

  7. Radical scavenging reactivity of catecholamine neurotransmitters and the inhibition effect for DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomonori; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2010-01-14

    Neurotransmitters such as catecholamines (dopamine, L-dopa, epinephrine, norepinephrine) have phenol structure and scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) to ROS. Radical scavenging reactivity of neurotransmitters with galvinoxyl radical (GO*) and cumyloxyl radical (RO*) in acetonitrile at 298 K was determined by the UV-vis spectral change. The UV-vis spectral change for HAT from catecholamine neurotransmitters to GO* was measured by a photodiode array spectrophotometer, whereas HAT to much more reactive cumylperoxyl radical, which was produced by photoirradiation of dicumyl peroxide, was measured by laser flash photolysis. The second-order rate constants (k(GO)) were determined from the slopes of linear plots of the pseudo-first-order rate constants vs concentrations of neurotransmitters. The k(GO) value of hydrogen transfer from dopamine to GO* was determined to be 23 M(-1) s(-1), which is the largest among examined catecholamine neurotransmitters. This value is comparable to the value of a well-known antioxidant: (+)-catechine (27 M(-1) s(-1)). The k(GO) value of hydrogen transfer from dopamine to GO* increased in the presence of Mg(2+) with increasing concentration of Mg(2+). Such enhancement of the radical scavenging reactivity may result from the metal ion-promoted electron transfer from dopamine to the galvinoxyl radical. Inhibition of DNA cleavage with neurotransmitters was also examined using agarose gel electrophoresis of an aqueous solution containing pBR322 DNA, NADH, and catecholamine neurotransmitters under photoirradiation. DNA cleavage was significantly inhibited by the presence of catecholamine neurotransmitters that can scavenge hydroperoxyl radicals produced under photoirradiation of an aerated aqueous solution of NADH. The inhibition effect of dopamine on DNA cleavage was enhanced by the presence of Mg(2+) because of the enhancement of the radical scavenging reactivity. PMID:19938853

  8. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  9. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study. PMID:26417153

  10. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study.

  11. Inhibition of cellular respiration by endogenously produced carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Lam, Francis; Hagen, Thilo; Moncada, Salvador

    2006-06-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) interacts with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. This interaction has been shown to have important physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is also known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase in vitro; however, it is not clear whether endogenously produced CO can inhibit cellular respiration and, if so, what the significance of this might be. In this study, we show that exogenous CO inhibits respiration in a moderate but persistent manner in HEK293 cells under ambient (21%) oxygen concentrations (K(i) = 1.44 microM). This effect of CO was increased (K(i) = 0.35 microM) by incubation in hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen). Endogenous CO, generated by HEK293 cells transfected with the inducible isoform of haem oxygenase (haem oxygenase-1; HO-1), also inhibited cellular respiration moderately (by 12%) and this was accompanied by inhibition (23%) of cytochrome c oxidase activity. When the cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions during HO-1 induction, the inhibitory effect of CO on cell respiration was markedly increased to 70%. Furthermore, endogenously produced CO was found to be responsible for the respiratory inhibition that occurs in RAW264.7 cells activated in hypoxic conditions with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, in the presence of N-(iminoethyl)-L-ornithine to prevent the synthesis of NO. Our results indicate that CO contributes significantly to the respiratory inhibition in activated cells, particularly under hypoxic conditions. Inhibition of cell respiration by endogenous CO through its interaction with cytochrome c oxidase might have an important role in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.

  12. Neocuproine potentiates the activity of the nitrergic neurotransmitter but inhibits that of S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    De Man, J G; Moreels, T G; De Winter, B Y; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A

    1999-09-24

    In the present study, we investigated the cellular components that are involved in the release of nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosothiols and whether these components also modulate the activity of the nitrergic neurotransmitter in the rat gastric fundus. Electrical stimulation of nitrergic nerves induced frequency-dependent transient relaxations which were mimicked by exogenous NO. The S-nitrosothiols S-nitrosocysteine, S-nitrosoglutathione and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine induced concentration-dependent relaxations which were generally more sustained as compared to those to nitrergic nerve stimulation or NO. The relaxations to nitrergic nerve stimulation and those to NO were significantly enhanced by the copper(I) chelator neocuproine but not affected by the copper(II) chelator cuprizone. The relaxations to the S-nitrosothiols were significantly inhibited by neocuproine but not by cuprizone. The antioxidant ascorbate did not affect the tension of the muscle strip. However, in the presence of an S-nitrosothiol, ascorbate induced an immediate, sharp and transient relaxation that was significantly inhibited by a low concentration of neocuproine but not by cuprizone. Ascorbate did not induce a relaxation during short-train or prolonged nerve stimulation of the muscle strip. These results suggest that ascorbate interacts with copper to modulate the biological activity of S-nitrosothiols but not that of the nitrergic neurotransmitter. The differential effect of neocuproine indicates that S-nitrosothiols do not mediate the nitrergic neurotransmission of the rat gastric fundus. As neocuproine is to date the only compound that exerts an opposite effect on the biological activity of the nitrergic neurotransmitter and on that of S-nitrosothiols, it may be useful to elucidate the nature of the nitrergic neurotransmitter in the peripheral nervous system.

  13. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U-{sup 14}C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production.

  14. Interleukin-6 inhibits neurotransmitter release and the spread of excitation in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, G; Tancredi, V; Onofri, F; D'Antuono, M; Giovedì, S; Benfenati, F

    2000-04-01

    Cytokines are extracellular mediators that have been reported to affect neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity phenomena when applied in vitro. Most of these effects occur rapidly after the application of the cytokines and are presumably mediated through the activation of protein phosphorylation processes. While many cytokines have an inflammatory action, interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been found to have a neuroprotective effect against ischaemia lesions and glutamate excitotoxicity, and to increase neuronal survival in a variety of experimental conditions. In this paper, the functional effects of IL-6 on the spread of excitation visualized by dark-field/infrared videomicroscopy in rat cortical slices and on glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes were analysed and correlated with the activation of the STAT3, mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK (MAPK/ERK) and stress-activated protein kinase/cJun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) pathways. We have found that IL-6 depresses the spread of excitation and evoked glutamate release in the cerebral cortex, and that these effects are accompanied by a stimulation of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, an inhibition of MAPK/ERK activity, a decreased phosphorylation of the presynaptic MAPK/ERK substrate synapsin I and no detectable effects on SAPK/JNK. The effects of IL-6 were effectively counteracted by treatment of the cortical slices with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lavendustin A. The inhibitory effects of IL-6 on glutamate release and on the spread of excitation in the rat cerebral cortex indicate that the protective effect of IL-6 on neuronal survival could be mediated by a downregulation of neuronal activity, release of excitatory neurotransmitters and MAPK/ERK activity. PMID:10762353

  15. Prostanoids inhibit release of endogenous norepinephrine from rat isolated trachea.

    PubMed

    Racké, K; Bähring, J; Langer, C; Bräutigam, M; Wessler, I

    1992-11-01

    Prostanoids, of epithelial origin, are known as modulators of several processes in the airways. The present study examined whether prostanoids are involved in the local control of sympathetic neurotransmission. The release of endogenous norepinephrine from rat isolated tracheae was evoked by electrical field stimulation (3 Hz, 540 pulses) in the presence of yohimbine, desipramine, and tyrosine. In different series of experiments, indomethacin (3 mumol/L) increased the evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine by 70 to 80%. In the presence of indomethacin, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and several prostanoid receptor agonists inhibited the evoked release of norepinephrine in a concentration-dependent manner, maximally by 60 to 70%. According to the concentration producing 35% inhibition of norepinephrine release (half-maximal effect), the following rank order of potencies was observed (EC35): nocloprost (8 nmol/L), sulprostone (30 nmol/L), PGE2 (308 nmol/L), iloprost (2 mumol/L), and U46619 (> 10 mumol/L). The EP1 receptor antagonist AH 6809 (3 mumol/L) had no effect on the evoked norepinephrine release and did not affect the inhibitory effect of 1 mumol/L of sulprostone. In the absence of indomethacin, the inhibitory effect of PGE2 was similar to that observed in the presence of indomethacin. After removal of the epithelium, the evoked norepinephrine release was markedly reduced. However, no significant effect of indomethacin was observed in epithelium-denuded tracheae. In conclusion, norepinephrine release in the rat trachea is inhibited via prostaglandin receptors that have the pharmacologic characteristics of the EP3 subtype. Endogenous eicosanoids, most likely of epithelial origin, are involved in the local control of the release of norepinephrine. PMID:1443867

  16. Increased Expression of Alpha-Synuclein Reduces Neurotransmitter Release by Inhibiting Synaptic Vesicle Reclustering After Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Lu, Wei; Berge, Victoria; Nakamura, Ken; Onoa, Bibiana; Lee, Michael K.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The protein α-synuclein accumulates in the brain of patients with sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD), and increased gene dosage causes a severe, dominantly inherited form of PD, but we know little about the effects of synuclein that precede degeneration. α-Synuclein localizes to the nerve terminal, but the knockout has little if any effect on synaptic transmission. In contrast, we now find that the modest over-expression of α-synuclein, in the range predicted for gene multiplication and in the absence of overt toxicity, markedly inhibits neurotransmitter release. The mechanism, elucidated by direct imaging of the synaptic vesicle cycle, involves a specific reduction in size of the synaptic vesicle recycling pool. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrates reduced synaptic vesicle density at the active zone, and imaging further reveals a defect in the reclustering of synaptic vesicles after endocytosis. Increased levels of α-synuclein thus produce a specific, physiological defect in synaptic vesicle recycling that precedes detectable neuropathology. PMID:20152114

  17. Influence of enkephalin on K+-evoked efflux of putative neurotransmitters in rat brain. Selective inhibition of acetylcholine and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, N; Mitznegg, P; Sprügel, W; Domschke, W; Domschke, S; Wünsch, E; Demling, L

    1977-09-01

    In rat brain slices preincubated with various radiolabelled putative neurotransmitters, methionine-enkephalin diminished the potassium-evoked release of dopamine and acetylcholine. The effect was antagonised by naloxone. The potassium-induced effux of three other neurotransmitters, histamine, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid, were unaffected by methionine-enkephalin. A probable physiological function for the endogenous ligands in specifically affecting the catecholaminergic and cholinergic transmission is suggested.

  18. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  19. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  20. Differences between endogenous and exogenous emotion inhibition in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of emotions is an integral part of our mental health. It has only recently been investigated using brain imaging techniques. In most studies, participants are instructed by a cue to inhibit a specific emotional reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alternative situation where a person decides to inhibit an emotion as an act of endogenous self-control. Healthy participants viewed highly arousing pictures with negative valence. In the endogenous condition, participants could freely choose on each trial to inhibit or feel the emotions elicited by the picture. In an exogenous condition, a visual cue instructed them to either feel or inhibit the emotion elicited by the picture. Participants' subjective ratings of intensity of experienced emotion showed an interaction effect between source of control (endogenous/exogenous) and feel/inhibit based on a stronger modulation between feel and inhibition for the endogenous compared to the exogenous condition. Endogenous inhibition of emotions was associated with dorso-medial prefrontal cortex activation, whereas exogenous inhibition was found associated with lateral prefrontal cortex activation. Thus, the brain regions for both endogenous and exogenous inhibition of emotion are highly similar to those for inhibition of motor actions in Brass and Haggard (J Neurosci 27:9141-9145, 2007), Kühn et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 30:2834-2843, 2009). Functional connectivity analyses showed that dorsofrontomedial cortex exerts greater control onto pre-supplementary motor area during endogenous inhibition compared to endogenous feel. This functional dissociation between an endogenous, fronto-medial and an exogenous, fronto-lateral inhibition centre has important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation in health and psychopathology.

  1. Lateral Inhibition in the Vertebrate Retina: The Case of the Missing Neurotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Richard H.; Davenport, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Lateral inhibition at the first synapse in the retina is important for visual perception, enhancing image contrast, color discrimination, and light adaptation. Despite decades of research, the feedback signal from horizontal cells to photoreceptors that generates lateral inhibition remains uncertain. GABA, protons, or an ephaptic mechanism have all been suggested as the primary mediator of feedback. However, the complexity of the reciprocal cone to horizontal cell synapse has left the identity of the feedback signal an unsolved mystery. PMID:26656622

  2. Lateral Inhibition in the Vertebrate Retina: The Case of the Missing Neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Richard H; Davenport, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Lateral inhibition at the first synapse in the retina is important for visual perception, enhancing image contrast, color discrimination, and light adaptation. Despite decades of research, the feedback signal from horizontal cells to photoreceptors that generates lateral inhibition remains uncertain. GABA, protons, or an ephaptic mechanism have all been suggested as the primary mediator of feedback. However, the complexity of the reciprocal cone to horizontal cell synapse has left the identity of the feedback signal an unsolved mystery. PMID:26656622

  3. Inhibition of cyclic gonadotropin secretion by endogenous human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J E; Khojandi, M; Huth, J; Smith, B; Thomas, P

    1975-02-01

    The resumption of cyclic uterine bleeding reportedly accompanies the use of human prolactin (HPRL)-suppressing agents in postpill galactorrhea-amenorrhea. In this laboratory, HPRL suppression with L-dopa was variable and short lived. Basal plasma HPRL levels were elevated before and after as much as five months of therapy. Galactorrhea persisted and mean gonadotropin concentrations were subnormal. An immediate and sustained attenuation of HPRL secretion ( less than 200 per cent) followed the use of 2-Br-alpha-ergocryptine (CB-154). Cyclic gonadotropin secretion resumed and was accompanied by ovulation and, in one instance, pregnancy. The cessation of galactorrhea was positively correlated with the rise in the daily concentration of 17 beta-estradiol. Cyclic postovulatory menstruation continued after the cessation of CB-154 treatment. HPRL levels remained normal. The daily patterns of human follicle-stimulating hormone (HFSH) and human tuteinizing hormone (HLH) secretion created by the suppression of HPRL displayed an inherent rhythmicity identical to that observed at the time of menarche. The inhibitory effects of HPRL appeared directed at cyclic rather than tonic gonadotropin secretion. At the same time, diminished ovarian estrogen production seemed to increase mammary gland sensitivity to HPRL, leading to lactation. One may postulate, therefore, that the ingestion of sex steroids is associated with an over-all suppression of endogenous cyclic and, to a lesser extent, tonic gonadotropin secretion secondary to which ovarian function is attenuated. Without physiologic concentration of circulating estrogen, HPRL induces mammary alveolar function with the production of a milklike secretion.

  4. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  5. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  6. Inhibition of Gli1 mobilizes endogenous neural stem cells for remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayshree; Grund, Ethan M.; Silva, Hernandez M.; Lafaille, Juan J.; Fishell, Gord; Salzer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enhancing repair of myelin is an important, but still elusive therapeutic goal in many neurological disorders1. In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease, endogenous remyelination does occur but is frequently insufficient to restore function. Both parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and endogenous adult neural stem cells (NSCs) resident within the subventricular zone (SVZ) are known sources of remyelinating cells2. Here, we characterize the contribution to remyelination of a subset of adult NSCs, identified by their expression of Gli1, a transcriptional effector of the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that these cells are recruited from the SVZ to populate demyelinated lesions in the forebrain but never enter healthy, white matter tracts. Unexpectedly, recruitment of this pool of NSCs, and their differentiation into oligodendrocytes, is significantly enhanced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Gli1. Importantly, complete inhibition of canonical hedgehog signaling was ineffective indicating that Gli1’s role in both augmenting hedgehog signaling and retarding myelination is specialized. Indeed, inhibition of Gli1 improves the functional outcome in a relapsing/remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE) and is neuroprotective. Thus, endogenous NSCs can be mobilized for the repair of demyelinated lesions by inhibiting Gli1, identifying a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of demyelinating disorders. PMID:26416758

  7. Selenium inhibits root elongation by repressing the generation of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Mo, Hai-Zhen; Zheng, Mei-Yu; Xian, Ming; Qi, Zhong-Qiang; Li, You-Qin; Hu, Liang-Bin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been becoming an emerging pollutant causing severe phytotoxicity, which the biochemical mechanism is rarely known. Although hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been suggested as an important exogenous regulator modulating plant physiological adaptions in response to heavy metal stress, whether and how the endogenous H2S regulates Se-induce phytotoxicity remains unclear. In this work, a self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in situ in the roots of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced root growth stunt was closely correlated with the inhibition of endogenous H2S generation in root tips. Se(IV) stress dampened the expression of most LCD and DCD homologues in the roots of B. rapa. By using various specific fluorescent probes for bio-imaging root tips in situ, we found that the increase in endogenous H2S by the application of H2S donor NaHS could significantly alleviate Se(IV)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation, oxidative impairment, and cell death in root tips, which further resulted in the recovery of root growth under Se(IV) stress. However, dampening the endogenous H2S could block the alleviated effect of NaHS on Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity. Finally, the increase in endogenous H2S resulted in the enhancement of glutathione (GSH) in Se(IV)-treated roots, which may share the similar molecular mechanism for the dominant role of H2S in removing ROS by activating GSH biosynthesis in mammals. Altogether, these data provide the first direct evidences confirming the pivotal role of endogenous H2S in modulating Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity in roots.

  8. Selenium Inhibits Root Elongation by Repressing the Generation of Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mei-Yu; Xian, Ming; Qi, Zhong-Qiang; Li, You-Qin; Hu, Liang-Bin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been becoming an emerging pollutant causing severe phytotoxicity, which the biochemical mechanism is rarely known. Although hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been suggested as an important exogenous regulator modulating plant physiological adaptions in response to heavy metal stress, whether and how the endogenous H2S regulates Se-induce phytotoxicity remains unclear. In this work, a self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in situ in the roots of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced root growth stunt was closely correlated with the inhibition of endogenous H2S generation in root tips. Se(IV) stress dampened the expression of most LCD and DCD homologues in the roots of B. rapa. By using various specific fluorescent probes for bio-imaging root tips in situ, we found that the increase in endogenous H2S by the application of H2S donor NaHS could significantly alleviate Se(IV)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation, oxidative impairment, and cell death in root tips, which further resulted in the recovery of root growth under Se(IV) stress. However, dampening the endogenous H2S could block the alleviated effect of NaHS on Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity. Finally, the increase in endogenous H2S resulted in the enhancement of glutathione (GSH) in Se(IV)-treated roots, which may share the similar molecular mechanism for the dominant role of H2S in removing ROS by activating GSH biosynthesis in mammals. Altogether, these data provide the first direct evidences confirming the pivotal role of endogenous H2S in modulating Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity in roots. PMID:25333279

  9. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases Preserves Myocardial Performance and Prevents Cardiac Remodeling through Stimulation of Endogenous Angiomyogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Qin, Xin; Zhao, Yu; Fast, Loren; Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Paul; Cheng, Guangmao

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) protects the heart against acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. We also demonstrated that HDAC inhibition stimulates myogenesis and angiogenesis in a cultured embryonic stem cell model. We investigate whether in vivo inhibition of HDAC preserves cardiac performance and prevents cardiac remodeling in mouse myocardial infarction (MI) through the stimulation of endogenous regeneration. MI was created by ligation of the left descending artery. Animals were divided into three groups: 1) sham group, animals that underwent thoracotomy without MI; 2) MI, animals that underwent MI; and 3) MI + trichostatin A (TSA), MI animals that received a daily intraperitoneal injection of TSA. In addition, infarcted mice received a daily intraperitoneal injection of TSA (0.1 mg/kg), a selective HDAC inhibitor. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (50 mg/kg) was delivered every other day to pulse-chase label in vivo endogenous cardiac replication. Eight weeks later, the MI hearts showed a reduction in ventricular contractility. HDAC inhibition increased the improvement of myocardial functional recovery after MI, which was associated with the prevention of myocardial remodeling and reduction of myocardial and serum tumor necrosis factor α. HDAC inhibition enhanced the formation of new myocytes and microvessels, which was consistent with the robust increase in proliferation and cytokinesis in the MI hearts. An increase in angiogenic response was demonstrated in MI hearts receiving TSA treatment. It is noteworthy that TSA treatment significantly inhibited HDAC activity and increased phosphorylation of Akt-1, but decreased active caspase 3. Taken together, our results indicate that HDAC inhibition preserves cardiac performance and mitigates myocardial remodeling through stimulating cardiac endogenous regeneration. PMID:22271820

  10. A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of four endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbin; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Lyu, Chunming; Zhang, Shen; Yan, Chao; Cheng, Yu; Wei, Hai

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters play an essential role in neural communication in mammalians. Many quantitative methods for endogenous monoamines have been developed during recent decades. Yet, matrix effect was usually a challenge in the quantification, in many cases asking for tedious sample preparation or sacrificing sensitivity. In this work, a simple, fast and sensitive method with no matrix effect was developed to simultaneously determine four endogenous monoamines including serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in rat brain tissues, using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Various conditions, including columns, chromatographic conditions, ion source, MS/MS conditions, and brain tissue preparation methods, were optimized and validated. Pre-weighed 20mg brain sample could be effectively and reproducibly homogenized and protein-precipitated by 20 times value of 0.2% formic acid in cold organic solvents (methanol-acetonitrile, 10:90, v/v). This method exhibited excellent linearity for all analytes (regression coefficients>0.998 or 0.999). The precision, expressed as coefficients of variation, was less than 3.43% for intra-day analyses and ranged from 4.17% to 15.5% for inter-day analyses. Good performance was showed in limit of detection (between 0.3nM and 3.0nM for all analytes), recovery (90.8-120%), matrix effect (84.4-107%), accuracy (89.8-100%) and stability (88.3-104%). The validated method was well applied to simultaneously determine the endogenous serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in four brain sections of 18 Wistar rats. The quantification of four endogenous monoamines in rat brain performed excellently in the sensitivity, high throughput, simple sample preparation and matrix effect.

  11. Replication of many human viruses is refractory to inhibition by endogenous cellular microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Kennedy, Edward M; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Griffin, Diane E; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-07-01

    The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. Importance: Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  12. Replication of Many Human Viruses Is Refractory to Inhibition by Endogenous Cellular MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W.; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  13. Inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on zebrafish methamphetamine dependence are associated with amelioration of neurotransmitters content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingjin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Chan; Peng, Qiuxian; Fang, Miao; Liu, Wei; Kang, Qunzhao; Lin, Yingbo; Yung, Ken Kin Lam; Mo, Zhixian

    2016-07-01

    Others and we have reported that rhynchophylline reverses amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) effect which may be partly mediated by amelioration of central neurotransmitters and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B) levels in the rat brains. The current study investigated the inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on methamphetamine-induced (METH-induced) CPP in adult zebrafish and METH-induced locomotor activity in tyrosine hydroxylase-green fluorescent protein (TH-GFP) transgenic zebrafish larvae and attempted to confirm the hypothesis that these effects were mediated via regulation of neurotransmitters and dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems. After baseline preference test (on days 1-3), zebrafish were injected intraperitoneally METH (on days 4, 6 and 8) or the same volume of fish physiological saline (on days 5 and 7) and were immediately conditioned. Rhynchophylline was administered at 12h after injection of METH. On day 9, zebrafish were tested for METH-induced CPP. Results revealed that rhynchophylline (100mg/kg) significantly inhibited the acquisition of METH-induced CPP, reduced the content of dopamine and glutamate and down-regulated the expression of TH and NR2B in the CPP zebrafish brains. Furthermore, the influence of rhynchophylline on METH-induced locomotor activity was also observed in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Results showed that rhynchophylline (50mg/L) treatment led to a significant reduction on the locomotor activity and TH expression in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Taken together, these data indicate that the inhibition of the formation of METH dependence by rhynchophylline in zebrafish is associated with amelioration of the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression. PMID:27009763

  14. Inhibition potential of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolites on the in vitro monoamine oxidase (MAO)-catalyzed deamination of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Boxler, Martina I; Stock, Lorena; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-01-22

    Neurotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is still controversially discussed. Formation of reactive oxygen species e.g. based on elevated dopamine (DA) concentrations and DA quinone formation is discussed among others. Inhibition potential of MDMA metabolites regarding neurotransmitter degradation by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase was described previously. Their influence on monoamine oxidase (MAO) - the major DA degradation pathway-has not yet been studied in humans. Therefore the inhibition potential of MDMA and its metabolites on the deamination of the neurotransmitters DA and serotonin (5-HT) by MAO-A and B using recombinant human enzymes in vitro should be investigated. In initial studies, MDMA and MDA showed relevant inhibition (>30%) toward MAO A for 5-HT and DA. No relevant effects toward MAO B were observed. Further investigation on MAO-A revealed MDMA as a competitive inhibitor of 5-HT and DA deamination with Ki 24.5±7.1 μM and 18.6±4.3 μM respectively and MDA as a mixed-type inhibitor with Ki 7.8±2.6 μM and 8.4±3.2 μM respectively. Although prediction of in vivo relevance needs to be done with care, relevant inhibitory effects at expected plasma concentrations after recreational MDMA consumption seems unlikely based on the obtained data. PMID:26721607

  15. Inhibition potential of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolites on the in vitro monoamine oxidase (MAO)-catalyzed deamination of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Boxler, Martina I; Stock, Lorena; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-01-22

    Neurotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is still controversially discussed. Formation of reactive oxygen species e.g. based on elevated dopamine (DA) concentrations and DA quinone formation is discussed among others. Inhibition potential of MDMA metabolites regarding neurotransmitter degradation by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase was described previously. Their influence on monoamine oxidase (MAO) - the major DA degradation pathway-has not yet been studied in humans. Therefore the inhibition potential of MDMA and its metabolites on the deamination of the neurotransmitters DA and serotonin (5-HT) by MAO-A and B using recombinant human enzymes in vitro should be investigated. In initial studies, MDMA and MDA showed relevant inhibition (>30%) toward MAO A for 5-HT and DA. No relevant effects toward MAO B were observed. Further investigation on MAO-A revealed MDMA as a competitive inhibitor of 5-HT and DA deamination with Ki 24.5±7.1 μM and 18.6±4.3 μM respectively and MDA as a mixed-type inhibitor with Ki 7.8±2.6 μM and 8.4±3.2 μM respectively. Although prediction of in vivo relevance needs to be done with care, relevant inhibitory effects at expected plasma concentrations after recreational MDMA consumption seems unlikely based on the obtained data.

  16. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain. PMID:26348457

  17. Increase in Endogenous and Exogenous Cyclic AMP Levels Inhibits Sclerotial Development in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Jeffrey A.; Dickman, Martin B.

    1998-01-01

    Growth and development of a wild-type Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolate were examined in the presence of various pharmacological compounds to investigate signal transduction pathways that influence the development of sclerotia. Compounds known to increase endogenous cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in other organisms by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity (caffeine and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine) or by activating adenylate cyclase (NaF) reduced or eliminated sclerotial development in S. sclerotiorum. Growth in the presence of 5 mM caffeine correlated with increased levels of endogenous cAMP in mycelia. In addition, incorporation of cAMP into the growth medium decreased or eliminated the production of sclerotia in a concentration-dependent manner and increased the accumulation of oxalic acid. Inhibition of sclerotial development was cAMP specific, as exogenous cyclic GMP, AMP, and ATP did not influence sclerotial development. Transfer of developing cultures to cAMP-containing medium at successive time points demonstrated that cAMP inhibits development prior to or during sclerotial initiation. Together, these results indicate that cAMP plays a role in the early transition between mycelial growth and sclerotial development. PMID:9647827

  18. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain.

  19. Androgen inhibits neurotransmitter turnover in the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat following exposure to a novel environment.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Hejna, G M; Lorens, S A

    1997-03-14

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gonadal steroid hormones affect the neuroendocrine response to a novel environment and other stressors. Introduction to a novel environment also increases neurotransmitter turnover in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). In this study, we examined the possibility that gonadal steroid hormones could similarly modulate the neurotransmitter response to a novel environment in the MPFC of the male rat. Male Fischer 344 rats at 3 months of age were gonadectomized (GDX'd) and implanted with Silastic capsules containing dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP, a non-aromatizable form of androgen), 17 beta-estradiol (E), or placebo. Control animals were left intact. Each of these groups was further divided into a group introduced to a novel environment or a home cage control group. Animals exposed to a novel environment were killed after spending 20 min in a novel open field, whereas control animals were killed immediately upon removal from their home cage. Using high performance liquid chromatography, the MPFC was assayed for tissue levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA); norepinephrine (NE) and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG); or serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA). The introduction to a novel environment caused significant increases in turnover of all three neurochemicals examined as estimated by metabolite/precursor ratios. These increases were characterized by increases in DOPAC, HVA, MHPG and 5-HIAA coupled with decreases in DA, NE and 5-HT. There was no effect of GDX on neurotransmitter turnover, however, treatment of GDX animals with DHTP prevented the open field induced increase in DOPAC/DA, MHPG/NE, and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio. Treatment of GDX animals with estrogen had the opposite effect of DHTP, DOPAC/DA and MHPG/NE ratios increased to a greater level following the introduction to a novel environment than

  20. Mechanisms underlying the endogenous dopaminergic inhibition of spinal locomotor circuit function in Xenopus tadpoles

    PubMed Central

    Picton, Laurence D.; Sillar, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine plays important roles in the development and modulation of motor control circuits. Here we show that dopamine exerts potent effects on the central pattern generator circuit controlling locomotory swimming in post-embryonic Xenopus tadpoles. Dopamine (0.5–100 μM) reduced fictive swim bout occurrence and caused both spontaneous and evoked episodes to become shorter, slower and weaker. The D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole mimicked this repertoire of inhibitory effects on swimming, whilst the D4 receptor antagonist, L745,870, had the opposite effects. The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion potently inhibited fictive swimming, demonstrating that dopamine constitutes an endogenous modulatory system. Both dopamine and quinpirole also inhibited swimming in spinalised preparations, suggesting spinally located dopamine receptors. Dopamine and quinpirole hyperpolarised identified rhythmically active spinal neurons, increased rheobase and reduced spike probability both during swimming and in response to current injection. The hyperpolarisation was TTX-resistant and was accompanied by decreased input resistance, suggesting that dopamine opens a K+ channel. The K+ channel blocker barium chloride (but not TEA, glybenclamide or tertiapin-Q) significantly occluded the hyperpolarisation. Overall, we show that endogenously released dopamine acts upon spinally located D2-like receptors, leading to a rapid inhibitory modulation of swimming via the opening of a K+ channel. PMID:27760989

  1. Endogenous inhibition of the trigeminally evoked neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Philbin, K; Bateman, R; Mendelowitz, D

    2010-10-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs.

  2. Endogenous inhibition of pain and spinal nociception in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Shreela; Bartley, Emily J; Kuhn, Bethany L; Kerr, Kara L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is characterized by severe affective and physical symptoms, such as increased pain, during the late-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in women with PMDD have yet to be identified, and supraspinal pain modulation has yet to be examined in this population. The present study assessed endogenous pain inhibitory processing by examining conditioned pain modulation (CPM, a painful conditioning stimulus inhibiting pain evoked by a test stimulus at a distal body site) of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a spinally-mediated withdrawal reflex) during the mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Methods Participants were regularly-cycling women (14 without PMDD; 14 with PMDD). CPM was assessed by delivering electrocutaneous test stimuli to the sural nerve before, during, and after a painful conditioning ischemia task. Participants rated their pain to electrocutaneous stimuli, and NFR magnitudes were measured. A linear mixed model analysis was used to assess the influence of group and menstrual phase on CPM. Results Compared with controls, women with PMDD experienced greater pain during the late-luteal phase and enhanced spinal nociception during the ovulation phase, both of which were independent of CPM. Both groups showed CPM inhibition of pain that did not differ by menstrual phase. Only women with PMDD evidenced CPM inhibition of NFR. Conclusion Endogenous modulation of pain and spinal nociception is not disrupted in women with PMDD. Additionally, greater NFR magnitudes during ovulation in PMDD may be due to tonically-engaged descending mechanisms that facilitate spinal nociception, leading to enhanced pain during the premenstrual phase. PMID:26929663

  3. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3380807

  4. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3357895

  5. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Vascular Calcification in Association with the TGF-β/Smad Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Huang, Yaqian; Du, Junbao; Liu, Angie Dong; Tang, Chaoshu; Qi, Yongfen; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate whether endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO2) plays a role in vascular calcification (VC) in rats and its possible mechanisms. In vivo medial vascular calcification was induced in rats by vitamin D3 and nicotine for four weeks. In vitro calcification of cultured A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced by calcifying media containing 5 mmol/L CaCl2. Aortic smooth muscle (SM) α-actin, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Smad expression was measured. VC rats showed dispersed calcified nodules among the elastic fibers in calcified aorta with increased aortic calcium content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. SM α-actin was markedly decreased, but the osteochondrogenic marker Runx2 concomitantly increased and TGF-β/Smad signaling was activated, in association with the downregulated SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway. However, SO2 supplementation successfully ameliorated vascular calcification, and increased SM α-actin expression, but inhibited Runx2 and TGF-β/Smad expression. In calcified A7r5 VSMCs, the endogenous SO2/AAT pathway was significantly downregulated. SO2 treatment reduced the calcium deposits, calcium content, ALP activity and Runx2 expression and downregulated the TGF-β/Smad pathway in A7r5 cells but increased SM α-actin expression. In brief, SO2 significantly ameliorated vascular calcification in association with downregulation of the TGF-β/Smad pathway. PMID:26907267

  6. Enhanced endogenous type I interferon cell-driven survival and inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis by Riluzole

    SciTech Connect

    Achour, Ammar

    2009-03-30

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), although effective in improving the survival of HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been able to reconstitute the adaptive immune response. We have described the use of novel chemical agents to restore T-cell survival/proliferation by inducing cytokine production. Due to its cationic amphiphilic structure, these molecules appear to enhance immune restoration. In this study, we investigated the action of Riluzole (2-amino-6-trifuromethoxybenzothiazole) in HIV-1 infection. Riluzole is able to increase (effective dose from 1 to 1000 nM) the cell-survival of T cells from HIV-1-infected patients and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. The immunomodulatory effect of riluzole-sensitized cells was ascribed to endogenous type I interferon (IFN) derived from monocytes. Riluzole might be used for restoring the cell survival of immunocompromised patients and eliminating latent infected cells upon HIV-1 reactivation.

  7. Tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate inhibits Escherichia coli by increasing endogenous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li-Gui; Chen, Yi-Jun; Tong, Jie-Wen; Huang, Jian-An; Li, Juan; Gong, Yu-Shun; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2017-02-15

    The antibacterial effects of tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a common phytochemical with a number of potential health benefits, are well known. However, the mechanism of its bactericidal action remains unclear. Using E. coli as a model organism, it is argued here that H2O2 synthesis by EGCG is not attributed to its inhibitory effects. In contrast, the bactericidal action of EGCG was a result of increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and blunted adaptive oxidative stress response in E. coli due to the co-administration of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, and not on account of exogenous catalase. Furthermore, we noted a synergistic bactericidal effect for EGCG when combined with paraquat. However, under anaerobic conditions, the inhibitory effect of EGCG was prevented. In conclusion, EGCG caused an increase in endogenous oxidative stress in E. coli, thereby inhibiting its growth, and hence the use of EGCG as a prooxidant is supported by this study. PMID:27664626

  8. Tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate inhibits Escherichia coli by increasing endogenous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li-Gui; Chen, Yi-Jun; Tong, Jie-Wen; Huang, Jian-An; Li, Juan; Gong, Yu-Shun; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2017-02-15

    The antibacterial effects of tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a common phytochemical with a number of potential health benefits, are well known. However, the mechanism of its bactericidal action remains unclear. Using E. coli as a model organism, it is argued here that H2O2 synthesis by EGCG is not attributed to its inhibitory effects. In contrast, the bactericidal action of EGCG was a result of increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and blunted adaptive oxidative stress response in E. coli due to the co-administration of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, and not on account of exogenous catalase. Furthermore, we noted a synergistic bactericidal effect for EGCG when combined with paraquat. However, under anaerobic conditions, the inhibitory effect of EGCG was prevented. In conclusion, EGCG caused an increase in endogenous oxidative stress in E. coli, thereby inhibiting its growth, and hence the use of EGCG as a prooxidant is supported by this study.

  9. Action and Inhibition of Endogenous Phospholipases during Isolation of Plant Membranes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F; Morré, D J

    1978-12-01

    Endogenous phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities were demonstrated in membrane fractions isolated from soybean (Glycine max L.) hypocotyls. Phospholipase D activity was distributed widely among different membrane fractions while phosphatidic acid phosphatase was found predominantly in membranes equilibrating in lower sucrose densities. Phospholipase D action was unaffected by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium salt or ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid but was prevented by a mixture of 4% choline and 4% ethanolamine. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase was inhibited by 10 millimolar glycerol 1-phosphate or by homogenization media prepared with coconut milk as a solvent instead of water. Under fully protected conditions the phospholipid composition of soybean membrane fractions remained unchanged for at least 1 hour at 20 C. Membranes prepared under protected conditions had low phosphatidic acid contents and the phospholipid compositions closely resembled those of corresponding animal membranes.

  10. Endogenous Inhibition of the Trigeminally Evoked Neurotransmission to Cardiac Vagal Neurons by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Philbin, K.; Bateman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs. PMID:20719927

  11. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  12. Inhibition of endogenous NGF degradation induces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously shown a sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis of the skin following subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the hindpaw. This sprouting correlated with an increase in pain-related sensitivity. We hypothesized that this sprouting and pain-related behavior were caused by an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) levels. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of mature NGF degradation, using a matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2/9) inhibitor, was sufficient to reproduce a similar phenotype. Results Behavioral tests performed on male Sprague–Dawley rats at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after intra-plantar MMP-2/9 inhibitor administration demonstrated that acute and chronic injections of the MMP-2/9 inhibitor induced sensitization, in a dose dependent manner, to mechanical, hot and cold stimuli as measured by von Frey filaments, Hargreaves and acetone tests, respectively. Moreover, the protein levels of mature NGF (mNGF) were increased, whereas the levels and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were reduced in the glabrous skin of the hind paw. MMP-2/9 inhibition also led to a robust sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis but there were no changes in the density of peptidergic nociceptive afferents. Conclusions These findings indicate that localized MMP-2/9 inhibition provokes a pattern of sensitization and fiber sprouting comparable to that previously obtained following CFA injection. Accordingly, the modulation of endogenous NGF levels should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory pain associated with arthritis. PMID:23889761

  13. Tests of an electrostatic screening hypothesis of the inhibition of neurotransmitter release by cations at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Misler, S; Hurlbut, W P

    1980-07-01

    We have investigated an electrostatic screening hypothesis of cationic inhibition of quantal release at the neuromuscular junction of the frog (Rana pipiens). According to this hypothesis, increasing the extracellular concentration of an inhibitory cation reduces the quantal content (m) of the end-plate potential by reducing the ability of negative surface charge to attract Ca2+ to the external surface of the presynaptic membrane. The inhibitory power of various cations should depend only on their net ionic charge and should increase strongly with increasing charge. We have demonstrated, in Ringer's solutions containing modified concentrations of Na+, Ca+, and Mg2+, that at fixed concentrations of Ca2+ and Na+ (a) the dependence of m on [Mg2+]0 is satisfactorily accounted for by electrostatic theory and (b) the dependence of m on the univalent cation concentration of the modified Ringer's solution is satisfactorily predicted from the Mg2+ inhibition of m. (Glucosamine or arginine was used to replace a fraction of the Na+ content of Ringer's solution in the latter experiments.) These results are consistent with electrostatic screening actions of Mg2+ and univalent cations in the inhibition of m. We have also re-examined the inhibition of m caused by the addition to Ringer's solution of two trace concentration divalent cations, Mn2+ and Sr2+. Our data suggest that the inhibition of m by Sr2+ at high quantal contents may also be due to surface charge screening, while the potent inhibitory actions of Mn2+ may be due to its ability to bind negative surface charge.

  14. Inhibition of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors by antagonists: strategy to estimate the association and the dissociation rate constant of antagonists with very strong affinity to the receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Inoue, Y; Hori, K

    1992-10-01

    Since binding of an agonist to an ionotropic neurotransmitter receptor causes not only channel opening, but also desensitization of the receptor, inhibition of the receptor by the antagonist sometimes becomes very complicated. The transient state kinetics of ligand association and dissociation, and desensitization of the receptor were considered on the basis of the minimal model proposed by Hess' group, and the following possibilities were proposed. 1) When an agonist is simultaneously applied to the receptor with an antagonist whose affinity to the receptor is extremely strong and different from that of the agonist, it is usually impossible to estimate the real inhibition constant exactly from the responses because desensitization of the receptor proceeds before the equilibrium of the ligand binding. Simultaneous addition of the antagonist with strong affinity to the receptor may apparently accelerate inactivation (desensitization) of the receptor. The association rate constant of the antagonist can be estimated by analyses of the rate of the inactivation in the presence and the absence of the antagonist. 2) A preincubated antagonist with a slow dissociation rate constant, i.e., a very effective inhibitor, may cause apparent noncompetitive inhibition of the receptor, since the receptor is desensitized by an agonist as soon as the antagonist dissociates from the receptor and the dissociation of the antagonist from the receptor becomes the rate-determining step. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNA prepared from Electrophorus electricus electroplax and used for the experiments on inhibition by an antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1337082

  15. Inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by an endogenous bornavirus-like element in the ground squirrel genome.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kan; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Merriman, Dana K; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2014-09-01

    Animal genomes contain endogenous viral sequences, such as endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons. Recently, we and others discovered that nonretroviral viruses also have been endogenized in many vertebrate genomes. Bornaviruses belong to the Mononegavirales and have left endogenous fragments, called "endogenous bornavirus-like elements" (EBLs), in the genomes of many mammals. The striking features of EBLs are that they contain relatively long ORFs which have high sequence homology to the extant bornavirus proteins. Furthermore, some EBLs derived from bornavirus nucleoprotein (EBLNs) have been shown to be transcribed as mRNA and probably are translated into proteins. These features lead us to speculate that EBLs may function as cellular coopted genes. An EBLN element in the genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), itEBLN, encodes an ORF with 77% amino acid sequence identity to the current bornavirus nucleoprotein. In this study, we cloned itEBLN from the ground squirrel genome and investigated its involvement in Borna disease virus (BDV) replication. Interestingly, itEBLN, but not a human EBLN, colocalized with the viral factory in the nucleus and appeared to affect BDV polymerase activity by being incorporated into the viral ribonucleoprotein. Our data show that, as do certain endogenous retroviruses, itEBLN potentially may inhibit infection by related exogenous viruses in vivo.

  16. Differential sensitivity of porcine endogenous retrovirus to APOBEC3-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Han; Kim, Jin Ha; Jung, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Pigs are considered to be suitable xenotransplantation organ donors. However, the risk of pathogen transmission from pigs to humans is a major concern in the transplantation of porcine tissues. The porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) PERV-A, PERV-A/C, and PERV-B can infect human cells, but PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Thus, several strategies have been proposed to reduce PERV transmission in xenograft recipients. Human APOBEC3G (huA3G) is a single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, which inactivates the coding capacity of the virus by deamination of cDNA cytosines to uracils. This reaction occurs within the (-) DNA strand during reverse transcription, resulting in a G-to-A mutation in the (+) strand. While recent data have shown that PERV-B is severely inhibited by huA3G and porcine A3Z2-Z3 (poA3F) in a pseudotype assay, little is known about PERV-C. Here, we compare the antiretroviral activities of huA3G, huA3F and poA3Z2-Z3 against PERV-C. Our data show that APOBEC3 was packaged into PERV-C particles and inhibited PERV-C replication in a dose-dependent manner. PERV-C infectivity was strongly inhibited by poA3Z2-Z3, but it did not markedly reduce PERV-B infectivity. This suggests that PERV-C Gag interacts efficiently with poA3Z2-Z3. In addition, we constructed stably huA3G- and poA3Z2-Z3-expressing 293-PERV-PK-CIRCE cells (human 293 cells infected with PK15-derived PERVs) to examine whether PERV is resistant to poA3Z2-Z3 in a virus-spreading assay. The stably expressed huA3G and poA3Z2-Z3 were more packaging-competent than transiently expressed APOBEC3 proteins. These results suggest that poA3Z2-Z3 can inhibit PERV replication in a pseudotype assay as well as in a virus-spreading assay.

  17. Endogenous transmembrane protein UT2 inhibits pSTAT3 and suppresses hematological malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Kalaitzidis, Demetrios; Ramachandran, Janani; Sykes, David B.; Raje, Noopur; Scadden, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of STAT3 activation is critical for normal and malignant hematopoietic cell proliferation. Here, we have reported that the endogenous transmembrane protein upstream-of-mTORC2 (UT2) negatively regulates activation of STAT3. Specifically, we determined that UT2 interacts directly with GP130 and inhibits phosphorylation of STAT3 on tyrosine 705 (STAT3Y705). This reduces cytokine signaling including IL6 that is implicated in multiple myeloma and other hematopoietic malignancies. Modulation of UT2 resulted in inverse effects on animal survival in myeloma models. Samples from multiple myeloma patients also revealed a decreased copy number of UT2 and decreased expression of UT2 in genomic and transcriptomic analyses, respectively. Together, these studies identify a transmembrane protein that functions to negatively regulate cytokine signaling through GP130 and pSTAT3Y705 and is molecularly and mechanistically distinct from the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of genes. Moreover, this work provides evidence that perturbations of this activation-dampening molecule participate in hematologic malignancies and may serve as a key determinant of multiple myeloma pathophysiology. UT2 is a negative regulator shared across STAT3 and mTORC2 signaling cascades, functioning as a tumor suppressor in hematologic malignancies driven by those pathways. PMID:26927669

  18. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Wiebke; Kwan, Saskia; Ahmed, Alysha-Karima; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience (“liking”) of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward (“wanting”), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief “won” in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality. PMID:26464995

  19. Light Inhibition of Shoot Regeneration Is Regulated by Endogenous Abscisic Acid Level in Calli Derived from Immature Barley Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rikiishi, Kazuhide; Matsuura, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoko; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Shoot regeneration in calli derived from immature barley embryos is regulated by light conditions during the callus-induction period. Barley cultivars Kanto Nijo-5 (KN5) and K-3 (K3) showed lower efficiency of shoot regeneration in a 16-h photoperiod during callus-induction than those in continuous darkness, whereas shoot regeneration was enhanced in cultures under a 16-h photoperiod in Golden Promise (GP) and Lenins (LN). These cultivars were classified as photo-inhibition type (KN5 and K3) or photo-induction type (GP and LN) according to their response to light. Contents of endogenous plant hormones were determined in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod and continuous darkness. In photo-inhibition type, higher accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) was detected in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod, whereas calli showed lower levels of endogenous ABA in continuous darkness. However, cultivars of photo-induction type showed lower levels of ABA in calli cultured under both light conditions, similarly to photo-inhibition type in continuous darkness. Exogenous ABA inhibited the callus growth and shoot regeneration independent of light conditions in all cultivars. In photo-inhibition type, lower levels of endogenous ABA induced by ABA biosynthesis inhibitor, fluridone, reduced the photo-inhibition of shoot regeneration. Expression of ABA biosynthesis gene, HvNCED1, in calli was regulated by the light conditions. Higher expression was observed in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod. These results indicate that ABA biosynthesis could be activated through the higher expression of HvNCED1 in a 16-h photoperiod and that the higher accumulations of ABA inhibit shoot regeneration in the photo-inhibition type cultivars. PMID:26670930

  20. Light Inhibition of Shoot Regeneration Is Regulated by Endogenous Abscisic Acid Level in Calli Derived from Immature Barley Embryos.

    PubMed

    Rikiishi, Kazuhide; Matsuura, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoko; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Shoot regeneration in calli derived from immature barley embryos is regulated by light conditions during the callus-induction period. Barley cultivars Kanto Nijo-5 (KN5) and K-3 (K3) showed lower efficiency of shoot regeneration in a 16-h photoperiod during callus-induction than those in continuous darkness, whereas shoot regeneration was enhanced in cultures under a 16-h photoperiod in Golden Promise (GP) and Lenins (LN). These cultivars were classified as photo-inhibition type (KN5 and K3) or photo-induction type (GP and LN) according to their response to light. Contents of endogenous plant hormones were determined in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod and continuous darkness. In photo-inhibition type, higher accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) was detected in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod, whereas calli showed lower levels of endogenous ABA in continuous darkness. However, cultivars of photo-induction type showed lower levels of ABA in calli cultured under both light conditions, similarly to photo-inhibition type in continuous darkness. Exogenous ABA inhibited the callus growth and shoot regeneration independent of light conditions in all cultivars. In photo-inhibition type, lower levels of endogenous ABA induced by ABA biosynthesis inhibitor, fluridone, reduced the photo-inhibition of shoot regeneration. Expression of ABA biosynthesis gene, HvNCED1, in calli was regulated by the light conditions. Higher expression was observed in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod. These results indicate that ABA biosynthesis could be activated through the higher expression of HvNCED1 in a 16-h photoperiod and that the higher accumulations of ABA inhibit shoot regeneration in the photo-inhibition type cultivars. PMID:26670930

  1. Myriocin, a serine palmitoyltransferase inhibitor, alters regional brain neurotransmitter levels without concurrent inhibition of the brain sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Osuchowski, Marcin F; Johnson, Victor J; He, Quanren; Sharma, Raghubir P

    2004-02-28

    Myriocin is a specific serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibitor whose effect on the brain is unknown. Brain amine metabolism and sphingolipid biosynthesis were studied in mice treated intraperitoneally with 0, 0.1, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg per day of myriocin for 5 days. Regional concentrations of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and norepinephrine (NE), were determined. Sphinganine (Sa) and sphingosine (So) concentrations and SPT activity in brain and liver were used to evaluate the impact of myriocin on sphingolipid biosynthesis. Myriocin treatment increased DA in striatum and hippocampus and reduced it in cortex. NE concentration decreased in cerebellum and 5-HT levels were reduced in cortex and in medulla oblongata. Changes in ratios for DOPAC/DA and HVA/DA were observed in hippocampus, cortex and midbrain. Brain Sa, So and SPT activity remained unchanged, whereas Sa and SPT activity decreased in liver. Results showed that myriocin may alter the levels and metabolism of brain amines and this effect is not related with inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis in the nervous system. PMID:14700532

  2. NF-κB Inhibition Resolves Cognitive Deficits in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through CREB and Glutamate/GABA Neurotransmitters Pathway.

    PubMed

    Datusalia, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with deficits in memory and cognitive functions and sustained inflammation. Recently, involvement of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) has been postulated in many cognitive functions, immune system and inflammation. Despite of role of NF-κB in inflammation, a large gap remains in understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of NF-κB activation in the central nervous system.In this study, we have evaluated the effects of NF-κB activation inhibitor on memory function, neurotransmitter levels changes and brain inflammatory cytokines in type-2 diabetic rats. BAY 11-7082 (BAY) was used as a pharmacological inhibitor of IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B alpha) phosphorylation to block NF-κB activation. Type-2 diabetic rats showed significant memory impairment at 15(th) week. Three weeks BAY treatment produced significant increase in Morris water maze test learning and memory performance. Diabetic animals also showed improved performance in passive avoidance and Y-maze test paradigm following treatment with NF-κB inhibitor BAY. BAY treatment did not show any significant effect on blood glucose and insulin levels. NF-κB inhibition significantly reduced neuroinflammation as evidenced by decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α levels. BAY treatment in diabetic rats also increased the phosphorylation of CREB which indicates that the NF-κB activation inhibitor engage a CREB regulated mechanism in-vivo. Moreover, BAY also reversed the alterations in brain glutamate and GABA levels in diabetic rats. These findings corroborate that NF-κB inhibition may be an effective treatment strategy in diabetes associated cognitive deficits. PMID:26517200

  3. NF-κB Inhibition Resolves Cognitive Deficits in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through CREB and Glutamate/GABA Neurotransmitters Pathway.

    PubMed

    Datusalia, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with deficits in memory and cognitive functions and sustained inflammation. Recently, involvement of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) has been postulated in many cognitive functions, immune system and inflammation. Despite of role of NF-κB in inflammation, a large gap remains in understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of NF-κB activation in the central nervous system.In this study, we have evaluated the effects of NF-κB activation inhibitor on memory function, neurotransmitter levels changes and brain inflammatory cytokines in type-2 diabetic rats. BAY 11-7082 (BAY) was used as a pharmacological inhibitor of IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B alpha) phosphorylation to block NF-κB activation. Type-2 diabetic rats showed significant memory impairment at 15(th) week. Three weeks BAY treatment produced significant increase in Morris water maze test learning and memory performance. Diabetic animals also showed improved performance in passive avoidance and Y-maze test paradigm following treatment with NF-κB inhibitor BAY. BAY treatment did not show any significant effect on blood glucose and insulin levels. NF-κB inhibition significantly reduced neuroinflammation as evidenced by decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α levels. BAY treatment in diabetic rats also increased the phosphorylation of CREB which indicates that the NF-κB activation inhibitor engage a CREB regulated mechanism in-vivo. Moreover, BAY also reversed the alterations in brain glutamate and GABA levels in diabetic rats. These findings corroborate that NF-κB inhibition may be an effective treatment strategy in diabetes associated cognitive deficits.

  4. Rhabdovirus-induced apoptosis in a fish cell line is inhibited by a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Björklund, H V; Johansson, T R; Rinne, A

    1997-07-01

    To determine the mechanisms of cell death in rhabdovirus-infected cells, we studied the infection of the epithelial papilloma of carp cell line with spring viremia of carp virus. Studies using electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed changes in cell morphology and DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. The virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in cells treated with a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9188644

  5. Signaling pathways take aim at neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael B

    2003-11-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are the target of various pharmacological agents used to treat psychological or cognitive conditions, such as depression and attention-deficit disorder. In addition, some of the effects of stimulant-type drugs of abuse result from inhibition of neurotransmitter transporters. Robinson describes the intersection between neurotransmitter transporters and signaling pathways. Neurotransmitter transporters can be regulated by altering the rate of internalization and insertion into the plasma membrane to control cell surface expression or by altering the activity of the transporters within the membrane. As the mechanisms governing regulation of these transporters become elucidated, new potential therapeutic targets may be revealed, given the many processes affected by the activity of neurotransmitter transporters.

  6. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  7. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release. PMID:26604076

  8. Neocuproine inhibits the decomposition of endogenous S-nitrosothiol by ultraviolet irradiation in the mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Ogülener, Nuran; Ergün, Yusuf

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether copper ions are involved in the decomposition of endogenous S-nitrosothiols by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation in the mouse gastric fundus. The effects of copper ions and chelators of copper(I) and copper(II), neocuproine and cuprozine, respectively, were studied on relaxations in response to S-nitrosoglutathione, UV irradiation, exogenous nitric oxide (NO), added as acidified NaNO(2), and isoproterenol. UV irradiation of smooth muscle strips induced fast and transient relaxations which were mimicked by exogenous NO. S-Nitrosoglutathione induced concentration-dependent relaxations, which were more sustained than those elicited by UV irradiation or NO. CuCl(2) did not affect relaxations elicited by UV irradiation, exogenous NO and isoproterenol but enhanced those elicited by S-nitrosoglutathione. CuSO(4) but not FeSO(4) mimicked the effect of CuCl(2) on relaxations elicited by S-nitrosoglutathione. Neocuproine, the copper(I)-specific chelator, inhibited both photorelaxation and S-nitrosoglutathione-induced relaxation, and this inhibition was prevented by CuCl(2). In contrast, neocuproine significantly enhanced the relaxations in response to exogenous NO, without affecting the relaxations elicited by isoproterenol. Cuprizone, a specific copper(II) chelator, did not affect relaxations in response to S-nitrosoglutathione, UV irradiation, exogenous NO and isoproterenol. These results suggest that copper(I) and not copper(II) may play a role in the NO release evoked by the light-induced decomposition of endogenous S-nitrosothiols in mouse gastric fundus. Also, results with the selective copper(I) chelator, neocuproine, confirmed our recent findings that the endogenous "store" of S-nitrosoglutathione, rather than NO, acts as an intermediate in photorelaxation of the mouse gastric fundus, and that photorelaxation may be a suitable model to elucidate the nature of endogenous S-nitrosothiols.

  9. Fourth-Generation Progestins Inhibit 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 and Modulate the Biosynthesis of Endogenous Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Louw-du Toit, Renate; Perkins, Meghan S.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz; Africander, Donita

    2016-01-01

    Progestins used in contraception and hormone replacement therapy are synthetic compounds designed to mimic the actions of the natural hormone progesterone and are classed into four consecutive generations. The biological actions of progestins are primarily determined by their interactions with steroid receptors, and factors such as metabolism, pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and the regulation of endogenous steroid hormone biosynthesis are often overlooked. Although some studies have investigated the effects of select progestins on a few steroidogenic enzymes, studies comparing the effects of progestins from different generations are lacking. This study therefore explored the putative modulatory effects of progestins on de novo steroid synthesis in the adrenal by comparing the effects of select progestins from the respective generations, on endogenous steroid hormone production by the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis showed that the fourth-generation progestins, nestorone (NES), nomegestrol acetate (NoMAC) and drospirenone (DRSP), unlike the progestins selected from the first three generations, modulate the biosynthesis of several endogenous steroids. Subsequent assays performed in COS-1 cells expressing human 3βHSD2, suggest that these progestins modulate the biosynthesis of steroid hormones by inhibiting the activity of 3βHSD2. The Ki values determined for the inhibition of human 3βHSD2 by NES (9.5 ± 0.96 nM), NoMAC (29 ± 7.1 nM) and DRSP (232 ± 38 nM) were within the reported concentration ranges for the contraceptive use of these progestins in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that newer, fourth-generation progestins may exert both positive and negative physiological effects via the modulation of endogenous steroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:27706226

  10. Endogenous thyrocyte-produced nitric oxide inhibits iodide uptake and thyroid-specific gene expression in FRTL-5 thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Fozzatti, Laura; Vélez, María L; Lucero, Ariel M; Nicola, Juan P; Mascanfroni, Iván D; Macció, Daniela R; Pellizas, Claudia G; Roth, Germán A; Masini-Repiso, Ana M

    2007-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical that mediates a wide array of cell functions. It is generated from l-arginine by NO-synthase (NOS). Expression of NOS isoforms has been demonstrated in thyroid cells. Previous reports indicated that NO donors induce dedifferentiation in thyrocytes. However, the functional significance of endogenous thyrocyte-produced NO has not been explored. This work aimed to study the influence of endogenous NO on parameters of thyroid cell function and differentiation in FRTL-5 cells. We observed that treatment with the NOS inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), increased the TSH-stimulated iodide uptake. The TSH-induced sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroglobulin (TG) mRNA expressions were increased after incubation with L-NAME. In transient transfection assays, TSH-stimulated transcriptional activities of NIS and TG promoters were increased by L-NAME. An increment of the TSH-stimulated cell proliferation was observed after NOS inhibition. Similar results were obtained when the action of another NOS inhibitor, N(g)-monomethyl-L-arginine, was analysed for most of these studies. The production of NO, which was not detectable in basal conditions, was increased by TSH. Our data provide strong evidence that endogenous NO could act as a negative signal for TSH-stimulated iodide uptake and thyroid-specific gene expression as well as proliferation in thyrocytes. These findings reveal a possible new inhibitory pathway in the regulation of thyroid cell function. PMID:17332530

  11. Endogenous ethylene does not regulate opening of unstressed Iris flowers but strongly inhibits it in water-stressed flowers.

    PubMed

    Çelikel, Fisun G; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2012-09-15

    The floral buds of Iris flowers (Iris x hollandica) are enclosed by two sheath leaves. Flower opening depends on lifting the flower up to a position whereby the tepals can move laterally. This upward movement is carried out by elongation of the subtending pedicel and ovary. In the pedicels and ovaries of unstressed control flowers, the concentration of ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) and the rate of ethylene production increased during d 0-1 of flower opening, and then decreased. Exposure to ≥200 nL L(-1) ethylene for 24 h at 20°C inhibited elongation of the pedicel+ovary, and inhibited flower opening. However, pulsing of unstressed flowers with solutions containing inhibitors of ethylene synthesis (AOA, AVG), or an inhibitor of ethylene action (STS), did not affect pedicel+ovary elongation or flower opening. When the flowers were dehydrated for 2 d at 20°C and 60% RH, they did not open when subsequently placed in water, and showed inhibited elongation in the pedicel+ovary. This dehydration treatment resulted in elevated pedicel+ovary ACC levels and in increased ethylene production. Treatment with STS prevented the increase in ACC levels and ethylene production, overcame the effect of dehydration on elongation of the pedicel+ovary, and resulted in full flower opening. It is concluded that flower opening in unstressed Iris flowers is not regulated by endogenous ethylene. An increase in endogenous ethylene above normal levels during stress, by contrast, strongly inhibited flower opening, due to its inhibitory effect on elongation of the pedicel+ovary.

  12. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  13. Tonically active protein kinase A regulates neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hilfiker, Sabine; Czernik, Andrew J; Greengard, Paul; Augustine, George J

    2001-01-01

    Electrophysiological and microinjection methods were used to examine the role of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in regulating transmitter release at the squid giant synapse. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by presynaptic action potentials were not affected by presynaptic injection of an exogenous active catalytic subunit of mammalian PKA. In contrast, presynaptic injection of PKI-amide, a peptide that inhibits PKA with high potency and specificity, led to a reversible inhibition of EPSPs. Injection of several other peptides that serve as substrates for PKA also reversibly inhibited neurotransmitter release. The ability of these peptides to inhibit release was correlated with their ability to serve as PKA substrates, suggesting that these peptides act by competing with endogenous substrates for phosphorylation by active endogenous PKA. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PKA substrates is maintained at a relatively high state under basal conditions and that this tonic activity of PKA is to a large degree required for evoked neurotransmitter release at the squid giant presynaptic terminal. PMID:11179398

  14. Tonically active protein kinase A regulates neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Hilfiker, S; Czernik, A J; Greengard, P; Augustine, G J

    2001-02-15

    1. Electrophysiological and microinjection methods were used to examine the role of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in regulating transmitter release at the squid giant synapse. 2. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by presynaptic action potentials were not affected by presynaptic injection of an exogenous active catalytic subunit of mammalian PKA. 3. In contrast, presynaptic injection of PKI-amide, a peptide that inhibits PKA with high potency and specificity, led to a reversible inhibition of EPSPs. 4. Injection of several other peptides that serve as substrates for PKA also reversibly inhibited neurotransmitter release. The ability of these peptides to inhibit release was correlated with their ability to serve as PKA substrates, suggesting that these peptides act by competing with endogenous substrates for phosphorylation by active endogenous PKA. 5. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PKA substrates is maintained at a relatively high state under basal conditions and that this tonic activity of PKA is to a large degree required for evoked neurotransmitter release at the squid giant presynaptic terminal.

  15. Three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite for electrochemical study on acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yingqiao; Fu, Ying; Xu, Lili; Lin, Bin; Wang, Zhongchuan; Xu, Zhiai; Jin, Litong; Zhang, Wen

    2012-09-13

    In this paper, an electrochemical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite was conducted. The 3DOM composite was first fabricated on the glassy carbon electrode by electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of ionic liquid (IL) on a sacrificial silica nanospheres template. After the silica nanospheres were etched, an IL-doped polyaniline (IL-PANI) film with 3DOM morphology was formed. Then, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were decorated on the IL-PANI film by electrodeposition. The immobilized AChE on the 3DOM composite displayed favorable affinity to substrate acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCh), and the 3DOM composite showed excellent electrocatalytic effect on thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of ATCh. The presence of IL and AuNPs could improve the sensitivity by accelerating the electron transfer. The designed AChE biosensor was successfully applied to evaluate the AChE inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin 1(R),2N-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline [(R)-NMSal]. The results demonstrate that (R)-NMSal exerts a considerable effect on AChE activity, and the inhibition is reversible. The developed method offers a new approach for AChE inhibition assay, which is of great benefit in understanding the mechanism behind neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Neurotransmitters in hiccups.

    PubMed

    Nausheen, Fauzia; Mohsin, Hina; Lakhan, Shaheen E

    2016-01-01

    Hiccups are the sudden involuntary contractions of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles. They are generally benign and self-limited, however, in some cases they are chronic and debilitating. There are approximately 4000 admissions for hiccups each year in the United States. The hiccup reflex arc is composed of three components: (1) an afferent limb including the phrenic, vagus, and sympathetic nerves, (2) the central processing unit in the midbrain, and (3) the efferent limb carrying motor fibers to the diaphragm and intercostal muscles. Hiccups may be idiopathic, organic, psychogenic, or medication-induced. Data obtained largely from case studies of hiccups either induced by or treated with medications have led to hypotheses on the neurotransmitters involved. The central neurotransmitters implicated in hiccups include GABA, dopamine, and serotonin, while the peripheral neurotransmitters are epinephrine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and histamine. Further studies are needed to characterize the nature of neurotransmitters at each anatomical level of the reflex arc to better target hiccups pharmacologically. PMID:27588250

  17. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements. PMID:25939038

  18. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  19. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  20. Brief optogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons mimics endogenous negative reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun Yun; Esber, Guillem R; Marrero-Garcia, Yasmin; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bonci, Antonello; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Correlative studies have strongly linked phasic changes in dopamine activity with reward prediction error signaling. But causal evidence that these brief changes in firing actually serve as error signals to drive associative learning is more tenuous. Although there is direct evidence that brief increases can substitute for positive prediction errors, there is no comparable evidence that similarly brief pauses can substitute for negative prediction errors. In the absence of such evidence, the effect of increases in firing could reflect novelty or salience, variables also correlated with dopamine activity. Here we provide evidence in support of the proposed linkage, showing in a modified Pavlovian over-expectation task that brief pauses in the firing of dopamine neurons in rat ventral tegmental area at the time of reward are sufficient to mimic the effects of endogenous negative prediction errors. These results support the proposal that brief changes in the firing of dopamine neurons serve as full-fledged bidirectional prediction error signals. PMID:26642092

  1. Brief optogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons mimics endogenous negative reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun Yun; Esber, Guillem R; Marrero-Garcia, Yasmin; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bonci, Antonello; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Correlative studies have strongly linked phasic changes in dopamine activity with reward prediction error signaling. But causal evidence that these brief changes in firing actually serve as error signals to drive associative learning is more tenuous. Although there is direct evidence that brief increases can substitute for positive prediction errors, there is no comparable evidence that similarly brief pauses can substitute for negative prediction errors. In the absence of such evidence, the effect of increases in firing could reflect novelty or salience, variables also correlated with dopamine activity. Here we provide evidence in support of the proposed linkage, showing in a modified Pavlovian over-expectation task that brief pauses in the firing of dopamine neurons in rat ventral tegmental area at the time of reward are sufficient to mimic the effects of endogenous negative prediction errors. These results support the proposal that brief changes in the firing of dopamine neurons serve as full-fledged bidirectional prediction error signals.

  2. An endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand inhibits proliferation and migration of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Dai, Cai-Feng; Patankar, Manish S; Song, Jia-Sheng; Zheng, Jing

    2013-10-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor mediates many biological processes. Herein, we investigated if 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE, an endogenous AhR ligand) regulated proliferation and migration of human ovarian cancer cells via AhR. We found that AhR was widely present in many histotypes of ovarian cancer tissues. ITE suppressed OVCAR-3 cell proliferation and SKOV-3 cell migration in vitro, which were blocked by AhR knockdown. ITE also suppressed OVCAR-3 cell growth in mice. These data suggest that the ITE might potentially be used for therapeutic intervention for at least a subset of human ovarian cancer.

  3. Focus on: neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, C Fernando; Puglia, Michael P; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, and third trimesters of human pregnancy. Results support the recommendation that pregnant women should abstain from drinking-even small quantities-as effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter systems have been detected at low levels of exposure. Recent studies have elucidated new mechanisms and/or consequences of the actions of ethanol on amino acid and biogenic amine neuro-transmitter systems. Alterations in these neurotransmitter systems could, in part, be responsible for many of the conditions associated with FASD, including (1) learning, memory, and attention deficits; (2) motor coordination impairments; (3) abnormal responsiveness to stress; and (4) increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as substance abuse and depression, and also neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. However, future research is needed to conclusively establish a causal relationship between these conditions and developmental dysfunctions in neurotransmitter systems.

  4. Esmolol activates endogenous neurokinin activity inhibiting infarction-induced arrhythmias in rats: novel mechanisms of anti-arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Han, Yi; Guo, Zheng; Han, Shi-Qi; Liu, Tao

    2013-09-10

    Endogenous neurokinin and adrenergic mechanisms might co-participate in the pathology of acute myocardial infarction (MI). This study sought to investigate the role of endogenous neurokinin and its relationship with β1-adrenergic mechanism in the infarction induced arrhythmias. In 60min of MI in rats, the contents of substance P (SP), a native agonist of neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R), norepinephrine (NE), NK1-R and β1-adrenergic receptor in the myocardium at risk of ischemia were examined and the ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed. The effects of pretreatment with D-SP (152ng/kg), a specific antagonist of NK1-R, esmolol (10mg/kg), a specific blocker of β1-adrenergic receptor, and a combination of the two blockers were studied. The results showed that the overlaps of up-regulation of NE, SP and the increase of ventricular arrhythmias were observed. D-SP exacerbated the episodes and duration of VT & VF by 54% and 104%, respectively (all P<0.05). Esmolol inhibited the morbidity rate, the episodes and the duration of VT & VF by 66%, 92% and 95%, respectively. Surprisingly, esmolol significantly attenuated the arrhythmogenic effect of D-SP throughout the MI, beyond the time span of esmolol action, during which a significant up-regulation of the NK1-R (by 19%, P<0.05) was detected. In conclusion, the findings of this study may indicate an anti-arrhythmic effect of endogenous neurokinin mechanism, through the activation of which, via up-regulation of NK1 receptor, esmolol may exert its anti-arrhythmic action at the early time of acute myocardial infarction.

  5. Fosetyl-Al photo-Fenton degradation and its endogenous catalyst inhibition.

    PubMed

    Micó, María M; Zapata, Ana; Maldonado, Manuel I; Bacardit, Jordi; Malfeito, Jorge; Sans, Carme

    2014-01-30

    Interferences from many sources can affect photo-Fenton reaction performance. Among them, catalyst inhibition can be caused by the complexation and/or precipitation of iron species by the organic matter and salts present in the reaction media. This is the case of the oxidation of effluents containing organophosphorous fosetyl-Al. The degradation of this fungicide generates phosphate anions that scavenge iron and hinder Fe(II) availability. Experimental design was applied to artificially enlighten photo-Fenton reaction, in order to evaluate fosetyl-Al degradation. The performed experiments suggested how iron inhibition takes place. The monitoring of photo-Fenton reaction over a mixture of fosetyl-Al with other two pesticides also showed the interferences caused by the presence of the fungicide on other species degradation. Solar empowered photo-Fenton was also essayed for comparison purposes. Artificial and solar light photo-Fenton reactions were revealed as effective treatments for the elimination of tested fungicide. However, the phosphate ions generated during fosetyl oxidation decreased iron availability, what hampered organic matter degradation.

  6. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (p<0.01), but not at m. quadriceps. FM patients had lower PPTs at all sites compared to healthy controls (p<0.001) and myalgia patients (p<0.001). During contraction of m. infraspinatus PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.003), but not in myalgia or FM patients. During contraction of m. quadriceps PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.001) and myalgia patients (all sites: p<0.02), but not in FM patients. In conclusion, we found a normal activation of endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions.

  7. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality.

  8. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. PMID:25462979

  9. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions.

  10. The cytochrome bd oxidase of Escherichia coli prevents respiratory inhibition by endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Sergey; Imlay, Karin R C; Imlay, James A

    2016-07-01

    When sulfur compounds are scarce or difficult to process, Escherichia coli adapts by inducing the high-level expression of sulfur-compound importers. If cystine then becomes available, the cystine is rapidly overimported and reduced, leading to a burgeoning pool of intracellular cysteine. Most of the excess cysteine is exported, but some is adventitiously degraded, with the consequent release of sulfide. Sulfide is a potent ligand of copper and heme moieties, raising the prospect that it interferes with enzymes. We observed that when cystine was provided and sulfide levels rose, E. coli became strictly dependent upon cytochrome bd oxidase for continued respiration. Inspection revealed that low-micromolar levels of sulfide inhibited the proton-pumping cytochrome bo oxidase that is regarded as the primary respiratory oxidase. In the absence of the back-up cytochrome bd oxidase, growth failed. Exogenous sulfide elicited the same effect. The potency of sulfide was enhanced when oxygen concentrations were low. Natural oxic-anoxic interfaces are often sulfidic, including the intestinal environment where E. coli dwells. We propose that the sulfide resistance of the cytochrome bd oxidase is a key trait that permits respiration in such habitats.

  11. The role of neurotransmitters in alcohol dependence: animal research.

    PubMed

    De Witte, P

    1996-03-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that alcohol changes neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. These changes in levels of dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), endogenous opioid peptides, and noradrenaline are associated with activation of reward centres in the brain. It is this property of alcohol that is believed to be responsible for the reinforcing effect of alcohol consumption in rats. One class of neurotransmitters, the endogenous opioid peptides, are believed to play an important role in alcohol reinforcement. This view is supported by the reduced preference for alcohol consumption found in rats given an opiate agonist. The widely distributed inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is also believed to play a fundamental role in mediating the effects of alcohol. A better understanding of the mechanisms that support alcohol dependence in animals offers hope for the development of pharmacological interventions to block these mechanisms, an approach that is now being explored in humans.

  12. Resveratrol protects the ovary against chromium-toxicity by enhancing endogenous antioxidant enzymes and inhibiting metabolic clearance of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Banu, Sakhila K; Stanley, Jone A; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Arosh, Joe A; Burghardt, Robert C

    2016-07-15

    Resveratrol (RVT), a polyphenolic component in grapes and red wine, has been known for its cytoprotective actions against several diseases. However, beneficial effects of RVT against early exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have not been understood. EDCs are linked to several ovarian diseases such as premature ovarian failure, polycystic ovary syndrome, early menopause and infertility in women. Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) is a heavy metal EDC, and widely used in >50 industries. Environmental contamination with CrVI in the US is rapidly increasing, predisposing the human to several illnesses including cancers and still birth. Our lab has been involved in determining the molecular mechanism of CrVI-induced female infertility and intervention strategies to mitigate CrVI effects. Lactating mother rats were exposed to CrVI (50ppm potassium dichromate) from postpartum days 1-21 through drinking water with or without RVT (10mg/kg body wt., through oral gavage daily). During this time, F1 females received respective treatments through mother's milk. On postnatal day (PND) 25, blood and the ovary, kidney and liver were collected from the F1 females for analyses. CrVI increased atresia of follicles by increasing cytochrome C and cleaved caspase-3; decreasing antiapoptotic proteins; decreasing estradiol (E2) biosynthesis and enhancing metabolic clearance of E2, increasing oxidative stress and decreasing endogenous antioxidants. RVT mitigated the effects of CrVI by upregulating cell survival proteins and AOXs; and restored E2 levels by inhibiting hydroxylation, glucuronidation and sulphation of E2. This is the first study to report the protective effects of RVT against any toxicant in the ovary. PMID:27129868

  13. Knock-Down of Endogenous Bornavirus-Like Nucleoprotein 1 Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendroglia Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Sun, Lin; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Guo, Yujie; Liu, Siwen; Zhou, Jingjing; Xu, Xiaoyan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoprotein elements (EBLNs) have been discovered in the genomes of various animals including humans, whose functions have been seldom studied. To explore the biological functions of human EBLNs, we constructed a lentiviral vector expressing a short-hairpin RNA against human EBLN1, which successfully inhibited EBLN1 expression by above 80% in infected human oligodendroglia cells (OL cells). We found that EBLN1 silencing suppressed cell proliferation, induced G2/M phase arrest, and promoted apoptosis in OL cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that 1067 genes were up-regulated, and 2004 were down-regulated after EBLN1 silencing. The top 10 most upregulated genes were PI3, RND3, BLZF1, SOD2, EPGN, SBSN, INSIG1, OSMR, CREB3L2, and MSMO1, and the top 10 most-downregulated genes were KRTAP2-4, FLRT2, DIDO1, FAT4, ESCO2, ZNF804A, SUV420H1, ZC3H4, YAE1D1, and NCOA5. Pathway analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in pathways related to the cell cycle, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, p53 signaling, and apoptosis. The gene expression profiles were validated by using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting these 20 most-changed genes. Three genes closely related to glioma, RND3, OSMR, and CREB3L2, were significantly upregulated and might be the key factors in EBLN1 regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of OL cells. This study provides evidence that EBLN1 plays a key role in regulating cell life and death, thereby opening several avenues of investigation regarding EBLN1 in the future. PMID:27023521

  14. Knock-Down of Endogenous Bornavirus-Like Nucleoprotein 1 Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendroglia Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Peng; Sun, Lin; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Guo, Yujie; Liu, Siwen; Zhou, Jingjing; Xu, Xiaoyan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoprotein elements (EBLNs) have been discovered in the genomes of various animals including humans, whose functions have been seldom studied. To explore the biological functions of human EBLNs, we constructed a lentiviral vector expressing a short-hairpin RNA against human EBLN1, which successfully inhibited EBLN1 expression by above 80% in infected human oligodendroglia cells (OL cells). We found that EBLN1 silencing suppressed cell proliferation, induced G2/M phase arrest, and promoted apoptosis in OL cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that 1067 genes were up-regulated, and 2004 were down-regulated after EBLN1 silencing. The top 10 most upregulated genes were PI3, RND3, BLZF1, SOD2, EPGN, SBSN, INSIG1, OSMR, CREB3L2, and MSMO1, and the top 10 most-downregulated genes were KRTAP2-4, FLRT2, DIDO1, FAT4, ESCO2, ZNF804A, SUV420H1, ZC3H4, YAE1D1, and NCOA5. Pathway analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in pathways related to the cell cycle, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, p53 signaling, and apoptosis. The gene expression profiles were validated by using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting these 20 most-changed genes. Three genes closely related to glioma, RND3, OSMR, and CREB3L2, were significantly upregulated and might be the key factors in EBLN1 regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of OL cells. This study provides evidence that EBLN1 plays a key role in regulating cell life and death, thereby opening several avenues of investigation regarding EBLN1 in the future. PMID:27023521

  15. DigiFab Interacts With Endogenous Cardiotonic Steroids and Reverses Preeclampsia-Induced Na/K-ATPase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ishkaraeva-Yakovleva, Valentina V.; Fedorova, Olga V.; Solodovnikova, Nelly G.; Frolova, Elena V.; Bzhelyansky, Anton M.; Emelyanov, Igor V.; Adair, C. David; Zazerskaya, Irina E.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of endogenous Na/K-ATPase (NKA) inhibitors, cardiotonic steroids (CTSs) including marinobufagenin (MBG), contribute to pathogenesis of preeclampsia (PE) and represent a target for immunoneutralization by Digibind (Ovine Digoxin Immune Antibody, Glaxo-Smith Kline). Because Digibind is no longer commercially available, we studied whether DigiFab (BTG International Ltd, UK) can substitute Digibind for immunoneutralization of CTS in patients with PE. We compared DigiFab, Digibind, and anti-MBG monoclonal antibody (mAb) with respect to their ability to interact with CTS in PE plasma and to restore NKA activity in erythrocytes from patients with PE. Using immunoassays based on DigiFab, Digibind, and anti-MBG mAb, we studied the elution profile of CTS following high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation of PE plasma. Totally, 7 patients with mild PE (28 ± 2 years; gestational age, 39 ± 0.5 weeks; blood pressure 156 ± 5/94 ± 2 mm Hg) and 6 normotensive pregnant participants (28 ± 1 years; gestational age, 39 ± 0.4 weeks; blood pressure 111 ± 2/73 ± 2 mm Hg) were enrolled. Preeclampsia was associated with a substantial inhibition of erythrocyte NKA (1.47 ± 0.17 vs 2.65 ± 0.16 µmol Pi/mL per h in control group, P < .001). Ex vivo, at 10 µg/mL concentration, which is consistent with the clinical dosing of Digibind administered previously in PE, DigiFab and Digibind as well as anti-MBG mAb (0.5 µg/mL) restored erythrocyte NKA activity. Following HPLC fractionation of pooled PE and control plasma, PE-associated increase in CTS material was detected by Digibind (176 vs 75 pmoles), DigiFab (221 vs 70 pmoles), and anti-MBG mAb (1056 vs 421 pmoles). Therefore, because DigiFab interacts with CTS from PE plasma and reverses PE-induced NKA inhibition, it can substitute Digibind for immunoneutralization of CTS in patients with PE. PMID:22649120

  16. Radioenzymatic analysis of neurotransmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, S.R.

    1987-08-17

    Since the late 1960's, radioenzymatic assays have gradually come to replace the less sensitive and less specific spectrofluorometric and bioassay procedures previously used to determine many of the neurotransmitters. These assays provide the means to measure picogram quantities of most of these substances, and have enabled determinations to be made in very small volumes of body fluids, in brain perfusates and individual brain nuclei, and in large individual cells of some simple animals. This paper reviews briefly some of the radioenzymatic techniques presently available for assaying norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA), serotonin, and the trace amines octopamine (OA), phenylethanolamine (PEOHA), phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TA) and tryptamine (T).

  17. The pediatric neurotransmitter disorders.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L; Taylor, Jacob L; Trzcinski, Stacey; Sokohl, Alex

    2007-05-01

    The pediatric neurotransmitter disorders represent an enlarging group of neurological syndromes characterized by abnormalities of neurotransmitter synthesis and breakdown. The disorders of dopamine and serotonin synthesis are aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency, tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency, and disorders of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis. Amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, sepiapterin reductase, and guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (Segawa disease) deficiencies do not feature elevated serum phenylalanine and require cerebrospinal fluid analysis for diagnosis. Segawa disease is characterized by dramatic and lifelong responsiveness to levodopa. Glycine encephalopathy is typically manifested by refractory neonatal seizures secondary to a defect of the glycine degradative pathway. gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism is associated with several disorders, including glutamic acid decarboxylase deficiency with nonsyndromic cleft lip/ palate, GABA-transaminase deficiency, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. The latter is characterized by elevated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and includes a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as epilepsy. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures have now been associated with deficiency of alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, as well as a new variant requiring therapy with pyridoxal-5-phosphate, the biologically active form of pyridoxine.

  18. Trophic effects of neurotransmitters during brain maturation.

    PubMed

    Emerit, M B; Riad, M; Hamon, M

    1992-01-01

    Besides their neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulatory roles, many neuroactive substances synthesized and released during brain development can also directly influence neuronal differentiation. Transitory expression of neurotransmitters, their metabolic enzymes and their receptors is only one aspect of this trophic role. The most considerable progress in neurotrophic factor research has been made with the use of primary cultures of neuronal cells, and numerous studies have focused on the effects of neurotransmitters on the differentiation of cells at various stages of development. Thus, several neuropeptides like VIP, substance P, enkephalins, somatostatin, and monoamines, can modulate neuronal differentiation, but only during a limited period of fetal life. Among the monoamines, it was shown that, depending on the target, 5-HT stimulates the development of the neuropile, the myelinization of axons, the differentiation of the synaptic contacts, induces markers of monoaminergic neuron differentiation, inhibits the development of the growth cone, decreases the branching of neurites, and influences the survival, cell body size, and neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cultures. 5-HT can also indirectly influence the differentiation of serotonergic neurons by the intermediate of astrocytes, and it was shown in our laboratory that 5-HT1A agonists can stimulate the cholinergic parameters of primary cultures of rat fetal septal neurons. At the molecular level, the events triggered by neurotransmitters that underlie their neurotrophic action probably involve the transmembrane influx of calcium. To date, calcium regulation of cellular processes is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of research in developmental neurobiology. PMID:1358226

  19. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed. PMID:26050033

  20. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J; Mazzola, Clarisse R; Hammers, Matthew D; Pluth, Michael D; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E; Chambers, Ann F; Leong, Hon S; Sener, Alp

    2015-09-15

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease.

  1. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O.; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J.; Mazzola, Clarisse R.; Hammers, Matthew D.; Pluth, Michael D.; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E.; Chambers, Ann F.; Leong, Hon S.; Sener, Alp

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease. PMID:26068241

  2. Inhibition of leukocyte function and interleukin-2 gene expression by 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide, a stable congener of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Ouyang Yanli; Herring, Amy; Yea, Sung Su; Razdan, Raj; Kaminski, Norbert E. . E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu

    2005-06-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Characterization of the direct cannabimimetic actions of anandamide has been hampered by its short duration of action and rapid degradation in in vivo and in vitro systems to arachidonic acid, a precursor in the biosynthesis of a broad range of biologically active molecules. In the present studies, we utilized 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide (F-Me-AEA), an analog of anandamide resistant to enzymatic degradation, to determine whether F-Me-AEA modulated T cell function similar to that of plant-derived cannabinoids. Indeed, F-Me-AEA at low micromolar concentrations exhibited a marked inhibition of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IL-2 protein secretion and steady state mRNA expression. Likewise, a modest suppression of the mixed lymphocyte response was observed in the presence of F-Me-AEA indicating an alteration in T cell responsiveness to allogeneic MHC class II antigens. F-Me-AEA was also found to modestly inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in thymocytes and splenocytes, a hallmark of cannabinoid receptor agonists. Further characterization of the influence of F-Me-AEA on the cAMP signaling cascade revealed an inhibition of CREB-1/ATF-1 phosphorylation and subsequently, an inhibition of CRE DNA binding activity. Characterization of nuclear binding proteins further revealed that NF-AT and, to a lesser extent, NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activities were also suppressed. These studies demonstrate that F-Me-AEA modulates T cell function in a similar manner to plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids and therefore can be utilized as an amidase- and hydrolysis-resistant endogenous cannabinoid.

  3. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the current knowledge about neurotransmitters in the SCN, including neurotransmitters that have been identified only recently. An attempt was made to describe the neurotransmitters and hormonal/diffusible signals of the SCN efference, which are necessary for the master clock to exert its overt function. The expression of robust circadian rhythms depends on the integrity of the biological clock and on the integration of thousands of individual cellular clocks found in the clock. Neurotransmitters are required at all levels, at the input, in the clock itself, and in its efferent output for the normal function of the clock. The relationship between neurotransmitter function and gene expression is also discussed because clock gene transcription forms the molecular basis of the clock and its working. PMID:16480518

  4. Pharmacology of neurotransmitter release: measuring exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Khvotchev, Mikhail; Kavalali, Ege T

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmission in the nervous system is initiated at presynaptic terminals by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane and subsequent exocytic release of chemical transmitters. Currently, there are multiple methods to detect neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals, each with their own particular advantages and disadvantages. For instance, most commonly employed methods monitor actions of released chemical substances on postsynaptic receptors or artificial substrates such as carbon fibers. These methods are closest to the physiological setting because they have a rapid time resolution and they measure the action of the endogenous neurotransmitters rather than the signals emitted by exogenous probes. However, postsynaptic receptors only indirectly report neurotransmitter release in a form modified by the properties of receptors themselves, which are often nonlinear detectors of released substances. Alternatively, released chemical substances can be detected biochemically, albeit on a time scale slower than electrophysiological methods. In addition, in certain preparations, where presynaptic terminals are accessible to whole cell recording electrodes, fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane can be monitored using capacitance measurements. In the last decade, in addition to electrophysiological and biochemical methods, several fluorescence imaging modalities have been introduced which report synaptic vesicle fusion, endocytosis, and recycling. These methods either take advantage of styryl dyes that can be loaded into recycling vesicles or exogenous expression of synaptic vesicle proteins tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP variant at regions facing the vesicle lumen. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of these methods with particular emphasis on their relative strengths and weaknesses and discuss the types of information one can obtain from them. PMID:18064410

  5. Pharmacology of neurotransmitter release: measuring exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Khvotchev, Mikhail; Kavalali, Ege T

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmission in the nervous system is initiated at presynaptic terminals by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane and subsequent exocytic release of chemical transmitters. Currently, there are multiple methods to detect neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals, each with their own particular advantages and disadvantages. For instance, most commonly employed methods monitor actions of released chemical substances on postsynaptic receptors or artificial substrates such as carbon fibers. These methods are closest to the physiological setting because they have a rapid time resolution and they measure the action of the endogenous neurotransmitters rather than the signals emitted by exogenous probes. However, postsynaptic receptors only indirectly report neurotransmitter release in a form modified by the properties of receptors themselves, which are often nonlinear detectors of released substances. Alternatively, released chemical substances can be detected biochemically, albeit on a time scale slower than electrophysiological methods. In addition, in certain preparations, where presynaptic terminals are accessible to whole cell recording electrodes, fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane can be monitored using capacitance measurements. In the last decade, in addition to electrophysiological and biochemical methods, several fluorescence imaging modalities have been introduced which report synaptic vesicle fusion, endocytosis, and recycling. These methods either take advantage of styryl dyes that can be loaded into recycling vesicles or exogenous expression of synaptic vesicle proteins tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP variant at regions facing the vesicle lumen. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of these methods with particular emphasis on their relative strengths and weaknesses and discuss the types of information one can obtain from them.

  6. Inhibition of cytochrome P4501-dependent clearance of the endogenous agonist FICZ as a mechanism for activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wincent, Emma; Bengtsson, Johanna; Bardbori, Afshin Mohammadi; Alsberg, Tomas; Luecke, Sandra; Rannug, Ulf; Rannug, Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Altered systemic levels of 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), an enigmatic endogenous ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), may explain adverse physiological responses evoked by small natural and anthropogenic molecules as well as by oxidative stress and light. We demonstrate here that several different chemical compounds can inhibit the metabolism of FICZ, thereby disrupting the autoregulatory feedback control of cytochrome P4501 systems and other proteins whose expression is regulated by AHR. FICZ is both the most tightly bound endogenous agonist for the AHR and an ideal substrate for cytochrome CYP1A1/1A2 and 1B1, thereby also participating in an autoregulatory loop that keeps its own steady-state concentration low. At very low concentrations FICZ influences circadian rhythms, responses to UV light, homeostasis associated with pro- and anti-inflammatory processes, and genomic stability. Here, we demonstrate that, if its metabolic clearance is compromised, femtomolar background levels of this compound in cell-culture medium are sufficient to up-regulate CYP1A1 mRNA and enzyme activity. The oxidants UVB irradiation and hydrogen peroxide and the model AHR antagonist 3′-methoxy-4′-nitroflavone all inhibited induction of CYP1A1 enzyme activity by FICZ or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, thereby subsequently elevating intracellular levels of FICZ and activating AHR. Taken together, these findings support an indirect mechanism of AHR activation, indicating that AHR activation by molecules with low affinity actually may reflect inhibition of FICZ metabolism and raising questions about the reported promiscuity of the AHR. Accordingly, we propose that prolonged induction of AHR activity through inhibition of CYP1 disturbs feedback regulation of FICZ levels, with potential detrimental consequences. PMID:22392998

  7. Chemical inhibition of potato ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity alters in vitro and in vivo ABA metabolism and endogenous ABA levels but does not affect potato microtuber dormancy duration.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Abrams, Suzanne R; De Stefano-Beltrán, Luis; Huckle, Linda L

    2012-09-01

    The effects of azole-type P450 inhibitors and two metabolism-resistant abscisic acid (ABA) analogues on in vitro ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity, in planta ABA metabolism, endogenous ABA content, and tuber meristem dormancy duration were examined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Russet Burbank). When functionally expressed in yeast, three potato CYP707A genes were demonstrated to encode enzymatically active ABA-8'-hydroxylases with micromolar affinities for (+)-ABA. The in vitro activity of the three enzymes was inhibited by the P450 azole-type inhibitors ancymidol, paclobutrazol, diniconazole, and tetcyclasis, and by the 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA analogues, with diniconazole and tetcyclasis being the most potent inhibitors. The in planta metabolism of [(3)H](±)-ABA to phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid in tuber meristems was inhibited by diniconazole, tetcyclasis, and to a lesser extent by 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA. Continuous exposure of in vitro generated microtubers to diniconazole resulted in a 2-fold increase in endogenous ABA content and a decline in dihydrophaseic acid content after 9 weeks of development. Similar treatment with 8'-acetylene-ABA had no effects on the endogenous contents of ABA or phaseic acid but reduced the content of dihydrophaseic acid. Tuber meristem dormancy progression was determined ex vitro in control, diniconazole-, and 8'-acetylene-ABA-treated microtubers following harvest. Continuous exposure to diniconazole during microtuber development had no effects on subsequent sprouting at any time point. Continuous exposure to 8'-acetylene-ABA significantly increased the rate of microtuber sprouting. The results indicate that, although a decrease in ABA content is a hallmark of tuber dormancy progression, the decline in ABA levels is not a prerequisite for dormancy exit and the onset of tuber sprouting.

  8. [Inhibiting effect of the polyphenolic complex from Plantago major (plantastine) on the carcinogenic effect of endogenously synthesized nitrosodimethylamine].

    PubMed

    Karpilovskaia, E D; Gorban', G P; Pliss, M B; Zakharenko, L N; Gulich, M P

    1989-01-01

    Amidopyrine administered in combination with sodium nitrite in the long-term experiment produces the toxic damage of the liver and tumors in rats in connection with endogenic synthesis of carcinogenic nitrosodimethylamine. The inclusion into the animal diet of the polyphenolic complex from Plantago major--plantastine as an inhibitor of the carcinogen synthesis reduced the toxic damage of the liver that was indicated by normalization of biochemical parameters and also decreased the tumor yield from 87.5% to 33.3%. The data obtained may be the basis for the combined use of plantastine with nitrosated drugs that would contribute to carcinogenesis prevention.

  9. [Inhibiting effect of the polyphenolic complex from Plantago major (plantastine) on the carcinogenic effect of endogenously synthesized nitrosodimethylamine].

    PubMed

    Karpilovskaia, E D; Gorban', G P; Pliss, M B; Zakharenko, L N; Gulich, M P

    1989-01-01

    Amidopyrine administered in combination with sodium nitrite in the long-term experiment produces the toxic damage of the liver and tumors in rats in connection with endogenic synthesis of carcinogenic nitrosodimethylamine. The inclusion into the animal diet of the polyphenolic complex from Plantago major--plantastine as an inhibitor of the carcinogen synthesis reduced the toxic damage of the liver that was indicated by normalization of biochemical parameters and also decreased the tumor yield from 87.5% to 33.3%. The data obtained may be the basis for the combined use of plantastine with nitrosated drugs that would contribute to carcinogenesis prevention. PMID:2806533

  10. Multifunctional amaranth cystatin inhibits endogenous and digestive insect cysteine endopeptidases: A potential tool to prevent proteolysis and for the control of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Galván-Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, the amaranth cystatin was characterized. This cystatin is believed to provide protection from abiotic stress because its transcription is induced in response to heat, drought, and salinity. It has also been shown that recombinant amaranth cystatin inhibits bromelain, ficin, and cysteine endopeptidases from fungal sources and also inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi. In the present study, evidence is presented regarding the potential function of amaranth cystatin as a regulator of endogenous proteinases and insect digestive proteinases. During amaranth germination and seedling growth, different proteolytic profiles were observed at different pH levels in gelatin-containing SDS-PAGE. Most of the proteolytic enzymes detected at pH 4.5 were mainly inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucyl amido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and the purified recombinant amaranth cystatin. Furthermore, the recombinant amaranth cystatin was active against insect proteinases. In particular, the E-64-sensitive proteolytic digestive enzymes from Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Acanthoscelides obtectus were inhibited by the amaranth cystatin. Taken together, these results suggest multiple roles for cystatin in amaranth, specifically during germination and seedling growth and in the protection of A. hypochondriacus against insect predation. Amaranth cystatin represents a promising tool for diverse applications in the control of insect pest and for preventing undesirable proteolytic activity.

  11. [Neurotransmitters, neurohormones and prolactin].

    PubMed

    Libertun, C; Arakelian, M C; Larrea, G A; Gorriño, L R; Becú, D

    1980-01-01

    After pointing out the reasons for undertaking the study of the regulation of prolactin secretion, the neuroendocrine mechanisms implicated in such secretion are discussed. Special attention is dedicated to the participation of chemical agents. Thus, the principal effects dealt with are: the net inhibition produced by dopamine and the less generalized inhibition effects of nicotine and somatostatin; the facilitatory action of serotoninergic pathways, TRH, histamine and endorphins. The dual effect described for GABA and noradrenaline, as well as some paradoxical actions, e.g., the antiserotoninergic and antihistaminergic H2 drugs which liberate prolactin in basal conditions but abolish the prolactin releasing effect of the respective agonist, or the immediate blocking effect of muscarinic agonists and antagonists are discussed. Finally, the possibility of a new mechanism of control at anterior pituitary receptors level is postulated.

  12. Endogenous levels of Echinacea alkylamides and ketones are important contributors to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide production in cultured macrophages

    PubMed Central

    LaLone, Carlie A.; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Wu, Lankun; Solco, Avery K.S.; Yum, Manyu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Kim, Meehye; Birt, Diane F.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of Echinacea as a dietary supplement, researchers have been actively investigating which Echinacea constituent or groups of constituents are necessary for immune modulating bioactivities. Our prior studies indicate that alkylamides may play an important role in the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. HPLC fractionation, employed to elucidate interacting anti-inflammatory constituents from ethanol extracts of E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. tennesseensis identified fractions containing alkylamides and ketones as key anti-inflammatory contributors using lipopolysaccharide induced PGE2 production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Nitric oxide (NO) production and parallel cytotoxicity screens were also employed to substantiate an anti-inflammatory response. Echinacea pallida showed significant inhibition of PGE2 with a first round fraction, containing GC-MS peaks for Bauer Ketones 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, with 23 and 24 identified as significant contributors to this PGE2 inhibition. Chemically synthesized Bauer Ketones 21 and 23 at 1 μM each significantly inhibited both PGE2 and NO production. Three rounds of fractionation were produced from an E. angustifolia extract. GC-MS analysis identified the presence of Bauer Ketone 23 in third round Fraction 3D32 and Bauer Alkylamide 11 making up 96% of third round Fraction 3E40. Synthetic Bauer Ketone 23 inhibited PGE2 production to 83 % of control and synthetic Bauer Alkylamide 11 significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production at the endogenous concentrations determined to be present in their respective fraction, thus each constituent partially explained the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of their respective fraction. From this study two key contributors to the anti-inflammatory properties of E. angustifolia were identified as Bauer Alkylamide 11 and Bauer Ketone 23. PMID:19807154

  13. Endogenous Saccade Preparation Does Not Produce Inhibition of Return: Failure to Replicate Rafal, Calabresi, Brennan, & Sciolto (1989)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chica, Ana B.; Klein, Raymond M.; Rafal, Robert D.; Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of Return (IOR, slower reaction times to previously cued or inspected locations) is observed both when eye movements are prohibited, and when the eyes move to the peripheral location and back to the centre before the target appears. It has been postulated that both effects are generated by a common mechanism, the activation of the…

  14. Trafficking of Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Hao; Grygoruk, Anna; Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Audrey; Krantz, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in secretory vesicles. Transporter expression can influence neurotransmitter storage and release, and trafficking targets the transporters to different types of secretory vesicles. Vesicular transporters traffic to synaptic vesicles as well as large dense core vesicles, and are recycled to synaptic vesicles at the nerve terminal. Some of the intrinsic signals for these trafficking events have been defined and include a dileucine motif present in multiple transporter subtypes, an acidic cluster in the neural isoform of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) and a polyproline motif in the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1. The sorting of VMAT2 and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) to secretory vesicles is regulated by phosphorylation. In addition, VGLUT1 uses alternative endocytic pathways for recycling back to synaptic vesicles following exocytosis. Regulation of these sorting events has the potential to influence synaptic transmission and behavior. PMID:18507811

  15. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an endogenous 17β-estradiol metabolite, inhibits microglial proliferation and activation via an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schaufelberger, Sara A; Rosselli, Marinella; Barchiesi, Federica; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (estradiol) inhibits microglia proliferation. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) is an endogenous metabolite of estradiol with little affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). We hypothesize that 2-ME inhibits microglial proliferation and activation and contributes to estradiol's inhibitory effects on microglia. We compared the effects of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol [2-OE; estradiol metabolite produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP450)], and 2-ME [formed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) acting upon 2-OE] on microglial (BV2 cells) DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, activation, and phagocytosis. 2-ME and 2-OE were approximately three- and 10-fold, respectively, more potent than estradiol in inhibiting microglia DNA synthesis. The antimitogenic effects of estradiol were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of CYP450 and COMT. Inhibition of COMT blocked the conversion of 2-OE to 2-ME and the antimitogenic effects of 2-OE but not 2-ME. Microglia expressed ERβ and GPR30 but not ERα. 2,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERβ agonist), but not 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (ERα agonist) or G1 (GPR30 agonist), inhibited microglial proliferation. The antiproliferative effects of estradiol, but not 2-OE or 2-ME, were partially reversed by ICI-182,780 (ERα/β antagonist) but not by 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole (ERα antagonist) or G15 (GPR30 antagonist). Lipopolysaccharide increased microglia iNOS and COX-2 expression and phagocytosing activity of microglia; these effects were inhibited by 2-ME. We conclude that in microglia, 2-ME inhibits proliferation, proinflammatory responses, and phagocytosis. 2-ME partially mediates the effects of estradiol via ER-independent mechanisms involving sequential metabolism of estradiol to 2-OE and 2-ME. 2-ME could be of potential therapeutic use in postischemic stroke injuries. Interindividual differences in estradiol metabolism might affect the

  16. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    PubMed

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p < 0.01, at 10 ng/mL). In contrast, no inhibitory effect of IL-10 was seen when cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  17. The Anti-HIV Microbicide Candidate RC-101 Inhibits Pathogenic Vaginal Bacteria Without Harming Endogenous Flora or Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Colleen R.; Cole, Amy L.; Diaz, Camila; Rohan, Lisa C.; Parniak, Michael A.; Marx, Preston; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Gupta, Phalguni; Cole, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Vaginal microbicides represent a promising approach for preventing heterosexual HIV transmission. However, preclinical evaluation should be conducted to ensure that microbicides will be safe for human cells and healthy microflora of the female reproductive tract. One microbicide candidate, RC-101, has been effective and well-tolerated in preliminary cell culture and macaque models. However, the effect of RC-101 on primary vaginal tissues and resident vaginal microflora requires further evaluation. Method of Study We treated primary vaginal tissues and vaginal bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal, with RC-101 to investigate effects of this microbicide. Results RC-101 was well-tolerated by host tissues, and also by commensal vaginal bacteria. Simultaneously, pathogenic vaginal bacteria, which are known to increase susceptibility to HIV acquisition, were inhibited by RC-101. Conclusions By establishing vaginal microflora, the specific antibacterial activity of RC-101 may provide a dual mechanism of HIV protection. These findings support advancement of RC-101 to clinical trials. PMID:23167830

  18. Beta-alanine as a small molecule neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Tiedje, K E; Stevens, K; Barnes, S; Weaver, D F

    2010-10-01

    This review discusses the role of beta-alanine as a neurotransmitter. Beta-alanine is structurally intermediate between alpha-amino acid (glycine, glutamate) and gamma-amino acid (GABA) neurotransmitters. In general, beta-alanine satisfies a number of the prerequisite classical criteria for being a neurotransmitter: beta-alanine occurs naturally in the CNS, is released by electrical stimulation through a Ca(2+) dependent process, has binding sites, and inhibits neuronal excitability. beta-Alanine has 5 recognized receptor sites: glycine co-agonist site on the NMDA complex (strychnine-insensitive); glycine receptor site (strychnine sensitive); GABA-A receptor; GABA-C receptor; and blockade of GAT protein-mediated glial GABA uptake. Although beta-alanine binding has been identified throughout the hippocampus, limbic structures, and neocortex, unique beta-alaninergic neurons with no GABAergic properties remain unidentified, and it is impossible to discriminate between beta-alaninergic and GABAergic properties in the CNS. Nevertheless, a variety of data suggest that beta-alanine should be considered as a small molecule neurotransmitter and should join the ranks of the other amino acid neurotransmitters. These realizations open the door for a more comprehensive evaluation of beta-alanine's neurochemistry and for its exploitation as a platform for drug design.

  19. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters: mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Anne, Christine; Gasnier, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Secondary transporters driven by a V-type H⁺-ATPase accumulate nonpeptide neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles. Distinct transporter families are involved depending on the neurotransmitter. Monoamines and acetylcholine on the one hand, and glutamate and ATP on the other hand, are accumulated by SLC18 and SLC17 transporters, respectively, which belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). GABA and glycine accumulate through a common SLC32 transporter from the amino acid/polyamine/organocation (APC) superfamily. Although crystallographic structures are not yet available for any vesicular transporter, homology modeling studies of MFS-type vesicular transporters based on distantly related bacterial structures recently provided significant advances, such as the characterization of substrate-binding pockets or the identification of spatial clusters acting as hinge points during the alternating-access cycle. However, several basic issues, such as the ion stoichiometry of vesicular amino acid transporters, remain unsettled.

  20. [Pediatric neurotransmitter disease in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Haruo

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric neurotransmitter disease (PND) encompasses a range of rare genetic disorders that affect the metabolism of neurotransmitters in children. While these neurological disorders are often studied independently of each other, they all manifest central nervous system symptoms and require proper diagnosis and intervention at early stages. Since clinical symptoms of PND can be nonspecific, the conditions are often under-diagnosed, leaving patients without a chance to receive effective treatment. Envisioning PND as a whole, a comprehensive research effort is underway for a better understanding of pathophysiology and epidemiology in Japan, and toward the establishment of diagnostic criteria. The early diagnosis and development of new effective therapies are of urgent importance for these rare disorders that are not covered by newborn mass screening. For rarer forms of PND, at the same time, it is important to encourage recognition and understanding of the disease concept among healthcare professionals.

  1. Genetics of monoamine neurotransmitter disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are a heterogeneous group of inherited neurological disorders involving defects in the metabolism of dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine and serotonin. The inheritance of these disorders is mostly autosomal recessive. The neurological symptoms are primarily attributable to cerebral deficiency of dopamine, serotonin or both. The clinical presentations were highly variable and substantial overlaps exist. Evidently, laboratory investigations are crucial for accurate diagnosis. Measurement of neurotransmitter metabolites in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is the key to delineate the metabolic defects. Adjuvant investigations including plasma phenylalanine, urine pterins, urine 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and serum prolactin are also helpful to establish the diagnosis. Genetic analyses are pivotally important to confirm the diagnosis which allows specific treatments, proper genetic counselling, prognosis prediction, assessment of recurrent risk in the family as well as prenatal diagnosis. Early diagnosis with appropriate treatment is associated with remarkable response and favourable clinical outcome in several disorders in this group. PMID:26835371

  2. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders. PMID:27638061

  3. Neurotransmitter precursors and brain function.

    PubMed

    Conlay, L A; Zeisel, S H

    1982-04-01

    Brain function can be affected by the availability of dietary precursors of neurotransmitters. This occurs because the rate-limiting synthetic enzymes are not "saturated" with substrate under normal circumstances. Tyrosine affects catecholaminergic neurons that fire rapidly, whether in the brain stem to decrease blood pressure in hypertension or in the adrenal gland to increase blood pressure in hypotension, and has been used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and depression. Choline forms acetylcholine and has been used successfully in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia and memory disorders. Tryptophan, which forms serotonin, has been used for chronic pain therapy, sleep disorders, depression, and appetite control. Although these substances may lack the potency of traditionally used agonists, they offer an increase in specificity because the enzymes necessary to convert them to neurotransmitters are found only in neurons. Precursors are also "physiological"; they are consumed as foods and, therefore, should be relatively safe therapeutic agents. PMID:6124895

  4. Human amniotic epithelial cell feeder layers maintain human iPS cell pluripotency via inhibited endogenous microRNA-145 and increased Sox2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Te; Cheng, Weiwei; Huang, Yongyi; Huang, Qin; Jiang, Lizhen; Guo, Lihe

    2012-02-15

    Currently, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from patient or disease-specific sources and share the same key properties as embryonic stem cells. This makes them attractive for personalized medicine, drug screens or cellular therapy. Long-term cultivation and maintenance of normal iPS cells in an undifferentiated self-renewing state are a major challenge. Our previous studies have shown that human amniotic epithelial cells (HuAECs) could provide a good source of feeder cells for mouse and human embryonic stem cells, or spermatogonial stem cells, but the mechanism for this is unknown. Here, we examined the effect of endogenous microRNA-145 regulation on Sox2 expression in human iPS cells by HuAECs feeder cells regulation, and in turn on human iPS cells pluripotency. We found that human IPS cells transfected with a microRNA-145 mutant expressed Sox2 at high levels, allowing iPS to maintain a high level of AP activity in long-term culture and form teratomas in SCID mice. Expression of stem cell markers was increased in iPS transfected with the microRNA-145 mutant, compared with iPS was transfected with microRNA-145. Besides, the expression of Drosha proteins of the microRNA-processor complex, required for the generation of precursor pre-miRNA, was significantly increased in human iPS cells cultured on MEF but not on HuAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that endogenous Sox2 expression may be regulated by microRNA-145 in human iPS cells with HuAECs feeder cells, and Sox2 is a crucial component required for maintenance of them in an undifferentiated, proliferative state capable of self-renewal. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 inhibits Sox2 expression in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 suppresses the self-renewal and pluripotency of human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs regulate expression of microRNA-145 and Sox2 in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs feeder

  5. Monoclonal antibody to an endogenous bufadienolide, marinobufagenin, reverses preeclampsia-induced Na/K-ATPase inhibition and lowers blood pressure in NaCl-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga V.; Simbirtsev, Andrey S.; Kolodkin, Nikolai I.; Kotov, Alexander Y.; Agalakova, Natalia I.; Kashkin, Vladimir A.; Tapilskaya, Natalia I.; Bzhelyansky, Anton; Reznik, Vitaly A.; Frolova, Elena V.; Nikitina, Elena R.; Budny, Georgy V.; Longo, Dan L.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Bagrov, Alexei Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background Levels of marinobufagenin (MBG), an endogenous bufadienolide Na/K-ATPase (NKA) inhibitor, increase in preeclampsia and in NaCl-sensitive hypertension. Methods We tested a 3E9 monoclonal anti-MBG antibody (mAb) for the ability to lower blood pressure (BP) in NaCl-sensitive hypertension and to reverse the preeclampsia-induced inhibition of erythrocyte NKA. Measurements of MBG were performed via immunoassay based on 4G4 anti-MBG mAb. Results In hypertensive Dahl-S rats, an intraperitoneal administration of 50 μg/kg 3E9 mAb lowered BP by 40 mmHg and activated Na/K-pump in thoracic aorta by 51%. NaCl supplementation of pregnant rats (n = 16) produced a 37 mmHg increase in BP, a 3.5-fold rise in MBG excretion, and a 25% inhibition of the Na/K-pump in the thoracic aorta, compared with pregnant rats on a normal NaCl intake. In eight pregnant hypertensive rats, 3E9 mAb reduced the BP (25 mmHg) and restored the vascular Na/K-pump. In 14 patients with preeclampsia (mean BP, 126 ± 3 mmHg; 26.9 ± 1.4 years; gestational age, 37 ± 0.8 weeks), plasma MBG was increased three-fold and erythrocyte NKA was inhibited compared with that of 12 normotensive pregnant women (mean BP, 71 W 3 mmHg)(1.5 ± 0.1 vs. 3.1 ± 0.2 μmol Pi/ml/h, respectively; P < .01). Ex-vivo 3E9 mAb restored NKA activity in erythrocytes from patients with preeclampsia. As compared with 3E9 mAb, Digibind, an affinity-purified antidigoxin antibody, was less active with respect to lowering BP in both hypertensive models and to restoration of NKA from erythrocytes from patients with preeclampsia. Conclusion Anti-MBG mAbs may be a useful tool in the studies of MBG in vitro and in vivo and may offer treatment of preeclampsia. PMID:19008721

  6. 2011 CCNP Heinz Lehman Award paper: Searching for an endogenous anti-Alzheimer molecule: identifying small molecules in the brain that slow Alzheimer disease progression by inhibition of β-amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Autumn R.; Simms, Gordon A.; Weaver, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that progresses with marked interindividual clinical variability. We postulate the existence of endogenous molecules within the human brain exerting an antiaggregant activity that will prevent/slow Alzheimer disease progression. Methods We performed in silico studies to determine if the small endogenous molecules L-phosphoserine (L-PS) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) could bind to the target region of β-amyloid responsible for protein misfolding. In vitro assays measured the antiaggregation effect of these molecules at varying concentrations. Results In silico studies demonstrated that L-PS and 3-HAA, both endogenous brain molecules, were capable of binding to the histidine13–histidine–glutamine–lysine16 (HHQK) region of β-amyloid involved in misfolding: these interactions were energetically favoured. The in vitro assays showed that both L-PS and 3-HAA were capable of inhibiting β-amyloid aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, with 3-HAA being more potent than L-PS. Limitations Studies were performed in silico and in vitro but not in vivo. Conclusion We successfully identified 2 endogenous brain molecules, L-PS and 3-HAA, that were capable of binding to the region of β-amyloid that leads to protein misfolding and neurotoxicity. Both L-PS and 3-HAA were able to inhibit β-amyloid aggregation in varying concentrations; levels of these compounds in the brain may impact their effectiveness in slowing/preventing β-amyloid aggregation. PMID:23394811

  7. Brain neurotransmitters and neuromodulators in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M V; Singer, H S

    1982-07-01

    Neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory systems provide the mechanism for communication between nerve cells in the central nervous system. Studies of synaptic neurotransmission within the brain during development and in pathologic conditions are furthering our knowledge of various pediatric disorders. Basic concepts of synaptic neurochemistry, evaluation strategies, and the development of neurotransmitter pathways are reviewed. Sections on movement and psychiatric disorders, hyperactivity, epilepsy, and hyperphenylalaninemia relate clinical pediatric situations to recently reported alterations of neurotransmitter substances. The emerging story of neuropeptides and their association with pain further illustrate the importance of neurotransmitter research.

  8. Synaptic Neurotransmitter-Gated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Trevor G.; Paoletti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors in the brain, many have deliberated over their likely structures and how these may relate to function. This was initially satisfied by the determination of the first amino acid sequences of the Cys-loop receptors that recognized acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine, followed later by similar determinations for the glutamate receptors, comprising non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. The last decade has seen a rapid advance resulting in the first structures of Cys-loop receptors, related bacterial and molluscan homologs, and glutamate receptors, determined down to atomic resolution. This now provides a basis for determining not just the complete structures of these important receptor classes, but also for understanding how various domains and residues interact during agonist binding, receptor activation, and channel opening, including allosteric modulation. This article reviews our current understanding of these mechanisms for the Cys-loop and glutamate receptor families. PMID:22233560

  9. Endogenous Rho-kinase signaling maintains synaptic strength by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    González-Forero, David; Montero, Fernando; García-Morales, Victoria; Domínguez, Germán; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) regulates neural cell migration, proliferation and survival, dendritic spine morphology, and axon guidance and regeneration. There is, however, little information about whether ROCK modulates the electrical activity and information processing of neuronal circuits. At neonatal stage, ROCKα is expressed in hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and in their afferent inputs, whereas ROCKβ is found in synaptic terminals on HMNs, but not in their somata. Inhibition of endogenous ROCK activity in neonatal rat brainstem slices failed to modulate intrinsic excitability of HMNs, but strongly attenuated the strength of their glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The mechanism acts presynaptically to reduce evoked neurotransmitter release. ROCK inhibition increased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Functional and ultrastructural changes induced by ROCK inhibition were fully prevented/reverted by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. Furthermore, ROCK inhibition drastically reduced the phosphorylated form of p21-associated kinase (PAK), which directly inhibits MLCK. We conclude that endogenous ROCK activity is necessary for the normal performance of motor output commands, because it maintains afferent synaptic strength, by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism of action involves a tonic inhibition of MLCK, presumably through PAK phosphorylation. This mechanism might be present in adults since unilateral microinjection of ROCK or MLCK inhibitors into the hypoglossal nucleus reduced or increased, respectively, whole XIIth nerve activity.

  10. The endogenous opioid system in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillman, M A; Sandyk, R

    1986-04-01

    The various neurotransmitter systems postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome(GTS) are described with special reference to the endogenous opioid system(EOS). Malfunction of the opioid system is proposed as the underlying disturbance in this disease causing secondary dysfunction of the other systems. Furthermore, the various symptoms of the illness are examined also in terms of dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system.

  11. Sources and consequences of oxidative damage from mitochondria and neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Arron, Sarah T; Chou, Kai-Ming; Cunningham, Eric; Cleaver, James E

    2016-06-01

    Cancer and neurodegeneration represent the extreme responses of growing and terminally differentiated cells to cellular and genomic damage. The damage recognition mechanisms of nucleotide excision repair, epitomized by xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Cockayne syndrome (CS), lie at these extremes. Patients with mutations in the DDB2 and XPC damage recognition steps of global genome repair exhibit almost exclusively actinic skin cancer. Patients with mutations in the RNA pol II cofactors CSA and CSB, that regulate transcription coupled repair, exhibit developmental and neurological symptoms, but not cancer. The absence of skin cancer despite increased photosensitivity in CS implies that the DNA repair deficiency is not associated with increased ultraviolet (UV)-induced mutagenesis, unlike DNA repair deficiency in XP that leads to high levels of UV-induced mutagenesis. One attempt to explain the pathology of CS is to attribute genomic damage to endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that inhibition of complex I of the mitochondria generates increased ROS, above an already elevated level in CSB cells, but without nuclear DNA damage. CSB, but not CSA, quenches ROS liberated from complex I by rotenone. Extracellular signaling by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in neurons, however, generates ROS enzymatically through oxidase that does lead to oxidative damage to nuclear DNA. The pathology of CS may therefore be caused by impaired oxidative phosphorylation or nuclear damage from neurotransmitters, but without damage-specific mutagenesis. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:322-330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311994

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  13. [Endogenous venous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Porembskaya, O Ya; Khmelniker, S M; Shaidakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Widely incorporated into vascular surgery pharmacological thrombolysis in treatment for deep vain thrombosis is fraught with a series of unsolved problems requiring further consideration. In spite of aggressive nature of treatment in a series of cases pharmacological thrombolysis sometimes turns out ineffective. Along with it, the results of experimental studies suggest a possibility of accelerating resorption of thrombotic masses and inhibiting remodelling of the venous wall by means of influencing effector cells of endogenous thrombolysis. A detailed study of the mechanisms of thrombolysis would make it possible to formulate strict criteria for carrying out pharmacological thrombolysis and to increase its efficacy. PMID:26355926

  14. Waterborne lead affects circadian variations of brain neurotransmitters in fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, R.E.; Russo, A.C.; Weber, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    Lead is a potent neurotoxin affecting brain levels of a number of vertebrate neurotransmitters. Reports on these effects are, however, not consistent either among or within species. For example, with lead-intoxicated rats there are reports of decreased acetylcholine (ACh) release and decreased ACh brain levels as well as reports of increased levels or no change in levels. Also, with rats there are reports of increased levels, decreased levels, or no change in brain catecholamines, with lead producing similar changes in both norephinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in some cases and differences in response between the two in others. Although most early reports dealt with whole brain levels, reports on neurotransmitter levels in specific brain regions can be equally conflicting. Similar sorts of discrepancies exist among studies with fishes. Much of the variation among studies on lead effects on neurotransmitters is, no doubt, due to differences among the studies in variables such as: species, age, dosage and duration, route of administration. However, lead can apparently affect circadian locomotor rhythms of both rats and fishes. Therefore, another possible cause for the variation among studies is that there is an interaction among dosage, sampling time and endogenous rhythms. A lead-produced phase shift or disruption in endogenous neurotransmitter rhythms could in turn elicit a host of varying results and interpretations depending on the circadian time of sampling. We elected to examine this possibility in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a freshwater species widely used for toxicity studies. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Orquestic regulation of neurotransmitters on reward-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Caraza-Santiago, Xanic; Salgado-Licona, Sergio; Salama, Mohamed; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area is strongly associated with the reward system. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex as a result of rewarding experiences such as food, sex, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them. Electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area or its output pathways can itself serve as a potent reward. Different drugs that increase dopamine levels are intrinsically rewarding. Although the dopaminergic system represent the cornerstone of the reward system, other neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids, glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, adenosine, endocannabinoids, orexins, galanin and histamine all affect this mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Consequently, genetic variations of neurotransmission are thought influence reward processing that in turn may affect distinctive social behavior and susceptibility to addiction. Here, we discuss current evidence on the orquestic regulation of different neurotranmitters on reward-seeking behavior and its potential effect on drug addiction. PMID:25061480

  16. Orquestic regulation of neurotransmitters on reward-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Caraza-Santiago, Xanic; Salgado-Licona, Sergio; Salama, Mohamed; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area is strongly associated with the reward system. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex as a result of rewarding experiences such as food, sex, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them. Electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area or its output pathways can itself serve as a potent reward. Different drugs that increase dopamine levels are intrinsically rewarding. Although the dopaminergic system represent the cornerstone of the reward system, other neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids, glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, adenosine, endocannabinoids, orexins, galanin and histamine all affect this mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Consequently, genetic variations of neurotransmission are thought influence reward processing that in turn may affect distinctive social behavior and susceptibility to addiction. Here, we discuss current evidence on the orquestic regulation of different neurotranmitters on reward-seeking behavior and its potential effect on drug addiction.

  17. Orquestic regulation of neurotransmitters on reward-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area is strongly associated with the reward system. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex as a result of rewarding experiences such as food, sex, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them. Electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area or its output pathways can itself serve as a potent reward. Different drugs that increase dopamine levels are intrinsically rewarding. Although the dopaminergic system represent the cornerstone of the reward system, other neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids, glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, adenosine, endocannabinoids, orexins, galanin and histamine all affect this mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Consequently, genetic variations of neurotransmission are thought influence reward processing that in turn may affect distinctive social behavior and susceptibility to addiction. Here, we discuss current evidence on the orquestic regulation of different neurotranmitters on reward-seeking behavior and its potential effect on drug addiction. PMID:25061480

  18. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  19. Neurotransmitters regulating feline aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Siegel, A; Schubert, K

    1995-01-01

    The experiments described in this review reveal that the expression and modulation of aggressive responses in the cat are organized by two distinct sets of pathways. One set of pathways is associated with the elicitation of a specific form of attack behavior. It includes the medial hypothalamus and its projections to the PAG for the expression of defensive rage behavior and the lateral hypothalamus and its descending projections for the expression of predatory attack behavior. The primary focus of the present review is upon the analysis of defensive rage behavior. It was demonstrated that the pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the PAG, which appears to be essential for elicitation of defensive rage, is powerfully excitatory and utilizes excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The other pathways examined in this review arise from different nuclei of the amygdala and are modulatory in nature. Here, two facilitatory systems have been identified. The first involves a projection system from the basal complex of amygdala that projects directly to the PAG. Its excitatory effects are manifest through excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The second facilitatory pathway arises from the medial nucleus of the amygdala. However, its projection system is directed to the medial hypothalamus rather than the PAG. Its neurotransmitter appears to be substance P that acts upon NK1 receptors within the medial hypothalamus (see Figure 10). It has yet to be determined whether substance P acts upon any of the other neurokinin receptor subtypes. It should also be pointed out that the substance P pathway from the medial amygdala to the medial hypothalamus functions to suppress predatory attack behavior elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. In this network, it is likely that the modulatory effects of the medial amygdala require the presence of a second, inhibitory pathway from the medial hypothalamus that innervates the

  20. Neurotransmitters as neurotrophic factors: a new set of functions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J P

    1992-01-01

    At the start of this review, factors were deemed trophic if they stimulated mitosis, permitted neural cell survival, promoted neurite sprouting and growth cone motility, or turned on a specific neuronal phenotype. The in vitro evidence from cell cultures is overwhelming that both neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can have such actions. Furthermore, the same chemical can exert several of these effects, either on the same or on different cell populations. Perhaps the most striking example is that of VIP, which can stimulate not only mitosis, but also survival and neurite sprouting of sympathetic ganglion neuroblasts (Pincus et al., 1990a,b). The in vivo data to support the in vitro experiments are starting to appear. A role for VIP in neurodevelopment is supported by in vivo studies that show behavioral deficits produced in neonatal rats by treatment with a VIP antagonist (Hill et al., 1991). The work of Shatz' laboratory (Chun et al., 1987; Ghosh et al., 1990) suggests that neuropeptide-containing neurons, transiently present, serve as guideposts for thalamocortical axons coming in to innervate specific cortical areas. Along similar lines, Wolff et al. (1979) demonstrated gamma-aminobutyric acid-accumulating glia in embryonic cortex that appeared to form axoglial synapses and suggested the possibility that gamma-aminobutyric acid released from the glia might play a role in synaptogenesis by increasing the number of postsynaptic thickenings. Meshul et al. (1987) have provided evidence that astrocytes can regulate synaptic density in the developing cerebellum. The work of Zagon and McLaughlin (1986a,b, 1987) has shown that naltrexone, an antagonist of the endogenous opioid peptides, affects both cell number and neuronal sprouting. Lauder's laboratory (Lauder et al., 1982) has shown a role for 5-HT in regulation of the proliferation of numerous cell types. These studies illustrate another important point, that neurotransmitters and neuropeptides function in

  1. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  2. Sorafenib inhibits endogenous and IL-6/S1P induced JAK2-STAT3 signaling in human neuroblastoma, associated with growth suppression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Jove, Veronica; Buettner, Ralf; Xin, Hong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yan; Nam, Sangkil; Xu, Yibing; Ara, Tasnim; DeClerck, Yves A; Seeger, Robert; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in the pediatric population. Sorafenib (Nexavar), a multikinase inhibitor, blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in certain types of cancers. Here, we tested antitumor effects of sorafenib (≤ 10 µM) on four human neuroblastoma cell lines, CHLA255, CHLA171, CHLA90 and SK-N-AS. Sorafenib inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of neuroblastoma tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. Sorafenib inhibited phosphorylation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) proteins at Tyr705 in these cells, associated with inhibition of phosphorylated JAK2, an upstream kinase that mediates STAT3 phosphorylation. Expression of a constitutively-activated STAT3 mutant (pSTAT3-C) partially blocked the antitumor effects of sorafenib on neuroblastoma cells. Sorafenib also inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT3 induced by IL-6 and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a recently identified regulator for STAT3, in these tumor cells. Moreover, sorafenib downregulated phosphorylation of MAPK (p44/42) in neuroblastoma cells, consistent with inhibition of their upstream regulators MEK1/2. Sorafenib inhibited expression of cyclin E, cyclin D1/D2/D3, key regulators for cell cycle, and the antiapoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and survivin. Finally, sorafenib suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells in a mouse xenograft model. Taken together, these findings suggest the potential use of sorafenib for the treatment of pediatric neuroblastomas.

  3. ENDOGENOUS RESPIRATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, H. H.

    1962-01-01

    Ramsey, H. H. (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 83:507–514. 1962.—The endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the medium used to grow the cell suspension. Within wide ranges, the concentration of glucose in the medium has no effect upon subsequent endogenous respiration of the cells, but the concentration of amino acids in the medium, within certain limits, has a very marked effect. The total carbohydrate content of the cells does not decrease during endogenous respiration. As endogenous respiration proceeds, ammonia appears in the supernatant, and the concentration of glutamic acid in the free amino acid pool decreases. Organisms grown in the presence of labeled glutamic acid liberate labeled CO2 when allowed to respire without added substrate. The principal source of this CO2 is the free glutamate in the metabolic pool; its liberation is not suppressed by exogenous glucose or glutamate. With totally labeled cells, the free pool undergoes a rapid, but not total, depletion and remains at a low level for a long time. Activity of the protein fraction declines with time and shows the largest net decrease of all fractions. Exogenous glucose does not inhibit the release of labeled CO2 by totally labeled cells. Other amino acids in the free pool which can serve as endogenous substrates are aspartic acid and, to much lesser extents, glycine and alanine. The results indicate that both free amino acids and cellular protein may serve as endogenous substrates of S. aureus. PMID:14490204

  4. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined.

  5. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  6. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes. PMID:20012186

  7. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection). PMID:19575473

  8. Genetic Susceptibility and Neurotransmitters in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to more complex models including additive and multifactorial inheritance and likely interaction with genetic factors. While the exact cellular and molecular base of TS is as yet elusive, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies have pointed to the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuits and abnormalities in dopamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin neurotransmitter systems, with the most consistent evidence being available for involvement of dopamine-related abnormalities, that is, a reduction in tonic extracellular dopamine levels along with hyperresponsive spike-dependent dopamine release, following stimulation. Genetic and gene expression findings are very much supportive of involvement of these neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, intriguingly, genetic work on a two-generation pedigree has opened new research pointing to a role for histamine, a so far rather neglected neurotransmitter, with the potential of the development of new treatment options. Future studies should be aimed at directly linking neurotransmitter-related genetic and gene expression findings to imaging studies (imaging genetics), which enables a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms through which the dynamic interplay of genes, brain, and environment shapes the TS phenotype. PMID:24295621

  9. The magnitude and significance of Ca2+ domains for release of neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Aharon, S; Parnas, H; Parnas, I

    1994-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that localized high concentrations of Ca2+ (Ca2+ domains) play a major role in controlling the time course of neurotransmitter release. In the present work we calculate the magnitude and the time course of Ca2+ domains that evolve in the vicinity of a Ca2+ channel and an adjacent release site. In the calculations we consider a accurately dimensioned Ca2+ channel. Moreover, the Ca2+ current is continuously adjusted with regard to the accumulated intracellular Ca2+ and, in addition, endogenous buffers are considered. The calculations, carried out by the software FIDAP, based on finite element method, show that the Ca2+ concentrations achieved near the release sites are significantly lower than claimed by other investigators. Furthermore, we present arguments indicating that the Ca2+ domains, regardless of their magnitude, do not play a role in controlling the time course of release of neurotransmitter.

  10. Microglial neurotransmitter receptors trigger superoxide production in microglia; consequences for microglial-neuronal interactions.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma L; Mosley, Angelina; Eaton, Simon; Dobson, Lucianne; Heales, Simon J; Pocock, Jennifer M

    2012-04-01

    Microglia express three isoforms of the NADPH oxidase, Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4, with the potential to produce superoxide (O(2) ˙(-) ). Microglia also express neurotransmitter receptors, which can modulate microglial responses. In this study, microglial activity of Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4 in primary rat cultured microglia or the rodent BV2 cell line were altered by microglial neurotransmitter receptor modulation. Glutamate, GABA or ATP triggered microglial O(2) ˙(-) production via Nox activation. Nox activation was elicited by agonists of metabotropic mGlu3 receptors and by group III receptors, by GABA(A) but not GABA(B) receptors, and by purinergic P2X(7) or P2Y(2/4) receptors but not P2Y(1) receptors, and inhibited by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists. The neurotransmitters also modulated Nox mRNA expression and NADPH activity. The activation of Nox by BzATP or GABA promoted a neuroprotective phenotype whilst the activation of Nox by glutamate promoted a neurotoxic phenotype. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial neurotransmitter receptors can signal via Nox to promote neuroprotection or neurotoxicity. This has implications for the subsequent neurotoxic profile of microglia when neurotransmitter levels may become skewed in neurodegeneration. PMID:22243365

  11. Endogenously synthesized n-3 fatty acids in fat-1 transgenic mice prevent melanoma progression by increasing E-cadherin expression and inhibiting β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuan; Yu, Xiong-Wei; Zhu, Pan; Zhang, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jin-Jie; Yan, Wang; Xi, Yang; Wan, Jian-Bo; Kang, Jing-Xuan; Zou, Zu-Quan; Bu, Shi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Although preclinical studies have shown that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are beneficial for prevention of melanoma, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of n‑3 PUFAs on melanoma remain largely unknown. In the present study, endogenously increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the tumor tissues of omega‑3 fatty acid desaturase (fat‑1) transgenic mice was associated with a reduction in the growth rate of melanoma xenografts. This reduction in tumor growth in fat‑1 mice compared with wild‑type controls may have been associated, in part, to the: i) Increased expression of E‑cadherin and the reduced expression of its transcriptional repressors, the zinc finger E‑box binding homeobox 1 and snail family transcriptional repressor 1; ii) significant repression of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Akt/β‑catenin signaling pathway; and iii) formation of significant levels of n‑3 PUFA‑derived lipid mediators, particularly resolvin D2 and E1, maresin 1 and 15‑hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid. In addition, vitamin E administration counteracted n‑3 PUFA‑induced lipid peroxidation and enhanced the antitumor effect of n‑3 PUFAs, which suggests that the protective role of n‑3 PUFAs against melanoma is not mediated by n‑3 PUFAs‑induced lipid peroxidation. These results highlight a potential role of n‑3 PUFAs supplementation for the chemoprevention of melanoma in high‑risk individuals, and as a putative adjuvant agent in the treatment of malignant melanoma.

  12. Endogenously synthesized n-3 fatty acids in fat-1 transgenic mice prevent melanoma progression by increasing E-cadherin expression and inhibiting β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuan; Yu, Xiong-Wei; Zhu, Pan; Zhang, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jin-Jie; Yan, Wang; Xi, Yang; Wan, Jian-Bo; Kang, Jing-Xuan; Zou, Zu-Quan; Bu, Shi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Although preclinical studies have shown that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are beneficial for prevention of melanoma, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of n‑3 PUFAs on melanoma remain largely unknown. In the present study, endogenously increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the tumor tissues of omega‑3 fatty acid desaturase (fat‑1) transgenic mice was associated with a reduction in the growth rate of melanoma xenografts. This reduction in tumor growth in fat‑1 mice compared with wild‑type controls may have been associated, in part, to the: i) Increased expression of E‑cadherin and the reduced expression of its transcriptional repressors, the zinc finger E‑box binding homeobox 1 and snail family transcriptional repressor 1; ii) significant repression of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Akt/β‑catenin signaling pathway; and iii) formation of significant levels of n‑3 PUFA‑derived lipid mediators, particularly resolvin D2 and E1, maresin 1 and 15‑hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid. In addition, vitamin E administration counteracted n‑3 PUFA‑induced lipid peroxidation and enhanced the antitumor effect of n‑3 PUFAs, which suggests that the protective role of n‑3 PUFAs against melanoma is not mediated by n‑3 PUFAs‑induced lipid peroxidation. These results highlight a potential role of n‑3 PUFAs supplementation for the chemoprevention of melanoma in high‑risk individuals, and as a putative adjuvant agent in the treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:27573698

  13. LeuT-Desipramine Structure Reveals How Antidepressants Block Neurotransmitter Reuptake

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Z.; Zhen, J.; Karpowich, N.; Goetz, R.; Law, C.; Reith, M.; Wang, D.

    2007-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect -- inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine -- by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  14. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    PubMed

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides/neurotransmitters

  15. Influence of age on neurotransmitter function.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, J W; Millard, W J

    1987-12-01

    Regulation by neurotransmitters of anterior pituitary hormone secretion is complex and a thorough understanding of their normal role in hormone secretion is a prerequisite to understanding their involvement in age-related changes in endocrine function. To date, uncertainties far out-number demonstrated causative relationships between alterations in neurotransmitter release and resulting age-associated changes in hormone secretion. The best demonstrated relationships are the following. First, a decline in function of the TIDA system is responsible, in part, for the age-related elevation in prolactin secretion and may be involved in the decline in LH secretion. Second, the age-related decrease in hypothalamic norepinephrine turnover plays a role in the decline in LH and GH secretion and may be involved in alterations in TSH secretion during aging. Third, the decline in circadian activity of suprachiasmatic nucleus serotoninergic neurons may account for the blunting of circadian rhythms in the secretions of several anterior pituitary hormones in old animals. Fourth, evidence exists for an age-related decline in function of LHRH neurons, which may contribute to the observation of blunted LH secretion in old animals. Finally, somatostatin release may be increased in old animals, which likely contributes to the age-related decline in GH secretion. Other hypothalamic-releasing hormones have only recently been isolated and characterized; thus, little research on their age-related alterations has been done. Research on these neuropeptides will contribute further to our understanding of the role of neurotransmitters in age-related alterations in hormone secretion.

  16. Presence of a low molecular weight endogenous inhibitor on 3H-muscimol binding in synaptic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yukio; Kuriyama, Kinya

    1980-06-01

    The specific binding of 3H-muscimol to synaptic membrane preparations obtained from the rat brain has been thought to reflect the association of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potential candidate as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), with its synaptic receptors1,2. Treatment of synaptic membranes with Triton X-100 significantly increases the specific binding of 3H-muscimol2. Several reports also indicate the presence of endogenous substances, such as GABA3, acidic protein4 and phosphatidylethanolamine5, which inhibit Na-independent binding of 3H-GABA in the synaptic membranous fractions from the rat brain. We report here that in the supernatant obtained from Triton-treated synaptic membranes there exists a new type of endogenous inhibitor of 3H-muscimol binding which is apparently different from the inhibitory substances described previously3-5. The new inhibitor has a low molecular weight (MW) and probably originated from neurones rather than glial cells. We have termed this endogenous inhibitor the GABA receptor binding inhibitory factor (GRIF).

  17. Experimental uremia affects hypothalamic amino acid neurotransmitter milieu.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, F; Vogel, M; Kerkhoff, G; Woitzik, J; Daschner, M; Mehls, O

    2001-06-01

    Chronic renal failure is associated with delayed puberty and hypogonadism. To investigate the mechanisms subserving the reported reduced pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in chronic renal failure, this study examined the amino acid neurotransmitter milieu in the medial preoptic area (MPOA), the hypothalamic region where the GnRH-secreting neurons reside, in 5/6-nephrectomized male rats and in ad libitum-fed or pair-fed controls. All rats were castrated and received either a testosterone or a vehicle implant to evaluate additional effects of the prevailing sex steroid milieu. Local excitatory (essential amino acids: aspartate, glutamate) and inhibitory (gamma-aminobutyric acid [GABA], taurine) amino acid transmitter outflow in the MPOA was measured by microdialysis via stereotactically implanted cannulae in the awake, freely moving rats. In addition to basal extracellular concentrations, the neurosecretory capacity was assessed by the addition of 100 mM KCl to the dialysis fluid. The mechanisms of neurosecretion were evaluated further by inhibition of vesicular release with the use of Ca(2+)-free, Mg(2+)-enriched dialysis fluid and by local perfusion with inhibitors of voltage-dependent synaptic release (1 microM tetrodotoxin) and of GABA reuptake (0.5 mM nipecotic acid). In the uremic rats, basal outflow of GABA, glutamate and aspartate, and K(+)-stimulated aspartate outflow were increased. K(+)-stimulated GABA and glutamate release was less sensitive to Ca(2+) depletion in the uremic than in the control rats. The elevated basal GABA and essential amino acid outflow in the uremic rats was due to a voltage- and Ca(2+)-independent mechanism. GABA reuptake was inhibited proportionately by nipecotic acid in uremic and pair-fed control rats. Testosterone supplementation had no independent effects on neurotransmitter outflow. In summary, the amino acid neurotransmitter milieu is altered in the MPOA of uremic rats by a nonsynaptic, nonvesicular

  18. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  19. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  20. [Neurotransmitter mechanisms of context-dependent behavior].

    PubMed

    D'iakonova, V E

    2012-01-01

    The influence of context on behavioral choice is well known. Context can refer to behavioral state of an animal and to external factors such as season, presence of other individuals or food availability. How external and internal factors influencing decision-making are translated at the cellular level? I review the recent neuroethological data that strongly suggest that context reflects in content of neuroactive substances (neurotransmitters, modulators, hormones) that present in the extraneuronal milieu, while heterochemical neuronal microenvironment in its turn impacts motor program selection. PMID:23530445

  1. The Fluorescence Methods to Study Neurotransmitters (Biomediators) in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-05-01

    -tubocurarine for acetylcholine, yohimbine for dopamine and norepinephrine, inmecarb for serotonin) of neurotransmitters that bound with animal receptors fluorescent in blue (460-480 nm) or blue-green (490-530 nm) and usually are bound with the plasmatic membrane of intact cells or with membrane of the isolated organelles studied. In some model cells autofluorescence (belonging to chlorophyll or not, for example secondary metabolites) may be stimulated by exogenous biogenic amines or their agonists and, on the contrary, be inhibited by certain antagonists. The fluorescence data may be applied for the testing in ecological monitoring, medicine and pharmacology. PMID:27056187

  2. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters in human placental villi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Cheng, L R; Wang, H; Zhuang, L Z; Huang, W Q

    1991-01-01

    The human placenta contains many kinds of bioactive substances which are more or less similar to those from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Most of the studies were carried out mainly with term placenta. The present study, therefore, was attempted to identify, quantify and characterize these substances in the human placenta at the early pregnancy. Using the RIA, immunohistochemistry, HPLC, tissue culture and intrauterine injection methods, we have found that: (1) many kinds of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are present in the placental villi; (2) LH-RH, NT and SRIF positive immunoreactive granules are localized in the cytotrophoblast and those of beta-EP, 5-HT positive granules in the syncytiotrophoblast; (3) synthetic LH-RH and dynorphin (Dyn) stimulate the hCG secretion of the early placental villi in vitro, and (4) the antisera of LH-RH, NT, Dyn and NE antagonist-alpha-MPT significantly reduced the number of blastocyst implantations in the early pregnant rat. These results indicate that in the human placenta there possibly exists a self-regulation mechanism for the synthesis and secretion of placental hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the human placenta can be regarded as a neuroendocrine organ.

  3. Integrated Carbon Nanostructures for Detection of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Sami; Palomäki, Tommi; Tujunen, Noora; Protopopova, Vera; Koehne, Jessica; Kordas, Krisztian; Koskinen, Jari; Meyyappan, M; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based materials, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are inherently interesting for neurotransmitter detection due to their good biocompatibility, low cost and relatively simple synthesis. In this paper, we report on new carbon-hybrid materials, where either CNTs or CNFs are directly grown on top of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C). We show that these hybrid materials have electrochemical properties that not only combine the best characteristics of the individual "building blocks" but their synergy makes the electrode performance superior compared to conventional carbon based electrodes. By combining ta-C with CNTs, we were able to realize electrode materials that show wide and stable water window, almost reversible electron transfer properties and high sensitivity and selectivity for detecting dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the sensitivity of ta-C + CNF hybrids towards dopamine as well as glutamate has been found excellent paving the road for actual in vivo measurements. The wide and stable water window of these sensors enables detection of other neurotransmitters besides DA as well as capability of withstanding higher potentials without suffering from oxygen and hydrogen evolution. PMID:26093378

  4. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  5. Interleukin-1 beta inhibits the endogenous expression of the early gene c-fos located within the nucleus of LH-RH neurons and interferes with hypothalamic LH-RH release during proestrus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rivest, S; Rivier, C

    1993-06-01

    surge in intact cycling rats. As central administration of this cytokine completely inhibited the endogenous expression of c-fos protein within the nucleus of LH-RH neurons, our findings also suggest that IL-1 beta acts at the level of LH-RH perikarya.

  6. The microwave spectrum of neurotransmitter serotonin.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Carlos; Varela, Marcelino; Peña, Isabel; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2012-10-21

    A laser ablation device in combination with a molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer has allowed the observation of the rotational spectrum of serotonin for the first time. Three conformers of the neurotransmitter have been detected and characterized in the 4-10 GHz frequency range. The complicated hyperfine structure arising from the presence of two (14)N nuclei has been fully resolved for all conformers and used for their identification. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the nitrogen atom of the side chain have been used to determine the orientation of the amino group probing the existence of N-Hπ interactions involving the amino group and the pyrrole unit in the Gauche-Phenyl conformer (GPh) or the phenyl unit in the Gauche-Pyrrole (GPy) ones.

  7. Imaging neurotransmitter release kinetics in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Weihong; Yeung, E.S.; Haydon, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    A new UV-laser based optical microscope and CCD detection system has been developed to image neurotransmitter in living biological cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. The detection methodology has high sensitivity, low limit of detection and does not require coupling to fluorescence dyes. We have studied serotonin uptake kinetics and its release dynamics in single glial cells. Different regions of a glial cell have taken up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of kinetics. Similarly, different serotonin release mechanisms have been observed in different astrocyte cell regions. The temporal resolution of this detection system is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. We will also report on single enzyme molecule reaction studies and single metal ion detection based on CCD imaging of pL reaction vials formed by micromachining on fused silica.

  8. Marine Toxins Potently Affecting Neurotransmitter Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi

    Synapses are specialised structures where interneuronal communication takes place. Not only brain function is absolutely dependent on synaptic activity, but also most of our organs are intimately controlled by synaptic activity. Synapses re therefore an ideal target to act upon and poisonous species have evolved fascinating neurotoxins capable of shutting down neuronal communication by blocking or activating essential components of the synapse. By hijacking key proteins of the communication machinery, neurotoxins are therefore extremely valuable tools that have, in turn, greatly helped our understanding of synaptic biology. Moreover, analysis and understanding of the molecular strategy used by certain neurotoxins has allowed the design of entirely new classes of drugs acting on specific targets with high selectivity and efficacy. This chapter will discuss the different classes of marine neurotoxins, their effects on neurotransmitter release and how they act to incapacitate key steps in the process leading to synaptic vesicle fusion.

  9. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  10. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  11. A neuronal Sec1 homolog regulates neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Dresbach, T; Burns, M E; O'Connor, V; DeBello, W M; Betz, H; Augustine, G J

    1998-04-15

    Sec1-related proteins are essential for membrane fusion at distinct stages of the constitutive and regulated secretory pathways in eukaryotic cells. Studies of neuronal isoforms of the Sec1 protein family have yielded evidence for both positive and negative regulatory functions of these proteins in neurotransmitter release. Here, we have identified a squid neuronal homolog (s-Sec1) of Sec1 proteins and examined its function in neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse. Microinjection of s-Sec1 into the presynaptic terminal of the giant synapse inhibited evoked neurotransmitter release, but this effect was prevented by coinjecting the cytoplasmic domain of squid syntaxin (s-syntaxin), one of the binding partners of s-Sec1. A 24 amino acid peptide fragment of s-Sec1, which inhibited the binding of s-Sec1 to s-syntaxin in vitro, completely blocked release, suggesting an essential function of the s-Sec1/s-syntaxin interaction in transmitter release. Electron microscopy showed that injection of s-Sec1 did not change the spatial distribution of synaptic vesicles at presynaptic release sites ("active zones"), whereas the inhibitory peptide increased the number of docked vesicles. These distinct morphological effects lead us to conclude that Sec1 proteins function at different stages of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and that an interaction of s-Sec1 with syntaxin-at a stage blocked by the peptide-is necessary for docked vesicles to fuse.

  12. Resolvin E1 Inhibits Substance P-Induced Potentiation of TRPV1 in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is expressed in primary sensory neurons and is commonly regarded as a “pain” neurotransmitter. Upon peripheral inflammation, SP activates the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and potentiates activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is coexpressed by nociceptive neurons. Therefore, SP functions as an important neurotransmitter involved in the hypersensitization of inflammatory pain. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inhibits TRPV1 activity via activation of the chemerin 23 receptor (ChemR23)—an RvE1 receptor located in dorsal root ganglion neurons—and therefore exerts an inhibitory effect on inflammatory pain. We demonstrate here that RvE1 regulates the SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) on peripheral nociceptive neurons. SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 inhibited by RvE1 was blocked by the Gαi-coupled GPCR inhibitor pertussis toxin and the G-protein inhibitor GDPβ-S. These results indicate that a low concentration of RvE1 strongly inhibits the potentiation of TRPV1, induced by the SP-mediated activation of NK-1, via a GPCR signaling pathway activated by ChemR23 in nociceptive neurons. RvE1 might represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain as a prospective endogenous inhibitor that strongly inhibits TRPV1 activity associated with peripheral inflammation. PMID:27738388

  13. Consideration of gene therapy for paediatric neurotransmitter diseases.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Michael; Kang, Un Jung

    2009-06-01

    The paediatric neurotransmitter diseases (PNDs) are a group of inborn errors of metabolism characterized by abnormalities of neurotransmitter synthesis or metabolism. Although some children may react favourably to neurotransmitter augmentation treatment, optimal response is not universal and other modes of treatment should be sought. The genes involved in many of the currently known monoamine PNDs have been utilized in pre-clinical and in phase I clinical trials in Parkinson disease (PD) and the basic principles could be applied to the therapy of PNDs with some modifications regarding the targeting and distribution of vectors. However, issues that go beyond neurotransmitter replacement are important considerations in PD and even more so in PNDs. Understanding the pathophysiology of PNDs including abnormal development resulting from the neurotransmitter deficiency will be critical for rational therapeutic approaches. Better animal models of PNDs are necessary to test gene therapy before clinical trials can be attempted.

  14. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  15. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients.

  16. Sodium-Assisted Formation of Binding and Traverse Conformations of the Substrate in a Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter Model

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ágnes; Bencsura, Ákos; Héja, László; Magyar, Csaba; Kardos, Julianna

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutics designed to increase synaptic neurotransmitter levels by inhibiting neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) classify a strategic approach to treat brain disorders such as depression or epilepsy, however, the critical elementary steps that couple downhill flux of sodium to uphill transport of neurotransmitter are not distinguished as yet. Here we present modelling of NSS member neuronal GAT1 with the substrate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABA binding is simulated with the occluded conformation of GAT1 homodimer in an explicit lipid/water environment. Simulations performed in the 1-10 ns range of time elucidated persistent formation of half-extended minor and H-bridged major GABA conformations, referred to as binding and traverse conformations, respectively. The traverse GABA conformation was further stabilized by GAT1-bound Na+(1). We also observed Na+(1) translocation to GAT1-bound Cl- as well as the appearance of water molecules at GABA and GAT1-bound Na+(2), conjecturing causality. Scaling dynamics suggest that the traverse GABA conformation may be valid for developing substrate inhibitors with high efficacy. The potential for this finding is significant with impact not only in pharmacology but wherever understanding of the mechanism of neurotransmitter uptake is valuable. PMID:25138914

  17. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  18. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  19. Pre- and postjunctional protective effect of neocuproine on the nitrergic neurotransmitter in the mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    De Man, J G; Moreels, T G; De Winter, B Y; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A

    2001-01-01

    1. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerves of the mouse gastric fundus induced frequency-dependent transient relaxations which were mimicked by nitric oxide (NO), added as acidified NaNO(2). The NO donors S-nitrosocysteine, S-nitrosoglutathione, SIN-1 and hydroxylamine induced sustained concentration-dependent relaxations. The NO synthase blocker L-nitro arginine (L-NOARG; 300 microM) abolished the relaxations to EFS without affecting the relaxations to NO. 2. The copper(I) chelator neocuproine (10 microM) enhanced the relaxations to EFS and NO but inhibited those to S-nitrosocysteine and S-nitrosoglutathione. Neocuproine potentiated the relaxations to SIN-1, which releases NO extracellularly, without affecting the relaxations to hydroxylamine, which releases NO intracellularly. 3. The potentiating effect of neocuproine on the relaxations to EFS was more pronounced after inhibition of catalase with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (1 mM) but not after inhibition of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) with diethyl dithiocarbamic acid (DETCA, 1 mM). The potentiating effect of neocuproine on relaxations to NO was not altered by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole or DETCA treatment. 4. The relaxations to EFS were significantly inhibited by the oxidants hydrogen peroxide (70 microM) and duroquinone (10 microM) but only after inhibition of catalase with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole or after inhibition of Cu/ZnSOD with DETCA respectively. 5. Our results suggest that neocuproine can act as an antioxidant in the mouse gastric fundus and that both catalase and Cu/ZnSOD protect the nitrergic neurotransmitter from oxidative breakdown. Since inhibition of catalase but not inhibition of Cu/ZnSOD potentiated the effect of neocuproine on relaxations to EFS without affecting the relaxations to NO, catalase may protect the nitrergic neurotransmitter mainly at a prejunctional site whereas Cu/ZnSOD protects at a postjunctional site.

  20. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  1. Chemical stimulation of rat retinal neurons: feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter-based prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayat, Samsoon; Rountree, Corey M.; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2015-02-01

    Objective. No cure currently exists for photoreceptor degenerative diseases, which cause partial or total blindness in millions of people worldwide. Electrical retinal prostheses have been developed by several groups with the goal of restoring vision lost to these diseases, but electrical stimulation has limitations. It excites both somas and axons, activating retinal pathways nonphysiologically, and limits spatial resolution because of current spread. Chemical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using the neurotransmitter glutamate has been suggested as an alternative to electrical stimulation with some significant advantages. However, sufficient scientific data to support developing a chemical-based retinal prosthesis is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis and determine therapeutic stimulation parameters. Approach. We injected controlled amounts of glutamate into rat retinas from the epiretinal side ex vivo via micropipettes using a pressure injection system and recorded RGC responses with a multielectrode array. Responsive units were identified using a spike rate threshold of 3 Hz. Main results. We recorded both somal and axonal units and demonstrated successful glutamatergic stimulation across different RGC subtypes. Analyses show that exogenous glutamate acts on RGC synapses similar to endogenous glutamate and, unlike electrical prostheses, stimulates only RGC somata. The spatial spread of glutamate stimulation was ˜ 290 μm from the injection site, comparable to current electrical prostheses. Further, the glutamate injections produced spatially differential responses in OFF, ON, and ON-OFF RGC subtypes, suggesting that differential stimulation of the OFF and ON systems may be possible. A temporal resolution of 3.2 Hz was obtained, which is a rate suitable for spatial vision. Significance. We provide strong support for the feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter

  2. Electrochemical nanoprobes for the chemical detection of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, acting as chemical messengers, play an important role in neurotransmission, which governs many functional aspects of nervous system activity. Electrochemical probes have proven a very useful technique to study neurotransmission, especially to quantify and qualify neurotransmitters. With the emerging interests in probing neurotransmission at the level of single cells, single vesicles, as well as single synapses, probes that enable detection of neurotransmitters at the nanometer scale become vitally important. Electrochemical nanoprobes have been successfully employed in nanometer spatial resolution imaging of single nanopores of Si membrane and single Au nanoparticles, providing both topographical and chemical information, thus holding great promise for nanometer spatial study of neurotransmission. Here we present the current state of electrochemical nanoprobes for chemical detection of neurotransmitters, focusing on two types of nanoelectrodes, i.e. carbon nanoelectrode and nano-ITIES pipet electrode. PMID:26327927

  3. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  4. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR. PMID:24882143

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (I GABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited I GABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I GABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  8. Effect of Gestational Exposure of Cypermethrin on Postnatal Development of Brain Cytochrome P450 2D1 and 3A1 and Neurotransmitter Receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay K; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Parmar, Devendra

    2015-08-01

    Oral administration of low doses (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg) of cypermethrin to pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 led to dose-dependent differences in the induction of cytochrome P450 2D1 (CYP2D1) and 3A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in brain regions isolated from the offsprings postnatally at 3 weeks that persisted up to adulthood (12 weeks). Similar alterations were observed in the expression of GABAergic, muscarinic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic neurotransmitter receptors in brain regions of rat offsprings. Rechallenge of the prenatally exposed offsprings at adulthood (12 weeks old) with cypermethrin (p.o., 10 mg/kg for 6 days) led to a greater magnitude of alterations in the expression of CYPs, neurotransmitter receptors, and neurotransmitter receptor binding in the brain regions when compared to the control offsprings treated at adulthood with cypermethrin or prenatally exposed offsprings. A greater magnitude of decrease was also observed in the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) in prenatally exposed offsprings rechallenged with cypermethrin. The present data indicating similarities in the alterations in the expression of CYPs (2D1 and 3A1) and neurotransmitter receptors in brain has led us to suggest that endogenous function regulating CYPs is possibly associated with neurotransmission processes. A greater magnitude of alterations in CYP2D1, 3A1, neurotransmitter receptors, and SLA in rechallenged animals has further provided evidence that alterations in CYPs are possibly linked with neurotransmission processes.

  9. Effect of Gestational Exposure of Cypermethrin on Postnatal Development of Brain Cytochrome P450 2D1 and 3A1 and Neurotransmitter Receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay K; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Parmar, Devendra

    2015-08-01

    Oral administration of low doses (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg) of cypermethrin to pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 led to dose-dependent differences in the induction of cytochrome P450 2D1 (CYP2D1) and 3A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in brain regions isolated from the offsprings postnatally at 3 weeks that persisted up to adulthood (12 weeks). Similar alterations were observed in the expression of GABAergic, muscarinic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic neurotransmitter receptors in brain regions of rat offsprings. Rechallenge of the prenatally exposed offsprings at adulthood (12 weeks old) with cypermethrin (p.o., 10 mg/kg for 6 days) led to a greater magnitude of alterations in the expression of CYPs, neurotransmitter receptors, and neurotransmitter receptor binding in the brain regions when compared to the control offsprings treated at adulthood with cypermethrin or prenatally exposed offsprings. A greater magnitude of decrease was also observed in the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) in prenatally exposed offsprings rechallenged with cypermethrin. The present data indicating similarities in the alterations in the expression of CYPs (2D1 and 3A1) and neurotransmitter receptors in brain has led us to suggest that endogenous function regulating CYPs is possibly associated with neurotransmission processes. A greater magnitude of alterations in CYP2D1, 3A1, neurotransmitter receptors, and SLA in rechallenged animals has further provided evidence that alterations in CYPs are possibly linked with neurotransmission processes. PMID:25288152

  10. The endogenous opioid system: a common substrate in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Trigo, José Manuel; Martin-García, Elena; Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits that involve several neurotransmitters. One of the neurochemical systems that plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction is the endogenous opioid system (EOS). Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within these reward circuits. Chronic exposure to the different prototypical drugs of abuse, including opioids, alcohol, nicotine, psychostimulants and cannabinoids has been reported to produce significant alterations within the EOS, which seem to play an important role in the development of the addictive process. In this review, we will describe the adaptive changes produced by different drugs of abuse on the EOS, and the current knowledge about the contribution of each component of this neurobiological system to their addictive properties.

  11. Diffusion cannot govern the discharge of neurotransmitter in fast synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Khanin, R; Parnas, H; Segel, L

    1994-01-01

    In the present work we show that diffusion cannot provide the observed fast discharge of neurotransmitter from a synaptic vesicle during neurotransmitter release, mainly because it is not sufficiently rapid nor is it sufficiently temperature-dependent. Modeling the discharge from the vesicle into the cleft as a continuous point source, we have determined that discharge should occur in 50-75 microseconds, to provide the observed high concentrations of transmitter at the critical zone. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:7811953

  12. Cathepsin L in secretory vesicles functions as a prohormone-processing enzyme for production of the enkephalin peptide neurotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yasothornsrikul, Sukkid; Greenbaum, Doron; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Toneff, Thomas; Bundey, Richard; Miller, Ruthellen; Schilling, Birgit; Petermann, Ivonne; Dehnert, Jessica; Logvinova, Anna; Goldsmith, Paul; Neveu, John M.; Lane, William S.; Gibson, Bradford; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Bogyo, Matthew; Hook, Vivian

    2003-01-01

    Multistep proteolytic mechanisms are essential for converting proprotein precursors into active peptide neurotransmitters and hormones. Cysteine proteases have been implicated in the processing of proenkephalin and other neuropeptide precursors. Although the papain family of cysteine proteases has been considered the primary proteases of the lysosomal degradation pathway, more recent studies indicate that functions of these enzymes are linked to specific biological processes. However, few protein substrates have been described for members of this family. We show here that secretory vesicle cathepsin L is the responsible cysteine protease of chromaffin granules for converting proenkephalin to the active enkephalin peptide neurotransmitter. The cysteine protease activity was identified as cathepsin L by affinity labeling with an activity-based probe for cysteine proteases followed by mass spectrometry for peptide sequencing. Production of [Met]enkephalin by cathepsin L occurred by proteolytic processing at dibasic and monobasic prohormone-processing sites. Cellular studies showed the colocalization of cathepsin L with [Met]enkephalin in secretory vesicles of neuroendocrine chromaffin cells by immunofluorescent confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Functional localization of cathepsin L to the regulated secretory pathway was demonstrated by its cosecretion with [Met]enkephalin. Finally, in cathepsin L gene knockout mice, [Met]enkephalin levels in brain were reduced significantly; this occurred with an increase in the relative amounts of enkephalin precursor. These findings indicate a previously uncharacterized biological role for secretory vesicle cathepsin L in the production of [Met]enkephalin, an endogenous peptide neurotransmitter. PMID:12869695

  13. Effects of zonisamide on neurotransmitter release associated with inositol triphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Satoshi; Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru; Kashimoto, Sanae; Hamaguchi, Tatsuya; Ohoyama, Keiko; Suzuki, Dai; Kanehara, Shinich; Nakagawa, Masanori; Shiroyama, Takashi; Okada, Motohiro

    2009-04-17

    To clarify the antiepileptic mechanisms of zonisamide (ZNS), we determined the interaction between ZNS and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) on exocytosis of GABA and glutamate in rat frontal cortex using microdialysis. ZNS increased basal GABA release, but not glutamate, concentration-dependently, and reduced concentration-dependently K(+)-evoked GABA and glutamate releases. Inhibition and activation of IP3R reduced and enhanced basal and K(+)-evoked GABA releases, respectively. The K(+)-evoked glutamate release was reduced and enhanced by IP3R antagonist and agonist, respectively, whereas basal glutamate release was increased by IP3R agonist but not affected by IP3R antagonist. Under extracellular Ca(2+) depletion, IP3R agonist increased basal GABA and glutamate releases. The latter effects of IP3R agonist were weakly enhanced by ZNS, but such stimulatory action of ZNS was abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) depletion. In contrast, ZNS inhibited the stimulatory effect of IP3R agonist on K(+)-evoked release. The stimulatory effect of IP3R agonist on basal release was regulated by N-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel (VSCC) rather than P- and L-type VSCCs, whereas the stimulatory effect of IP3R agonist on K(+)-evoked release was regulated by P- and L-type VSCCs rather than N-type VSCC. These results suggest that ZNS-activated N-type VSCC enhances IP3R-associated neurotransmitter release during resting stage, whereas ZNS-induced suppression of P- and L-type VSCCs possibly attenuates IP3R-associated neurotransmitter release during neuronal hyperexcitability. Therefore, the combination of both of these two actions of ZNS on IP3R-associated neurotransmitter release mechanism seems to be involved, at least in part, in the mechanisms of antiepileptic and neuroprotective actions of ZNS.

  14. Time-coded neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Serafim; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin; Cortes, Jesus M; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Ali, Afia B

    2016-02-23

    Communication between neurons at chemical synapses is regulated by hundreds of different proteins that control the release of neurotransmitter that is packaged in vesicles, transported to an active zone, and released when an input spike occurs. Neurotransmitter can also be released asynchronously, that is, after a delay following the spike, or spontaneously in the absence of a stimulus. The mechanisms underlying asynchronous and spontaneous neurotransmitter release remain elusive. Here, we describe a model of the exocytotic cycle of vesicles at excitatory and inhibitory synapses that accounts for all modes of vesicle release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP). For asynchronous release, the model predicts a delayed inertial protein unbinding associated with the SNARE complex assembly immediately after vesicle priming. Experiments are proposed to test the model's molecular predictions for differential exocytosis. The simplicity of the model will also facilitate large-scale simulations of neural circuits.

  15. Time-coded neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Serafim; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin; Cortes, Jesus M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Ali, Afia B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication between neurons at chemical synapses is regulated by hundreds of different proteins that control the release of neurotransmitter that is packaged in vesicles, transported to an active zone, and released when an input spike occurs. Neurotransmitter can also be released asynchronously, that is, after a delay following the spike, or spontaneously in the absence of a stimulus. The mechanisms underlying asynchronous and spontaneous neurotransmitter release remain elusive. Here, we describe a model of the exocytotic cycle of vesicles at excitatory and inhibitory synapses that accounts for all modes of vesicle release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP). For asynchronous release, the model predicts a delayed inertial protein unbinding associated with the SNARE complex assembly immediately after vesicle priming. Experiments are proposed to test the model’s molecular predictions for differential exocytosis. The simplicity of the model will also facilitate large-scale simulations of neural circuits. PMID:26858411

  16. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  17. Altered isotope charge distribution of acetylcholine neurotransmitter and Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Bayri, A; Unal, S; Altin, S; Bulut, F; Dayanc, B E

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a central neurotransmitter that is used for signal transmission among neurons. For signal transmission in neurons, a neurotransmitter must bind to its receptor in order to produce an action potential. It is known that in Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases, autoantibodies could block this binding. In the future, the treatment of MG could be achieved via modulation of molecular interaction between ACh and acetylcholine receptor (AChR). This study suggests that if an atom on a ligand (i.e. a neurotransmitter) is replaced with its isotope, it may cause charge redistribution such as that the binding between ligand and its receptor may be improved. Hence suggesting that with replacement of atoms with their isotopes in any biologically important ligand could alter its affinity towards its corresponding receptor, which would have a wide array of applications in medicine.

  18. THE PURINERGIC NEUROTRANSMITTER REVISITED: A SINGLE SUBSTANCE OR MULTIPLE PLAYERS?

    PubMed Central

    Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.; Durnin, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    The past half century has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of extracellular purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic neurotransmission, in particular, has emerged as a key contributor in the efficient control mechanisms in the nervous system. The identity of the purine neurotransmitter, however, remains controversial. Identifying it is difficult because purines are present in all cell types, have a large variety of cell sources, and are released via numerous pathways. Moreover, studies on purinergic neurotransmission have relied heavily on indirect measurements of integrated postjunctional responses that do not provide direct information for neurotransmitter identity. This paper discusses experimental support for adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) as a neurotransmitter and recent evidence for possible contribution of other purines, in addition to or instead of ATP, in chemical neurotransmission in the peripheral, enteric and central nervous systems. Sites of release and action of purines in model systems such as vas deferens, blood vessels, urinary bladder and chromaffin cells are discussed. This is preceded by a brief discussion of studies demonstrating storage of purines in synaptic vesicles. We examine recent evidence for cell type targets (e.g., smooth muscle cells, interstitial cells, neurons and glia) for purine neurotransmitters in different systems. This is followed by brief discussion of mechanisms of terminating the action of purine neurotransmitters, including extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and possible salvage and reuptake in the cell. The significance of direct neurotransmitter release measurements is highlighted. Possibilities for involvement of multiple purines (e.g., ATP, ADP, NAD+, ADP-ribose, adenosine, and diadenosine polyphosphates) in neurotransmission are considered throughout. PMID:24887688

  19. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    SciTech Connect

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  20. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Scallet, A C; Gee, K W; Paule, M G; Brown, R M; Slikker, W

    1989-01-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the [35S]TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects. Results from these experiments suggest that chronic exposure to THC does not produce significant alterations in catecholamine or indoleamine neurotransmitter systems or in opiate or GABA receptor systems in the rat brain.

  1. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  2. [Genetics of endogenous psychoses].

    PubMed

    Zerbin-Rüdin, E

    1979-01-01

    As the endogeneous psychoses do not show a Mendelian mode of inheritance, empirical risk figures have to be calculated. They are heterogeneous and nurture as well as nature have a share in the manifestation of illness. The genetic basis of the schizophrenias is demonstrated by twin and adoption studies. The concordance rate in monozygotic twins is four times the rate in dizygotic twins. Schizophrenia is to be found in the biological families of schizophrenic adoptees but not in the adoptive families. However, despite their genetic identity, monozygotic twins do not show 100% concordance but 60% only. Nongenetic factors must be considered. Obviously they are nonspecific and vary between individuals. The same principles apply to the affective psychoses. At present research is most interested in the problem of heterogeneity. Do pure depressive and manic-depressive disease form one genetic entity, or two different ones, or have they in common part of their genetic basis? Some remarks on genetic counselling are made.

  3. Correlation of 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Induced Seizures and Changes in Striatal Neurotransmitters Monitored by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Crick, Eric W.; Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark; Mayer, Andrew P.; Lunte, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to use a status epilepticus steady-state chemical model in rats using the convulsant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), and to compare the changes in striatal neurotransmission on a slow (5 minute) and fast (60 second) timescale. In vivo microdialysis was combined with electrophysiological methods in order to provide a complete evaluation of the dynamics of the results obtained. Objective To compare the effects of a steady-state chemical model pof status epilepticus on striatal amino-acid and amine neurotransmitters contents, as measured via in vivo microdialysis combined with electrophysiological methods. Measurements were performed on samples collected every 60 seconds and every 5 minutes. “Fast” (60s) and “slow” (5 min.) sampling timescales were selected, to gain more insight into the dynamics of GABA synthesis inhibition and of its effects on other neurotransmitters and on cortical electrical activity. Methods 3-MPA was administered in the form of an intra-venous load(60 mg/kg) followed by a constant infusion (50 mg/kg/min) for min. Microdialysis samples were collected from the striatum at intervals of 5 minutes and 60 seconds and analyzed for biogenic amine and amino acid neurotransmitters. ECoG activity was monitored via screws placed over the cortex. Results In the 5 minute samples, glutamate (Glu) increased and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decreased monotonically while changes in dopamine (DA) concentration were bimodal. In the sixty second samples, Glu changes were bimodal, a feature that was not apparent with the five minute samples. ECoG activity was indicative of status epilepticus. Conclusions This study describes the combination of in vivo microdialysis with electrophysiology to monitor the effect of 3-MPA on neurotransmission in the brain. This led to a better understanding of the chemical changes in the striatum due to the applied 3-MPA chemical model of status epilepticus. PMID:24462767

  4. A neurotransmitter transporter encoded by the Drosophila inebriated gene

    PubMed Central

    Soehnge, Holly; Huang, Xi; Becker, Marie; Whitley, Penn; Conover, Diana; Stern, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies on mutants defective in the Drosophila inebriated (ine) gene demonstrated increased excitability of the motor neuron. In this paper, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of ine. Mutations in ine were localized on cloned DNA by restriction mapping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping of ine mutants. DNA from the ine region was then used to isolate an ine cDNA. In situ hybridization of ine transcripts to developing embryos revealed expression of this gene in several cell types, including the posterior hindgut, Malpighian tubules, anal plate, garland cells, and a subset of cells in the central nervous system. The ine cDNA contains an open reading frame of 658 amino acids with a high degree of sequence similarity to members of the Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family. Members of this family catalyze the rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters released into the synapse and thereby play key roles in controlling neuronal function. We conclude that ine mutations cause increased excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron by causing the defective reuptake of the substrate neurotransmitter of the ine transporter and thus overstimulation of the motor neuron by this neurotransmitter. From this observation comes a unique opportunity to perform a genetic dissection of the regulation of excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron. PMID:8917579

  5. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  6. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    PubMed

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia. PMID:26712377

  7. Polyphosphoinositide metabolism in rat brain: effects of neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Jolles, J; van Dongen, C J; ten Haaf, J; Gispen, W H

    1982-01-01

    This study describes effects of various peptides, neurotransmitters and cyclic nucleotides on brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism in vitro. The interconversion of the polyanionic inositol phospholipids was studied by incubation of a lysed crude mitochondrial/synaptosomal fraction with [gamma-32P]-ATP. The reference peptide ACTH1-24 stimulated the formation of radiolabelled phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (TPI) and inhibited that of phosphatidic acid (PA). Substance P inhibited both TPI and PA labelling, whereas beta-endorphin inhibited that of PA without any effect on TPI. Morphine had no effect at any concentration tested, whereas high concentrations of naloxone inhibited the labelling of both PA and TPI. Naloxone did not counteract the effects of ACTH1-24. The other peptides tested (lysine 8-vasopressin and angiotensin II) were without any effect. Under the conditions used, adrenaline, noradrenaline and acetylcholine did not affect the labelling of the (poly)phosphoinositides. Both dopamine and serotonin, however, dose-dependently inhibited the formation of radiolabelled TPI and PA. Low concentrations of cAMP stimulated TPI, but higher concentrations had an overall inhibitory effect on the labelling of TPI, PA and especially phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (DPI). The cyclic nucleotide did not mediate or counteract the effects of ACTH, and cGMP was without any effect. These results are discussed in the light of current ideas on the mechanism of action of neuropeptides.

  8. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  9. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  10. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satinder K.; Pal, Aritra

    2016-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. PMID:25950965

  11. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K+ regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    PubMed Central

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G.; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H.; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na+-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K+ inhibits Na+-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K+-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni2+ bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K+-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na+ and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K+-effect. The K+-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K+ binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K+ to regulate the LeuT transport cycle. PMID:27678200

  12. Neuron-glia signaling in developing retina mediated by neurotransmitter spillover

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Juliana M; Bos, Rémi; Sack, Georgeann S; Fortuny, Cécile; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E; Flannery, John G; Feller, Marla B

    2015-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions play a critical role in the maturation of neural circuits; however, little is known about the pathways that mediate their communication in the developing CNS. We investigated neuron-glia signaling in the developing retina, where we demonstrate that retinal waves reliably induce calcium transients in Müller glial cells (MCs). During cholinergic waves, MC calcium transients were blocked by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, whereas during glutamatergic waves, MC calcium transients were inhibited by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that the responsiveness of MCs changes to match the neurotransmitter used to support retinal waves. Using an optical glutamate sensor we show that the decline in MC calcium transients is caused by a reduction in the amount of glutamate reaching MCs. Together, these studies indicate that neurons and MCs exhibit correlated activity during a critical period of retinal maturation that is enabled by neurotransmitter spillover from retinal synapses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09590.001 PMID:26274565

  13. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  14. Neurotransmitter imaging in living cells based on native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.; Yeung, E.S. |; Parpura, V.; Haydon, P.G.

    1995-08-01

    A UV laser-based optical microscope and CCD detection system with high sensitivity has been developed to image neurotransmitters in living cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. We found that the fluorescence intensity of astrocytes increased by up to 10 times after serotonin uptake. The temporal resolution of this detection system at 10{sup -4} M serotonin is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. This UV laser microscope imaging system shows promise for studies of spatial-temporal dynamics of neurotransmitter levels in living neurons and glia. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Wnt signalling tunes neurotransmitter release by directly targeting Synaptotagmin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Marzo, Aude; Boyle, Kieran; Stamatakou, Eleanna; Lopes, Douglas M.; Anane, Derek; McLeod, Faye; Rosso, Silvana B.; Gibb, Alasdair; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The functional assembly of the synaptic release machinery is well understood; however, how signalling factors modulate this process remains unknown. Recent studies suggest that Wnts play a role in presynaptic function. To examine the mechanisms involved, we investigated the interaction of release machinery proteins with Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1), a scaffold protein that determines the cellular locale of Wnt action. Here we show that Dvl1 directly interacts with Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt-1) and indirectly with the SNARE proteins SNAP25 and Syntaxin (Stx-1). Importantly, the interaction of Dvl1 with Syt-1, which is regulated by Wnts, modulates neurotransmitter release. Moreover, presynaptic terminals from Wnt signalling-deficient mice exhibit reduced release probability and are unable to sustain high-frequency release. Consistently, the readily releasable pool size and formation of SNARE complexes are reduced. Our studies demonstrate that Wnt signalling tunes neurotransmitter release and identify Syt-1 as a target for modulation by secreted signalling proteins. PMID:26400647

  16. Imaging Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Perez, Gustavo A.; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a toolbox of versatile techniques that enable us to investigate analytes in samples at molecular level. In recent years, IMS, and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI), has been used to visualise a wide range of metabolites in biological samples. Simultaneous visualisation of the spatial distribution of metabolites in a single sample with little tissue disruption can be considered as one important advantage of MALDI over other techniques. However, several technical hurdles including low concentrations and rapid degradation rates of small molecule metabolites, matrix interference of signals and poor ionisation, need to be addressed before MALDI can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of metabolites such as neurotransmitters in brain tissues from different sources including humans. In the present review we will briefly describe current MALDI IMS techniques used to study neurotransmitters and discuss their current status, challenges, as well as future prospects. PMID:26819893

  17. Protein modifications involved in neurotransmitter and gasotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Nilkantha; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modifications of intracellular proteins, such as phosphorylation, are generally thought to occur as secondary or tertiary responses to neurotransmitters, following the intermediation of membrane receptors and second messengers such as cyclic AMP. By contrast, the gasotransmitter nitric oxide directly S-nitrosylates cysteine residues in diverse intracellular proteins. Recently, hydrogen sulfide has been acknowledged as a gaso-transmitter, which analogously sulfhydrates cysteine residues in proteins. Cysteine residues are also modified by palmitoylation in response to neurotransmitter signaling, possibly in reciprocity with S-nitrosylation. Neurotransmission also elicits sumoylation and acetylation of lysine residues within diverse proteins. This review addresses how these recently appreciated protein modifications impact our thinking about ways in which neurotransmission regulates intracellular protein disposition. PMID:20843563

  18. Directed evolution reveals hidden properties of VMAT, a neurotransmitter transporter.

    PubMed

    Gros, Yael; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2010-02-12

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporter VMAT2 is responsible for the transport of monoamines into synaptic and storage vesicles. VMAT2 is the target of many psychoactive drugs and is essential for proper neurotransmission and survival. Here we describe a new expression system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that takes advantage of the polyspecificity of VMAT2. Expression of rVMAT2 confers resistance to acriflavine and to the parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) by their removal into the yeast vacuole. This expression system allowed identification of a new substrate, acriflavine, and isolation of mutants with modified affinity to tetrabenazine (TBZ), a non-competitive inhibitor of VMAT2 that is used in the treatment of various movement disorders including Tourette syndrome and Huntington chorea. Whereas one type of mutant obtained displayed decreased affinity to TBZ, a second type showed only a slight decrease in the affinity to TBZ, displayed a higher K(m) to the neurotransmitter serotonin, but conferred increased resistance to acriflavine and MPP(+). A protein where both types of mutations were combined (with only three amino acid replacements) lost most of the properties of the neurotransmitter transporter (TBZ-insensitive, no transport of neurotransmitter) but displayed enhanced resistance to the above toxicants. The work described here shows that in the case of rVMAT2, loss of traits acquired in evolution of function (such as serotonin transport and TBZ binding) bring about an improvement in older functions such as resistance to toxic compounds. A process that has taken millions of years of evolution can be reversed by three mutations. PMID:20007701

  19. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  20. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    PubMed

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (≤200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 μm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents.

  1. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field Modulates the Level of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Ho Sung; Chung, Su Jin; Lim, Cheol Hee; Oh, Keon Woong; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to observe that extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) may be relevant to changes of major neurotransmitters in rat brain. After the exposure to ELF-MF (60 Hz, 2.0 mT) for 2 or 5 days, we measured the levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites, amino acid neurotransmitters and nitric oxide (NO) in the cortex, striatum, thalamus, cerebellum and hippocampus. The exposure of ELF-MF for 2 or 5 days produced significant differences in norepinephrine and vanillyl mandelic acid in the striatum, thalamus, cerebellum and hippocampus. Significant increases in the levels of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were also observed in the striatum, thalamus or hippocampus. ELF-MF significantly increased the concentration of dopamine in the thalamus. ELF-MF tended to increase the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamine, glycine and γ -aminobutyric acid in the striatum and thalamus, whereas it decreased the levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. ELF-MF significantly increased NO concentration in the striatum, thalamus and hippocampus. The present study has demonstrated that exposure to ELF-MFs may evoke the changes in the levels of biogenic amines, amino acid and NO in the brain although the extent and property vary with the brain areas. However, the mechanisms remain further to be characterized. PMID:25605992

  2. Extremely low frequency magnetic field modulates the level of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Ho Sung; Chung, Su Jin; Lim, Cheol Hee; Oh, Keon Woong; Sohn, Uy Dong; Park, Eon Sub; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to observe that extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) may be relevant to changes of major neurotransmitters in rat brain. After the exposure to ELF-MF (60 Hz, 2.0 mT) for 2 or 5 days, we measured the levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites, amino acid neurotransmitters and nitric oxide (NO) in the cortex, striatum, thalamus, cerebellum and hippocampus. The exposure of ELF-MF for 2 or 5 days produced significant differences in norepinephrine and vanillyl mandelic acid in the striatum, thalamus, cerebellum and hippocampus. Significant increases in the levels of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were also observed in the striatum, thalamus or hippocampus. ELF-MF significantly increased the concentration of dopamine in the thalamus. ELF-MF tended to increase the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamine, glycine and γ -aminobutyric acid in the striatum and thalamus, whereas it decreased the levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. ELF-MF significantly increased NO concentration in the striatum, thalamus and hippocampus. The present study has demonstrated that exposure to ELF-MFs may evoke the changes in the levels of biogenic amines, amino acid and NO in the brain although the extent and property vary with the brain areas. However, the mechanisms remain further to be characterized.

  3. English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) protect endogenous antioxidants in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ellagic acid monomers, polymeric tannins and related phenolic compounds isolated from English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) have been reported to inhibit LDL oxidation ex vivo and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress in animal models. To determine whether dietary and endogenous antioxidants are pres...

  4. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  5. Endogenous Metabolism of Azotobacter agilis

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, J. M.; Charba, J. F.; Foust, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Sobek, J. M. (University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette), J. F. Charba, and W. N. Foust. Endogenous metabolism of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:687–695. 1966—Ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, cellular carbohydrate, and the cold trichloroacetic acid and acidic alcohol fractions of the cell do not appear to function as endogenous reserves for Azotobacter agilis. The immediate endogenous reserve of cells grown on glucose, acetate, or succinate was poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB). Viability of the cells during starvation was dependent upon the initial levels of PHB and the growth substrate. Cells with high initial PHB levels survived longer than cells with lower levels. Cells from succinate-grown cultures had lower PHB levels than cells from glucose-grown cultures, but were capable of maintaining their viability longer. Cellular protein may also serve as a secondary endogenous reserve substrate for this organism. PMID:5922542

  6. Purification and characterization of the blue-green rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) tyrosine hydroxylase with a dopamine-Fe(III) complex. Reversal of the endogenous feedback inhibition by phosphorylation of serine-40.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, K K; Vassort, C; Brennan, B A; Que, L; Haavik, J; Flatmark, T; Gros, F; Thibault, J

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was purified from tumours of rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells by a three-step purification procedure giving 30 mg of pure enzyme in 3 days. The enzyme sedimented with an S(eo),w value of 9.2 S and revealed an apparent subunit molecular mass of 62 kDa with a minor 60 kDa component. Two-dimensional gel isoelectric focusing/electrophoresis and tryptic digestion revealed that the heterogeneity could be accounted for by limited proteolysis of the 62 kDa component and the presence of covalently bound phosphate. The enzyme had a strong blue-green colour (epsilon 700 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 mM-iron-1.cm-1). The resonance Raman spectrum obtained with lambda excitation = 605 nm revealed the presence of an Fe(III)-catecholamine complex in the isolate enzyme, similar to that observed in the bovine adrenal enzyme [Andersson, Cox, Que, Flatmark & Haavik (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 18621-18626]. In the rat PC12 enzyme, all of the iron present (0.53 +/- 0.03 atom per subunit) seems to be chelated by the feedback inhibitors (0.49 +/- 0.05 mol of dopamine and 0.10 +/- 0.03 mol of noradrenaline per mol of subunit). The e.p.r. spectra at 3.6 K show g-values at 7.0, 5.2 and 1.9 as observed for other catecholate-complexed enzymes. After phosphorylation of serine-40 and addition of L-tyrosine a new rhombic (magnitude of E/D = 0.33) e.p.r. species could be observed. Phosphorylation of serine-40 by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase increased the catalytic activity; depending on assay conditions, up to 80-110-fold activation could be observed when measured at high TH (i.e. high endogenous catecholamine) concentration. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1352446

  7. Real-time monitoring of inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced neurotransmitter release using a potassium ion image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiteru; Sakurai, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiaki; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To directly image the release of neurotransmitters from neurons, we combined a substance-selective layer with a 128 × 128-pixel ion image sensor based on CMOS technology. Using the substance-specific image sensors, we studied the dynamics of potassium ion ( K+) release from neurons and examined the effect of ouabain on K+ release. K+ transients were significantly inhibited by ouabain. The K+ image sensor used in this study demonstrated the dynamic analysis of ligand-operated signal release and the pharmacological assessment of secretagogues without requiring cell labeling.

  8. Evidence that synaptosomal high-affinity carriers for amino acid neurotransmitters are glycosylated

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of removal of surface sialic acid from synaptosomes on the high-affinity, Na/sup +/-dependent uptake systems for amino acid neurotransmitters was evaluated. Synaptosomes from rat forebrain were preincubated with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae for 20 min at 34/sup 0/. After washing and resuspension, their ability to transport /sup 14/C-GABA and the acidic amino acid, /sup 3/H-aspartate was studied. Pretreatment with neuraminidase resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the uptake of both amino acids while the influx of /sup 3/H-L-leucine was unaffected. Inhibition was a function of the amount of sialic acid released from membranes. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of amino acid uptake revealed that inhibition resulted from a decrease of Vmax without any change in the Km. Neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the internal concentration of potassium ions was affected by the pretreatment with neuraminidase. The maximum accumulation ratios for both amino acids remained largely unaltered. It is concluded that the GABA and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of carrier proteins directly and not through modification of the driving forces responsible for amino acid transport.

  9. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions.

  10. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  12. Name that neurotransmitter: using music to teach psychopharmacology concepts.

    PubMed

    Hermanns, Melinda; Lilly, Mary LuAnne; Wilson, Kathy; Russell, Nathan Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of music (i.e., two original songs, "Neurotransmitter Twitter" and "Parkinson's Shuffle") to teach aspects of psychopharmacology to students in the course Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. Songs were incorporated in both the clinical and classroom settings. This innovative teaching method allowed students the opportunity to revisit the information through multiple exposures of the content for reinforcement and enhancement of student learning in a fun, creative approach. Brain-based research will be discussed, along with the process of development.

  13. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. PMID:26820249

  14. Endogenous conversion of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fat-1 mice attenuated intestinal polyposis by either inhibiting COX-2/β-catenin signaling or activating 15-PGDH/IL-18.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-05-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3PUFAs) have inhibitory effects in various preclinical cancer models, but their effects in intestinal polyposis have never been examined. As attempts have been made to use nutritional intervention to counteract colon cancer development, in this study we evaluated the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on intestinal polyposis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The experimental groups included wild-type C56BL/6 mice, Apc(Min/+) mice, fat-1 transgenic mice expressing an n-3 desaturase to enable ω-3 PUFA synthesis, and Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 double-transgenic mice; all mice were 20 weeks of age. Small intestines were collected for gross and pathologic evaluation, including assessment of polyp number and size, followed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. After administration of various concentrations of ω-3 PUFAs, PUFA levels were measured in small intestine tissue by GC/MS/MS analysis to compare with PUFA synthesis of between C57BL6 and fat-1mice. As a result, ω-3 PUFAs significantly attenuated Apc mutation-induced intestinal polyposis accompanied with significant inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, COX-2 and PGE2, but induced significant levels of 15-PGDH. In addition, significant induction of the inflammasome-related substrates as IL-1β and IL-18 and activation of caspase-1 was observed in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. Administration of at least 3 g/60 kg ω-3 PUFAs was equivalent to ω-3 PUFAs produced in fat-1 mice and resulted in significant increase in the expression of IL-1β, caspase-3 and IL-18, as seen in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. We conclude that ω-3PUFAs can prevent intestinal polyp formation by inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but increased levels of 15-PGDH and IL-18.

  15. Detection and Monitoring of Neurotransmitters - a Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Lee, Kendall; Durrer, William; Bennet, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy for simultaneously and locally detecting important compounds in neuroscience such as dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine. The Raman results show shifting of the characteristic vibrations of the compounds, observations consistent with previous spectroscopic studies. Although some vibrations are common in these neurotransmitters, Raman mapping was achieved by detecting non-overlapping characteristic spectral signatures of the compounds, as follows: for dopamine the vibration attributed to C-O stretching, for serotonin the indole ring stretching vibration, and for adenosine the adenine ring vibrations. Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific micro-scale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where modification of the chemical or physical composition can influence the neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.

  16. Developmental profiles of neurotransmitter receptors in respiratory motor nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Kubin, Leszek; Volgin, Denys V.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the time course of postnatal development of selected neurotransmitter receptors in motoneurons that innervate respiratory pump and accessory respiratory muscles, with emphasis on other than classic respiratory signals as important regulatory factors. Functions of those brainstem motoneurons that innervate the pharynx and larynx change more dramatically during early postnatal development than those of spinal respiratory motoneurons. Possibly in relation to this difference, the time course of postnatal expression of distinct receptors for serotonin differ between the hypoglossal (XII) and phrenic motoneurons. In rats, distinct developmental patterns include a decline or increase that extends over the first 3−4 postnatal weeks, a rapid increase during the first two weeks, or a transient decline on postnatal days 11−14. The latter period coincides with major changes in many transmitters in brainstem respiratory regions that may be related to a brain-wide reconfiguration of sensorymotor processing resulting from eye and ear opening and beginning of a switch from suckling to mature forms of food seeking and processing. Such rapid neurochemical changes may impart increased vulnerability on the respiratory system. We also consider rapid eye movement sleep as a state during which some brain functions may revert to conditions typical of perinatal period. In addition to normal developmental processes, changes in the expression or function of neurotransmitter receptors may occur in respiratory motoneurons in response to injury, perinatal stress, or disease conditions that increase the load on respiratory muscles or alter the normal levels and patterns of oxygen delivery. PMID:18514591

  17. "Stiff neonate" with mitochondrial DNA depletion and secondary neurotransmitter defects.

    PubMed

    Moran, Margaret M; Allen, Nicholas M; Treacy, Eileen P; King, Mary D

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders comprise a heterogenous group. A neonate who presented with episodes of severe truncal hypertonia and apnea progressed to a hypokinetic rigid syndrome characterized by hypokinesia, tremulousness, profound head lag, absent suck and gag reflexes, brisk deep tendon reflexes, ankle and jaw clonus, and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters from age 7 weeks demonstrated low levels of amine metabolites (homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), tetrahydrobiopterin, and pyridoxal phosphate. Mitochondrial DNA quantitative studies on muscle homogenate demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA depletion disorder. Respiratory chain enzymology demonstrated decreased complex IV activity. Screening for mitochondrial DNA rearrangement disorders and sequencing relevant mitochondrial genes produced negative results. No clinical or biochemical response to treatment with pyridoxal phosphate, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-dopa occurred. The clinical course was progressive, and the patient died at age 19 months. Mitochondrial disorders causing secondary neurotransmitter diseases are usually severe, but are rarely reported. This diagnosis should be considered in neonates or infants who present with hypertonia, hypokinesia rigidity, and progressive neurodegeneration.

  18. Mechanisms of interaction of peptide and nonpeptide vascular neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1987-01-01

    The vascular neuromuscular junction is described and the terms neuromodulation and cotransmission defined. Two main types of interaction between peptide and nonpeptide neurotransmitter substances during the local control of blood flow are distinguished. The first concerns the interacting roles of peptides and nonpeptides that coexist in, and are released from, perivascular nerve varicosities. Examples include the interactions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) with noradrenaline (NA) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) released from some sympathetic nerves; vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) with acetylcholine (ACh) released from some parasympathetic nerves; and NPY and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) released from intracardiac neurones supplying coronary vessels. Possible interactions of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) with ATP released from some primary afferent sensory nerves are also considered. The second type of interaction concerns vascular neurotransmitters and locally released agents such as histamine, prostanoids, and bradykinin. Finally, a hypothesis is put forward in which it is suggested that peptides and nonpeptides released from endothelial cells during hypoxia lead to protective vasodilatation via receptors on the endothelium, while these substances released from perivascular nerves during different physiological circumstances usually constrict the blood vessel via receptors on the smooth muscle cells.

  19. MRI sensing of neurotransmitters with a crown ether appended Gd(3+) complex.

    PubMed

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Même, Sandra; Même, William; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Logothetis, Nikos K; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-02-18

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI. PMID:25496344

  20. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  1. Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model system to study neurotransmitter transporters

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ciara A.; Krantz, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The model genetic organism Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, uses many of the same neurotransmitters as mammals and very similar mechanisms of neurotransmitter storage, release and recycling. This system offers a variety of powerful molecular-genetic methods for the study of transporters, many of which would be difficult in mammalian models. We review here progress made using Drosophila to understand the function and regulation of neurotransmitter transporters and discuss future directions for its use. PMID:24704795

  2. Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model system to study neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ciara A; Krantz, David E

    2014-07-01

    The model genetic organism Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, uses many of the same neurotransmitters as mammals and very similar mechanisms of neurotransmitter storage, release and recycling. This system offers a variety of powerful molecular-genetic methods for the study of transporters, many of which would be difficult in mammalian models. We review here progress made using Drosophila to understand the function and regulation of neurotransmitter transporters and discuss future directions for its use.

  3. RFamide neuropeptide actions on molluscan proboscis smooth muscle: interactions with primary neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Moulis, A; Huddart, H

    2004-07-01

    The potency (muscle force-generated) of a number of long-chain RFamide neuropeptides was examined in mechanical experiments with the radular-retractor and radular-sac muscles of gastropods Buccinum undatum and Neptunea antiqua. Many of the heptapeptides, octapeptides and the decapeptide LMS were found to induce greater contraction than FMRFamide in both smooth muscles and in both species. RFamide neuropeptides interacted with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in an additive way and RFamide-induced contractions were inhibited by the neuromodulator serotonin. Pre-treatment with a calcium-free saline completely abolished acetylcholine-induced responses but only partially inhibited RFamide responses in the muscles, suggesting that acetylcholine acts to cause influx of extracellular calcium for contraction. In contrast, RFamide neuropeptides may mobilise intracellular calcium to maintain sustained tonic force in calcium-free conditions. This suggests that an additional involvement of a fast calcium channel may be present in the RFamide responses, since loss of the usual superimposed twitch activity is observed. Force regulation in these muscles appears to result from a complex interaction of RFamide neuropeptides with the primary transmitter acetylcholine and the neuromodulator serotonin.

  4. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakova, Elena V.; Haller, Steven T.; Kennedy, David J.; Isachkina, Alina N.; Budny, George V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Piecha, Grzegorz; Nikitina, Elena R.; Malhotra, Deepak; Fedorova, Olga V.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Previous reports demonstrated that digitalis-like cardiotonic steroids (CTS) contribute to the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. The goal of the present study was to define the nature of CTS in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in partially nephrectomized (PNx) rats. Methods. In patients with CKD and in healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of marinobufagenin (MBG) and endogenous ouabain (EO) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase activity in the absence and in the presence of 3E9 anti-MBG monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Digibind. Levels of MBG and EO were also determined in sham-operated Sprague–Dawley rats and in rats following 4 weeks of PNx. Results. In 25 patients with CKD plasma, MBG but not EO was increased (0.86 ± 0.07 versus 0.28 ± 0.02 nmol/L, P < 0.01) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase was inhibited (1.24 ± 0.10 versus 2.80 ± 0.09 μmol Pi/mL/h, P < 0.01) as compared to that in 19 healthy subjects. Ex vivo, 3E9 mAb restored Na/K-ATPase in erythrocytes from patients with CKD but did not affect Na/K-ATPase from control subjects. Following chromatographic fractionation of uremic versus normal plasma, a competitive immunoassay based on anti-MBG mAb detected a 3-fold increase in the level of endogenous material having retention time similar to that seen with MBG. A similar pattern of CTS changes was observed in uremic rats. As compared to sham-operated animals, PNx rats exhibited 3-fold elevated levels of MBG but not that of EO. Conclusions. In chronic renal failure, elevated levels of a bufadienolide CTS, MBG, contribute to Na/K-ATPase inhibition and may represent a potential target for therapy. PMID:21292813

  5. The action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning. Involvement of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Ekwerike, Alphonsus; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    The extensive projection of orexigenic neurons and the diffuse expression of orexin receptors suggest that endogenous orexins are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including learning and memory. Our previous study demonstrated that orexin A improves learning, consolidation and retrieval processes, which involves α- and β-adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-A-ergic, opiate and nitrergic neurotransmissions. However, we have little evidence about the action of orexin B on memory processes and the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of neurotransmitters in this action in rats. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with the selective orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist, EMPA; the γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, the bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone; the non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; the nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Our results demonstrate that orexin B can improve learning, consolidation of memory and retrieval. EMPA reversed completely the action of orexin B on memory consolidation. Bicuculline blocked fully; naloxone, nitro-l-arginine, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol attenuated the orexin B-induced memory consolidation, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. These data suggest that orexin B improves memory functions through OX2R and GABA-ergic, opiate, nitrergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions are also involved in this action.

  6. Reelin secretion from glutamatergic neurons in culture is independent from neurotransmitter regulation.

    PubMed

    Lacor, P N; Grayson, D R; Auta, J; Sugaya, I; Costa, E; Guidotti, A

    2000-03-28

    Reelin (Reln) is a glycoprotein that in postnatal and adult mammalian brain is believed to be secreted from telencephalic GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar glutamatergic granule neurons into the extracellular matrix. To address the question of whether Reln neurosecretion occurs via a regulated or a constitutive process, we exposed postnatal rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) maintained in culture for 7-9 days to: (i) 100 microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in a Mg(+2)-free medium to stimulate NMDA-selective glutamate receptors and Ca(2+)-dependent neurotransmitter release, (ii) 50 mM KCl to depolarize the cells and elicit Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis, (iii) 10-100 microM nicotine to activate excocytosis by nicotinic receptors present in these cells, (iv) 10 microM 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2, 3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide in combination with 10 microM dizocilpine to block alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid- and NMDA-preferring glutamate receptors activated by endogenously released glutamate, or (v) EGTA (5 mM) to virtually eliminate extracellular Ca(2+) and block Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis. Although, CGNs express and secrete Reln (measured by quantitative immunoblotting), none of the above-mentioned conditions that control regulated exocytosis alters the stores or the rate of Reln release. In contrast, application of either: (i) a Reln antisense oligonucleotide (5'-GCAATGTGCAGGGAAATG-3') (10 microM) that reduces Reln biosynthesis or (ii) brefeldin A (5 x 10(-5) M), an inhibitor of the traffic of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi network, sharply curtail the rate of Reln secretion. Because, in subcellular fractionation studies, we have shown that Reln is not contained in synaptic vesicles, these data suggest that Reln secretion from CGNs does not require Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis, but probably is related to a Reln pool stored in Golgi secretory vesicles mediating a constitutive secretory pathway.

  7. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations. PMID:26404311

  8. Neurotransmitters in the human and nonhuman primate basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Haber, S N

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new molecules, particularly peptides, have been identified as putative neurotransmitters. The basal ganglia, is especially rich in a number of classical transmitter molecules, amino acids and neuropeptides considered to function in neurotransmission. These include: the well-described terminal fields in the striatum which originate from the brain stem and contain the monoamines, dopamine and serotonin; amino acid containing axons projecting from the cortex and thalamus; striatal cholinergic and peptide-positive interneurons; and amino acid and peptide containing projection neurons to the globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Two amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, are considered to provide excitatory input to the striatum while gamma aminobutyric acid is thought to mediate inhibitory output. Neuropeptides which are richly concentrated in the basal ganglia include, enkephalin, dynorphin, substance P, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and cholincystokinease. Changes in many of these peptide levels have recently been associated with a number of basal ganglia disorders.

  9. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong M.; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q.; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations. PMID:26404311

  10. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-09-23

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  11. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Hakeem O; Krantz, David E

    2013-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H(+) Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1).

  12. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine ☆

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H+ Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1). PMID:23506877

  13. Mimicking subsecond neurotransmitter dynamics with femtosecond laser stimulated nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takashi; Chin, Catherine; Myint, David Mo Aung; Tan, Eng Wui; Hale, Peter John; Krishna M, Bala Murali; Reynolds, John N J; Wickens, Jeff; Dani, Keshav M

    2014-06-23

    Existing nanoscale chemical delivery systems target diseased cells over long, sustained periods of time, typically through one-time, destructive triggering. Future directions lie in the development of fast and robust techniques capable of reproducing the pulsatile chemical activity of living organisms, thereby allowing us to mimic biofunctionality. Here, we demonstrate that by applying programmed femtosecond laser pulses to robust, nanoscale liposome structures containing dopamine, we achieve sub-second, controlled release of dopamine--a key neurotransmitter of the central nervous system--thereby replicating its release profile in the brain. The fast delivery system provides a powerful new interface with neural circuits, and to the larger range of biological functions that operate on this short timescale.

  14. Clinical neuroanatomy and neurotransmitter-mediated regulation of penile erection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Junyang; Jo, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Hyunseob; Jeong, Na Young

    2014-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has an adverse impact on men's quality of life. Penile erection, which is regulated by nerves that are innervated into the erectile tissue, can be affected by functional or anatomical trauma of the perineal region, including specific structures of the penis, causing ED. Penile erection is neurologically controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the neurogenic structure of the erectile tissue and the types of neurotransmitters involved in the penile erection process. Here, we highlight the basic clinical anatomy and erectile function of the penis. Understanding the clinical connotation of the relationship between penile erectile structure and function may provide fresh insights for identifying the main mechanisms involved in ED and help develop surgical techniques for the treatment of ED.

  15. Skeletal Fragility in Endogenous Hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Delgado, Adriano; Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of endogenous hypercortisolism, and fragility fractures may be the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Fractures involve more frequently the vertebrae and may occur in 30-50% of the patients exposed to glucocorticoid excess, in close relationship with severity and duration of hypercortisolism. Although improvement of bone mineral density was reported after resolution of hypercortisolism, there are patients with persistently high fracture risk after the cure of hypercortisolism, and other patients in whom the resolution of hypercortisolism may take a long time, implying a multistep therapeutic approach. Since vertebral fractures tend to occur early during the natural history of disease, a skeletal-specific approach should be undertaken in these patients; however, the cost-effectiveness of this approach is still largely unknown since data on effectiveness and safety of bone-active drugs in endogenous hypercortisolism are scarce. PMID:27210111

  16. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2013.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-sixth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2013 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses.

  17. A new role for GABA: inhibition of tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Arturo

    2003-04-01

    GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, participates outside the CNS in diverse functions such as platelet aggregation and the acrosomal reaction in spermatozoa. A recent study now demonstrates that GABA inhibits the migration of colon carcinoma cells, paving the way to the development of specific pharmacological agents that delay or inhibit invasion and metastasis of various cancer types.

  18. Endogenous Protease Activation of ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Johnson, John P.; Bridges, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous serine proteases have been reported to control the reabsorption of Na+ by kidney- and lung-derived epithelial cells via stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In this study we investigated the effects of aprotinin on ENaC single channel properties using transepithelial fluctuation analysis in the amphibian kidney epithelium, A6. Aprotinin caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition (84 ± 10.5%) in the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport (INa) with a time constant of 18 min and half maximal inhibition constant of 1 μM. Analysis of amiloride analogue blocker–induced fluctuations in INa showed linear rate–concentration plots with identical blocker on and off rates in control and aprotinin-inhibited conditions. Verification of open-block kinetics allowed for the use of a pulse protocol method (Helman, S.I., X. Liu, K. Baldwin, B.L. Blazer-Yost, and W.J. Els. 1998. Am. J. Physiol. 274:C947–C957) to study the same cells under different conditions as well as the reversibility of the aprotinin effect on single channel properties. Aprotinin caused reversible changes in all three single channel properties but only the change in the number of open channels was consistent with the inhibition of INa. A 50% decrease in INa was accompanied by 50% increases in the single channel current and open probability but an 80% decrease in the number of open channels. Washout of aprotinin led to a time-dependent restoration of INa as well as the single channel properties to the control, pre-aprotinin, values. We conclude that protease regulation of INa is mediated by changes in the number of open channels in the apical membrane. The increase in the single channel current caused by protease inhibition can be explained by a hyperpolarization of the apical membrane potential as active Na+ channels are retrieved. The paradoxical increase in channel open probability caused by protease inhibition will require further

  19. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN BIOMEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are important biological molecules that are essential to many neurophysiological processes including memory, cognition, and behavioral states. The development of analytical methodologies to accurately detect neurotransmitters is of great importance in neurological and biological research. Specifically designed microelectrodes or microbiosensors have demonstrated potential for rapid, real-time measurements with high spatial resolution. Such devices can facilitate study of the role and mechanism of action of neurotransmitters and can find potential uses in biomedicine. This paper reviews the current status and recent advances in the development and application of electrochemical sensors for the detection of small-molecule neurotransmitters. Measurement challenges and opportunities of electroanalytical methods to advance study and understanding of neurotransmitters in various biological models and disease conditions are discussed. PMID:26973348

  20. Dynamic equilibrium of endogenous selenium nanoparticles in selenite-exposed cancer cells: a deep insight into the interaction between endogenous SeNPs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Chen, Song-Can; Xiao, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Elemental selenium (Se) was recently found to exist as endogenous nanoparticles (i.e., SeNPs) in selenite-exposed cancer cells. By sequestrating critical intracellular proteins, SeNPs appear capable of giving rise to multiple cytotoxicity mechanisms including inhibition of glycolysis, glycolysis-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, microtubule depolymerization and inhibition of autophagy. In this work, we reveal a dynamic equilibrium of endogenous SeNP assembly and disassembly in selenite-exposed H157 cells. Endogenous SeNPs are observed both in the cytoplasm and in organelles. There is an increase in endogenous SeNPs between 24 h and 36 h, and a decrease between 36 h and 72 h according to transmission electron microscopy results and UV-Vis measurements. These observations imply that elemental Se in SeNPs could be oxidized back into selenite by scavenging superoxide radicals and ultimately re-reduced into selenide; then the assembly and disassembly of SeNPs proceed simultaneously with the sequestration and release of SeNP high-affinity proteins. There is also a possibility that the reduction of elemental Se to selenide pathway may lie in selenite-exposed cancer cells, which results in the assembly and disassembly of endogenous SeNPs. Genome-wide expression analysis results show that endogenous SeNPs significantly altered the expression of 504 genes, compared to the control. The endogenous SeNPs induced mitochondrial impairment and decreasing of the annexin A2 level can lead to inhibition of cancer cell invasion and migration. This dynamic flux of endogenous SeNPs amplifies their cytotoxic potential in cancer cells, thus provide a starting point to design more efficient intracellular self-assembling systems for overcoming multidrug resistance. PMID:26456389

  1. Repeated immobilization stress alters rat hippocampal and prefrontal cortical morphology in parallel with endogenous agmatine and arginine decarboxylase levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meng-Yang; Wang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Jingjing; Feng, Yang-Zheng; Regunathan, Soundar; Bissette, Garth

    2008-01-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous amine derived from decarboxylation of L-arginine catalyzed by arginine decarboxylase, has been proposed as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain. In the present study we examined whether agmatine has neuroprotective effects against repeated immobilization-induced morphological changes in brain tissues and possible effects of immobilization stress on endogenous agmatine levels and arginine decarboxylase expression in rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to two hour immobilization stress daily for seven days. This paradigm significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels, and the glutamate efflux in the hippocampus as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Immunohistochemical staining with β-tubulin III showed that repeated immobilization caused marked morphological alterations in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex that were prevented by simultaneous treatment with agmatine (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Likewise, endogenous agmatine levels measured by high performance liquid chromatography in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and hypothalamus were significantly increased by immobilization, as compared to controls. The increased endogenous agmatine levels, ranging from 92% to 265% of controls, were accompanied by a significant increase of arginine decarboxylase protein levels in the same regions. These results demonstrate that administration of exogenous agmatine protects the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex against neuronal insults caused by repeated immobilization. The parallel increase in endogenous brain agmatine and arginine decarboxylase protein levels triggered by repeated immobilization indicates that the endogenous agmatine system may play an important role in adaptation to stress as a potential neuronal self-protection mechanism. PMID:18832001

  2. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  3. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  4. Receptors on lymphocytes for endogenous splenic glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, M G; Parish, C R

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that lymphocytes carry cell surface receptors for sulphated polysaccharides (SPS), and SPS recognition may play a role in lymphocyte migration and positioning in vivo. This paper describes attempts to isolate and characterize the endogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of murine spleen and determine whether splenic lymphocytes carry cell surface receptors for these GAGs. A procedure was devised for isolating GAGs from murine spleen in good yield and high purity and the GAG preparation was then radiolabelled for subsequent binding studies. It was found that the splenic GAGs bound to murine splenocytes in a saturable, rapid and reversible manner with only a small subpopulation of the splenic GAG preparation being involved in binding. This reactive species was chondroitinase ABC-resistant and nitrous acid-sensitive, indicative of a heparan sulphate/heparin-like molecule. Furthermore, using immunofluorescent flow cytometry studies it was demonstrated that the majority of spleen cells have receptors for these GAGs. Subsequent ion-exchange fractionation and SDS-PAGE analysis of chondroitinase ABC-resistant GAGs confirmed that the splenic GAG recognized by splenocytes was a heparan sulphate/heparin molecule of approximately 20,000 MW with a binding affinity to splenocytes of approximately 5 X 10(-8) M. Additional binding inhibition studies indicated two possible binding sites for splenic GAGs on the splenocyte surface, one being fully inhibited by a range of SPS such as heparin (both coagulant and anticoagulant forms), pentosan sulphate, fucoidan, dextran sulphate, lambda- and iota-carrageenan, and the second being partially inhibited by kappa-carrageenan. The possible relevance of these heparan sulphate/heparin receptors on splenocytes to lymphocyte positioning in vivo is discussed. Images Figure 6 PMID:2541072

  5. [Preliminary research on multi-neurotransmitters' change regulation in 120 depression patients' brains].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Qing, Xue-Mei; Pan, Yan-Shu; Xu, Feng-Quan; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-04-01

    In view of the effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of clinical depression, the mechanism is not clear, this study attempts to research the cause of depression in a complex situation to lay the foundation for the next step of TCM curative effect evaluation. Based on the brain wave of 120 depression patients and 40 ordinary person, the change regulation of acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters in the whole and various encephalic regions' multi-neurotransmitters of depression patients-serotonin are analysed by search of encephalo-telex (SET) system, which lays the foundation for the diagnosis of depression. The result showed that: contrased with the normal person group, the mean value of the six neurotransmitters in depression patients group are: (1) in the whole encephalic region of depression patients group the dopamine fall (P < 0.05), and in the double centralregions, right temporal region and right parietal region distinct fall (P < 0.01); (2) in the right temporal region of depression patients group the serotonin rise (P < 0.05); (3) in the right central region, left parietal region of depression patients group the acetylcholine fall (P < 0.05), left rear temporal region fall obviously (P < 0.01). The correlation research between antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters and neurotransmitters: (1) the three antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters-serotonin and dopamine, acetylcholine and norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters, in ordinary person group and depression patients group are characterizeed by middle or strong negative correlation. Serotonin and dopamine, which are characterized by weak negative correlation in the right rear temporal region of ordinary person group, are characterized by strong negative correlation in the other encephalic regions and the whole encephalic (ordinary person group except the right rear temporal region

  6. Toxic effects of methoxychlor in rat striatum: modifications in several neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Cabaleiro, T; Caride, A; Gutiérrez, A; Esquifino, A I

    2007-06-01

    Neurotoxic effects of methoxychlor (MTX) are poorly understood at present. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible effects of MTX in norepinephrine, dopamine and amino acid contents and serotonin turnover in rat striatum. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 25 mg/kg/day of MTX in sesame oil or vehicle only for 30 days. The neurotransmitters of interest were measured in the striatum by HPLC. MTX decreased norepinephrine and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) content and serotonin turnover (measured as 5-HIAA/serotonin ratio), and increased glutamate and GABA concentrations. However, the content of serotonin, aspartate, glutamine and taurine was not modified by MTX exposure. These data suggest that MTX exposure inhibits norepinephrine synthesis and serotonin metabolism. The inhibitory effect on norepinephrine could be explained, at least in part, by the increase of both GABA and glutamate contents. Further studies are needed to understand the effects of MTX on serotonin. Also a disruptive effect of MTX on the metabolisms of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine and GABA emerges.

  7. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by ≈1,000–17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation. PMID:17640910

  8. [Effect of cyanamide on the level of endogenous ethanol in the liver of normal rats and in hypocorticism].

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Iu A; Satanovskaia, V I; Shishkin, S N; Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M

    1988-01-01

    The rat liver endogenous ethanol level was found to increase under inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenases by cyanamide. Adrenalectomy results in a decrease of the liver endogenous ethanol content and abolishes cyanamide effect on this index. One of the mechanisms of cyanamide toxic effect may be accumulation of different aldehydes including acetaldehyde.

  9. Adrenal-mediated endogenous metabolites inhibit puberty in female mice.

    PubMed

    Novotny, M; Jemiolo, B; Harvey, S; Wiesler, D; Marchlewska-Koj, A

    1986-02-14

    While assessing a potential role of adrenal glands in the production of the hitherto unidentified puberty-delaying pheromone of female mice, the urinary volatile profiles of normal and adrenalectomized animals were quantitatively compared. Six components, whose concentrations were depressed after adrenalectomy, were identified: 2-heptanone, trans-5-hepten-2-one, trans-4-hepten-2-one, n-pentyl acetate, cis-2-penten-1-yl acetate, and 2,5-dimethylpyrazine. When these laboratory-synthesized chemicals were added (in their natural concentrations) to either previously inactive urine from adrenalectomized females or plain water, the biological activity was fully restored. PMID:3945805

  10. Plasma neurotransmitters and cortisol in chronic illness: role of stress.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Lechin, A; Orozco, B; Lechin, M; Báez, S; Rada, I; León, G; Acosta, E

    1994-01-01

    We routinely measured plasma neurotransmitters and hormone levels in order to investigate the role of stress on many types of diseases. In this study, we present results obtained from patients with severe chronic diseases. The study sample consisted of 88 patients (asthmatics, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, chronic active hepatitis, chronic relapsing hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia, systemic lupus erithematous, and rheumatoid arthritis), and their respective controls. Noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (Ad), dopamine (DA), platelet-serotonin (pS), free-serotonin (fS), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol (CRT) were determined during both exacerbation and improvement periods. A profile compatible with uncoping stress disorder (raised NA-Ad-DA + fS + CRT as well as low pS and NA/Ad ratio) was found during exacerbation periods when compared with improvement, as seen in controls. However, during improvement periods the neurochemical profile remained significantly different from that of normal controls. The neurochemical plus hormonal plasma profiles registered in chronic illness, both during exacerbation and improvement periods, strongly suggest that an uncoping stress mechanism underlies diseases of these patients. PMID:7996062

  11. Polyethylenimine carbon nanotube fiber electrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Jacobs, Christopher B; Trikantzopoulos, Elefterios; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  12. REM Sleep at its Core - Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fraigne, Jimmy J; Torontali, Zoltan A; Snow, Matthew B; Peever, John H

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  13. Effects of neurotransmitters on calcium efflux from cultured glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarewicz, J.W.; Kanje, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various neurotransmitters and cyclic nucleotides on 45Ca2+ efflux in cultured human glioma cells were investigated. Glutamate and glycine, but not GABA, stimulated 45Ca2+ release from the cells. Stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors but not alpha-adrenergic receptors also increased 45Ca2+ efflux. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbachol had the same effect. The stimulatory effect of carbachol was abolished in the presence of either atropine or hexamethonium. C-AMP and c-GMP increased the 45Ca2+ efflux, suggesting that these agents are involved in the transmitter-stimulated release of 45Ca2+ from the cell. Kinetic analysis of the efflux revealed four calcium compartments. The carbachol-stimulated efflux represented a net release of calcium and could be ascribed to the slowest compartment. The physiological role of the transmitter-stimulated calcium release is discussed in terms of calcium-regulated stimulus-response coupling in glial-neural interaction during excitation.

  14. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens.

  15. Benefits of Neuronal Preferential Systemic Gene Therapy for Neurotransmitter Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Liu, Wen-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Chia-Hao; Hu, Meng-Kai; Chen, Pin-Wen; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease that impairs synthesis of dopamine and serotonin. Children with AADC deficiency exhibit severe motor, behavioral, and autonomic dysfunctions. We previously generated an IVS6+4A>T knock-in mouse model of AADC deficiency (Ddc(KI) mice) and showed that gene therapy at the neonatal stage can rescue this phenotype. In the present study, we extended this treatment to systemic therapy on young mice. After intraperitoneal injection of AADC viral vectors into 7-day-old Ddc(KI) mice, the treated mice exhibited improvements in weight gain, survival, motor function, autonomic function, and behavior. The yfAAV9/3-Syn-I-mAADC-treated mice showed greater neuronal transduction and higher brain dopamine levels than AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice, whereas AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice exhibited hyperactivity. Therefore, neurotransmitter-deficient animals can be rescued at a young age using systemic gene therapy, although a vector for preferential neuronal expression may be necessary to avoid hyperactivity caused by this treatment. PMID:26137853

  16. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Peever, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  17. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Go, Mary Ann; To, Minh-Son; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Stephen; Bachor, Hans-A; Stuart, Greg J; Daria, Vincent R

    2013-01-01

    Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions. PMID:24348330

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter metabolites in neurologically normal infants and children.

    PubMed

    Langlais, P J; Walsh, F X; Bird, E D; Levy, H L

    1985-03-01

    Significant inverse correlations with age were observed for free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in CSF from 75 neurologically normal newborns, infants, and children aged 1 day to 10 years. The concentration of free MHPG decreased rapidly in early neonatal life and was reduced to near adult levels by 8 to 9 months of age. Adult levels of 5-HIAA were observed at about 4 years of age whereas HVA concentrations were still above adult levels at 10 years of age. Data from 0- to 1-month-old premature (28 to 32 weeks of gestation) and full-term (37 weeks of gestation) infants revealed marked changes in HVA and 5-HIAA concentrations which were related to postconceptional rather than postnatal age. This study demonstrates a previously undetected age effect on CSF MHPG concentration during the neonatal period and provides valuable normal data that are necessary for the interpretation of CSF monoamine metabolites in infants and children with hyperphenylalaninemia and other neurologic disease involving monoamine neurotransmitters.

  19. Benefits of Neuronal Preferential Systemic Gene Therapy for Neurotransmitter Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Liu, Wen-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Chia-Hao; Hu, Meng-Kai; Chen, Pin-Wen; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease that impairs synthesis of dopamine and serotonin. Children with AADC deficiency exhibit severe motor, behavioral, and autonomic dysfunctions. We previously generated an IVS6+4A>T knock-in mouse model of AADC deficiency (Ddc(KI) mice) and showed that gene therapy at the neonatal stage can rescue this phenotype. In the present study, we extended this treatment to systemic therapy on young mice. After intraperitoneal injection of AADC viral vectors into 7-day-old Ddc(KI) mice, the treated mice exhibited improvements in weight gain, survival, motor function, autonomic function, and behavior. The yfAAV9/3-Syn-I-mAADC-treated mice showed greater neuronal transduction and higher brain dopamine levels than AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice, whereas AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice exhibited hyperactivity. Therefore, neurotransmitter-deficient animals can be rescued at a young age using systemic gene therapy, although a vector for preferential neuronal expression may be necessary to avoid hyperactivity caused by this treatment.

  20. Benefits of Neuronal Preferential Systemic Gene Therapy for Neurotransmitter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Liu, Wen-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Chia-Hao; Hu, Meng-Kai; Chen, Pin-Wen; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease that impairs synthesis of dopamine and serotonin. Children with AADC deficiency exhibit severe motor, behavioral, and autonomic dysfunctions. We previously generated an IVS6+4A>T knock-in mouse model of AADC deficiency (DdcKI mice) and showed that gene therapy at the neonatal stage can rescue this phenotype. In the present study, we extended this treatment to systemic therapy on young mice. After intraperitoneal injection of AADC viral vectors into 7-day-old DdcKI mice, the treated mice exhibited improvements in weight gain, survival, motor function, autonomic function, and behavior. The yfAAV9/3-Syn-I-mAADC-treated mice showed greater neuronal transduction and higher brain dopamine levels than AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice, whereas AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice exhibited hyperactivity. Therefore, neurotransmitter-deficient animals can be rescued at a young age using systemic gene therapy, although a vector for preferential neuronal expression may be necessary to avoid hyperactivity caused by this treatment. PMID:26137853

  1. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Go, Mary Ann; To, Minh-Son; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Stephen; Bachor, Hans-A.; Stuart, Greg J.; Daria, Vincent R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions. PMID:24348330

  2. Microfabricated sampling probes for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Hee; Slaney, Thomas R; Hower, Robert W; Kennedy, Robert T

    2013-04-16

    Microfabricated fluidic systems have emerged as a powerful approach for chemical analysis. Relatively unexplored is the use of microfabrication to create sampling probes. We have developed a sampling probe microfabricated in Si by bulk micromachining and lithography. The probe is 70 μm wide by 85 μm thick by 11 mm long and incorporates two buried channels that are 20 μm in diameter. The tip of the probe has two 20 μm holes where fluid is ejected or collected for sampling. Utility of the probe was demonstrated by sampling from the brain of live rats. For sampling, artificial cerebral spinal fluid was infused in through one channel at 50 nL/min while sample was withdrawn at the same flow rate from the other channel. Analysis of resulting fractions collected every 20 min from the striatum of rats by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry demonstrated reliable detection of 17 neurotransmitters and metabolites. The small probe dimensions suggest it is less perturbing to tissue and can be used to sample smaller brain nuclei than larger sampling devices, such as microdialysis probes. This sampling probe may have other applications such as sampling from cells in culture. The use of microfabrication may also enable incorporation of electrodes for electrochemical or electrophysiological recording and other channels that enable more complex sample preparation on the device. PMID:23547793

  3. REM Sleep at its Core - Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fraigne, Jimmy J; Torontali, Zoltan A; Snow, Matthew B; Peever, John H

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  4. The blockade of the neurotransmitter release apparatus by botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Sergio; Montecucco, Cesare

    2014-03-01

    The high toxicity of the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A to G), together with their specificity and reversibility, includes them in the list A of potential bioterrorism weapons and, at the same time, among the therapeutics of choice for a variety of human syndromes. They invade nerve terminals and cleave specifically the three proteins which form the heterotrimeric SNAP REceptors (SNARE) complex that mediates neurotransmitter release. The BoNT-induced cleavage of the SNARE proteins explains by itself the paralysing activity of the BoNTs because the truncated proteins cannot form the SNARE complex. However, in the case of BoNT/A, the most widely used toxin in therapy, additional factors come into play as it only removes a few residues from the synaptosomal associate protein of 25 kDa C-terminus and this results in a long duration of action. To explain these facts and other experimental data, we present here a model for the assembly of the neuroexocytosis apparatus in which Synaptotagmin and Complexin first assist the zippering of the SNARE complex, and then stabilize and clamp an octameric radial assembly of the SNARE complexes.

  5. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peizhong

    2011-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART. PMID:21785720

  6. Synaptic scaling stabilizes persistent activity driven by asynchronous neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Volman, Vladislav; Gerkin, Richard C

    2011-04-01

    Small networks of cultured hippocampal neurons respond to transient stimulation with rhythmic network activity (reverberation) that persists for several seconds, constituting an in vitro model of synchrony, working memory, and seizure. This mode of activity has been shown theoretically and experimentally to depend on asynchronous neurotransmitter release (an essential feature of the developing hippocampus) and is supported by a variety of developing neuronal networks despite variability in the size of populations (10-200 neurons) and in patterns of synaptic connectivity. It has previously been reported in computational models that "small-world" connection topology is ideal for the propagation of similar modes of network activity, although this has been shown only for neurons utilizing synchronous (phasic) synaptic transmission. We investigated how topological constraints on synaptic connectivity could shape the stability of reverberations in small networks that also use asynchronous synaptic transmission. We found that reverberation duration in such networks was resistant to changes in topology and scaled poorly with network size. However, normalization of synaptic drive, by reducing the variance of synaptic input across neurons, stabilized reverberation in such networks. Our results thus suggest that the stability of both normal and pathological states in developing networks might be shaped by variance-normalizing constraints on synaptic drive. We offer an experimental prediction for the consequences of such regulation on the behavior of small networks.

  7. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  8. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  9. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  10. Crosstalk among electrical activity, trophic factors and morphogenetic proteins in the regulation of neurotransmitter phenotype specification.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Belgacem, Yesser H

    2016-04-01

    Morphogenetic proteins are responsible for patterning the embryonic nervous system by enabling cell proliferation that will populate all the neural structures and by specifying neural progenitors that imprint different identities in differentiating neurons. The adoption of specific neurotransmitter phenotypes is crucial for the progression of neuronal differentiation, enabling neurons to connect with each other and with target tissues. Preliminary neurotransmitter specification originates from morphogen-driven neural progenitor specification through the combinatorial expression of transcription factors according to morphogen concentration gradients, which progressively restrict the identity that born neurons adopt. However, neurotransmitter phenotype is not immutable, instead trophic factors released from target tissues and environmental stimuli change expression of neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzymes and specific vesicular transporters modifying neuronal neurotransmitter identity. Here we review studies identifying the mechanisms of catecholaminergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic and serotonergic early specification and of the plasticity of these neurotransmitter phenotypes during development and in the adult nervous system. The emergence of spontaneous electrical activity in developing neurons recruits morphogenetic proteins in the process of neurotransmitter phenotype plasticity, which ultimately equips the nervous system and the whole organism with adaptability for optimal performance in a changing environment. PMID:26686293

  11. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies. PMID:24009559

  12. Endogenous nociceptin system involvement in stress responses and anxiety behavior.

    PubMed

    Fulford, Allison Jane

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underpinning stress-related behavior and dysfunctional events leading to the expression of neuropsychiatric disorders remain incompletely understood. Novel candidates involved in the neuromodulation of stress, mediated both peripherally and centrally, provide opportunities for improved understanding of the neurobiological basis of stress disorders and may represent targets for novel therapeutic development. This chapter provides an overview of the mechanisms by which the opioid-related peptide, nociceptin, regulates the neuroendocrine stress response and stress-related behavior. In our research, we have employed nociceptin receptor antagonists to investigate endogenous nociceptin function in tonic control over stress-induced activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Nociceptin demonstrates a wide range of functions, including modulation of psychological and inflammatory stress responses, modulation of neurotransmitter release, immune homeostasis, in addition to anxiety and cognitive behaviors. Greater appreciation of the complexity of limbic-hypothalamic neuronal networks, together with attention toward gender differences and the roles of steroid hormones, provides an opportunity for deeper understanding of the importance of the nociceptin system in the context of the neurobiology of stress and behavior.

  13. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Erin M.G.; Anderson, David G.R.; Florang, Virginia R.; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D.; Doorn, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites towards ALDH were investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition. PMID:20954713

  14. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase 2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Allen, Erin M G; Anderson, David G R; Florang, Virginia R; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2010-11-15

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites toward ALDH was investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. The ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, as compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition.

  15. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  16. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  17. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  18. Chronic infusion of enalaprilat into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy by restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Qing; Qi, Jie; Su, Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Yue, Li-Ying; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Qin, Da-Nian

    2014-02-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We hypothesized that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension via restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines. Rats underwent subcutaneous infusions of ANG II or saline and bilateral PVN infusions of ACE inhibitor enalaprilat (ENL, 2.5 μg/h) or vehicle for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in higher mean arterial pressure and cardiac hypertrophy as indicated by increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio, whole heart weight/tibia length ratio, left ventricular weight/tibia length ratio, and mRNA expressions of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide and beta-myosin heavy chain. These ANG II-infused rats had higher PVN levels of glutamate, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and lower PVN levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, interleukin (IL)-10 and the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), and higher plasma levels of PICs, norepinephrine and aldosterone, and lower plasma IL-10, and higher renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, PVN treatment with ENL attenuated these changes. PVN microinjection of ANG II induced increases in IL-1β and IL-6, and a decrease in IL-10 in the PVN, and pretreatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonist losartan attenuated these changes. These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the PVN, and PVN inhibition of the RAS restores neurotransmitters and cytokines in the PVN, thereby attenuating ANG II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Chronic ANG II infusion results in sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac hypertrophy. • PVN inhibition of ACE

  19. Endogenous Auxin and Ethylene in Pellia (Bryophyta) 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.; Harrison, Marcia A.; Taylor, Jane; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid and ethylene in bryophyte tissue was tentatively demonstrated using gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and double-standard isotope dilution techniques. Rapidly elongating stalks (or setae) of Pellia epiphylla (L.) Corda sporophytes contain approximately 2.5 to 2.9 micrograms per gram fresh weight of putative free IAA. Ethylene released by setae increases during growth from 0.027 to 0.035 nanoliter per seta per hour. Application of 5 microliters per liter ethylene inhibits auxin-stimulated elongation growth of this tissue, a result which suggests that both endogenously produced compounds act in tandem as natural growth modulators. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663227

  20. Acute effects of tianeptine on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Hernández, Gerardo; Orozco, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Simon; Baez, Scarlet

    2006-03-01

    Tianeptine is a serotonin-uptake enhancer drug whose antidepressant effectiveness is based on its ability to reduce rather than increase serotonin availability at the synaptic cleft. This paradoxical neuropharmacological mechanism has raised doubt among neuropharmacologists and psychiatrists as to the role of tianeptine as a trusty-reliable antidepressant drug. This controversial issue led us to investigate the acute effects of a single, oral dose (12.5 mg) of this drug on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters in 50 healthy subjects. The drug provoked a striking and significant reduction of plasma noradrenaline (NA) and plasma serotonin (f-5-HT) while it increased plasma dopamine (DA) and platelet serotonin (p-5-HT) concentrations within the 4-h study period. No adrenaline (Ad) changes were registered. The NA/Ad ratio and the f-5-HT/p-5-HT ratio showed significant reduction throughout the test. Finally, although diastolic blood pressure (DBP) showed significant decrease, neither systolic blood pressure (SBP) nor heart rate (HR) showed significant change. These findings are consistent with the postulation that tianeptine reduces both neural sympathetic activity and parasympathetic activity without affecting adrenal sympathetic activity, enabling us to discuss the possible mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of tianeptine. The well-known fact that major depressed patients always show raised NA plus lower than normal p-5-HT levels, both disorders which are normalized by tianeptine, gives neurochemical support to the clinical improvement triggered by the drug in these patients. Summarizing, the results presented in this study demonstrate that tianeptine triggers significant reduction of circulating noradrenaline and plasma serotonin while increasing circulating dopamine and platelet serotonin. Other possible neuropharmacological effects are also discussed.

  1. Functional differences between neurotransmitter binding sites of muscle acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Bruhova, Iva; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Gupta, Shaweta; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    A muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has two neurotransmitter binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αε (adult) or αγ (fetal) subunit interfaces. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the effects of mutations of five conserved aromatic residues at each site with regard to their contribution to the difference in free energy of agonist binding to active versus resting receptors (ΔGB1). The two binding sites behave independently in both adult and fetal AChRs. For four different agonists, including ACh and choline, ΔGB1 is ∼-2 kcal/mol more favorable at αγ compared with at αε and αδ. Only three of the aromatics contribute significantly to ΔGB1 at the adult sites (αY190, αY198, and αW149), but all five do so at αγ (as well as αY93 and γW55). γW55 makes a particularly large contribution only at αγ that is coupled energetically to those contributions of some of the α-subunit aromatics. The hydroxyl and benzene groups of loop C residues αY190 and αY198 behave similarly with regard to ΔGB1 at all three kinds of site. ACh binding energies estimated from molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with experimental values from electrophysiology and suggest that the αγ site is more compact, better organized, and less dynamic than αε and αδ. We speculate that the different sensitivities of the fetal αγ site versus the adult αε and αδ sites to choline and ACh are important for the proper maturation and function of the neuromuscular synapse. PMID:25422413

  2. Reelin secretion from glutamatergic neurons in culture is independent from neurotransmitter regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lacor, Pascale N.; Grayson, Dennis R.; Auta, James; Sugaya, Ikuko; Costa, Erminio; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2000-01-01

    Reelin (Reln) is a glycoprotein that in postnatal and adult mammalian brain is believed to be secreted from telencephalic GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar glutamatergic granule neurons into the extracellular matrix. To address the question of whether Reln neurosecretion occurs via a regulated or a constitutive process, we exposed postnatal rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) maintained in culture for 7–9 days to: (i) 100 μM N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in a Mg+2-free medium to stimulate NMDA-selective glutamate receptors and Ca2+-dependent neurotransmitter release, (ii) 50 mM KCl to depolarize the cells and elicit Ca2+-dependent exocytosis, (iii) 10–100 μM nicotine to activate excocytosis by nicotinic receptors present in these cells, (iv) 10 μM 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide in combination with 10 μM dizocilpine to block α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid- and NMDA-preferring glutamate receptors activated by endogenously released glutamate, or (v) EGTA (5 mM) to virtually eliminate extracellular Ca2+ and block Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Although, CGNs express and secrete Reln (measured by quantitative immunoblotting), none of the above-mentioned conditions that control regulated exocytosis alters the stores or the rate of Reln release. In contrast, application of either: (i) a Reln antisense oligonucleotide (5′-GCAATGTGCAGGGAAATG-3′) (10 μM) that reduces Reln biosynthesis or (ii) brefeldin A (5 × 10−5 M), an inhibitor of the traffic of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi network, sharply curtail the rate of Reln secretion. Because, in subcellular fractionation studies, we have shown that Reln is not contained in synaptic vesicles, these data suggest that Reln secretion from CGNs does not require Ca2+-dependent exocytosis, but probably is related to a Reln pool stored in Golgi secretory vesicles mediating a constitutive secretory pathway. PMID:10725375

  3. The discovery of endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robin A

    2006-01-01

    When endogenous retroviruses (ERV) were discovered in the late 1960s, the Mendelian inheritance of retroviral genomes by their hosts was an entirely new concept. Indeed Howard M Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis enunciated in 1964 was not generally accepted, and reverse transcriptase was yet to be discovered. Nonetheless, the evidence that we accrued in the pre-molecular era has stood the test of time, and our hypothesis on ERV, which one reviewer described as 'impossible', proved to be correct. Here I recount some of the key observations in birds and mammals that led to the discovery of ERV, and comment on their evolution, cross-species dispersion, and what remains to be elucidated. PMID:17018135

  4. Endogenous Retroviruses and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Yuri; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Humans share about 99% of their genomic DNA with chimpanzees and bonobos; thus, the differences between these species are unlikely to be in gene content but could be caused by inherited changes in regulatory systems. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise ∼ 5% of the human genome. The LTRs of ERVs contain many regulatory sequences, such as promoters, enhancers, polyadenylation signals and factor-binding sites. Thus, they can influence the expression of nearby human genes. All known human-specific LTRs belong to the HERV-K (human ERV) family, the most active family in the human genome. It is likely that some of these ERVs could have integrated into regulatory regions of the human genome, and therefore could have had an impact on the expression of adjacent genes, which have consequently contributed to human evolution. This review discusses possible functional consequences of ERV integration in active coding regions. PMID:18629260

  5. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Cirnaru, Maria D.; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex. PMID:24904275

  6. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex.

    PubMed

    Cirnaru, Maria D; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex. PMID:24904275

  7. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex.

    PubMed

    Cirnaru, Maria D; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex.

  8. Botulinum neurotoxin C1 blocks neurotransmitter release by means of cleaving HPC-1/syntaxin.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, J; Chapman, E R; Yamasaki, S; Binz, T; Niemann, H; Jahn, R

    1993-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum produces several related neurotoxins that block exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals and that are responsible for the clinical manifestations of botulism. Recently, it was reported that botulinum neurotoxin type B as well as tetanus toxin act as zinc-dependent proteases that specifically cleave synaptobrevin, a membrane protein of synaptic vesicles (Link et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 189, 1017-1023; Schiavo et al., Nature, 359, 832-835). Here we report that inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum neurotoxin type C1 was associated with the proteolysis of HPC-1 (= syntaxin), a membrane protein present in axonal and synaptic membranes. Breakdown of HPC-1/syntaxin was selective since no other protein degradation was detectable. In vitro studies showed that the breakdown was due to a direct interaction between HPC-1/syntaxin and the toxin light chain which acts as a metallo-endoprotease. Toxin-induced cleavage resulted in the generation of a soluble fragment of HPC-1/syntaxin that is 2-4 kDa smaller than the native protein. When HPC-1/syntaxin was translated in vitro, cleavage occurred only when translation was performed in the presence of microsomes, although a full-length product was obtained in the absence of membranes. However, susceptibility to toxin cleavage was restored when the product of membrane-free translation was subsequently incorporated into artificial proteoliposomes. In addition, a translated form of HPC-1/syntaxin, which lacked the putative transmembrane domain at the C-terminus, was soluble and resistant to toxin action. We conclude that HPC-1/syntaxin is involved in exocytotic membrane fusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7901002

  9. Involvement of enzymatic degradation in the inactivation of tachykinin neurotransmitters in neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Yoshioka, K; Yanagisawa, M; Urayama, O; Kurihara, T; Hosoki, R; Saito, K; Otsuka, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The possible involvement of enzymatic degradation in the inactivation of tachykinin neurotransmitters was examined in the spinal cord of the neonatal rat. 2. The magnitude of substance P (SP)- or neurokinin A (NKA)-evoked depolarization of a lumbar ventral root in the isolated spinal cord preparation was increased by a mixture of peptidase inhibitors, consisting of actinonin (6 microM), arphamenine B (6 microM), bestatin (10 microM), captopril (10 microM) and thiorphan (0.3 microM). The mixture augmented the response to NKA more markedly than that to SP. 3. In the isolated spinal cord-cutaneous nerve preparation, the saphenous nerve-evoked slow depolarization of the L3 ventral root was augmented by the mixture of peptidase inhibitors in the presence of naloxone (0.5 microM) but not in the presence of both naloxone and a tachykinin receptor antagonist, GR71251 (5 microM). 4. Application of capsaicin (0.5 microM) for 6 min to the spinal cord evoked an increase in the release of SP from the spinal cord. The amount of SP released was significantly augmented by the mixture of peptidase inhibitors. 5. Synaptic membrane fractions were prepared from neonatal rat spinal cords. These fractions showed degrading activities for SP and NKA and the activities were inhibited by the mixture of peptidase inhibitors. The degrading activity for NKA was higher than that for SP and the inhibitory effect of the mixture for NKA was more marked than that for SP. Although some other fractions obtained from homogenates of spinal cords showed higher degrading activities for SP, these activities were insensitive to the mixture of peptidase inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7529113

  10. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  11. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  12. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Endogenous Respiration of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.; Cherry, John

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), and John Cherry. Influence of glutamic acid on the endogenous respiration of Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 91:546–550. 1966.—Amino acids serve as the major initial endogenous substrate for Bacillus subtilis. The endogenous activity of freshly harvested washed cells is high and falls off rapidly with time of shaking at 30 C to lower but still significant levels. The rate of O2 consumption after the addition of glutamic acid also decreases as the cells age, but more slowly than noted for endogenous respiration. When cells were fed glutamate as soon as possible after harvesting, an apparent stimulation of endogenous respiration was noted. However, endogenous activity was inhibited if the cell suspensions were shaken for at least 1 hr before addition of the glutamate. Similar results were obtained with glycerol or glucose as exogenous substrates. Variation in rates of respiration with age of the cells, inherent instability of B. subtilis, and possible utilization of substances initially excreted by the cells appear to account for the variations noted regarding the influence of an exogenous substrate on endogenous respiration. PMID:4956754

  13. Population aging and endogenous economic growth.

    PubMed

    Prettner, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the consequences of population aging for long-run economic growth perspectives. Our framework incorporates endogenous growth models and semi-endogenous growth models as special cases. We show that (1) increases in longevity have a positive impact on per capita output growth, (2) decreases in fertility have a negative impact on per capita output growth, (3) the positive longevity effect dominates the negative fertility effect in case of the endogenous growth framework, and (4) population aging fosters long-run growth in the endogenous growth framework, while its effect depends on the relative change between fertility and mortality in the semi-endogenous growth framework.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00148-012-0441-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  14. Neurotransmitter transporters in schistosomes: structure, function and prospects for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula; Patocka, Nicholas

    2013-12-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) play a fundamental role in the control of neurotransmitter signaling and homeostasis. Sodium symporters of the plasma membrane mediate the cellular uptake of neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, whereas proton-driven vesicular transporters sequester the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. Together these transporters control how much transmitter is released and how long it remains in the synaptic cleft, thereby regulating the intensity and duration of signaling. NTTs have been the subject of much research in mammals and there is growing interest in their activities among invertebrates as well. In this review we will focus our attention on NTTs of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni. Bloodflukes of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, a devastating disease that afflicts over 200 million people worldwide. Schistosomes have a well-developed nervous system and a rich diversity of neurotransmitters, including many of the small-molecule ("classical") neurotransmitters that normally employ NTTs in their mechanism of signaling. Recent advances in schistosome genomics have unveiled numerous NTTs in this parasite, some of which have now been cloned and characterized in vitro. Moreover new genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that NTTs are required for proper control of neuromuscular signaling and movement of the worm. Among these carriers are proteins that have been successfully targeted for drug discovery in other organisms, in particular sodium symporters for biogenic amine neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine. Our goal in this chapter is to review the current status of research on schistosome NTTs, with emphasis on biogenic amine sodium symporters, and to evaluate their potential for anti-schistosomal drug targeting. Through this discussion we hope to draw attention to this important superfamily of parasite proteins and to identify new

  15. Control of RFM strain endogenous retrovirus in RFM mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Tennant, R W; Otten, J A; Wang, T W; Liou, R S; Brown, A; Yang, W K

    1983-01-01

    RFM/Un mice express an endogenous type C retrovirus throughout their life span in many tissues; primary or established embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not express a virus but can be induced by exposure to 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. All of our sources yielded a single ecotropic virus (RFV) which appeared to be related more closely to the endogenous N-tropic virus (WN1802N) of BALB/c mice than to Gross leukemia virus on the basis of two-dimensional gel electropherograms of virion proteins. No xenotropic or recombinant viruses were isolated by cocultivation techniques. RFV is N-tropic, and RFM/Un cells possess the Fv-1n allele, as indicated by restriction of B-tropic virus and susceptibility to Gross strain N-tropic virus. However, RFM cells are highly resistant to RFV and other endogenous N-tropic viruses. This resistance is expressed by two-hit titration kinetics and by inhibition of viral linear duplex DNA formation. This is similar to the effects of the Fv-1 locus, but preliminary work has shown no apparent genetic linkage between the two restrictions. The relative strength of the restriction, the presence of a single class of ecotropic virus, and the absence of recombinant viruses suggest that in RFM mice virus is expressed only in cells in which it is induced and not by cell-to-cell transmission.

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions. PMID:24586439

  17. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  18. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  19. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-08-14

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection.

  20. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  1. Functional mechanisms of neurotransmitter transporters regulated by lipid-protein interactions of their terminal loops

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    The physiological functions of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) in reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve have been shown to be complemented by their involvement, together with non-plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, in the reverse transport of substrate (efflux) in response to psychostimulants. Recent experimental evidence implicates highly anionic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids in such functions of the serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters. Thus, for both SERT and DAT, neurotransmitter efflux has been shown to be strongly regulated by the presence of PIP2 lipids in the plasma membrane, and the electrostatic interaction of the N-terminal region of DAT with the negatively charged PIP2 lipids. We examine the experimentally established phenotypes in a structural context obtained from computational modeling based on recent crystallographic data. The results are shown to set the stage for a mechanistic understanding of physiological actions of neurotransmitter transporters in the NSS family of membrane proteins. PMID:25847498

  2. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic differentiation by proteins containing complement-related domains.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Minoru; Hama, Chihiro

    2011-02-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play central roles in basic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have revealed that some transmembrane and extracellular proteins bind to neurotransmitter receptors, forming protein complexes that are required for proper synaptic localization or gating of core receptor molecules. Consequently, the components of these complexes contribute to long-term potentiation, a process that is critical for learning and memory. Here, we review factors that regulate neurotransmitter receptors, with a focus on proteins containing CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) or CCP (complement control protein) domains, which are frequently found in complement system proteins. Proteins that contain these domains are structurally distinct from TARPs (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins), and may constitute new protein families that modulate either the localization or function of neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, other CCP domain-containing proteins participate in dendritic patterning and/or synaptic differentiation, although current evidence has not identified any direct activities on neurotransmitter receptors. Some of these proteins are involved in pathologic conditions such as epileptic seizure and mental retardation. Together, these lines of information have shown that CUB and CCP domain-containing proteins contribute to a wide variety of neuronal events that ultimately establish neural circuits.

  3. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  4. Exogenous and endogenous protease inhibitors in the gut of the fall armyworm larvae, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Lwalaba, Digali; Weidlich, Sandy; Hoffmann, Klaus H; Woodring, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    A dose-dependent inhibition of endogenous trypsin and aminopeptidase occurs in the lumen of Spodoptera frugiperda after feeding L6 larvae exogenous inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone-HCl (TLCK), or bestatin, respectively, for 3 days. TLCK inhibits trypsin in tissue extracts and in secretions more strongly than SBTI. The aminopeptidase released into the lumen (containing the peritrophic membrane) is strongly inhibited by bestatin, but the membrane-bound enzyme is not. A bound enzyme may be more resistant to an inhibitor than unbound. A cross-class elevation of aminopeptidase activity occurs in response to ingested trypsin inhibitor, but there was no cross-class effect of aminopeptidase inhibitor (bestatin) on trypsin activity. An endogenous trypsin and aminopeptidase inhibitor is present in the lumen and ventricular cells. The strength of the endogenous trypsin inhibition seems to be in the same range as that resulting from ingestion of the exogenous inhibitor SBTI. In some insect species, considerable trypsin secretion occurs in unfed as well as in fed animals, and endogenous protease inhibitors might function to protect the ventricular epithelium by inactivation of trypsin when less food is available. PMID:20513059

  5. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    PubMed

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'.

  6. Studies on endogenous circulating calcium entry blocker and stimulator

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, P.K.T.; Yang, M.C.M.

    1986-03-01

    Several synthetic compounds have been studied extensively for their calcium entry blockade and stimulation in smooth muscles. It is hypothesized that there should be endogenous substances which control calcium entry into cells. We recently investigated the effect of some vasoactive hormones on calcium entry. Our studies on rat tail artery helical strip showed that the in vitro vasoconstriction produced by arginine vasopressin (AVP) decreased stepwise with decreasing concentration of both calcium. After exposure of the tail artery to calcium-free Ringer's solution for 1 minute or longer, the tissue lost its ability to respond to AVP. Subsequent addition of calcium to the medium produced immediate contraction. Measurements of low affinity lanthanum resistant pool of calcium with /sup 45/Ca showed that AVP increased calcium uptake by tail artery in a dose-dependent manner. In another study rat tail artery helical strip indicated that the vasorelaxing action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related to an inhibition of calcium uptake. AVP or 60 mM potassium chloride increased the low affinity lanthanum resistant pool of calcium in rate tail artery and PTH inhibited the increase. In conclusion, AVP and PTH may behave like endogenous calcium entry stimulator and inhibitor respectively in vascular tissues.

  7. Protons are a neurotransmitter that regulates synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianyang; Reznikov, Leah R; Price, Margaret P; Zha, Xiang-ming; Lu, Yuan; Moninger, Thomas O; Wemmie, John A; Welsh, Michael J

    2014-06-17

    Stimulating presynaptic terminals can increase the proton concentration in synapses. Potential receptors for protons are acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-permeable channels that are activated by extracellular acidosis. Those observations suggest that protons might be a neurotransmitter. We found that presynaptic stimulation transiently reduced extracellular pH in the amygdala. The protons activated ASICs in lateral amygdala pyramidal neurons, generating excitatory postsynaptic currents. Moreover, both protons and ASICs were required for synaptic plasticity in lateral amygdala neurons. The results identify protons as a neurotransmitter, and they establish ASICs as the postsynaptic receptor. They also indicate that protons and ASICs are a neurotransmitter/receptor pair critical for amygdala-dependent learning and memory.

  8. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  9. Actions of tremorgenic fungal toxins on neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Norris, P J; Smith, C C; De Belleroche, J; Bradford, H F; Mantle, P G; Thomas, A J; Penny, R H

    1980-01-01

    The neurochemical effects of the tremorgenic mycotoxins Verruculogen and Penitrem A, which produce a neurotoxic syndrome characterised by sustained tremors, were studied using sheep and rat synaptosomes. The toxins were administered in vivo, either by chronic feeding (sheep) or intraperitoneal injection 45 min prior to killing (rat), and synaptosomes were subsequently prepared from cerebrocortical and spinal cord/medullary regions of rat, and corpus striatum of sheep. Penitrem A (400 mg mycelium/kg) increased the spontaneous release of endogenous glutamate, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), and aspartate by 213%, 455%, and 277%, respectively, from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. Verruculogen (400 mg mycelium/kg) increased the spontaneous release of glutamate and aspartate by 1300% and 1200%, respectively, but not that of GABA from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The spontaneous release of the transmitter amino acids or other amino acids was not increased by the tremorgens in spinal cord/medullary synaptosomes. Penitrem A pretreatment reduced the veratrine (75 microM) stimulated release of glutamate, aspartate, and GABA from cerebrocortical synaptosomes by 33%, 46%, and 11%, respectively, and the stimulated release of glycine and GABA from spinal cord/medulla synaptosomes by 67% and 32% respectively. Verruculogen pretreatment did not alter the veratrine-induced release of transmitter amino acids from cerebrocortex and spinal cord/medulla synaptosomes. Penitrem A pretreatment increased the spontaneous release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA by 68%, 62%, and 100%, respectively, from sheep corpus striatum synaptosomes but did not alter the synthesis and release of dopamine in this tissue. Verruculogen was shown to cause a substantial increase (300-400%) in the miniature-end-plate potential (m.e.p.p.) frequency at the locust neuromuscular junction. The response was detectable within 1 min, rose to a maximum within 5-7 min, and declined to the control rate over a similar

  10. Protective Effect of Spermidine Against Excitotoxic Neuronal Death Induced by Quinolinic Acid in Rats: Possible Neurotransmitters and Neuroinflammatory Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Sumit; Singh, Shamsher; Kaur, Navneet; Kumar, Puneet

    2015-08-01

    Huntington disease is hyperkinetic movement disorder characterized by selective and immense degradation of GABAergic medium spiny neurons in striatum. Quinolinic acid (QA)-induced neurotoxicity involves a cascade of events such as excitotoxicity, ATP depletion, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, as well as selective GABAergic neuronal loss. Therefore, we investigated spermidine, an endogenous molecule with free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonistic properties, for its beneficial potential if any, in QA-induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats. Rats were administered with QA (200 nmol/2 µl saline) bilaterally on 0 day. Spermidine (5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 21 days once a day. Behavioral parameters (body weight, locomotor activity, grip strength, and narrow beam walk) observations were done on 1st, 7th, 14th, and 21st day after QA treatment. On 21st day, animals were sacrificed and rat striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, GSH, Nitrite), neuroinflammation (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6), and neurochemical analysis (GABA, glutamate, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, DOPAC, HVA, 5-HIAA, adenosine, adenine, hypoxanthine, and inosine). QA treatment significantly altered body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination, oxidative defense (increased LPO, nitrite, and decreased GSH), pro-inflammatory levels (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β), GABA, glutamate, catecholamines level (norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites), and purines level (adenosine, inosine, and hypoxanthine). Spermidine (5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly attenuated these alterations in body weight, motor impairments, oxidative stress, neuroinflammatory markers, GABA, glutamate, catecholamines, adenosine, and their metabolites levels in striatum. The neuroprotective effect of spermidine against QA-induced excitotoxic cell death is attributed to its antioxidant, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonistic, anti

  11. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system. PMID:26013541

  12. Decreased cerebral spinal fluid neurotransmitter levels in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S E; Wassif, C A; Goodwin, H; Conley, S K; Lanham, D C; Kratz, L E; Hyland, K; Gropman, A; Tierney, E; Porter, F D

    2014-05-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with cognitive impairment and a distinct behavioral phenotype that includes autistic features. SLOS is caused by a defect in 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(7)-reductase which leads to decreased cholesterol levels and elevated cholesterol precursors, specifically 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol. However, the pathological processes contributing to the neurological abnormalities in SLOS have not been defined. In view of prior data suggesting defects in SLOS in vesicular release and given the association of altered serotonin metabolism with autism, we were interested in measuring neurotransmitter metabolite levels in SLOS to assess their potential to be used as biomarkers in therapeutic trials. We measured cerebral spinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) respectively, in 21 SLOS subjects. Results were correlated with the SLOS anatomical severity score, Aberrant Behavior Checklist scores and concurrent sterol biochemistry. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were significantly reduced in SLOS subjects. In individual patients, the levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were reduced to a similar degree. CSF neurotransmitter metabolite levels did not correlate with either CSF sterols or behavioral measures. This is the first study demonstrating decreased levels of CSF neurotransmitter metabolites in SLOS. We propose that decreased levels of neurotransmitters in SLOS are caused by a sterol-related defect in synaptic vesicle formation and that CSF 5HIAA and HVA will be useful biomarkers in development of future therapeutic trials.

  13. Neurotransmitter, opiodergic system, steroid-hormone interaction and involvement in the replacement therapy of sexual disorders.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Lazzari, R; Magnani, A; Moretti, C; Sforza, V; Nerozzi, D

    1990-11-20

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) are the neurotransmitters most directly involved in sexual activity. DA plays a stimulatory role while 5-HT has an inhibitory effect. The two monoaminergic systems modulate the secretion of many hormones (GnRH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and endorphins) involved in sexual functional capacity. Furthermore, hormones influence synthesis and storage of brain neurotransmitters. Impotence can often be associated to clinical depression and altered neurotransmitter function. Moreover, stress represents an unbalance between various neurotransmitter systems and can induce impotence especially when disorders of the endorphinic system are present. Replacement therapy is based upon the understanding of these basic concepts. Impotence due to an underlying depressive illness must be treated with dopaminergic antidepressant drugs; while in stressful conditions a good response to the naloxone test is the preliminary criterion to subsequent naltrexone treatment. When a hormonal deficiency has been proved, the hormone replacement therapy is of course highly effective (gonadotropins in hypogonadotropic syndromes, testosterone in aging, etc.). Finally, idiopathic impotence could be treated by DA agonist and/or 5-HT antagonist drugs either alone or better yet in association with psychotherapy.

  14. Review of recent advances in analytical techniques for the determination of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Maura; Li, Qiang; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Methods and advances for monitoring neurotransmitters in vivo or for tissue analysis of neurotransmitters over the last five years are reviewed. The review is organized primarily by neurotransmitter type. Transmitter and related compounds may be monitored by either in vivo sampling coupled to analytical methods or implanted sensors. Sampling is primarily performed using microdialysis, but low-flow push-pull perfusion may offer advantages of spatial resolution while minimizing the tissue disruption associated with higher flow rates. Analytical techniques coupled to these sampling methods include liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, enzyme assays, sensors, and mass spectrometry. Methods for the detection of amino acid, monoamine, neuropeptide, acetylcholine, nucleoside, and soluable gas neurotransmitters have been developed and improved upon. Advances in the speed and sensitivity of these methods have enabled improvements in temporal resolution and increased the number of compounds detectable. Similar advances have enabled improved detection at tissue samples, with a substantial emphasis on single cell and other small samples. Sensors provide excellent temporal and spatial resolution for in vivo monitoring. Advances in application to catecholamines, indoleamines, and amino acids have been prominent. Improvements in stability, sensitivity, and selectivity of the sensors have been of paramount interest. PMID:19800472

  15. Neurotransmitter, opiodergic system, steroid-hormone interaction and involvement in the replacement therapy of sexual disorders.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Lazzari, R; Magnani, A; Moretti, C; Sforza, V; Nerozzi, D

    1990-11-20

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) are the neurotransmitters most directly involved in sexual activity. DA plays a stimulatory role while 5-HT has an inhibitory effect. The two monoaminergic systems modulate the secretion of many hormones (GnRH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and endorphins) involved in sexual functional capacity. Furthermore, hormones influence synthesis and storage of brain neurotransmitters. Impotence can often be associated to clinical depression and altered neurotransmitter function. Moreover, stress represents an unbalance between various neurotransmitter systems and can induce impotence especially when disorders of the endorphinic system are present. Replacement therapy is based upon the understanding of these basic concepts. Impotence due to an underlying depressive illness must be treated with dopaminergic antidepressant drugs; while in stressful conditions a good response to the naloxone test is the preliminary criterion to subsequent naltrexone treatment. When a hormonal deficiency has been proved, the hormone replacement therapy is of course highly effective (gonadotropins in hypogonadotropic syndromes, testosterone in aging, etc.). Finally, idiopathic impotence could be treated by DA agonist and/or 5-HT antagonist drugs either alone or better yet in association with psychotherapy. PMID:1979499

  16. Ontogeny of modulatory inputs to motor networks: early established projection and progressive neurotransmitter acquisition.

    PubMed

    Le Feuvre, Y; Fenelon, V S; Meyrand, P

    2001-02-15

    Modulatory information plays a key role in the expression and the ontogeny of motor networks. Many developmental studies suggest that the acquisition of adult properties by immature networks involves their progressive innervation by modulatory input neurons. Using the stomatogastric nervous system of the European lobster Homarus gammarus, we show that contrary to this assumption, the known population of projection neurons to motor networks, as revealed by retrograde dye migration, is established early in embryonic development. Moreover, these neurons display a large heterogeneity in the chronology of acquisition of their full adult neurotransmitter phenotype. We performed retrograde dye migration to compare the neuronal population projecting to motor networks located in the stomatogastric ganglion in the embryo and adult. We show that this neuronal population is quantitatively established at developmental stage 65%, and each identified projection neuron displays the same axon projection pattern in the adult and the embryo. We then combined retrograde dye migration with FLRFamide-like, histamine, and GABA immunocytochemistry to characterize the chronology of neurotransmitter expression in individual identified projection neurons. We show that this early established population of projection neurons gradually acquires its neurotransmitter phenotype complement. This study indicates that (1) the basic architecture of the known population of projection inputs to a target network is established early in development and (2) ontogenetic plasticity may depend on changes in neurotransmitter phenotype expression within preexisting neurons rather than in the addition of new projection neurons or fibers. PMID:11160402

  17. RFamide neuropeptide actions on the molluscan ventricle: Interactions with primary neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Moulis, A; Huddart, H

    2006-01-01

    Different RFamide neuropeptides, some of non-molluscan origin, were examined for their effect on the ventricles of Buccinum undatum and Busycon canaliculatum. None of the peptides tested were inhibitory on these ventricles. All the peptides were extremely active, causing excitation of the preparations at low concentrations. The neuropeptides were then tested with the primary neurotransmitters. In the case of serotonin, the excitatory primary neurotransmitter, the RFamide neuropeptides induced a response, which was greatly enhanced by serotonin. Acetylcholine, the inhibitory neurotransmitter, induced relaxation whenever added, following a neuropeptide. The neuropeptides seemed to be independent of external Ca(2+), since in Ca(2+)-free media tension was induced. On the contrary, serotonin was dependent on external Ca(2+). These findings indicate that the neuropeptides generated tension via a different receptor to that of the primary neurotransmitters, using a different 2nd messenger and activating different Ca(2+) sources. Finally, the parent neuropeptide Phe-Leu-Arg-Phe-NH(2), when added following a different RFamide peptide, excited the preparation further, thus indicating the presence of a receptor that has higher affinity for some structures than others. When Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH(2) followed Phe-Leu-Arg-Phe-NH(2), no such response was recorded since the latter is of higher potency than the former.

  18. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening.

  19. Neuronal release and successful astrocyte uptake of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters after spinal cord injury in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Valle-Maroto, Silvia María; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, the spinal cord of lampreys spontaneously recovers from a complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Understanding the differences between lampreys and mammals in their response to SCI could provide valuable information to propose new therapies. Unique properties of the astrocytes of lampreys probably contribute to the success of spinal cord regeneration. The main aim of our study was to investigate, in the sea lamprey, the release of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters and the subsequent astrocyte uptake of these neurotransmitters during the first week following a complete SCI by detecting glutamate, GABA, glycine, Hu and cytokeratin immunoreactivities. This is the first time that aminoacidergic neurotransmitter release from neurons and the subsequent astrocytic response after SCI are analysed by immunocytochemistry in any vertebrate. Spinal injury caused the immediate loss of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivities in neurons close to the lesion site (except for the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting GABA cells). Only after SCI, astrocytes showed glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity. Treatment with an inhibitor of glutamate transporters (DL-TBOA) showed that neuronal glutamate was actively transported into astrocytes after SCI. Moreover, after SCI, a massive accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitters around some reticulospinal axons was observed. Presence of GABA accumulation significantly correlated with a higher survival ability of these neurons. Our data show that, in contrast to mammals, astrocytes of lampreys have a high capacity to actively uptake glutamate after SCI. GABA may play a protective role that could explain the higher regenerative and survival ability of specific descending neurons of lampreys.

  20. Newer putative central neurotransmitters: roles in thermoregulation. Hypothalamic substances in the control of body temperature: general characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Blatteis, C.M.

    1981-11-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that their central, exogenous application induces thermal responses, it is not yet established whether various substances found in the hypothalami of many species function as neurotransmitters in central thermoregulatory pathways. Available data concerning their presence, synthesis, release, possible binding sites, and inactivation are reviewed in the light of established criteria for determining a neurotransmitter role for such substances.

  1. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  2. Mechanisms of metabonomic for a gateway drug: nicotine priming enhances behavioral response to cocaine with modification in energy metabolism and neurotransmitter level.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Bu, Qian; Chen, Bo; Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Deng, Pengchi; Lv, Lei; Deng, Yi; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Zhang, Baolai; Hou, Jing; Du, Changman; Zhao, Qian; Fu, Dengqi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, one of the most commonly used drugs, has become a major concern because tobacco serves as a gateway drug and is linked to illicit drug abuse, such as cocaine and marijuana. However, previous studies mainly focused on certain genes or neurotransmitters which have already been known to participate in drug addiction, lacking endogenous metabolic profiling in a global view. To further explore the mechanism by which nicotine modifies the response to cocaine, we developed two conditioned place preference (CPP) models in mice. In threshold dose model, mice were pretreated with nicotine, followed by cocaine treatment at the dose of 2 mg/kg, a threshold dose of cocaine to induce CPP in mice. In high-dose model, mice were only treated with 20 mg/kg cocaine, which induced a significant CPP. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance based on metabonomics was used to investigate metabolic profiles of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and striatum. We found that nicotine pretreatment dramatically increased CPP induced by 2 mg/kg cocaine, which was similar to 20 mg/kg cocaine-induced CPP. Interestingly, metabolic profiles showed considerable overlap between these two models. These overlapped metabolites mainly included neurotransmitters as well as the molecules participating in energy homeostasis and cellular metabolism. Our results show that the reinforcing effect of nicotine on behavioral response to cocaine may attribute to the modification of some specific metabolites in NAc and striatum, thus creating a favorable metabolic environment for enhancing conditioned rewarding effect of cocaine. Our findings provide an insight into the effect of cigarette smoking on cocaine dependence and the underlying mechanism. PMID:24489831

  3. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning.

  4. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  5. Neurotransmitter receptor density changes in Pitx3ak mice--a model relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J N; Amunts, K; Graw, J; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Zilles, K

    2015-01-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by alterations of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. Compared to the wealth of data on the impairment of the dopamine system, relatively limited evidence is available concerning the role of major non-dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems in PD. Therefore, we comprehensively investigated the density and distribution of neurotransmitter receptors for glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and adenosine in brains of homozygous aphakia mice being characterized by mutations affecting the Pitx3 gene. This genetic model exhibits crucial hallmarks of PD on the neuropathological, symptomatic and pharmacological level. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to characterize 19 different receptor binding sites in eleven brain regions in order to understand receptor changes on a systemic level. We demonstrated striking differential changes of neurotransmitter receptor densities for numerous receptor types and brain regions, respectively. Most prominent, a strong up-regulation of GABA receptors and associated benzodiazepine binding sites in different brain regions and concomitant down-regulations of striatal nicotinic acetylcholine and serotonergic receptor densities were found. Furthermore, the densities of glutamatergic kainate, muscarinic acetylcholine, adrenergic α1 and dopaminergic D2/D3 receptors were differentially altered. These results present novel insights into the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in Pitx3(ak) mice supporting findings on PD pathology in patients and indicating on the possible underlying mechanisms. The data suggest Pitx3(ak) mice as an appropriate new model to investigate the role of neurotransmitter receptors in PD. Our study highlights the relevance of non-dopaminergic systems in PD and for the understanding of its molecular pathology. PMID:25451278

  6. Trafficking of an endogenous potassium channel in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Cheng, Yvonne; Dou, Ying; Goonesekara, Charitha; David, Jens-Peter; Steele, David F.; Huang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The roles of several small GTPases in the expression of an endogenous potassium current, Ito,f, in adult rat ventricular myocytes have been investigated. The results indicate that forward trafficking of newly synthesized Kv4.2, which underlies Ito,f in these cells, requires both Rab1 and Sar1 function. Expression of a Rab1 dominant negative (DN) reduced Ito,f current density by roughly one-half relative to control, mCherry-transfected myocytes. Similarly, expression of a Sar1DN nearly halved Ito,f current density. Rab11 is not essential to trafficking of Kv4.2, as expression of a Rab11DN had no effect on Ito,f over the time frames investigated here. In a process dependent on intact endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport, however, overexpression of wild-type Rab11 resulted in a doubling of Ito,f density; block of ER-to-Golgi traffic by Brefeldin A completely abrogated the effect. Also implicated in the trafficking of Kv4.2 are Rab5 and Rab4. Rab5DN expression increased endogenous Ito,f by two- to threefold, nonadditively with inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis. And, in a phenomenon similar to that previously reported for myoblast-expressed Kv1.5, Rab4DN expression roughly doubled endogenous peak transient currents. Colocalization experiments confirmed the involvement of Rab4 in postinternalization trafficking of Kv4.2. There was little role evident for the lysosome in the degradation of internalized Kv4.2, as overexpression of neither wild-type nor DN isoforms of Rab7 had any effect on Ito,f. Instead, degradation may depend largely on the proteasome; the proteasome inhibitor MG132 significantly increased Ito,f density. PMID:22914645

  7. Overview of endogenous and synthetic melanocortin peptides.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K R; Todorovic, A; Proneth, B; Haskell-Luevano, C

    2006-01-01

    The melanocortin system consists of five seven-transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled (GPCRs) receptors (MC1R-MC5R), the endogenous agonists a-, B- and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and the endogenous antagonists Agouti and Agouti-related protein (AGRP). Melanocortin agonists are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and weight omeostasis in mammals. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) have been performed on the endogenous melanocortin receptor agonists and antagonists that have identified ligand amino acid residues implicated as important for receptor binding and stimulation. Knowledge of putative ligand-receptor interactions may help to design molecules as therapeutic agents for the treatment of physiological diseases. PMID:16914082

  8. Analysis of the Human Endogenous Coregulator Complexome

    PubMed Central

    Malovannaya, Anna; Lanz, Rainer B.; Jung, Sung Yun; Bulynko, Yaroslava; Le, Nguyen T.; Chan, Doug W.; Ding, Chen; Shi, Yi; Yucer, Nur; Krenciute, Giedre; Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Chunshu; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Qin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Summary Elucidation of endogenous cellular protein-protein interactions and their networks is most desirable for biological studies. Here we report our study of endogenous human coregulator protein complex networks obtained from integrative mass spectrometry-based analysis of 3,290 affinity purifications. By preserving weak protein interactions during complex isolation and utilizing high levels of reciprocity in the large dataset we identified many unreported protein associations, such as a transcriptional network formed by ZMYND8, ZNF687 and ZNF592. Furthermore, our work revealed a tiered interplay within networks that share common proteins, providing a conceptual organization of a cellular proteome composed of minimal endogenous modules (MEMOs), functional uniCOREs and regulatory complex-complex interaction networks (CCIs). This resource will effectively fill a void in linking correlative genomic studies with an understanding of transcriptional regulatory protein functions within the proteome for formulation and testing of new hypotheses. PMID:21620140

  9. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  10. Presynaptic Control of Corticostriatal Synapses by Endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABAB receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABAA, and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABAB receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABAB receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  11. Human neuromelanin: an endogenous microglial activator for dopaminergic neuron death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zecca, Luigi; Wilson, Belinda; Ren, RW; Wang, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that neuroinflammation caused by over-activation of microglial in the substantia nigra is critical in the pathogenesis of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing data demonstrates that environmental factors such as rotenone, paraquat play pivotal roles in the death of dopaminergic neurons. Here, potential role and mechanism of neuromelanin (NM), a major endogenous component in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, on microglial activation and associated dopaminergic neurotoxicity were investigated. Using multiple well-established primary mesencephalic cultures, we tested whether human NM (HNM) could activate microglia, thereby provoking dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrated that in primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, HNM caused dopaminergic neuronal damage characterized by the decreased dopamine uptake and reduced numbers and shorted dendrites of dopaminergic neurons. HNM-induced degeneration was relatively selective to dopaminergic neurons since the other types of neurons determined by either gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake and total neuronal numbers after staining showed smaller decrease. We demonstrated that HNM produced modest dopaminergic neurotoxicity in neuron-enriched cultures; in contrast, much greater neurotoxicity was observed in the presence of microglia. HNM-induced microglial activation was shown by morphological changes and production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. These results suggest that HNM, once released from damaged dopaminergic neurons, can be an potent endogenous activator involved in the reactivation of microglia, which may mediate disease progression. Thus, inhibition of reactive microglia can be a useful strategy for PD therapy. PMID:23276965

  12. Endogenous patterns of mechanical stress are required for branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterning of cell behaviors establishes the regional differences within tissues that collectively develop branched organs into their characteristic treelike shapes. Here we show that the pattern of branching morphogenesis of three-dimensional (3D) engineered epithelial tissues is controlled in part by gradients of endogenous mechanical stress. We used microfabrication to build model mammary epithelial tissues of defined geometry that branched in a stereotyped pattern when induced with growth factors. Branches initiated from sites of high mechanical stress within the tissues, as predicted numerically and measured directly using 3D traction force microscopy. Branch sites were defined by activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), inhibition of which disrupted morphogenesis. Stress, FAK activation, and branching were all altered by manipulating cellular contractility, matrix stiffness, intercellular cohesion and tissue geometry. These data suggest that the pattern and magnitude of mechanical stress across epithelial tissues cooperate with biochemical signals to specify branching pattern. Insight, innovation, integration Morphogenesis is ultimately a physical process wherein tissues are sculpted into their final three-dimensional (3D) patterns. Mechanical stresses from the microenvironment can also play regulatory roles, but their influence on pattern is difficult to ascertain in 3D systems in vivo. Here we integrate 3D microscale engineered tissues with insight from biological mechanics to understand the role of endogenous mechanical stresses in patterning tissue development. The innovation lies in the use of numerical modeling to design experiments that can predict the stress distribution and resulting morphogenesis of model tissues. PMID:20717570

  13. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  14. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species. PMID:26783017

  15. Involvement of the Cerebral Monoamine Neurotransmitters System in Antidepressant-Like Effects of a Chinese Herbal Decoction, Baihe Dihuang Tang, in Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Li; Gao, Jie; He, Xin-Rong; Chen, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Baihe Dihuang Tang (BDT) is a renowned Chinese herbal formula which is commonly used for treating patients with mental instability, absentmindedness, insomnia, deficient dysphoria, and other psychological diseases. These major symptoms closely associated with the depressive disorders. BDT was widely popular use for treating emotion-thought disorders for many years in China. In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of BDT in mice was investigated by using the forced swim test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST). The underlying mechanism was explored by determining the effect of BDT on the level of cerebral monoamine neurotransmitters. BDT (9 and 18 g/kg, p.o. for 14 days) administration significantly reduced the immobility time in both the FST and the TST without changing locomotion in the open field-test (OFT). Moreover, BDT treatment at the dose of 18 g/kg inhibited reserpine-induced ptosis. Meanwhile, BDT enhanced 5-HT and NA levels in mouse cerebrum as well as decreased the ratio of 5-HT compared to its metabolite, 5-HIAA, (turnover, 5-HIAA/5-HT) after TST. The results demonstrated that the antidepressant-like effect of BDT is mediated, at least partially, via the central monoaminergic neurotransmitter system. PMID:22956973

  16. Endogenous RNAi pathways in C. elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Allison C; Fischer, Sylvia E J; Kim, John K

    2014-01-01

    In addition to several hundred microRNAs, C. elegans produces thousands of other small RNAs targeting coding genes, pseudogenes, transposons, and other noncoding RNAs. Here we review what is currently known about these endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), providing an overview of their biogenesis, their associated protein factors, and their effects on mRNA dynamics and chromatin structure. Additionally, we describe how the molecular actions of these classes of endogenous small RNAs connect to their physiological roles in the organism. PMID:24816713

  17. Animal spirits, competitive markets, and endogenous growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a simple model with an endogenous discount rate and linear technology to investigate whether a competitive equilibrium has a higher balanced growth path (BGP) than the social planning solution and whether the BGP is determinate or indeterminate. The implications are as follows. To start with, people with an instinct to compare themselves with others possess an endogenous discount rate. In turn, this instinct affects the economic growth rate in a competitive market economy. The competitive market economy also sometimes achieves higher economic growth than a social planning economy. However, the outcomes of market economy occasionally fluctuate because of the presence of the self-fulfilling prophecy or animal spirits.

  18. Angptl4 serves as an endogenous inhibitor of intestinal lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Frits; Alex, Sheril; Swarts, Hans J; Groen, Albert K; van Schothorst, Evert M; Kersten, Sander

    2014-04-01

    Dietary triglycerides are hydrolyzed in the small intestine principally by pancreatic lipase. Following uptake by enterocytes and secretion as chylomicrons, dietary lipids are cleared from the bloodstream via lipoprotein lipase. Whereas lipoprotein lipase is inhibited by several proteins including Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), no endogenous regulator of pancreatic lipase has yet been identified. Here we present evidence that Angptl4 is an endogenous inhibitor of dietary lipid digestion. Angptl4-/- mice were heavier compared to their wild-type counterparts without any difference in food intake, energy expenditure or locomotor activity. However, Angptl4-/- mice showed decreased lipid content in the stools and increased accumulation of dietary triglycerides in the small intestine, which coincided with elevated luminal lipase activity in Angptl4-/- mice. Furthermore, recombinant Angptl4 reduced the activity of pancreatic lipase as well as the lipase activity in human ileostomy output. In conclusion, our data suggest that Angptl4 is an endogenous inhibitor of intestinal lipase activity. PMID:24634819

  19. Oxidatively Generated DNA Damage Following Cu(II)-Catalysis of Dopamine and Related Catecholamine Neurotransmitters and Neurotoxins: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Wendy A.; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Kichambre, Sunita; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2012-01-01

    a possible contributory role of oxidatively generated DNA damage by dopamine and related catechol neurotransmitters/neurotoxins in neurodegeneration and cell death. We also found that a naturally occurring broad spectrum antioxidant, ellagic acid, was substantially effective (nearly 50% inhibition) at low doses (1 μM) at preventing this dopamine/Cu(II)-mediated oxidatively generated DNA damage. Since dietary ellagic acid has been found to reduce oxidative stress in rat brains, a neuro-protective role of this polyphenol is plausible. PMID:21075203

  20. Oxidatively generated DNA damage after Cu(II) catalysis of dopamine and related catecholamine neurotransmitters and neurotoxins: Role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Wendy A; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Kichambre, Sunita; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    studies suggest a possible contributory role of oxidatively generated DNA damage by dopamine and related catechol neurotransmitters/neurotoxins in neurodegeneration and cell death. We also found that a naturally occurring broad-spectrum antioxidant, ellagic acid, was substantially effective (nearly 50% inhibition) at low doses (1μM) at preventing this dopamine/Cu(II)-mediated oxidatively generated DNA damage. Because dietary ellagic acid has been found to reduce oxidative stress in rat brains, a neuroprotective role of this polyphenol is plausible.

  1. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  2. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state.

  3. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  4. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state. PMID:24949960

  5. Characterization of Endogenous Ethanol in the Mammal.

    PubMed

    McManus, I R; Contag, A O; Olson, R E

    1960-01-01

    Ethanol has been isolated from the tissues of several animal species in amounts ranging from 23 to 145 micromole/100 gm of tissue. Intestinal bacterial flora appear to be excluded as a source of this ethanol. Radioactivity from pyruvate-2-C(14) appeared in ethanol after incubation with liver slices; this finding indicates an endogenous synthesis.

  6. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  7. Microfluidic in-channel multi-electrode platform for neurotransmitter sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, A.; Mathault, J.; Reitz, A.; Boisvert, M.; Tessier, F.; Greener, J.; Miled, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this project we present a microfluidic platform with in-channel micro-electrodes for in situ screening of bio/chemical samples through a lab-on-chip system. We used a novel method to incorporate electrochemical sensors array (16x20) connected to a PCB, which opens the way for imaging applications. A 200 μm height microfluidic channel was bonded to electrochemical sensors. The micro-channel contains 3 inlets used to introduce phosphate buffer saline (PBS), ferrocynide and neurotransmitters. The flow rate was controlled through automated micro-pumps. A multiplexer was used to scan electrodes and perform individual cyclic voltammograms by a custom potentiostat. The behavior of the system was linear in terms of variation of current versus concentration. It was used to detect the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and glutamate.

  8. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-05-28

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions.

  9. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-01

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released. Abbreviations: ACh, acetylcholine AFM, atomic force microscopy

  10. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    PubMed

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms. PMID:26589213

  11. Neurotransmitters and synaptic components in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, a gentle touch receptor

    PubMed Central

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cells are an enigmatic group of rare cells found in the skin of vertebrates. Most make contacts with somatosensory afferents to form Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which are gentle-touch receptors that initiate slowly adapting type I responses. The function of Merkel cells within the complex remains debated despite decades of research. Numerous anatomical studies demonstrate that Merkel cells form synaptic-like contacts with sensory afferent terminals. Moreover, recent molecular analysis reveals that Merkel cells express dozens of presynaptic molecules that are essential for synaptic vesicle release in neurons. Merkel cells also produce a host of neuro-active substances that can act as fast excitatory neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. Here, we review the major neurotransmitters found in Merkel cells and discuss these findings in relation to the potential function of Merkel cells in touch reception. PMID:23530998

  12. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-Dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Richard W; Buhl, Lauren K; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J Troy

    2015-11-18

    Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca(2+) entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity.

  13. Laser R2PI spectroscopic and mass spectrometric studies of chiral neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, A.; Marotta, V.; Paladini, A.; Piccirillo, S.; Rondino, F.; Satta, M.; Speranza, M.

    2007-07-01

    One color, mass selected resonant two-photon ionization (1cR2PI) spectra of supersonically expanded bare neurotransmitter, (1 S,2 S)-(+)- N-methyl pseudoephedrine (MPE), and its complexes with chiral and achiral molecules have been investigated. The excitation spectrum of bare MPE has been analyzed and discussed on the basis of theoretical predictions at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The results allowed to get information on the possible conformers of MPE molecule and on the intermolecular forces on its cluster formed with a variety of solvent molecules, including chiral alcohols, lactates and water. Further information on intermolecular interactions have been obtained with ESI-CID-MS 2 technique, applied to chiral biomolecules linked through a metal ion to the neurotransmitter. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  14. Quantification of Amino Acid Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, José Augusto; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease that affects the central nervous system. Its main clinical manifestations are epileptic seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the different evolutive forms of neurocysticercosis with or without seizures. Methods : Neurotransmitter concentrations (Aspartate, Glutamate, GABA, Glutamine, Glycine, Taurine) were determined in CSF samples from 42 patients with neurocysticercosis divided into patients with the active cystic form (n = 24, 12 with and 12 without seizures) and patients with calcified form (n = 18, 12 with and 6 without seizures), and a control group consisting of 59 healthy subjects. Results : Alterations in amino acid concentration were observed in all patients with neurocysticercosis. Conclusion : We conclude that disturbances in amino acid metabolism accompany the presentation of neurocysticercosis. Replacement of the terms inactive cyst by reactive inactive cyst and calcification by reactive calcification is suggested. PMID:26157521

  15. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  16. Catecholamine neurotransmitters, psychoactive drugs, and biological clocks. The 1981 Harvey Cushing oration.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J

    1981-11-01

    In his Cushing oration, the 1970 Nobel Laureate reviews the experimental history of the vital role which chemical agents play in the transmission of nerve impulses and the important functions of the brain. He reveals the intriguing steps in his own early involvement in the field of neurotransmitters. A beacon for neuroscientists of the future is his unique talent for not only looking, but seeing potentially significant clues.

  17. Influence of central neurotransmitters on heart rate variability in outbred rats at rest and during acute stress: nature of very-low-wave spectrum component revisited.

    PubMed

    Kurjanova, E V; Teplyj, D L

    2010-07-01

    We studied the effect of blockade of neurotransmitter monoamine reuptake and inhibition of catecholamine synthesis on heart rate variability in outbred albino rats at rest and during acute stress. Amitriptyline increased, while α-methyltyrosine reduced the power of VLF waves in heart rate variability spectrum. The effect of amitriptyline manifested at rest and was most striking under stressful conditions, while the effect of α-methyltyrosine was observed only under conditions of acute stress. This suggests that VLF-band waves in the heart rate variability spectrum have catecholaminergic nature and are determined by activity of the central monoaminergic systems; the role of peripheral adrenergic influences mediated by humoral and nervous regulation in the formation of these waves cannot also be excluded.

  18. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with "emotive" neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the "neutrix." Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding ("flavoring") cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology.

  19. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with "emotive" neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the "neutrix." Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding ("flavoring") cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  20. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  1. Neurotransmitter and their metabolite concentrations in different areas of the HPRT knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tschirner, Sarah K; Gutzki, Frank; Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-06-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is characterized by uric acid overproduction and severe neurobehavioral symptoms, such as recurrent self-mutilative behavior. To learn more about the pathophysiology of the disease, we quantified neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and the medulla oblongata of HPRT knockout mice, an animal model for LNS, in comparison to the corresponding wild-type. Our analyses included l-glutamate, 4-aminobutanoic acid (GABA), acetylcholine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine, l-normetanephrine, epinephrine and l-metanephrine and were conducted via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Among these neurotransmitter systems, we did not find any abnormalities in the HPRT knockout mouse brains. On one side, this might indicate that HPRT deficiency most severely affects dopamine signaling, while brain functioning based on other neurotransmitters is more or less spared. On the other hand, our findings may reflect a compensating mechanism for impaired purine salvage that protects the brain in HPRT-deficient mice but not in LNS patients. PMID:27206901

  2. The Dynamics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Neurotoxic Compounds and Neurotransmitters Interact

    PubMed Central

    Quaak, Ilona; Brouns, Madeleine R.; de Bor, Margot Van

    2013-01-01

    In recent years concern has risen about the increasing prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Accumulating evidence shows that exposure to neurotoxic compounds is related to ASD. Neurotransmitters might play a key role, as research has indicated a connection between neurotoxic compounds, neurotransmitters and ASD. In the current review a literature overview with respect to neurotoxic exposure and the effects on neurotransmitter systems is presented. The aim was to identify mechanisms and related factors which together might result in ASD. The literature reported in the current review supports the hypothesis that exposure to neurotoxic compounds can lead to alterations in the GABAergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic system which have been related to ASD in previous work. However, in several studies findings were reported that are not supportive of this hypothesis. Other factors also might be related, possibly altering the mechanisms at work, such as time and length of exposure as well as dose of the compound. Future research should focus on identifying the pathway through which these factors interact with exposure to neurotoxic compounds making use of human studies. PMID:23924882

  3. Altered levels of brain neurotransmitter from new born rabbits with intrauterine restriction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Andrade, E; Cortés-Camberos, A J; Díaz, N F; Flores-Herrera, H; García-López, G; González-Jiménez, M; Santamaría, A; Molina-Hernández, A

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction generates chronic hypoxia due to placental insufficiency. Despite the hemodynamic process of blood flow, redistributions are taking place in key organs such as the fetal brain during intrauterine growth restriction, in order to maintain oxygen and nutrients supply. The risk of short- and long-term neurological effects are still present in hypoxic offspring. Most studies previously reported the effect of hypoxia on the levels of a single neurotransmitter, making it difficult to have a better understanding of the relationship among neurotransmitter levels and the defects reported in products that suffer intrauterine growth restriction, such as motor development, coordination and execution of movement, and the learning-memory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin in three structures of the brain related to the above-mentioned function such as the cerebral cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus in the chronic hypoxic newborn rabbit model. Our results showed a significant increase in glutamate and dopamine levels in all studied brain structures and a significant decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels but only in the striatum, suggesting that the imbalance on the levels of several neurotransmitters could be involved in new born brain damage due to perinatal hypoxia. PMID:25304540

  4. Organic electronics for precise delivery of neurotransmitters to modulate mammalian sensory function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Daniel T.; Kurup, Sindhulakshmi; Larsson, Karin C.; Hori, Ryusuke; Tybrandt, Klas; Goiny, Michel; Jager, Edwin W. H.; Berggren, Magnus; Canlon, Barbara; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2009-09-01

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular targets and therapies for the treatment of a variety of nervous-system disorders. Particular therapies involve electrical sensing and stimulation of neural activity, and significant effort has therefore been devoted to the refinement of neural electrodes. However, direct electrical interfacing suffers from some inherent problems, such as the inability to discriminate amongst cell types. Thus, there is a need for novel devices to specifically interface nerve cells. Here, we demonstrate an organic electronic device capable of precisely delivering neurotransmitters in vitro and in vivo. In converting electronic addressing into delivery of neurotransmitters, the device mimics the nerve synapse. Using the peripheral auditory system, we show that out of a diverse population of cells, the device can selectively stimulate nerve cells responding to a specific neurotransmitter. This is achieved by precise electronic control of electrophoretic migration through a polymer film. This mechanism provides several sought-after features for regulation of cell signalling: exact dosage determination through electrochemical relationships, minimally disruptive delivery due to lack of fluid flow, and on-off switching. This technology has great potential as a therapeutic platform and could help accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies for nervous-system disorders.

  5. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with “emotive” neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the “neutrix.” Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding (“flavoring”) cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  6. Altered levels of brain neurotransmitter from new born rabbits with intrauterine restriction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Andrade, E; Cortés-Camberos, A J; Díaz, N F; Flores-Herrera, H; García-López, G; González-Jiménez, M; Santamaría, A; Molina-Hernández, A

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction generates chronic hypoxia due to placental insufficiency. Despite the hemodynamic process of blood flow, redistributions are taking place in key organs such as the fetal brain during intrauterine growth restriction, in order to maintain oxygen and nutrients supply. The risk of short- and long-term neurological effects are still present in hypoxic offspring. Most studies previously reported the effect of hypoxia on the levels of a single neurotransmitter, making it difficult to have a better understanding of the relationship among neurotransmitter levels and the defects reported in products that suffer intrauterine growth restriction, such as motor development, coordination and execution of movement, and the learning-memory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin in three structures of the brain related to the above-mentioned function such as the cerebral cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus in the chronic hypoxic newborn rabbit model. Our results showed a significant increase in glutamate and dopamine levels in all studied brain structures and a significant decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels but only in the striatum, suggesting that the imbalance on the levels of several neurotransmitters could be involved in new born brain damage due to perinatal hypoxia.

  7. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-11-15

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl(-) gradient maintained by the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter and requires Ca(2+) entry through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  8. [Effect of female sex steroids on levels of endogenous ethanol].

    PubMed

    Garber, M R; Kovalenko, A E

    1988-01-01

    The authors presented the results of a study of the effect of female sex steroids on the level of endogenous ethanol. The time course of endogenous ethanol during the menstrual cycle was investigated. The concentration of endogenous ethanol was compared in the groups of women receiving and not receiving hormonal contraceptives. An increase in sex steroids during the menstrual cycle was accompanied by a decrease in the level of endogenous ethanol. The use of hormonal contraceptives caused an increase in the background concentration of endogenous ethanol. A possible effect of endogenous and exogenous female sex steroids on different levels of regulation of ethanol metabolism was assumed.

  9. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Ertuzun, Irina A; Kachaeva, Evgeniya V; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100) exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well) which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26604768

  10. Maintenance of homeostasis of endogenous ethanol as a method for the therapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nikolaenko, V N

    2001-03-01

    We propose a new method for the therapy of alcoholism based on maintenance of homeostasis of endogenous ethanol and inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase with emetine. After the standard antialcohol therapy, activity of this enzyme remained high or even increased, and pathological alcohol addiction also increased. Emetine normalized activity of alcohol dehydrogenase and suppressed pathological alcohol addiction. After this therapy more than 50% patients achieved stable remissions from alcoholism over 1 year, which indicated high efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. Environment- and activity-dependent dopamine neurotransmitter plasticity in the adult substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Aumann, Tim D

    2016-04-01

    The ability of neurons to change the amount or type of neurotransmitter they use, or 'neurotransmitter plasticity', is an emerging new form of adult brain plasticity. For example, it has recently been shown that neurons in the adult rat hypothalamus up- or down-regulate dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in response to the amount of light the animal receives (photoperiod), and that this in turn affects anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (Dulcis et al., 2013). In this Chapter I consolidate recent evidence from my laboratory suggesting neurons in the adult mouse substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) also undergo DA neurotransmitter plasticity in response to persistent changes in their electrical activity, including that driven by the mouse's environment or behavior. Specifically, we have shown that the amounts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) gene promoter activity, TH mRNA and TH protein in SNc neurons increases or decreases after ∼20h of altered electrical activity. Also, infusion of ion-channel agonists or antagonists into the midbrain for 2 weeks results in ∼10% (∼500 neurons) more or fewer TH immunoreactive (TH+) SNc neurons, with no change in the total number of SNc neurons (TH+ and TH-). Targeting ion-channels mediating cell-autonomous pacemaker activity in, or synaptic input and afferent pathways to, SNc neurons are equally effective in this regard. In addition, exposing mice to different environments (sex pairing or environment enrichment) for 1-2 weeks induces ∼10% more or fewer TH+ SNc (and ventral tegmental area or VTA) neurons and this is abolished by concurrent blockade of synaptic transmission in midbrain. Although further research is required to establish SNc (and VTA) DA neurotransmitter plasticity, and to determine whether it alters brain function and behavior, it is an exciting prospect because: (1) It may play important roles in movement, motor learning, reward, motivation, memory and cognition; and (2

  12. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2), glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6), cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4) and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4), adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c), adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b), glycinergic (Glra), purinergic (P2rx7), and serotonergic (Htr1b) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas), adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5), protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb) protein kinase C (Prkca) and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation. PMID:27774052

  13. Protein Prenylation Constitutes an Endogenous Brake on Axonal Growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Oakley, Derek; Nikulina, Elena; Hou, Jianwei; Yang, Wan Seok; Lowry, Emily Rhodes; Lamas, Nuno Jorge; Amoroso, Mackenzie Weygandt; Croft, Gist F; Hosur, Raghavendra; Wichterle, Hynek; Sebti, Said; Filbin, Marie T; Stockwell, Brent; Henderson, Christopher E

    2016-07-12

    Suboptimal axonal regeneration contributes to the consequences of nervous system trauma and neurodegenerative disease, but the intrinsic mechanisms that regulate axon growth remain unclear. We screened 50,400 small molecules for their ability to promote axon outgrowth on inhibitory substrata. The most potent hits were the statins, which stimulated growth of all mouse- and human-patient-derived neurons tested, both in vitro and in vivo, as did combined inhibition of the protein prenylation enzymes farnesyltransferase (PFT) and geranylgeranyl transferase I (PGGT-1). Compensatory sprouting of motor axons may delay clinical onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Accordingly, elevated levels of PGGT1B, which would be predicted to reduce sprouting, were found in motor neurons of early- versus late-onset ALS patients postmortem. The mevalonate-prenylation pathway therefore constitutes an endogenous brake on axonal growth, and its inhibition provides a potential therapeutic approach to accelerate neuronal regeneration in humans. PMID:27373155

  14. [Concentration of endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation].

    PubMed

    Burov, Iu V; Treskov, V G; Kampov-Polevoĭ, A B; Kovalenko, A E; Rodionov, A P

    1983-11-01

    Trials with patients suffering from stage II chronic alcoholism and normal test subjects as well as experiments made on male C57BL mice (with genetically determined alcoholic motivation) and CBA mice (with genetically determined alcoholic aversion) and random-bred male rats with different levels of initial alcoholic motivation have shown the presence of reverse proportional dependence between blood plasma endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation.

  15. HERVd: database of human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Václav

    2002-01-01

    The human endogenous retroviruses database (HERVd) is maintained at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and is accessible via the World Wide Web at http://herv.img.cas.cz. The HERVd provides complex information on and analysis of retroviral elements found in the human genome. It can be used for searches of individual HERV families, identification of HERV parts, graphical output of HERV structures, comparison of HERVs and identification of retrovirus integration sites.

  16. Endogenous Retroviruses in the Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Welkin E

    2015-11-01

    Endogenous retroviruses comprise millions of discrete genetic loci distributed within the genomes of extant vertebrates. These sequences, which are clearly related to exogenous retroviruses, represent retroviral infections of the deep past, and their abundance suggests that retroviruses were a near-constant presence throughout the evolutionary history of modern vertebrates. Endogenous retroviruses contribute in myriad ways to the evolution of host genomes, as mutagens and as sources of genetic novelty (both coding and regulatory) to be acted upon by the twin engines of random genetic drift and natural selection. Importantly, the richness and complexity of endogenous retrovirus data can be used to understand how viruses spread and adapt on evolutionary timescales by combining population genetics and evolutionary theory with a detailed understanding of retrovirus biology (gleaned from the study of extant retroviruses). In addition to revealing the impact of viruses on organismal evolution, such studies can help us better understand, by looking back in time, how life-history traits, as well as ecological and geological events, influence the movement of viruses within and between populations. PMID:26958910

  17. Endogenous growth of persistently active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stevenson, David

    1993-12-01

    LAVA lakes and active strombolian vents have persisted at some volcanoes for periods exceeding the historic record. They liberate prodigious amounts of volatiles and thermal energy but erupt little lava, a paradox that raises questions about how volcanoes grow. Although long-lasting surface manifestations can be sustained by convective exchange of magma with deeper reservoirs, residence times of magmas beneath several basaltic volcanoes are & sim10-100 years1,2, indicating that where surface activity continues for more than 100-1,000 years, the reservoirs are replenished by new magma. Endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) through dyke intrusion and cumulate formation is a well-understood consequence of the steady supply of mantle-derived magma3,4. As we show here, inferred heat losses from the Halemaumau lava lake indicate a period of dominantly endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano during the nineteenth century. Moreover, heat losses and degassing rates for several other volcanoes, including Stromboli, also indicate cryptic influxes of magma that far exceed visible effluxes of lavas. We propose that persistent activity at Stromboli, and at other volcanoes in different tectonic settings, is evidence of endogenous growth, involving processes similar to those at Kilauea.

  18. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  19. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  20. An Update of the Classical and Novel Methods Used for Measuring Fast Neurotransmitters During Normal and Brain Altered Function

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes Castro, Victor Hugo; López Valenzuela, Carmen Lucía; Salazar Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Peña, Kenia Pardo; López Pérez, Silvia J.; Ibarra, Jorge Ortega; Villagrán, Alberto Morales

    2014-01-01

    To understand better the cerebral functions, several methods have been developed to study the brain activity, they could be related with morphological, electrophysiological, molecular and neurochemical techniques. Monitoring neurotransmitter concentration is a key role to know better how the brain works during normal or pathological conditions, as well as for studying the changes in neurotransmitter concentration with the use of several drugs that could affect or reestablish the normal brain activity. Immediate response of the brain to environmental conditions is related with the release of the fast acting neurotransmission by glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and acetylcholine (ACh) through the opening of ligand-operated ion channels. Neurotransmitter release is mainly determined by the classical microdialysis technique, this is generally coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of neurotransmitters can be done by fluorescence, optical density, electrochemistry or other detection systems more sophisticated. Although the microdialysis method is the golden technique to monitor the brain neurotransmitters, it has a poor temporal resolution. Recently, with the use of biosensor the drawback of temporal resolution has been improved considerably, however other inconveniences have merged, such as stability, reproducibility and the lack of reliable biosensors mainly for GABA. The aim of this review is to show the important advances in the different ways to measure neurotransmitter concentrations; both with the use of classic techniques as well as with the novel methods and alternant approaches to improve the temporal resolution. PMID:25977677

  1. Effects of exogenous and endogenous opiates on the hypothalamic--pituitary--gonadal axis in the male.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J

    1980-06-01

    Narcotics acutely depress serum testosterone levels in the male. Three mechanisms could be involved: an enhancement of the degradation of testosterone; a direct inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis; or, finally, an inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-luteinizing hormone (LH) axis resulting in a reduction in LH-dependent testicular steroidogenesis. The currently available evidence indicates that narcotics do not affect the catabolism of testosterone by the liver or testicular steroidogenesis. Rather, the data favor a direct action on the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis, probably by inhibiting the secretion of LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH) from the hypothalamus. The effects of narcotics on serum LH appear to be mediated via specific opioid receptors, suggesting that a naturally occurring opioid-like substance exists that normally inhibits LH. In support of this conclusion, opiate receptor blockers markedly increase serum LH levels shortly after their subcutaneous administration. In addition, endogenous opioids also seem to participate in testosterone's negative feedback control of the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis. Thus, it appears that opiate drugs inhibit the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by occupying opiate receptors in the hypothalamus and, moreover, that endogenous opioids exist that normally bind to these receptors and regulate activity in this axis.

  2. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Fractions Prepared from Danzhi-Xiaoyao-San Decoction in Rats with Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress: Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, Arginine Vasopressin, and Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yi; Su, Jun-Fang; Wu, Wei-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of two fractions, including petroleum ether soluble fraction (Fraction A, FA) and water-EtOH soluble fraction (Fraction B, FB) prepared from the Danzhi-xiaoyao-san (DZXYS) by using chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive rat model. The results indicated that DZXYS could ameliorate the depression-like behavior in chronic stress model of rats. The inhibition of hyperactivity of HPA axis and the modulation of monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus may be the important mechanisms underlying the action of DZXYS antidepressant-like effect in chronically stressed rats. PMID:27413389

  3. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Fractions Prepared from Danzhi-Xiaoyao-San Decoction in Rats with Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress: Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, Arginine Vasopressin, and Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Yan, Can; Pan, Yi; Su, Jun-Fang; Wu, Wei-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of two fractions, including petroleum ether soluble fraction (Fraction A, FA) and water-EtOH soluble fraction (Fraction B, FB) prepared from the Danzhi-xiaoyao-san (DZXYS) by using chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive rat model. The results indicated that DZXYS could ameliorate the depression-like behavior in chronic stress model of rats. The inhibition of hyperactivity of HPA axis and the modulation of monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus may be the important mechanisms underlying the action of DZXYS antidepressant-like effect in chronically stressed rats. PMID:27413389

  4. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc.

    PubMed

    Kalappa, Bopanna I; Anderson, Charles T; Goldberg, Jacob M; Lippard, Stephen J; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-12-22

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses.

  5. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  6. Targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors, but not cholinesterase or neurotransmitter, in the neurotoxicity of TDCPP in Chinese rare minnow adults (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lilai; Li, Jiasu; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been detected at high concentrations in various environmental and biotic samples, but little is known about their toxicity. In this study, the potential neurotoxicity of three OPFRs (TCEP, TDCPP, and TPP) and Chlorpyrifos (CPF, an organophosphate pesticide) were compared in Chinese rare minnow using an acute toxicity test and a 21-day fish assay. The acute test demonstrated significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) by CPF. Although significant AChE inhibition at high concentration of TPP was also observed, none of the OPFRs had effects similar to CPF on these enzymes, indicating that their acute toxicities to Chinese rare minnow may be unrelated to cholinesterase inhibition. In addition, the 21-day fish assay with TDCPP demonstrated no significant effects on cholinesterase activities or neurotransmitter levels. Nonetheless, this OPFR exhibited widespread effects on the neurotrophic factors and their receptors (e.g., ntf3, ntrk1, ntrk2, ngfr, and fgf2, fgf11, fgf22, fgfr4), indicating that TDCPP or other OPFRs may elicit neurological effects by targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors in Chinese rare minnow. PMID:26552522

  7. A Derivatization and Validation Strategy for Determining the Spatial Localization of Endogenous Amine Metabolites in Tissues using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Manier, M. Lisa; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) studies increasingly focus on endogenous small molecular weight metabolites and consequently bring special analytical challenges. Since analytical tissue blanks do not exist for endogenous metabolites, careful consideration must be given to confirm molecular identity. Here we present approaches for the improvement in detection of endogenous amine metabolites such as amino acids and neurotransmitters in tissues through chemical derivatization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS. Chemical derivatization with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (CA) was used to improve sensitivity and specificity. CA was applied to the tissue via MALDI sample targets precoated with a mixture of derivatization reagent and ferulic acid (FA) as a MALDI matrix. Spatial distributions of chemically derivatized endogenous metabolites in tissue were determined by high-mass resolution and MSn imaging mass spectrometry. We highlight an analytical strategy for metabolite validation whereby tissue extracts are analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS to unambiguously identify metabolites and distinguish them from isobaric compounds. PMID:25044893

  8. Biophysical constraints of optogenetic inhibition at presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Mahn, Mathias; Prigge, Matthias; Ron, Shiri; Levy, Rivka; Yizhar, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of optogenetic inhibition at presynaptic terminals using halorhodopsin, archaerhodopsin and chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins. Precisely timed activation of both archaerhodopsin and halorhodpsin at presynaptic terminals attenuated evoked release. However, sustained archaerhodopsin activation was paradoxically associated with increased spontaneous release. Activation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins triggered neurotransmitter release upon light onset. Our results indicate that the biophysical properties of presynaptic terminals dictate unique boundary conditions for optogenetic manipulation. PMID:26950004

  9. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities.

  11. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  12. In Vivo Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Modulators with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Yang, Shaolin; Fischer, Bernard A.; Rowland, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo measurement of neurotransmitters and modulators is now feasible with advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) techniques. This review provides a basic tutorial of MRS, describes the methods available to measure brain glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutathione, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glycine, and serine at magnetic field strengths of 3Tesla or higher, and summarizes the neurochemical findings in schizophrenia. Overall, 1H-MRS holds great promise for producing biomarkers that can serve as treatment targets, prediction of disease onset, or illness exacerbation in schizophrenia and other brain diseases. PMID:25614132

  13. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  14. Spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis: a possibly novel cerebral neurotransmitter disorder.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Masruha, Marcelo; Lin, Jaime; Arita, Juliana Harumi; De Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira; Scerni, Débora Amado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Mazzacoratti, Maria Da Graça Naffah; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira

    2011-04-01

    Spontaneous periodic episodes of hypothermia still defy medical knowledge. In 1969, Shapiro et al. described the first two cases of spontaneous periodic hypothermia associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, Dundar et al. reported a case of spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis without corpus callosum agenesis, suggesting that the periodic episodes of hypothermia might be of epileptiform origin. Here we describe two paediatric patients with spontaneous periodic hypothermia without corpus callosum agenesis and demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, altered levels of neurotransmitter metabolites within the cerebrospinal fluid.

  15. Spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis: a possibly novel cerebral neurotransmitter disorder.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Masruha, Marcelo; Lin, Jaime; Arita, Juliana Harumi; De Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira; Scerni, Débora Amado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Mazzacoratti, Maria Da Graça Naffah; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira

    2011-04-01

    Spontaneous periodic episodes of hypothermia still defy medical knowledge. In 1969, Shapiro et al. described the first two cases of spontaneous periodic hypothermia associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, Dundar et al. reported a case of spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis without corpus callosum agenesis, suggesting that the periodic episodes of hypothermia might be of epileptiform origin. Here we describe two paediatric patients with spontaneous periodic hypothermia without corpus callosum agenesis and demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, altered levels of neurotransmitter metabolites within the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:21166673

  16. Exploration of inclusion complexes of neurotransmitters with β-cyclodextrin by physicochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Saha, Subhadeep; Kundu, Mitali; Saha, Binoy Chandra; Barman, Siti

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assemblies of β-cyclodextrin with few of the most important neurotransmitters, viz., dopamine hydrochloride, tyramine hydrochloride and (±)-epinephrine hydrochloride in aqueous medium have been explored by reliable spectroscopic and physicochemical techniques as potential drug delivery systems. Job plots confirm the 1:1 host-guest inclusion complexes, while surface tension and conductivity studies illustrate the inclusion process. The inclusion complexes were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and association constants have been calculated by using Benesi-Hildebrand method. Thermodynamic parameters for the formation of inclusion complexes have been derived by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrate that the overall inclusion processes are thermodynamically favorable.

  17. Nutrients and botanicals for treatment of stress: adrenal fatigue, neurotransmitter imbalance, anxiety, and restless sleep.

    PubMed

    Head, Kathleen A; Kelly, Gregory S

    2009-06-01

    Research shows a dramatic increase in use of the medical system during times of stress, such as job insecurity. Stress is a factor in many illnesses - from headaches to heart disease, and immune deficiencies to digestive problems. A substantial contributor to stress-induced decline in health appears to be an increased production of stress hormones and subsequent decreased immune function. Non-pharmaceutical approaches have much to offer such patients. This article focuses on the use of nutrients and botanicals to support the adrenals, balance neurotransmitters, treat acute anxiety, and support restful sleep.

  18. Endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity increases in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Laux, Alexis; Berthet, Amandine; Porras, Gregory; Canron, Marie-Hélène; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Li, Qin; Qin, Chuan; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Giros, Bruno; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Vital, Anne; Goumon, Yannick; Bezard, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Morphine is endogenously synthesized in the central nervous system and endogenous dopamine is thought to be necessary for endogenous morphine formation. As Parkinson's disease results from the loss of dopamine and is associated with central pain, we considered how endogenous morphine is regulated in the untreated and l-DOPA-treated parkinsonian brain. However, as the cellular origin and overall distribution of endogenous morphine remains obscure in the pathological adult brain, we first characterized the distribution of endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactive cells in the rat striatum. We then studied changes in the endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity of medium spiny neurons in normal, Parkinson's disease-like and l-DOPA-treated Parkinson's disease-like conditions in experimental (rat and monkey) and human Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an unexpected dramatic upregulation of neuronal endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity and levels in experimental and human Parkinson's disease, only partially normalized by l-DOPA treatment. Our data suggest that endogenous morphine formation is more complex than originally proposed and that the parkinsonian brain experiences a dramatic upregulation of endogenous morphine immunoreactivity. The functional consequences of such endogenous morphine upregulation are as yet unknown, but based upon the current knowledge of morphine signalling, we hypothesize that it is involved in fatigue, depression and pain symptoms experienced by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Endogenous formation of morphine in human cells.

    PubMed

    Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Jürgen; Brandsch, Matthias; Dräger, Birgit; Zenk, Meinhart H

    2004-09-28

    Morphine is a plant (opium poppy)-derived alkaloid and one of the strongest known analgesic compounds. Studies from several laboratories have suggested that animal and human tissue or fluids contain trace amounts of morphine. Its origin in mammals has been believed to be of dietary origin. Here, we address the question of whether morphine is of endogenous origin or derived from exogenous sources. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids present in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and human pancreas carcinoma cells (DAN-G) were identified by GC/tandem MS (MS/MS) as norlaudanosoline (DAN-G), reticuline (DAN-G and SH-SY5Y), and morphine (10 nM, SH-SY5Y). The stereochemistry of reticuline was determined to be 1-(S). Growth of the SH-SY5Y cell line in the presence of (18)O(2) led to the [(18)O]-labeled morphine that had the molecular weight 4 mass units higher than if grown in (16)O(2), indicating the presence of two atoms of (18)O per molecule of morphine. Growth of DAN-G cells in an (18)O(2) atmosphere yielded norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline, both labeled at only two of the four oxygen atoms. This result clearly demonstrates that all three alkaloids are of biosynthetic origin and suggests that norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline are endogenous precursors of morphine. Feeding of [ring-(13)C(6)]-tyramine, [1-(13)C, N-(13)CH(3)]-(S)-reticuline and [N-CD(3)]-thebaine to the neuroblastoma cells led each to the position-specific labeling of morphine, as established by GC/MS/MS. Without doubt, human cells can produce the alkaloid morphine. The studies presented here serve as a platform for the exploration of the function of "endogenous morphine" in the neurosciences and immunosciences.

  20. Endogenous adenosine modulates stimulation-induced depression at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Meriney, S D; Grinnell, A D

    1991-01-01

    1. Endogenous adenosine, which is produced by enzymatic degradation of ATP released from synaptic vesicles, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of acetylcholine release from motor nerve terminals. It has been proposed that this auto-inhibition mechanism might contribute significantly to tetanic stimulation-induced depression. 2. Levels of facilitation and depression during a 20 Hz stimulus train differ greatly in different terminals, but are strongly and non-linearly correlated with the terminal's release characteristics (the amount of transmitter released per unit terminal length, or 'release efficacy'). There is a weaker, approximately linear, correlation between depression and release efficacy at 2 Hz stimulation. 3. The effects of both endogenous and exogenously applied adenosine are also highly variable for different nerve terminals. We have shown that much of this variability can be attributed to the release efficacy of each terminal in the case of endogenous effects, and to the size of the nerve terminal in the case of exogenously applied adenosine receptor agonists. 4. When nerve terminals are pooled according to their individual release characteristics, endogenous adenosine can be shown to contribute significantly to stimulation-induced depression of release primarily in terminals that release enough transmitter to generate significant levels of adenosine, but do not release so much transmitter that depletion of releasable quanta is severe. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1688026

  1. Prion diseases and adult neurogenesis: how do prions counteract the brain's endogenous repair machinery?

    PubMed

    Relaño-Ginés, Aroa; Lehmann, Sylvain; Crozet, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Scientific advances in stem cell biology and adult neurogenesis have raised the hope that neurodegenerative disorders could benefit from stem cell-based therapy. Adult neurogenesis might be part of the physiological regenerative process, however it might become impaired by the disease's mechanism and therefore contribute to neurodegeneration. In prion disorders this endogenous repair system has rarely been studied. Whether adult neurogenesis plays a role or not in brain repair or in the propagation of prion pathology remains unclear. We have recently investigated the status of adult neural stem cells isolated from prion-infected mice. We were able to show that neural stem cells accumulate and replicate prions thus resulting in an alteration of their neuronal destiny. We also reproduced these results in adult neural stem cells, which were infected in vitro. The fact that endogenous adult neurogenesis could be altered by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein represents another great challenge. Inhibiting prion propagation in these cells would thus help the endogenous neurogenesis to compensate for the injured neuronal system. Moreover, understanding the endogenous modulation of the neurogenesis system would help develop effective neural stem cell-based therapies.

  2. Endogenous Synthesis of Coenzyme Q in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2007-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) functions in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as a lipophilic antioxidant. There is increasing interest in the use of Q as a nutritional supplement. Although the physiological significance of Q is extensively investigated in eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to human, the eukaryotic Q biosynthesis pathway is best characterized in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At least ten genes (COQ1-COQ10) have been shown to be required for Q biosynthesis and function in respiration. This review highlights recent knowledge about the endogenous synthesis of Q in eukaryotes, with emphasis on S. cerevisiae as a model system. PMID:17482885

  3. Human endogenous retroviruses: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robin A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of proviral DNA into host chromosomal DNA as an obligatory step in the replication cycle of retroviruses is a natural event of genetic recombination between virus and host. When integration occurs in cells of the germ line, it results in mendelian inheritance of viral sequences that we call endogenous retroviruses (ERV) and HERV for humans. HERVs and host often establish a symbiotic relationship, especially in the placenta and in pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but HERVs occasionally have deleterious consequences for the host. This special issue of APMIS features the fascinating relationships between HERV and humans in health and disease. PMID:26818257

  4. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  5. Transcranial low-level laser therapy (810 nm) temporarily inhibits peripheral nociception: photoneuromodulation of glutamate receptors, prostatic acid phophatase, and adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Ferraresi, Cleber; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Kaippert, Beatriz; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Photobiomodulation or low-level light therapy has been shown to attenuate both acute and chronic pain, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. In most cases, the light is applied to the painful area, but in the present study we applied light to the head. We found that transcranial laser therapy (TLT) applied to mouse head with specific parameters (810 nm laser, [Formula: see text], 7.2 or [Formula: see text]) decreased the reaction to pain in the foot evoked either by pressure (von Frey filaments), cold, or inflammation (formalin injection) or in the tail (evoked by heat). The pain threshold increasing is maximum around 2 h after TLT, remains up to 6 h, and is finished 24 h after TLT. The mechanisms were investigated by quantification of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), immunofluorescence, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of brain tissues. TLT increased ATP and prostatic acid phosphatase (an endogenous analgesic) and reduced the amount of glutamate receptor (mediating a neurotransmitter responsible for conducting nociceptive information). There was no change in the concentration of tubulin, a constituent of the cytoskeleton, and the H&E staining revealed no tissue damage. This is the first study to show inhibition of peripheral pain due to photobiomodulation of the central nervous system. PMID:26835486

  6. The ly-6 protein, lynx1, is an endogenous inhibitor of nicotinic signaling in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao Wen; Rekow, Stephen S; Spindel, Eliot R

    2012-10-15

    Our laboratory has previously reported that bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) express a regulatory cascade of classic neurotransmitters and receptors that communicate in an almost neuronal-like manner to achieve physiological regulation. In this paper we show that the similarity between neurotransmitter signaling in neurons and BEC extends to the level of transmitter receptor allosteric modulators. Lynx1 is a member of the ly-6/three-finger superfamily of proteins, many of which modulate receptor signaling activity. Lynx1 specifically has been shown to modulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function in neurons by altering receptor sensitivity and desensitization. We now report that lynx1 forms a complex with α7 nAChR in BEC and serves to negatively regulate α7 downstream signaling events. Treatment of primary cultures of BEC with nicotine increased levels of nAChR subunits and that increase was potentiated by lynx1 knockdown. Lynx1 knockdown also potentiated the nicotine-induced increase in GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) and MUC5AC mRNA expression, and that effect was blocked by α7 antagonists and α7 knockdown. In parallel with the increases in nAChR, GABA(A)R, and mucin mRNA levels, lynx1 knockdown also increased levels of p-Src. Consistent with this, inhibition of Src signaling blocked the ability of the lynx1 knockdown to increase basal and nicotine-stimulated GABA(A)R and mucin mRNA expression. Thus lynx1 appears to act as a negative modulator of α7 nAChR-induced events by inhibiting Src activation. This suggests that lynx1 agonists or mimetics are a potentially important therapeutic target to develop new therapies for smoking-related diseases characterized by increased mucin expression.

  7. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a preconcentration tool for the simultaneous determination of the panel of underivatized neurotransmitters in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Lucyna; Roszkowska, Anna; Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-29

    determination of trace amounts of polar endogenous compounds, such as neurotransmitters, in human urine samples, including samples with a reduced volume obtained from pediatric patients.

  8. Evaluation of Tetrahydrobiopterin Therapy with Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation in Phenylketonuria: Effects on Potential Peripheral Biomarkers, Melatonin and Dopamine, for Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shoji; Moseley, Kathryn; Fu, Xiaowei; Azen, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Phenylketonuria (PKU) is due to a defective hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine (Phe) hydroxylase. Transport of the precursor amino acids from blood into the brain for serotonin and dopamine synthesis is reported to be inhibited by high blood Phe concentrations. Deficiencies of serotonin and dopamine are involved in neurocognitive dysfunction in PKU. Objective (1) To evaluate the effects of sapropterin (BH4) and concurrent use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) on the peripheral biomarkers, melatonin and dopamine with the hypothesis they reflect brain serotonin and dopamine metabolism. (2) To evaluate synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA. (3) To determine the effects of blood Phe concentrations on the peripheral biomarkers concentrations. Methods Nine adults with PKU completed our study consisting of four 4-week phases: (1) LNAA supplementation, (2) Washout, (3) BH4 therapy, and (4) LNAA with BH4 therapy. An overnight protocol measured plasma amino acids, serum melatonin, and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine in first void urine after each phase. Results (1) Three out of nine subjects responded to BH4. A significant increase of serum melatonin levels was observed in BH4 responders with decreased blood Phe concentration. No significant change in melatonin, dopamine or Phe levels was observed with BH4 in the subjects as a whole. (2) Synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA were observed in serum melatonin in BH4 responders. (3) The relationship between serum melatonin and Phe showed a significant negative slope (p = 0.0005) with a trend toward differing slopes among individual subjects (p = 0.066). There was also a negative association overall between blood Phe and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine (P = 0.040 and 0.047). Conclusion Blood Phe concentrations affected peripheral monoamine neurotransmitter biomarker concentrations differently in each individual with PKU. Melatonin levels increased with BH4 therapy only when blood Phe decreased. Monitoring

  9. Adolescent brain maturation, the endogenous cannabinoid system and the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2010-11-01

    Cannabis use during adolescence increases the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life. However, the neurobiological processes underlying this relationship are unknown. This review reports the results of a literature search comprising various neurobiological disciplines, ultimately converging into a model that might explain the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia. The article briefly reviews current insights into brain development during adolescence. In particular, the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in experience-dependent maturation of specific cortical circuitries is examined. The review also covers recent hypotheses regarding disturbances in strengthening and pruning of synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex, and the link with latent psychotic disorders. In the present model, cannabis-induced schizophrenia is considered to be a distortion of normal late postnatal brain maturation. Distortion of glutamatergic transmission during critical periods may disturb prefrontal neurocircuitry in specific brain areas. Our model postulates that adolescent exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive substance in cannabis, transiently disturbs physiological control of the endogenous cannabinoid system over glutamate and GABA release. As a result, THC may adversely affect adolescent experience-dependent maturation of neural circuitries within prefrontal cortical areas. Depending on dose, exact time window and duration of exposure, this may ultimately lead to the development of psychosis or schizophrenia. The proposed model provides testable hypotheses which can be addressed in future studies, including animal experiments, reanalysis of existing epidemiological data, and prospective epidemiological studies in which the role of the dose-time-effect relationship should be central.

  10. Role of Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide in Regulating Vascular Structural Remodeling in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Selena; Tang, Chaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2), an emerging gasotransmitter, was discovered to be endogenously generated in the cardiovascular system. Recently, the physiological effects of endogenous SO2 were confirmed. Vascular structural remodeling (VSR), an important pathological change in many cardiovascular diseases, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Here, the authors reviewed the research progress of endogenous SO2 in regulating VSR by searching the relevant data from PubMed and Medline. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and pulmonary hypertensive rats, SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway was significantly altered. SO2 inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, promoted apoptosis, inhibited the synthesis of extracellular collagen but promoted its degradation, and enhanced antioxidative capacity, thereby playing a significant role in attenuating VSR. However, the detailed mechanisms needed to be further explored. Further studies in this field would be important for the better understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension. Also, clinical trials are needed to demonstrate if SO2 would be a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27721913

  11. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  12. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27492052

  13. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Neurotransmitter Transporter-Like: A Male Germline-specific SLC6 Transporter Required for Drosophila Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Rollins, Janet; Mahowald, Anthony P.; Bazinet, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The SLC6 class of membrane transporters, known primarily as neurotransmitter transporters, is increasingly appreciated for its roles in nutritional uptake of amino acids and other developmentally specific functions. A Drosophila SLC6 gene, Neurotransmitter transporter-like (Ntl), is expressed only in the male germline. Mobilization of a transposon inserted near the 3′ end of the Ntl coding region yields male-sterile mutants defining a single complementation group. Germline transformation with Ntl cDNAs under control of male germline-specific control elements restores Ntl/Ntl homozygotes to normal fertility, indicating that Ntl is required only in the germ cells. In mutant males, sperm morphogenesis appears normal, with elongated, individualized and coiled spermiogenic cysts accumulating at the base of the testes. However, no sperm are transferred to the seminal vesicle. The level of polyglycylation of Ntl mutant sperm tubulin appears to be significantly lower than that of wild type controls. Glycine transporters are the most closely related SLC6 transporters to Ntl, suggesting that Ntl functions as a glycine transporter in developing sperm, where augmentation of the cytosolic pool of glycine may be required for the polyglycylation of the massive amounts of tubulin in the fly's giant sperm. The male-sterile phenotype of Ntl mutants may provide a powerful genetic system for studying the function of an SLC6 transporter family in a model organism. PMID:21298005

  15. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes. PMID:26099947

  16. Genetic Variants of Neurotransmitter-Related Genes and miRNAs in Egyptian Autistic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Ahmed M.; Ismail, Samira; Zarouk, Waheba A.; Abdul Baky, Olwya; Sayed, Ahmed A.; Abd El-Hamid, Sawsan; Salem, Sohair

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with indisputable evidence for a genetic component. This work studied the association of autism with genetic variations in neurotransmitter-related genes, including MAOA uVNTR, MAOB rs1799836, and DRD2 TaqI A in 53 autistic patients and 30 healthy individuals. The study also analyzed sequence variations of miR-431 and miR-21. MAOA uVNTR was genotyped by PCR, MAOB and DRD2 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-based RFLP, and miR-431 and miR-21 were sequenced. Low expressing allele of MAOA uVNTR was frequently higher in female patients compared to that in controls (OR = 2.25). MAOB G allele frequency was more significantly increased in autistic patients than in controls (P < 0.001 for both males and females). DRD2 A1+ genotype increased autism risk (OR = 5.1). Severity of autism tends to be slightly affected by MAOA/B genotype. Plasma MAOB activity was significantly reduced in G than in A allele carrying males. There was no significant difference in patients and maternal plasma MAOA/B activity compared to controls. Neither mutations nor SNPs in miR-431 and miR-21 were found among studied patients. This study threw light on some neurotransmitter-related genes suggesting their potential role in Autism pathogenesis that warrants further studies and much consideration. PMID:24453887

  17. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes.

  18. Fine-tuning of defensive behaviors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray by atypical neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Gomes, F V; Casarotto, P C; Guimarães, F S

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an up-to-date review of the evidence indicating that atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoids (eCBs) play an important role in the regulation of aversive responses in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Among the results supporting this role, several studies have shown that inhibitors of neuronal NO synthase or cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor agonists cause clear anxiolytic responses when injected into this region. The nitrergic and eCB systems can regulate the activity of classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that control PAG activity. We propose that they exert a 'fine-tuning' regulatory control of defensive responses in this area. This control, however, is probably complex, which may explain the usually bell-shaped dose-response curves observed with drugs that act on NO- or CB1-mediated neurotransmission. Even if the mechanisms responsible for this complex interaction are still poorly understood, they are beginning to be recognized. For example, activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1) receptors by anandamide seems to counteract the anxiolytic effects induced by CB1 receptor activation caused by this compound. Further studies, however, are needed to identify other mechanisms responsible for this fine-tuning effect.

  19. Probing interactions of neurotransmitters with twin tailed anionic surfactant: A detailed physicochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rajwinder; Sanan, Reshu; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Keeping in view the role of neurotransmitters (NTs) in central nervous system diseases and in controlling various physiological processes, present study is aimed to study the binding of neurotransmitters (NTs) such as norepinephrine hydrochloride (NE) and serotonin hydrochloride (5-HT) with twin tailed surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements combined with microcalorimetric measurements were used to characterize the interactions between AOT and NTs. Meteoric modifications to emission profile and absorption spectra of NTs upon addition of AOT are indicative of the binding of NTs with AOT. Distinct interactional states such as formation of ion-pairs, induced and regular micelles with adsorbed NTs molecules have been observed in different concentration regimes of AOT. The formation of ion-pairs from oppositely charged NTs and AOT is confirmed by the reduced absorbance, quenched fluorescence intensity and decrease in peak current (ipa) as well as shifts in peak potential (Epa) values. The stoichiometry and formation of the NTs-AOT complexes has been judged and the extent of interactions is quantitatively discussed in terms of binding constant (K) and free energy of binding (ΔG°). The enthalpy (ΔH°mic) and free energy of micellization (ΔG°mic) for AOT in presence and absence of NTs are determined from the enthalpy curves.

  20. Near-future carbon dioxide levels alter fish behaviour by interfering with neurotransmitter function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Dixson, Danielle L.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Sørensen, Christina; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2012-03-01

    Predicted future CO2 levels have been found to alter sensory responses and behaviour of marine fishes. Changes include increased boldness and activity, loss of behavioural lateralization, altered auditory preferences and impaired olfactory function. Impaired olfactory function makes larval fish attracted to odours they normally avoid, including ones from predators and unfavourable habitats. These behavioural alterations have significant effects on mortality that may have far-reaching implications for population replenishment, community structure and ecosystem function. However, the underlying mechanism linking high CO2 to these diverse responses has been unknown. Here we show that abnormal olfactory preferences and loss of behavioural lateralization exhibited by two species of larval coral reef fish exposed to high CO2 can be rapidly and effectively reversed by treatment with an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor. GABA-A is a major neurotransmitter receptor in the vertebrate brain. Thus, our results indicate that high CO2 interferes with neurotransmitter function, a hitherto unrecognized threat to marine populations and ecosystems. Given the ubiquity and conserved function of GABA-A receptors, we predict that rising CO2 levels could cause sensory and behavioural impairment in a wide range of marine species, especially those that tightly control their acid-base balance through regulatory changes in HCO3- and Cl- levels.

  1. BDNF and NT-3 Modulate Neurotransmitter Receptor Expressions on Developing Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Salvi, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) provide the only pathway for transmitting sound evoked activity from the hair cells to the central auditory system. Neurotrophic factor-3 (NT-3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) released from hair cells and supporting cells exert a profound effect on SGN survival and neural firing patterns; however, it is unclear what the effects NT-3 and BDNF have on the type of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on SGN. To address this question, the whole-cell patch clamp recording technique was used to determine what effect NT-3 and BDNF had on the function and expression of glutamate, GABA and glycine receptors on postnatal SGN. Receptor currents induced by the agonist of each receptor were recorded from SGN cultured with or without BDNF or NT-3. NT-3 and BDNF exerted different effects. NT-3, and to a lesser extent BDNF, enhanced the expression of GABA receptors and had comparatively little effect on glutamate receptors. Absence of BDNF and NT-3 resulted in the emergence of glycine-induced currents; however, glycine receptor currents were absent from the short term cultured SGN. In contrast, NT-3 and BDNF suppressed glycine receptor expression on SGN. These results indicate that NT-3 and BDNF exert a profound effect on the types of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on postnatal SGN, results that may have important implications for neural development and plasticity. PMID:19778585

  2. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  3. Vesicular release of neurotransmitters: converting amperometric measurements into size, dynamics and energetics of initial fusion pores.

    PubMed

    Oleinick, Alexander; Lemaître, Frédéric; Collignon, Manon Guille; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Amperometric currents displaying a pre-spike feature (PSF) may be treated so as to lead to precise information about initial fusion pores, viz., about the crucial event initiating neurotransmitter vesicular release in neurons and medullary glands. However, amperometric data alone are not self-sufficient, so their full exploitation requires external calibration to solve the inverse problem. For this purpose we resorted to patch-clamp measurements published in the literature on chromaffin cells. Reported pore radii were thus used to evaluate the diffusion rate of neurotransmitter cations in the partially altered matrix located near the fusion pore entrance. This allowed an independent determination of each initial fusion pore radius giving rise to a single PSF event. The statistical distribution of the radii thus obtained provided for the first time an experimental access to the potential energy well governing the thermodynamics of such systems. The shape of the corresponding potential energy well strongly suggested that, after their creation, initial fusion pores are essentially controlled by the usual physicochemical laws describing pores formed in bilayer lipidic biological membranes, i.e., they have an essentially lipidic nature. PMID:24466657

  4. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-10-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to -aminobutyric acid, -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders.

  5. Brainstem amino acid neurotransmitters and ventilatory response to hypoxia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hehre, Dorothy A; Devia, Carlos J; Bancalari, Eduardo; Suguihara, Cleide

    2008-01-01

    The ventilatory response to hypoxia is influenced by the balance between inhibitory (GABA, glycine, and taurine) and excitatory (glutamate and aspartate) brainstem amino acid (AA) neurotransmitters. To assess the effects of AA in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) on the ventilatory response to hypoxia at 1 and 2 wk of age, inhibitory and excitatory AA were sampled by microdialysis in unanesthetized and chronically instrumented piglets. Microdialysis samples from the NTS area were collected at 5-min intervals and minute ventilation (VE), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and arterial blood gases (ABG) were measured while the animals were in quiet sleep. A biphasic ventilatory response to hypoxia was observed in wk 1 and 2, but the decrease in VE at 10 and 15 min was more marked in wk 1. This was associated with an increase in inhibitory AA during hypoxia in wk 1. Excitatory AA levels were elevated during hypoxia in wk 1 and 2. Changes in ABP, pH, and ABG during hypoxia were not different between weeks. These data suggest that the larger depression in the ventilatory response to hypoxia observed in younger piglets is mediated by predominance of the inhibitory AA neurotransmitters, GABA, glycine, and taurine, in the NTS. PMID:18043517

  6. Competing Insertion and External Binding Motifs in Hydrated Neurotransmitters: Infrared Spectra of Protonated Phenylethylamine Monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Aude; Schütz, Markus; Dopfer, Otto

    2016-01-18

    Hydration has a drastic impact on the structure and function of flexible biomolecules, such as aromatic ethylamino neurotransmitters. The structure of monohydrated protonated phenylethylamine (H(+) PEA-H2 O) is investigated by infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy of cold cluster ions by using rare-gas (Rg=Ne and Ar) tagging and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-D3/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Monohydration of this prototypical neurotransmitter gives an insight into the first step of the formation of its solvation shell, especially regarding the competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions. The spectra of Rg-tagged H(+) PEA-H2 O reveal the presence of a stable insertion structure in which the water molecule is located between the positively charged ammonium group and the phenyl ring of H(+) PEA, acting both as a hydrogen bond acceptor (NH(+) ⋅⋅⋅O) and donor (OH⋅⋅⋅π). Two other nearly equivalent isomers, in which water is externally H bonded to one of the free NH groups, are also identified. The balance between insertion and external hydration strongly depends on temperature. PMID:26584245

  7. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584556

  8. Peptidergic and aminergic neurotransmitters of the exocrine pancreas of the Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata).

    PubMed

    Mensah-Brown, E P; Pallot, D J

    2000-04-01

    The immunochemical distribution of peptidergic and aminergic neurotransmitters in the exocrine pancreas of the Houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata, was determined. Immunoreactivity to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and galanin (Gal) occurred mainly as varicose terminals in the walls of capillaries around the acini and arterioles within the connective tissue. Neuronal cell bodies immunoreactive to ChAT were infrequently observed. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and somatostatin (Som) were observed mainly in intra-acinar cell bodies but nerve fibers immunoreactive to these neuropeptides were also seen along the basal surfaces of the acini. Immunoreactivity to NPY and PP was also discernible in cells of the pancreatic ducts. In addition, NPY occurred as varicose terminals in vessels around the ducts. SP occurred rarely in interacinar ganglia. The distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was similar to that of ChAT and, in addition, the occasional TH immunoreactive intra-acinar neuronal cell body was observed. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) occurred in neuronal cell bodies among the acinar cells as well as nerve fibers along the bases of the acini. The potential roles of these peptidergic and aminergic neurotransmitters in the neurohormonal control of pancreatic secretion are discussed.

  9. Molecular organization and assembly of the presynaptic active zone of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fejtova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2006-01-01

    At chemical synapses, neurotransmitter is released at a restricted region of the presynaptic plasma membrane, called the active zone. At the active zone, a matrix of proteins is assembled, which is termed the presynaptic grid or cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ). Components of the CAZ are thought to localize and organize the synaptic vesicle cycle, a series of membrane trafficking events underlying regulated neurotransmitter exocytosis. This review is focused on a set of specific proteins involved in the structural and functional organization of the CAZ. These include the multi-domain Rab3-effector proteins RIM1alpha and RIM2alpha; Bassoon and Piccolo, two multi-domain CAZ scaffolding proteins of enormous size; as well as members of the CAST/ERC family of CAZ-specific structural proteins. Studies on ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptor cells have fostered understanding the molecular design of the CAZ. In addition, the analysis of the delivery pathways for Bassoon and Piccolo to presynaptic sites during development has produced new insights into assembly mechanisms of brain synapses during development. Based on these studies, the active zone transport vesicle hypothesis was formulated, which postulates that active zones, at least in part, are pre-assembled in neuronal cell bodies and transported as so-called Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs) to sites of synaptogenesis. Several PTVs can fuse on demand with the presynaptic membrane to rapidly form an active zone.

  10. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Rıfat Emrah; Wallace, Kenneth N; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-06-10

    We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/μM, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n=6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels. PMID:21601035

  11. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Wallace, Kenneth N.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/µM, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5 % for n=6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels. PMID:21601035

  12. MicroRNA's impact on neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems: small but mighty mediators of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Martinetz, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders rank among the most common severe diseases worldwide, with millions of people affected worldwide every year. The symptoms are manifold, and the outcome for the patients is often unclear. As a high and yearly rising cost burden for society, anxiety disorders, depression and their related mental disorders are currently a well-researched topic in order to develop new functional pharmacological therapies as alternatives to those that are in use and bear many unpleasant side effects. Brain circuitries, such as those underlying anxiety formations, are mainly driven by the interplay of various neurotransmitter systems and the interaction of different brain loci, as well as the modulating impact of neuropeptides. Targeting those networks is a complex but promising way to regulate mood. Alterations on molecular level of the neuronal cell in response to respective receptor activation, especially at post-transcriptional level via the highly regulatory function of non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to hold a promising future in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and are therefore under intensified investigation. This review focusses on the impact of miRNAs on the neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems of the central nervous system relevant for the formation of anxiety disorders and discusses the potential of miRNAs for the development of new therapeutic strategies for anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:27138168

  13. The fax-1 nuclear hormone receptor regulates axon pathfinding and neurotransmitter expression.

    PubMed

    Much, J W; Slade, D J; Klampert, K; Garriga, G; Wightman, B

    2000-02-01

    Specification of neuron identity requires the activation of a number of discrete developmental programs. Among these is pathway selection by growth cones: in order for a neuron's growth cone to respond appropriately to guidance cues presented by other cells or the extracellular matrix, the neuron must express genes to mediate the response. The fax-1 gene of C. elegans is required for pathfinding of axons that extend along the ventral nerve cord. We show that fax-1 is also required for pathfinding of axons in the nerve ring, the largest nerve bundle in the nematode, and for normal expression of FMRFamide-like neurotransmitters in the AVK interneurons. The fax-1 gene encodes a member of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors and has a DNA-binding domain related to the human PNR and Drosophila Tailless proteins. We observe fax-1 expression in embryonic neurons, including the AVK interneurons, just prior to axon extension, but after neurogenesis. These data suggest that fax-1 coordinately regulates the transcription of genes that function in the selection of axon pathways, neurotransmitter expression and, perhaps, other aspects of the specification of neuron identity.

  14. Novel microfabricated device to measure hormone/neurotransmitter release with millisecond temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kevin D.; Chen, Peng; Xu, Bai; Tokranova, Natalya; Feng, Xiaojun; Castracane, James

    2002-06-01

    We are developing a novel readout for secretion of hormones and neurotransmitter on micro/nanofabricated chips. Traditional biochemical assays of signaling molecules secreted from cells are slow, cumbersome and have at best, a temporal resolution of several seconds. On the other hand, electrochemical measurement of hormone or transmitter secretion can obtain millisecond temporal resolution if the diffusion distance between the release site on the cell and the working electrode is within 1 micron. Carbon fiber microelectrodes can have millisecond time resolution, but can only measure release form a small fraction of the cell surface. We have fabricated arrays of Au electrodes in wells micromachined on the surface of silicon microchips. Each well/microelectrode roughly conforms to the shape of a single cell in order to capture release forma large fraction of the surface area of each cell with minimal diffusional delays. This paper will present details of the microfabrication process flow as well a initial results demonstrating millisecond-resolution measurement of catecholamine secretion form adrenal chromaffin cells. Our goal for this project is to develop enabling technology for massively parallel systems on a chip such as cell-based biosensors to detect neurotoxins and high-throughput assays of drugs that affect neurotransmitter release.

  15. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  16. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  17. Impact of Synaptic Neurotransmitter Concentration Time Course on the Kinetics and Pharmacological Modulation of Inhibitory Synaptic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Andrea; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of synaptic currents is a crucial determinant of rapid signaling between neurons. Traditionally, the mechanisms underlying the shape of synaptic signals are classified as pre- and post-synaptic. Over the last two decades, an extensive body of evidence indicated that synaptic signals are critically shaped by the neurotransmitter time course which encompasses several phenomena including pre- and post-synaptic ones. The agonist transient depends on neurotransmitter release mechanisms, diffusion within the synaptic cleft, spill-over to the extra-synaptic space, uptake, and binding to post-synaptic receptors. Most estimates indicate that the neurotransmitter transient is very brief, lasting between one hundred up to several hundreds of microseconds, implying that post-synaptic activation is characterized by a high degree of non-equilibrium. Moreover, pharmacological studies provide evidence that the kinetics of agonist transient plays a crucial role in setting the susceptibility of synaptic currents to modulation by a variety of compounds of physiological or clinical relevance. More recently, the role of the neurotransmitter time course has been emphasized by studies carried out on brain slice models that revealed a striking, cell-dependent variability of synaptic agonist waveforms ranging from rapid pulses to slow volume transmission. In the present paper we review the advances on studies addressing the impact of synaptic neurotransmitter transient on kinetics and pharmacological modulation of synaptic currents at inhibitory synapses. PMID:21734864

  18. Quantitative mass spectrometry imaging of small-molecule neurotransmitters in rat brain tissue sections using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Hilde-Marléne; Lundin, Erik; Andersson, Malin; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2016-06-01

    Small molecule neurotransmitters are essential for the function of the nervous system, and neurotransmitter imbalances are often connected to neurological disorders. The ability to quantify such imbalances is important to provide insights into the biochemical mechanisms underlying the disorder. This proof-of-principle study presents online quantification of small molecule neurotransmitters, specifically acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, in rat brain tissue sections using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry imaging. By incorporating deuterated internal standards in the nano-DESI solvent we show identification, accurate mapping, and quantification of these small neurotransmitters in rat brain tissue without introducing any additional sample preparation steps. We find that GABA is about twice as abundant in the medial septum-diagonal band complex (MSDB) as in the cortex, while glutamate is about twice as abundant in the cortex as compared to the MSDB. The study shows that nano-DESI is well suited for imaging of small molecule neurotransmitters in health and disease. PMID:26859000

  19. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  20. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  1. Agmatine: identification and inhibition of methamphetamine, kappa opioid, and cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Gerber, Kristin; Ding, Zhe; Roth, Christopher; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Agmatine blocks morphine physical dependence in mammals, but its effects on withdrawal signs caused by other abused drugs have been less studied. One of the reasons is that withdrawal to some of these drugs is difficult to quantify in mammals. An alternative to mammals is planarians, a type of flatworm. Planarians possess mammalian-like neurotransmitters and display withdrawal from amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and opioids. The withdrawal is manifested as a reduction in locomotor behavior following discontinuation of drug exposure. In the present study, our goal was to identify agmatine in planarians and to determine if planarians exposed to agmatine display withdrawal to methamphetamine, a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2), or a kappa-opioid receptor agonist (U-50,488H). Neurochemical experiments revealed that the concentration of agmatine in planarians was 185 +/- 33.7 pmol per mg of planarian weight (dry weight). In behavioral experiments, withdrawal (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) was observed when planarians exposed to each drug (10 microM) for 60 min were placed into water. The withdrawal was attenuated when methamphetamine- or U-50,488H-exposed planarians were tested in agmatine (100 microM). Withdrawal was inhibited similarly when planarians coexposed to agmatine (100 microM) plus methamphetamine (10 microM), WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM), or U-50,488H (10 microM) were tested in water. Arginine, the metabolic precursor to agmatine, was ineffective. Our results identify endogenous agmatine in planarians and demonstrate that agmatine exposure blocks withdrawal to three different drugs in planarians. This suggests that a change in agmatine signaling is a common mechanism in the withdrawal caused by these drugs, at least in planarians.

  2. The Role of Neurotransmitters in Protection against Amyloid-β Toxicity by KiSS-1 Overexpression in SH-SY5Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Milton, Nathaniel G. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin (KP) and kissorphin (KSO) peptides have neuroprotective actions against the Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Overexpression of the human KiSS-1 gene that codes for KP and KSO peptides in SH-SY5Y neurons has also been shown to inhibit Aβ neurotoxicity. The in vivo actions of KP include activation of neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter systems. The present study used antagonists of KP, neuropeptide FF (NPFF), opioids, oxytocin, estrogen, adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors plus inhibitors of catalase, cyclooxygenase, nitric oxide synthase, and the mitogen activated protein kinase cascade to characterize the KiSS-1 gene overexpression neuroprotection against Aβ cell model. The results showed that KiSS-1 overexpression is neuroprotective against Aβ and the action appears to involve the KP or KSO peptide products of KiSS-1 processing. The mechanism of neuroprotection does not involve the activation of the KP or NPFF receptors. Opioids play a role in the toxicity of Aβ in the KiSS-1 overexpression system and opioid antagonists naloxone or naltrexone inhibited Aβ toxicity. The mechanism of KiSS-1 overexpression induced protection against Aβ appears to have an oxytocin plus a cyclooxygenase dependent component, with the oxytocin antagonist atosiban and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor SC-560 both enhancing the toxicity of Aβ. PMID:24967306

  3. The hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is an endogenous sigma-1 receptor regulator.

    PubMed

    Fontanilla, Dominique; Johannessen, Molly; Hajipour, Abdol R; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Jackson, Meyer B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2009-02-13

    The sigma-1 receptor is widely distributed in the central nervous system and periphery. Originally mischaracterized as an opioid receptor, the sigma-1 receptor binds a vast number of synthetic compounds but does not bind opioid peptides; it is currently considered an orphan receptor. The sigma-1 receptor pharmacophore includes an alkylamine core, also found in the endogenous compound N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). DMT acts as a hallucinogen, but its receptor target has been unclear. DMT bound to sigma-1 receptors and inhibited voltage-gated sodium ion (Na+) channels in both native cardiac myocytes and heterologous cells that express sigma-1 receptors. DMT induced hypermobility in wild-type mice but not in sigma-1 receptor knockout mice. These biochemical, physiological, and behavioral experiments indicate that DMT is an endogenous agonist for the sigma-1 receptor.

  4. Participation of endogenous opiates in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in normal men.

    PubMed

    Delitala, G; Giusti, M; Mazzocchi, G; Granziera, L; Tarditi, W; Giordano, G

    1983-12-01

    To assess the influence of endogenous opioids on human gonadotropin secretion, integrated concentrations of gonadotropins during 24-h naloxone infusion (2.08 mg/h) were examined in a group of six normal men. Naloxone significantly stimulated LH secretion in all subjects, whereas serum FSH levels were similar during both saline and naloxone infusion. Serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels increased during the infusion of naloxone, but the delta 4-androstenedione concentration was not modified. The frequency and amplitude of LH secretory episodes were clearly increased when an equal amount of the drug was given and LH concentrations were measured every 15 min for 6 h. The results suggest the endogenous opioids inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in normal men.

  5. Effective Delivery of Endogenous Antioxidants Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongsoo; Kim, Hyunok; Park, Leejin; Min, Dongsoo; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Sooyoung; Park, Moon Hyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is thought to be partially due to the injury of renal cells and the renal micro-environment by free radicals. Free radial scavenging agents that inhibit free radical damage may well prevent the development of underlying conditions such as mesangial expansion (by inhibiting extracellular matrix expression) in these patients. Methods Using techniques for intra-cellular delivery of peptides, we made metallothionein (MT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), potent endogenous antioxidants, readily transducible into cell membrane and tested their protective effect against the development of DN in OLETF rats. Herein, we study antioxidant peptides for their ability to prevent oxidative damage to primary rat mesangial cells (MCs), which are important constituents of renal glomeruli. Results Intraperitoneal administration of these antioxidants resulted in delivery to the kidney and decreased ROS and the expression of downstream signals in renal cells and postponed the usual progression to DN. In in vitro experiments, MT and SOD were efficiently transferred to MCs, and the increased removal of ROS by MT and SOD was proportional to the degree of scavenging enzymes delivered. MT and SOD decreased three major oxidative injuries (hyperglycemia, AGE and ROS exposure) and also injuries directly mediated by angiotensin II in MCs while changing downstream signal transduction. Conclusions The protective effects of MT and SOD for the progression of DN in experimental animals may be associated with the scavenging of ROS by MT and SOD and correlated changes in signal transduction downstream. Concomitant administration of these antioxidant peptides may prove to be a new approach for the prevention and therapy of DN. PMID:26114547

  6. Endogenous Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Pathway in High Altitude Adapted Yaks

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Shiro; Ishizaki, Takeshi; Toga, Hirohisa; Sakai, Akio; Isakova, Jainagul; Taalaibekova, Elnura; Baiserkeev, Zamirbek; Kojonazarov, Baktybek; Aldashev, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced and high altitude pulmonary hypertension are a major problem in the mountain areas of the world. The asymmetric methylarginines (ADMA) inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by competing with L-arginine, and high levels of plasma ADMA predict adverse outcomes in pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the regulation of the ADMA-NO pathway in animals adapted to high altitudes. We measured the plasma ADMA concentration, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH) protein expression, and DDAH activities in the lungs from yaks. Although the yaks are hypoxemic, cardiac function and pulmonary arterial pressures are almost normal, and we found decreased DDAH expression and activity in association with reduced plasma ADMA concentrations. The eNOS expression was significantly higher in yaks. These results indicate that augmented endogenous NO activity in yaks through the ADMA-DDAH pathway and eNOS upregulation account for the low pulmonary vascular tone observed in high altitude adapted yaks. PMID:26380264

  7. [Neuropeptide thyroliberin--an endogenous anticonvulsant in the brain].

    PubMed

    Chepurnov, S A; Chepurnova, N E; Abbasova, K R; Goncharov, O B

    2002-01-01

    Thyroliberin (TRH) promoting endogenous antidepressive effect is the most general regulator of the central mechanisms and visceral functions (especially respiration). Our group pioneered in applying the anticonvulsant action of TRH after local intranasal application. This application TRH in ultra-low doses contrast the method of systemic TRH administration (i.v., i.m. or oral in the large doses--mg). In our experiments intranasal application of 10(-9) M, 10(-10) M and 10(-12) M TRH significantly inhibited the severe epileptic motor fits in rats induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Beneficent effect of TRH is also confirmed by EEG (TRH suppressed SWD in cortex, amygdala and hippocamp). In the experiment that follows compared effects of TRH (pyroGlu-His-Pro-NH2) and its metabolite dipeptide cHis-Pro-NH2 (10(-10) M, 10(-5) M). The experiments make more precise that only TRH but not His-Pro posses the anticonvulsant properties. There is a good believe that medical potentialities of TRH have not been exhausted and its new possibilities of its usage will be revealed in epileptology. PMID:11881332

  8. Endogenous opioid peptides and the control of gonadotrophin secretion.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A N; Lamming, G E; Haynes, N B

    1986-11-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides are a group of recently discovered compounds which occur in the brain of a wide variety of species. Originally named because of their opiate-like activity, they have since been demonstrated to have multifaceted actions, one of which appears to be the modulation of luteinising hormone (LH) secretion. Because of the prime position of LH in the ovulatory process, this role for the opioids has attracted considerable interest. Their mode of action is essentially one of suppression and they work by inhibiting the release of hypothalamic gonadotrophin releasing hormone. Through this mechanism they have been implicated in the suppression of LH secretion during the prepubertal period and the modulation of LH during the oestrous cycle. It is well established that gonadal steroids suppress LH secretion by negative feedback upon the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and this action may be brought about, in part, through intermediary opioidergic neurones. Much of the research to date has been carried out upon laboratory rodents and primates, but there is evidence now accruing that the opioids have similar actions in domestic animals. Knowledge of the role of these compounds may therefore aid in the understanding of an area of commercial importance, namely the control of ovulation in farm livestock.

  9. Involvement of endogenous neuromedin U and neuromedin S in thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Keiko; Akagi, Ai; Shimizu, Seiya; Tateno, Satoshi; Qattali, Abdul Wahid; Mori, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2016-02-19

    We investigated the possible involvement of neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS) in thermoregulation in rats. Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of NMU or NMS increased the back surface temperature (BS-T) in a dose-dependent manner during both the light and dark periods. Pre-treatment with the β3 blocker SR59230A, and the cyclooxygenase blocker indomethacin, inhibited the increase in BS-T induced by NMS. Icv injection of NMS and NMU increased the expression of mRNAs for prostaglandin E synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in the hypothalamus, and that of mRNA for uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in the brown adipose tissue. Comparison of thermogenesis in terms of body temperature under normal and cold conditions revealed that NMS-KO and double-KO mice had a significantly low BS-T during the active phase, whereas NMU-KO mice did not. Exposure to low temperature decreased the BS temperature in all KO mice, but BS-T was lower in NMS-KO and double-KO mouse than in NMU-KO mice. Calorie and oxygen consumption was also significantly lower in all KO mice than in wild-type mice during the dark period. These results suggest that NMU and NMS are involved in thermoregulation via the prostaglandin E2 and β3 adrenergic receptors, but that endogenous NMS might play a more predominant role than NMU.

  10. Opening of Iris flowers is regulated by endogenous auxins.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Wouter G; Dole, Isabelle; Celikel, Fisun G; Harkema, Harmannus

    2013-01-15

    Flower opening in Iris (Iris×hollandica) requires elongation of the pedicel and ovary. This moves the floral bud upwards, thereby allowing the tepals to move laterally. Flower opening is requires with elongation of the pedicel and ovary. In cv. Blue Magic, we investigated the possible role of hormones other than ethylene in pedicel and ovary elongation and flower opening. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and the cytokinins benzyladenine (N6-benzyladenine, BA) and zeatin did not affect opening. Jasmonic acid (JA) and abscisic acid (ABA) were slightly inhibitory, but an inhibitor of ABA synthesis (norflurazon) was without effect. Flower opening was promoted by gibberellic acid (GA(3)), but two inhibitors of gibberellin synthesis (4-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methylphenyltrimethyl ammonium chloride-1-piperidine carboxylate, AMO-1618; ancymidol) did not change opening. The auxins indoleacetic acid (IAA) and naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) strongly promoted elongation and opening. An inhibitor of auxin transport (2,3,5-triodobenzoic acid, TIBA) and an inhibitor of auxin effects [α-(p-chlorophenoxy)-isobutyric acid; PCIB] inhibited elongation and opening. The data suggest that endogenous auxins are among the regulators of the pedicel and ovary elongation and thus of flower opening in Iris. PMID:23218543

  11. Curbing Inflammation through Endogenous Pathways: Focus on Melanocortin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tazeen J.; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Perretti, Mauro; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is now known to be an active process, armed with a multitude of mediators both lipid and protein in nature. Melanocortins are peptides endowed with considerable promise with their proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammatory disease, with tissue protective effects. These peptides and their targets are appealing because they can be seen as a natural way of inducing these effects as they harness endogenous pathways of control. Whereas most of the information generated about these mediators derives from several acute models of inflammation (such as zymosan induced peritonitis), there is some indication that these mediators may inhibit chronic inflammation by modulating cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte apoptosis. In addition, proresolving mediators and their mimics have often been tested alongside therapeutic protocols, hence have been tested in settings more relevant to real life clinical scenarios. We provide here an overview on some of these mediators with a focus on melanocortin peptides and receptors, proposing that they may unveil new opportunities for innovative treatments of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23738228

  12. Infection Barriers to Successful Xenotransplantation Focusing on Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Xenotransplantation may be a solution to overcome the shortage of organs for the treatment of patients with organ failure, but it may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms and the development of xenozoonoses. Whereas most microorganisms may be eliminated by pathogen-free breeding of the donor animals, porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) cannot be eliminated, since these are integrated into the genomes of all pigs. Human-tropic PERV-A and -B are present in all pigs and are able to infect human cells. Infection of ecotropic PERV-C is limited to pig cells. PERVs may adapt to host cells by varying the number of LTR-binding transcription factor binding sites. Like all retroviruses, they may induce tumors and/or immunodeficiencies. To date, all experimental, preclinical, and clinical xenotransplantations using pig cells, tissues, and organs have not shown transmission of PERV. Highly sensitive and specific methods have been developed to analyze the PERV status of donor pigs and to monitor recipients for PERV infection. Strategies have been developed to prevent PERV transmission, including selection of PERV-C-negative, low-producer pigs, generation of an effective vaccine, selection of effective antiretrovirals, and generation of animals transgenic for a PERV-specific short hairpin RNA inhibiting PERV expression by RNA interference. PMID:22491774

  13. The reverse operation of Na+/Cl−-coupled neurotransmitter transporters–why amphetamines take two to tango

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-chloride coupled neurotransmitter transporters achieve reuptake of their physiological substrate by exploiting the pre-existing sodium-gradient across the cellular membrane. This terminates the action of previously released substrate in the synaptic cleft. However, a change of the transmembrane ionic gradients or specific binding of some psychostimulant drugs to these proteins, like amphetamine and its derivatives, induce reverse operation of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. This effect eventually leads to an increase in the synaptic concentration of non-exocytotically released neurotransmitters [and – in the case of the norepinephrine transporters, underlies the well-known indirect sympathomimetic activity]. While this action has long been appreciated, the underlying mechanistic details have been surprisingly difficult to understand. Some aspects can be resolved by incorporating insights into the oligomeric nature of transporters, into the nature of the accompanying ion fluxes, and changes in protein kinase activities. PMID:19891736

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T.; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection. PMID:25819161

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection.

  16. Regulation of vascular tone in rabbit ophthalmic artery: cross talk of endogenous and exogenous gas mediators.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Salvatore; Foresti, Roberta; Villari, Ambra; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio

    2014-12-15

    Nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) modulate vascular tone. In view of their therapeutic potential for ocular diseases, we examined the effect of exogenous CO and H2S on tone of isolated rabbit ophthalmic artery and their interaction with endogenous and exogenous NO. Ophthalmic artery segments mounted on a wire myograph were challenged with cumulative concentrations of phenylephrine (PE) in the presence or absence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA) to inhibit production of NO, the CO-releasing molecules CORMs or the H2S-donor GYY4137. The maximal vasoconstriction elicited by PE reached 20-30% of that induced by KCl but was dramatically increased by incubation with LNNA. GYY4137 significantly raised PE-mediated vasoconstriction, but it did not change the response to PE in the presence of LNNA or the relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). CORMs concentration-dependently inhibited PE-induced constriction, an effect that was synergistic with endogenous NO (reduced by LNNA), but insensitive to blockade of guanylyl cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). In vascular tissues cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels seemed reduced by GYY4137 (not significantly), but were not changed by CORM. These data indicate that CO is able per se to relax isolated ophthalmic artery and to synergize with NO, while H2S counteracts the effect of endogenous NO. CO does not stimulate cGMP production in our system, while H2S may reduce cGMP production stimulated by endogenous NO. These findings provide new insights into the complexities of gas interactions in the control of ophthalmic vascular tone, highlighting potential pharmacological targets for ocular diseases.

  17. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs.

    PubMed

    Aimone, Jason A; Iannaccone, Laurence R; Makowsky, Michael D; Rubin, Jared

    2013-10-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game-one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  18. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  19. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue. PMID:27292833

  20. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  1. Parental representations of neurotic and endogenous depressives.

    PubMed

    Parker, G; Kiloh, L; Hayward, L

    1987-01-01

    Low parental care and parental overprotection have been incriminated as risk factors to depression in adult life. The relevance of these parental characteristics to broad depressive 'types' with their varying imputed aetiologies was assessed by having 26 patients with endogenous depression (ED) and 40 with neurotic depression (ND) complete the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) self-report measure. In comparison to their controls, the EDs did not differ on the parental care and overprotection scales. The NDs, by contrast, were more likely than their controls to report their parents as uncaring and overprotective. A PBI care scale score of less than 10 was particularly discriminating, being reported by 3.8% of the EDs and 37.5% of the NDs. While findings support the binary view of depression in terms of broad imputed aetiological factors, several response biases which might influence the findings are considered. PMID:2959703

  2. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  3. Spintronic characteristics of self-assembled neurotransmitter acetylcholine molecular complexes enable quantum information processing in neural networks and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Majauskaite, Kristina; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zborowski, Krzysztof; Adhikari, Kapil; Krisciukaitis, Sarunas

    2016-09-01

    Implementation of liquid state quantum information processing based on spatially localized electronic spin in the neurotransmitter stable acetylcholine (ACh) neutral molecular radical is discussed. Using DFT quantum calculations we proved that this molecule possesses stable localized electron spin, which may represent a qubit in quantum information processing. The necessary operating conditions for ACh molecule are formulated in self-assembled dimer and more complex systems. The main quantum mechanical research result of this paper is that the neurotransmitter ACh systems, which were proposed, include the use of quantum molecular spintronics arrays to control the neurotransmission in neural networks.

  4. Adenosine analogs inhibit fighting in isolated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palmour, R.M.; Lipowski, C.J.; Simon, C.K.; Ervin, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potent adenosine analogs N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) inhibit fighting and associated agonistic behaviors in isolated male mice. These effects are reversed by methylxanthines; moderate doses of NECA which inhibit fighting have minimal effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. At very low doses, both NECA and PIA increase fighting in parallel with previously reported increases of motor activity. Brain levels of (/sup 3/H)-NECA and (/sup 3/H)-PIA achieved at behaviorally effective doses suggest an involvement of adenosine receptors. The biochemical mechanism of adenosine receptor action with respect to fighting is unknown, but may include neuromodulatory effects on the release of other, more classical neurotransmitters.

  5. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  6. Validated methods for determination of neurotransmitters and metabolites in rodent brain tissue and extracellular fluid by reversed phase UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Marianne Skov-Skov; Bogen, Inger Lise; Lundanes, Elsa; Øiestad, Åse Marit Leere

    2016-08-15

    Fast and sensitive methods for simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA), the two DA-metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), serotonin (5-HT) and the 5-HT-metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), glutamic acid (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rodent brain tissue (1.0-4000nM) and extracellular fluid (ECF) (0.5-2000nM) based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) have been developed. Of the three different sample preparation methods for brain tissue samples tested, a simple and rapid protein precipitation procedure with formic acid was found to give the best results. The neurotransmitters (NTs) and NT metabolites were separated using UHPLC with an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 C18 column (2.1×100mm, 1.8μm particle size) with acidic mobile phase. Gradient elution with methanol was used and quantification was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The total run time was 5.2min including equilibration time. The methods were validated by determining calibration model, intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, limit of detection (LOD), lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), matrix effects (ME), carry-over and stability. Surrogate analytes were used to enable determination of the recovery and ME of the endogenous analytes in brain tissue. The methods were applied for determination of NTs at basal levels in rodent brain ECF and brain tissue homogenate. The developed methods are valuable tools in the studies of mechanisms of drugs of abuse, and neurologic and psychiatric disease. PMID:27336704

  7. Analysis of neurotransmitter amino acids by CE-LIF detection in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Deiana, Luca; Carru, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acids like Alanine (Ala), Glutamic acid (Glu), Aspartic acid (Asp), Serine (Ser), Taurine (Tau), and Glycine (Gly) are widely distributed in biological fluids and tissues and they have important physiological functions, so that the evaluation of their levels in organisms plays an essential role in physiology. We here report a new capillary electrophoresis (CE) method with laser-induced fluorescence detection by which analytes are resolved and detected in less than 12 min both in human plasma and in other samples types, such as red blood cells, urine, cultured cells, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and vitreous humor, thus avoiding the typical limitations of the other methods normally suitable only in one or two matrix types.

  8. Activities of autonomic neurotransmitters in Meibomian gland tissues are associated with menopausal dry eye★

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lianxiang; Jin, Dongling; Gao, Jinsheng; Wang, Liguang; Liu, Xianjun; Wang, Jingzhang; Xu, Zhongxin

    2012-01-01

    The secretory activities of meibomian glands are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. The change in density and activity of autonomic nerves in meibomian glands during menopause play an important role in the pathogenesis of dry eye. In view of this, we established a dry eye rat model by removing the bilateral ovaries. We used neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as markers of autonomic neurotransmitters. Our results showed that the concentration of estradiol in serum significantly decreased, the density of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly increased, the density of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly decreased, and the ratio of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/neuropeptide Y positive staining significantly decreased. These results suggest that a decrease in ovary activity may lead to autonomic nervous system dysfunction, thereby affecting the secretory activity of the meibomian gland, which participates in sexual hormone imbalance-induced dry eye. PMID:25317125

  9. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    PubMed

    Faget, Lauren; Osakada, Fumitaka; Duan, Jinyi; Ressler, Reed; Johnson, Alexander B; Proudfoot, James A; Yoo, Ji Hoon; Callaway, Edward M; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2016-06-21

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  10. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca(2+)-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca(2+) sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  11. Common molecular basis of the sentence comprehension network revealed by neurotransmitter receptor fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zilles, Karl; Bacha-Trams, Maraike; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Amunts, Katrin; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-02-01

    The language network is a well-defined large-scale neural network of anatomically and functionally interacting cortical areas. The successful language process requires the transmission of information between these areas. Since neurotransmitter receptors are key molecules of information processing, we hypothesized that cortical areas which are part of the same functional language network may show highly similar multireceptor expression pattern ("receptor fingerprint"), whereas those that are not part of this network should have different fingerprints. Here we demonstrate that the relation between the densities of 15 different excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory receptors in eight language-related areas are highly similar and differ considerably from those of 18 other brain regions not directly involved in language processing. Thus, the fingerprints of all cortical areas underlying a large-scale cognitive domain such as language is a characteristic, functionally relevant feature of this network and an important prerequisite for the underlying neuronal processes of language functions.

  12. Microelectronics-Based Biosensors Dedicated to the Detection of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of neurotransmitters (NTs) in the human body are related to diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The mechanisms of several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, have been linked to NTs. Because the number of diagnosed cases is increasing, the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases are important. To detect biomolecules including NTs, microtechnology, micro and nanoelectronics have become popular in the form of the miniaturization of medical and clinical devices. They offer high-performance features in terms of sensitivity, as well as low-background noise. In this paper, we review various devices and circuit techniques used for monitoring NTs in vitro and in vivo and compare various methods described in recent publications. PMID:25264957

  13. Stress-induced cognitive dysfunction: hormone-neurotransmitter interactions in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shansky, Rebecca M; Lipps, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms and neural circuits that drive emotion and cognition are inextricably linked. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as a result of stress or other causes of arousal initiates a flood of hormone and neurotransmitter release throughout the brain, affecting the way we think, decide, and behave. This review will focus on factors that influence the function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a brain region that governs higher-level cognitive processes and executive function. The PFC becomes markedly impaired by stress, producing measurable deficits in working memory. These deficits arise from the interaction of multiple neuromodulators, including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and gonadal hormones; here we will discuss the non-human primate and rodent literature that has furthered our understanding of the circuitry, receptors, and signaling cascades responsible for stress-induced prefrontal dysfunction.

  14. The neural basis of the complex mental task of meditation: neurotransmitter and neurochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Newberg, A B; Iversen, J

    2003-08-01

    Meditation is a complex mental process involving changes in cognition, sensory perception, affect, hormones, and autonomic activity. Meditation has also become widely used in psychological and medical practices for stress management as well as a variety of physical and mental disorders. However, until now, there has been limited understanding of the overall biological mechanism of these practices in terms of the effects in both the brain and body. We have previously described a rudimentary neuropsychological model to explain the brain mechanisms underlying meditative experiences. This paper provides a substantial development by integrating neurotransmitter systems and the results of recent brain imaging advances into the model. The following is a review and synthesis of the current literature regarding the various neurophysiological mechanisms and neurochemical substrates that underlie the complex processes of meditation. It is hoped that this model will provide hypotheses for future biological and clinical studies of meditation.

  15. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  16. Activities of autonomic neurotransmitters in Meibomian gland tissues are associated with menopausal dry eye.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianxiang; Jin, Dongling; Gao, Jinsheng; Wang, Liguang; Liu, Xianjun; Wang, Jingzhang; Xu, Zhongxin

    2012-12-15

    The secretory activities of meibomian glands are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. The change in density and activity of autonomic nerves in meibomian glands during menopause play an important role in the pathogenesis of dry eye. In view of this, we established a dry eye rat model by removing the bilateral ovaries. We used neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as markers of autonomic neurotransmitters. Our results showed that the concentration of estradiol in serum significantly decreased, the density of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly increased, the density of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly decreased, and the ratio of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/neuropeptide Y positive staining significantly decreased. These results suggest that a decrease in ovary activity may lead to autonomic nervous system dysfunction, thereby affecting the secretory activity of the meibomian gland, which participates in sexual hormone imbalance-induced dry eye.

  17. In-capillary derivatization and capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid neurotransmitters from brain microdialysis samples.

    PubMed

    Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine; Renaud, Louis; Renaud, Bernard; Zimmer, Luc

    2008-09-26

    A new in-capillary derivatization method with naphtalene-2,3-dicarboxyaldehyde (NDA)/CN(-) has been developed for capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of brain microdialysate amino acids. Samples are sandwiched between two plugs of reagent mixture at the capillary inlet and subsequently separated. Highest derivatization yields are obtained by using a reagent to sample plug length ratio equal to 4, performing a first electrophoretic mixing followed by a zero potential amplification step before applying the separation voltage and using a NaCN to NDA concentration ratio equal to 1. This new single-step methodology allows the analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  18. Discovery and characterization of gut microbiota decarboxylases that can produce the neurotransmitter tryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brianna B.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Cimermancic, Peter; Donia, Mohamed S.; Zimmermann, Michael; Taketani, Mao; Ishihara, Atsushi; Kashyap, Purna C.; Fraser, James S.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Several recent studies describe the influence of the gut microbiota on host brain and behavior. However, the mechanisms responsible for microbiota-nervous system interactions are unknown. Using a combination of genetics, biochemistry, and crystallograp