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Sample records for endonasal endoscopic repair

  1. Endoscopic endonasal repair of spontaneous CSF fistulae.

    PubMed

    Tormenti, Matthew J; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos D; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Snyderman, Carl H; Gardner, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a fully endoscopic endonasal repair of a spontaneous CSF leak caused by a defect in the anterior fossa floor. Patients were positioned supine in a Mayfield headholder in slight extension. A complete ethmoidectomy was performed to expose the defect. The middle turbinate was removed to increase visualization and allow for more working room. The defect was identified and exposed. A nasoseptal flap was raised and placed over the defect. A free-mucosal graft fashioned from the removed middle turbinate was placed on the nasoseptal donor site. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/gAN2cvQVXCE .

  2. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Caused by a Rare Traumatic Clival Fracture

    PubMed Central

    HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; KOMATSU, Fuminari; HOTTA, Kazuko; IMAI, Masaaki; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old male presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea associated with head trauma sustained as a pedestrian in a traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed pneumocephalus and multiple cranial bone fractures, including the clivus. Although the CSF rhinorrhea was treated conservatively for a week, clinical symptoms did not improve and surgical repair was performed. Preoperative thin-sliced bone CT and steady-state magnetic resonance images revealed a bone defect at the middle clivus and a collection of CSF fluid from the clival fistula in the sphenoid sinus. Endoscopic endonasal reconstruction was performed, and the 3-mm diameter dural tear and bone defect at the middle clivus were well visualized. The fistula was repaired using a pedicled nasoseptal mucosal flap. The CSF rhinorrhea completely disappeared as a result of the endoscopic endonasal surgery. The present report describes a rare case of CSF rhinorrhea caused by a traumatic clival fracture and surgical management by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:26804187

  3. Endoscopic Endonasal Odontoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Mascari, Carmelo; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Odontoidectomy is the treatment of choice for irreducible ventral cervical-medullary compression. The endonasal endoscopic approach is an innovative approach for odontoidectomy. The aim of this article is to identify in which conditions this approach is indicated, discussing variants of the technique for selected cases of craniovertebral malformation with platybasia. We believe that the technical difficulties of this approach are balanced by the advantages for patients. Some conditions related to the patient and to the anatomy of the craniovertebral junction may favor adoption of the endoscopic endonasal approach, which should be considered complementary and not alternative to standard approaches.

  4. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  5. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  6. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  7. Endonasal endoscopic closure of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, S; Righini, C; Lavielle, J P; Passagia, J G; Reyt, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (beta(2)-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed.

  8. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  9. Endoscopic Endonasal-Assisted Resection of Orbital Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Wencan; Yan, Wentao; Tu, Yunhai; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-07-14

    Orbital schwannomas are rare and despite a variety of external surgical approaches previously utilized, removal of tumors located in the deep orbital apex remains challenging. The endoscopic endonasal approach has been used increasingly for various apical tumours, but few describe this technique for orbital schwannomas. The authors describe 2 cases of orbital schwannoma removed via an endoscopic endonasal assisted approach. The first patient was a 31-year-old Cantonese female who was found to have an 11 × 8 × 8 mm right orbital apical schwannoma which was removed using an endoscopic endonasal sphenoethmoidal approach. The second patient was a 78-year-old Caucasian male who had a 28 × 17 × 18 mm orbital schwannoma removed via a transcaruncular and endoscopic endonasal-assisted approach. These findings suggest that the use of an endonasal approach may facilitate the safe removal of selected medially located orbital schwannomas whose posterior margins involve the orbital apex.

  10. Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, J. Drew; Vender, John R.; Alleyne, Cargill H.; Solares, C. Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cranial base meningiomas have traditionally been addressed via frontal or frontolateral approaches. However, with the advances in endoscopic endonasal treatment of pituitary lesions, the transphenoidal approach is being expanded to address lesions of the petrous ridge, anterior clinoid, clivus, sella, parasellar region, tuberculum, planum, olfactory groove, and crista galli regions. The expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA) has the advantage of limiting brain retraction and resultant brain edema, as well as minimizing manipulation of neural structures. Herein, we describe the techniques of transclival, transphenoidal, transplanum, and transcribiform resections of anterior skull base meningiomas. Selected cases are presented. PMID:23730542

  11. The selective odontoidectomy: endoscopic endonasal approach to the craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Osman; Tugcu, Bekir; Gunaldi, Omur; Baydin, Sevki Serhat; Demirgil, Bulent Timur; Sam, Bulent; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Tanriover, Necmettin

    2014-07-01

    The resection of the odontoid process via an extended endoscopic endonasal approach has been recently proposed as an alternative to the microscopic transoral method. We aimed to delineate a minimally invasive endoscopic transnasal odontoidectomy and to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the anterior craniovertebral junction (CVJ). The anterior CVJ of 14 fresh adult cadavers were selectively accessed via a binostril endoscopic endonasal approach using 0- and 30-degree endoscopes. The nasopharynx was widely exposed without removing any of the turbinates and without performing a sphenoidotomy. Occipital condyles and lateral masses of the C1 vertebra have been exposed inferiorly at lateral margins of the exposure, in addition to the foramen lacerum, which came into view at the superolateral corner of the operative field. The anterior arch of C1 and the upper 1.5 cm of the odontoid process of C2 have been removed via a minimally invasive endoscopic transnasal approach in all dissections. We propose the selective odontoidectomy as a minimally invasive method for the endoscopic endonasal removal of the odontoid process. By using this approach, turbinates and the sphenoid sinus remain unharmed. In addition, this approach may be used in exposing pathologies situated laterally at the anterior CVJ, such as the lateral masses of atlas and occipital condyles.

  12. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yr; Sachdev, S; Parihar, V; Namdev, H; Bhatele, Pr

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma.

  13. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, YR; Sachdev, S; Parihar, V; Namdev, H; Bhatele, PR

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma. PMID:23188987

  14. Variations of endonasal anatomy: relevance for the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ingels, Koen; Mylanus, Emmanuel; Grotenhuis, J. André

    2010-01-01

    Background The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) to the pituitary is performed by ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgeons in collaboration with neurosurgeons but also by neurosurgeons alone even though neurosurgeons have not been trained in rhinological surgery. Purpose To register the frequency of endonasal anatomical variations and to evaluate whether these variations hinder the progress of EETA and require extra rhinological surgical skills. Methods A prospective cohort study of 185 consecutive patients receiving an EETA through a binostril approach was performed. All anatomical endonasal variations were noted and the relevance for the progress of surgery evaluated. Results In 48% of patients, anatomical variations were recognized, the majority of which were spinae septi and septum deviations. In 5% of patients, the planned binostril approach had to be converted into a mononostril approach; whereas in 18% of patients with an anatomical variation, a correction had to be performed. There was no difference between the ENT surgeon and the neurosurgeon performing the approach. Complications related to the endonasal phase of the surgery occurred in 3.8%. Fluoroscopy or electromagnetic navigation has been used during 6.5% of the surgeries. Conclusion Although endonasal anatomical variations are frequent, they do not pose a relevant obstacle for EETA. PMID:20306338

  15. Variations of endonasal anatomy: relevance for the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach.

    PubMed

    van Lindert, Erik J; Ingels, Koen; Mylanus, Emmanuel; Grotenhuis, J André

    2010-06-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) to the pituitary is performed by ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgeons in collaboration with neurosurgeons but also by neurosurgeons alone even though neurosurgeons have not been trained in rhinological surgery. To register the frequency of endonasal anatomical variations and to evaluate whether these variations hinder the progress of EETA and require extra rhinological surgical skills. A prospective cohort study of 185 consecutive patients receiving an EETA through a binostril approach was performed. All anatomical endonasal variations were noted and the relevance for the progress of surgery evaluated. In 48% of patients, anatomical variations were recognized, the majority of which were spinae septi and septum deviations. In 5% of patients, the planned binostril approach had to be converted into a mononostril approach; whereas in 18% of patients with an anatomical variation, a correction had to be performed. There was no difference between the ENT surgeon and the neurosurgeon performing the approach. Complications related to the endonasal phase of the surgery occurred in 3.8%. Fluoroscopy or electromagnetic navigation has been used during 6.5% of the surgeries. Although endonasal anatomical variations are frequent, they do not pose a relevant obstacle for EETA.

  16. Indications, technique and results of endonasal endoscopic ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Göde, U; Wigand, M E

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic ethmoid sinus surgery was introduced in Erlangen in 1976. Posterior-to-anterior ethmoidectomy under the optical control of a 70 degrees telescope with a suction-irrigation handpiece was established for treatment of chronic-diffuse hyperplastic paranasal sinusitis. This technique complements partial resections of the ethmoid. The different procedures are applied depending upon the extent of the disease. The indication for endonasal endoscopic surgery was expanded with practical experience. Diseases of the nasolacrimal duct and the frontal sinus, the frontal skull base as well as the orbita often proved to be accessible for endonasal surgery. A survey of the technical aspects of endoscopic ethmoid surgery and an introduction of the extended range of indications are presented together with the results of each procedure.

  17. [ENDOSCOPIC REMOVAL OF TUBERCULUM SELLAE MENINGEOMA THROUGH ENDONASAL TRANSSPHENOIDAL APPROACH].

    PubMed

    Fülöp, Béla; Bella, Zsolt; Palágyi, Péter; Barzó, Pál

    2016-03-30

    Experiences acquired in our department with endoscope assisted microsurgical transsphenoidal pituitary surgery encouraged us to expanded the endoscopic approach to skull base lesions. The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach proved to be less traumatic to the traditional microsurgical approaches, yet very effective. The endoscopic transsphenoidal technique was applied in a patient havin anterior skull base tumor. The patient was a 49-year-old woman with several months history of left visual defect. The magnetic resonance (MR) scans of the skull revealed a midline anterior fossa space-occupying lesion measuring 21 x 16 x 22 mm located on planum sphenoidale, tuberculum sellae and intrasellar. The tumor compressed both optic nerves and optic chiasm. Total resection of the tumor was achieved by use of endoscopic transnasal, transsphenoidal technique. This is the first reported case of an anterior fossa meningeoma being treated by an endoscopic transsphenoidal technique in Hungary.

  18. The need for intranasal packing in endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chiaki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yao, William; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2010-11-01

    The present findings indicate that conventional nasal packing is not required for endoscopic endonasal surgery. To evaluate the routine use of packing in endoscopic endonasal surgery. From January 2006 through January 2009, 146 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal surgery performed by the same surgeon in Kyoto University Hospital were evaluated. The surgical procedure was ended with conventional gauze packing in 70 consecutive patients from January 2006 through August 2007 (Packing group), and placing of oxidized cellulose on operative sites was performed in 76 consecutive patients from September 2007 to January 2009 (Non-packing group). We analyzed demographic characteristics, comorbidities, surgical procedures, incidence of packing the nose after excessive postoperative bleeding, and occurrence of postoperative adhesion. No significant differences in the demographic characteristics, except for gender, and in comorbidities were found between the two groups. The number of endoscopic sinus surgery procedures with septoplasty and/or turbinoplasty, or tumor extirpation in the Non-packing group was significantly larger than that in the Packing group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative bleeding or postoperative adhesion between the two groups.

  19. Indications and limitations of endoscopic endonasal orbitotomy for orbital lesion.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Masayuki; Akiyama, Kosuke; Kagawa, Masahiro; Tamiya, Takashi; Mori, Nozomu

    2012-07-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgical techniques have developed tremendously in the last 20 years. Endoscopic techniques have been applied to the treatment of cranial base lesions, pituitary tumors, orbital lesions, pterygopalatine fossa lesions, infratemporal fossa lesions, posterior cranial fossa lesions, and clival lesions. In some reports, endoscopic endonasal transparanasal orbitotomies have been indicated for lesions localized to the medial and inferomedial parts of the orbit. The aim of this article was to present the technique of endoscopic endonasal orbitotomy (EEO) for orbital extraperiosteal and intraperiosteal lesions, as well as its indications and limitations. We present cases of 4 patients who underwent EEO for typical extraperiosteal and intraperiosteal orbital lesions. We examined the indications and limitations in each case. All 4 orbital lesions were completely removed by EEO with no major complications. The EEO procedure, which does not require a skin incision, is a minimally invasive surgery used for treating orbital retrobulbar lesions. It leads to excellent cosmetic results with little bleeding. In the future, we need to determine its operative indications, safety, and dangers. It is necessary for us to further improve this surgical technique to allow for the generalization of the procedure.

  20. A physical simulator for endoscopic endonasal drilling techniques: technical note.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Wang, Anthony C; Joseph, Jacob R; Wang, Page I; Sullivan, Stephen E; McKean, Erin L; Shih, Albert J; Rooney, Deborah M

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors present a physical model developed to teach surgeons the requisite drilling techniques when using an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to the skull base. EEA is increasingly used for treating pathologies of the ventral and ventrolateral cranial base. Endonasal drilling is a unique skill in terms of the instruments used, the long reach required, and the restricted angulation, and gaining competency requires much practice. Based on the successful experience in creating custom simulators, the authors used 3D printing to build an EEA training model from post-processed thin-cut head CT scans, formulating the materials to provide realistic haptic feedback and endoscope handling. They performed a preliminary assessment at 2 institutions to evaluate content validity of the simulator as the first step of the validation process. Overall results were positive, particularly in terms of bony landmarks and haptic response, though minor refinements were suggested prior to use as a training device.

  1. [Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal study of skull base anatomy].

    PubMed

    Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; López-Álvarez, Beatriz; Lloret-García, Jaime; Sanchez-del Campo, Jose; Gras-Albert, Juan Ramon; Moreno-López, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Training in dissection of the paranasal sinuses and the skull base is essential for anatomical understanding and correct surgical techniques. Three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of endoscopic skull base anatomy increases spatial orientation and allows depth perception. To show endoscopic skull base anatomy based on the 3D technique. We performed endoscopic dissection in cadaveric specimens fixed with formalin and with the Thiel technique, both prepared using intravascular injection of coloured material. Endonasal approaches were performed with conventional 2D endoscopes. Then we applied the 3D anaglyph technique to illustrate the pictures in 3D. The most important anatomical structures and landmarks of the sellar region under endonasal endoscopic vision are illustrated in 3D images. The skull base consists of complex bony and neurovascular structures. Experience with cadaver dissection is essential to understand complex anatomy and develop surgical skills. A 3D view constitutes a useful tool for understanding skull base anatomy. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Suprasellar pediatric craniopharyngioma resection via endonasal endoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zarina S; Lang, Shih-Shan; Kamat, Ameet R; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Storm, Phillip B; Lee, John Y K

    2013-11-01

    Purely endoscopic endonasal approaches to surgical resection of pediatric suprasellar craniopharyngiomas are uncommonly performed. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and to describe the short-term outcomes of endonasal endoscopic approaches for the gross total resection of suprasellar craniopharyngiomas in the pediatric population. A combined neurosurgical-otolaryngologic team performed gross total resection of craniopharyngiomas in seven pediatric patients (mean age 9.6 years) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia over 2011-2012. Short-term outcomes were analyzed over a mean follow-up period of 6.3 months. All tumors involved the sellar and/or suprasellar space and contained some cystic component. The mean maximal tumor diameter was 31.5 mm (range 18.5-62.0 mm). Using a binostril approach, gross total tumor resection was obtained in all patients (100 %). All patients with preoperative visual dysfunction demonstrated improvement in visual acuity. New or stable panhypopituitarism was observed in all cases. All patients developed postoperative diabetes insipidus, and cerebrospinal fluid leak occurred in one patient (15 %). Complete radiographic resection of pediatric craniopharyngioma can be achieved via a purely endoscopic endonasal approach. In particular, this approach can be performed safely using the "two-nostrils-four-hands" technique with intraoperative neuronavigation. This approach should be highly considered in patients with progressive visual dysfunction. Further studies are needed to characterize the long-term surgical and clinical outcome of pediatric patients treated with this surgical approach.

  3. Evolution from microscopic transoral to endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Soriano-Barón, Hector Enrique; Sotomayor-González, Arturo; Arriada-Mendicoa, Nicasio; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis; Palma-Díaz, Marité; Barges-Coll, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the indications, benefits, and complications between the endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) and the microscopic transoral approach to perform an odontoidectomy. Transoral approaches have been standard for odontoidectomy procedures; however, the potential benefits of the EEA might be demonstrated to be a more innocuous technique. The authors present their experience with 12 consecutive cases that required odontoidectomy and posterior instrumentation. Twelve consecutive cases of craniovertebral junction instability with or without basilar invagination were diagnosed at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City, Mexico, between January 2009 and January 2013. The EEA was used for 5 cases in which the odontoid process was above the nasopalatine line, and was compared with 7 cases in which the odontoid process was beneath the nasopalatine line; these were treated using the transoral microscopic approach (TMA). Odontoidectomy was performed after occipital-cervical or cervical posterior augmentation with lateral mass and translaminar screws. One case was previously fused (Oc-C4 fusion). The senior author performed all surgeries. American Spinal Injury Association scores were documented before surgical treatment and after at least 6 months of follow-up. Neurological improvement after odontoidectomy was similar for both groups. From the transoral group, 2 patients had postoperative dysphonia, 1 patient presented with dysphagia, and 1 patient had intraoperative CSF leakage. The endoscopic procedure required longer surgical time, less time to extubation and oral feeding, a shorter hospital stay, and no complications in this series. Endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy is a feasible, safe, and well-tolerated procedure. In this small series there was no difference in the outcome between the EEA and the TMA; however, fewer complications were documented with the endonasal technique.

  4. Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Castelnuovo, Paolo; Dallan, Iacopo; Battaglia, Paolo; Bignami, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic techniques have undergone tremendous advancement in the past years. From the management of phlogistic pathologies, we have learned to manage skull base lesions and even selected intracranial diseases. Current anatomical knowledge plus computer-aided surgery has enabled surgeons to remove large lesions in the paranasal sinuses extending beyond the boundaries of the sinuses themselves. In this sense, management of benign diseases via endoscopic routes is nowadays well accepted whilst the role of endoscopic techniques in sinonasal malignancies is still under investigation. Nowadays, it is possible to tackle different pathologies placed not only in the ventral skull base, but also extended laterally (infratemporal fossa and petrous apex) and even, in really selected cases, within the orbit. The ability to resect and reconstruct has improved significantly. At the moment, the improvement in surgical techniques, like the four-handed technique, has rendered endoscopic procedures capable of managing complex pathologies, according the same surgical principles of the open approaches. From now onwards, frameless neuronavigation, modular approaches, intraoperative imaging systems and robotic surgery are and will be an increasingly important part of endonasal surgery, and they will be overtaken by further evolution.

  5. Endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of a ventral pontine cavernous malformation: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis; Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Palacios-Ortíz, Isaac Jair; Perdomo-Pantoja, Alexander; Nares-López, Felipe Eduardo; Vega-Alarcón, Alfredo

    2016-10-21

    Brainstem cavernous malformations are challenging due to the critical anatomy and potential surgical risks. Anterolateral, lateral, and dorsal surgical approaches provide limited ventral exposure of the brainstem. The authors present a case of a midline ventral pontine cavernous malformation resected through an endoscopic endonasal transclival approach based on minimal brainstem transection, negligible cranial nerve manipulation, and a straightforward trajectory. Technical and reconstruction technique advances in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery provide a direct, safe, and effective corridor to the brainstem.

  6. Transnasal endoscopic repair of pediatric meningoencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Keshri, Amit Kumar; Shah, Saurin R.; Patadia, Simple D.; Sahu, Rabi N.; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Encephaloceles in relation to the nose are rare lesions affecting the skull base. In the pediatric population, majority are congenital lesions manifesting as nasal masses requiring surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 6 consecutive patients below 12 years of age with intranasal meningoencephalocele treated by endonasal endoscopic approach at our tertiary centre was done. The follow up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years. A detailed clinical and radiological evaluation of these cases was done. Endonasal endoscopic repair (gasket seal/fat plug) was carried out in all cases. Results: Out of 6 patients, 4 patients had post-traumatic and rest 2 cases had congenital meningo-encephaloceles. All patients were asymptomatic in post-operative follow up period. One patient had minor complication of nasal alar collapse due to intra-operative adherence of encephalocele to cartilaginous framework. Conclusion: Transnasal endoscopic repair of anterior skull base meningoencephalocele is a minimally invasive single stage surgery, and has advantage in terms of lesser hospital stay, cost of treatment, and better cosmesis. The repair technique should be tailored to the size of defect to provide a water-tight seal for better outcome. PMID:27195032

  7. Meckel's cave access: anatomic study comparing the endoscopic transantral and endonasal approaches.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Jason; Suruliraj, Anand; Carrau, Ricardo; Panizza, Benedict; Solares, C Arturo

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in endonasal endoscopy have facilitated the surgical access to the lateral skull base including areas such as Meckel's cave. This approach has been well documented, however, few studies have outlined transantral specific access to Meckel's. A transantral approach provides a direct pathway to this region obviating the need for extensive endonasal and transsphenoidal resection. Our aim in this study is to compare the anatomical perspectives obtained in endonasal and transantral approaches. We prepared 14 cadaveric specimens with intravascular injections of colored latex. Eight cadavers underwent endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid approaches to Meckel's cave. Six additional specimens underwent an endoscopic transantral approach to the same region. Photographic evidence was obtained for review. 30 CT scans were analyzed to measure comparative distances to Meckel's cave for both approaches. The endoscopic approaches provided a direct access to the anterior and inferior portions of Meckel's cave. However, the transantral approach required shorter instrumentation, and did not require clearing of the endonasal corridor. This approach gave an anterior view of Meckel's cave making posterior dissection more difficult. A transantral approach to Meckel's cave provides access similar to the endonasal approach with minimal invasiveness. Some of the morbidity associated with extensive endonasal resection could possibly be avoided. Better understanding of the complex skull base anatomy, from different perspectives, helps to improve current endoscopic skull base surgery and to develop new alternatives, consequently, leading to improvements in safety and efficacy.

  8. Endoscopic Endonasal Transplanum Approach to the Paraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Leon T.; Morgan, Michael K.; Snidvongs, Kornkiat; Chin, David C. W.; Sacks, Ray; Harvey, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the relevance of an endoscopic transnasal approach to the surgical treatment of paraophthalmic aneurysms. Setting Binasal endoscopic transplanum surgery was performed. Participants Seven cadaver heads were studied. Main Outcome Measures (1) Dimensions of the endonasal corridor, including the operative field depth, lateral limits, and the transplanum craniotomy. (2) The degree of vascular exposure. (3) Surgical maneuverability and access for clip placements. Results The mean operative depth was 90 ± 4 mm. The lateral corridors were limited proximally by the alar rim openings (29 ± 4 mm) and distally by the distance between the opticocarotid recesses (19 ± 2 mm). The mean posteroanterior distance and width of the transplanum craniotomy were 19 ± 2 mm and 17 ± 3 mm, respectively. Vascular exposure was achieved in 100% of cases for the clinoidal internal carotid artery (ICA), ophthalmic artery, superior hypophyseal artery, and the proximal ophthalmic ICA. Surgical access and clip placement was achieved in 97.6% of cases for vessels located anterior to the pituitary stalk (odds ratio [OR] 73.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.66 to 710.8; p = 0.00). Conclusion The endoscopic transnasal approach provides excellent visualization of the paraclinoid region vasculature and offers potential surgical alternative for paraclinoid aneurysms. PMID:24436941

  9. Endoscopic expanded endonasal approach: preliminary experience with the new 3D endoscope.

    PubMed

    Felisati, G; Lenzi, R; Pipolo, C; Maccari, A; Messina, F; Revay, M; Lania, A; Cardia, A; Lasio, G

    2013-04-01

    The recent introduction of the 3D endoscope for endonasal surgery has been welcomed because of its promise to overcome the main limitation of endoscopy, namely the lack of stereoscopic vision. This innovation particularly regarded the most complex transnasal surgery of the skull base. We therefore discuss our early experience as ENT surgeons with the use of a purely 3D endoscopic expanded endonasal approach for supradiaphragmatic lesions in 10 consecutive patients. This article will focus on the surgical technique, the complications, the outcome, and more importantly the advantages and limitations of the new device. We believe that the new 3D system shows its main drawback when surgery is conducted in the narrow nasal spaces. Nevertheless, the improved knowledge of the three-dimensional nasal anatomy enabled the ENT surgeon to perform a more selective demolition of the nasal structures even in the anterior part of the nose. The depth perception obtained with the 3D system also permitted a better understanding of the plasticity of the surgical defects, increasing the confidence to perform successful skull base plasties. We believe that, for both the ENT surgeon and the neurosurgeon, the expanded endonasal approach is the main indication for this exciting tool, although larger prospective studies are needed to determine the equality to the 2D HD endoscope in oncological terms.

  10. Endoscopic endonasal approach for a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos D; Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the technical and anatomical nuances needed to perform an endoscopic endonasal removal of a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient is a 47-year-old female with headaches and an incidental finding of a small tuberculum sellae meningioma with no vascular encasement, no optic canal invasion, but mild inferior to superior compression of the cisternal segment of the left optic nerve. Neuroophthalmology assessment revealed no visual defects. Treatment options included clinical observation with imaging follow-up studies, radiosurgery, and resection. The patient elected to undergo surgical removal and an endonasal endoscopic approach was the preferred surgical option. Preoperative radiological studies showed the presence of an osseous ring between the left middle and anterior clinoids, the so-called carotico-clinoidal ring. The surgical implications of this finding and its management are illustrated. The surgical anatomy of the suprasellar region is reviewed, including concepts such as the chiasmatic sulcus and limbus sphenoidale, medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses, and the paraclinoidal and supraclinoidal segments of the internal carotid artery. Emphasis is made in the importance of exposing the distal dural ring of the internal carotid artery and the precanalicular segment of the optic nerve for adequate intradural dissection. The endonasal route allows for early coagulation of the tumor meningeal supply and extensive resection of dural attachments, and importantly, provides an inferior to superior access to the infrachiasmatic region that facilitates complete tumor removal without any manipulation of the optic nerve. The lateral limit of dural removal is formed by the distal dural ring, which is gently coagulated after the tumor is resected. A 45° scope is used to inspect for any residual tumor, in particular at the entrance of the optic nerve into the optic canal and at the most anterior margin of the exposure (limbus sphenoidale). The

  11. Endoscopic endonasal approach for a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Pinheiro-Nieto, Carlos; Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the technical and anatomical nuances needed to perform an endoscopic endonasal removal of a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient is a 47-year-old female with headaches and an incidental finding of a small tuberculum sellae meningioma with no vascular encasement, no optic canal invasion, but mild inferior to superior compression of the cisternal segment of the left optic nerve. Neuroophthalmology assessment revealed no visual defects. Treatment options included clinical observation with imaging follow-up studies, radiosurgery, and resection. The patient elected to undergo surgical removal and an endonasal endoscopic approach was the preferred surgical option. Preoperative radiological studies showed the presence of an osseous ring between the left middle and anterior clinoids, the so-called carotico-clinoidal ring. The surgical implications of this finding and its management are illustrated. The surgical anatomy of the suprasellar region is reviewed, including concepts such as the chiasmatic sulcus and limbus sphenoidale, medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses, and the paraclinoidal and supraclinoidal segments of the internal carotid artery. Emphasis is made in the importance of exposing the distal dural ring of the internal carotid artery and the precanalicular segment of the optic nerve for adequate intradural dissection. The endonasal route allows for early coagulation of the tumor meningeal supply and extensive resection of dural attachments, and importantly, provides an inferior to superior access to the infrachiasmatic region that facilitates complete tumor removal without any manipulation of the optic nerve. The lateral limit of dural removal is formed by the distal dural ring, which is gently coagulated after the tumor is resected. A 45° scope is used to inspect for any residual tumor, in particular at the entrance of the optic nerve into the optic canal and at the most anterior margin of the exposure (limbus sphenoidale). The

  12. Endoscopic endonasal extended transsphenoidal removal of tuberculum sellae meningioma (TSM): an experience of six cases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Forhad H; Haque, Mohammod R; Goel, Atul H; Kawsar, Khandkar A

    2012-10-01

    Tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSMs) are usually removed through a transcranial approach. Recently, the sublabial transsphenoidal microscopic approach has been used to remove such tumours. More recently, endonasal extended transsphenoidal approach is getting popular for removal of tuberculum sellae meningioma. Here, we describe our initial experience of endonasal extended transsphenoidal approach for removal of suprasellar meningiomas in six consecutive cases. Six patients (four female and two male) who presented for headache and visual loss were investigated with MRI of brain that showed tuberculum sellae meningioma compressing visual apparatus. Average size was 3 × 3 cm in three cases and 4 × 4 cm in rest of the three. All patients underwent endoscopic endonasal extended transsphenoidal tumour removal, but in two patients with large tumour, microscopic assistance was needed. Complete tumour removal was done in all cases except one case where perforators seemed to be encased by the tumour and resulted in incomplete removal. The surgical dural and bony defects were repaired in all patients with thigh fat graft. Nasal packing was not used, but inflated balloon of Foley's catheter was used to keep fat in position. There was mild postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in one patient on the fourth postoperative day after removal of lumbar CSF drain and stopped spontaneously on the seventh postoperative day. There were no postoperative CSF leaks or meningitis in the rest of the cases. In one patient, there was visual deterioration due to pressure on optic nerve by grafted fat and improved within 4 weeks. At 4 months after surgery, three patients had normal vision, two patients improved vision comparing with that of preoperative state but with some persisting deficit; one patient had static vision, no new endocrinopathy and no residual tumour on MRI in five cases but residual tumour in remaining case was static at the end of the ninth month. The endoscopic

  13. Endonasal endoscopic reoperation for residual or recurrent craniopharyngiomas.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Singh, Harminder; Negm, Hazem M; Cohen, Salomon; Souweidane, Mark M; Greenfield, Jeffrey P; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Craniopharyngiomas can be difficult to remove completely based on their intimate relationship with surrounding visual and endocrine structures. Reoperations are not uncommon but have been associated with higher rates of complications and lower extents of resection. So radiation is often offered as an alternative to reoperation. The endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach has been used in recent years for craniopharyngiomas previously removed with craniotomy. The impact of this approach on reoperations has not been widely investigated. METHODS The authors reviewed a prospectively acquired database of endonasal endoscopic resections of craniopharyngiomas over 11 years at Weill Cornell Medical College, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, performed by the senior authors. Reoperations were separated from first operations. Pre- and postoperative visual and endocrine function, tumor size, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QOL), extent of resection (EOR), impact of prior radiation, and complications were compared between groups. EOR was divided into gross-total resection (GTR, 100%), near-total resection (NTR, > 95%), and subtotal resection (STR, < 95%). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS Of the total 57 endonasal surgical procedures, 22 (39%) were reoperations. First-time operations and reoperations did not differ in tumor volume, radiological configuration, or patients' BMI. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus (DI) were more common before reoperations (82% and 55%, respectively) compared with first operations (60% and 8.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). For the 46 patients in whom GTR was intended, rates of GTR and GTR+NTR were not significantly different between first operations (90% and 97%, respectively) and reoperations (80% and 100%, respectively). For reoperations, prior radiation and larger tumor volume had lower rates of GTR. Vision improved equally in first operations (80%) compared with reoperations (73%). New anterior

  14. Circumferential watertight dural repair using nitinol U-clips in expanded endonasal and sublabial approaches to the cranial base.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, Francesco; Genden, Eric; Bederson, Joshua

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in the field of expanded endonasal approaches that permit treatment of different cranial base intradural lesions. To report our technique of cranial base dural repair by the application of nitinol U-Clips in endoscope-assisted extended endonasal or sublabial approaches. Closure techniques and postoperative cerebrospinal (CSF) leaks are reported. We reviewed 11 patients with different kinds of cranial base tumors or vascular diseases (2 tuberculum sellae meningiomas, 1 planum sphenoidale meningioma, 4 craniopharyngiomas, 1 recurrent clival chordoma, 1 esthesioneuroblastoma, 1 ethmoidal melanoma metastasis, 1 basilar trunk aneurysm) who underwent an endoscope-assisted extended endonasal or sublabial approach. Dural repair was performed using nitinol U-Clips to circumferentially suture AlloDerm or fascia lata directly to the existing dural borders. Lumbar drainage was not used in 9 patients and was used in 2 patients for 5 days. Patients were evaluated for the appearance of CSF leaks. Postoperative CSF leak was observed in 1 patient (9%). This required a second transnasal repair. Circumferential dural closure with U-Clips is a useful adjunct to prevent CSF leaks after expanded endonasal or sublabial approaches to the cranial base for treatment of intracranial pathology.

  15. Image-Guided Endoscopic Endonasal Transmaxillary Transpterygoid Approach to Meckel's Cave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejian; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Gu, Ye; Xie, Tao; Ge, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to summarize our preliminary experience on the resection of tumors located in Meckel's cave via the endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach with image-guided system and to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. Two patients who had tumors in left Meckel's cave underwent surgical treatment using the image-guided endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach. This particular technique has advantages of no brain retraction, direct vision of tumor resection and protection of surrounding neurovascular structures. Neuronavigation increases the safety of the endoscopic approach.

  16. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Middle Cranial Fossa through the Cavernous Sinus Triangles: Anatomical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, Fuminari; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; IMAI, Masaaki; SHIGEMATSU, Hideaki; KOMATSU, Mika; TSCHABITSCHER, Manfred; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Access from the sphenoid sinus to the middle cranial fossa through the cavernous sinus triangles was evaluated by cadaver dissection. Anatomical analysis demonstrated that the medial temporal dura mater was exposed through the anterior area of the clinoidal triangle, anteromedial triangle, and superior area of the anterolateral triangle, indicating potential corridors to the middle cranial fossa. This study suggests that the cavernous sinus triangles are applicable in selected cases to manage middle cranial fossa lesions by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:25446385

  17. Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Craniovertebral Junction: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tatsuhiro; Platt, Andrew; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background We reviewed the current literature pertaining to extended endoscopic endonasal approaches to the craniovertebral junction. Methods A systematic literature review was utilized to identify published surgical cases of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the craniovertebral junction. Full-text manuscripts were examined for various measures of surgical indications, patient characteristics, operative technique, and surgical outcomes. Results We identified 71 cases involving endoscopic endonasal approaches for surgical management of a variety of pathologies located within the craniovertebral junction. Patient ages ranged from 3 to 87 years, with 40 females and 31 males. Five patients required tracheostomy, two were reintubated, and all others experienced an average intubation duration of 0.54 days following surgery. Fifty-eight patients (81.7%) underwent an additional posterior decompression or fusion either before or after the endonasal procedure. A complete resection of the pathologic lesion was reported in 57 cases (83.8%), another five were successful biopsies, and four resulted in partial resection. The follow-up time ranged from 0.5 to 57 months. Conclusion Although the transoral approach has been the standard for anterior surgical management for the past several decades, our systematic review illustrates that the extended endoscopic endonasal approach is a safe and effective alternative for most pathologies affecting the craniovertebral junction. PMID:26682128

  18. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Vogel, Richard W; Lober, Robert M; Doan, Adam T; Matsumoto, Craig I; Kenning, Tyler J; Evans, James J

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route.

  19. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    PubMed Central

    Lober, Robert M.; Doan, Adam T.; Matsumoto, Craig I.; Kenning, Tyler J.; Evans, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route. PMID:27293965

  20. Suction Filter in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Marucci, Gianluca; Milanese, Laura; Bonfatti, Rocco; Sturiale, Carmelo; Ernesto, Pasquini; Frank, Giorgio; Mazzatenta, Diego

    2016-11-01

    The collection of the greatest possible amount of pathologic tissue is of paramount importance in neurosurgery to achieve the most accurate histopathologic diagnosis, to perform all of the necessary biomolecular tests on the pathologic specimen, and to collect biological material for basic or translational science studies. This problem is particularly relevant in pituitary surgery because of the possible small size and soft consistency of tumors, which make them suitable for removal through suction, reducing the amount of available pathologic tissue. To solve this issue, we adopted a filter connected to the suction tube, which allows the surgeon to collect all of the tissue aspirated during surgery. Our experience of 1734 endoscopic endonasal procedures, performed adopting this device since 1998 to December 2015, has been revised to assess its advantages and limitations. This system is easy-to-use, does not impair the surgical maneuvers, and does not add any relevant cost to the surgery. The tissue collected through the filter proved useful for diagnostic histologic and biomolecular analyses and for research purposes, without any relevant artifacts as a result of this method of collection. The use of a filter has allowed us to obtain the greatest amount possible of pathologic tissue at each surgery. This surgical material has revealed to be helpful both for diagnostic and basic science purposes. The use of the filter has proven to be of particular importance for microadenomas, soft tumors, and supradiaphragmatic or skull base lesions with heterogeneous features, improving the accuracy of histopathologic diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of endoscopic endonasal pituitary surgery on nasal airway patency

    PubMed Central

    Jalessi, Maryam; Farhadi, Mohammad; Asghari, Alimohamad; Hosseini, Maryam; Amini, Elahe; Pousti, Seyyed Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nose is used as a corridor in endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETSA) for pituitary adenoma. Thus, it may affect the nasal airway patency, function and sinonasal-related quality of life. The aim of this study is to objectively and subjectively evaluate these effects. Methods: In this prospective study, 43 patients with pituitary adenoma who were candidates for EETSA from March 2012 to October 2013 were enrolled. The patients were evaluated preoperatively using acoustic rhinometry and rhinomanometry (with/without the use of decongestant drops) and asked to complete the 22-Item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) questionnaire. The tests were repeated at one and three months postoperatively. The preoperative data were compared with the first and second postoperative ones using paired-sample t-test. Results: Without the use of decongestant drops, the total airway resistance increased significantly (p=0.016), and the nasal airflow decreased significantly (p=0.031) in the first postoperative evaluation. However, in the 3rd postoperative month, the difference was not significant. With the use of decongestant drops, the objective parameters showed no significant changes compared to preoperative data even at the first evaluation. The SNOT- 22 scores also did not differ significantly in 1st and 3rd postoperative months. The first postoperative SNOT-22 showed a strong correlation with the second minimal cross-sectional area on simultaneous evaluation, and with the preoperative total airway resistance. Conclusion: EETSA has a transient adverse effect on the nasal patency that quickly improves, making it a safe approach for the sinonasal system. Rhinomanometry is the most sensitive test for detecting these nasal functional changes objectively. PMID:27493923

  2. A Middle Cranial Fossa Dermoid Cyst Treated by an Endonasal Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Abdullah; Yildizoğlu, Üzeyir; Polat, Bahtiyar; Binar, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare, benign, congenital ectodermal inclusion cysts in the skull base, comprising skin supplements surrounded by squamous epithelium. In the period of embryological development, the cysts originate from ectodermal cells left behind in the cranial region by the closure of the neural tube and are primarily located at the midline, especially in the subarachnoid spaces. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. When the cysts reach large sizes, they can be symptomatic due to infection, rupture, or mass effect around neurovascular tissue. The cysts typically demonstrate accurate radiological diagnostic features. In this case report, we present a rare dermoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa, treated by an endonasal endoscopic approach. The endonasal endoscopic management of appropriate middle cranial fossa is discussed as a recent advance in the extended applications of endoscopic sinus surgery.

  3. [Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery using a navigation system for pituitary adenoma].

    PubMed

    Kashio, Akinori; Suzuki, Mitsuya; Watanabe, Hidetoshi

    2005-11-01

    Hardy's operation using a microscope has long been the standard for treating pituitary adenoma. A new endonasal approach to the sella using an endoscope combined with a navigation system has been reported, which we used to conduct endocopic endonasal hypophysectomy from October 2000 to June 2003 in 11 patients with pituitary lesions. We introduced an angle-dependent navigation system, Neuro Navigator III. We approached the sphenoid sinus mainly via the hemilateral common meatus. The deviation of the nasal septum and sphenoidal septum was carefully evaluated to determine the optimal operating side. We concluded that the hemilateral common meatus route is useful because it is least invasive in endocopic endonasal hypophysectomy. Another route should be taken, however, if hemorrhaging is uncontrollable or the tumor is quite large. Navigation systems are quite effective in executing this operation safely. Angle-dependent navigation system is a good choice for this operation, considering its cost performance.

  4. Endoscope-assisted endonasal versus supraorbital keyhole resection of olfactory groove meningiomas: comparison and combination of 2 minimally invasive approaches.

    PubMed

    Banu, Matei A; Mehta, Alpesh; Ottenhausen, Malte; Fraser, Justin F; Patel, Kunal S; Szentirmai, Oszkar; Anand, Vijay K; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-03-01

    Although the endonasal endoscopic approach has been applied to remove olfactory groove meningiomas, controversy exists regarding the efficacy and safety of this approach compared with more traditional transcranial approaches. The endonasal endoscopic approach was compared with the supraorbital (eyebrow) keyhole technique, as well as a combined "above-and-below" approach, to evaluate the relative merits of each approach in different situations. Nineteen cases were reviewed and divided according to operative technique into 3 different groups: purely endonasal (6 cases); supraorbital eyebrow (microscopic with endoscopic assistance; 7 cases); and combined endonasal endoscopic with either the bicoronal or eyebrow microscopic approach (6 cases). Resection was judged on postoperative MRI using volumetric analysis. Tumors were assessed based on the Mohr radiological classification and the presence of the lion's mane sign. The mean age at surgery was 61.4 years. The mean tumor volume was 19.6 cm(3) in the endonasal group, 33.5 cm(3) in the supraorbital group, and 37.8 cm(3) in the combined group. Significant frontal lobe edema was identified in 10 cases (52.6%). The majority of tumors were either Mohr Grade II (moderate) (42.1%) or Grade III (large) (47.4%). Gross-total resection was achieved in 50% of the endonasal cases, 100% of the supraorbital eyebrow cases with endoscopic assistance, and 66.7% of the combined cases. The extent of resection was 87.8% for the endonasal cases, 100% for the supraorbital eyebrow cases, and 98.9% for the combined cases. Postoperative anosmia occurred in 100% of the endonasal and combined cases and only 57.1% of the supraorbital eyebrow cases. Excluding anosmia, permanent complications occurred in 83.3% of the cases in the endoscopic group, 0% of the cases in the supraorbital eyebrow group, and 16.7% of cases in the combined group (p = 0.017). There were 3 tumor recurrences: 2 in the endonasal group and 1 in the combined group. The

  5. Endoscopic endonasal biopsy for a tumor at the cavernous sinus and pons.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Qiuhang, Zhang; Hongchuan, Guo; Zhenlin, Wang

    2015-03-01

    Lesions at the cavernous sinus and brainstem can be detected by radiologic studies, but a definitive diagnosis depends on histopathologic analysis. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman with symptoms including cranial nerve palsy, hydrocephalus,seizures, and long-term coma caused by squamous cell carcinoma at the cavernous sinus and ventral pons, which was confirmed by an endoscopic endonasal biopsy.

  6. Intranasal Volume Changes Caused by the Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach and Their Effects on Nasal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Park, Yong Jin; Kim, Soo Whan; Cho, Jin Hee; Kim, Boo Young; Han, Sungwoo; Lee, Yong Joo; Hwang, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated postoperative changes in nasal cavity volume and their effects on nasal function and symptoms after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for antero-central skull base surgery. Study Design Retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center. Methods We studied 92 patients who underwent binostril, four-hand, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach surgery using the bilateral modified nasoseptal rescue flap technique. Pre- and postoperative paranasal computed tomography and the Mimics® program were used to assess nasal cavity volume changes at three sections. We also performed several pre- and postoperative tests, including the Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center test, Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test, Nasal Obstruction Symptoms Evaluation, and Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20. In addition, a visual analog scale was used to record subjective symptoms. We compared these data with the pre- and postoperative nasal cavity volumes. Results Three-dimensional, objective increases in nasal passage volumes were evident between the inferior and middle turbinates (p<0.001) and between the superior turbinate and choana (p = 0.006) postoperatively. However, these did not correlate with subjectively assessed symptoms (NOSE, SNOT-20 and VAS; all nasal cavity areas; p≥0.05) or olfactory dysfunction (CCCRC and CCSIT test; all nasal cavity areas; p≥0.05). Conclusion Skull base tumor surgery via an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach altered the patients’ nasal anatomy, but the changes in nasal cavity volumes did not affect nasal function or symptoms. These results will help surgeons to appropriately expose the surgical field during an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. PMID:27010730

  7. Recent Evolution of Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    NISHIOKA, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    For the treatment of pituitary tumors, microscopic transsphenoidal surgery has been considered the “gold standard” since the late 1960s. Over the last two decades, however, a worldwide shift towards endoscopic endonasal surgery is in progress for many reasons. These include a wide panoramic view, improved illumination, an ability to look around anatomical corners using angled tip and, in addition, application to the extended approaches for parasellar tumors. Both endoscopic and microscopic approaches appear equally effective for nonfunctioning adenomas without significant suprasellar or lateral extensions, whereas the endoscopic approach may improve outcomes associated with the extent of resection and postoperative complications for larger tumors. Despite many theoretical benefits in the endoscopic surgery, remission rates of functioning adenomas do not substantially differ between the approaches in experienced hands. The endoscopic approach is a valid alternative to the microscopic approach for adenomas. The benefits will be more appreciated in the extended surgery for parasellar tumors. PMID:28239067

  8. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  9. [Efficacy analysis of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for recurrent or regrowing pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yajun; Zhao, Yaodong; Cui, Daming; Wang, Ke; Shen, Zhaoli; Shen, Rui; Lou, Meiqing

    2015-02-03

    To analyze the safety and efficacy of surgical removal of recurrent or regrowing pituitary adenomas by endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. The clinical data were retrospectively reviewed for 28 patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for recurrent or regrowing pituitary adenomas between April 2010 and December 2013. There were 9 males and 19 females with a mean age of 44. 2 (11 - 73) years. The maximal tumor diameter ranged from 2. 1 to 6.9 cm. The Knosp grades were 1 -2 (n = 11), 3 (n =8) and 4 (n =9). Fifteen tumors were endocrinically functional and the remainder endocrinically nonfunctional. All operations were performed with an assistance of intraoperative neuronavigation. Neuro-ophthalmological, neuroimaging and endocrinological results were followed up postoperatively. And surgical outcomes and risk factors were analyzed for incomplete tumor resection in previous operations. The mean follow-up period was 19. 1 (3 - 45) months. Gross total resection(n = 18, 64. 3%), subtotal resection(n = 6, 21. 4%) and partial resection(n = 4, 14. 3%) were achieved. Postoperatively, visual acuity improved in 11 patients (73. 3%) and 6 patients (40. 0%) showed endocrine remission. Qne patient had short-term postoperative leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is both safe and effective for recurrent or regrowing pituitary adenomas.

  10. Outcomes of endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy for intractable lacrimal dacryostenosis and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Tohru; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Nonoyama, Hiroshi; Horibe, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Hoshino, Tetsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Murotani, Kenta; Ueda, Hiromi; Kaneda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the effects of patient age, canalicular obstruction, mode of anesthesia, and duration of nasolacrimal intubation on the outcomes of endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). METHODS Totally 56 eyes of 46 patients with prolonged epiphora underwent minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal DCR. A successful surgical outcome was defined as a significant improvement in symptoms, adequate water passage from the puncta to the nasal cavity, and patency of the DCR ostium. All outcomes were assessed at least 6mo after extubation. Fisher's exact test was used to discuss the factors, and then the logistic regression analysis was made by SAS 9.4 software. RESULTS The overall success rate was 75.0%, and complete resolution was observed in 27 eyes. The success rate was higher for patients with ≥6mo intubation than for those with <6mo intubation. However, there were no significant differences in outcomes between groups stratified by age (<65 or ≥65y), presence or absence of canalicular obstruction, mode of anesthesia (local or general), and use or nonuse of a radiowave unit. One patient developed subcutaneous emphysema around the eye and nose and one developed subcutaneous hemorrhage after surgery. CONCLUSION Endoscopic endonasal DCR can be considered safe and minimally invasive with reasonable success rates, particularly when the duration of nasolacrimal intubation is ≥6mo. PMID:27803866

  11. Endoscopic endonasal minimal access approach to the clivus: case series and technical nuances.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Justin F; Nyquist, Gurston G; Moore, Nicholas; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2010-09-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach is a novel minimal-access method of managing clival pathology. Limited cases have been published. To summarize our clinical experience with this approach and discuss technical nuances. We retrospectively reviewed a prospective database of 250 endoscopic, endonasal skull base surgeries. Patients in whom a transclival approach was performed were identified. Extent of resection, complications, and clinical outcome were analyzed. Seventeen patients underwent 21 procedures. Pathology included chordoma, meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, enterogenous cyst, epidermoid, and metastasis. Lumbar drain was placed intraoperatively in 9 cases and maintained for approximately 2 days postoperatively. Mean operative time was 252.8 minutes. Intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in 10 cases. Greater than 95% resection was achieved in 11 of 12 cases (92%) in which it was the surgical goal. The risk of postoperative CSF leak was 4.8% for all procedures, 9.1% for procedures with large skull base defect, and 0% if a gasket-seal closure was achieved. A nasoseptal flap was used in 2 patients. There was one perioperative infarct, one case of deep vein thrombosis, and one postoperative pulmonary embolus. Mean follow-up was 8.5 months. All but one patient with preoperative cranial nerve deficits improved at last follow-up. All patients were free of disease progression at last follow-up. The endonasal endoscopic transclival approach provides a minimal-access approach to the ventral midline posterior fossa skull base. The risk of CSF leak is low if appropriate closure techniques are applied.

  12. Use of equine pericardium sheet (LYOMESH®) as dura mater substitute in endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Luigi M.; Solari, Domenico; Somma, Teresa; Di Somma, Alberto; Chiaramonte, Carmela; Cappabianca, Paolo

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the use of equine pericardium sheet (Lyomesh ® ) as dural substitute for sellar reconstruction after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for the removal of pituitary adenomas. Methods We reviewed data of patients that underwent surgery by means of an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for the removal of pituitary adenomas over a 12-months period, starting in May 2012, i.e. when we adopted Lyomesh ® (Audio Technologies, Piacenza, Italy) an equine pericardium sheet, as dura mater substitute. Results: During the 12-months period evaluated, we performed an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal operation for a variety of pituitary lesions on 102 consecutive patients. Among these, in 12 patients (9.4%) harboring a pituitary adenoma, the implant of the pericardium sheet was used. Four patients (33.3%) presented a small intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak; in these cases the Lyomesh ® was placed intradurally with fibrin glue and, thereafter, several layers were positioned in extradural space. In 8 other subjects without any evidence of CSF leak, the dural substitute was placed intradurally and fibrin glue was injected intradurally to hold the material in place. Conclusions: Even if based on a relatively small patient series, our experience demonstrated that the use of equine pericardium sheet (Lyomesh ® ) as dura mater substitute in transsphenoidal surgery is safe and biocompatible, as compared with other dural substitutes. PMID:24251248

  13. [Neurophysiological identification of the cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors].

    PubMed

    Shkarubo, A N; Ogurtsova, A A; Moshchev, D A; Lubnin, A Yu; Andreev, D N; Koval', K V; Chernov, I V

    Intraoperative identification of the cranial nerves is a useful technique in removal of skull base tumors through the endoscopic endonasal approach. Searching through the scientific literature found one pilot study on the use of triggered electromyography (t-EMG) for identification of the VIth nerve in endonasal endoscopic surgery of skull base tumors (D. San-Juan, et al, 2014). The study objective was to prevent iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves without reducing the completeness of tumor tissue resection. In 2014, 5 patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach. Surgeries were performed for large skull base chordomas (2 cases) and trigeminal nerve neurinomas located in the cavernous sinus (3). Intraoperatively, identification of the cranial nerves was performed by triggered electromyography using a bipolar electrode (except 1 case of chordoma where a monopolar electrode was used). Evaluation of the functional activity of the cranial nerves was carried out both preoperatively and postoperatively. Tumor resection was total in 4 out of 5 cases and subtotal (chordoma) in 1 case. Intraoperatively, the IIIrd (2 patients), Vth (2), and VIth (4) cranial nerves were identified. No deterioration in the function of the intraoperatively identified nerves was observed in the postoperative period. In one case, no responses from the VIth nerve on the right (in the cavernous sinus region) were intraoperatively obtained, and deep paresis (up to plegia) of the nerve-innervated muscles developed in the postoperative period. The nerve function was not impaired before surgery. The t-EMG technique is promising and requires further research.

  14. Endonasal endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Salmasi, Vafi; Blitz, Ari M; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2011-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant tumor originating in the upper nasal cavity. The surgical treatment for this tumor has traditionally been via an open craniofacial resection. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous development in endoscopic techniques. In this report, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients with esthesioneuroblastomas treated with a purely endonasal endoscopic approach and resection at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between January 2005 and April 2010. A total of eight patients with esthesioneuroblastoma, five men and three women, were identified. Six patients were treated for primary disease, and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was A in one patient (12.5%), B in two patients (25%), C in four patients (50%), and D in one patient (12.5%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. One patient had intraoperative hypertension; there were no perioperative complications. With a mean follow-up of over 27 months, all patients are without evidence of disease. In addition, we reviewed the literature and identified several overlapping case series of patients with esthesioneuroblastoma treated via a purely endoscopic technique. Our series adds to the growing experience of expanded endonasal endoscopic surgery in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on a larger number of patients is required to further demonstrate the utility of endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignancy.

  15. The expanding role of the endonasal endoscopic approach in pituitary and skull base surgery: A 2014 perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Bjorn; Heng, Annie; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Griffiths, Chester F.; Kelly, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The past two decades have been the setting for remarkable advancement in endonasal endoscopic neurosurgery. Refinements in camera definition, surgical instrumentation, navigation, and surgical technique, including the dual surgeon team, have facilitated purely endonasal endoscopic approaches to the majority of the midline skull base that were previously difficult to access through the transsphenoidal microscopic approach. Methods: This review article looks at many of the articles from 2011 to 2014 citing endonasal endoscopic surgery with regard to approaches and reconstructive techniques, pathologies treated and outcomes, and new technologies under consideration. Results: Refinements in approach and closure techniques have reduced the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak and infection. This has allowed surgeons to more aggressively treat a variety of pathologies. Four main pathologies with outcomes after treatment were identified for discussion: pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, anterior skull base meningiomas, and chordomas. Within all four of these tumor types, articles have demonstrated the efficacy, and in certain cases, the advantages over more traditional microscope-based techniques, of the endonasal endoscopic technique. Conclusions: The endonasal endoscopic approach is a necessary tool in the modern skull base surgeon's armamentarium. Its efficacy for treatment of a wide variety of skull base pathologies has been repeatedly demonstrated. In the experienced surgeon's hands, this technique may offer the advantage of greater tumor removal with reduced overall complications over traditional craniotomies for select tumor pathologies centered near the midline skull base. PMID:26015870

  16. Resident simulation training in endoscopic endonasal surgery utilizing haptic feedback technology.

    PubMed

    Thawani, Jayesh P; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Abdullah, Kalil G; Hudgins, Eric; Vaughan, Kerry; Piazza, Matthew; Madsen, Peter J; Buch, Vivek; Sean Grady, M

    2016-12-01

    Simulated practice may improve resident performance in endoscopic endonasal surgery. Using the NeuroTouch haptic simulation platform, we evaluated resident performance and assessed the effect of simulation training on performance in the operating room. First- (N=3) and second- (N=3) year residents were assessed using six measures of proficiency. Using a visual analog scale, the senior author scored subjects. After the first session, subjects with lower scores were provided with simulation training. A second simulation served as a task-learning control. Residents were evaluated in the operating room over six months by the senior author-who was blinded to the trained/untrained identities-using the same parameters. A nonparametric bootstrap testing method was used for the analysis (Matlab v. 2014a). Simulation training was associated with an increase in performance scores in the operating room averaged over all measures (p=0.0045). This is the first study to evaluate the training utility of an endoscopic endonasal surgical task using a virtual reality haptic simulator. The data suggest that haptic simulation training in endoscopic neurosurgery may contribute to improvements in operative performance. Limitations include a small number of subjects and adjudication bias-although the trained/untrained identity of subjects was blinded. Further study using the proposed methods may better describe the relationship between simulated training and operative performance in endoscopic Neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Beyond the nasoseptal flap: outcomes and pearls with secondary flaps in endoscopic endonasal skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mihir R; Taylor, Robert J; Hackman, Trevor G; Germanwala, Anand V; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Ewend, Matthew G; Zanation, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery defects require effective reconstruction. Although the nasoseptal flap (NSF) has become our institution's workhorse for large skull base defects with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, situations where it is unavailable require secondary flaps. Clinical outcomes, pearls and pitfalls, and an algorithm will be presented for these secondary flaps. Clinical case series. Medical records of all endoscopic endonasal skull base surgeries at a tertiary care academic medical center were reviewed for skull base defect type, reconstruction method, CSF leak rate, and flap necrosis rate. Of 330 flaps for reconstructing endoscopic endonasal skull base defects, secondary flaps were used in 34 cases (10%). These included 16 endoscopic-assisted pericranial flaps, seven tunneled temporoparietal fascia flaps, three inferior turbinate flaps, two middle turbinate flaps, two anterior lateral nasal wall flaps, two palatal flaps, one occipital flap, and one facial artery buccinator flap. There were 19 anterior cranial fossa defects, 10 clival defects, three sellar defects, and one frontal and one lateral orbit/middle fossa defect. Twenty-five of the 34 cases (73.5%) had either prior or postoperative radiation therapy. The most common pathology was sinonasal cancer, with 16 cases (47.1%). The postoperative CSF leak rate was 3.6% due to one middle turbinate flap necrosis. Secondary flaps for skull base reconstruction can be harvested with minimally invasive techniques and demonstrate excellent success rates (97%) that are comparable to that of the NSF (>95%). Multiple flaps for complex skull base defects should be in the armamentarium of comprehensive skull base surgery centers. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Endonasal surgery of the ventral skull base--endoscopic transcranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhatki, Amol M; Carrau, Ricardo L; Snyderman, Carl H; Prevedello, Daniel M; Gardner, Paul A; Kassam, Amin B

    2010-02-01

    Skull base surgery is evolving from traditional transfacial and transcranial approaches to the endoscopic endonasal approach, a less intrusive corridor for accessing the ventral skull base. This technique eliminates facial scars, expedites recovery, and obviates brain retraction. The goals of surgical excision, whether palliative or curative, are identical: an approach that is less disruptive to normal tissues. By exploiting the sinonasal corridor, the entire ventral skull base may be accessed to successfully treat benign and malignant lesions. The expanding limits of endoscopic skull base surgery have been accompanied by commensurate innovations in reconstructive techniques that are reliable and have been shown to limit postoperative complications. This article describes the basis for this approach and provides the latest outcome data supporting the current state of the art for endoscopic skull base surgery.

  19. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach through the bilateral nostrils for pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shigetoshi; Kawano, Takayuki; Kudo, Mareina; Makino, Keishi; Nakamura, Hideo; Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2009-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach through the bilateral nostrils was evaluated for the treatment of pituitary adenoma. The surgical approach is through the bilateral nostrils via minimal or wide dissection of the septal mucosa, depending on the degree of tumor extension. After anterior sphenoidotomy, the endoscope is fixed in one nostril and required instrumentation is inserted in either nostril. In addition, neuronavigation and real-time hormone monitoring are used. Tumor removal rate, endocrinological outcomes, and complications were retrospectively assessed in 194 patients with pituitary adenomas who underwent 213 procedures between December 2001 and March 2008. Greater than 95% resection was achieved in 74 of 131 nonfunctioning adenomas, and the removal rate was significantly higher during 2005-2008 compared to 2002-2004 (p < 0.05). Endocrinological remission was achieved in 20 of 26 growth hormone-secreting tumors of Knosp grades 0-2, 16 of 17 microprolactinomas, and 6 of 9 cases of pure Cushing's disease. Postoperative complications were cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 9 cases, visual worsening in 5, anterior pituitary insufficiency in 5, and permanent diabetes insipidus in 2. The bilateral endonasal approach provides a wide working area without the need for special instrumentation. By modifying mucosal dissection, the endoscopic approach provides flexibility and less invasiveness. The use of neuronavigation or intraoperative hormone monitoring leads to improved surgical results. The present study confirms that this approach is suitable for more extensive sellar tumors.

  20. First Application of 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-07-01

    Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7-T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of the skull base. In this study, we apply a 7-T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images with clinical standard of care. Images were acquired at 7 T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and internal carotid artery (ICA) branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were used for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7 T. The 7-T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Our study represents the first application of 7-T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7-T MRI compared with 3- and 1.5-T MRI, and found that integration of 7 T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7-T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7-, 3-, and 1.5-T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7-T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modified Hemostatic Technique Using Microfibrillar Collagen Hemostat in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMOTO, Yasunori; KOBAYASHI, Taisuke; KOMORI, Masahiro; MARIANI, Pedro; BOR-SENG-SHU, Edson; TEIXEIRA, Manoel Jacobsen; WAKAYAMA, Akatsuki; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Microfibrillar collagen hemostat (MCH) is accepted as an effective topical hemostatic agent during endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS), particularly to achieve venous hemostasis; however, handling MCH may be troublesome because of its adherence to gloves and instruments. We describe here a method of “injection” of MCH suspension using a syringe applicator. This technique allows a rapid and precise delivery of MCH to the bleeding points and thereby results in effective hemostasis; in addition, it is easy to prepare and it is also inexpensive. PMID:25070019

  2. Endoscopic Endonasal Infrapetrous Transpterygoid Approach to the Petroclival Junction for Petrous Apex Chondrosarcoma: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Adrian J; Bonney, Phillip A; Iser, Courtney R; Ali, Rohaid; Sanclement, Jose A; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Chondrosarcomas of the skull base are rare tumors that present difficult management considerations due to the pathoanatomical relationships of the tumor to adjacent structures. We present the case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a chondrosarcoma of the right petrous apex extending inferiorly, medial to the cranial nerves. The tumor was resected via an endoscopic endonasal infrapetrous transpterygoid approach that achieved complete resection and an excellent long-term outcome with no complications. Technical nuances and potential pitfalls of the case are discussed in depth including measures to protect the carotid artery while performing the required drilling of the skull base to access the lesion.

  3. Endoscopic Endonasal Infrapetrous Transpterygoid Approach to the Petroclival Junction for Petrous Apex Chondrosarcoma: Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Adrian J.; Bonney, Phillip A.; Iser, Courtney R.; Ali, Rohaid; Sanclement, Jose A.; Sughrue, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas of the skull base are rare tumors that present difficult management considerations due to the pathoanatomical relationships of the tumor to adjacent structures. We present the case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a chondrosarcoma of the right petrous apex extending inferiorly, medial to the cranial nerves. The tumor was resected via an endoscopic endonasal infrapetrous transpterygoid approach that achieved complete resection and an excellent long-term outcome with no complications. Technical nuances and potential pitfalls of the case are discussed in depth including measures to protect the carotid artery while performing the required drilling of the skull base to access the lesion. PMID:26251785

  4. Panorama of reconstruction of skull base defects: from traditional open to endonasal endoscopic approaches, from free grafts to microvascular flaps.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C Arturo

    2014-10-01

    Introduction A substantial body of literature has been devoted to the distinct characteristics and surgical options to repair the skull base. However, the skull base is an anatomically challenging location that requires a three-dimensional reconstruction approach. Furthermore, advances in endoscopic skull base surgery encompass a wide range of surgical pathology, from benign tumors to sinonasal cancer. This has resulted in the creation of wide defects that yield a new challenge in skull base reconstruction. Progress in technology and imaging has made this approach an internationally accepted method to repair these defects. Objectives Discuss historical developments and flaps available for skull base reconstruction. Data Synthesis Free grafts in skull base reconstruction are a viable option in small defects and low-flow leaks. Vascularized flaps pose a distinct advantage in large defects and high-flow leaks. When open techniques are used, free flap reconstruction techniques are often necessary to repair large entry wound defects. Conclusions Reconstruction of skull base defects requires a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, disease, and patient risk factors associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Various reconstruction techniques are available, from free tissue grafting to vascularized flaps. Possible complications that can befall after these procedures need to be considered. Although endonasal techniques are being used with increasing frequency, open techniques are still necessary in selected cases.

  5. Panorama of Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects: From Traditional Open to Endonasal Endoscopic Approaches, from Free Grafts to Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A substantial body of literature has been devoted to the distinct characteristics and surgical options to repair the skull base. However, the skull base is an anatomically challenging location that requires a three-dimensional reconstruction approach. Furthermore, advances in endoscopic skull base surgery encompass a wide range of surgical pathology, from benign tumors to sinonasal cancer. This has resulted in the creation of wide defects that yield a new challenge in skull base reconstruction. Progress in technology and imaging has made this approach an internationally accepted method to repair these defects. Objectives Discuss historical developments and flaps available for skull base reconstruction. Data Synthesis Free grafts in skull base reconstruction are a viable option in small defects and low-flow leaks. Vascularized flaps pose a distinct advantage in large defects and high-flow leaks. When open techniques are used, free flap reconstruction techniques are often necessary to repair large entry wound defects. Conclusions Reconstruction of skull base defects requires a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, disease, and patient risk factors associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Various reconstruction techniques are available, from free tissue grafting to vascularized flaps. Possible complications that can befall after these procedures need to be considered. Although endonasal techniques are being used with increasing frequency, open techniques are still necessary in selected cases. PMID:25992142

  6. Endoscopic Endonasal Versus Microscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery for Recurrent and/or Residual Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Essayed, Walid I; Singh, Harminder; Mauer, Elizabeth; Ahmed, Mudassir; Christos, Paul J; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2017-05-01

    Surgery for recurrent/residual pituitary adenomas is increasingly being performed through endoscopic surgery. Whether this new technology has altered the indications and outcomes of surgery is unknown. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies to compare the indications and outcomes between microscopic and endoscopic approaches. A PubMed search was conducted (1985-2015) to identify surgical series of endoscopic endonasal and microscopic transsphenoidal resection of residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas. Data were extracted regarding tumor characteristics, surgical treatment, extent of resection, endocrine remission, visual outcome, and complications. Twenty-one studies met inclusion criteria. A total of 292 patients were in the endoscopic group, and 648 patients were in the microscopic group. Endoscopic cases were more likely nonfunctional (P < 0.001) macroadenomas (P < 0.001) with higher rates of cavernous sinus invasion (P = 0.012). The pooled rate of gross total tumor resection was 53.5% for the endoscopic group and 46.6% for the microscopic group. Endocrine remission was achieved in 53.0% and 46.7% of patients, and visual improvement occurred in 73.2% and 49.6% for the endoscopic and microscopic groups. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and pituitary insufficiency were higher in the endoscopic group. This meta-analysis indicates that the use of the endoscope to reoperate on residual or recurrent adenomas has only led to modest increases in resection rates. However, larger more complex cases are being tackled, so direct comparisons are misleading. The most dramatic change has been in visual improvement along with modest increases in risk. Reoperation for recurrent or residual adenomas is a safe and effective treatment option. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of Ultrasonic Bone Curette in Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Milton M.; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos D.; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C.; Wang, Eric W.; Snyderman, Carl H.; Gardner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base often requires extensive bone work in proximity to critical neurovascular structures. Objective To demonstrate the application of an ultrasonic bone curette during EES. Methods Ten patients with skull base lesions underwent EES from September 2011 to April 2012 at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Most of the bone work was done with high-speed drill and rongeurs. The ultrasonic curette was used to remove specific structures. Results All the patients were submitted to fully endoscopic endonasal procedures and had critical bony structures removed with the ultrasonic bone curette. Two patients with degenerative spine diseases underwent odontoid process removal. Five patients with clival and petroclival tumors underwent posterior clinoid removal. Two patients with anterior fossa tumors underwent crista galli removal. One patient underwent unilateral optic nerve decompression. No mechanical or heat injury resulted from the ultrasonic curette. The surrounding neurovascular structures and soft tissue were preserved in all cases. Conclusion In selected EES, the ultrasonic bone curette was successfully used to remove loose pieces of bone in narrow corridors, adjacent to neurovascular structures, and it has advantages to high-speed drills in these specific situations. PMID:24719795

  8. Accidental Ingestion of Nasal Packing Gauze during Endonasal Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy under Local Anesthesia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Mupas-Uy, Jacqueline; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Kazushige; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of accidental ingestion of a nasal packing gauze during endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (en-DCR) under local anesthesia. Case Report A 66-year-old female patient underwent an en-DCR for a right acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The surgery was performed in a supine position under local anesthesia. An X-ray detectable ribbon gauze soaked in 0.02% epinephrine was placed in the middle meatus to prevent blood and liquid from flowing into the pharynx. The same packing gauze was also used for hemostasis during the surgery. At the end of the surgery, 1 piece of gauze was missing and could not be detected by the endonasal endoscopic exploration. An abdominal X-ray image performed on the same day demonstrated the presence of the gauze in the stomach although the patient did not notice swallowing the gauze. The gauze was not there on the X-ray 1 week later. Conclusion Surgeons need to be aware of accidental ingestion of a nasal packing gauze in en-DCR under local anesthesia. Keeping the gauze end out of the nostril is likely preventive for this complication. The use of X-ray detectable gauze was helpful to detect its location. PMID:28203194

  9. Predicting postoperative fever and bacterial colonization on packing material following endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Yurika; Sekine, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Esu, Yoshihiko; Hara, Mariko; Hasegawa, Masayo; Shinnabe, Akihiro; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Kakuta, Risako; Ozawa, Daiki; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Katori, Yukio; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative fever following endoscopic endonasal surgery is a rare occurrence of concern to surgeons. To elucidate preoperative and operative predictors of postoperative fever, we analyzed the characteristics of patients and their perioperative background in association with postoperative fever. A retrospective review of 371 patients who had undergone endoscopic endonasal surgery was conducted. Predictors, including intake of antibiotics, steroids, history of asthma, preoperative nasal bacterial culture, duration of operation, duration of packing and intraoperative intravenous antibiotics on the occurrence of postoperative fever, and bacterial colonization on the packing material, were analyzed retrospectively. Fever (≥38 °C) occurred in 63 (17 %) patients. Most incidences of fever occurred on postoperative day one. In majority of these cases, the fever subsided after removal of the packing material without further antibiotic administration. However, one patient who experienced persistent fever after the removal of packing material developed meningitis. History of asthma, prolonged operation time (≥108 min), and intravenous cefazolin administration instead of cefmetazole were associated with postoperative fever. Odds ratios (ORs) for each were 2.3, 4.6, and 2.0, respectively. Positive preoperative bacterial colonization was associated with postoperative bacterial colonization on the packing material (OR 2.3). Postoperative fever subsided in most patients after removal of the packing material. When this postoperative fever persists, its underlying cause should be examined.

  10. Extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for retrochiasmatic craniopharyngioma: Surgical technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, Suresh K.; Jayashankar, Narayan; Khan, Ghulam M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Surgical treatment of retrochiasmatic craniopharyngioma still remains a challenge. While complete removal of the tumor with preservation of the vital neurovascular structures is often the goal of the treatment, there is no optimal surgical approach available to achieve this goal. Transcranial and transsphenoidal microsurgical approaches, commonly used in the past, have considerable technical limitations. The extended endonasal endoscopic surgical route, obtained by removal of tuberculum sellae and planum sphenoidale, offers direct midline access to the retrochiasmatic space and provides excellent visualization of the undersurface of the optic chiasm. In this report, we describe the technical details of the extended endoscopic approach, and review our results using this approach in the surgical management of retrochiasmatic craniopharyngiomas. Methods: Fifteen children, including 9 girls and 6 boys, aged 8 to 15 years underwent surgery using extended endoscopic transsphenoidal approach between 2008 and 2014. Nine patients had a surgical procedure done previously and presented with recurrence of symptoms and regrowth of their residual tumors. Results: A gross total or near total excision was achieved in 10 (66.7%) patients, subtotal resection in 4 (26.7%), and partial removal in 1 (6.7%) patient. Postoperatively, headache improved in 93.3%, vision recovered in 77.3%, and the hormonal levels stabilised in 66.6%. Three patients (20%) developed postoperative CSF leaks which were managed conservatively. Three (20%) patients with diabetes insipidus and 2 (13.3%) with panhypopituitarism required long-term hormonal replacement therapy. Conclusions: Our early experience suggests that the extended endonasal endoscopic approach is a reasonable option for removal of the retrochiasmal craniopharyngiomas. Compared to other surgical approaches, it provides better opportunities for greater tumor removal and visual improvement without any increase in risks. PMID:26962333

  11. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of anterior skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Suárez, Vanessa; Costales, María; Rodrigo, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increasing expertise of transnasal endoscopic surgery has recently expanded its indications to include the management of tumours affecting the skull base. We report our experience with endoscopic management of these tumours, emphasising the indications and surgical technique used. A retrospective analysis was performed of patients treated by an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) in our department from 2004 until 2011. Sixty-three patients were analysed. We performed an endoscopic craniofacial resection in 32 patients (51%), an expanded EEA in 22 (35%), a transclival approach in 6 (9%) and a transpterygoid approach in 3 (5%). The most frequent benign tumour was nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (24%), while adenocarcinoma (30%) was the most common among malignancies. Mean follow-up was 26 months (range: 6 to 84 months). The complication rate was 5% and resection was complete in 56 cases (89%). The 5-year overall-survival was 71% in patients with malignant tumours and the effectiveness was 100% in benign tumours. Our results support that endoscopic surgery, when properly planned, represents a valid alternative to standard surgical approaches for the management of skull base tumours. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoscopic Assisted Supraorbital Keyhole Approach or Endoscopic Endonasal Approach in Cases of Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma: Which Surgical Route Should Be Favored?

    PubMed

    Linsler, Stefan; Fischer, Gerrit; Skliarenko, Volodymyr; Stadie, Axel; Oertel, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Keyhole approaches are under investigation for skull base tumor surgery. They are expected to have a low complication rate with the same successful resection rate compared with endoscopic endonasal procedures. In this study, we compare our current series of tuberculum sellae meningiomas resected via an endoscopic endonasal or microsurgical supraorbital keyhole approach. Between 2011 and 2016, 16 patients were treated using the supraorbital keyhole procedure and 6 patients received an endoscopic endonasal procedure. Both surgical techniques were analyzed and compared concerning complications, surgical radicality, endocrinologic, and ophthalmologic outcome and recurrences in patients' follow-up. The 2 different approaches yielded similar rates of gross total resection (endonasal 83% [5 of 6] vs. supraorbital 87% [14 of 16]), near total resection (17% [1 of 6] vs. 13% [2 of 16]), and visual recovery (endonasal 66% [2 of 3] vs. supraorbital 60% [3 of 5]). An extension lateral to the internal carotid artery was noted in 81% (13 of 16) of the supraorbital cases and in none of the endonasal cases. Tumor volume was 14.9 cm(3) (±8.2 cm(3)) for supraorbital tumors versus 2.1 cm(3) (±0.8 cm(3)) for the endonasal approach. Both approaches provide minimally invasive surgical routes accessing meningiomas of the sellar region. The ideal approach should be tailored to the individual patient considering the tumor anatomy, lateral extension, and the experience of the surgeon with both surgical approaches. We suggest using the supraorbital approach for larger meningiomas of sellar region with far lateral extension or broad vascular encasement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endoscopic endonasal clip ligation of cerebral aneurysms: an anatomical feasibility study and future directions.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Oszkar; Hong, Yuan; Mascarenhas, Lino; Salek, Al Amin; Stieg, Philip E; Anand, Vijay K; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-02-01

    The expansion of endovascular procedures for obliteration of cerebral aneurysms highlights one of the drawbacks of clip ligation through the transcranial route, namely brain retraction or brain transgression. Sporadic case reports have emerged over the past 10 years describing endonasal endoscopic clip ligation of cerebral aneurysms. The authors present a detailed anatomical study to evaluate the feasibility of an endoscopic endonasal approach for application of aneurysm clips. Nine human cadaveric head specimens were used to evaluate operative exposures for clip ligation of aneurysms in feasible anterior and posterior circulation locations. Measurements of trajectories were completed using a navigation system to calculate skull base craniectomy size, corridor space, and the surgeon's ability to gain proximal and distal control of parent vessels. In each of the 9 cadaveric heads, excellent exposure of the target vessels was achieved. The transplanum, transtuberculum, and transcavernous approaches were used to explore the feasibility of anterior circulation access. Application of aneurysm clips was readily possible to the ophthalmic artery, A1 and A2 segments of the anterior cerebral artery, anterior communicating artery complex, and the paraclinoid and paraclival internal carotid artery. The transclival approach was explored, and clips were successfully deployed along the proximal branches of the vertebrobasilar system and basilar trunk and bifurcation. The median sizes of skull base craniectomy necessary for exposure of the anterior communicating artery complex and basilar tip were 3.24 cm(2) and 4.62 cm(2), respectively. The mean angles of surgical corridors to the anterior communicating artery complex and basilar tip were 11.4° and 14°, respectively. Although clip placement was feasible on the basilar artery and its branches, the associated perforating arteries were difficult to visualize, posing unexpected difficulty for safe clip application, with the

  14. [Computer-assisted video-endoscopic endonasal surgery].

    PubMed

    Schmerber, S; Chen, B; Lavallée, S; Coulomb, M; Chirossel, J P; Lavieille, J P; Reyt, E

    2001-02-01

    To make the surgical procedure safer and more precise in FESS, a non-invasive markerless computer-assisted system (CAS) is described for intra-operative navigation whenever the critical regions may be affected by surgical manipulation. Twenty patients with benign diseases of the paranasal sinuses were treated by Computer Assisted Video-endoscopic surgery, between December 1997 and March 1998. For the determination of accuracy and reproducibility of the system, ten anatomical landmarks on each side of the paranasal sinuses were chosen and measured. All of these points were identified on the direct live video-endoscopy image and compared to those obtained with the Optical Digitizing System (Flashpoint 5000(R)), on axial, coronal and sagittal view. The Optical Localizer we used detects the position of the relative coordinates of two rigid bodies made of IR-LED's each, one rigid body is secured to the head' of the patient with a headset, so that patient motion can be tracked, and the second rigid body attached to the operating instrument, leading to direct localization of the tip of the instrument. We use a markerless, skin surface-based registration method, which has the advantage to avoid doing a second CT scan examination usually performed to process the position of the fiducial markers. We register the data from the patient's usual paranasal CT scan. Computer-assisted surgery does not increase significantly the duration of the operation. Our markerless skin surface points registration method is reliable enabling of the movements patient's head during the procedure. Computer assistance can be used in almost any type of endoscopic sinonasal procedure. We obtained a registration and calibration accuracy of less than 1.5 mm in 89.2% of cases. CAS enables the surgeon to have a more thorough understanding of the complicated anatomy of paranasal sinuses, and may be especially helpful in revision surgery when normal anatomic landmarks are lacking. Due to the passive

  15. Endoscopic Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy: Best Surgical Management for DCR.

    PubMed

    Bharangar, Sandeep; Singh, Nirupama; Lal, Vikram

    2012-12-01

    EEDCR is a highly rewarding Endoscopic procedure for management of dacryocystitis when epiphora does not respond to medications or repeated syringing of nasolacrimal duct. It is a simple, less time consuming, safe but skilful, highly satisfying surgery both for the patients as well as the surgeons. There is very big advantage of EEDCR, it is close 100% successful procedure, even if there is recurrence of epiphora it is again correctable fully with no residual affects. EEDCR is far more superior to External DCR/Laser DCR and there are definite reasons for it. A total number of 578 cases have been operated by me from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2011, only very few reoccurrences were there and they were corrected easily so much so that it can be said that it is a close 100% successful procedure and best surgical management of DACRYOCYSTITIS up to date. The successful outcome was defined as symptomatic relief from epiphora and dacryocystitis and a patent nasolacrimal duct upon syringing at the end of procedure and on follow up of patient.

  16. Required Reading: The Most Impactful Articles in Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael; Singh, Harminder; Almodovar-Mercado, Gustavo J; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has become widely accepted in neurosurgery and otolaryngology over the last 15 years. However, there has yet to be a formal curation of the most impactful articles for an introductory curriculum to its technical evolution. The Science Citation Index Expanded was used to generate a citation rank list (October 2015) on articles relevant to endoscopic skull base surgery. The top 35 cited articles overall, as well as the top 15 since 2009, were identified. Journal, year, author, study population, article format, and level of evidence were compiled. Additional surgeon experts were polled and made recommendations for significant contributions to the literature. The top 35 publications ranged from 98 to 467 citations and were published in 10 different journals. Four articles had more than 250 citations. A period of frequent contribution occurred between 2005 and 2009, when 21/35 reports were published. 18/35 articles were case series, and 13/35 were technical reports. There were 11/35 articles focused primarily on pituitary surgery and 10/35 on extrasellar lesions. The top 15 articles since 2009 had 8/15 articles focused on extrasellar lesions. Polled surgeons consistently identified the most prominently cited articles, and their recommendations drew attention to cerebrospinal fluid leak as well as extrasellar management. Identification of the most cited works within endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery shows greater anatomic access and safety over the last 2 decades. These articles can serve as an educational tool for novices or midlevel practitioners wishing to obtain a greater understanding of the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal exposure of circle of Willis (CW); can it be applied in vascular neurosurgery in the near future? A cadaveric study of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Forhad H; Haque, Mohammod R; Kawsar, Khandkar A; Ara, Shamim; Mohammod, Quazi Deen; Sarker, Mainul H; Goel, Atul H

    2012-01-01

    Endonasal transsphenoidal approaches are getting rapidly popular in removing many midline skullbase lesions from crista galli to foramen magnum. For safe removal of these lesions, familiarity with endoscopic endonasal anatomy of circle of Willis is very important. Furthermore, for safe development of this approach in vascular neurosurgery in the near future, endoscopic endonasal exposure of circle of Willis is a fundamental step. The goals in this study were to dissect the circle of Willis completely through the endoscopic endonasal approach and to become more familiar with the views and skills associated with the technique by using fresh cadaveric specimens. After obtaining ethical clearance, 26 fresh cadaver heads were used without any preparation. Using a neuroendoscope, complete exposure of the circle of Willis was done endonasaly, and various observations including relation of circle of Willis was recorded. Complete exposure of the circle of Willis was made through an endonasal approach in all cases without injuring surrounding structures. Endoscopic endonasal extended transsphenoidal exposure of CW can make the surgeon more efficient in removing midline skullbase lesions with safe handling of different parts of circle of Willis and it may help in development of endonasal endoscopic vascular neurosurgery in the near future.

  18. Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal resection of sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masahide; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Shuho; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sphenoorbital meningiomas are surgically challenging because of their nature to extend to adjacent structures. Here, we describe a case of recurrent sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa, which was resected using combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches. Case Description: A 62-year-old man who had 15 years earlier undergone partial resection of a left sphenoorbital meningioma presented with a 1-year history of progressive proptosis of the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a Gd-enhancing tumor occupying the left sphenoid wing and orbital lateral wall and extending into extracranial structures such as the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa as well as adjacent structures such as the cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure (SOF). Based on the MRI findings of tumor extension into the sphenoid sinus with broad continuity, the risk of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage through the large defect in the sphenoid sinus was considered high. Subtotal resection using combined simultaneous transzygomatic and endoscopic endonasal approaches was performed, leaving residual tumor in the cavernous sinus and SOF. The large skull base defect between the middle fossa and sphenoid sinus was covered with a free graft of fascia lata from the transcranial side and with a vascularized nasoseptal flap from the endonasal side. No CSF rhinorrhea and no neurological deficits developed postoperatively. Conclusion: Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches may become a safe and feasible alternative for sphenoorbital meningioma with a large skull base defect penetrating to the paranasal sinus.

  19. Visualization of the normal pituitary gland during the endoscopic endonasal removal of pituitary adenoma by narrow band imaging.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Nobuyuki; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-10-01

    Narrow band imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic technology that enhances the visualization of the superficial and submucosal vasculature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of NBI in visualizing the normal pituitary gland during the endoscopic endonasal removal of pituitary adenoma. A total of 25 patients with pituitary adenoma underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery using a rigid endoscope with conventional imaging. The NBI of the surgical field was conducted under air and/or continuous irrigation of artificial cerebrospinal fluid using a flexible videoscope before and/or after the gross removal of the tumor. The capillaries of the normal pituitary gland had a characteristic appearance that could be confirmed in 16 cases. In contrast, the adenomas exhibited no characteristic vascular enhancement under NBI. The reasons why NBI failed to visualize the pituitary gland included the presence of a blood clot or a certain amount of tumor obscuring the normal pituitary gland and difficulty in steering the videoscope within the sella to approach the assumed site of the residual pituitary gland. NBI observation during the endoscopic endonasal removal of pituitary adenoma may be useful for visualizing the normal pituitary gland after the gross removal of the tumor. The absence of a typical vascular pattern suggests the presence of a residual tumor, which may justify further exploration in cases where gross total removal is considered necessary.

  20. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    PubMed Central

    de Notaris, Matteo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam; San Molina, Joan; Berenguer, Joan; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1) simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions); (2) dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries). Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered. PMID:24575410

  1. The endoscopic endonasal approach to the Meckel's cave tumors: surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Simon, Emile; Jacquesson, Timothée; Sindou, Marc; Tringali, Stéphane; Messerer, Mahmoud; Berhouma, Moncef

    2014-12-01

    Many benign and malignant tumors as well as other inflammatory or vascular diseases may be located in the areas of Meckel's cave or the cavernous sinus. Except for typical features such as for meningiomas, imaging may not by itself be sufficient to choose the best therapeutic option. Thus, even though modern therapy (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or radiosurgery) dramatically reduces the field of surgery in this challenging location, there is still some place for surgical biopsy or tumor removal in selected cases. Until recently, the microscopic subtemporal extradural approach with or without orbitozygomatic removal was classically used to approach Meckel's cave but with a non-negligible morbidity. Percutaneous biopsy using the Hartel technique has been developed for biopsy of such tumors but may fail in the case of firm tumors, and additionally it is not appropriate for anterior parasellar tumors. With the development of endoscopy, the endonasal route now represents an interesting alternative approach to Meckel's cave as well as the cavernous sinus. Through our experience, we describe the modus operandi and discuss what should be the appropriate indication of the use of the endonasal endoscopic approach for Meckel's cave disease in the armamentarium of the skull base surgeon.

  2. Immediate complications associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid egress during endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Edward E; Prevedello, Daniel M; Jamshidi, Ali; Ditzel Filho, Leo F; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic expanded endonasal approaches (EEAs) to the skull base are increasingly being used to address a variety of skull base pathologies. Postoperative CSF leakage from the large skull base defects has been well described as one of the most common complications of EEAs. There are reports of associated formation of delayed subdural hematoma and tension pneumocephalus from approximately 1 week to 3 months postoperatively. However, there have been no reports of immediate complications of high-volume CSF leakage from EEA skull base surgery. The authors describe two cases of EEAs in which complications related to rapid, large-volume CSF egress through the skull base surgical defect were detected in the immediate postoperative period. Preventive measures to reduce the likelihood of these immediate complications are presented.

  3. Endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal surgery using the BrainLAB® Headband for navigation without rigid fixation.

    PubMed

    Duque, Sara G; Gorrepati, Ramana; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Huang, Clark; Boockvar, John A

    2014-07-01

    The number of lesions of the skull base currently resected via endoscopic, endonasal, transphenoidal approach has increased. We have successfully treated 63 consecutive patients with pituitary lesions using this technique in combination with BrainLAB reference headband and laser surface scanning (BrainLAB(®), Heimstetten, Germany) for surgical navigation. This technique affords several advantages over neuronavigation based on adhesive-mounted fiducial registration. Rigid fixation in a Mayfield clamp is not required, which allows for flexibility with respect to positioning of the head during the procedure. This is particularly important, as extension and flexion of the head provide greater exposure to the clivus and anterior skull base, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that this technique is safe, easy-to-use, and faster compared with other ones. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery using a skull reference array and laser surface scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, J P; Howard, B M; Huang, C; Boockvar, J A

    2008-08-01

    Lesions of the skull base are increasingly being resected via the endoscopic, endonasal, transphenoidal approach. We have successfully treated 33 consecutive patients with pituitary lesions using this technique in combination with BrainLAB skull reference array and laser surface scanning for surgical navigation. This technique affords several advantages over neuronavigation based on adhesive-mounted fiducial registration. Rigid fixation in a Mayfield clamp is not required, which allows for flexibility with respect to positioning of the head during the procedure. This is particularly important as extension and flexion of the head provide greater exposure to the clivus and anterior skull base respectively. Also, this technique obviates the need for additional preoperative MRI, thereby reducing cost and delays.

  5. Endoscopic endonasal suturing of dural reconstruction grafts: a novel application of the U-Clip technology. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul; Kassam, Amin; Snyderman, Carl; Mintz, Arlan; Carrau, Ricardo; Moossy, John J

    2008-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage following endoscopic endonasal skull base resection can be a significant problem. A method for securing tissue grafts is needed. In this paper the authors used an endonasal suturing device to secure the graft reconstruction following endonasal tumor resection. The U-Clip anastomotic device (Medtronic), developed for cardiovascular anastomoses, was used to secure the tissue graft to native dura. A specialized needle driver and hemoclip applier were used for the application and deployment of this device. No suture tying was necessary, facilitating its endonasal application. The graft was successfully secured in its desired position to native dura by using the U-Clip anastomotic device. The patient did not suffer a postoperative CSF leak, and postoperative imaging and endoscopy revealed that the graft was in a good position. There was no complication from the use of the device. The U-Clip anastomotic device can be used as a suture device during endonasal surgery. It may prevent tissue graft migration and help prevent CSF leakage.

  6. How I do it: the endoscopic endonasal optic nerve and orbital apex decompression.

    PubMed

    Jacquesson, Timothée; Abouaf, Lucie; Berhouma, Moncef; Jouanneau, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    With the refinement of the technique, endoscopic endonasal surgery increases its field of indications. The orbital compartment is among the locations easily reached through the nostril. This anteromedial approach has been described primarily for inflammatory or traumatic diseases, with few data for tumoral diseases. Since 2010, this route has been used at our institution either for decompression or for biopsy of orbital tumoral diseases. Even if further studies are warranted, this strategy proved to be beneficial for patients, with improvements in visual outcome. In this article, the authors summarize their technique and their experience with endonasal endoscopic orbital decompression. Nasal and sphenoidal anatomies determine the feasibility and risks for doing an efficient medial optic or orbit decompression. • Techniques and tools used are those developed for pituitary surgery. • A middle turbinectomy and posterior ethmoidectomy are mandatory to expose the medial wall of the orbit. • The Onodi cell is a key marker for the optic canal and must be opened up with caution. • The lamina papyracea is opened first with a spatula and the optic canal opened up by a gentle drilling under continuous irrigation from distal to proximal. • Drilling might always be used under continuous irrigation to avoid overheating of the optic nerve. An ultrasonic device can be used as well. • The nasal corridor is narrow and instruments may hide the infrared neuronavigation probe. To overcome this issue, a magnetic device could be useful. • Doppler control could be useful to locate the ICA. • The optic canal must be opened up from the tuberculum of the sella to the orbital apex and from the planum (anterior cranial fossa) to the lateral OCR or ICA canal • At the end of the procedure, the optic nerve becomes frequently pulsatile, which is a good marker of decompression.

  7. A system for video-based navigation for endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Mirota, Daniel J; Wang, Hanzi; Taylor, Russell H; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L; Hager, Gregory D

    2012-04-01

    Surgeries of the skull base require accuracy to safely navigate the critical anatomy. This is particularly the case for endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery (ESBS) where the surgeons work within millimeters of neurovascular structures at the skull base. Today's navigation systems provide approximately 2 mm accuracy. Accuracy is limited by the indirect relationship of the navigation system, the image and the patient. We propose a method to directly track the position of the endoscope using video data acquired from the endoscope camera. Our method first tracks image feature points in the video and reconstructs the image feature points to produce 3D points, and then registers the reconstructed point cloud to a surface segmented from preoperative computed tomography (CT) data. After the initial registration, the system tracks image features and maintains the 2D-3D correspondence of image features and 3D locations. These data are then used to update the current camera pose. We present a method for validation of our system, which achieves submillimeter (0.70 mm mean) target registration error (TRE) results.

  8. Hemostasis in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery using the Aquamantys bipolar sealer: Technical note.

    PubMed

    Bram, Richard; Fiore, Susan; McHugh, Daryl; Samara, Ghassan J; Davis, Raphael P

    2017-07-01

    A major challenge during endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is adequate intraoperative hemostasis. The Aquamantys® is a relatively new bipolar sealing device which uses radiofrequency energy and saline. This promotes hemostasis while decreasing charring and thermal spread. In this paper, we describe our experience with the Aquamantys® Mini EVS 3.4 Epidural Vein Sealer Bipolar Electrocautery System (Medtronic Advanced Energy, Portsmouth, NH, USA) during endoscopic surgery for tumors of the skull base with particular attention to ergonomic benefits and technical nuances. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients undergoing endoscopic surgery for skull base tumors from September 2012 to June 2016 at our institution. All procedures used the Aquamantys® system. 45 cases were identified. Successful hemostasis was achieved in all cases with an average estimated blood loss (EBL) of 46mL (Range 10-250). There were no intraoperative complications. The single-shaft design allowed for excellent manipulation compared to pistol-grip bipolar forceps. The thermal energy provided excellent radial coverage without extensive penetration into viable pituitary tissue. To our knowledge, this is the largest series documenting the use of the Aquamantys® system in skull base surgery. The device is easily mobile and highly effective within the endonasal corridor and should be a tool in the repertoire of the endoneurosurgeon. Randomized control trials would be useful in comparing EBL between the Aquamantys® and standard bipolar electrocautery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current Status of Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Skull Base Meningiomas: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, Masahiro; KONDO, Kenji; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) is expected to be ideal for the paramedian ventral skull base meningiomas, allowing wide access to the ventral skull base regions and realizing early devascularization of the tumor without retraction of the brain. We searched clinical reports of EEA for skull base meningiomas, written in English language, published before October 2014, using the PubMed literature search on the website. Skull base meningiomas are subdivided by the site of occurrence, olfactory groove (8 articles including 80 cases), tuberculum sellae (14 articles, 153 cases), cavernous sinus (2 articles, 8 cases), petroclival region (4 articles, 10 cases), and craniofacial region (2 articles, 5 cases), and the surgical outcomes of EEA were analyzed. In anterior skull base regions, EEA contributed to effective improvement of the symptoms in small and round-shaped meningiomas, but 25% of the patients had postoperative cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea. In cavernous sinus and petroclival regions, successful surgical removal largely depended on tumor consistency, and the extent of the surgical resection proportionally increased the risks of serious complications. Thus, judicious endoscopic resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or radiosurgery remains to be the most reasonable treatment option. To decrease the risks of surgical complications, the surgeons must master the closure techniques of dural defect and meticulous microsurgical procedure under endoscopic vision. Further progress will depend on the progresses of surgical technique in neurosurgeons engaging this potentially “minimally invasive” surgery. PMID:26345667

  10. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence to Evaluate Nasoseptal Flap Viability in Endoscopic Endonasal Cranial Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Edward E; Jamshidi, Ali; Carrau, Ricardo L; Campbell, Raewyn G; Filho, Leo F Ditzel; Otto, Bradley A; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2017-10-01

    Objectives  The pedicled nasoseptal flap (NSF) has dramatically reduced postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage following endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) surgery. Although rare, its arterial supply may be damaged during harvest or may be preoperatively damaged for numerous reasons. Early recognition permits harvesting a contralateral flap before sacrificing its pedicle as part of the surgical exposure or use of an alternative flap. Design  Technical feasibility study and case series. Setting  Tertiary care university-associated medical center. Participants  Five patients requiring an EEA with NSF reconstruction. Main Outcome Measures  During NSF harvest, intravenous indocyanine green (IVICG) was administered, and a customized endoscopic system was used to visualize the emerging fluorescence. At the end of each case, just before final positioning of the NSF, additional IVICG was administered, and the custom endoscope was again introduced to evaluate fluorescence. Results  In four patients, the entire NSF fluoresced brightly with IVICG on initial harvest and before final positioning. One patient showed heterogeneous fluorescence of the pedicle and distal parts of the NSF at both stages. All NSFs healed well without complication. Conclusion  IVICG facilitates real-time evaluation NSF's arterial supply. This may provide early recognition of arterial compromise, allowing the harvest of alternate flaps or modification of surgery.

  11. Usefulness of the indocyanine green fluorescence endoscope in endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hide, Takuichiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Shinojima, Naoki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-01

    To avoid disorientation during endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS), the confirmation of anatomical landmarks is essential. Neuronavigation systems can be pointed at exact sites, but their spatial resolution power is too low for the detection of vessels that cannot be seen on MR images. On Doppler ultrasonography the shape of concealed arteries and veins cannot be visualized. To address these problems, the authors evaluated the clinical usefulness of the indocyanine green (ICG) endoscope. The authors included 38 patients with pituitary adenomas (n = 26), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (n = 4), craniopharyngiomas (n = 3), chordomas (n = 2), Rathke's cleft cyst (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), or fibrous dysplasia (n = 1). After opening the sphenoid sinus and placing the ICG endoscope, the authors injected 12.5 mg of ICG into a peripheral vein as a bolus and observed the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), cavernous sinus, intercavernous sinus, and pituitary. The ICA was clearly identified by a strong fluorescence signal through the dura mater and the covering thin bone. The intercavernous and cavernous sinuses were visualized a few seconds later. In patients with tuberculum sellae meningiomas, the abnormal tumor arteries in the dura were seen and the vague outline of the attachment was identified. At the final inspection after tumor removal, perforators to the brain, optic nerves, chiasm, and pituitary stalk were visualized. ICG fluorescence signals from the hypophyseal arteries were strong enough to see and spread to the area of perfusion with the passage of time. The ICA and the patent cavernous sinus were detected with the ICG endoscope in real time and at high resolution. The ICG endoscope is very useful during ETSS. The authors suggest that the real-time observation of the blood supply to the optic nerves and pituitary helps to predict the preservation of their function.

  12. Endoscopic endonasal odontoid resection with real-time intraoperative image-guided computed tomography: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Rote, Sarang; Jada, Ajit; Bander, Evan D; Almodovar-Mercado, Gustavo J; Essayed, Walid I; Härtl, Roger; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2017-06-16

    The authors present 4 cases in which they used intraoperative CT (iCT) scanning to provide real-time image guidance during endonasal odontoid resection. While intraoperative CT has previously been used as a confirmatory test after resection, to the authors' knowledge this is the first time it has been used to provide real-time image guidance during endonasal odontoid resection. The operating room setup, as well as the advantages and pitfalls of this approach, are discussed. A mobile intraoperative CT scanner was used in conjunction with real-time craniospinal neuronavigation in 4 patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy for basilar invagination. All patients underwent a successful decompression. In 3 of the 4 patients, real-time intraoperative CT image guidance was instrumental in achieving a comprehensive decompression. In 3 (75%) cases in which the right nostril was the predominant working channel, there was a tendency for asymmetrical decompression toward the right side, meaning that residual bone was seen on the left, which was subsequently removed prior to completion of the surgery. Endoscopic endonasal odontoid resection with real-time intraoperative image-guided CT scanning is feasible and provides accurate intraoperative localization of pathology, thereby increasing the chance of a complete odontoidectomy. For right-handed surgeons operating predominantly through the right nostril, special attention should be paid to the contralateral side of the resection, where there is often a tendency for residual pathology.

  13. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors.

    PubMed

    Graffeo, Christopher S; Dietrich, August R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D; Golfinos, John G; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations.

  14. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors

    PubMed Central

    Graffeo, Christopher S.; Dietrich, August R.; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D.; Golfinos, John G.; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations. PMID:24014055

  15. Predictors and incidence of orthostatic headache associated with lumbar drain placement following endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Liang, Buqing; Shetty, Sathwik R; Omay, Sacit Bulent; Almeida, Joao Paulo; Ni, Shilei; Chen, Yu-Ning; Ruiz-Treviño, Armando S; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2017-08-01

    Orthostatic headache (OH) is a potential complication of lumbar drainage (LD) usage. The incidence and risk factors for OH with the use of lumbar drainage during endoscopic endonasal procedures have not been documented. To investigate the incidence of post-procedure OHs associated with placement of LD in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal procedures. We prospectively noted the placement of LDs in a consecutive series of endoscopic endonasal skull base surgeries. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and patients were divided into two groups: those with OH and those without. The patient demographics, drain durations, imaging findings of intracranial hypotension, pathologies and need for a blood patch were compared between the two groups. Two hundred forty-nine patients were included in the study. Seven patients (2.8%) suffered post-dural puncture OH, which was mild to moderate and disappeared 2-8 days (median 3 days) after treatment. Blood patches were used in four patients. Significant predisposing factors were age (33.0 vs. 53.5, P = 0.014) and a strong trend for female gender (85.7% vs. 47.9%, P = 0.062). BMI and drain duration were not significant. Postoperative intracranial hypotension was diagnosed radiographically in 43% of OH patients and in 5.4% of those without OH (P = 0.003). Four (1.6%) patients required treatment with an epidural blood patch. OH associated with intracranial hypotension in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal procedures with LDs is an infrequent complication seen more commonly in young female patients. Radiographic signs of intracranial hypotension are a specific but not sensitive test for OH.

  16. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurophysiological Identification of Cranial Nerves During Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors: Pilot Study Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Shkarubo, Alexey Nikolaevich; Chernov, Ilia Valerievich; Ogurtsova, Anna Anatolievna; Moshchev, Dmitry Aleksandrovich; Lubnin, Andrew Jurievich; Andreev, Dmitry Nicolaevich; Koval, Konstantin Vladimirovich

    2017-02-01

    Intraoperative identification of cranial nerves is crucial for safe surgery of skull base tumors. Currently, only a small number of published papers describe the technique of trigger electromyography (t-EMG) in endoscopic endonasal removal of such tumors. To assess the effectiveness of t-EMG in preventing intraoperative cranial nerve damage in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors. Nine patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach within a 1-year period. The tumors included large skull base chordomas and trigeminal neurinomas localized in the cavernous sinus. During the surgical process, cranial nerve identification was carried out using monopolar and bipolar t-EMG methods. Assessment of cranial nerve functional activity was conducted both before and after tumor removal. We mapped 17 nerves in 9 patients. Third, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves were identified intraoperatively. There were no cases of postoperative functional impairment of the mapped cranial nerves. In one case we were unable to get an intraoperative response from the fourth cranial nerve and observed its postoperative transient plegia (the function was normal before surgery). t-EMG allows surgeons to control the safety of cranial nerves both during and after skull base tumor removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term outcomes of endoscopic endonasal approach for skull base surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Elena; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Enriquez, Karla; Enseñat, Joaquim; Valero, Ricard; de Notaris, Matteo; Mullol, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of either transnasal transsphenoidal endoscopic approach (TTEA) or expanded endonasal approach (EEA). This study assessed the long-term impact of endoscopic skull base surgery on olfaction, sinonasal symptoms, mucociliary clearance time (MCT), and quality of life (QoL). Patients with pituitary adenomas underwent TTEA (n = 38), while patients with other benign parasellar tumours who underwent an EEA with vascularised septal flap reconstruction (n = 17) were enrolled in this prospective study between 2009 and 2012. Sinonasal symptoms (Visual Analogue Scale), subjective olfactometry (Barcelona Smell Test-24, BAST-24), MCT (saccharin test), and QoL (short form SF-36, rhinosinusitis outcome measure/RSOM) were evaluated before, and 12 months after, surgery. At baseline, sinonasal symptoms, MCT, BAST-24, and QoL were similar between groups. Twelve months after surgery, both TTEA and EEA groups experienced smell impairment compared to baseline. Moreover, EEA (but not TTEA) patients reported increased posterior nasal discharge and longer MCTs compared to baseline. No significant changes in olfactometry or QoL were detected in either group 12 months after surgery. Over the long-term, expanded skull base surgery, using EEA, produced more sinonasal symptoms (including loss of smell) and longer MCTs than pituitary surgery (TTEA). EEA showed no long-term impact on smell test or QoL. IIb.

  19. Changes in cytokines in tears after endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy for primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, J K; Kim, T H

    2014-05-01

    We attempted to compare the cytokine composition of tears between primary acquired nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction and normal controls. We investigated the changes in cytokines in tears after endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Eighteen patients underwent endonasal DCR, with seven patients undergoing bilateral DCR, resulting in twenty-five DCRs in total. Eleven contralateral un-operated eyes were used as normal controls. Silicone stents were removed 3 months after surgery. Tear samples were collected from all eyes before surgery, and at 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, and 4 months after surgery. The level of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tears was measured. The concentrations of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, VEGF, and FGF-2 were significantly higher in eyes with NLD obstruction than controls before surgery (P=0.006, 0.018, 0.002, 0.048, and 0.039, respectively). Most inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, VEGF, and FGF-2) were higher in the tears of the DCR group compared with the controls during the postoperative follow-up, but then rapidly decreased to the level of the controls after removal of the silicone stent. The recurred eyes showed a higher level of TGF-β2 and FGF-2 in tears compared with the eyes that showed good surgical results (P<0.005 and <0.005, respectively). The tear levels of inflammatory cytokines were higher in eyes with NLD obstruction than controls. The changes in cytokine level during the postoperative period showed the importance of cytokine analysis in understanding wound healing after DCR.

  20. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma.

  1. Assessment of frontal lobe sagging after endoscopic endonasal transcribriform resection of anterior skull base tumors: is rigid structural reconstruction of the cranial base defect necessary?

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Shukla, Pratik A; Choudhry, Osamah J; Singh, Rahul; Liu, James K

    2012-12-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transcribriform approach (EETA) is a viable alternative option for resection of selected anterior skull base (ASB) tumors. However, this technique results in the creation of large cribriform defects. Some have reported the use of a rigid substitute for ASB reconstruction to prevent postoperative frontal lobe sagging. We evaluate the degree of frontal lobe sagging using our triple-layer technique [fascia lata, acellular dermal allograft, and pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF)] without the use of rigid structural reconstruction for large cribriform defects. Retrospective analysis. Nine patients underwent an EETA for resection of large ASB tumors from August 2010 to November 2011. The degree of frontal lobe displacement after EETA, defined as the ASB position, was calculated based on the most inferior position of the frontal lobe relative to the nasion-sellar line defined on preoperative and postoperative imaging. A positive value signified upward displacement, and a negative value represented inferior displacement of the frontal lobe. The average cribriform defect size was 9.3 cm(2) (range, 5.0-13.8 cm(2) ). The average distance of postoperative frontal lobe displacement was 0.2 mm (range, -3.9 to 2.9 mm) without any cases of significant brain sagging. The mean follow-up period was 10.1 months (range, 4-19 months). There were no postoperative CSF leaks. Rigid structural repair may not be necessary for ASB defect repair after endoscopic endonasal resection of the cribriform plate. Our technique for multilayer cranial base reconstruction appears to be satisfactory in preventing delayed frontal lobe sagging. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to sellar lesions allows a high radicality: The benefit of angled optics.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Joachim; Gaab, Michael R; Linsler, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The endonasal endoscopic approach is currently under investigation for perisellar tumour surgery. A higher resection rate is to be expected, and nasal complications should be minimized. Here, the authors report their technique of transnasal endoscopic neurosurgery with a special reference to the impact of the use of angled optics. Two-hundred-and-seventy-one endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal procedures were performed for sellar lesions between January 2000 and August 2013. One-hundred-and-twenty-nine patients out of them could be used for analysing the use of angled endoscopes including completed follow up, MR imaging as resection control and documentation of the intraoperative use and benefit of angled optics. Exclusion criteria were: planned incomplete resection or incomplete data set. The surgical technique was carefully analysed; and these cases were followed prospectively. Standard technique was a mononostril approach with 0° endoscopes. Angled endoscopes were used for assessment of radicality during the tumour resection and at the end of the procedure. In 95 cases (72%), an angled endoscope was used. Remnant tumour was visualized with angled optics in 27 of the 95 cases (28%). In all these cases, remnant tumour tissue was subsequently further removed. Complete resection was seen on MRI FU in 91 of 95 cases (96%) in this subgroup. In the cases without application of angled optics, there was already a sufficient sight via the 0° endoscope (14/34; 42%), or a significant bleeding from the cavernous sinus made the application of an angled endoscope impossible (19/34; 55%). On follow up, MRI revealed radical tumour resection in 93% (120/129). In the subgroup without angled optics use, radicality reached 88% (30/34) in contrast to 96% in the angled optics subgroup. Recurrent tumour growth was observed in four patients (3%). The endscopic technique has been shown to be safe and successful with a high radicality and only minor complications. The application of

  3. Early outcome in endoscopic extended endonasal approach for removal of supradiaphragmatic craniopharyngiomas: a case series and a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Bosnjak, Roman; Benedicic, Mitja; Vittori, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Background The choice of endoscopic expanded endonasal approach introduces the possibility of improved gross total resection of craniopharyngioma while minimizing surgical morbidity in a significant subset of patients. Methods From our trans-sphenoidal surgical series of 331 cases, we retrospectively reviewed visual, endocrine and neuro-cognitive outcomes in the first consecutive eight patients (median age 63 years; range 47–73 years) with newly diagnosed supradiaphragmatic craniopharyngioma (median tumour height 23 mm; range 15–34 mm), removed by expanded endonasal approach (median follow-up 27 months; range 10–69 months). Gross total resection was attempted in all patients. Results Gross total resection was achieved in 6 of 8 patients. Visual improvement was present in 6 of 8 patients of patients or in 14 of 16 eyes. New endocrinopathy, including diabetes insipidus, appeared in 5 of 8 patients. Stalk was preserved in 4 patients. Cognitive decline was present in 2 cases. Five of 8 patients retained previous quality of life. Conclusions Our early outcome results are comparable to the recent few expanded endonasal approach series, except for the incidence of new endocrinopathy and cerebrospinal fluid leak rate. This was influenced by higher number of transinfundibular tumours in our series, where stalk preservation is less likely, and not using nasoseptal flap or gasket closure in the first half of cases. Including data from the literature and ours, expanded endonasal approach shows a trend for improved gross total resection rate with less morbidity, more obviously for visual outcome and quality of life than for endocrine outcome. However, validity of expanded endonasal approach should be confirmed in a larger number of patients with a longer follow-up period. PMID:24133392

  4. Transsphenoidal Approach in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Skull Base Lesions: What Radiologists and Surgeons Need to Know.

    PubMed

    García-Garrigós, Elena; Arenas-Jiménez, Juan José; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Cortés-Vela, Jesús Julián; De La Hoz-Rosa, Javier; Guirau-Rubio, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery has become the most popular choice of neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists to treat lesions of the skull base, with minimal invasiveness, lower incidence of complications, and lower morbidity and mortality rates compared with traditional approaches. The transsphenoidal route is the surgical approach of choice for most sellar tumors because of the relationship of the sphenoid bone to the nasal cavity below and the pituitary gland above. More recently, extended approaches have expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery by using different corridors leading to specific target areas, from the crista galli to the spinomedullary junction. Computer-assisted surgery is an evolving technology that allows real-time anatomic navigation during endoscopic surgery by linking preoperative triplanar radiologic images and intraoperative endoscopic views, thus helping the surgeon avoid damage to vital structures. Preoperative computed tomography is the preferred modality to show bone landmarks and vascular structures. Radiologists play an important role in surgical planning by reporting extension of sphenoid pneumatization, recesses and septations of the sinus, and other relevant anatomic variants. Radiologists should understand the relationships of the sphenoid bone and skull base structures, anatomic variants, and image-guided neuronavigation techniques to prevent surgical complications and allow effective treatment of skull base lesions with the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. ©RSNA, 2015.

  5. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach for Apoplectic Pituitary Tumor: Surgical Outcomes and Complications in 45 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Li, Xueen; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) for apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Design A retrospective study. Setting Qilu Hospital of Shandong University; Brain Science Research Institute, Shandong University. Participants Patients admitted to Qilu Hospital of Shandong University who were diagnosed with an apoplectic pituitary tumor and underwent EETA for resection of the tumor. Main Outcome Measures In total 45 patients were included in a retrospective chart review. Data regarding patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications were obtained from the chart review. Results In total, 38 (92.7%) of 41 patients with loss of vision obtained visual remission postoperatively. In addition, 16 patients reported a secreting adenoma, and postsurgical hormonal levels were normal or decreased in 14 patients. All other symptoms, such as headache and alteration of mental status, recovered rapidly after surgery. Two patients (4.4%) incurred cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six patients (13.3%) experienced transient diabetes insipidus (DI) postoperatively, but none of these patients developed permanent DI. Five patients (11.1%) developed hypopituitarism and were treated with replacement of hormonal medicine. No cases of meningitis, carotid artery injury, or death related to surgery were reported. Conclusion EETA offers a safe and effective surgical option for apoplectic pituitary tumors and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:26949589

  6. Use of image guidance in endoscopic endonasal surgeries: a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, M; Jalessi, M; Sharifi, G; Khamesi, S; Bahrami, E; Hammami, M R; Behzadi, A H

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) is standard practice in sinonasal disease and is becoming more accepted in the performance of anterior skull base resections. We report our experience with image-guided surgery (IGS) in difficult cases of paranasal sinus (PNS) and skull base pathologies and discuss advantages and disadvantages of this technique. A retrospective chart review was performed for the period 2004-2009. Degree of PNS involvement, indication for IGS, incidence of major complications, need for revision surgery, and technical data regarding the system were gathered. Sixty-two of 86 patients were followed for at least one year and therefore included in the analysis. Indications for IGS were mostly revision surgery for polyposis (42%), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) of frontal and/or sphenoid sinuses (14.5%), skull base tumours (30.6%), and foreign body removal (4.8%). Revision rates after IGS in polyposis, CRS, and benign skull base tumours were 7.7%, 11.11%, and 7.1%, respectively. IGS is of particular benefit in the management of sinonasal polyposis, benign skull base tumours, palliative surgery, and foreign body removal. IGS may avoid trauma to the orbit and anterior skull base and reduces the rate of revision surgeries rendering more meticulous and complete operations possible. We also think it could be helpful for foreign body removal.

  7. Safety and efficacy of adjunctive intranasal mitomycin C and triamcinolone in endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Emmy Y; Cheng, Andy C; Wong, Alex C; Sze, Amy M; Yuen, Hunter K

    2016-02-01

    One of the common causes of failure in dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO) is mucosal scarring and fibrosis around the ostium. Steroid and mitomycin C (MMC) can potentially reduce scarring by their action on the inflammatory and proliferative phase of wound healing, respectively. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined usage of adjunctive MMC and intranasal triamcinolone (TA) in endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EE-DCR). This is a retrospective interventional case series. All patients underwent mechanical EE-DCR in two regional hospitals in Hong Kong from January 2005 to December 2006 were included. All received intraoperative MMC application for 5 min and gelfoam soaked with TA onto the ostium. Main outcome measures include the anatomical and functional success rate at follow-up at least 6 months after operation. Other outcomes include complications occurred during and after operation. A total of 73 EE-DCR were performed in 69 patients. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral DCR; one had sequential DCRs for both sides. At the last follow-up, anatomical success was achieved in 68 cases (93 %) and both anatomical with functional success in 67 cases (92 %). No major complication was observed. Minor complications included asymptomatic mucosal adhesion between the nasal septum and lateral nasal wall in one patient and moderate secondary hemorrhage in another. EE-DCR with adjunctive MMC and TA is a safe and successful procedure for the treatment of NLDO.

  8. A systematic review of published evidence on expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery and the risk of postoperative seizure.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon; Morgan, Michael K; Trooboff, Spencer; Harvey, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    Although postoperative seizure is an acknowledged risk following transcranial surgery, the incidence of seizure after removal of intradural pathology via an expanded endoscopic endonasal approach is not well defined. The current study was performed to systematically review the risk of seizure in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal skull base (EESB) surgery. Embase (1980 to 9 March 2012) and Medline (1950 to 9 March 2012) were searched using a search strategy designed to include any studies that report the perioperative outcomes following EESB surgery. Outcomes of patients undergoing a simple closure of cerebrospinal fluid fistulae or encephaloceles and transellar approaches for pituitary or intrasellar lesions were excluded because this review is focused on large skull base defects. A title search selected those articles relevant to clinical series on expanded endoscopic approaches. A subsequent search of abstracts selected for manuscripts of any report that documented the presence or absence of postoperative seizure. A total of 2234 manuscripts were selected initially and full text analysis produced 67 studies with extractable data regarding the perioperative outcomes for EESB surgery. Of these manuscripts, seven reported the incidence of seizure following EESB procedures. Two of these studies were excluded due to duplication of authorship and institutional data. The overall risk of postoperative seizure following EESB surgery was estimated at 1.1% (six of 530). Subgroup analyses of data revealed that the risk of seizure following an endoscopic endonasal to the anterior cranial base was 2.3% (one patient of 43). For a posterior cranial base approach, the risk of seizure was indeterminate due to deficiency of reporting in the current literature. We concluded that the risk of seizure following an EESB procedure appears to be low (1%). However, the lack of reporting on the incidence of seizures or the use of antiepileptic prophylaxis following EESB procedure is

  9. Pure endoscopic expanded endonasal approach for olfactory groove and tuberculum sellae meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Khan, Osaama H; Krischek, Boris; Holliman, Damian; Klironomos, George; Kucharczyk, Walter; Vescan, Allan; Gentili, Fred; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-06-01

    The expanded endoscopic endonasal (EEE) approach for the removal of olfactory groove (OGM) and tuberculum sellae (TSM) meningiomas is currently becoming an acceptable surgical approach in neurosurgical practice, although it is still controversial with respect to its outcomes, indications and limitations. Here we provide a review of the available literature reporting results with use of the EEE approach for these lesions together with our experience with the use of the endoscope as the sole means of visualization in a series of patients with no prior surgical biopsy or resection. Surgical cases between May 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-three patients (OGM n=6; TSM n=17) were identified. In our series gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 4/6 OGM (66.7%) and 11/17 (64.7%) TSM patients. Vision improved in the OGM group (2/2) and 8/11 improved in the TSM group with no change in visual status in the remaining three patients. Post-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in 2/6 (33%) OGM and 2/17 (11.8%) TSM patients. The literature review revealed a total of 19 OGM and 174 TSM cases which were reviewed. GTR rate was 73% for OGM and 56.3% for TSM. Post-operative CSF leak was 30% for OGM and 14% for TSM. With careful patient selection and a clear understanding of its limitations, the EEE technique is both feasible and safe. However, longer follow-ups are necessary to better define the appropriate indications and ideal patient population that will benefit from the use of these newer techniques.

  10. Predicting the limits of the endoscopic endonasal approach in children: a radiological anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Carl A; Smotherman, Carmen R; Kraemer, Dale F; Aldana, Philipp R

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) has been established as an alternative approach to craniovertebral junction (CVJ) pathology in adults. The authors have previously described the nasoaxial line (NAxL) as an accurate predictor of the lower limit of the EEA to the CVJ in adults. The surgical anatomy limiting the EEA to the pediatric CVJ has not been well studied. Furthermore, predicting the lower limit of the EEA in various pediatric age groups is important in surgical planning. To better understand the anatomy affecting the EEA to the CVJ, the authors examined the skull base anatomy relevant to the EEA in children of different age groups and used the NAxL to predict the EEA lower limit in children. METHODS Axial brain CT scans of 39 children with normal skull base anatomy were reconstructed sagittally. Children were divided into 4 groups according to age: 3-6, 7-10, 11-14, and 15-18 years old. The intersection of the NAxL with the odontoid process of C-2 was described for each group. Analyses of variance were used to estimate the effect of age, sex, interaction between age and sex on different anatomical parameters relevant to the endonasal corridor (including the length of the hard palate [HPLe]), dimensions of choana and piriform aperture, and the length of the NAxL to C-2. The effect of the HPLe on the working distance of NAxL to the odontoid was also estimated using analysis of covariance, controlling for age, sex, and their interaction. RESULTS The NAxL extended to the odontoid process in 38 of the 39 children. Among the 39 children, the NAxL intersected the upper third of the odontoid process in 25 while intersecting the middle third in the remaining 13 children. The measurements of the inferior limits did not differ with age, varying between 9 and 11 mm below the hard palate line at the ventral surface of C-2. Significant increases in the size of the piriform aperture and choana and the HPLe were observed after age 10. The HPLe predicted the

  11. Extended endoscopic endonasal surgery using three-dimensional endoscopy in the intra-operative MRI suite for supra-diaphragmatic ectopic pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Fuminari, Komatsu; Hideki, Atsumi; Manabu, Osakabe; Mitsunori, Matsumae

    2015-01-01

    We describe a supra-diaphragmatic ectopic pituitary adenoma that was safely removed using the extended endoscopic endonasal approach, and discuss the value of three-dimensional (3D) endoscopy and intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to this type of procedure. A 61-year-old-man with bitemporal hemianopsia was referred to our hospital, where MRI revealed an enhanced suprasellar tumor compressing the optic chiasma. The tumor extended on the planum sphenoidale and partially encased the right internal carotid artery. An endocrinological assessment indicated normal pituitary function. The extended endoscopic endonasal approach was taken using a 3D endoscope in the intraoperative MRI suite. The tumor was located above the diaphragma sellae and separated from the normal pituitary gland. The pathological findings indicated non-functioning pituitary adenoma and thus the tumor was diagnosed as a supra-diaphragmatic ectopic pituitary adenoma. Intra-operative MRI provided useful information to minimize dural opening and the supra-diaphragmatic ectopic pituitary adenoma was removed from the complex neurovascular structure via the extended endoscopic endonasal approach under 3D endoscopic guidance in the intra-operative suite. Safe and effective removal of a supra-diaphragmatic ectopic pituitary adenoma was accomplished via the extended endoscopic endonasal approach with visual information provided by 3D endoscopy and intra-operative MRI.

  12. Endoscopic endonasal retrieval of a nasolacrimal duct stone via the valve of Hasner in the inferior meatus.

    PubMed

    Cnaan, Ran Ben; Moosajee, Mariya; Heatley, Catherine J; Olver, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    A 37 year old man presented with a 6 month history of a right epiphora with associated mucus discharge. Lacrimal irrigation demonstrated right unilateral partial nasolacrimal duct obstruction, confirmed with lacrimal scintigraphy. Nasal endoscopy showed a pale elevation in the right inferior meatus. Endoscopic endonasal examination revealed a yellow-white nasolacrimal duct stone emerging from the valve of Hasner in the inferior meatus. The distal nasolacrimal duct in the lateral wall of the inferior meatus was marsupialised and the stone removed. At 12 months follow-up the patient maintained complete resolution of symptoms.

  13. Supraorbital Versus Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Olfactory Groove Meningiomas: A Cost-Minimization Study.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Pease, Matthew; Smith, Kenneth J; Sekula, Raymond F

    2017-09-01

    To perform a cost-minimization study comparing the supraorbital and endoscopic endonasal (EEA) approach with or without craniotomy for the resection of olfactory groove meningiomas (OGMs). We built a decision tree using probabilities of gross total resection (GTR) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak rates with the supraorbital approach versus EEA with and without additional craniotomy. The cost (not charge or reimbursement) at each "stem" of this decision tree for both surgical options was obtained from our hospital's finance department. After a base case calculation, we applied plausible ranges to all parameters and carried out multiple 1-way sensitivity analyses. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses confirmed our results. The probabilities of GTR (0.8) and CSF leak (0.2) for the supraorbital craniotomy were obtained from our series of 5 patients who underwent a supraorbital approach for the resection of an OGM. The mean tumor volume was 54.6 cm(3) (range, 17-94.2 cm(3)). Literature-reported rates of GTR (0.6) and CSF leak (0.3) with EEA were applied to our economic analysis. Supraorbital craniotomy was the preferred strategy, with an expected value of $29,423, compared with an EEA cost of $83,838. On multiple 1-way sensitivity analyses, supraorbital craniotomy remained the preferred strategy, with a minimum cost savings of $46,000 and a maximum savings of $64,000. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found the lowest cost difference between the 2 surgical options to be $37,431. Compared with EEA, supraorbital craniotomy provides substantial cost savings in the treatment of OGMs. Given the potential differences in effectiveness between approaches, a cost-effectiveness analysis should be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of Synthetic Polyurethane Foam as a Nasal Packing Material in Endoscopic Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsik; Lee, Hwa; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Chang, Minwook; Park, Minsoo; Baek, Sehyun

    2015-10-01

    To compare the effects of 2 nasal packing materials, synthetic polyurethane foam (absorbable) and expandable polyvinyl acetate (nonabsorbable), on the surgical success rate and postoperative complications after endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (EDCR). A retrospective medical review of 459 patients (580 eyes) who underwent EDCR for primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction at Korea University Guro Hospitals from January 2009 to February 2014. Surgical success rate (anatomical, functional), postoperative complications (granuloma, synechia, bleeding, and infection) were compared between the 2 groups, absorbable (318 eyes) and nonabsorbable (262 eyes). The absorbable group showed better results in surgical success rate regarding anatomical (90.5% versus 76.3%, P = 0.00) and functional (89.3% versus 75.9%, P = 0.00). Granulomas developed less frequently in the absorbable group (24.5% versus 38.9%, P = 0.00). Also, bleeding and crust were less frequent in the absorbable group (P = 0.00). Infections were less frequent in the nonabsorbable group (1.52%) compared with the absorbable group (7.86%, P = 0.00). The rate of revision surgery was lower in the absorbable group (7.86% versus 20.9%, P = 0.00). As for the influence of secondary outcomes to the surgical success by multiple logistic regression, granulomas had the largest effect on surgical success either anatomical or functional (odds ratio = 82.393 to anatomical and 44.058 to functional). Synechia had the second largest effect on surgical success (odds ratio = 11.897 to anatomical and 9.605 to functional). The authors suggest that using a synthetic polyurethane foam as a nasal packing material is not only a surgical option, but also a crucial and essential procedure in EDCR.

  15. Gasket seal closure for extended endonasal endoscopic skull base surgery: efficacy in a large case series.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Navarro, Victor; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2013-11-01

    To assess long-term efficacy of the gasket seal, a method for watertight closure of the cranial base using autologous fascia lata held in place by a rigid buttress, in a large case series. A prospectively acquired database of all endonasal endoscopic surgeries performed over a 5-year period at Weill Cornell Medical College starting in September 2005 was reviewed. The gasket seal was used in 46 consecutive patients. Mean age was 53 years (range 7-83 years). All patients had extensive intracranial disease with a significant intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Pathology included craniopharyngioma (39.1%), meningioma (23.9%), and pituitary adenoma (17.4%). After a mean follow-up of 28 months (range 3-63 months), two (4.3%) patients had a postoperative CSF leak. Excluding the patients with adenomas, the CSF leak rate was 5.2% (2 of 38 patients). One leak was controlled with reoperation, and the other was stopped with a lumbar drain (LD). The significance of pathology, type of approach, exposure of the ventricular system, use of fat graft, use of nasoseptal (NS) flap, and use of lumbar drain (LD) was examined, and none of these were significant predictors of postoperative CSF leak. Gasket seal closure is a reliable long-term effective method for achieving watertight closure of the cranial base. It can be used in association with an intracranial fat graft, NS flap, LD, and tissue sealants. In this series, none of these other factors were significant predictors of postoperative CSF leak. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronavigational endoscopic endonasal sellar and parasellar surgery using a 2-mm-diameter lens rigid-rod endoscope: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Federico; Oi, Shizuo; Samii, Amir; Paternó, Vincenzo; Feigl, Günther C; Lüdemann, Wolf; Samii, Madjid

    2007-04-01

    Most of the endoscopes used for endonasal transsphenoidal surgery use 4-mm diameter lenses. The applicability of a newly developed neuroendoscope with a lens diameter of only 2 mm was tested in endonasal transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. The newly developed rigid-rod neuroendoscope with a 2-mm lens and an endoscope with a 4-mm lens were coupled with a navigation system and used for this comparative study. Comparison between the views obtained with these two devices was performed in a model and in formalin-fixed cadaver heads. A pure endonasal approach was used to reach and explore the sellar and parasellar regions. The navigation system was used to locate the same position in both lenses for image comparison. The sellar and parasellar regions could be reached and explored using the new endoscope with the 2-mm lens and an oval-shaped irrigation and suction channel. The visual field appeared to be reduced compared with that of the 4-mm lens. However, this reduction was compensated by greater mobility and easier introduction and maneuvering of the instruments at the sellar level. Reduced image size and brightness were also found using the 2-mm lens compared with the 4-mm lens. These differences could be overcome by increasing the amount of light and enlarging the image but with subsequent reduction in image resolution. The small diameter of this neuroendoscope resulted in good maneuverability and maintained a fine quality of vision. Children and patients with small nostrils are good candidates for the use of such a device.

  17. Comparative analysis of the transcranial "far lateral" and endoscopic endonasal "far medial" approaches: surgical anatomy and clinical illustration.

    PubMed

    Benet, Arnau; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Kassam, Amin B

    2014-02-01

    The main aim of our study was to analyze and compare the surgical anatomy pertinent to the dorsal transcranial transcondylar (far lateral approach) with that of the ventral endoscopic endonasal transcondylar (far medial approach) route. Eight cadaveric specimens were dissected and analyzed bilaterally. Brainstem exposure and surgical corridor areas were measured. In addition, we present three clinical scenarios to illustrate the clinical feasibility of the proposed surgical strategies. The hypoglossal nerve, vertebral artery, and hypoglossal canal divide the lower third of the clivus into ventromedial and dorsolateral compartments. The far medial approach provides significantly larger exposure of the brainstem in the ventromedial compartment (464.6 ± 68.34 mm(2)) compared with the far lateral approach (126.35 ± 32.25 mm(2)), P < 0.01. The far lateral approach provides a wide exposure of the brainstem in the dorsolateral compartment (295.24 ± 58.03 mm(2), 74% of the dorsolateral compartment). The exposure of the brainstem in the dorsolateral compartment is not possible using the endonasal route. The surgical corridor from one compartment to the other, through the lower cranial nerves, was significantly larger on the far lateral approach (78.19 ± 14.54 mm(2)) than on the far medial (23.77 ± 15.17 mm(2)), P = 0.03. The far medial approach offers a safe, wide exposure of the lower third of the clivus for lesions that expand ventromedial to the hypoglossal nerve. The far lateral approach is most suitable for lesions located dorsolateral to the lower cranial nerves. The vertebral artery and hypoglossal canal are the most important landmarks to guide surgical planning. A combined endonasal-transcranial approach should be considered for resection of extensive lesions involving both ventromedial and dorsolateral compartments. We strive to encourage skull base surgeons to integrate endoscopic and microscopic approaches to the posterior fossa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  18. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens.

  19. Combined endoscopic endonasal transorbital approach with transconjunctival-medial orbitotomy for excisional biopsy of the optic nerve: technical note.

    PubMed

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Gardner, Paul A; Stefko, S Tonya; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Snyderman, Carl H; Maroon, Joseph C

    2012-10-01

    Background Access to the intraorbital optic nerve segment can be facilitated via a transcranial approach that allows access to the entire orbital cavity. The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) combined with a transconjunctival-medial orbitotomy represents an alternative technique to achieve the same goal. Objective Report a surgical technique that allows total resection of the intraorbital optic nerve with minimal trauma and excellent results. Further extend and define the limits and indications of the EEA to orbital surgery. Methods A patient with rapidly progressive, but asymmetric, vision loss underwent EEA for optic nerve biopsy. Due to the undetermined histopathological diagnosis and complete unilateral vision loss, diagnostic total optic nerve resection was indicated. The entire intraorbital length of the nerve was resected via an endoscopic endonasal transorbital approach combined with transconjunctival-medial orbitotomy. Results A 2-cm intraorbital nerve segment was sent for pathological examination. The patient maintained normal extraocular movements and experienced no complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged the next day. Conclusion The EEA provides another option for access to the entire optic nerve. It is a safe and effective technique lacking cosmetic defects and providing an alternative corridor to traditional transcranial approaches to the orbit.

  20. Combined Endoscopic Endonasal Transorbital Approach with Transconjunctival-Medial Orbitotomy for Excisional Biopsy of the Optic Nerve: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Gardner, Paul A.; Stefko, S. Tonya; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C.; Snyderman, Carl H.; Maroon, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to the intraorbital optic nerve segment can be facilitated via a transcranial approach that allows access to the entire orbital cavity. The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) combined with a transconjunctival-medial orbitotomy represents an alternative technique to achieve the same goal. Objective Report a surgical technique that allows total resection of the intraorbital optic nerve with minimal trauma and excellent results. Further extend and define the limits and indications of the EEA to orbital surgery. Methods A patient with rapidly progressive, but asymmetric, vision loss underwent EEA for optic nerve biopsy. Due to the undetermined histopathological diagnosis and complete unilateral vision loss, diagnostic total optic nerve resection was indicated. The entire intraorbital length of the nerve was resected via an endoscopic endonasal transorbital approach combined with transconjunctival-medial orbitotomy. Results A 2-cm intraorbital nerve segment was sent for pathological examination. The patient maintained normal extraocular movements and experienced no complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged the next day. Conclusion The EEA provides another option for access to the entire optic nerve. It is a safe and effective technique lacking cosmetic defects and providing an alternative corridor to traditional transcranial approaches to the orbit. PMID:23946927

  1. An Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Early-Stage Olfactory Neuroblastoma: An Evaluation of 2 Cases with Minireview of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Hidenori; Kodama, Satoru; Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Matsumoto, Yuma; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical findings in two patients with pathologically diagnosed olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) of the sinonasal area and the surgical methods used for its treatment. Using an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) without dura resection, along with radiotherapy, we successfully treated ONB at the Kadish stage A. One of our patients, however, experienced tumor recurrence 24 years after open surgery with radiotherapy that was conducted at another hospital. This patient was no longer eligible for radiotherapy, and the tumor was therefore resected with dura resection using an EEA combined with duraplasty. The dura resection with duraplasty using fascia lata and a pedicled nasal septal flap was minimally invasive. As with surgery without duraplasty, a postoperative computed tomography (CT) examination revealed that EEA with duraplasty led to quick improvement of the postoperative inflammatory response as well as pneumocranium. Here, we investigated whether to modify the method of surgery depending upon the primary site of early-stage ONB. We suggest that, in early-stage ONB, an endoscopic endonasal approach is an effective and less invasive method. It is also advisable to perform dura mater resection of the lesion site despite the absence of obvious intracranial invasions in image findings. PMID:25650131

  2. Three-Dimensional Radiologic Study on Index Measurement of Endonasal Endoscopic Optic Nerve Decompression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Duan, Haobo; Liu, Jianming; Cheng, Kailiang; Han, Yingying; Li, Youqiong

    2017-09-01

    To provide the radiologic basis for the clinical application of endonasal endoscopic optic nerve decompression (EEOND). CTA images were used to observe the optic canal (OC) and related structures of 60 patients (120 sides) with normal nasal, paranasal sinuses, OC, and other related structures. Optic canal could be classified as: the canal (10 sides, 8.33%), the semicanal (25 sides, 20.83%), the impression (49 sides, 40.83%), and the nonimpression (36 sides, 30%). According to its relationships with the sinuses, OC could be further typed as: ethmoid sinus (22 sides, 18.3%), sphenoid sinus (38 sides, 31.7%), ethmoid and sphenoid sinus (60 sides, 50%). The thickness of OC medial wall is about 1.11 ± 0.24 mm at orbital mouth, 0.87 ± 0.25 mm at middle part and 1.19 ± 0.27 mm at cranial mouth. The arc length of OC bone wall which can be opened from the sinus cavity is about 7.18 ± 0.76 mm at orbital mouth, 8.27 ± 0.93 mm at middle part, and 6.98 ± 0.89 mm at cranial mouth. The length of the OC medial wall is 12.18 ± 1.35 mm. In the three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system that origined with the last point of middle turbinate root and oriented by temporal side, front side, and superior side, the coordinates of midpoints of OC medial wall are: (3.64 ± 1.11, 8.48 ± 1.65, 23.14 ± 2.67) at orbital mouth, (0.16 ± 1.21, 3.99 ± 1.80, 24.85 ± 2.67) at middle part, and (-3.59 ± 1.22, 0.77 ± 2.13, 26.39 ± 2.68) at cranial mouth. One length unit on the axes is a millimeter. Computed tomography (CT) scanning technique can measure the data of the OC in EEOND. It has great guiding significance for clinical operation.

  3. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic endonasal surgery for pediatric skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Cheran; Singh, Supriya Palwinder; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) using electromyography (EMG), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) to predict and/or prevent postoperative neurological deficits in pediatric patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) for skull base tumors. METHODS All consecutive pediatric patients with skull base tumors who underwent EES with at least 1 modality of IONM (BAEP, SSEP, and/or EMG) at our institution between 1999 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Staged procedures and repeat procedures were identified and analyzed separately. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of significant free-run EMG activity, the prevalence of cranial nerve (CN) deficits and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. RESULTS A total of 129 patients underwent 159 procedures; 6 patients had a total of 9 CN deficits. The incidences of CN deficits based on the total number of nerves monitored in the groups with and without significant free-run EMG activity were 9% and 1.5%, respectively. The incidences of CN deficits in the groups with 1 staged and more than 1 staged EES were 1.5% and 29%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) of significant EMG to detect CN deficits in repeat procedures were 0.55 (0.22-0.84), 0.86 (0.79-0.9), and 0.97 (0.92-0.99), respectively. Two patients had significant changes in their BAEPs that were reversible with an increase in mean arterial pressure. CONCLUSIONS IONM can be applied effectively and reliably during EES in children. EMG monitoring is specific for detecting CN deficits and can be an effective guide for dissecting these procedures. Triggered EMG should be elicited intraoperatively to check the integrity of the CNs during and after tumor resection. Given the anatomical complexity of pediatric EES and

  4. The value of 3D-FIESTA MRI in detecting non-iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea: correlations with endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Liu, Tengfei; Ding, Hailing; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Gu, Ye

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the value of three-dimensional (3D) fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting non-iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea and compared it with regular MRI and 3D magnetisation prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) MRI sequences, as well as high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging. We also present the endoscopic experiences of such cases. From June 2011 to Feb 2016, 17 patients with non-iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea were included. Seven patients had spontaneous rhinorrhoea, three patients had invasive tumours, and the remaining patients had traumatic aetiologies. All the patients underwent HRCT, regular MRI sequence imaging, 3D-MPRAGE MRI sequence imaging and 3D-FIESTA MRI sequence imaging for the preoperative evaluations of the leakages. For each patient, the CSF fistula site was confirmed by intraoperative neuronavigation and endoscopic findings. Statistical analyses were performed. All patients underwent endoscopic multilayer repair. The sensitivities of the HRCT, regular MRI (T1 and T2), 3D-MPRAGE and 3D-FIESTA modalities for identifying CSF leakage were 58.8 %, (11.8 % and 29.4 %), 74.7 %, and 88.2 %, respectively. The origins of the leakages included the cribriform plate (18 %), ethmoidal fovea (23 %), lateral recess of the sphenoid (17 %), sellar floor (12 %), ethmoidal roof (12 %), junction of the fovea and cribriform plate (6 %) and the junction of sellar and sphenoidal planum (6 %). Two patients required repair. The first was under local anaesthesia when the nasal packing was removed, and the second underwent repair at the same site a half-year later due to hydrocephalus. Lumbar drainage was performed in all cases. No major complications were encountered. The endoscopic endonasal approach is safe and effective for the treatment of CSF rhinorrhoea. The 3D-FIESTA MR modality is superior to 3D-MPRAGE MR and HRCT

  5. [Clinical observation on controlling antihypertension with the general anesthesia of TEAS and anesthetics in endoscopic endonasal surgery].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wensheng; Zhao Xian; Li, Jinjin; Fang, Jianqiao

    2015-12-01

    To study whether the dose of controlling antihypertensive drug is reduced by transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) and the anesthetics, as well as the control of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in endoscopic endonasal surgery with general anesthesia. Sixty patients for selective endoscopic endonasal surgery with general anesthetics and controlling antihypertension involved were selected and randomized into a TEAS group, a sham-TEAS group, 30 cases in each one. The electric pads were attached to bilateral Hegu (LI 4), Zusanli (ST 36), Sanyinjiao (SP 6) and Quchi (LI 11), stimulated with Hans-200 apparatus, 3 to 5 mA, 2 Hz/100 Hz in the TEAS group based on the patients' response to comfort. No electric stimulation was applied to the sham-TEAS group. The general anesthesia started after 30 min intervention and lasted till the end of surgery. The BP and HR were observed and recorded at the end of monitoring in operation room, 10 min after tranquilization (T0), 30 min after intervention (Tj, after induction~of general anestiesa (T2), 30 min after surgery start (T3), 60 min after surgery start (T4) and 30 min after extubation (T5). The doses of vecuronium bromide, propofol and nitroglycerin were recorded statistically in surgery, as well as the operative bleeding volume, the operative time, the resuscitation time and the visual analogue scale (VAS) score after resuscitation. Compared with that at T0, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) at T2, T3, T4 and T5 in the TEAS group and at T3 and T4 in the sham-TEAS group was all reduced, indicating the significant difference (all P < 0.01). MAP at T2 and T5 in the TEAS group was lower than that in the sham-TEAS group (both P < 0.01). Compared, with that at T5, except at T2 in the TEAS group (P<0. 05), HR was not different significantly at the rest time points (all P > 0.05). HR was different at T2 to Ts in the sham-TEAS group statistically (all P < 0.01). The doses of vecuronium bromide, propofol and

  6. Superior Turbinectomy: Role for a Two-surgeon Technique in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery—Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMOTO, Yasunori; RAMOS, Henrique F.; MARIANI, Pedro P.; ROMANO, Fabrizio R.; CUKIERT, Arthur; BOR-SENG-SHU, Edson; WAKAYAMA, Akatsuki; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    We describe a practical technique of superior turbinectomy followed by posterior ethmoidectomy as a less invasive procedure for two-surgeon technique on endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. After identification of the superior turbinate and the sphenoid ostium, the inferior third portion of the superior turbinate was coagulated and resected. This partial superior turbinectomy procedure exposed the posterior ethmoidal sinus. Resection of the bony walls between the sphenoid and posterior ethmoid sinuses provided more lateral and superior exposure of the sphenoid sinus. This technique was performed in 56 patients with midline skull base lesions, including 49 pituitary adenomas and 7 other lesions. Meticulous manipulation of instruments was performed in all cases without surgical complications such as permanent hyposmia/anosmia or nasal bleeding. Our findings suggested that the partial superior turbinectomy followed by retrograde posterior ethmoidectomy is a simple and safe technique providing a sufficient surgical corridor for two-surgeon technique to approaching midline skull base regions, mainly involving pituitary adenomas. PMID:25797783

  7. Endoscopic endonasal approach to cholesterol granulomas of the petrous apex: a series of 17 patients: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Gardner, Paul; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos D; Scopel, Tiago Fernando; Koutourousiou, Maria; Snyderman, Carl H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report the results in a consecutive series of patients who had undergone an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) for drainage of a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma (CG). Seventeen cases with a confirmed diagnosis of petrous apex CG were identified from a database of more than 1600 patients who had undergone an EEA to skull base lesions at the authors' institution in the period from 1998 to 2011. Clinical outcomes were reviewed and compared with those in previous studies of open approaches. Nine patients underwent a transclival approach and 8 patients underwent a combined transclival and infrapetrous approach. A Silastic stent was used in 11 patients (65%), a miniflap in 4 (24%), and a simple marsupialization of the cyst in 3 (18%). All symptomatic patients had partial or complete improvement of their symptoms postoperatively and at the follow-up (mean follow-up 20 months, range 3-67 months). Complications developed in 3 patients (18%) including epistaxis, chronic serous otitis media, eye dryness, and a transient sixth cranial nerve palsy. Two patients (12%) had a symptomatic recurrence of the cyst requiring repeat endoscopic endonasal drainage. There were no instances of internal carotid artery injuries, CSF leaks, or new hearing loss. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2 days (range 0.7-4.6 days). These results were comparable with those in previous studies of open approaches to petrous apex CGs. There was a strong correlation between the size of the cyst and the type of approach chosen (Rpb [point biserial correlation coefficient] = +0.67, p = 0.003359) and a very strong correlation between the degree of medial extension (defined by the V-angle) and the choice of approach (Rpb = +0.81, p < 0.0001). Based on these observations, the authors developed an algorithm for guiding the choice of the most appropriate route of drainage. The EEA is a safe and effective alternative to traditional open approaches to petrous apex CGs.

  8. Long-Term Prognostic Analysis after Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Olfactory Neuroblastoma: A Retrospective Study of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luyao; Zhu, Kang; Xia, Cui; Yan, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Junrong; Duan, Maoli; Zheng, Guoxi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To summarize the characteristics and long–term outcomes of olfactory neuroblastoma through the analysis of 13 cases in single institution, with the assessment of treatment modality, prognostic factors. Method A retrospective study of thirteen cases diagnosed as olfactory neuroblastoma and underwent combined treatments during the period 2000–2010. Statistical analysis was performed to search for prognostic factors and compared different treatment modalities. Results 13 patients were enrolled in this study, including 8 male and 5 female, ranging from 15 to 69 (median 43) years old. One patient at stage A was only treated with endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES). Seven patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and EES, two with EES and postoperative radiotherapy, and the other three with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The range of follow-up time varied from 23 to 116 months (median 65 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 46.2% (6/13). To date, these thirteen patients have not suffered local recurrences while two patients had lymph node recurrences and one had distant metastasis in the bone marrow. In 13 patients, 61.5% were diagnosed as late T stage (T3/4), 69.2% late Kadish stage (C/D) and 53.8% were high Hyams grade (I/ II), which indicated poor prognosis. Related prognostic factors were the TNM stage (T stage P = 0.028, N stage P = 0.000, M stage P = 0.007), Kadish stage (P = 0.025) and treatment modality (P = 0.015). Conclusion Late stage of TNM and Kadish staging system indicated a poor prognosis. Combined treatment modality, including endoscopic endonasal surgery, achieved a better outcome than non-surgical approach. PMID:27806104

  9. Efficacy of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing's disease in 230 patients with positive and negative MRI.

    PubMed

    Cebula, Hélène; Baussart, Bertrand; Villa, Chiara; Assié, Guillaume; Boulin, Anne; Foubert, Luc; Aldea, Sorin; Bennis, Saad; Bernier, Michèle; Proust, François; Gaillard, Stephan

    2017-07-01

    The primary objective was to assess the remission rate, and the secondary objectives were to evaluate the early complications and recurrence rate and to define the predictive factors for the remission and recurrence rates. This prospective single-center study included 230 consecutive patients, operated on by a single surgeon for Cushing's disease via a transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach, over a 6-year period (2008-2013). The patients included in this series were all adults (>18 years of age), who presented with clinical and biological characteristics of Cushing's disease confirmed based on dedicated MRI pituitary imaging. Biochemical remission was defined as a postoperative serum cortisol level <5 μg/dl on the 2nd day following surgery that required glucocorticoid replacement therapy. The remission rate for the global population (n = 230) with a follow-up of 21 ± 19.2 months concerned 182 patients (79.1%) divided into 132 patients (82.5%) with positive MRI and 50 patients (71.4%) with negative MRI with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.077). Complications occurred in 77 patients with no deaths. A total of 22% of patients had transient diabetes insipidus and 6.4% long-term diabetes insipidus, and no postoperatively CSF leakage was observed. The recurrence rate was 9.8% with a mean time of 32.7 ± 15.2 months. The predictive factors for the remission rate were the presence of pituitary microadenoma and a positive histology. No risk factors were involved regarding the recurrence rate. Whatever the MRI results, the transsphenoidal endonasal endoscopic approach remains the gold standard treatment for Cushing's disease. It was maximally effective with a remission rate of 79.1% and lower morbidity.

  10. Endoscopic Endonasal Transethmoidal Approach for the Management of a Traumatic Brain Abscess and Reconstruction of the Accompanying Anterior Skull Base Defect.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Erdi, Fatih; Kafadar, Ali Metin; Gazioğlu, Nurperi

    2015-09-01

    Skull base endoscopy in the treatment of brain abscesses has been rarely published. Moreover, endoscopic endonasal transethmoidal approach (EETA) for the treatment of brain abscess following a head trauma has been reported only in a few case reports. We report the management of a patient of intracerebral abscess and reconstruction of the accompanying anterior skull base defect through an EETA.Thirty-year-old male with a frontal lobe abscess due to a penetrating skull base trauma was operated via EETA. After drainage of the abscess, dural and bony defects were repaired to prevent any recurrence. Postoperative radiological imaging revealed prominent decrease in abscess size. The patient did not need any further surgical intervention, and antibiotherapy was adequate.EETA is safe and effective in the management of brain abscesses. Skull base endoscopy provides direct visualization of the abscess cavity through a minimal invasive route, facilitates wide exposure of surrounding neurovascular structures within the operative field, and enables concurrent closure of the skull base defect.

  11. Workspace and pivot point for robot-assisted endoscope guidance in functional endonasal sinus surgery (FESS).

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Klaus Wolfgang; Westphal, Ralf; Last, Carsten; Rilk, Markus; Bootz, Friedrich; Wahl, Friedrich M; Jakob, Mark

    2015-03-01

    For the further development of robot-assisted endoscope guidance in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), ground data about the workspaces and endoscope movements in conventional FESS are needed. Applying a self-developed marker-based tracking system, we collected the pose data (position and orientation) of the endoscope and all other instruments used in five real sinus surgeries. The automated segmentation of the endoscope poses shows the shape of a hourglass, with a pivot region or pivot point at the 'waistline' of the hourglass, close to the nasal entrance in the nasal dome. We were able to identify a pivot point at the waistline of the segmented endoscope poses. The size of the pivot point corresponds with the diameter of the 4 mm endoscope. Because of the reduction to four degrees of freedom for endoscope motions (three rotations and one translation), easier and safer robot-assisted endoscope guidance becomes feasible. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal chiasmapexy using a clival cranial base cranioplasty for visual loss from massive empty sella following macroprolactinoma treatment with bromocriptine: case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Berastegui, G Rene; Raza, Shaan M; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-04-01

    Visual deterioration after dopamine-agonist treatment of prolactinomas associated with empty sella syndrome and secondary optic apparatus traction is a rare event. Chiasmapexy has been described as a viable treatment option, although few cases exist in the literature. Here, a novel endonasal endoscopic approach to chiasmapexy is described and its efficacy is demonstrated in a case report. A 55-year-old female patient with a history of a giant prolactinoma and 14 years of treatment using dopaminergic agonist therapy presented to our institution with a 1-month history of visual changes. Neuroophthalmological examination confirmed severe bitemporal field defects, and MRI revealed a large empty sella with downward optic chiasmal herniation. Endoscopic endonasal chiasmapexy was performed by elevating the chiasm with lumbar drainage and filling the clival and sellar defect with an extradural liquid (HydroSet; a cranioplasty bone cement), and a piece of AlloDerm was used to cover and cushion the chiasm. Postoperative imaging demonstrated successful anatomical elevation of the optic apparatus, and the patient showed functional improvement in the visual field at 3 months postoperatively. Although rare, massive empty sellar and chiasmal descent from macroadenoma treatment can result in progressive visual loss. Here, a novel technique of endonasal endoscopic extradural cranioplasty aided by lumbar drainage is reported, which appears to be an effective technique for stabilizing and possibly reversing anatomical and visual deterioration.

  13. [Recurrence of nasosinusal polyposis after ethmoidectomy by endonasal approach. Functional, endoscopic, x-ray tomographic aspects and surgical implications].

    PubMed

    Batteur, B; Strunski, V; Caprio, D; Berthet, V; Goin, M

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent polyposis after 116 endonasal ethmoidectomies performed in 61 patients were investigated on the basis of functional, endoscopic and tomodensitometric data. The results of the endoscopic examinations revealed that the anterior ethmoid was involved most often (41%) with either a single localization or in combination with other sites in the sinuses. Functional rhinosinus symptomatology was satisfactory in most cases after a mean follow-up of 22 months, especially for nasal obstruction which was initially predominant (91%). Headaches, especially fronto-orbial localizations, clearly decreased after the operation but there was no correlation between the presence of headache after the operation and the recurrence of the polyposis. Computed tomography gave results similar to those obtained by endoscopy. However, a distinction could not be made between radio-opaque images of polyposis and certain cicatricial or inflammatory reactions. Unlike the functional outcome, ethmoidectomy had little effect on these images. Recurrent polyps appeared most often on the anterior ethmoid and the role of the initial infundibulotomy can be debated. It would appear that the prognosis of polyposis is not modified by extended anterior ethmoidectomy, suggesting that a more conservative surgical approach may be appropriate for frontal ethomoidal polyps.

  14. A Perfusion-based Human Cadaveric Model for Management of Carotid Artery Injury during Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin; Kale, Aydemir; Marquez, Yvette; Winer, Jesse; Lee, Brian; Harris, Brianna; Minnetti, Michael; Carey, Joseph; Giannotta, Steven; Zada, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create and develop a reproducible and realistic training environment to prepare residents and trainees for arterial catastrophes during endoscopic endonasal surgery. Design An artificial blood substitute was perfused at systolic blood pressures in eight fresh human cadavers to mimic intraoperative scenarios. Setting The USC Keck School of Medicine Fresh Tissue Dissection Laboratory was used as the training site. Participants Trainees were USC neurosurgery residents and junior faculty. Main Outcome A 5-point questionnaire was used to assess pre- and posttraining confidence scores. Results High-pressure extravasation at normal arterial blood pressure mimicked real intraoperative internal carotid artery (ICA) injury. Residents developed psychomotor skills required to achieve hemostasis using suction, cottonoids, and muscle grafts. Questionnaire responses from all trainees reported a realistic experience enhanced by the addition of the perfusion model. Conclusions The addition of an arterial perfusion system to fresh tissue cadavers is among the most realistic training models available. This enables the simulation of rare intraoperative scenarios such as ICA injury. Strategies for rapid hemostasis and implementation of techniques including endoscope manipulation, suction, and packing can all be rehearsed via this novel paradigm. PMID:25301092

  15. Endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kljajić, Vladimir; Vuleković, Petar; Vlaški, Ljiljana; Savović, Slobodan; Dragičević, Danijela; Papić, Vladimir

    Nasal liquorrhea indicates a cerebrospinal fluid fistula, an open communication between the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid and the nasal cavity. It can be traumatic and spontaneous. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula using fluorescein. This retrospective study included 30 patients of both sexes, with a mean age of 48.7 years, treated in the period from 2007 to 2015. All patients underwent lumbar administration of 5% sodium fluorescein solution preoperatively. Fistula was closed using three-layer graft and fibrin glue. Cerebrospinal fluid fistulas were commonly located in the ethmoid (37%) and sphenoid sinus (33%). Most patients presented with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (2/3 of patients). The reported success rate for the first repair attempt was 97%. Complications occurred in three patients: one patient presented with acute hydrocephalus, one with reversible encephalopathy syndrome on the fifth postoperative day with bilateral loss of vision, and one patient was diagnosed with hydrocephalus two years after the repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Endoscopic diagnosis and repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas using fluorescein intrathecally has high success rate and low complication rate. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscope-guided round window fistula repair.

    PubMed

    Karhuketo, T S; Puhakka, H J

    2001-11-01

    Endoscope-guided round window membrane repair was performed to evaluate whether the approach is feasible in the treatment of a round window fistula. Retrospective case review. Tertiary care academic center. A 27-year-old man had been scuba diving 6 days previously in the Australian Great Barrier Reefs. He had poor hearing with tinnitus in the left ear and a vertiginous sensation. A myringotomy was incised, and a tympanoscope was introduced into the middle ear cavity. With the patient under general anesthesia, the middle ear and the oval and round window areas were examined with a tympanoscope. In endoscopic visualization, a round perforation could be seen in the round window membrane. After detection of the round window perforation, a small piece of temporal fascia was obtained to seal the membrane perforation. One month after the operation, the patient's hearing was significantly better. The myringotomy had healed. A transmyringeal endoscopic procedure for round window fistula repair is feasible and combines the best features of minimally invasive surgery and aural endoscopy.

  17. Shortening the learning curve in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: a reproducible polymer tumor model for the trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular approach to retro-infundibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Berhouma, Moncef; Baidya, Nishanta B; Ismaïl, Abdelhay A; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery attracts an increasing number of young neurosurgeons. This recent technique requires specific technical skills for the approaches to non-pituitary tumors (expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery). Actual residents' busy schedules carry the risk of compromising their laboratory training by limiting significantly the dedicated time for dissections. To enhance and shorten the learning curve in expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery, we propose a reproducible model based on the implantation of a polymer via an intracranial route to provide a pathological retro-infundibular expansive lesion accessible to a virgin expanded endoscopic endonasal route, avoiding the ethically-debatable need to hundreds of pituitary cases in live patients before acquiring the desired skills. A polymer-based tumor model was implanted in 6 embalmed human heads via a microsurgical right fronto-temporal approach through the carotido-oculomotor cistern to mimic a retro-infundibular tumor. The tumor's position was verified by CT-scan. An endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular trans-planum approach was then carried out on a virgin route under neuronavigation tracking. Dissection of the tumor model from displaced surrounding neurovascular structures reproduced live surgery's sensations and challenges. Post-implantation CT-scan allowed the pre-removal assessment of the tumor insertion, its relationships as well as naso-sphenoidal anatomy in preparation of the endoscopic approach. Training on easily reproducible retro-infundibular approaches in a context of pathological distorted anatomy provides a unique opportunity to avoid the need for repetitive live surgeries to acquire skills for this kind of rare tumors, and may shorten the learning curve for endoscopic endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete endoscopic resection of a pituitary stalk epidermoid cyst using a combined infrasellar interpituitary and suprasellar endonasal approach: case report.

    PubMed

    Nakassa, Ana C I; Chabot, Joseph D; Snyderman, Carl H; Wang, Eric W; Gardner, Paul A; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2017-04-14

    Intracranial epidermoid cysts are benign lesions of epithelial origin that most frequently present with symptoms of mass effect. Although they are often associated with a high rate of residual tumor and recurrence, maximal safe resection usually leads to good outcomes. The authors report a complete resection of an uncommon pituitary stalk epidermoid cyst with intrasellar extension using a combined suprasellar and infrasellar interpituitary, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. The patient, a 54-year-old woman, presented with headache, visual disturbance, and diabetes insipidus. Postoperatively, she reported improvement in her visual symptoms and well-controlled diabetes insipidus using 0.1 mg of desmopressin at bedtime and normal anterior pituitary gland function. One year later, she continues to receive the same dosage of desmopressin and is also taking 50 mcg of levothyroxine daily after developing primary hypothyroidism unrelated to the surgical procedure. A combined infrasellar interpituitary and suprasellar approach to this rare location for an epidermoid cyst can lead to a safe and complete resection with good clinical outcomes.

  19. Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: Advantages, Limitations, and Our Techniques to Overcome Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    ISHII, Yudo; TAHARA, Shigeyuki; TERAMOTO, Akira; MORITA, Akio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, resections of midline skull base tumors have been conducted using endoscopic endonasal skull base (EESB) approaches. Nevertheless, many surgeons reported that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is still a major complication of these approaches. Here, we report the results of our 42 EESB surgeries and discuss the advantages and limits of this approach for resecting various types of tumors, and also report our technique to overcome CSF leakage. All 42 cases involved midline skull base tumors resected using the EESB technique. Dural incisions were closed using nasoseptal flaps and fascia patch inlay sutures. Total removal of the tumor was accomplished in seven pituitary adenomas (33.3%), five craniopharyngiomas (62.5%), five tuberculum sellae meningiomas (83.3%), three clival chordomas (100%), and one suprasellar ependymoma. Residual regions included the cavernous sinus, the outside of the intracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the lower lateral part of the posterior clivus, and the posterior pituitary stalk. Overall incidence of CSF leakage was 7.1%. Even though the versatility of the approach is limited, EESB surgery has many advantages compared to the transcranial approach for managing mid-line skull base lesions. To avoid CSF leakage, surgeons should have skills and techniques for complete closure, including use of the nasoseptal flap and fascia patch inlay techniques. PMID:25446379

  20. Value of free-run electromyographic monitoring of lower cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal approach to skull base surgeries.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 73 patients out of 990 patients who had EEA in our institution who had at least one CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as group I and those who did not as group II. Results We monitored a total of 342 CNs. A total of 62 nerves had SG f-EMG activity including CN VII = 18, CN IX = 16, CN X = 13, CN XI = 5, and CN XII = 10. No nerve deficit was found in the nerves that had significant activity during procedure. A total of five nerve deficits including (CN IX = 1, CN X = 2, CN XII = 2) were observed in the group that did not display SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG seems highly sensitive to surgical manipulations and in locating CNs. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of lower CNs during EEA procedures need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  1. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Lower Cranial Nerves in Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to Skull Base Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D.; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J.; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 73 patients out of 990 patients who had EEA in our institution who had at least one CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as group I and those who did not as group II. Results We monitored a total of 342 CNs. A total of 62 nerves had SG f-EMG activity including CN VII = 18, CN IX = 16, CN X = 13, CN XI = 5, and CN XII = 10. No nerve deficit was found in the nerves that had significant activity during procedure. A total of five nerve deficits including (CN IX = 1, CN X = 2, CN XII = 2) were observed in the group that did not display SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG seems highly sensitive to surgical manipulations and in locating CNs. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of lower CNs during EEA procedures need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG. PMID:23904999

  2. Design and Validation of an Open-Source, Partial Task Trainer for Endonasal Neuro-Endoscopic Skills Development: Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Baby, Britty; Damodaran, Natesan; Srivastav, Vinkle; Suri, Ashish; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kumar, Subodh; Kalra, Prem; Prasad, Sanjiva; Paul, Kolin; Anand, Sneh; Kumar, Sanjeev; Dhiman, Varun; Ben-Israel, David; Kapoor, Kulwant Singh

    2016-02-01

    Box trainers are ideal simulators, given they are inexpensive, accessible, and use appropriate fidelity. The development and validation of an open-source, partial task simulator that teaches the fundamental skills necessary for endonasal skull-base neuro-endoscopic surgery. We defined the Neuro-Endo-Trainer (NET) SkullBase-Task-GraspPickPlace with an activity area by analyzing the computed tomography scans of 15 adult patients with sellar suprasellar parasellar tumors. Four groups of participants (Group E, n = 4: expert neuroendoscopists; Group N, n =19: novice neurosurgeons; Group R, n = 11: neurosurgery residents with multiple iterations; and Group T, n = 27: neurosurgery residents with single iteration) performed grasp, pick, and place tasks using NET and were graded on task completion time and skills assessment scale score. Group E had lower task completion times and greater skills assessment scale scores than both Group N and R (P ≤ 0.03, 0.001). The performance of Groups N and R was found to be equivalent; in self-assessing neuro-endoscopic skill, the participants in these groups were found to have equally low pretraining scores (4/10) with significant improvement shown after NET simulation (6, 7 respectively). Angled scopes resulted in decreased scores with tilted plates compared with straight plates (30° P ≤ 0.04, 45° P ≤ 0.001). With tilted plates, decreased scores were observed when we compared the 0° with 45° endoscope (right, P ≤ 0.008; left, P ≤ 0.002). The NET, a face and construct valid open-source partial task neuroendoscopic trainer, was designed. Presimulation novice neurosurgeons and neurosurgical residents were described as having insufficient skills and preparation to practice neuro-endoscopy. Plate tilt and endoscope angle were shown to be important factors in participant performance. The NET was found to be a useful partial-task trainer for skill building in neuro-endoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated high-level disinfection of nonchanneled flexible endoscopes: duty cycles and endoscope repair.

    PubMed

    Statham, Melissa McCarty; Willging, J Paul

    2010-10-01

    Guidelines issued by the Association of Operating Room Nurses and the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology recommend high-level disinfection (HLD) for semicritical instruments, such as flexible endoscopes. We aim to examine the durability of endoscopes to continued use and automated HLD. We report the number of duty cycles a flexible endoscope can withstand before repairs should be anticipated. Retrospective review. A total of 4,336 endoscopic exams and subsequent disinfection cycles were performed with 60 flexible endoscopes in an outpatient tertiary pediatric otolaryngology practice from 2005 to 2009. All endoscopes were systemically cleaned with mechanical cleansing followed by leak testing, enzymatic cleaning, and exposure to Orthophthaldehyde (0.55%) for 5 minutes at a temperature of at least 25°C, followed by rinsing for 3 minutes. A total of 77 repairs were performed, 48 major (average cost $3,815.97), and 29 minor (average cost $326.85). On average, the 2.2-mm flexible endoscopes were utilized for 61.9 examinations before major repair was needed, whereas the 3.6 mm endoscopes were utilized for 154.5 exams before needing minor repairs. No major repairs have been needed to date on the 3.6-mm endoscopes. Automated endoscope reprocessor use for HLD is an effective means to disinfect and process flexible endoscopes. This minimizes variability in the processing of the endoscopes and maximizes the rate of successful HLD. Even when utilizing standardized, automated HLD and limiting the number of personnel processing the endoscopes, smaller fiberoptic endoscopes demonstrate a shortened time interval between repairs than that seen with the larger endoscopes. Laryngoscope, 2010.

  4. [Endonasal skull base endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pancucci, Giovanni; Evangelista-Zamora, Rocío; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Perez-de-Sanromán, Laila; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal techniques used in skull base surgery have evolved greatly in recent years. Our study objective was to perform a qualitative systematic review of the likewise systematic reviews in published English language literature, to examine the evidence and conclusions reached in these studies comparing transcranial and endoscopic approaches in skull base surgery. We searched the references on the MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases selecting the systematic reviews, meta-analyses and evidence based medicine reviews on skull based pathologies published from January 2000 until January 2013. We focused on endoscopic impact and on microsurgical and endoscopic technique comparisons. Full endoscopic endonasal approaches achieved gross total removal rates of craniopharyngiomas and chordomas higher than those for transcranial approaches. In anterior skull base meningiomas, complete resections were more frequently achieved after transcranial approaches, with a trend in favour of endoscopy with respect to visual prognosis. Endoscopic endonasal approaches minimised the postoperative complications after the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, encephaloceles, meningoceles, craniopharyngiomas and chordomas, with the exception of postoperative CSF leaks. Randomized multicenter studies are necessary to resolve the controversy over endoscopic and microsurgical approaches in skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoscopic endonasal surgery for resection of benign sinonasal tumors: experience with 105 patients.

    PubMed

    Baradaranfar, Mohammad-Hossein; Dabirmoghaddam, Payman

    2006-07-01

    The use of endoscopic surgery for nasal and sinus pathologies has revolutionized our approaches towards the diseases of these areas. To report our experience with endoscopic surgery of benign tumors and tumor-like conditions of the nose and paranasal sinuses. The medical records of 105 patients with benign sinonasal tumor, who had undergone endoscopic surgery for removal of their neoplasm between 1997 and 2003, were retrospectively studied. The studied patients included 32 with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, 24 with inverted papilloma, 23 with benign fibroosseous lesions, 18 with pyogenic granuloma, 6 with intranasal hemangioma, and 2 with pleomorphic adenoma. The patients had a follow-up ranging from 9 to 73 (mean: 41) months. During the follow-up period, the patients were under close observation by performing serial endoscopy and yearly CT scan. Eight cases of recurrent tumor--2 angiofibroma, 4 inverted papilloma, 1 fibrous dysplasia, and 1 osteoma--were noted and managed endoscopically alone or in combination with Caldwell-Luc approach. The major complication encountered in this study was cerebrospinal fluid leakage (2 cases) that was sealed intra-operatively with local tissue flaps without any further sequela. Endoscopic surgery is a valuable tool for removal of benign tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses in the hands of an experienced surgeon.

  6. Endoscopic transpterygoidal repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with extensive osteoradionecrosis of the skull base: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Brand, Y; Lim, E; Waran, V; Prepageran, N

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal techniques have recently become the method of choice in dealing with cerebrospinal fluid leak involving the anterior cranial fossa. However, most surgeons prefer an intracranial approach when leaks involve the middle cranial fossa. This case report illustrates the possibilities of using endoscopic techniques for cerebrospinal fluid leaks involving the middle fossa. A 37-year-old male patient presented with multiple areas of cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak due to osteoradionecrosis following radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma 4 years earlier. Clinical examination showed involvement of all cranial nerves except the IInd and XIth nerves on the left side. A prior attempt to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with craniotomy was not successful. This case demonstrates the successful endoscopic repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  7. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 .

  8. Effects of Merogel coverage on wound healing and ostial patency in endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy for primary chronic dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, W; Cannon, P S; Yan, W; Tu, Y; Selva, D; Qu, J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of Merogel coverage on ostial patency in endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EES-DCR) for primary chronic dacryocystitis (PCD). Methods In all, 260 patients with unilateral PCD were randomized into two groups: the Merogel group and the control group. All patients underwent EES-DCR. The Merogel group received Merogel covering the wound 1–2 mm around the ostium and the control group received no treatment. Patients were followed up for 9 months. The mucosal epithelialization of the wound, the proliferation of fibrosis tissue, and the success rate of ostial patency were compared. Results Our study included 112 patients in the Merogel group and 115 patients in the control group. At the 2-week review, intact mucosal epithelium lined the ostia in 96 Merogel patients compared with 80 control patients (ITT analysis: χ 2=4.502, P=0.034). At the 9-month review, scars were present in 18 patients in the Merogel group compared with 39 patients in the control group (ITT analysis: χ 2=9.909, P=0.002, ITT analysis). No differences were observed in the granulation formation between the two groups. The success rate of ostial patency reached 94.6% (106/112) in the Merogel group compared with 80% (92/115) in the control group (ITT analysis: χ 2=4.151, P=0.042). Conclusion Merogel coverage may enhance the success rate of EES-DCR for PCD by promoting mucosal epithelial healing and preventing excessive scarring. PMID:21394118

  9. Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Remission of Cushing Disease Caused by Ectopic Intracavernous Macroadenoma: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Winstead, Welby I

    2017-02-01

    Complete surgical resection of an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma is the gold standard of treatment of Cushing disease. Ectopic location of these adenomas is an extremely rare condition that may compromise the diagnosis and surgical success. We present the first case of an ectopic intracavernous ACTH-secreting macroadenoma totally resected with endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES). A 36-year-old woman presented with Cushing syndrome. Increased ACTH, serum cortisol, and free urine cortisol levels were identified; however, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging failed to show a pituitary tumor; instead, a parasellar lesion in the left cavernous sinus (CS) was noticed. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling showed a significant central to peripheral and lateralized left-sided ACTH gradient. The patient underwent EES. No tumor was found in the sella; however, the left CS was widely explored and a tumor was found lateral to the paraclival segment of the carotid artery. There were no complications after EES. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of an ACTH-secreting adenoma. During the immediate postoperative course, serum cortisol levels decreased lower than 5 μg/dL. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed complete tumor resection. At 20 months follow-up, the patient remained in clinical and biochemical remission of Cushing disease. Only 12 cases of ectopic intracavernous ACTH-secreting adenomas have been reported and all were microadenomas. The presence of an ectopic ACTH-secreting macroadenoma in the CS represents a surgical challenge. EES is the ideal approach for complete resection of ectopic intracavernous adenomas, allowing for a wide exploration of the CS with no surgical complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endoscopic endonasal removal of laterally extended clival chordoma using side-viewing scopes.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2012-04-01

    The transsphenoidal approach provides a straight and direct route to the clival chordoma, but has limitations for removing the tumor compartment extending laterally into the space posterior to the paraclival internal carotid artery. To overcome the limitations, a side-viewing endoscope and malleable/steerable instruments were employed. Four clinical cases with clival chordoma extending into the retro-carotid space were analyzed for extent of resection, complications and clinical outcome. The retro-carotid tumor compartment was removed in all cases under 30- and 70-degree side-viewing endoscopes using a malleable dissector and/or steerable forceps, resulting in gross total removal of the entire tumor. Single cases were complicated by transient abducens nerve palsy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, which required surgical revision. All patients have been symptom free without tumor recurrence during the mean postoperative follow-up of 21.3 months. Though a longer follow-up is needed to evaluate its effectiveness in long-term tumor control, the surgical maneuver using the side-viewing endoscope is effective for removing laterally extended clival chordomas.

  11. [Transnasal, endoscopical surgery for chronic sinusitis. III. Endonasal ethmoidectomy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wigand, M E

    1981-09-01

    Transnasal total ethmoidectomy appears to be the surgical treatment of choice for cases of severe polyposis of the ethmoid. A thorough knowledge of the surgical anatomy, special instruments, including a new suction-irrigation-endoscope, and basic concept of flanking surgical measures are prerequisite. On the basis of the experience with 372 interventions, the own technique and results are reported. In a consecutive series of 84 patients, controlled over more than one year postoperatively, a success rate of 83 percent was achieved. The low incidence of complications, and the minimal postoperative discomfort of the patients are emphasized. The method also offers changes for the effective treatment of sinu-bronchitis and bronchial asthma.

  12. Management of Major Vascular Injury During Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Jankowitz, Brian T

    2016-06-01

    A major vascular injury is the most feared complication of endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. Risk factors for vascular injury are discussed, and an algorithm for management of a major vascular injury is presented. A team of surgeons (otolaryngology and neurosurgery) is important for identification and control of a major vascular injury applying basic principles of vascular control. A variety of techniques can be used to control a major injury, including coagulation, a muscle patch, sacrifice of the artery, and angiographic stenting. Immediate and close angiographic follow-up is critical to prevent and manage subsequent complications of vascular injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Anatomical limits of endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Prades, J M; Veyret, C; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    Constant anatomic boundaries of the lateral mass of the ethnoid are described, based on data from microdissections, endoscopic examinations, computed tomography imaging and histology in 12 subjects. As with surgical progression, identification of these boundaries follows the lateral orbital and superior craniofrontal surfaces. The "starred groove formation", ethmoidal roof lamina and ethmoidosphenoidal recesses are the safety beacons for endonasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopic control.

  14. Software-assisted live visualization system for subjacent blood vessels in endonasal endoscopic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Maschke, R.; Gruening, J.; Ernstberger, M.; Basan, F.; Baselt, T.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-02-01

    Minimal invasive surgery methods have received growing attention in recent years. In vital important areas, it is crucial for the surgeon to have a precise knowledge of the tissue structure. Especially the visualization of arteries is desirable, as the destruction of the same can be lethal to the patient. In order to meet this requirement, the study presents a novel assistance system for endoscopic surgery. While state-of-the art systems rely on pre-operational data like computer-tomographic maps and require the use of radiation, the goal of the presented approach is to provide the clarification of subjacent blood vessels on live images of the endoscope camera system. Based on the transmission and reflection spectra of various human tissues, a prototype system with a NIR illumination unit working at 808 nm was established. Several image filtering, processing and enhancement techniques have been investigated and evaluated on the raw pictures in order to obtain high quality results. The most important were increasing contrast and thresholding by difference of Gaussian method. Based on that, it is possible to rectify a fragmented artery pattern and extract geometrical information about the structure in terms of position and orientation. By superposing the original image and the extracted segment, the surgeon is assisted with valuable live pictures of the region of interest. The whole system has been tested on a laboratory scale. An outlook on the integration of such a system in a clinical environment and obvious benefits are discussed.

  15. Transposition of the paraclival carotid artery: a novel concept of self-retaining vascular retraction during endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery technical report.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jacob L; Sampath, Raghuram; Casey, Michael A; Quattlebaum, Steven Craig; Ramakrishnan, Vijay R; Youssef, A Samy

    2016-08-01

    Fixed retraction of the internal carotid artery (ICA) has previously been described for use during transcranial microscopic surgery. We report the novel use of a self-retaining microvascular retractor for static repositioning and protection of the ICA during expanded endonasal endoscopic approaches to the paramedian skull base. The transmaxillary, transpterygoid approach was performed in five cadaver heads (ten sides). The self-retaining microvascular retractor was used to laterally reposition the pterygopalatine fossa contents during exposure of the pterygoid base/plates and the paraclival ICA to expose the petrous apex. Maximum ICA retraction distance was measured in the x-axis for all ten sides. The average horizontal distance of ICA retraction measured at the mid-paraclival segment for all ten sides was 4.75 mm. In all cases, the carotid artery was repositioned without injury to the vessel or disruption of the surrounding neurovascular structures. Static repositioning of the ICA and other delicate neurovascular structures was effectively performed during endonasal, endoscopic cadaveric surgery of the skull base and has potential merits in live patients.

  16. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, B A; Schlosser, R J; Palmer, J N

    2005-09-01

    To describe endoscopic management of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. Retrospective. We reviewed all frontal sinus CSF leaks treated using an endoscopic approach at our institutions from 1998 to 2003. CSF leaks originated immediately adjacent to or within the frontal recess or frontal sinus proper for inclusion in the study. Data collected included demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, site and size of skull-base defect, surgical approach, repair technique, and clinical follow up. Seven frontal sinus CSF leaks in six patients were repaired endoscopically. Average age of presentation was 45 years (range 25-65 years). Aetiology was idiopathic (three), congenital (one), accidental trauma (one), and surgical trauma (two). All patients presented with CSF rhinorrhea; two patients presented with meningitis. Four defects originated in the frontal recess, while two others involved the posterior table and frontal sinus outflow tract. Four patients had associated encephaloceles. We performed endoscopic repair in all six patients with one patient requiring an adjuvant osteoplastic flap without obliteration. All repairs were successful at the first attempt with a mean follow up of 13 months. All frontal sinuses remained patent on both post-operative endoscopic and radiographic exam. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks and encephaloceles can be an effective method if meticulous attention is directed toward preservation of the frontal sinus outflow tract, thus avoiding an osteoplastic flap and obliteration. The major limiting factor for an endoscopic approach is extreme extension superiorly or laterally within the posterior table beyond the reach of current instrumentation.

  17. Endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia.

    PubMed

    Postema, R R; Bonjer, H J

    2002-04-01

    There are three types of lumbar hernia: congenital, acquired, and incisional hernias. Acquired hernia can appear in two forms: the inferior (Petit) type and the superior type, first described by Grynfeltt in 1866. We report endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia. A 46-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling in the left lumbar region that had caused her increasing discomfort. The diagnosis of Grynfeltt's hernia was made, and she underwent surgery. With the patient in a left-side decubitus position, access to the extraperitoneal space was gained by inserting a 10-mm inflatable balloon trocar just anteriorly to the midaxillary line between the 12th rib and the superior iliac crest through a muscle-splitting incision into the extraperitoneal space. After the balloon trocar had been removed a blunt-tip trocar was inserted. Using two 5-mm trocars, one above and another below the 10-mm port in the midaxillary line, the hernia could be reduced. A polypropylene mesh graft was introduced through the 10-mm trocar and tacked with spiral tackers. The patient could be discharged the next day after requiring only minimal analgesics. At this writing, 2 (1/2) years after the operation, there is no sign of recurrence. This Grynfeltt hernia could safely be treated using the extraperitoneal approach, which obviates opening and closing the peritoneum, thereby reducing operative time and possibly postoperative complications.

  18. Endoscopic endonasal anatomy of superior orbital fissure and orbital apex regions: critical considerations for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dallan, Iacopo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; de Notaris, Matteo; Sellari-Franceschini, Stefano; Lenzi, Riccardo; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The superior orbital fissure is a critical three-dimensional space connecting the middle cranial fossa and the orbit. From an endoscopic viewpoint, only the medial aspect has a clinical significance. It presents a critical relationship with the lateral sellar compartment, the pterygopalatine fossa and the middle cranial fossa. The connective tissue layers and neural and vascular structures of this region are described. The role of Muller's muscle is confirmed, and the utility of the maxillary and optic strut is outlined. Muller's muscle extends for the whole length of the inferior orbital fissure, passes over the maxillary strut and enters the superior orbital fissure, representing a critical surgical landmark. Dividing the tendon between the medial and inferior rectus muscle allows the identification of the main trunk of the oculomotor nerve, and a little laterally, it is usually possible to visualize the first part of the ophthalmic artery. Based on a better knowledge of anatomy, we trust that this area could be readily addressed in clinical situations requiring an extended approach in proximity of the orbital apex.

  19. Medial and Superior Orbital Decompression: Improving Access for Endonasal Endoscopic Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Poczos, Pavel; Kurbanov, Almaz; Keller, Jeffrey T; Zimmer, Lee A

    2015-12-01

    Visualization by Draf I-III endoscopic access to the frontal sinus via drainage pathways is sometimes inadequate. We compare lateral frontal sinus exposures by Draf approaches versus our modification of removing the medial-superior wall of the orbit while preserving the periorbita. Twenty cadaveric heads dissected using Draf IIB, III, and modified Draf III with medial and superior orbital decompression (MSOD) underwent thin-cut computed tomography (CT) scanning. Under image guidance, measurements extended from the midline crista gali to the most lateral point of the frontal sinus. A case report shows the modified Draf III improved frontal sinus access. Comparing Draf IIB and III with Draf III with MSOD, respectively, distances between midline and most lateral point averaged 19.1 mm, 23.7 mm, and 30.4 mm (left) and 18.7 mm, 25.1 mm, and 32.2 mm (right). Differences between Draf III with/without MSOD were 6.65 mm (left) and 7.09 mm (right); 12 heads were excluded because of under-pneumatization of the sinuses. Draf III with MSOD extended surgical access to lateral regions of the frontal sinus. This extension achieved better visualization and instrumentation with minimal removal of the frontal bone's orbital segment anterior and superior to the anterior ethmoidal artery while preserving the periorbita. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Retrospective analysis of a new antibiotic chemoprophylaxis regimen in 170 patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Raffaele; Cappabianca, Paolo; Tosone, Grazia; Esposito, Felice; Piazza, Marcello; de Divitiis, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the rate of infectious complications post endoscopic transspheinodal neurosurgery in patients receiving a new antibiotic chemoprophylaxis regimen. Clinical records of 170 patients who received prophylaxis with a third-generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside (160 cases) or alone (10 cases) were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-eight patients (16.4%) had CSF leakage. The postsurgical follow-up ranged from 3 months to 4 years. Of 170 patients, 2 (1.17%) developed infectious complications: 1 case of meningitis by Staphylococcus epidermidis and 1 case of sphenoid sinusitis (without microbiological diagnosis). In addition, asymptomatic sphenoid sinusitis was diagnosed in 2 other patients. The cost ranged from 22.50 to 33.34 euros/d. The rate of infectious complications was very low in patients receiving prophylaxis with a third-generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside or alone; because of the broad-spectrum of antibiotics and their high cost, this regimen could be used in at-risk patients (eg, smokers, patients with cerebrospinal leak, or patients with Cushing diseases).

  1. Invagination of the Sphenoid Sinus Mucosa after Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Park, Jae-Sung; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Soo Whan; Cho, Jin Hee; Park, Yong Jin; Kang, Yun Jin; Kim, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical features of invagination of the sphenoid sinus mucosa (ISM) and compare them with other similar cases using a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the various nasal symptoms and to discuss its clinical significance and means of prevention. Study Design Retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center. Methods Between 2010 and 2015, 8 patients who had undergone EETSA surgery displayed postoperative ISM. The comparison group consisted of 147 patients who underwent the same surgical procedures and were diagnosed with the same diseases. Pre- or postoperative paranasal sinus computed tomography (PNS CT) and VAS were performed and subsequently analyzed. Results The clinical features of ISM of the sphenoid sinus showed sellar floor invagination and regenerated inverted ingrowing sphenoid mucosa on endoscopic imaging. PNS CT also showed a bony defect and invaginated air densities at the sellar turcica. Pre- and postoperative VAS scores revealed that the ISM group had much less of an improvement in headaches after surgery than that of the comparison group (p = 0.049). Conclusion ISM may occur because of a change in pressure, sphenoid mucosal status, or arachnoid membrane status. Moreover, ISM is related to improvements in headaches. Therefore, EETSA patients should avoid activities that cause rapid pressure changes during the healing process. In addition, sellar reconstruction that is resistant to physical pressure changes should be mandated despite the absence of an intraoperative CSF leak. PMID:27622454

  2. Synchronous femoral hernias diagnosed during endoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnis, Soni; Wong, April; Berney, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    During totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair of inguinal hernias, it is possible to see the internal opening of the femoral canal. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence of synchronous femoral hernias found in patients undergoing TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. This was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 362 consecutive patients who underwent 484 TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during a 5-year period, May 2005 to May 2010. During surgery, both inguinal and femoral canal orifices were routinely inspected. The presence of unilateral or bilateral inguinal and femoral hernias was recorded and repaired accordingly. There were a total of 362 patients. More males (343, 95%) underwent a TEP hernia repair than females (19, 5%). There were more cases of unilateral (240/362, 66%) than bilateral (122/362, 34%) inguinal hernias. A total of 18 cases of synchronous femoral hernias were found during operation. There was a higher incidence of femoral hernia in females (7/19, 37%) compared to males (11/343, 3%) (P < 0.001). None of the femoral hernias were clinically detectable preoperatively. Females undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair are more likely to have a synchronous femoral hernia than males. We suggest that all women presenting with an inguinal hernia also have a formal assessment of the femoral canal. TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an ideal approach as both inguinal and femoral orifices can be assessed and hernias repaired simultaneously during surgery.

  3. Endoscopic Repair of the Superficial Deltoid Ligament and Spring Ligament.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    The plantar calcaneonavicular ligament, also known as the spring ligament, is an important static stabilizer of the medial longitudinal foot arch. Compromise of this ligament is a primary causative factor of peritalar subluxation, and it should be repaired in addition to treatment of tibialis posterior tendon abnormalities. Open repair of the ligament requires extensive soft-tissue dissection. The development of the high distal portal for posterior tibial tendoscopy allows repair of the ligament endoscopically. This, together with endoscopically assisted reconstruction of the tibialis posterior tendon, allows complete endoscopic treatment of stage 2 posterior tibial tendon deficiency. The major structure at risk is the medial plantar nerve. This technique is technically demanding and should be reserved for experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists.

  4. The modified hemi-Lothrop procedure: a variation of the endoscopic endonasal approach for resection of a supraorbital psammomatoid ossifying fibroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Mendelson, Zachary S; Dubal, Pariket M; Mirani, Neena; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2014-12-01

    Tumors in the supraorbital region are most commonly accessed through transcranial approaches, including fronto-orbital, orbitozygomatic, and eyebrow supraorbital keyhole approaches. Purely endoscopic endonasal approaches (EEA) are more challenging to perform because of limitations in access and visualization for lateral extension beyond the midline corridor. The modified hemi-Lothrop procedure, a variation of an extended EEA, allows for binostril access and visualization of the lateral supraorbital region while preserving the contralateral frontal sinus drainage pathway. The operative technique and nuances are illustrated in a rare case of a supraorbital juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma (JPOF) causing symptomatic orbital compression. The key components of the approach consisted of an endoscopic Draf IIB (left frontal sinusotomy) ipsilateral to the tumor, and a superior septectomy for binostril bimanual instrumentation. Excellent visualization, access, and tumor removal of the supraorbital region was achieved with angled endoscopy and curved instrumentation from the contralateral nasal cavity and through the septectomy window ("cross-court" trajectory). The modified hemi-Lothrop procedure with angled endoscopy is a safe and effective alternative route to traditional transcranial approaches to access the supraorbital region. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a supraorbital JPOF that was successfully resected via a purely EEA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D-FIESTA MR images are useful in the evaluation of the endoscopic expanded endonasal approach for midline skull-base lesions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Biao; Yun, Hong; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Gu, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The endoscopic expanded endonasal approach (EEA) has been reported in literature as a useful tool to treat sellar, parasellar, suprasellar, and clival lesions. The endoscope permits a panoramic view rather than a narrow microscopic view, and this approach can reach the lesion without brain retraction and with minimal neurovascular manipulation. However, because of the narrow corridor, the preoperative evaluation of the lesions should be of high priority. 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) or constructive interference in steady state (CISS) MR imaging provides high spatial resolution in the small structures within the cisterns. Therefore, this technique may be useful for better preoperative planning in detecting optic nerve, oculomotor nerve, chiasma, infundibulum, pituitary stalk, and small vessels in sellar region. Here we used the 3D-FIESTA MR images to evaluate EEA for seven midline skull-base lesions. Our report showed that, when EEA was used to treat midline skull-base lesions, 3D-FIESTA MR images were valuable in the assessment of vital structures in and around the tumor-involved midline skull-base region. 3D-FIESTA MR images can help in making a better preoperative planning, locating the intraoperative structures, and reducing the surgical risks. Otherwise, this approach is helpful for the craniopharyngioma classification based on EEA.

  6. Endoscopic Proximal Hamstring Repair and Ischial Bursectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dierckman, Brian D.; Guanche, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    With the significant increase in use of the arthroscope around the hip have come several less invasive techniques to manage pathologies around this joint. This technical note with a video details one such technique that allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now have been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. This procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:23766996

  7. Transnasal endoscopic repair of posterior table fractures.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, Mohamad R; Conger, Bryant; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2012-12-01

    Conventional treatment of frontal sinus posterior table fractures has included osteoplastic flap or cranialization procedures despite considerable advances in endoscopic technique and experience. The objective of the current study was to evaluate outcomes of frontal sinus fractures involving the posterior table managed using endoscopic approaches. Prospective cohort. Tertiary care, academic university hospital. Prospective evaluation of patients with posterior table fractures was performed. Data were collected regarding demographics, etiology, technique, operative site, length involving the posterior table, size of the skull base defect, complications, and clinical follow-up. Thirteen patients (average age 37 years) with posterior table fractures were treated using endoscopic techniques from 2008 to 2012. Mean follow-up time was 68 weeks (range, 2-206 weeks). Patients were primarily managed using Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies with 1 individual requiring a concomitant trephine. A Draf III procedure was performed in 1 patient. Average fracture defect (length vs width) was 13 × 4.5 mm, and average length involving the posterior table was 9.7 mm (1-30 mm). Skull base defects were covered with a septal flap and/or free tissue grafts. Although 1 individual required a revision frontal sinusotomy and follow-up was short in several patients, all sinuses remained patent on last clinical examination. Management of frontal sinus posterior table fractures using minimally invasive endoscopic techniques provides excellent outcomes in selected cases. Fractures of up to 30 mm in length were adequately managed in this series and indicate this approach can be a viable alternative in the treatment of these fractures.

  8. Occult hernias and bilateral endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: is there a need for prophylactic repair? : Results of endoscopic extraperitoneal repair over a period of 10 years.

    PubMed

    Saggar, V R; Sarangi, R

    2007-02-01

    An advantage of the endoscopic total extraperitoneal approach over the conventional hernia repair is detection of an unsuspected, asymptomatic hernia on the contralateral side. A high incidence of occult contralateral hernias has been reported in the literature. However, few studies have examined the incidence of development of a hernia on the healthy side evaluated previously during an endoscopic unilateral hernia repair. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of development of a contralateral hernia after a previous bilateral exploration. The need for a prophylactic contralateral repair is also addressed. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 822 endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs done in 634 patients over a period of 10 years from May 1993 to 2003. Incidence of hernia undetected clinically and during previous contralateral repair was assessed over a follow up period ranging from 10 to 82 months. About 7.97% of bilateral hernias were clinically occult hernias. Only 1.12% of unilateral hernia repairs (who had undergone a contralateral evaluation at surgery) subsequently developed a hernia on the other side. The endoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair is an excellent tool to detect and treat occult contralateral hernias. The incidence of hernia occurring at the contralateral side after a previous bilateral exploration is low, hence a prophylactic repair on the contralateral side is not recommended on a routine basis.

  9. Endonasal management of pediatric congenital transsphenoidal encephaloceles: nuances of a modified reconstruction technique. Technical note and report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Zeinalizadeh, Mehdi; Sadrehosseini, Seyed Mousa; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; Silva, Harley Brito da; Singh, Harminder

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Congenital transsphenoidal encephaloceles are rare malformations, and their surgical treatment remains challenging. This paper reports 3 cases of transsphenoidal encephalocele in 8- to 24-month-old infants, who presented mainly with airway obstruction, respiratory distress, and failure to thrive. METHODS The authors discuss the surgical management of these lesions via a minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal approach, as compared with the traditional transcranial and transpalatal approaches. A unique endonasal management algorithm for these lesions is outlined. The lesions were repaired with no resection of the encephalocele sac, and the cranial base defects were reconstructed with titanium mesh plates and vascular nasoseptal flaps. RESULTS Reduction of the encephalocele and reconstruction of the skull base was successfully accomplished in all 3 cases, with favorable results. CONCLUSIONS The described endonasal management algorithm for congenital transsphenoidal encephaloceles is a safe, viable alternative to traditional transcranial and transpalatal approaches, and avoids much of the morbidity associated with these open techniques.

  10. Gigantism treated by pure endoscopic endonasal approach in a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with sphenoid fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Guive; Jalessi, Maryam; Sarvghadi, Farzaneh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is an uncommon polyostotic manifestation of fibrous dysplasia in association with at least one endocrinopathy that is mostly associated with precocious puberty and hyperpigmented skin macules named café-au-lait spots. We present an atypical manifestation of McCune-Albright syndrome in a 19-year-old man with the uncommon association of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and gigantism in the absence of café-au-lait spots and precocious puberty. He presented with a height increase to 202 cm in the previous 3 years, which had become more progressive in the few months prior. Physical examination revealed only a mild facial asymmetry; however, a computed tomography (CT) scan discovered vast areas of voluminous bones with ground-glass density and thickening involving the craniofacial bones and skull base. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) found a right stalk shift of the pituitary with a 20 mm pituitary adenoma. We describe the diagnostic and endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for excision of the tumor.

  11. Efficacy of Microsurgical Sublabial Approach (MSA) Versus Endoscopic Endonasal Approach (EEA) for the Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas Based on Radiological and Hormonal Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mattogno, Pier Paolo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Lofrese, Giorgio; Vigo, Vera; Anile, Carmelo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical efficacy of the microsurgical sublabial approach (MSA) versus the endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) for the treatment of pituitary adenomas, based on short-term (12 months) radiological and endocrinological follow-up. One hundred and fourteen patients affected by pituitary adenoma were enrolled at our Unit between January 2007 and February 2012; 72 were treated with MSA, and 42 with EEA. The preoperative parameters considered were: type of lesion (secreting or nonsecreting), lesion size, presence of intralesional hemorrhage, lesion perimeter (nodular vs. uniform), intrasellar vs. suprasellar, involvement of cavernous sinus, and osteodural infiltration. Hormonal assays and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed at 12 months after the surgical procedure. Univariate analysis of the data documented a statistically significant difference in favor of MSA for the subgroups of secreting adenomas (90.9 % vs. nonsecreting 48.3 %), microadenomas (100 % vs. macroadenomas 57.1 %), adenomas without osteodural infiltration (87.5 % vs. 55.5 % with the infiltration) or those without intralesional hemorrhage (75 % vs. 45.9 % with the hemorrhage), and growth hormone (GH) adenomas (88.8 % vs. 43.7 %). Multivariate analysis confirmed the greater effectiveness of MSA for the treatment of micro-secreting adenomas. Recent advances in the EEA for treating pituitary adenomas could lead to this modality replacing the microsurgical technique. In our experience the MSA allowed us to achieve better results in the treatment of microadenomas.

  12. Endoscopic endonasal surgery for pituitary tumors. Results in a series of 121 patients operated at the same center and by the same neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Torales, Jorge; Halperin, Irene; Hanzu, Felicia; Mora, Mireia; Alobid, Isam; De Notaris, Mateo; Ferrer, Enrique; Enseñat, Joaquim

    2014-10-01

    Pituitary adenomas account for approximately 15% of intracranial benign tumors. The neurosurgical results achieved since the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal (EET) approach was introduced in our center in 2005 are reported here. A retrospective analysis of 121 patients with sellar lesions (58% females, age 55.7 ± 16 years, range 18-82) who underwent EET surgery from February 2005 to January 2012 and were followed up for a mean time of 4.58 years (range 1.08-8.58). Six Rathke cleft cysts (3 intra-suprasellar, 1 intrasellar, 2 suprasellar); 114 pituitary adenomas (16 microadenomas, 98 macroadenomas), and 1 case of normal MRI were included. Baseline findings included hormonal changes in 59 patients (48,7%) and visual field changes in 38 patients (31%); in 7 patients (5.8%), clinical presentation was pituitary apoplexy. Complete resection was achieved in 77 patients (63.6%), subtotal resection in 29 (23.9%), and partial resection in 15 (12.3%). In patients with Grade 3 and 4 cavernous sinus invasion, resection was subtotal in 30% (12/39) and complete in 46% (18/39). Hormonal remission was achieved in 16 patients with Cushing disease (84%), 18 patients with prolactinoma (78.2%), and 18 patients with acromegaly (85,7%). There were 12 cases (9%) of cerebrospinal fluid leak, 4 cases of diabetes insipidus, and 3 cases with transient SIADH/hyponatremia. Seven patients developed panhypopituitarism. Postoperative mortality rate was 2.4%. One hundred and three patients (85.3%) were discharged from the hospital less than 48 hours after surgery. Our results are similar to those reported by renowned pituitary units. Results achieved using an endoscopic approach in pituitary neurosurgery are better than those of microneurosurgery for cavernous sinus invasion. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence signal reduction after endoscopic endonasal transcribiform total resection of olfactory groove meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Prevedello, Daniel M.; Ditzel Filho, Leo F. S.; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C.; Solari, Domenico; do Espírito Santo, Marcelo Prudente; Wehr, Allison M.; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Kassam, Amin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Olfactory groove meningiomas grow insidiously and compress adjacent cerebral structures. Achieving complete removal without further damage to frontal lobes can be difficult. Microsurgical removal of large lesions is a challenging procedure and usually involves some brain retraction. The endoscopic endonasal approaches (EEAs) for tumors arising from the anterior fossa have been well described; however, their effect on the adjacent brain tissue has not. Herein, the authors utilized the magnetic resonance imaging fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence signal as a marker for edema and gliosis on pre- and post-operative images of olfactory groove meningiomas, thus presenting an objective parameter for brain injury after surgical manipulation. Methods: Imaging of 18 olfactory groove meningiomas removed through EEAs was reviewed. Tumor and pre/postoperative FLAIR signal volumes were assessed utilizing the DICOM image viewer OsiriX®. Inclusion criteria were: (1) No previous treatment; (2) EEA gross total removal; (3) no further treatment. Results: There were 14 females and 4 males; the average age was 53.8 years (±8.85 years). Average tumor volume was 24.75 cm3 (±23.26 cm3, range 2.8–75.7 cm3), average preoperative FLAIR volume 31.17 cm3 (±39.38 cm3, range 0–127.5 cm3) and average postoperative change volume, 4.16 cm3 (±6.18 cm3, range 0–22.2 cm3). Average time of postoperative scanning was 6 months (range 0.14–20 months). In all cases (100%) gross total tumor removal was achieved. Nine patients (50%) had no postoperative FLAIR changes. In 2 patients (9%) there was minimal increase of changes postoperatively (2.2 cm3 and 6 cm3 respectively); all others demonstrated image improvement. The most common complication was postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage (27.8%); 1 patient (5.5%) died due to systemic complications and pulmonary sepsis. Conclusions: FLAIR signal changes tend to resolve after endonasal tumor resection and do not seem

  14. Endoscopic Repair of CSF Fistulae: A Ten Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Arun; Mathew, John; Varghese, Ajoy Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebrospinal Fluid (CFF) fistulae are repaired endoscopically with varying degrees of success around the world. Large series are still uncommon, and the results varied primarily because of the different techniques by different surgeons and also because of a variation in the patient profile in each series, for example, many series deal primarily with traumatic CSF leaks where the defects are larger and outcomes poorer. Aim To analyse the surgical outcomes of Endoscopic CSF rhinorrhea closure. Materials and Methods This is a series of 34 cases operated upon primarily by one surgeon in two different centres over a period of 10 years. Results Of the 34 cases, 76% of the patients were women. Among the patients only 20.6% patients had a history of trauma preceding the CSF leak. The most common site of leak was in the fovea ethmoidalis in 19 (55.8%) followed by 10 (29.4%) in the cribriform plate. An overlay technique of placing the multiple layers of fascia and mucosa was used in 26 (76.5%) patients and underlay technique in the remaining. Postoperative lumbar drain was used in all patients. Conclusion Based on the treatment outcome of the 34 patients, it can be concluded that the success rate of a single endoscopic procedure in our experience is 97% and 100% following the second. Endoscopic approach for closure of CSF leak is safe with minimal complications and little morbidity. PMID:27656471

  15. Endoscopic repair technique for traumatic penetrating injuries of the clivus.

    PubMed

    Liebelt, Brandon D; Boghani, Zain; Haider, Ali S; Takashima, Masayoshi

    2016-06-01

    Unlike basilar skull fractures, penetrating traumatic injuries to the clivus are uncommon. We present two novel and interesting cases of traumatic crossbow arrow injury and penetrating screwdriver injury to the clivus. A review of the literature describing methods to repair these injuries was performed. A careful, systematic approach is required when working up and treating these injuries, as airway preservation is critical. An adaptation to the previously described "gasket-seal" method for skull base repair was utilized to repair the traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. This repair technique is unique in that it is tailored to a much smaller defect than typical post-surgical defects. Two patients are presented, one with a post-traumatic CSF fistula after penetrating crossbow injury to the clivus and one with a penetrating screwdriver injury to the clivus. The patients were treated successfully with transnasal endoscopic repair with fascia lata graft and a nasoseptal flap, a novel adaptation to the previously described "gasket-seal" technique of skull base repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy with anterior C1 arch preservation in reumathoid arthritis: long term follow-up and further technical improvement by anterior endoscopic C1-C2 screw fixation and fusion.

    PubMed

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nasi, Davide; Colasanti, Roberto; Pan, Baogen; Re, Massimo; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia; Dobran, Mauro; Specchia, Nicola; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-08-22

    To examine the long-term outcomes (minimum of 4,5 years) of endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy (EEO) with preservation of anterior C1 ring to treat irreducible ventral bulbo-medullary compressions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to illustrate a novel technique of anterior pure endoscopic craniovertebral junction (CVJ) reconstruction and fusion. In fact, long-term clinical studies are still lacking to elucidate the effective role of EEO and whether it can obviate the need for posterior fixation. From November 2008 to January 2012, clinical and radiological data of 7 patients presenting with RA and associated irreducible bulbo-medullary compression treated with EEO were retrospectively analyzed. In all patients decompression was achieved by EEO with anterior C1 arch preservation. In the last two patients, after EEO, we used the spared anterior C1 arch for reconstruction of anterior column of CVJ by positioning, under pure endoscopic guidance, autologous bone and two tricortical screws between the anterior arch of C1 and the residual odontoid. All patients were examined clinically with Ranawat classification and radiographically with CT scan, MRI and dynamic x-ray immediately after surgery and during follow-up. Adequate bulbo-medullary decompression with anterior C1 arch preservation was obtained in all cases. At follow up (average 66,2 months; range 91-54 months) all patients experienced an improvement at least of one Ranawat classification level and presented no clinical and/or radiological signs of instability. EEO with anterior C1 arch sparing provides satisfying long term results for irreducible ventral CVJ lesions in RA. The preservation of anterior C1 arch and, when possible, the reconstruction of anterior CVJ can prevent the need for posterior fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective comparison of sinonasal outcomes after microscopic sublabial or endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pledger, Carrie L; Elzoghby, Mohamed A; Oldfield, Edward H; Payne, Spencer C; Jane, John A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Both endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal approaches are accepted techniques for the resection of pituitary adenomas. Although studies have explored patient outcomes for each technique individually, none have prospectively compared sinonasal and quality of life outcomes in a concurrent series of patients at the same institution, as has been done in the present study. METHODS Patients with nonfunctioning adenomas undergoing transsphenoidal surgery were assessed for sinonasal function, quality of life, and pain using the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20 (SNOT-20), the short form of the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) instrument, the SF-36, and a headache scale. Eighty-two patients undergoing either endoscopic (47 patients) or microscopic (35 patients) surgery were surveyed preoperatively and at 24-48 hours, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 1 year after surgery. RESULTS Patients who underwent endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal surgery experienced a similar recovery pattern, showing an initial increase in symptoms during the first 2 weeks, followed by a return to baseline by 4 weeks and improvement beyond baseline functioning by 8 weeks. Patients who underwent endoscopic surgery experienced better sinonasal outcomes at 24-48 hours (SNOT total p = 0.015, SNOT rhinologic subscale [ssRhino] p < 0.001), 2 weeks (NOSE p = 0.013), and 8 weeks (SNOT total p = 0.032 and SNOT ssRhino p = 0.035). By 1 year after surgery, no significant differences in sinonasal outcomes were observed between the 2 groups. Headache scales at 1 year improved in all dimensions except duration for both groups (total result 73%, p = 0.004; severity 46%, p < 0.001; frequency 53%, p < 0.001), with 80% of either microscopic or endoscopic patients experiencing improvement or resolution of headache symptoms. Endoscopic and microscopic patients experienced reduced vitality preoperatively compared with US population norms and remained low postoperatively. By 8 weeks after surgery

  18. Comparison of endoscopic endonasal and bifrontal craniotomy approaches for olfactory groove meningiomas: A matched pair analysis of outcomes and frontal lobe changes on MRI.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, John R; Carvalho, Felipe; Vaz Guimaraes Filho, Francisco; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Koutourousiou, Maria; Su, Shirley; Vescan, Allan D; Witterick, Ian J; Zadeh, Gelareh; Wang, Eric W; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Gardner, Paul A; Gentili, Fred; Snyderman, Carl H

    2015-11-01

    We compare the outcomes and postoperative MRI changes of endoscopic endonasal (EEA) and bifrontal craniotomy (BFC) approaches for olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM). All patients who underwent either BFC or EEA for OGM were eligible. Matched pairs were created by matching tumor volumes of an EEA patient with a BFC patient, and matching the timing of the postoperative scans. The tumor dimensions, peritumoral edema, resectability issues, and frontal lobe changes were recorded based on preoperative and postoperative MRI. Postoperative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensity and residual cystic cavity (porencephalic cave) volume were compared using univariable and multivariable analyses. From a total of 70 patients (46 EEA, 24 BFC), 10 matched pairs (20 patients) were created. Three patients (30%) in the EEA group and two (20%) in the BFC had postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks (p=0.61). Gross total resections were achieved in seven (70%) of the EEA group and nine (90%) of the BFC group (p=0.26), and one patient from each group developed a recurrence. On postoperative MRI, there was no significant difference in FLAIR signal volumes between EEA and BFC approaches (6.9 versus 13.3 cm(3); p=0.17) or in porencephalic cave volumes (1.7 versus 5.0 cm(3); p=0.11) in univariable analysis. However, in a multivariable analysis, EEA was associated with less postoperative FLAIR change (p=0.02) after adjusting for the volume of preoperative edema. This study provides preliminary evidence that EEA is associated with quantifiable improvements in postoperative frontal lobe imaging.

  19. A technical note on endonasal combined microscopic endoscopic with free head navigation technique of removal of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Al-Mefty, Ossama; Pravdenkova, Svetlana; Gragnaniello, Cristian

    2010-04-01

    Pituitary surgery exemplifies the continuous refinement of surgical techniques. The transsphenoidal approach is the approach of choice to treat most pituitary adenomas. We report here, as a technical note, an operative nuance that represents an encompassment of various technical steps that we utilize in our current surgery, including the corroboration of navigation system on a free head with combined use of endoscope and microscope techniques.

  20. Long term follow-up of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas submitted to endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Leopoldo, Caroline Martins Dos Santos; Leopoldo, Felippe Martins Dos Santos; Santos, Américo Rubens Leite Dos; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Lima, José Viana; Scalissi, Nilza Maria; Lazarini, Paulo Roberto; Dolci, Ricardo Landini Lutaif

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the endoscopic transsphenoidal technique for growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas. A retrospective analysis based on medical records of 23 acromegalic patients submitted to endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. Biochemical control was defined as basal GH < 1ng/ml, nadir GH < 0.4ng/ml after glucose load and age-adjusted IGF-1 normal at the last follow-up. The overall endocrinological remission rate was 39.1%. While all microademonas achieved a cure, just one third of macroadenomas went into remission. Suprasellar extension, cavernous sinus invasion and high GH levels were associated with lower rates of disease control. The most common complication was diabetes insipidus and the most severe was an ischemic stroke. The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach is a safe and effective technique to control GH-secreting adenomas. The transcavernous approach may increase the risk of complications. Suprasellar and cavernous sinus extensions may preclude gross total resection of these tumors.

  1. Endoscopic endonasal management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after anterior clinoidectomy for aneurysm surgery: changing the paradigm of complication management.

    PubMed

    Beer-Furlan, Andre; Balsalobre, Leonardo; Vellutini, Eduardo de Arnaldo Silva; Stamm, Aldo Cassol; Pahl, Felix Hendrik; Gentil, Andre Felix

    2016-07-01

    Resection of the anterior clinoid process results in the creation of the clinoid space, an important surgical step in the exposure and clipping of clinoidal and supraclinoidal internal carotid artery aneurysms. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea is an undesired and potentially serious complication. Conservative measures may be unsuccesful, and there is no consensus on the most appropriate surgical treatment. Two patients with persistent transclinoidal CSF rhinorrhea after aneurysm surgery were successfully treated with a combined endoscopic transnasal/transeptal binostril approach using a fat graft and ipsilateral mucosal nasal septal flap. Anatomical considerations and details of the surgical technique employed are discussed, and a management plan is proposed.

  2. Delayed Failure after Endoscopic Staple Repair of an Anterior Spine Surgery Related Pharyngeal Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khudari, Samer; Succar, Eric; Ghanem, Tamer; Gardner, Glendon M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare complication of endoscopic staple repair of a pharyngeal diverticulum related to prior anterior cervical spine surgery. A 70-year-old male developed a symptomatic pharyngeal diverticulum 2 years after an anterior cervical fusion that was repaired via endoscopic stapler-assisted diverticulectomy. He initially had improvement of his symptoms after the stapler-assisted approach. Three years later, the patient presented with dysphagia and was found to have erosion of the cervical hardware into the pharyngeal lumen at the site of the prior repair. We present the first reported case of late hardware erosion into a pharyngeal diverticulum after endoscopic stapler repair. PMID:24454395

  3. Endonasal transsphenoidal removal of tuberculum sellae meningiomas: technical note.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shon W; Smith, Zachary; Kelly, Daniel F

    2004-07-01

    Tuberculum sellae meningiomas traditionally have been removed through a transcranial approach. More recently, the sublabial transsphenoidal approach has been used to remove such tumors. Here, we describe use of the direct endonasal transsphenoidal approach for removal of suprasellar meningiomas. Three women, aged 32, 34, and 55 years, each sought treatment for visual loss and headaches. In each patient, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a suprasellar mass causing optic chiasmal and optic nerve compression (average size, 2 x 2 cm). All three patients underwent tumor removal via an endonasal approach with the operating microscope. Suprasellar exposure was facilitated by removal of the posterior planum sphenoidale. Ultrasound was used to help define tumor location before dural opening. The extent of tumor removal was verified with angled endoscopes in all patients, and with intraoperative MRI in one patient. The surgical dural and bony defects were repaired in all patients with abdominal fat, titanium mesh, and 2 to 3 days of cerebrospinal fluid lumbar drainage. Nasal packing was not used. There were no postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks or meningitis. One patient required a reoperation 2 weeks after surgery to reduce the size of her fat graft, which was causing optic nerve compression; within 24 hours, her vision rapidly improved. At 3 months after surgery, all three patients had normal vision, no new endocrinopathy, and no residual tumor on MRI. At 10 months after surgery, one patient had a small asymptomatic tumor regrowth seen on MRI. The endonasal approach with the operating microscope appears to be an effective minimally invasive method for removing relatively small midline tuberculum sellae meningiomas. Intraoperative ultrasound, the micro-Doppler probe, and angled endoscopes are useful adjuncts for safely and completely removing such tumors. Longer follow-up is needed to monitor for tumor recurrence in these patients.

  4. Endoscopic Resection of Avulsed Fragment of Tibial Tuberosity and Endoscopic-Assisted Repair of Patellar Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    An avulsion fracture of part of the tibial tuberosity can occur as a result of a tophaceous tuberosity or Osgood-Schlatter disease. We describe an endoscopic technique of debridement, bone fragment resection, and tendon repair. This technique has the potential advantage of fewer wound complications. It is performed through proximal and distal portals on the sides of the patellar tendon. The working space is deep to the tendon. After debridement of the tendon and resection of the bone fragment, the tendon gap is assessed. Endoscopic-assisted side-by-side repair is performed to close the gap if the gap is less than 30% of the width of the tendon. If the gap is more than 30% of the width of the tendon, the proximal stump of the avulsed tendon can be retrieved through the proximal portal. Krackow suture with stay stitches is applied to the proximal stump. The stump is put back and sutured to the tibial insertion through a bone tunnel or suture anchor. This is augmented by side-by-side suturing of the avulsed tendon with the adjacent normal tendon.

  5. Treatment of a skull-base giant cell tumor with endoscopic endonasal resection and denosumab: case report.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yukihiro; Furuno, Yuichi; Kawabe, Takuya; Ohwada, Kei; Tatsuzawa, Kazunori; Sasajima, Hiroyasu; Hashimoto, Naoya

    2017-02-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 1-week history of diplopia was referred to the authors' hospital. Neurological examination revealed left abducens nerve palsy. Computed tomography showed a lesion in the left sphenoid sinus involving the medial wall of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) and osteolytic change at the clivus bordering the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an extensive soft-tissue mass occupying the left sphenoid sinus. Surgical intervention by the endoscopic transnasal method allowed most of the lesion to be removed. Only the portion attached to the medial wall of the ICA was not removed. Postoperatively, the lesion was diagnosed as a giant cell tumor (GCT) and the patient received 120 mg of subcutaneous denosumab every 4 weeks, with additional doses on Days 8 and 15 during the first month of therapy. MRI a week after starting denosumab revealed shrinkage of the initially fast-growing residual tumor. The patient was discharged upon completion of the third denosumab administration. GCT is an aggressive stromal tumor developing mainly in young adults. Complete resection is recommended for GCT in the literature. However, size and location of the CGT often limit this approach. Various adjuvant treatments for skull base GCTs have been reported, including radiation and chemotherapy. However, the roles of adjuvant therapies have yet to be clearly defined. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody, was recently approved for GCT in several countries. Denosumab may permit less invasive treatments for patients with GCTs while avoiding deleterious outcomes, and may also limit disease progression and recurrence.

  6. Efficacy of ultra-short single agent regimen antibiotic chemo-prophylaxis in reducing the risk of meningitis in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Somma, Teresa; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to evaluate the incidence of infectious complications (namely meningitis) within 30 days after endoscopic endonasal transspheinodal neurosurgery (EETS) in patients receiving an ultra-short peri-operative chemo-prophylaxis regimen with 2 doses of 1st generation cephalosporin or macrolide. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 145 patients who received an ultra-short chemoprophylaxis with two doses of an antibiotic, given 30 min before and 8h after EETS, over a 30-month time-frame. Ninety-seven patients (66.89%) received endovenous cefazolin, a 1st generation cephalosporin, administered at a dosage of 1000 mg, and 48 patients (33.10%) with an history of allergy to various agents, received endovenous clarithromycin at a dosage of 500 mg. No case of peri- and post-operative meningitis occurred in patients receiving the 2 doses of antibiotic. Only one patient (0.68%) developed cerebral fluid leakage on the 7th postoperative day, which required the switching to a broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis for one week; this patient received the ultrashort prophylaxis with a macrolide. In addition, 7 patients (4.82%) developed minor infectious complications such as low-grade fever (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), enlarged submandibular and cervical lymphnodes (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), and upper and lower respiratory tract infection (1 case receiving clarithromycin). The cost of this prophylaxis regimen ranged from 7.76 Euro (cefazolin) to 39.54 Euro (clarithromycin). This study suggested that an ultra-short single-antibiotic prophylaxis is a safe, cheap and effective regimen to prevent post-operative meningitis in patients undergoing EETS and who do not require lumbar drainage after surgery. In these patients also the rate of minor infective complications was acceptable when compared with the previous more expensive regimen based on 3rd generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside or alone, that could be suitable only

  7. Parasellar Extension Grades and Surgical Extent in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenomas : A Single Surgeon's Consecutive Series with the Aspects of Reliability and Clinical Validity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, Jae-Sung; Lee, Song; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective The inter-rater reliability of the modified Knosp's classification was measured before the analysis. The clinical validity of the parasellar extension grading system was evaluated by investigating the extents of resection and complication rates among the grades in the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS) for pituitary adenomas. Methods From November 2008 to August 2015, of the 286 patients who underwent EETS by the senior author, 208 were pituitary adenoma cases (146 non-functioning pituitary adenomas, 10 adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting adenomas, 31 growth hormone-secreting adenomas, 17 prolactin-secreting adenomas, and 4 thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting adenomas; 23 microadenomas, 174 macroadenomas, and 11 giant adenomas). Two neurosurgeons and a neuroradiologist independently measured the degree of parasellar extension on the preoperative sellar MRI according to the modified Knosp's classification. Inter-rater reliability was statistically assessed by measuring the intraclass correlation coefficient. The extents of resection were evaluated by comparison of the pre- and post-operative MR images; the neurovascular complications were assessed by reviewing the patients' medical records. The extent of resection was measured in each parasellar extension grade; thereafter, their statistical differences were calculated. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient value of reliability across the three raters amounted to 0.862. The gross total removal (GTR) rates achieved in each grade were 70.0, 69.8, 62.9, 21.4, 37.5, and 4.3% in Grades 0, 1, 2, 3A, 3B, and 4, respectively. A significant difference in the extent of resection was observed only between Grades 2 and 3A. In addition, significantly higher complication rates were observed in the groups above Grade 3A. Conclusion Although the modified Knosp's classification system appears to be complex, its inter-rater reliability proves to be excellent. Regarding the clinical validity of

  8. Percutaneous Achilles tendon repair with and without endoscopic control.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Tamás; Tállay, András; Berkes, István

    2003-11-01

    One hundred and fifty six patients were treated using the modified double suture technique for percutaneous Achilles tendon repair between 1994 and 1998. Endoscopy was used in 67 cases. The first ten cases were dropped (learning curve), 57 were followed (E-group). Percutaneous suture without endoscopy was performed in 89 patients. Two could not be followed (went abroad), so this group consists of 87 patients (P-group). Mean age: E-group 37.8 (22-60) years, P-group 38.9 (20-68) years. Male-female ratio: E 49/8, P 74/13. There were 54 and 83 athletes in groups E and P respectively. Follow-up period was 12-60 months. Overall re-rupture rate was 6/144 (4.2%). Two total and 3 partial re-ruptures were in the P-group, and 1 partial was in the E-group. Fusiform thickening of the tendon (delayed healing) occurred in 4 cases in each group. The mean plantar flexion strength compared with the non-affected side was 89% in the P-group and 86% in the E-group. The length of time before returning to sports activity ranged from 4 to 6 months after surgery in both groups. Subjective results were excellent to good in 88% (P-group) and in 89% (E-group) of the cases. On the basis of the results, the percutaneous double suture technique proved to be a simple and safe method for Achilles tendon repair with or without the use of an endoscope. The re-rupture rate was lower in the endoscopic controlled group. The basic goal of the endoscopy was to control the adaptation of the tendon ends. This method yielded further operative possibilities and benefits as well.

  9. Repair of an Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography-Related Large Duodenal Perforation Using Double Endoscopic Band Ligation and Endoclipping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keunmo; Kim, Eun Bee; Choi, Yong Hyeok; Oh, Youngmin; Han, Joung-Ho; Park, Seon Mee

    2017-03-01

    Endoscopic closure techniques have been introduced for the repair of duodenal wall perforations that occur during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We report a case of successful repair of a large duodenal wall perforation by using double endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and an endoclip. Lateral duodenal wall perforation occurred during ERCP in a 93-year-old woman with acute calculous cholangitis. We switched to a forward endoscope that had a transparent band apparatus. A 2.0-cm oval-shaped perforation was found at the lateral duodenal wall. We repaired the perforation by sequentially performing double EBL and endoclipping. The first EBL was performed at the proximal edge of the perforation orifice, and two-thirds of the perforation were repaired. The second EBL, which also included the contents covered under the first EBL, repaired the defect almost completely. Finally, to account for the possible presence of a residual perforation, an endoclip was applied at the distal end of the perforation. The detection and closure of the perforation were completed within 10 minutes. We suggest that double EBL is an effective method for closure.

  10. Ectopic ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma of the sphenoid sinus: case report of endoscopic endonasal resection and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Justin; Lucas, Joshua; Commins, Deborah; Lerner, Olga; Lerner, Alexander; Carmichael, John D; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    Ectopic pituitary adenomas are exceedingly rare entities that are often misdiagnosed. The resulting delay in diagnosis may be particularly concerning in the case of Cushing syndrome caused by an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. Although the total resection of ectopic adenomas results in rapid and durable remission, persistent Cushing syndrome is often associated with permanently damaging invasive procedures and significantly higher risk of mortality. The authors report the case of a 48-year-old man with ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome. On the morning before surgery, his serum cortisol measured 51 μg/dl, his ACTH level was 195.7 pg/ml, and his urinary free cortisol level was 2109 μg/day. Serum cortisol was not suppressed with the administration of high-dose dexamethasone. Imaging showed separate masses in both the sphenoid sinus and the pituitary gland, complicating the diagnostic process and requiring pathological assessment of both masses. No other abnormalities were found on thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic scans. Gross-total resection of both lesions was accomplished via an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathology confirmed an ectopic ACTH pituitary adenoma of the sphenoid sinus and a Crooke hyaline change of the pituitary gland. The patient achieved stable hormonal remission without significant postoperative complications, returned to full activity within 3 months, and remained disease free nearly 1 year after tumor resection. In a systematic literature review, the authors identified 41 cases of ectopic ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas, including 18 arising in the sphenoid sinus without direct involvement of the sella. Including the case described here, the total number of ectopic ACTH pituitary adenomas arising in the sphenoid sinus was 19, and the total number of ectopic ACTH pituitary adenomas without regard to location was 42. For the 19 patients with adenomas found in the sphenoid sinus, ages ranged

  11. Outcomes of Open Versus Endoscopic Repair of Abductor Muscle Tears of the Hip: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lodhia, Parth; Gui, Chengcheng; Vemula, S Pavan; Martin, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    To compare the outcome of open versus endoscopic gluteal tendon repair. An extensive review of PubMed was conducted by 2 independent reviewers for articles containing at least 1 of the following search terms: gluteus medius, gluteus medius tear, gluteus medius tendinopathy, gluteus medius repair, hip abductors, hip abductor tears, hip abductor repair, hip rotator cuff, hip rotator cuff repair, trochanteric bursa, trochanteric bursitis, trochanteric bursectomy, peritrochanteric procedures, peritrochanteric repair, and peritrochanteric arthroscopy. This yielded 313 articles. Of these articles, 7 satisfied the following inclusion criteria: description of an open or endoscopic gluteal repair with outcomes consisting of patient-reported outcome scores, patient satisfaction, strength scores, pain scores, and complications. Three studies on open gluteal repairs and 4 on endoscopic gluteal repairs met the inclusion criteria. In total, there were 127 patients who underwent open procedures and 40 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures. Of the 40 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures, 15 had concomitant intra-articular procedures documented, as compared with 0 in the open group. The modified Harris Hip Score was common to 1 study on open repairs and 3 studies on endoscopic repairs. The scores were similar for follow-up periods of 1 and 2 years. Visual analog pain scale scores were reported in 1 study on open gluteal repairs and 1 study on endoscopic repairs and were similar between the 2 studies. Improvement in abductor strength was also similarly reported in selected studies between the 2 groups. The only difference between the 2 groups was the reported incidence of complications, which was higher in the open group. Open and endoscopic gluteal repairs have similar patient-reported outcome scores, pain scores, and improvement in abduction strength. Open techniques have a higher reported complication rate. Randomized studies of sufficient numbers of patients are

  12. Endoscopic repair of anterior table: frontal sinus fractures with a Medpor implant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kenneth K; Mueller, Reid; Huang, Faye; Strong, E Bradley

    2007-04-01

    Isolated anterior table frontal sinus fractures are commonly repaired through a coronal incision. Endoscopic repair of these injuries has recently been described. This study evaluates the endoscopic repair of isolated anterior table frontal sinus fractures with a Medpor implant. Preinjury photographs of 10 cadaveric heads were obtained. Anterior table frontal sinus fractures were generated in all cadavers. The fractures were documented with postinjury computerized tomography (CT) scans. The fractures were then endoscopically repaired with a Medpor implant. Five cadavers received prefabricated implants generated from the post injury CT data. Five cadavers received a standard implant (0.85 mm sheet) contoured intraoperatively. The success of each repair was documented with post repair CT scans, photographs, and direct transcutaneous visualization. All 10 defects were successfully repaired within 1 to 2 mm. All implants were palpable, but no objective asymmetry could be appreciated photographically or on CT scan. Anterior table frontal sinus fractures can be endoscopically repaired with either a standard 0.85 mm sheet or a prefabricated implant. Clinical application of this technique would be expected to reduce operating time, surgical morbidity, and cost.

  13. Endoscopic Removal of a Bullet in Rosenmuller Fossa: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D.; Glenn, Chad A.; Conner, Andrew K.; Bonney, Phillip A.; Sanclement, Jose A.; Sughrue, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the anterior skull base may occur in gunshot victims and can result in traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Less commonly, CSF leaks occur days or even weeks after the trauma occurred. Here, we present the case of a 21-year-old man with a delayed-onset, traumatic CSF leak secondary to a missile injury that left a bullet fragment in the Rosenmuller fossa. The patient was treated successfully with endoscopic, endonasal extraction of the bullet, and repair with a nasal septal flap. Foreign bodies lodged in Rosenmuller fossa can be successfully treated with endoscopic skull base surgery. PMID:27330924

  14. The endonasal microscopic approach for pituitary adenomas and other parasellar tumors: a 10-year experience.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Nasrin; Dusick, Joshua R; de Paiva Neto, Manoel A; Kelly, Daniel F

    2008-10-01

    THE DIRECT ENDONASAL transsphenoidal approach to the sella with the operating microscope was initially described more than 20 years ago. Herein, we describe the technique, its evolution, and lessons learned over a 10-year period for treating pituitary adenomas and other parasellar pathology. From July 1998 to January 2008, 812 patients underwent a total of 881 operations for a pituitary adenoma (n = 605), Rathke's cleft cyst (n = 59), craniopharyngioma (n = 26), parasellar meningioma (n = 23), chordoma (n = 18), or other pathological condition (n = 81). Of these, 118 operations (13%) included an extended approach to the suprasellar, infrasellar/clival, or cavernous sinus regions. Endoscopic assistance was used in 163 cases (19%) overall, including 36% of the last 200 cases in the series and 18 (72%) of the last 25 extended endonasal cases. Surgical complications included 19 postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks (2%), 6 postoperative hematomas (0.7%), 4 carotid artery injuries (0.4%), 4 new permanent neurological deficits (0.4%), 3 cases of bacterial meningitis (0.3%), and 2 deaths (0.2%). The overall complication rate was higher in the first 500 cases in the series and in extended approach cases. Major technical modifications over the 10-year period included increased use of shorter (60-70 mm) endonasal speculums for greater instrument maneuverability and visualization, the micro-Doppler probe for cavernous carotid artery localization, endoscopy for more panoramic visualization, and a graded cerebrospinal fluid leak repair protocol. These changes appear to have collectively and incrementally made the approach safer and more effective. In summary, the endonasal approach provides a minimally invasive route for removal of pituitary adenomas and other parasellar tumors.

  15. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Purely endoscopic pterional extradural approach: A novel technique for repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ajit Kumar; Goyal, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective descriptive study of an innovative surgical technique. Objective: To assess the feasibility and success of repair of transfrontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea through pterional transcranial extradural approach using endoscope. Summary of Background Data: Repair of CSF rhinorrhea has seen advancement with the evolution of endoscopic transnasal techniques. However, leaks from defect in the posterior wall of frontal sinus still remain a challenge for the skull base surgeons and requires conventional craniotomy more often. We describe a novel technique to repair these leaks by purely endoscopic pterional extradural (PEPE) approach thereby avoiding complications associated with conventional craniotomy and endoscopic transnasal approaches. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with traumatic CSF rhinorrhea from the posterior wall of frontal sinus underwent repair with the present technique. They were followed up for 6–18 months and were evaluated for feasibility of procedure, recurrence of leak, and occurrence of the fresh neurological deficit. Results: Thirty-five patients underwent CSF rhinorrhea repair using the above technique. The procedure was accomplished in all patients without any intraoperative complications. There was no requirement of blood transfusion in any case. All patients had a cessation of CSF leak in the postoperative period, and there was no recurrence. There was no evidence of frontal lobe retraction injury in any of these patients, and no fresh neurological deficit was observed. Conclusion: This PEPE approach to repair CSF leak through the posterior wall of the frontal sinus is a novel technique in which we can avoid disadvantages associated with both conventional craniotomy as well as transnasal endoscopic approaches. PMID:27114672

  17. Combined totally endoscopic robotic coronary bypass and mitral valve repair via right-sided ports.

    PubMed

    Maciolek, Kimberly A; Krienbring, Dorothy J; Naum, Efstathios S; Arnsdorf, Susan E; Balkhy, Husam H

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of combined coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve (MV) repair using a robotic totally endoscopic right-sided approach. A 61-year-old man presented with fatigue due to significant mitral regurgitation and was found to have a tight stenosis in the mid left anterior descending artery. Using the da Vinci robotic system, the patient underwent a left internal mammary artery graft to the left anterior descending artery using the C-Port Flex A distal anastomotic device followed by a MV repair. Both procedures were performed endoscopically via right chest ports and right femorofemoral bypass successfully. The patient was discharged from the hospital 3 days postoperatively and returned to normal activity within 3 weeks after surgery. This case study shows the feasibility of using an endoscopic robotic approach in selected patients undergoing combined MV coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

  18. Quality control on endoscopic maintenance and repair services: safety considerations for the patient.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Quality control and maintenance services are 2 important points when we organize an endoscopic unit. From the medical side, we have always expected to purchase the most advanced equipment and obtained the best-repaired service. From the hospital administrators' point of view the global costs of endoscopic equipment is the most important criterion. These 2 goals should be compatible by a close relationship between medical doctors and hospital administrators. The quality of maintenance and the reliability of services are important points considering quality control and safety for our patients. Endoscope malfunctions and inadequate repair services could be a threat for our patients. In this case, legal responsibility could rely on hospital and medical doctors if services and maintenance have not been carefully planned. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Endoscopic- Assisted Trephination approach for repair of Frontal Sinus posterior wall fracture in a Child.

    PubMed

    Tarrats, Luis A; Torre-León, Carlos; Almodóvar, Gustavo; Portela, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    A 9 year-old male sustained multiple maxillofacial fractures after falling from a two-store building. Frontal sinuses suffered a bilateral non-displaced linear fractures extending into the anterior and posterior walls. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at this time showed a small encephalocele extending into the right frontal sinus. Operative repair was performed using an Endoscopic-Assisted Trephination approach.

  20. [Clinical study on endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qi; Xiao, Wenzhi; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Li

    2016-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relevant applied technique and clinical value of endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture. A total of 10 cases of unilateral zygomatic arch fracture and 8 cases ofunilateral zygomatic fracture were included. Reduction and fixation of the zygomatic arch in all cases were performed via asmall face incision by an endoscope. Endoscope-assisted repair allowed exposure of zygomatic arch fracture and ended the anatomy of the reset. Zygomatic arch was stabilized with titanium plates. Symmetric malar was achieved in allcases after operation. Patients did not show difficulty in opening the mouth. No chewing problems or severe complicationswere evident. This method had the advantage of hidden incision, and it did not leave scars on the face. Postoperative CT examination showed excellent reduction of zygomatic arch fracture and good fixed position of titanium plate. Endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture via a small face incision can be an alternative operation for zygomaticarch fracture. Patients are less traumatized. There are fewer complications. A good reduction of fracture is achieved.

  1. Trans-oral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy does not worsen the speech after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Khalifa, Badawy; Shawky, Ahmed; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader; Abdel-Hameed, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy may play a role in velopharyngeal closure especially in patients with palatal abnormality; adenoidectomy may lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency and hyper nasal speech. Patients with cleft palate even after repair should not undergo adenoidectomy unless absolutely needed, and in such situations, conservative or partial adenoidectomy is performed to avoid the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Trans-oral endoscopic adenoidectomy enables the surgeon to inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy on the speech of children with repaired cleft palate. Twenty children with repaired cleft palate underwent transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy to relieve their airway obstruction. The procedure was completely visualized with the use of a 70° 4mm nasal endoscope; the upper part of the adenoid was removed using adenoid curette and St. Claire Thompson forceps, while the lower part was retained to maintain the velopharyngeal competence. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of speech was performed, subjectively by auditory perceptual assessment, and objectively by nasometric assessment. Speech was not adversely affected after surgery. The difference between preoperative and postoperative auditory perceptual assessment and nasalance scores for nasal and oral sentences was insignificant (p=0.231, 0.442, 0.118 respectively). Transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy is a safe method; it does not worsen the speech of repaired cleft palate patients. It enables the surgeon to strictly inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure with better determination of the adenoidal part that may contribute in velopharyngeal closure. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Rare complication after totally extraperitoneal endoscopic inguinal hernia repair: Small bowel perforation without peritoneal disruption.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shigehiro; Sakamoto, Tsuguo; Honda, Masayuki; Nishiguchi, Ryohei; Ogawa, Fumihiro

    2016-11-01

    We report a rare case of visceral injury after totally extraperitoneal endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A 48-year-old man underwent needlescopic totally extraperitoneal repair of a direct inguinal hernia. Bleeding from a branch of the inferior epigastric vessels occurred at the beginning of the extraperitoneal dissection with a monopolar electrosurgical device. Hemostasis was prolonged. However, herniorrhaphy and mesh repair were successfully performed, and no peritoneal disruption or pneumoperitoneum was visible. The patient was discharged home on the next day. However, 30 h after this operation, he underwent diagnostic and operative laparoscopy because of acute abdominal pain. Ileal perforation was found and repaired, and pathological examination indicated cautery artifact. Thus, thermal damage to the ileum during the initial operation may have caused the bowel perforation. To the best of our knowledge, no other cases of bowel perforation after totally extraperitoneal repair without peritoneal disruption have been reported.

  3. Endoscopic Management of Esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Christopher R; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D

    2016-02-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of sinonasal origin. These tumors typically present with unilateral nasal obstruction and epistaxis, and diagnosis is confirmed on biopsy. Over the past 15 years, significant advances have been made in endoscopic technology and techniques that have made this tumor amenable to expanded endonasal resection. There is growing evidence supporting the feasibility of safe and effective resection of esthesioneuroblastoma via an expanded endonasal approach. This article outlines a technique for endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma and reviews the current literature on esthesioneuroblastoma with emphasis on outcomes after endoscopic resection of these malignant tumors.

  4. Comparison of endoscopic transcanal myringoplasty and endoscopic type I tympanoplasty in repairing medium-sized tympanic perforations.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Ding, Yi-Fang

    2017-12-01

    The tympanomeatal flap elevation technique has been used in tympanoplasty for decades; however, this procedure has disadvantages. In recent years, endoscopic transcanal myringoplasty (ETM) has been increasingly practiced and has yielded positive results.This study compares the efficacy of ETM and endoscopic type I tympanoplasty (ETT) in repairing medium-sized perforations of the tympanic membrane. This retrospective medical record review included patients undergoing surgery for medium-sized perforations of the tympanic membrane from January 1, 2013 to August 1, 2015. We divided our patients into 2 groups: the ETM group and ETT group. The main outcome measure was comparison of the graft take rates and hearing results between ETM and ETT. A total of 113 patients were enrolled in this study; of these patients, 64 underwent ETM and 49 received ETT. The overall graft take rates and improvement of air-bone gaps were comparable between the groups. However, the patients in the ETM group had shorter operative times and fewer follow-up visits over 3 months than those in the ETT group did. We recommend that ETM (instead of ETT) be used for repairing medium-sized perforations of the tympanic membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair in the management of occult obturator and femoral hernias.

    PubMed

    Rath, Alok; Bhatia, Parveen; Kalhan, Sudhir; John, Suviraj; Khetan, Mukund; Bindal, Vivek; Ali, Asfar; Singh, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    The gold standard technique for the repair of groin hernias has always been a controversial issue. Richard Ger introduced the endoscopic approach for the repair of groin hernias in 1991.The endoscopic technique follows the basic principle of preperitoneal placement of a polypropylene mesh over the myopectineal orifice. During the course of dissection of the preperitoneal space, occult obturator and femoral hernias were discovered. Patients who underwent endoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernias over a period of 2 years were included in this retrospective study. A total of 305 cases of groin hernias were operated in 208 patients over a period of 2 years from January 2010 to January 2012 in a single institution. Eleven synchronous clinically occult obturator hernias were found in 8 patients (3.84%) and 5 synchronous clinically occult femoral hernias were found in 5 patients (2.40%) during repair. Preoperative and perioperative findings were discordant in quite a few cases. Preperitoneal dissection discovered coincidental occult hernias in 6.25% of patients.

  6. Immunohistochemistry staining for mismatch repair proteins: the endoscopic biopsy material provides useful and coherent results.

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Wasserberg, Nir; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Sneh-Arbib, Orly; Levi, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) in patients with colorectal cancer can be performed on endoscopic biopsy material or the surgical resection material. Data are continuing to accumulate regarding the deleterious effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on MMRP expression. However, despite continuing rise in the use of endoscopic biopsies for IHC, most pathology departments still use mainly the surgical materials for IHC testing. In this study we compared the quality of stains among 96 colon cancer subjects with paired endoscopic and surgical material available for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 stains (96 × 4, yielding 384 paired stains). Each slide received both a quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]) and a qualitative score (absent; weak and focal; strong). The quantitative scores of all MMRP were significantly higher among the endoscopic material (P<.001 for all). In 358 pairs (93.2%), both the endoscopic and operative material stained either strong (322, 83.9%) or absent (36, 9.4%). In 26 pairs (6.8%), the endoscopic material stained strong, whereas the operative material stained focal and weak. No endoscopic biopsy materials stained focal and weak. Our findings indicate that the biopsy material may provide more coherent results. Although these results may indicate that biopsy material provides coherent and useful results, it is yet to be determined if the demonstrated differences pose a real clinical problem in interpreting final results of IHC staining of such kind. Hence, we suggest that when available, the endoscopic material rather than the operative one should serve as the primary substrate for IHC staining.

  7. Endoscopic Repair of Acute and Chronic Retracted Distal Biceps Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2016-12-01

    Distal biceps tendon (DBT) ruptures are infrequent injuries that result in pain, weakness, and cosmetic deformity. Severe retraction of the ruptured DBT can occur at the time of injury, or in chronic neglected ruptures, and surgical exposure is performed using a single incision or a 2-incision technique. The technique presented here describes an endoscopic approach using 3 portals that provide access to the retracted DBT, biceps sheath, and radial tuberosity. Preoperative sonographic localization of the retracted DBT and neurovascular structures is used to guide portal placement. The parabiceps portal is used for visualization of the biceps sheath remnant, and the midbiceps portal is used to visualize and retrieve the retracted tendon in the arm. The retracted DBT is shuttled through the biceps sheath into the upper forearm, and 2 suture anchors are passed into the radial tuberosity under direct endoscopic vision. The DBT is whipstitched via the distal anterior portal, and nonsliding knots are tied to securely reattach the DBT to the prepared radial tuberosity. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lamb’s head: The model for novice education in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skitarelić, Neven; Mladina, Ranko

    2015-01-01

    Structured training in endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (EESS) and skull base surgery is essential considering serious potential complications. We have developed a detailed concept on training these surgical skills on the lamb’s head. This simple and extremely cheap model offers the possibility of training even more demanding and advanced procedures in human endonasal endoscopic surgery such as: frontal sinus surgery, orbital decompression, cerebrospinal fluid-leak repair followed also by the naso-septal flap, etc. Unfortunately, the sphenoid sinus surgery cannot be practiced since quadrupeds do not have this sinus. Still, despite this anatomical limitation, it seems that the lamb’s head can be very useful even for the surgeons already practicing EESS, but in a limited edition because of a lack of the experience and dexterity. Only after gaining the essential surgical skills of this demanding field it makes sense to go for the expensive trainings on the human cadaveric model. PMID:26413487

  9. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  10. Postoperative observation of children after endoscopic type 1 posterior laryngeal cleft repair.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Liu, Judy Z; Bhushan, Bharat; Holinger, Lauren D; Schroeder, James W

    2015-01-01

    To report the perioperative management and surgical outcomes in a large series of pediatric patients with endoscopically repaired type 1 posterior laryngeal cleft (PLC). Case series with chart review. Urban, tertiary care, free-standing pediatric hospital. Patients who underwent endoscopic carbon dioxide laser-assisted repair of type 1 posterior laryngeal clefts between January 2006 and December 2012. Medical records were reviewed. Fifty-four patients (34 male) underwent repair of type 1 PLC. Median age was 25.5 months (range, 2-120 months). Indications for repair included aspiration (n = 39; 72%), chronic bronchitis (n = 13; 24%), and stridor with feeds (n = 2; 4%). No children remained intubated postoperatively. Thirty-three patients (61%) stayed in overnight observation ("Obs PLC") and 21 patients (39%) stayed in the pediatric intensive care unit ("PICU PLC") postoperatively. Between Obs PLC and PICU PLC groups, there was no significant difference in age (mean 22 vs 30 months, respectively; P = .28). Comorbidities were similar between the groups. Symptoms improved in 41 of the 54 patients (76%). No postoperative complications were noted. Two patients required revision PLC repair. The cost of admitting a patient to a lower acuity location was estimated to be 60% less per day than cost of a PICU admission. The endoscopic surgical repair of a type 1 PLC is successful and has a low morbidity and complication rate. Patients may be safely managed in an observation unit and without postoperative intubation. This approach achieved a marked cost reduction in postoperative care. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Endoscope

    MedlinePlus

    An endoscope is a medical device with a light attached. It is used to look inside a body cavity ... sigmoidoscopy . A medical procedure using any type of endoscope is called an endoscopy . See also: Colonoscopy Cystourethroscopy ...

  12. History of endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy J; Zaidi, Hasan A; Laws, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    While the endonasal approach to the skull base continues to advance, this paper invokes its long history. The centuries of medieval neuroanatomy and early neurosurgery enabled the conception of the first transfacial approaches in the late 1800s; Henry Schloffer performed the first transsphenoidal surgery in 1907. Although the procedure was initially met with much interest, Harvey Cushing eventually led the field of neurosurgery to abandon the transsphenoidal approach in the 1920s. The following three generations of neurosurgeons contained several key figures including Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy who were steadfast in preserving the technique as well as in addressing its shortcomings. The endoscopic approach developed simultaneously, and advances in magnifying and fiberoptics further resolved limitations previously inherent to the transsphenoidal approach. At last, in the 1960s, the transsphenoidal approach entered its renaissance. Today, the momentum of its development persists in the endoscopic endonasal approach, which has recently expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery across the skull base, far beyond its original jurisdiction of the sella. Continued progress must not take for granted the rich history of the transsphenoidal approach, which was developed over centuries by surgeons around the world. The authors present the evolution of modern endonasal surgery as a dynamic interplay between technology, medicine, and surgery over the past 100 years. Progress can be attributed to courageous surgeons who affirmed their contemporary practices despite gaps in technology or medicine, and to visionary individuals who produced and incorporated new elements into transsphenoidal surgery. And so while the new endoscopic technique brings forth new challenges, its development reaffirms the principles laid down by the pioneers of transsphenoidal surgery.

  13. The Pedicled Buccal Fat Pad: Anatomical Study of the New Flap for Skull Base Defect Reconstruction After Endoscopic Endonasal Transpterygoid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Golbin, Denis A; Lasunin, Nikolay V; Cherekaev, Vasily A; Polev, Georgiy A

    2017-02-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using a buccal fat pad for endoscopic skull base defect reconstruction. Design Descriptive anatomical study with an illustrative case presentation. Setting Anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh human cadaver specimens with injected arteries (24 sides). Internal carotid artery was exposed in the coronal plane via the endoscopic transpterygoid approach. The pedicled buccal fat pad was used for reconstruction. Participants: 12 human cadaver head specimens; one patient operated using the proposed technique. Main outcome measures: Proximity of the buccal fat pad flap to the defect, compliance of the flap, comfort and safety of harvesting procedure, and compatibility with the Hadad-Bassagasteguy nasoseptal flap. Results: Harvesting procedure was performed using anterior transmaxillary corridor. The pedicled buccal fat pad flap can be used to pack the sphenoid sinus or cover the internal carotid artery from cavernous to upper parapharyngeal segment. Conclusion The buccal fat pad can be safely harvested through the same approach without external incisions and is compliant enough to conform to the skull base defect. The proposed pedicled flap can replace free abdominal fat in central skull base reconstruction. The volume of the buccal fat pad allows obliteration of the sphenoid sinus or upper parapharyngeal space.

  14. Analysis of the Bacterial Flora in the Nasal Cavity and the Sphenoid Sinus Mucosa in Patients Operated on with an Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    SHIBAO, Shunsuke; TODA, Masahiro; TOMITA, Toshiki; OGAWA, Kaoru; YOSHIDA, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the bacterial flora in the nasal cavity and sphenoid sinus and evaluate the sensitivity of these bacteria to antibiotics that can be used to prevent postoperative meningitis. Bacteria of the preoperative nasal cavity and intraoperative sphenoid sinus mucosa were cultured and analyzed in 40 patients (20 men and 20 women; mean age, 52.2 years) who underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. The sensitivity of these bacteria to cephalosporin, a representative prophylactic antibiotic, was examined. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequently detected species in both spaces; 24 (38.7%) of 62 isolates in the nasal cavity and 26 (37.1%) of 70 isolates in the sphenoid sinus. In contrast, Corynebacterium species were found mainly in the nasal cavity, and anaerobic bacteria were found only in the sphenoid sinus. Bacteria that were resistant to cephalosporin were found in the nasal cavity in 3.2% of patients and in the sphenoid sinus in 20% of patients. In conclusion, the composition of bacterial flora, including bacteria that are resistant to prophylactic antibiotics, differs between the nasal cavity and the sphenoid sinus. PMID:25446386

  15. Efficacy of three-dimensional endoscopy in endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ogino-Nishimura, Eriko; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-06-01

    To examine the efficacy of a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. The study design was a retrospective case series and qualitative research. The clinical efficacy of 3D endoscopes was examined on five cadavers. We performed conventional endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) in five cases and hypophysectomy in two cases using a 3D endoscope. The educational advantages of the 3D endoscope were assessed using questionnaires given to the participants of cadaver dissection courses. In the posterior portion of the nasal cavity, images captured via 3D endoscopy provided a superior perception of depth of information than those via two-dimensional (2D) endoscopy. All endonasal surgeries were completed in clinical settings using a 3D endoscope without perioperative complications. In terms of the operative time and amount of bleeding, the results of 3D endoscopic surgeries were not inferior to those of 2D endoscopic surgeries. Fatigue from 3D viewing through polarized glasses did not adversely affect performance of the surgery. Moreover, questionnaires for the evaluation of educational efficacy were completed by 73 surgeons. Of the respondents, 89% agreed that 3D endoscopy provided a better understanding of the surgical anatomy than did 2D endoscopy. As for the site where 3D endoscopy would be the most useful for understanding surgical anatomy, 40% of the respondents named the skull base; 29%, the posterior ethmoid sinuses; and 26%, the sphenoid sinus; and 9%, the ethmoid bulla and middle turbinate. The 3D endoscope contributes to a more precise anatomical understanding of the posterior structures of the sinuses and skull base and ensures a more precise operation of the instruments. Thus, 3D endoscopes will likely become a standard device for endonasal surgery in the near future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Can the learning curve of totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair be short-circuited?

    PubMed

    Yaffee, David W; Loulmet, Didier F; Kelly, Lauren A; Ward, Alison F; Ursomanno, Patricia A; Rabinovich, Annette E; Neuburger, Peter J; Krishnan, Sandeep; Hill, Frederick T; Grossi, Eugene A

    2014-01-01

    A concern with the initiation of totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair (TERMR) programs has been the risk for the learning curve. To minimize this risk, we initiated a TERMR program with a defined team and structured learning approach before clinical implementation. A dedicated team (two surgeons, one cardiac anesthesiologist, one perfusionist, and two nurses) was trained with clinical scenarios, simulations, wet laboratories, and "expert" observation for 3 months. This team then performed a series of TERMRs of varying complexity. Thirty-two isolated TERMRs were performed during the first programmatic year. All operations included mitral valve repair, left atrial appendage exclusion, and annuloplasty device implantation. Additional procedures included leaflet resection, neochordae insertion, atrial ablation, and papillary muscle shortening. Longer clamp times were associated with number of neochordae (P < 0.01), papillary muscle procedures (P < 0.01), and leaflet resection (P = 0.06). Sequential case number had no impact on cross-clamp time (P = 0.3). Analysis of nonclamp time demonstrated a 71.3% learning percentage (P < 0.01; ie, 28.7% reduction in nonclamp time with each doubling of case number). There were no hospital deaths or incidences of stroke, myocardial infarction, unplanned reoperation, respiratory failure, or renal failure. Median length of stay was 4 days. All patients were discharged home. Totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair can be safely performed after a pretraining regimen with emphasis on experts' current practice and team training. After a pretraining regimen, cross-clamp times were not subject to learning curve phenomena but were dependent on procedural complexity. Nonclamp times were associated with a short learning curve.

  17. Endoscopic Shelf Acetabuloplasty Combined With Labral Repair, Cam Osteochondroplasty, and Capsular Plication for Treating Developmental Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Soshi; Wada, Takahiko; Sakoda, Shinsuke; Ariumi, Akihiro; Sakai, Akinori; Iida, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the underlying shallow acetabular deformity, a patient with hip dysplasia has a greater risk of development of a labral tear, a cam lesion, and capsular laxity. This combination of abnormalities exacerbates joint instability, ultimately leading to osteoarthritis. Unsurprisingly, only repairing the acetabular labrum remains controversial, and the outcome is unpredictable. In this technical note, with video, we demonstrate an entirely endoscopic approach for simultaneously repairing the most common mechanical abnormalities found in moderate hip dysplasia: labral repair, cam osteochondroplasty, capsular plication, and shelf acetabuloplasty using an autologous iliac bone graft. PMID:24749043

  18. Stentless endoscopic transnasal repair of bilateral choanal atresia starting with resection of vomer.

    PubMed

    El-Ahl, Magdy Abdalla Sayed; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed

    2012-07-01

    To assess the results of a transnasal endoscopic repair of congenital choanal atresia beginning by resection of the posterior portion of the vomer and ending by no stent. Seven patients with bilateral congenital choanal atresia aged ranging from 3 to 15 days were operated upon between June 2009 and September 2011. This transnasal endoscopic approach allowed resection of the posterior portion of the vomer first then the atretic plates and part of the medial pterygoid plate if needed leaving no stent. Postoperative control included office fiberoptic nasal endoscopy. Adequate functional nasal breathing was maintained in all patients during follow up of 11 to 23 months. Apart from one case that complicated by palatal defect, no any other complications were detected. The described technique was proved to be very effective, allowing fast recovery, and one step surgery with early discharge from hospital using neither stents nor nasal packing. Good patency with no reduction in functional quality was also observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Survival Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amar; Eckstein, Jeremy G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction With over 20 million repairs performed worldwide annually, inguinal hernias represent a significant source of disability and loss of productivity. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES™), as a potentially less invasive form of surgery may reduce postoperative disability and accelerate return to work. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and short-term effectiveness of transgastric inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic mesh in a survival canine model. Materials and Methods Under general anesthesia with the animal in trendelenburg position, a gastrostomy was created. A 4 × 6 cm acellular dermal implant was deployed endoscopically across the myopectineal orifice, draped over the cord structures, and secured with Bioglue. Following completion of bilateral repairs the animals were survived for 14 days. At the end of the study period, the animals were euthanized and a necropsy performed. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment were obtained. In addition, a visual inspection of the peritoneal cavity was performed. Results All animals thrived postoperatively and did not manifest signs of peritonitis or sepsis at any point. At necropsy accurate placement and adequate myopectineal coverage was confirmed in all subjects. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment had no growth. Discussion This study confirms that NOTES-inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic implant can be performed safely. In addition, the transgastric technique provided good short-term myopectineal coverage without infectious sequelae. PMID:21457111

  20. Endonasal versus supraorbital keyhole removal of craniopharyngiomas and tuberculum sellae meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Nasrin; Dusick, Joshua R; de Paiva Neto, Manoel A; Malkasian, Dennis; Kelly, Daniel F

    2009-05-01

    , the major limitation of both approaches is a narrow surgical corridor. The endonasal approach has the added challenges of restricted lateral suprasellar access, a greater need for endoscopy, and a more demanding cranial base repair.

  1. Successful application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy to orbital floor trapdoor fracture in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasunori; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Although surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures can be performed by many different approaches, the application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for this condition has rarely been described in the literature. We report on a case of a 7-year-old boy with a trapdoor orbital floor fracture successfully treated with the application of EMMM. The patient suffered trauma to the right orbit floor and the inferior rectus was entrapped at the orbital floor. Initially, surgical repair via endoscopic endonasal approach was attempted. However, we were unable to adequately access the orbital floor through the maxillary ostium. Therefore, an alternative route of access to the orbital floor was established by EMMM. With sufficient visualization and operating space, the involved orbital content was completely released from the entrapment site and reduced into the orbit. To facilitate wound healing, the orbital floor was supported with a water-inflated urethral balloon catheter for 8 days. At follow-up 8 months later, there was no gaze restriction or complications associated with the EMMM. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of EMMM in endoscopic endonasal repair of orbital floor fracture, particularly for cases with a narrow nasal cavity such as in pediatric patients.

  2. Successful repair of recurrent rectovaginal fistula by stratified suture using transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weijie; Chen, Xin; Lin, Guole; Qiu, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rectovaginal fistulas (RVFs) are abnormal connections between the rectum and vagina. Although many surgical approaches to correct them have been attempted, management of RVFs still remains a challenge, especially for recurrent RVFs. Methods: In the present study, we report a case in a 22-year-old female with a chief complaint of obvious passages of flatus or stool through the vagina for 10 years. She had suffered a vaginal trauma from a violent accident 10 years prior, and gradually noticed the uncontrollable passage of gas or feces from the vagina 2 weeks later. The patient underwent a transvaginal direct repair surgery at local hospital 9 years ago, but the symptoms recurred 1 month after the surgery. After 2-years monitoring, the patient underwent another transvaginal repair surgery (fistulectomy followed by direct suture) at another hospital, but the fistula recurred again. We initially performed a temporary protective transversostomy upon admission. After 8-months of observation, a methylene blue test was conducted and the diagnosis of recurrent RVF was confirmed. Subsequently, we performed a successful repair by stratified suture using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). The scar tissue on the posterior wall of the vagina and the anterior wall of the rectum were meticulously excised until the margin of the excisional line showed healthy tissue. In addition, the fistulous tract was completely removed. The edges of the fistula on the posterior wall of the vagina were closed by simple continuous suturing, and the rectal anterior wall was sutured in the same manner. Results: During a 1-year follow-up period, the fistulae were not recurrent and no complication such as incontinences or rectal bleeding were found. The latest Wexner score was 3. Conclusion: We present a case of successful treatment with stratified suture using TEM throughout the procedure. We strongly recommend this efficient and minimally invasive procedure for recurrent

  3. Indocyanine green fluorescence endoscopy at endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for an intracavernous sinus dermoid cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Hide, Takuichiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The complete resection of intracavernous sinus dermoid cysts is very difficult due to tumor tissue adherence to important anatomical structures such as the internal carotid artery (ICA), cavernous sinus, and cranial nerves. As residual dermoid cyst tissue sometimes induces symptoms and repeat surgery may be required after cyst recurrence, minimal invasiveness is an important consideration when selecting the surgical approach to the lesion. We addressed a recurrent intracavernous sinus dermoid cyst by the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach assisted by neuronavigation and indocyanine green (ICG) endoscopy to confirm the ICA and patency of the cavernous sinus. The ICG endoscope detected the fluorescence signal from the ICA and cavernous sinus; its intensity changed with the passage of time. The ICG endoscope was very useful for real-time imaging, and its high spatial resolution facilitated the detection of the ICA and the patent cavernous sinus. We found it to be of great value for successful endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

  4. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Endoscopy at Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for an Intracavernous Sinus Dermoid Cyst: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HIDE, Takuichiro; YANO, Shigetoshi; KURATSU, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The complete resection of intracavernous sinus dermoid cysts is very difficult due to tumor tissue adherence to important anatomical structures such as the internal carotid artery (ICA), cavernous sinus, and cranial nerves. As residual dermoid cyst tissue sometimes induces symptoms and repeat surgery may be required after cyst recurrence, minimal invasiveness is an important consideration when selecting the surgical approach to the lesion. We addressed a recurrent intracavernous sinus dermoid cyst by the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach assisted by neuronavigation and indocyanine green (ICG) endoscopy to confirm the ICA and patency of the cavernous sinus. The ICG endoscope detected the fluorescence signal from the ICA and cavernous sinus; its intensity changed with the passage of time. The ICG endoscope was very useful for real-time imaging, and its high spatial resolution facilitated the detection of the ICA and the patent cavernous sinus. We found it to be of great value for successful endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. PMID:25446381

  5. Using the Endoscopic Transconjunctival and Transcaruncular Approach to Repair Combined Orbital Floor and Medial Wall Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Minwook; Yang, Seong Won; Park, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Joonsik; Lee, Hwa; Park, Min Soo; Baek, Sehyun

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of the endoscopic transcaruncular and transconjunctival approach in the repair of combined medial and inferior orbital wall fractures. A retrospective chart review was conducted on 160 patients with combined medial and inferior orbital wall fractures. All patients underwent surgery via an endoscopic transcaruncular and transconjunctival approach without lateral canthotomy, performed by a single surgeon. Porous polyethylene sheets (1.0 mm in thickness) were implanted to cover the orbital defects. The minimal postoperative follow-up period was 6 months. The authors evaluated enophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular motility pre and postoperatively and report surgical complications. A total of 160 patients were included, comprising 121 men and 39 women. The mean patient age was 33.9 ± 14.1 years, and the mean postoperative follow-up period was 12 months. The average enophthalmos was 3.20 mm preoperatively, and the mean improvement at 6 months after surgery was 2.82 mm. One patient suffered a canalicular laceration after surgery, and another retrobulbar hemorrhage; however, both of these complications resolved with appropriate management. Otherwise, there were no significant surgical complications including newly developed diplopia, decreased visual acuity, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The endoscopic transcaruncular and transconjunctival approach is a useful and promising technique to repair combined medial and inferior orbital wall fractures.

  6. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  7. Methodical endoscopic repair of congenital indirect inguinoscrotal hernia in adult male patients with completely patent processus vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2017-07-11

    Indirect inguinal hernia related to the presence of a patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in adult is estimated to be around 15%. Most surgeons would favor a standard anterior hernioplasty to minimize the potential risk of damaging the spermatic cord structures that are always intimately fused to the congenital peritoneal sac. This also means overlooking the potential benefit of alternative posterior techniques such as endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair that is known to offer faster recovery with reduced risk of developing chronic groin pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of TEP approach for repair of adult inguinoscrotal hernias associated with completely PPV and to compare those results with a corresponding group of male patients undergoing an identical procedure, but with no demonstrated PPV. This is a prospective study of consecutive male patients diagnosed with inguinal hernia during a 10-year period and eligible for endoscopic TEP repair. Every recognized completely PPV were systematically divided taking care not to damage the attached cord structures and the proximal end closed with a pre-tied Endoloop of PDS. In both groups, all meshes were secured with fibrin sealant only. Patients were reviewed in clinic 2 and 6 weeks after the operation. Further follow-up was scheduled if deemed necessary. The primary post-operative outcome parameter was spermatic cord injury; secondary outcome parameters included groin pain, surgical complications, and recurrence. Nine hundred and thirty-nine hernia repairs were prospectively recorded during this period. All procedures were carried out endoscopically. A total of 41 patients with a median age of 27 years presented with 43 inguinoscrotal hernias (two bilateral) related to the presence of a congenital completely PPV. 72% of them were right-sided. No injury to the cord structures was recorded and only one complication (2.4%) occurred at 1 week post-operatively that was unrelated to the PPV

  8. Computer vision distance measurement from endoscopic sequences: prospective evaluation in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Ernesto; Casado, Santiago; Grasa, Óscar G; Montiel, J M M; Gil, Ismael

    2014-12-01

    Research in computer vision and mobile robotics has developed a family of popular algorithms known as Visual Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (Visual SLAM). These algorithms can provide 3D models of body cavities using the images obtained from standard monocular endoscopes. The 3D models can be used to estimate hernia defect measurements during laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). We conducted a descriptive and comparative prospective study to analyze results from 15 patients who underwent LVHR. Three methods of measurement were used in each patient: two classical methods (needle and tape) and a new visual SLAM measurement (VSM) method. The major and minor axes of the ellipse-shaped hernia defect were measured. Both axes could be measured using the VSM method in all patients except one (93%). The tape method measured 63% of the axes, but was difficult to perform because of patient comorbidities and because of limited range of motion of the laparoscopic tools. The needle method obtained 73% of measurements, because of patient comorbidities. The tape method was the most accurate (accuracy up to 0.5 cm because of tape resolution). The needle method was relatively inaccurate, with a mean error of >3 cm. The VSM method was as accurate as the tape method. The mean time taken to perform measurements was 40 s for the VSM method (range 29-60 s), 169 s for the needle method (range 66-300 s), and 186 s for the tape method (range 110-322 s). The needle method is relatively inaccurate and invasive. The tape method is accurate, but is not easy to perform and is relatively time consuming. The VSM method is noninvasive and fast and is as accurate as the tape method.

  9. Endoscopic observation of different repair patterns in human traumatic tympanic membrane perforations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Zhang, Shujun; Gong, Xinhong; Wang, Xuesong; Lou, Zi-Han

    2017-08-03

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing use of biomaterial patches in the regeneration of traumatic tympanic membrane perforations. The major advantages of biomaterial patches are to provisionally restore the physiological function of the middle ear, thereby immediately improving ear symptoms, and act as a scaffold for epithelium migration. However, whether there are additional biological effects on eardrum regeneration is unclear for biological material patching in the clinic. This study evaluated the healing response for different repair patterns in human traumatic tympanic membrane perforations by endoscopic observation. In total, 114 patients with traumatic tympanic membrane perforations were allocated sequentially to two groups: the spontaneous healing group (n=57) and Gelfoam patch-treated group (n=57). The closure rate, closure time, and rate of otorrhea were compared between the groups at 3 months. Ultimately, 107 patients were analyzed in the two groups (52 patients in the spontaneous healing group vs. 55 patients in the Gelfoam patch-treated group). The overall closure rate at the end of the 3 month follow-up period was 90.4% in the spontaneous healing group and 94.5% in the Gelfoam patch-treated group; the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). However, the total average closure time was significantly different between the two groups (26.8±9.1 days in the spontaneous healing group vs. 14.7±9.1 days in the Gelfoam patch-treated group, p<0.01). In addition, the closure rate was not significantly different between the spontaneous healing group and Gelfoam patch-treated group regardless of the perforation size. The closure time in the Gelfoam patch-treated group was significantly shorter than that in the spontaneous healing group regardless of the perforation size (small perforations: 7.1±1.6 days vs. 12.6±3.9, medium-sized perforations: 13.3±2.2 days vs. 21.8±4.2 days, and large perforations: 21.2±4.7 days vs. 38.4±5.7 days

  10. New diagnostic criteria and operative strategy for cesarean scar syndrome: Endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by cesarean scar defect.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Satoshi; Funamoto, Hiroshi; Hosono, Takashi; Shitano, Yasushi; Nakashima, Masao; Ametani, Yuka; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by post-cesarean scar defect (PCSD). Our investigation focused on the validity of new diagnostic criteria and selection methods. The subjects were 22 women with secondary infertility due to PCSD with retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity. Women with a residual myometrial thickness of ≥ 2.5 mm and an anteflexed or straight uterus underwent hysteroscopic surgery, while all others underwent laparoscopic repair. Hysteroscopic surgery involved resection and coagulation of scarred areas, whereas laparoscopic surgery involved removal of scarred areas combined with hysteroscopy, followed by resuturing. Fourteen of the 22 women (63.6%) who were followed up for ≥ 1 year after surgery achieved pregnancy. Pregnancies occurred in all four women (100%) who underwent hysteroscopic surgery and in 10 of the 18 women (55.6%) who underwent laparoscopic surgery. Three out of four women who underwent hysteroscopic surgery had term deliveries. Among the women who underwent laparoscopic surgery, five had term deliveries. No cases of uterine rupture were experienced, and the delivery method was cesarean section in all cases. We propose that infertility associated with PCSD, cesarean scar syndrome, is caused by the retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity and scarring. Endoscopic treatment, such as hysteroscopy or laparoscopy, was effective for cesarean scar syndrome. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Do gastrotomies require repair after endoscopic transgastric peritoneoscopy? A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Simon; Fix, Daniel J; Volt, Kevin; Roland, Jason C; Happel, Lynn; Reavis, Kevin M; Cios, Theodore J; Ho, Vincent; Evans, Alan; Narula, Vimal K; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Melvin, W Scott

    2010-05-01

    The optimal method for closing gastrotomies after transgastric instrumentation has yet to be determined. To compare gastrotomy closure with endoscopically delivered bioabsorbable plugs with no closure. Prospective, controlled study. Animal laboratory. Twenty-three dogs undergoing endoscopic transgastric peritoneoscopy between July and August 2007. Endoscopic anterior wall gastrotomies were performed with balloon dilation to allow passage of the endoscope into the peritoneal cavity. The plug group (n = 12) underwent endoscopic placement of a 4 x 6-cm bioabsorbable mesh plug in the perforation, whereas the no-treatment group (n = 11) did not. Animals underwent necropsy 2 weeks after the procedure. Complications related to gastrotomy closure, gastric burst pressures, relationship of burst perforation to gastrotomy, and the degree of adhesions and inflammation at the gastrotomy site. After the gastrotomy, all dogs survived without any complications. At necropsy, burst pressures were 77 +/- 11 mm Hg and 76 +/- 15 mm Hg (P = .9) in the plug group and no-treatment group, respectively. Perforations occurred at the site of the gastrotomy in 2 of 12 animals in the plug group and in none of the 11 dogs in the no-treatment group (P = .5). Finally, there were minimal adhesions in all dogs (11/11) in the no-treatment group and minimal adhesions in 3 and moderate adhesions or inflammatory masses in 9 of the 12 animals in the plug group (P = .004). Small number of subjects, animal model, no randomization. Gastrotomy trauma during short peritoneoscopy may not be applicable to longer procedures. After endoscopic gastrotomy, animals that were left untreated did not show any clinical ill effects and demonstrated adequate healing, with fewer adhesions and less inflammation compared with those treated with a bioabsorbable plug. 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual-Port 2D and 3D Endoscopy: Expanding the Limits of the Endonasal Approaches to Midline Skull Base Lesions with Lateral Extension

    PubMed Central

    Beer-Furlan, Andre; Evins, Alexander I.; Rigante, Luigi; Anichini, Giulio; Stieg, Philip E.; Bernardo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate a novel dual-port endonasal and subtemporal endoscopic approach targeting midline lesions with lateral extension beyond the intracavernous carotid artery anteriorly and the Dorello canal posteriorly. Methods Ten dual-port approaches were performed on five cadaveric heads. All specimens underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach from the sella to middle clivus. The endonasal port was combined with an anterior or posterior endoscopic extradural subtemporal approach. The anterior subtemporal port was placed directly above the middle third of the zygomatic arch, and the posterior port was placed at its posterior root. The extradural space was explored using two-dimensional and three-dimensional endoscopes. Results The anterior subtemporal port complemented the endonasal port with direct access to the Meckel cave, lateral sphenoid sinus, superior orbital fissure, and lateral and posterosuperior compartments of the cavernous sinus; the posterior subtemporal port enhanced access to the petrous apex. Endoscopic dissection and instrument maneuverability were feasible and performed without difficulty in both the anterior and posterior subtemporal ports. Conclusion The anterior and posterior subtemporal ports enhanced exposure and control of the region lateral to the carotid artery and Dorello canal. Dual-port neuroendoscopy is still minimally invasive yet dramatically increases surgical maneuverability while enhancing visualization and control of anatomical structures. PMID:25072012

  13. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  14. Laparoscopic Repair and Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy to Treat Giant Esophageal Hiatal Hernia with Gastric Obstruction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Yoichi; Hihara, Jun; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Furukawa, Takaoki; Yamakita, Ichiko; Ibuki, Yuta; Okada, Morihito

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 74-year-old man with repeated aspiration pneumonia who developed gastric obstruction due to giant esophageal hiatal hernia (EHH). We repaired the giant EHH by laparoscopic surgery and subsequently anchored the stomach to the abdominal wall by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) using gastrofiberscopy. Thereafter, the patient resumed oral intake and was discharged on postoperative day 21. At two years after these procedures, the patient has adequate oral intake and lives at home. Because this condition occurs more frequently in the elderly with comorbidities, laparoscopic surgery contributes to minimally invasive treatment. Furthermore, the procedure combined with concurrent gastropexy via PEG is useful for treating patients who have difficulty swallowing and for preventing recurrent hernia.

  15. Nonendoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy: Outcome in 134 eyes

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anasua; Videkar, Chetan; Goyal, Ritin; Rath, Suryasnata

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the outcome of nonendoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (NEN-DCR) in patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO) in India. Methods: Retrospective case series of NEN-DCR between July 2012 and October 2014. All patients had follow-up >3 months. Success was defined anatomically as patency on irrigation and functionally as relief from epiphora. Statistical Analysis Used: Fischer's exact test and Chi-square test. Results: A total of 122 patients (134 eyes; 81 female; mean age 37 ± 18 years) were included. Indications were primary acquired NLDO in 92 (68%) eyes of adults (>18 years), NLDO in children (<18 years) in 22 eyes (16%), acute dacryocystitis in 13 eyes, failed prior DCR in six eyes, and secondary acquired NLDO in one eye. Mean duration of surgery was 36 min (range: 16–92). At a median follow-up of 6 months (range: 3–15), 86% eyes had functional success and 85% had anatomical success. Revision NEN-DCR was successful in 13/16 eyes. All patients with acute dacryocystitis were completely symptom-free at final visit. In children, (17/22) 77% achieved functional success after primary NEN-DCR which improved to 100% after one revision. Tube-related epiphora and granuloma in ten eyes resolved after removal. Conclusion: NEN-DCR gives good outcome in primary NLDO and is also effective in those with acute dacryocystitis and in children with NLDO. The technique obviates the need for an endoscope and has an acceptable safety profile and thus may be particularly suited for the developing nations. PMID:27146931

  16. Endoscopic repair of high-flow cranial base defects using a bilayer button.

    PubMed

    Luginbuhl, Adam J; Campbell, Peter G; Evans, James; Rosen, Marc

    2010-05-01

    Repair of the skull base still begins with a direct repair of the dural defect. We present a new button closure for primary repair of the dura for high flow defects. Retrospective review. We reviewed our 20 cases of primary button grafts and compared the results to the previous 20 high-flow open-cistern cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cases. Subjects were excluded if they had no violation of the arachnoid space or potential for low-flow CSF leak. The button is constructed so that the inlay portion is at least 25% larger than the dural defect, and the onlay portion is just large enough to cover the dural defect. The two grafts are sutured together using two 4-0 Neurolon sutures and placed with the inlay portion intradurally and the onlay portion extradurally. The button graft repair of open-cisternal defects had a drop in CSF leak complications to 10% (2/20), and these two leaks were repaired with the button technique as the salvage surgery. This is a significant improvement over the 45% leak rate in the prebutton graft group (P < .03). In our button graft group we used nasoseptal flaps on 16/20 repairs, and 1/2 repairs that leaked in the button group did not have a nasoseptal flap. Lumbar drains were used in approximately 38% in both groups (P = .83). The button graft can be used in conjunction with the nasal septal flap or as a stand-alone repair with good results reducing the postoperative leak rate to 10% for high-flow CSF repairs. Laryngoscope, 2010.

  17. Endoscopic feature tracking for augmented-reality assisted prosthesis selection in mitral valve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Sandy; Kolb, Silvio; De Simone, Raffaele; Karck, Matthias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Mitral valve annuloplasty describes a surgical procedure where an artificial prosthesis is sutured onto the anatomical structure of the mitral annulus to re-establish the valve's functionality. Choosing an appropriate commercially available ring size and shape is a difficult decision the surgeon has to make intraoperatively according to his experience. In our augmented-reality framework, digitalized ring models are superimposed onto endoscopic image streams without using any additional hardware. To place the ring model on the proper position within the endoscopic image plane, a pose estimation is performed that depends on the localization of sutures placed by the surgeon around the leaflet origins and punctured through the stiffer structure of the annulus. In this work, the tissue penetration points are tracked by the real-time capable Lucas Kanade optical flow algorithm. The accuracy and robustness of this tracking algorithm is investigated with respect to the question whether outliers influence the subsequent pose estimation. Our results suggest that optical flow is very stable for a variety of different endoscopic scenes and tracking errors do not affect the position of the superimposed virtual objects in the scene, making this approach a viable candidate for annuloplasty augmented reality-enhanced decision support.

  18. Female 'groin' hernia: totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair seems the most appropriate treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Schouten, N; Burgmans, J P J; van Dalen, T; Smakman, N; Clevers, G J; Davids, P H P; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Elias, S G; Simmermacher, R K J

    2012-08-01

    About 30% of all female 'groin' hernias are femoral hernias, although often only diagnosed during surgery. A Lichtenstein repair though, as preferred treatment modality according to guidelines, would not diagnose and treat femoral hernias. Totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair, however, offers the advantage of being an appropriate modality for the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of both inguinal and femoral hernias. TEP therefore seems an appealing surgical technique for women with groin hernias. This study included all female patients ≥ 18 years operated for a groin hernia between 2005 and 2009. A total of 183 groin hernias were repaired in 164 women. TEP was performed in 85% of women; the other 24 women underwent an open anterior (mesh) repair. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 23% of patients with primary hernias and 35% of patients with recurrent hernias. There were 30 cases (18.3%) of an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 17.3% of women who were diagnosed with an inguinal hernia before surgery. In addition, inguinal hernias were found in 24.0% of women who were diagnosed with a femoral hernia preoperatively. After a follow-up of 25 months, moderate to severe (VAS 4-10) postoperative pain was reported by 8 of 125 patients (6.4%) after TEP and 5 of 23 patients (21.7%) after open hernia repair (P = 0.03). Five patients had a recurrent hernia, two following TEP (1.4%) and three following open anterior repair (12.5%, P = 0.02). Two of these three patients presented with a femoral recurrence after a previous repair of an inguinal hernia. Femoral hernias are common in women with groin hernias, but not always detected preoperatively; this argues for the use of a preperitoneal approach. TEP hernia repair combines the advantage of a peroperative diagnosis and subsequent appropriate treatment with the known good clinical outcomes.

  19. A checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Laws, Edward R; Wong, Judith M; Smith, Timothy R; de Los Reyes, Kenneth; Aglio, Linda S; Thorne, Alison J; Cote, David J; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Gawande, Atul

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Approximately 250 million surgical procedures are performed annually worldwide, and data suggest that major complications occur in 3%-17% of them. Many of these complications can be classified as avoidable, and previous studies have demonstrated that preoperative checklists improve operating room teamwork and decrease complication rates. Although the authors' institution has instituted a general preoperative "time-out" designed to streamline communication, flatten vertical authority gradients, and decrease procedural errors, there is no specific checklist for transnasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery, with or without endoscopy. Such minimally invasive cranial surgery uses a completely different conceptual approach, set-up, instrumentation, and operative procedure. Therefore, it can be associated with different types of complications as compared with open cranial surgery. The authors hypothesized that a detailed, procedure-specific, preoperative checklist would be useful to reduce errors, improve outcomes, decrease delays, and maximize both teambuilding and operational efficiency. Thus, the object of this study was to develop such a checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery. METHODS An expert panel was convened that consisted of all members of the typical surgical team for transsphenoidal endoscopic cases: neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, circulating nurses, scrub technicians, surgical operations managers, and technical assistants. Beginning with a general checklist, procedure-specific items were added and categorized into 4 pauses: Anesthesia Pause, Surgical Pause, Equipment Pause, and Closure Pause. RESULTS The final endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery checklist is composed of the following 4 pauses. The Anesthesia Pause consists of patient identification, diagnosis, pertinent laboratory studies, medications, surgical preparation, patient positioning, intravenous/arterial access, fluid management

  20. A New Irrigation System (Endosplash) for a Rigid Endoscope in Trans-sphenoidal Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    KURODA, Rintarou; NAKAJIMA, Takeshi; YAMAGUCHI, Takashi; WATANABE, Eiju

    2016-01-01

    Obstruction of the visual field by blood is a major hindrance during endonasal endoscopic surgery, and a rapid and effective method for cleaning the lens is needed. We developed a new lens-cleaning system that does not employ a sheath or an irrigation-suction system. It is a 20-mm long cylinder with side holes that is attached to the barrel of the endoscope and is connected to a syringe containing saline. When the syringe is pressed, saline flows down to the tip along the barrel and washes the lens without requiring a sheath. We report the use of the system in six cases of endonasal endoscopic surgery. The lens was wiped significantly less often than during similar surgery performed without the use of this system. The Endosplash is simple and enables the surgeon to clean the lens with a single press of a syringe, thereby greatly enhancing the efficacy of endoscopic surgery. PMID:27063147

  1. Changing the surgical dogma in frontal sinus trauma: transnasal endoscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica W; Jeyarajan, Hari; Illing, Elisa A; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-05-01

    Management of frontal sinus trauma includes coronal or direct open approaches through skin incisions to either ablate or obliterate the frontal sinus for posterior table fractures and openly reduce/internally fixate fractured anterior tables. The objective of this prospective case-series study was to evaluate outcomes of frontal sinus anterior and posterior table trauma using endoscopic techniques. Prospective evaluation of patients undergoing surgery for frontal sinus fractures was performed. Data were collected regarding demographics, etiology, technique, operative site, length involving the posterior table, size of skull base defects, complications, and clinical follow-up. Forty-six patients (average age, 42 years) with frontal sinus fractures were treated using endoscopic techniques from 2008 to 2016. Mean follow-up was 26 (range, 0.5 to 79) months. Patients were treated primarily with a Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies. Draf III was used in 8 patients. Average fracture defect (length vs width) was 17.1 × 9.1 mm, and the average length involving the posterior table was 13.1 mm. Skull base defects were covered with either nasoseptal flaps or free tissue grafts. One individual required Draf IIb revision, but all sinuses were patent on final examination and all closed reductions of anterior table defects resulted in cosmetically acceptable outcomes. Frontal sinus trauma has traditionally been treated using open approaches. Our findings show that endoscopic management should become part of the management algorithm for frontal sinus trauma, which challenges current surgical dogma regarding mandatory open approaches. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. Three-Dimensional Hand-to-Gland Combat: The Future of Endoscopic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Nassimizadeh, A.; Muzaffar, S. J.; Nassimizadeh, M.; Beech, T.; Ahmed, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare two dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) non–high-definition (HD), and 3D HD endoscopic surgical techniques. Methods We describe our initial operative experience with a novel 3D HD endoscopic endonasal approach involving a pituitary adenoma resection, provide a case series, and review the current literature. This is the first case in Europe using the new 3D HD endoscope. Results Although research evidence remains limited, there are no significant negative perioperative or postoperative outcomes when compared with 2D endoscopic techniques. In our experience the narrow operating corridors of endoscopic surgery cannot be addressed with 3D endoscopic techniques. The new 3D HD endoscope creates imaging quality similar to conventional 2D HD systems. Conclusion Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal techniques provide an exciting new avenue, effectively addressing potential depth perception difficulties with current 2D systems. PMID:26623227

  3. Endoscopic transpterygoid approach and skull base repair after sphenoid meningoencephalocele resection. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Martínez Arias, Àngels; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Rioja, Elena; Enseñat, Joaquim; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Alobid, Isam

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leaks associated to meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess are rare entities. A congenital bony defect at this level results in the persistence of Sternberg's canal, or a lateral craniopharyngeal canal, which is supposed to be the origin of these lesions. Our objective was to show that the endoscopic transpterygoid approach is an effective technique for their treatment. We present a series of 5 cases of meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess treated with endoscopic sinus surgery (4 women and one man; mean age=59, range 37-72 years). Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea was present in all of them and they all underwent a transpterygoid approach with reconstruction of the skull base. We describe the surgical technique and review the literature. No complications were observed during surgery or the postoperative period. After a mean follow-up of 81 months, only one recurrence was seen. The transpterygoid approach has proven to be effective for the treatment of meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess. Providing wide access to identify the defect, followed by meningoencephalocele ablation, is the key for successful surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  4. Venous air embolism from Tisseel use during endoscopic cranial vault remodeling for craniosynostosis repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Felema, Gohalem G; Bryskin, Robert B; Heger, Ian M; Saswata, Roy

    2013-08-01

    Venous air embolism (VAE) is a potential complication during cranial vault remodeling requiring early detection and prompt therapeutic intervention. The incidence of VAE has been reported to be as high as 82.6% during open craniectomy for craniosynostosis repair. On the other hand, two separate studies reported a much lower incidence of VAE (8% and 2%) during endoscopic strip craniectomy. As surgical advancements progress, minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures are increasing in the pediatric population with reported benefits of decreased blood loss and need for transfusion, shorter hospital stay, decreased cost, lower morbidity, and mortality. In addition, there is a heightened emphasis on achieving hemostasis, which has led to the use of products such as antifibrinolytics and fibrin sealants. We present a case where a VAE causing significant hemodynamic instability (grade III) ensued immediately following aerosolized fibrin sealant application. Exploration of the potential source of VAE pointed to the high pressure and close proximity (between spray device and tissue) during application of the sealant, likely forcing air into the vascular system.

  5. Endoscopic Adipofascial Radial Forearm Flap Reconstruction of a Clival Defect

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Skull base surgical defects present unique challenges to anatomic and functional reconstruction. Fortunately, many endonasal skull base defects are successfully managed with a variety of local and regional reconstructive techniques. However, when prior surgery or radiotherapy eliminates the use of these local and regional reconstructive options, more elaborate free tissue transfer techniques are required. Managing endoscopic skull base defects of the anterior cranial fossa and clivus is further complicated by the limited access afforded for flap inset. The following case report describes durable reconstruction of a clival defect with an endoscopically-tunneled adipofascial radial forearm tissue transfer. The case highlights importance of a multidisciplinary surgical team approach with strong foundations in endonasal skull base and reconstructive surgery to achieve successful reconstruction of complex endonasal defects. PMID:27975017

  6. [Endonasal and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy by diode laser. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Alañón Fernández, M A; Alañón Fernández, F J; Martínez Fernández, A; Cárdenas Lara, M; Rodríguez Domínguez, R; Ballesteros Navarro, J M; Sainz Quevedo, M

    2004-04-01

    To describe the surgical technique and to evaluate the clinical results after having performed the transcanalicular and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomies by diode laser, including the advantages and limits of this technique. 34 were performed by diode laser in patients with clinical history of epiphora, with or without mucopurulent secretion, for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The study was prospective, interventional, non randomized and non comparative. Diode laser was used to realize vaporization of lacrimal sac, osteotomy and vaporization with coagulation of nasal mucosa. The mean of surgical time was 15 minutes (range 7 to 29 minutes). Bicanalicular intubation was performed with a silicone tube and prolene filament for two months in all cases. Postsurgical follow-up was between 4 and 11 months. The degree of epiphora was evaluated by the Munk scale and lacrimal permeability was evaluated by endoscopic functional staining test in all cases. Out of the 34 DCR-EDN+ENC that were performed, 32 cases (94.11%) remain asymptomatic. Two of them (5.88%) required endonasal dacryocystorhinostomies by drilling, because the bony perforation was impossible to achieve by laser fiber. Two cases (5.88%) presented fibrosis and lacrimal and lower canaliculi obstruction, without epiphora because the superior canaliculi was permeable. Endonasal and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy technique performed by diode laser is a valid method. It does not cause cutaneous scarring, it decreases thermic canalicular damage, it respects the lacrimal pump, it minimizes pain and bleeding, it needs less surgical time and it has turned into an out-patient procedure with a minimal surgical and postsurgical morbility.

  7. A 10-year experience of totally extraperitoneal endoscopic repair for adult inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Toma, Hiroki; Eguchi, Toru; Toyoda, Shuichi; Okabe, Yasuhiro; Kobarai, Tomonari; Naritomi, Gen; Ogawa, Takahiro; Hirota, Ichio

    2015-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is fast becoming the treatment of choice for inguinal hernia. By reviewing our 10-year experience of performing totally extraperitoneal repair (TEP), we sought to establish its clinical significance in the treatment of adult inguinal hernia. We reviewed retrospectively the clinical records of patients who underwent TEP for adult inguinal hernia between January 2003 and December 2012. None of the 303 patients with adult primary or recurrent inguinal hernia in our study needed TEP converted to other procedures or suffered serious complications during the procedure. A significant difference was noted in the operation time between direct (n = 32) vs indirect (n = 128) hernias in the primary unilateral inguinal hernia group (91 ± 27 vs 80 ± 32 min, p = 0.033) and between direct/direct (n = 31) vs indirect/indirect (n = 24) hernias (136 ± 58 vs 89 ± 24 min, p = 0.01) in the primary bilateral inguinal hernia group. The only postoperative complications recorded were four cases of hernia recurrence (1.3 %) and one case of chronic pain (0.3 %). The results obtained for TEP over 10 years support this as a promising procedure for the treatment of adult inguinal hernia.

  8. Analysis of 104 cases of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy in a tertiary care hospital: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rashmi; Gupta, Saroj

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the results of endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy performed in a tertiary care hospital. Prospective, nonrandomized, interventional clinical study. A prospective interventional study was performed on 104 patients presenting with epiphora between January 2006 and January 2010. All patients were operated by one surgeon. Out of 104 cases, 08 cases were of revision endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Bicanalicular silicon intubation was performed in all cases of revision endonasal DCR. Twelve patients had concomitant sinonasal disease for which septoplasty or FESS was done. The patency of nasolacrimal duct was assessed by doing syringing of lacrimal passage weekly for 1 month, monthly for 3 month, then at 6 month and 1 year. Out of 104 patients 10 patients lost follow up after surgery. Ninety four patients were followed for 1 year. On syringing, rhinostomy site was found patent in 80 patients (85.10 %), therefore they were fully satisfied. In 6 cases (6.38 %) minimal block was seen with clear fluid regurgitation, were to some extent symptomatically relieved and were found to be satisfied, whereas in 08 cases (8.51 %) syringing showed complete block. They required further management. Success rate of our study is comparable to other studies on endonasal DCR as well as external DCR, with advantages of less intra-operative bleeding, shorter operative time, better cosmesis, preservation of lacrimal pump mechanism. Other nasal pathology can be treated at the same time. Our results are clinically as well as statistically highly significant (P value < 0.0001).

  9. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. [Endoscopic ethmoidectomy. How to prevent complications?].

    PubMed

    Khoury, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of the microscope and more recently of the endoscope, improve the conditions of endonasal surgery. These techniques must not give the impression of complete security. The complications of the ethmoidectomy exist. A good knowledge of the anatomy of the sinus cavities and a gradual apprenticeship are the best means to prevent these complications. We present the different types of complications and their preventions.

  11. Early results of a randomised trial comparing Prolene and VyproII-mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (TEP) of recurrent unilateral hernias.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T; Wollert, S; Osterberg, J; Smedberg, S; Bringman, S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a lightweight mesh to a standard polypropylene hernia mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal hernioplasty in recurrent hernias. A total of 140 men with recurrent unilateral inguinal hernias were randomised to a totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) with Prolene or VyproII in a single-blinded multi-center trial. The randomisation and all data handling were performed through the Internet. 137 patients were operated as allocated. Follow-up was completed in 88% of the patients. The median operation times were 55 (24-125) min and 53.5 (21-123) min for the Prolene and VyproII groups, respectively. The meshes had comparable results in the surgeon's assessment of the handling of the mesh, return to work, return to daily activities, complications, postoperative pain and quality of life during the first 8 weeks of rehabilitation, except in General Health (GH) SF-36, where the VyproII-group had a significantly better score (P=0.045). The use of Prolene and VyproII-meshes in endoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernia seems to result in similar short-term outcomes and quality of life.

  12. Endonasal ethmoidectomy and bifrontal craniotomy with craniofacial approach for resection of frontoethmoidal osteoma causing tension pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael C; Goldman, Marc A; Donahue, John E; Tung, Glenn A; Goel, Ritu; Sampath, Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Tension pneumocephalus is an unusual, potentially life-threatening complication of frontal fossa tumors. We present an uncommon case of a frontoethmoidal osteoma causing a tension pneumocephalus and neurological deterioration prompting a combined endonasal ethmoidectomy and bifrontal craniotomy with craniofacial approach for resection. A 68-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of worsening headache, slowness of speech, and increasing confusion. Standard computed tomography scan revealed a marked tension pneumocephalus with ventricular air and 1-cm midline shift to the right. Further studies showed a calcified left ethmoid mass and a left anterior cranial-base defect. A team composed of neurosurgery and otolaryngology performed a combined endonasal ethmoidectomy and bifrontal craniotomy with craniofacial approach to resect a large frontoethmoid bony tumor. No abscess or mucocele was identified. The skull base defect was repaired with the aid of a transnasal endoscopy, a titanium mesh, and a pedunculated pericranial flap. Postoperatively, the pneumocephalus and the patient's symptoms completely resolved. Pathology was consistent with a benign osteoma. This is an uncommon case of a frontoethmoidal osteoma associated with tension pneumocephalus. Recognition of this entity and timely diagnosis and treatment, consisting of an endonasal ethmoidectomy and a bifrontal craniotomy with craniofacial approach, may prevent potential life-threatening complications.

  13. Transnasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopical control.

    PubMed

    Wigand, M E

    1981-03-01

    Endonasal sinus surgery aims at the preservation of a lining mucosa in the reventilated and redrained cavities. It can, therefore, be confined to the removal of narrowing bone at the "isthmus" of the ducts or windows. Transnasal ethmoidectomy for diffuse polyposis consists of the removal of the ethmoidal cell septa, including the middle turbinate, and a broad fenestration of both the sphenoid sinus and the frontal infundibulum. A consequent postoperative care provided, transnasal ethmoidectomy offers excellent clinical results. A new suction-irrigation endoscope and refined instruments contribute to improved surgical exposure and to the avoidance of complications.

  14. Endoscopic management of pediatric nasolacrimal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Michael J

    2006-10-01

    Developmental anomalies of the nasolacrimal drainage system typically manifest early in childhood with epiphora and occasionally infection. Although the majority of cases of congenital nasolacrimal obstruction resolve spontaneously with conservative medical management, certain anomalies require operative intervention. Included in this latter group are dacryocystoceles or nasolacrimal duct cysts. The application of endoscopic sinus surgical techniques to children with persistent symptomatic nasolacrimal obstruction provides an alternative to external dacryocystorhinostomy that appears to be equally efficacious and concurrently allows for the potential correction of any predisposing intranasal pathology. Endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy is best performed as a joint otolaryngologic-ophthalmologic procedure.

  15. [Image-guided endoscopic transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qui-Hang; Liu, Hai-Sheng; Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Yu

    2005-01-01

    To assess the role of neuronavigation in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas. Ten endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations for pituitary adenomas were selected. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Five of 10 patients had gigantic adenoma, 3 microadenoma, 2 large adenoma. The mean setup time was 5 minutes, and the operative time was 50 minutes in image-guided procedures. In all cases, the system worked well without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and.sagittal planes indicated a mean verified system error of 1.5 mm. for pituitary adenomas. After operation, the symptoms relieved in all patients. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and safer.

  16. A matched pairs analysis of non-rib-spreading, fully endoscopic, mini-incision technique versus conventional mini-thoracotomy for mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Westhofen, Sumi; Conradi, Lenard; Deuse, Tobias; Detter, Christian; Vettorazzi, Eik; Treede, Hendrik; Reichenspurner, Hermann

    2016-12-01

    Advances in video-assistance lead to an increase in minimal access mitral valve surgery (MAMVS) with decreased incision size yet maintaining the same quality of surgery. Further reduction in surgical trauma and at the same time improved visual guidance can be achieved by a non-rib-spreading fully 3D endoscopic technique (NRS-3D). We compared patients who underwent MAMVS either through an NRS fully 3D endoscopic or rib-spreading (RS) access in a retrospective matched-pair analysis. A matched pairs analysis was undertaken of retrospectively collected data of 284 consecutive patients having received an MAMVS between January 2011 and May 2015. Fifty patients with an RS procedure were compared with 50 patients with an NRS fully 3D endoscopic operation. For all patients, access was made through a 3-4 cm incision in the inframammary fold through the fourth intercostal space. In the NRS-3D group, only a soft-tissue protector, and no additional rib-spreader, was used. Operative visualization was provided by 3D endoscopy in the NRS-3D group. The NRS as well as the RS procedure was successful in all patients without technical repair limitations. Mortality was 0% in both groups. Significant differences were seen for operation times (39.0 min mean shorter operation time in the NRS-3D group; P < 0.001), and length of stay on intensive care unit (1.0 day mean shorter stay in the NRS-3D group; P = 0.002) and in the hospital (1.4 days mean shorter stay in the NRS-3D group; P = 0.003). Postoperative analgesics doses were significantly lower in the NRS-3D group [P = 0.007 (paracetamol); P = 0.123 (metamizole); P = 0.013 (piritramide)]. Postoperative pain rated on a pain-scale from 0 to 10 was significantly lower in the NRS-3D group (mean difference of 1.8; P = 0.006). Patient satisfaction regarding cosmetic results was comparable in both the groups. Repair results, ejection fraction, perioperative morbidity and MACCE during follow-up showed no significant differences between both

  17. Endoscopic Vacuum-Assisted Closure (E-VAC) Treatment in a Patient with Delayed Anastomotic Perforation following a Perforated Gastric Conduit Repair after an Ivor-Lewis Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Se Hwan

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that intrathoracic esophageal leakages occur at a rate of 4%–17% after Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy. There has been no consensus on a specific treatment for the post-operative anastomotic leakage. Recently, endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (E-VAC) has been introduced as a novel treatment for the post-operative anastomotic leakage. We herein report the case of a patient with early perforation of the gastric conduit followed by late esophagogastric anastomotic leakage who was successfully treated with early surgical repair and subsequent E-VAC. The patient had been previously diagnosed with achalasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and undergone an Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy. PMID:27075934

  18. Endoscopic Vacuum-Assisted Closure (E-VAC) Treatment in a Patient with Delayed Anastomotic Perforation following a Perforated Gastric Conduit Repair after an Ivor-Lewis Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyo Chul; Kwon, Se Hwan

    2016-12-20

    It has been reported that intrathoracic esophageal leakages occur at a rate of 4%-17% after Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy. There has been no consensus on a specific treatment for the post-operative anastomotic leakage. Recently, endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (E-VAC) has been introduced as a novel treatment for the post-operative anastomotic leakage. We herein report the case of a patient with early perforation of the gastric conduit followed by late esophagogastric anastomotic leakage who was successfully treated with early surgical repair and subsequent E-VAC. The patient had been previously diagnosed with achalasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and undergone an Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy.

  19. Multimodality gynecomastia repair by cross-chest power-assisted superficial liposuction combined with endoscopic-assisted pull-through excision.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Ytzhack; Fodor, Lucian; Peled, Isaac J; Eldor, Liron; Egozi, Dana; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Numerous methods of gynecomastia repair have been described to accomplish removal of breast tissue. Our multimodality surgical approach for the treatment of gynecomastia combines the use of power-assisted superficial cross-chest liposuction with direct pull-through excision of the breast parenchyma under endoscopic supervision. Seventeen patients, aging 17-39, underwent this multimodality approach. According to Simon's grading, 3 patients had grade 1, 5 had grade 2a, 6 had grade 2b, and 3 had grade 3 gynecomastia. Power-assisted liposuction was performed with a 3- or 4-mm triple-hole cannula inserted through the contralateral periareolar medial incision to suction the contralateral prepectoral fatty breast. At the end of the liposuction, the fibrous tissue was easily pulled through the ipsilateral stab wound and excised under endoscopic control. Follow-up time ranged from 6 to 34 months. The amount of fat removed by liposuction varied from 100-800 mL per breast, and the amount of breast parenchyma removed by excision varied from 20-110 g. All patients recovered remarkably well. No complications were recorded. All patients were satisfied with their results. This technique enables an effective treatment of both the fatty and fibrous tissue of the male breast and avoids skin redundancy due to skin contraction. A smooth masculine breast contour is consistently achieved without the stigma of this type of surgery.

  20. Preoperative planning with three-dimensional reconstruction of patient's anatomy, rapid prototyping and simulation for endoscopic mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Sardari Nia, Peyman; Heuts, Samuel; Daemen, Jean; Luyten, Peter; Vainer, Jindrich; Hoorntje, Jan; Cheriex, Emile; Maessen, Jos

    2017-02-01

    Mitral valve repair performed by an experienced surgeon is superior to mitral valve replacement for degenerative mitral valve disease; however, many surgeons are still deterred from adapting this procedure because of a steep learning curve. Simulation-based training and planning could improve the surgical performance and reduce the learning curve. The aim of this study was to develop a patient-specific simulation for mitral valve repair and provide a proof of concept of personalized medicine in a patient prospectively planned for mitral valve surgery. A 65-year old male with severe symptomatic mitral valve regurgitation was referred to our mitral valve heart team. On the basis of three-dimensional (3D) transoesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography, 3D reconstructions of the patient's anatomy were constructed. By navigating through these reconstructions, the repair options and surgical access were chosen (minimally invasive repair). Using rapid prototyping and negative mould fabrication, we developed a process to cast a patient-specific mitral valve silicone replica for preoperative repair in a high-fidelity simulator. Mitral valve and negative mould were printed in systole to capture the pathology when the valve closes. A patient-specific mitral valve silicone replica was casted and mounted in the simulator. All repair techniques could be performed in the simulator to choose the best repair strategy. As the valve was printed in systole, no special testing other than adjusting the coaptation area was required. Subsequently, the patient was operated, mitral valve pathology was validated and repair was successfully done as in the simulation. The patient-specific simulation and planning could be applied for surgical training, starting the (minimally invasive) mitral valve repair programme, planning of complex cases and the evaluation of new interventional techniques. The personalized medicine could be a possible pathway towards enhancing reproducibility

  1. Combined Endonasal-Transcervical Approach to a Metastatic Parapharyngeal Space Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benet, Arnau; El-Sayed, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although papillary thyroid carcinoma metastases to the parapharyngeal space are rare, the high amount of fat tissue allows tumors to grow clinically undetectable until they invade most of the parapharyngeal space. We describe for the first time a combined endonasal and transcervical approach for a parapharyngeal metastasis from a papillary thyroid carcinoma. Materials and Methods: A 51-year-old male with a previous history of papillary thyroid carcinoma presented with left ear fullness and left-sided facial numbness. Imaging revealed a 4x3 cm pre-styloid parapharyngeal space mass invading the foramen ovale and extending below the palate. Needle biopsy confirmed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Results: The lesion was resected with a combined endoscopic endonasal and transcervical approach. Postoperative MRI revealed gross total resection, and the patient recovered from his symptoms. Conclusion: This novel approach provides access to pre-styloid parapharyngeal tumors with superior extension to the skull base, avoiding more extensive traditional open approaches. PMID:26203403

  2. Nasalance Changes Following Various Endonasal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Hazem Saeed; Elaassar, Ahmed Shaker; Anany, Ahmad Mohammad; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is change in nasalance post endonasal surgery which is not permanent. Objectives The objective of this study is to evaluate the long-term nasalance changes following different types of endonasal surgeries. Methods We included in this study patients who underwent sinonasal surgery at the Otorhinolaryngology Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from February 2015 until March 2016. We divided the patients into two groups according to the surgeries they underwent: Group (A) was the FESS group and group (B), the septoturbinoplasty group. We checked nasalance using a nasometer before and after the sinonasal surgery. Results Nasalance increased at one month after the operation in both groups. However, it returned to nearly original levels within three months postoperatively. Conclusion FESS, septoplasty, and turbinate surgery may lead to hypernasal speech. This hypernasal speech can be a result of change in the shape and diameter of the resonating vocal tract. Hypernasal speech in these circumstances may be a temporary finding that can decrease with time. Surgeons should inform their patients about the possibility of hypernasality after such types of surgery, especially if they are professional voice users. PMID:28382115

  3. Endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair for inguinal disruption (Sportsman's hernia): rationale and design of a prospective observational cohort study (TEP-ID-study)

    PubMed Central

    Voorbrood, C E H; Goedhart, E; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Sanders, F; Naafs, D; Burgmans, J P J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inguinal pain is a frequently occurring problem in athletes. A diagnosis of inguinal disruption is performed by exclusion of other conditions causing groin pain. Up to now, conservative medical management is considered to be the primary treatment for this condition. Relevant large and prospective clinical studies regarding the treatment of inguinal disruption are limited; however, recent studies have shown the benefits of the totally extraperitoneal patch (TEP) technique. This study provides a complete assessment of the inguinal area in athletes with chronic inguinal pain before and after treatment with the TEP hernia repair technique. Methods and analysis We describe the rationale and design of an observational cohort study for surgical treatment with the endoscopic TEP hernia repair technique in athletes with a painful groin (inguinal disruption). The study is being conducted in a high-volume, single centre hospital with specialty in TEP hernia repair. Patients over 18 years, suffering from inguinal pain for at least 3 months during or after playing sports, and whom have not undergone previous inguinal surgery and have received no benefit from physiotherapy are eligible for inclusion. Patients with any another cause of inguinal pain, proven by physical examination, inguinal ultrasound, X-pelvis/hip or MRI are excluded. Primary outcome is reduction in pain after 3 months. Secondary outcomes are pain reduction, physical functioning, and resumption of sport (in frequency and intensity). Ethics and dissemination An unrestricted research grant for general study purposes was assigned to the Hernia Centre. This study itself is not directly subject to the above mentioned research grant or any other financial sponsorship. We intend to publish the outcome of the study, regardless of the findings. All authors will give final approval of the manuscript version to be published. PMID:26739740

  4. [Endonasal ethmoidectomy in naso-sinusal polyposis. Results in 110 surgically treated patients].

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Fombeur, J P; Ebbo, D; Lecomte, F; Koubbi, G; Barrault, S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed retrospectively functional and endoscopic results obtained in 110 patients who underwent endonasal ethmoidectomy (n = 218). The patients were divided into 3 groups according to associated pathology (polyposis alone, asthma without intolerance to aspirin, Widal's disease) and outcome was evaluated after a mean 19.5 month follow-up. Function was improved in 88% of the patients. Endoscopic recurrence was seen in 40% of the patients including 10% with major polyposis. Oedema of the mucose remained in 20% of the patients and the mucosa was normal in 40%. Improvement in patients with Widal's disease was the least favourable among the three groups and was best in those with asthma and no intolerance to aspirin. Post-operative complications occurred in 12.6% of the patients and were severe in 0.9%. These satisfactory results, both in terms of function and the low rate of complications, suggest that the current medicosurgical management should be continued with particular attention to the rate of endoscopic recurrence.

  5. Minimally invasive surgery (endonasal) for anterior fossa and sellar tumors.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Timothy; Greenlee, Jeremy D W; Teo, Charles

    2010-10-01

    The primary goal of any surgical approach is to adequately visualize and treat the pathologic condition with minimal disruption to adjacent normal anatomy. The work of several researchers has revealed the promise of minimally invasive endonasal neurosurgery and paved the way for broader applications of the technology. This article discusses the current state of minimally invasive endonasal techniques to address the pathologic conditions of the anterior cranial fossa and parasellar region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of intrathecal fluorescein and white light excitation for detecting intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak in endoscopic skull base surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shaan M; Banu, Matei A; Donaldson, Angela; Patel, Kunal S; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-03-01

    The intraoperative detection of CSF leaks during endonasal endoscopic skull base surgery is critical to preventing postoperative CSF leaks. Intrathecal fluorescein (ITF) has been used at varying doses to aid in the detection of intraoperative CSF leaks. However, the sensitivity and specificity of ITF at certain dosages is unknown. A prospective database of all endoscopic endonasal procedures was reviewed. All patients received 25 mg ITF diluted in 10 ml CSF and were pretreated with dexamethasone and Benadryl. Immediately after surgery, the operating surgeon prospectively noted if there was an intraoperative CSF leak and fluorescein was identified. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of ITF for detecting intraoperative CSF leak were calculated. Factors correlating with postoperative CSF leak were determined. Of 419 patients, 35.8% of patients did not show a CSF leak. Fluorescein-tinted CSF (true positive) was noted in 59.7% of patients and 0 false positives were encountered. CSF without fluorescein staining (false negative) was noted in 4.5% of patients. The sensitivity and specificity of ITF were 92.9% and 100%, respectively. The negative and positive predictive values were 88.8% and 100%, respectively. Postoperative CSF leaks only occurred in true positives at a rate of 2.8%. ITF is extremely specific and very sensitive for detecting intraoperative CSF leaks. Although false negatives can occur, these patients do not appear to be at risk for postoperative CSF leak. The use of ITF may help surgeons prevent postoperative CSF leaks by intraoperatively detecting and confirming a watertight repair.

  7. Laser-assisted surgery of endonasal diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Leunig, Andreas; Janda, P.; Rosler, P.; Grevers, G.; Baumgartner, Reinhold

    2000-06-01

    Clinical studies were performed to assess the clinical outcome of laser assisted endonasal turbinate surgery in long-term. By means of a pulsed Ho:YAG laser emitting at (lambda) equals 2100nm 57 patients suffering form nasal obstruction due to allergic rhinitis and vasomotoric rhinitis were treated under local anesthesia. Furthermore 50 patients were treated by means of light of a diode laser. The light was fed into a fiber being introduced into a fiber guidance system which serves for suction of smoke and pyrolyse products. The distal part of this system could be bent in the range of -5 degrees up to 45 degrees due to the optical axes of the fiber. The study was conducted by a standardized questionnaire, photo documentation, allergy test, mucocilliar function test, rhinomanometry, radiology and histology. Within 2 weeks after laser treatment a significant improvement of nasal airflow correlating to the extent of the ablated turbinate tissue could be determined. This effect lasted up until 1 year post treatment resulting in an improved quality of life in more than 80 percent of the patients. Side effects like nasal dryness and pain were rare, no immediate complications were observed. The total treatment time took 3-8 minutes/turbinate and nasal packing was not necessary after the laser procedure. In conclusion laser treatment by means of the fiber guidance system can be performed as an outpatient procedure under local anesthesia with excellent ablation of soft tissue in a short treatment time with promising results. It will become a time and cost effective treatment modality in endonasal laser surgery.

  8. Neuronavigation in endonasal pituitary and skull base surgery using an autoregistration mask without head fixation: an assessment of accuracy and practicality.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Carrau, Ricardo L; Kassam, Amin B; Kelly, Daniel F

    2012-11-01

    Intraoperative navigation is an important tool used during endonasal surgery, which typically requires rigid head fixation. Herein we describe a navigational technique using an autoregistration mask without head fixation. Prospective evaluation of a surface autoregistration mask used without rigid head fixation in 12 consecutive endonasal endoscopic skull base procedures was performed with patients positioned in a horseshoe head holder. We assessed the accuracy by recording the surface registration error (SRE) and target registration error (TRE). We also noted the time required for installation and the occurrence of system failure. The system's accuracy was validated using a deep target simultaneously viewed with endoscopic. In 12 consecutive endonasal cases performed by a neurosurgeon and ENT team, pathologies included pituitary macroadenomas (9), chordoma (1), craniopharyngioma (1), and sinonasal melanoma (1). Median time required for the registration and accuracy verification was 84 seconds (interval 64 to 129 seconds). The mask stayed on the patient throughout the procedure. The mean SRE was 0.8 mm (interval 0.6 to 0.9 mm). The mean TRE was 0.9 ± 0.7 mm and 1.0 ± 0.8 mm measured respectively at the beginning and end of the case. In every case, the system was judged accurate by the surgical team using the sphenoid keel or an intrasphenoidal bony septation as a deep target for internal validation. No system failure occurred during these 12 cases. A facial surface autoregistration mask maintained in place throughout surgery without rigid head fixation allows excellent operational accuracy in endonasal pituitary and skull base surgery. This navigation system is practical, reliable, and noninvasive. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Preservation of hormonal function by identifying pituitary gland at endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Linsler, Stefan; Hero-Gross, Renate; Friesenhahn-Ochs, Bettina; Sharif, Salman; Lammert, Frank; Oertel, Joachim

    2017-09-01

    The endonasal endoscopic approach has been established for perisellar tumor surgery with a higher resection rate and reduced complications. We analyzed the potential to identify the pituitary gland under endoscopic view, at surgery and see its relation to postoperative hormonal insufficiency in endonasal endoscopic procedures. Between January 2011 and January 2014, 70 cases of pituitary adenomas with preoperative intact pituitary function underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal procedures for intrasellar pathologies. Endocrinologists and neurosurgeons followed these patients prospectively. Special attention was paid to intraoperative identification of gland tissue, surgical complications, degree of resection and postoperative hormonal insufficiency. The pituitary gland was identified in 57 out of 70 procedures (81.4%). Eleven percent (8 of 70 patients) had persistent pituitary insufficiency. Two of these 8 patients belonged to the group with pituitary gland identification (2 out of 57); thus, when the pituitary gland was identified during the procedure postoperative hormonal insufficiency was seen in 3.5% of cases. Failure of pituitary gland identification presented with hormonal insufficiency of 46.2%. In analysis with Fisher's exact test, there was a high significant correlation between the identification of the pituitary gland intraoperatively and normal pituitary function postoperatively (p<0.005). On follow up radical tumor resection was seen in 88% (62 of 70 patients). This study indicates that identification and preservation of pituitary gland tissue and function is possible in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. This preservation of gland tissue is a positive predictor of postoperative normal pituitary function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Image-guided endoscopic transnasal removal of recurrent pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Lasio, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo; Felisati, Giovanni; Broggi, Giovanni

    2002-07-01

    To assess the role that neuronavigation plays in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal reoperations for recurrent pituitary adenomas. During a 45-month period, 19 endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations were performed for recurrent pituitary adenomas. In 11 of 19 patients, the procedure was performed with the aid of an optically guided system. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively, with attention to the following: comparison of baseline clinical data, the duration of surgery, and the postoperative course and complications of both image-guided and non-image-guided endoscopic reoperations. In addition, to test the reliability of the neuronavigation system, we made measurements of intraoperative accuracy in five additional transnasal endoscopic procedures in "virgin" noses and sphenoidal sinuses. In both groups studied, we found no difference with regard to either morbidity or mortality, which were null. The mean setup time was 13 minutes shorter in non-image-guided procedures (P = 0.021), and the operative time was 36 minutes shorter in image-guided procedures (P = 0.038). No other statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. In all cases, we found that the system performed without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of the intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes indicated a mean intraoperatively verified system error of 1.6 +/- 0.6 mm. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and probably safer.

  11. Interdomal Suture through a Nondelivery Endonasal Approach: A New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Leibou, Lior

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of interdomal sutures for tip refinement is common in open rhinoplasty and in endonasal rhinoplasty using a delivery technique, but there is paucity of reports in the literature regarding the use of interdomal suturing techniques when the nondelivery endonasal approach is chosen. Objective: The authors describe a technique designed to refine the nasal tip with an interdomal suture placed through a nondelivery endonasal approach. Methods: In this study, the authors retrospectively review the cases of 45 patients who underwent endonasal rhinoplasty with the authors’ interdomal suturing technique between the years 2011 and 2013. The average age of the patients was 25.3 years. Intercrural sutures (PDS 4.0 straight needle, Cincinnati, Ohio) were placed as mattress-like suture in the tip region, with the knot buried between both alar cartilages. The suture is tightened progressively according to the tip definition and narrowing sought. Results: The patients were followed for 12 months. All of the patients demonstrated a significant reduction in lobule and tip widths. This series had only 1 complication of tip asymmetry that was revised 1 year after the initial operation. There were no cases of infection, allergic reaction, or extrusion of the suture. Conclusions: Despite the lack of a large volume of patients, our study confirms that this technique is indeed an attractive and highly predictable option for achieving adequate tip refinement and definition when using a nondelivery endonasal rhinoplasty. PMID:27622086

  12. Rhinosurgical therapy planning via endonasal airflow simulation.

    PubMed

    Bockholt, U; Mlynski, G; Müller, W; Voss, G

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods play an important part in the production process of the automotive industry. Progress in recent years has made possible highly sophisticated airflow-simulation models that are used in engineering for optimization and verification of aerodynamics. The key purpose of the Simulation Tool for Airflow in the human Nose (STAN), developed at the Darmstadt University of Technology in cooperation with the University Hospital in Greifswald, is to use these techniques to support the rhinosurgeon in diagnosis and planning of therapy (Frühauf T, Mlynski G. Simulation and visualization of the air flow in the human nose. Proceedings of the First World Congress on Computational Medicine, Austin, Texas, 1994). A system has been developed that realizes a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the endonasal cavities based on computer tomography (CT) scans. This semiautomatic reconstruction method requires minimal manual intervention. The surface model is used to create an unstructured 3D volume mesh suitable for finite volume simulations. In this way, an individual simulation based on patient-specific data can be realized. At the University Hospital in Greifswald, experimental investigations and measurements are made in nasal models to verify the simulation result. The goal of this project is to investigate individual nasal complaints and to detect respiratory disorders. The surgeon should be able to simulate the disordered respiration before performing a surgical procedure, and thereby increase the effectiveness of surgical planning. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Two-Dimensional High Definition Versus Three-Dimensional Endoscopy in Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Comparative Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Rampinelli, Vittorio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mattavelli, Davide; Qiu, Jimmy; Raffetti, Elena; Schreiber, Alberto; Villaret, Andrea Bolzoni; Kucharczyk, Walter; Donato, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) endoscopy has been recently introduced in endonasal skull base surgery. Only a relatively limited number of studies have compared it to 2-dimensional, high definition technology. The objective was to compare, in a preclinical setting for endonasal endoscopic surgery, the surgical maneuverability of 2-dimensional, high definition and 3D endoscopy. A group of 68 volunteers, novice and experienced surgeons, were asked to perform 2 tasks, namely simulating grasping and dissection surgical maneuvers, in a model of the nasal cavities. Time to complete the tasks was recorded. A questionnaire to investigate subjective feelings during tasks was filled by each participant. In 25 subjects, the surgeons' movements were continuously tracked by a magnetic-based neuronavigator coupled with dedicated software (ApproachViewer, part of GTx-UHN) and the recorded trajectories were analyzed by comparing jitter, sum of square differences, and funnel index. Total execution time was significantly lower with 3D technology (P < 0.05) in beginners and experts. Questionnaires showed that beginners preferred 3D endoscopy more frequently than experts. A minority (14%) of beginners experienced discomfort with 3D endoscopy. Analysis of jitter showed a trend toward increased effectiveness of surgical maneuvers with 3D endoscopy. Sum of square differences and funnel index analyses documented better values with 3D endoscopy in experts. In a preclinical setting for endonasal skull base surgery, 3D technology appears to confer an advantage in terms of time of execution and precision of surgical maneuvers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiport Combined Endoscopic Approach to Nonembolized Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma with Parapharyngeal Extension: An Emerging Concept

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia Sharma, Shilpee; Nahata Gattani, Vijayshree

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surgical approaches to the parapharyngeal space (PPS) are challenging by virtue of deep location and neurovascular content. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) is a formidable hypervascular tumor that involves multiple compartments with increase in size. In tumors with extension to parapharyngeal space, the endonasal approach was observed to be inadequate. Combined Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches and Endoscopic Transoral Surgery (EEA-ETOS) approach has provided a customized alternative of multicorridor approach to access JNA for its safe and efficient resection. Methods. The study demonstrates a case series of patients of JNA with prestyloid parapharyngeal space extension operated by endoscopic endonasal and endoscopic transoral approach for tumor excision. Results. The multiport EEA-ETOS approach was used to provide wide exposure to access JNA in parapharyngeal space. No major complications were observed. No conversion to external approach was required. Postoperative morbidity was low and postoperative scans showed no residual tumor. A one-year follow-up was maintained and there was no evidence of disease recurrence. Conclusion. Although preliminary, our experience demonstrates safety and efficacy of multiport approach in providing access to multiple compartments, facilitating total excision of JNA in selected cases. PMID:28101106

  15. [Endonasal ethmoidectomy in the treatment of nasal sinus polyposis].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, D; Darras, J A; Sarini, J; Piquet, J J

    1995-01-01

    Endonasal surgery of paranasal polyposis. Two hundred and fifty one microscopical sphenoethmoidectomies with a major complication rate of 2.6% are reported. Long term results are analysed. Nasal obstruction disappears in 96% and persists in 70% of the cases 5 years later. Through topical steroid therapy and surgical experience polyp recurrence rate is reduced to 30%.

  16. [First clinical experiences with an endoscope manipulator system in endo- and transnasal surgery].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Gröbner, C; Dietz, A; Lueth, T C; Strauss, G

    2012-08-01

    Endo- and transnasal surgery needs optical support. The use of a microscope allows bimanual manipulation. More often the endoscopic technique is used which needs one hand for endoscope guidance "loosing" it for manipulation or demanding an assistant for endoscope guidance. In this work the use of a miniature endoscope manipulator system for endonasal and transnasal surgery was evaluated. 31 FESS with manipulator-assisted endoscope guidance were performed. The used endoscope positions, the number of position changes and conditional interruptions were documented. In addition, a transsphenoidal approach to the pituitary gland was performed in a cadaver trial. Non-inferiority was shown for the use of the endoscope manipulator with reference to time and accuracy of manipulator-assisted endoscope guidance. There were 6.4 position changes for each side. Bimanual manipulation was possible in all cases. In the region of high-risk structures (lamina papyracea, frontal recess) we conceptual switched to manual endoscope guidance. The evaluated endoscope manipulator fulfills the minimum requirements to be integrated into the surgical workflow of endo- and transnasal surgery. The number of required endoscope position changes is small allowing bimanual instrumentation. Still a disadvantage is the need for interrupting the workflow to remote the endoscope manipulator with the joystick console. Further development potential would be a forced-feedback function and hands-free navigated-controlled guidance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Larsen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    A gastrointestinal fistula is a common occurrence, especially after surgery. Patients who develop a fistula may have an infection, surgically altered anatomy, nutritional deficiency, or organ failure, making surgical revision more difficult. With advancements in flexible endoscopic devices and technology, new endoscopic options are available for the management of gastrointestinal fistulae. Endoscopically deployable stents, endoscopic suturing devices, through-the-scope and over-the-scope clips, sealants, and fistula plugs can be used to treat fistulae. These therapies are even more effective in combination. Despite the inherent challenges in patients with fistulae, endoscopic therapies for treatment of fistulae have demonstrated safety and efficacy, allowing many patients to avoid surgical fistula repair. In this paper, we review the emerging role of endoscopy in the management of gastrointestinal fistulae. PMID:28845140

  18. Feasibility of Piezoelectric Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Craniotomy: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Gellner, Verena; Koele, Wolfgang; Hammer, Georg Philipp; Braun, Eva Maria; Gerstenberger, Claus; Clarici, Georg; Holl, Etienne; Braun, Hannes; Stammberger, Heinz; Mokry, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Endoscopic transsphenoidal approach has become the gold standard for surgical treatment of treating pituitary adenomas or other lesions in that area. Opening of bony skull base has been performed with burrs, chisels, and hammers or standard instruments like punches and circular top knives. The creation of primary bone flaps—as in external craniotomies—is difficult.The piezoelectric osteotomes used in the present study allows creating a bone flap for endoscopic transnasal approaches in certain areas. The aim of this study was to prove the feasibility of piezoelectric endoscopic transnasal craniotomies. Study Design. Cadaveric study. Methods. On cadaveric specimens (N = 5), a piezoelectric system with specially designed hardware for endonasal application was applied and endoscopic transsphenoidal craniotomies at the sellar floor, tuberculum sellae, and planum sphenoidale were performed up to a size of 3–5 cm2. Results. Bone flaps could be created without fracturing with the piezoosteotome and could be reimplanted. Endoscopic handling was unproblematic and time required was not exceeding standard procedures. Conclusion. In a cadaveric model, the piezoelectric endoscopic transsphenoidal craniotomy (PETC) is technically feasible. This technique allows the surgeon to create a bone flap in endoscopic transnasal approaches similar to existing standard transcranial craniotomies. Future trials will focus on skull base reconstruction using this bone flap. PMID:24689037

  19. [Neuronavigation-guided pure endoscopic endonasai transsphenoidal approach for pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Hu, Changchen; Ji, Hongming; Zhang, Shiyuan; Hao, Xudong; Shen, Bo; Su, Luhai

    2015-02-03

    To explore the efficacies of neuronavigation-guided pure endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for removing pituitary adenomas. Retrospective analyses were conducted for the clinical data of 139 patients undergoing pure endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas between July 2011 and July 2014. There were 55 males and 84 females with a mean age of 48. 9 (21 - 73) years. The classifications of Hardy-Wilson were I (n =16), II (n = 39), III (n = 48) and IV (n = 36). Neuronavigation was used in all patients. And neuro-ophthalmological, neuroimaging and endocrinological follow-ups were conducted postoperatively. Total (n = 95, 68. 3%), subtotal (n = 33, 23. 7%) and partial (n = 11, 7. 9%) removals were achieved. For Hardy-Wilson I, gross total removal was achieved (n = 16, 100%); Hardy-Wilson II (n = 35, 89. 7%), Hardy-Wilson III (n = 34, 70. 8%) and Hardy-Wilson IV (n = 10, 27. 8%). Postoperative visual acuity improved (92. 1%, 70/76) and endocrine remission was observed (59. 6%, 53/89). The postoperative complications included cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage (n = 8, 5. 8%), meningitis (n = 3), sellar hematoma (n = 5) and delayed carotid artery rupture (n = 1). And the patient of hemorrhagic shock underwent emergency interventional procedures and was discharged successfully. Pure endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for removing pituitary adenoma is both safe and effective. And its efficacies may further increased through combined neuronavigation.

  20. Endoscopic septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Getz, Anne E; Hwang, Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Successful septoplasty involves accurate assessment of septal pathology and sound technique to avoid persistent symptoms and new complications. This review highlights endoscopic septoplasty techniques and instrumentation, as well as the indications for and advantages of endoscopic septoplasty as compared with traditional headlight septoplasty. Isolated lesions such as septal spurs and contact points may be better addressed with limited endoscopic techniques. Powered instrumentation has been utilized with reported success. Operative time and outcomes of endoscopic septoplasty are at least commensurate with, and at times superior to, traditional techniques. Endoscopic technology greatly enhances visualization during septoplasty. Discrete septal pathologies such as isolated deflection, spurs, perforations, and contact points can be addressed in a directed fashion. These advantages can be especially important in revision cases. Endoscopic technique in conjunction with video imaging is valuable for the education of residents and staff.

  1. Endoscopic septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Nathan B; Smith, Timothy L

    2009-04-01

    Endoscopic septoplasty has gained popularity since Lanza and colleagues and Stammberger first described the technique. This technique has several advantages over the traditional "headlight" septoplasty. These advantages include superior visualization, accommodation of limited and minimally invasive septoplasty, and usefulness as an effective teaching tool. This article reviews and illustrates the endoscopic septoplasty technique and discusses its limitations and advantages.

  2. Chicken wing training model for endoscopic microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Sivakanthan, Sananthan; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos Diogenes; Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Objectives To present and validate a chicken wing model for endoscopic endonasal microsurgical skill development. Setting A surgical environment was constructed using a Styrofoam box and measurements from radiological studies. Endoscopic visualization and instrumentation were utilized in a manner to mimic operative setting. Design Five participants were instructed to complete four sequential tasks: (1) opening the skin, (2) exposing the main artery in its neurovascular sheath, (3) opening the neurovascular sheath, and (4) separating the nerve from the artery. Time to completion of each task was recorded. Participants Three junior attendings, one senior resident, and one medical student were recruited internally. Main Outcome Measures Time to perform the surgical tasks measured in seconds. Results The average time of the first training session was 48.8 minutes; by the 10th training session, the average time was 22.4 minutes. The range of improvement was 25.7 minutes to 72.4 minutes. All five participants exhibited statistically significant decrease in time after 10 trials. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that an improvement of 50% was achieved by an average of five attempts at the 95% confidence interval. Conclusions The ex vivo chicken wing model is an inexpensive and relatively realistic model to train endoscopic dissection using microsurgical techniques.

  3. Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rinki; Sinha, Anuradha; Phukan, Jyoti Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) consists of creating a lacrimal drainage pathway to the nasal cavity to restore permanent drainage of previously obstructed excreting system. Aim: To compare the result and advantages of both endonasal endoscopic and external DCR regarding the patency rate, patient compliance and complications. Study Design: Prospective non-randomized comparative study. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted for 16 months duration in a teaching hospital with 50 cases of endoscopic and 30 cases of external DCR with a follow-up of minimum 6 months. Data regarding surgical outcome and complications were analysed and compared using χ2 test. Results: Total 72 patients were included in the study with six having bilateral involvement, out of which 20 were male and 52 were female. The mean age for endoscopic and external DCR was 33.6 years and 46.0 years, respectively. Right eye (63.8%) was involved more commonly than left eye (36.2%). Epiphora was the commonest presenting symptom (63.7%). Mean duration of surgery was much lengthier in external (mean 119.6 minutes) than endoscopic (mean 49.0 minutes) DCR. Bleeding was the most common immediate postoperative complication seen in 33.3% and 10.0% of external and endoscopic DCR cases, respectively. Primary surgical success rate was 90% and 96.7% for endoscopic and external DCR, respectively (P = 0.046). Among the endoscopic DCR group, four patients underwent revision surgery giving a total successful surgical outcome of 98% at third month of follow-up. However, at 6 month of follow-up, success rate was 92% for endoscopic DCR and 93.3% for external DCR. The difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.609). Conclusion: Intranasal endoscopic DCR is a simple, minimally invasive, day care procedure and had comparable result with conventional external DCR. PMID:23901178

  4. A novel multipurpose mini-endoscope for frontal sinus endoscopy "sinus view".

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Bozzato, Victoria; Bozzato, Alessandro; Papaspyrou, George; Schick, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic frontal sinus surgery has been proven to enable the treatment of most frontal sinus pathologies but may be challenging for the surgeon in regard to the variable frontal sinus anatomy. Frontal sinus drainage identification and frontal sinus visualization are an essential part of successful frontal sinus surgery. We demonstrate a novel modular mini-endoscopic system for frontal sinus surgery. Fifty-two patients (37 male, 15 female) with a chronic rhino-sinusitis were enrolled. In this study, all patients were subjected to standard endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery with use of the fibre optic endoscope "Sinus View" (1.1 mm diameter, 10,000 pixels, irrigation channel and additional working channel) accessing the frontal sinus. A frontal sinus drainage type I in 38 cases, a frontal sinus drainage type IIa in 9 cases and a frontal sinus drainage type IIb in 5 cases according to Draf were performed. The modular mini-endoscopic system "Sinus view" was used to identify frontal sinus drainage in ten patients before ethmoidectomy and in the remaining patients (N = 42) after ethmoidectomy. Visualization of the frontal sinus drainage or the frontal sinus itself was easily carried out after irrigation. A clear identification of the frontal sinus by illumination was achieved in all cases. In addition the working channel of the endoscope was successfully used to perform visualized balloon dilatation at the frontal sinus drainage or for biopsy. The endonasal visualization of the frontal sinus drainage and frontal sinus itself is facilitated by also using a modular mini-endoscope with the option to use the working channel of the endoscope for biopsy or balloon dilatation.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis References Lee LS. Endoscopic ultrasound. In: McNalley PR, ed. GI/Liver Secrets Plus . 5th ed. Philadelphia, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  6. Endoscopic approach to a collision tumor of growth hormone-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma in the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Aydin, Ovgu; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Abuzayed, Bashar; Guler, Huseyin; Oz, Buge; Gazioglu, Nurperi

    2014-07-01

    The authors share their experience on a collision tumor of growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma in the pituitary gland, which was reported by few articles in the literature. Also, an intraoperative view of this tumor, operated via endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach, is presented for the first time. A 39-year-old female patient was admitted with clinical manifestation of acromegaly present in a 2-year period. Laboratory investigations revealed high levels of GH and insulinlike growth factor 1. Sellar computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar mass diagnosed as a pituitary adenoma. Based on clinical, biochemical, and radiologic evaluations, GH-secreting pituitary adenoma was diagnosed and operated by endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach achieving total removal of the tumor. Histopathologic examination revealed a collision tumor of GH-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma. Postoperative radiologic and biochemical investigations showed no residual tumor and total remission. The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach promotes a close intraoperative view of sellar pathologies. We believe that a detailed histopathologic workup is necessary to diagnose collision tumors, because even a close intraoperative view does not facilitate to differentiate these tumors from a regular pituitary adenoma.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Stelnicki, Eric J

    2002-03-01

    We are entering a new era of craniosynostosis repair. When detected early, endoscopic skull remodeling, combined with a postoperative external skull-molding device, gives an excellent long-standing reconstruction of the cranial skeleton. This technique diminishes the morbidity of the operation and decreases the overall cost. It does not replace classic plate and screw cranial vault reconstruction in the older patient but is a useful weapon in the armamentarium of the craniofacial surgeon for the treatment of craniosynostosis in the neonatal period.

  8. From above or below: the controversy and historical evolution of tuberculum sellae meningioma resection from open to endoscopic skull base approaches.

    PubMed

    Soni, Resha S; Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Dahodwala, Mufaddal Q; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2014-04-01

    In the early 20th century, the first successful surgical removal of a tuberculum sellae meningioma (TSM) was performed and described by Harvey Cushing. It soon became recognized that TSM pose a formidable challenge for skull base surgeons because of their deep and sensitive location, proximity to critical neurovascular elements, and often dense and fibrous nature. Because of this, over the next several decades controversy transpired regarding their optimal method of resection. Early attempts involved utilization of open transcranial routes. This included classic bilateral and unilateral frontal approaches, followed by pterional or frontotemporal approaches, which have evolved to incorporate skull base modifications, such as the supraorbital, orbitozygomatic, and orbitopterional approaches. Minimally invasive supraorbital keyhole approaches through eyebrow incisions have also been adopted. Over the past 25 years, the microsurgical transsphenoidal approach, classically used for pituitary and parasellar tumors, was modified to resect suprasesllar TSM via the extended transsphenoidal approach. More recently, with the evolution of endoscopic techniques, resection of TSM has been achieved using purely endoscopic endonasal transplanum transtuberculum approaches. Although each of these techniques has been successfully described for the treatment of TSM, the question still remains: is it better to access and operate on these lesions via a traditional, transcranial avenue, or are they better treated via endoscopic endonasal techniques? We outline the surgical management of TSM through history, from early transcranial and transsphenoidal approaches to modern extended endoscopic endonasal procedures. We briefly explore the arguments favoring each of the methods and the advancements which have emerged to further optimize surgical resection.

  9. Anatomic analysis specific for the endoscopic approach to the inferior, medial and lateral orbit.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Jason; Bush, Carrie; Solares, C Arturo

    2014-04-01

    The endoscopic approaches to the medial and inferior orbital walls have continued to grow in popularity. The ability to provide a safe approach to the orbit through this technique has been described in a handful of studies. Even though metric analyses have been conducted on orbital anatomy, few have outlined the anatomical relations pertinent to endoscopic surgery. The goal is to provide improved understanding of the complex anatomy encountered through anatomical dissections and metric analysis of the orbit. This information could assist in approach selection during preoperative planning. Anatomical dissections via transantral and endonasal approaches were used to define the limits with current endoscopic sinus surgery instrumentation. The surface area was then calculated of the floor and medial wall to assess access created by the approaches. The path of the infraorbital canal was conducted to assess its placement within the orbital floor. The transantral and endonasal approaches to the orbit provided an adequate surgical window inferiorly and medially. This was confirmed by the surface area calculations. Access laterally was also possible, however, it became limited as dissection advanced superior to the lateral rectus muscle. The infraorbital canal was located consistently at midline on the orbital floor. Endoscopic access to the medial and inferior parts of the orbit is feasible and creates adequate access with current instrumentation. Knowing the surgical boundaries and the amount of exposure created can assist the surgeon in deciding a minimally invasive approach.

  10. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated.

  11. Evaluation of surgical freedom for microscopic and endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches to the sella.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Hardesty, Douglas A; Zaidi, Hasan A; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; White, William L; Preul, Mark C; Little, Andrew S

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic and endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches to the sellar are well established. Surgical freedom is an important skull base principle that can be measured objectively and used to compare approaches. To compare the surgical freedom of 4 transsphenoidal approaches to the sella turcica to aid in surgical approach selection. Four transsphenoidal approaches to the sella were performed on 8 silicon-injected cadaveric heads. Surgical freedom was determined with stereotactic image guidance using previously established techniques. The results are presented as the area of surgical freedom and angular surgical freedom (angle of attack) in the axial and sagittal planes. Mean total exposed area surgical freedom for the microscopic sublabial, endoscopic binostril, endoscopic uninostril, and microscopic endonasal approaches were 102 ± 13, 89 ± 6, 81 ± 4, and 69 ± 10 cm2, respectively. The endoscopic binostril approach had the greatest surgical freedom at the pituitary gland and ipsilateral and contralateral internal carotid arteries (25.7 ± 5.4, 28.0 ± 4.0, and 23.0 ± 3.0 cm2) compared with the microscopic sublabial (21.8 ± 3.5, 21.3 ± 2.4, and 19.5 ± 6.3 cm2), microscopic endonasal (14.2 ± 2.7, 14.1 ± 3.2, and 16.3 ± 4.0 cm2), and endoscopic uninostril (19.7 ± 4.8, 22.4 ± 2.3, and 19.5 ± 2.9 cm2) approaches. Axial angle of attack was greatest for the microscopic sublabial approach to the same targets (14.7 ± 1.3°, 11.0 ± 1.5°, and 11.8 ± 1.1°). For the sagittal angle of attack, the endoscopic binostril approach was superior for all 3 targets (16.6 ± 1.7°, 17.2 ± 0.70°, and 15.5 ± 1.2°). Microscopic sublabial and endoscopic binostril approaches provided superior surgical freedom compared with the endonasal microscopic and uninostril endoscopic approaches. This work provides objective baseline values for the quantification and evaluation of future refinements in surgical technique or instrumentation.

  12. [Endoscopic endonasal removal of the invaginated odontoid process of the C2 vertebra].

    PubMed

    Shkarubo, A N; Konovalov, N A; Zelenkov, P V; Mazaev, V A; Andreev, D N; Chernov, I V

    2015-01-01

    Патологические процессы в краниовертебральной области (скат черепа, переднее полукольцо С1 позвонка, зубовидный отросток и тело С2 позвонка, т.е. сегменты С0, С1 и С2) представляют большие трудности для диагностики и лечения. При значительном поражении сегментов С1—С2 возможно развитие нестабильности краниовертебрального сочленения. Из заболеваний, вызывающих деструкцию структур ската, С1 и С2 позвонков и компрессию верхних отделов спинного мозга, наиболее часто встречаются: хордома, гигантоклеточная опухоль, остеобластома, ревматоидное поражение, метастазы, платибазия и базилярная импрессия. Эти заболевания могут вызывать изначальную нестабильность краниовертебрального сочленения, сопровождаться грубыми неврологическими нарушениями, что усложняет диагностику и хирургическое лечение этих пациентов. Материал и методы. Нами оперированы 2 пациента с диагнозом инвагинация зубовидного отростка С2 позвонка. В обоих случаях произведена одномоментная операция: окципитоспондилодез и эндоскопическое эндоназальное удаление зубовидного отростка С2 позвонка. Результаты. В послеоперационном периоде отмечен частичный регресс неврологической симтоматики: увеличение силы и объема движений в руках и в дистальных отделах ног, регрессировала спастика в руках и значительно уменьшилась спастика в ногах; значительно улучшились все виды чувствительности в руках, ногах и на туловище. Послеоперационная ликворея была в одном случае (второй пациент), проведена повторная операция по закрытию ликворной фистулы. В дальнейшем признаков ликвореи не отмечалось. На контрольных МРТ и СКТ в обоих случаях выявлены поражения: послеоперационный костный дефект зубовидного отростка С2 и ската, полная декомпрессия продолговатого мозга и верхних шейных сегментов спинного мозга, отсутствие признаков стеноза позвоночного канала, стабилизирующая система состоятельна и установлена правильно. Заключение. По сравнению со стандартным трансоральным доступом эндоскопический эндоназальный доступ имеет значимые преимущества, заключающиеся в том, что мягкое небо остается неповрежденным, а область ротоглотки менее травмированной, сокращаются сроки госпитализации и реабилитации. Также отсутствуют такие проблемы и осложнения, как возможная несостоятельность швов в полости рта, значительная раневая поверхность в области ротоглотки. Больной может питаться самостоятельно сразу после операции без использования желудочного зонда (это не грозит какими-либо воспалительными осложнениями полости рта). Однако хирургическая техника при эндоскопическом эндоназальном доступе к С1—С2 сегментам более сложна, чем при трансоральной операции и требует наличия у хирурга навыков и опыта.

  13. [Two-cavity (sectional) nasal hydrotamponade after endonasal surgical interventions].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A I; Tsarapkin, G Iu; Kunel'skaia, N L; Gorovaia, E V; Lavrova, A S

    2010-01-01

    This paper is focused on the problem of achieving post-operative hemostasis in patients undergoing endonasal surgical intervention. Analysis of 156 tamponades of the nasal cavity with three types of silicone hydrotampons gives evidence that the use of two separate balloons within a single block of an original sectional hydrotampon allows for differential mechanical impact on anteromedial and posterior nasal cavities to avoid unnecessary compression of the mucous membrane. Results of manometric measurements suggest that a combination of mechanical arrest of post-operative hemorrhage and selective hyperthermia in the choanal compartment of the hydrotampon permits to reduce tampon pressure on the mucous membrane in anteromedial and posterior nasal cavities by 6.0-9.3% and 10.3-24.7% respectively.

  14. Transnasal, Transethmoidal Endoscopic Removal of a Foreign Body in the Medial Extraconal Orbital Space

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Guijarro, Beatriz; Cenjor Español, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Intraorbital foreign bodies are located within the orbit but outside the ocular globe. Though not uncommon, removal of these objects poses a challenge for surgeons. External approaches have been the most frequently used but are associated with increased complications and morbidity. An endoscopic endonasal approach can be an appropriate and less complicated technique in these cases. We report a case of a chronic intraorbital foreign body located within the medial extraconal space lateral to the lamina papyracea and behind the lacrimonasal duct, which was successfully removed using a transnasal, transethmoidal endoscopic technique. Neither postoperative complications nor ocular impairment was reported. The patient improved and remains asymptomatic. The transnasal transethmoidal endoscopic approach can be used as a safer and less invasive alternative when removing foreign bodies from the medial orbital compartment. PMID:27957368

  15. Danger points, complications and medico-legal aspects in endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Draf, C

    2013-12-13

    Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery represents the overall accepted type of surgical treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis. Notwithstanding raised and still evolving quality standards, surgeons performing routine endoscopic interventions are faced with minor complications in 5% and major complications in 0.5-1%. A comprehensive review on all minor and major complications of endoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses and also on the anterior skull base is presented listing the actual scientific literature. The pathogenesis, signs and symptoms of each complication are reviewed and therapeutic regimens are discussed in detail relating to actual publication references. Potential medico-legal aspects are explicated and recent algorithms of avoidance are mentioned taking into account options in surgical training and education.

  16. Danger points, complications and medico-legal aspects in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosemann, W.; Draf, C.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery represents the overall accepted type of surgical treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis. Notwithstanding raised and still evolving quality standards, surgeons performing routine endoscopic interventions are faced with minor complications in 5% and major complications in 0.5–1%. A comprehensive review on all minor and major complications of endoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses and also on the anterior skull base is presented listing the actual scientific literature. The pathogenesis, signs and symptoms of each complication are reviewed and therapeutic regimens are discussed in detail relating to actual publication references. Potential medico-legal aspects are explicated and recent algorithms of avoidance are mentioned taking into account options in surgical training and education. PMID:24403974

  17. Endoscopic anterior tarsal tunnel release: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the inferior extensor retinaculum of the ankle. We report a patient with anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome who was successfully treated with endoscopic anterior tarsal tunnel release. Our endoscopic technique, because it preserves the inferior extensor retinaculum, is potentially less traumatic than traditional surgical techniques for repairing this entrapment neuropathy.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of the Ostium After External and Nonendoscopic Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy Using Image Processing (Matlabs and Image J) Softwares.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anasua; Kaza, Hrishikesh; Kapoor, Aditya; Sheth, Jenil; Ali, Mohammad Hasnat; Tripathy, Devjyoti; Rath, Suryasnata

    The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of the ostium after external dacryocystorhinostomy and nonendoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (NEN-DCR). This cross-sectional study included patients who underwent a successful external dacryocystorhinostomy or NEN-DCR and had ≥1 month follow up. Pictures of the ostium were captured with a nasal endoscope (4 mm, 30°) after inserting a lacrimal probe premarked at 2 mm. Image analyses were performed using Image J and Contour softwares. Of the 113 patients included, external dacryocystorhinostomy group had 53 patients and NEN-DCR group had 60 patients. The mean age of patients in the NEN-DCR group (38 years) was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than the external dacryocystorhinostomy group (50 years). There was no statistically significant difference (2 sample t test, p > 0.05) in mean follow up (6 vs. 4 months), maximum diameter of ostium (8 vs. 7 mm), perpendicular drawn to it (4 vs. 4 mm), area of ostium (43 vs. 36 mm), and the minimum distance between common internal punctum and edge of the ostium (1 vs. 1 mm) between the external and NEN-DCR groups. Image processing softwares offer simple and objective method to measure the ostium. While ostia are comparable in size, their relative position differs with posteriorly placed ostia in external compared with inferior in NEN-DCR.

  19. Endoscopic extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy in 316 patients.

    PubMed

    Massaad, A A; Fiorillo, M A; Hallak, A; Ferzli, G S

    1996-02-01

    The posterior approach for groin hernia repair as popularized by Stoppa and Nyhus is one of the most solid repairs available. It requires a larger incision than the anterior approach, which has limited its use to recurrent and bilateral hernias. The endoscopic extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy (EEPH) accomplishes a similar repair via three minute incisions. This study suggests that EEPH is at least as safe and efficient as the open preperitoneal repair. Three hundred sixteen male patients underwent 405 hernia repairs by an endoscopic extraperitoneal approach. Ages ranged from 18 to 82 years old. There were 204 indirect, 182 direct, 13 pantaloon, and six femoral hernias. Eighty-nine were bilateral and 42 were recurrent. All repairs were done using polypropylene mesh. Follow-up has been achieved in 89% of patients and ranged from 7 to 50 months, with a median of 25 months. Seven patients (2.2%) required conversion to an open approach. Five recurrences have developed to date. Complications (5.7%) have included urinary retention, bladder injury, groin and/or scrotal hematoma, trocar site infection, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuralgia, and cardiac arrhythmia. Endoscopic extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy may provide an appropriate alternative to other methods of hernia repair when performed by experienced laparoscopists.

  20. Endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal approach for locally aggressive tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Masahiro; Kondo, Kenji; Hanakita, Shunya; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Yoshino, Masanori; Teranishi, Yu; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Reports about endoscopic endonasal surgery for skull base tumors involving the lateral part of petrous apex remain scarce. The authors present their experience with the endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal (ETAP) approach through the retrocarotid space for tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus. METHODS The authors performed the ETAP approach in 10 patients with 11 tumors (bilateral in 1 patient) that extensively occupied the lateral part of petrous apex, e.g., the internal auditory canal and jugular fossa. Eight patients presented with diplopia (unilateral abducens nerve palsy), 3 with tinnitus, and 1 with unilateral hearing loss with facial palsy. After wide anterior sphenoidotomy, the sellar floor, clival recess, and carotid prominence were verified. Tumors were approached via an anteromedial petrosectomy through the retrocarotid triangular space, defined by the cavernous and vertical segments of the internal carotid artery (ICA), the clivus, and the petrooccipital fissure. The surgical window was easily enlarged by drilling the petrous bone along the petrooccipital fissure. After exposure of the tumor and ICA, dissection and resection of the tumor were mainly performed under direct visualization with 30° and 70° endoscopes. RESULTS Gross-total resection was achieved in 8 patients (9 tumors). In a patient with invasive meningioma, the tumor was strongly adherent to the ICA, necessitating partial resection. Postoperatively, all 8 patients who had presented with abducens nerve palsy preoperatively showed improvement within 6 months. In the patient presenting with hearing loss and facial palsy, the facial palsy completely resolved within 3 months, but hearing loss remained. Regarding complications, 3 patients showed mild and transient abducens nerve palsy resolving within 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Postoperative CSF rhinorrhea requiring surgical repair was observed in 1 patient. No patient

  1. Revision endoscopic sinus surgery: the Thomas Jefferson University experience.

    PubMed

    Moses, R L; Cornetta, A; Atkins, J P; Roth, M; Rosen, M R; Keane, W M

    1998-03-01

    Since its introduction, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has demonstrated success rates of 76% to 98%. A small group of the patients in whom initial FESS and optimal medical therapy fail require revision endoscopic sinus surgery (RESS). This group has recently been studied by several authors, and we have evaluated a group of 90 RESS patients selected from 753 consecutive primary FESS patients. Patients were followed for a mean of 22.8 months. Extent of disease, history of polyps, allergy, previous traditional endonasal sinus surgery, male gender, chronic steroid use, and the presence of a deviated septum all appeared to adversely affect RESS outcome. The surgeon's knowledge of the sinus anatomy is critical, especially in revision sinus cases in which landmarks are distorted or absent. In our review, RESS was associated with a 1% major complication rate and was successful in 67% of patients. Computer-assisted endoscopic sinus surgery integrates preoperative imaging with realtime endoscopic visualization, augments the surgeon's knowledge of anatomy, and helps to minimize patient risk.

  2. Brief history of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery--from Philipp Bozzini to the First World Congress of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doglietto, Francesco; Prevedello, Daniel M; Jane, John A; Han, Joseph; Laws, Edward R

    2005-12-15

    Since its inception, one of the major issues in transsphenoidal surgery has been the adequate visualization of anatomical structures. As transsphenoidal surgery evolved, technical advancements improved the surgical view of the operative field and the orientation. The operating microscope replaced Cushing's headlight and Dott's lighted speculum retractor, and fluoroscopy provided intraoperative imaging. These advances led to the modern concept of microsurgical transsphenoidal procedures in the early 1970s. For the past 30 years the endoscope has been used for the treatment of diseases of the sinus and, more recently, in the surgical treatment of pituitary tumors. The collaboration between neurological and otorhinolaryngological surgeons has led to the development of novel surgical procedures for the treatment of various pathological conditions in the skull base. In this paper the authors review the history of the endoscope--its technical development and its application--from the first endoscope described by Philipp Bozzini to the First World Congress of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery held in 2005 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Specifically, in this review the history of endoscopy and its application in endonasal neurosurgery are presented.

  3. Access to the parapharyngeal space: an anatomical study comparing the endoscopic and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Jason; Suruliraj, Anand; Carrau, Ricardo; Panizza, Benedict; Solares, C Arturo

    2013-10-01

    A subtemporal preauricular approach to the infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal space has been the traditional path to tumors of this region. The morbidity associated with this procedure has lead to the pursuit of less invasive techniques. Endoscopic access using a minimally invasive transmaxillary/transpterygoid approach potentially may obviate the drawbacks associated with open surgery. The anatomy of the parapharyngeal space is complex and critical; therefore, a comparison of the anatomy exposed by these different approaches could aid in the decision making toward a minimally invasive surgical corridor. Technical Note. The parapharyngeal space was accessed endonasally by removal of the medial and posterior walls of the maxillary sinus. To allow better visualization and increased triangulation of a bimanual dissection technique, a sublabial canine fossa antrostomy was created. The medial and lateral pterygoid plates were removed. Further lateral dissection exposed the relevant anatomy of the parapharyngeal space. A subtemporal preauricular infratemporal approach was also completed. The endoscopic approach provided sufficient access to the superior portion of the parapharyngeal space. The open approach also provided adequate access; however, it required a larger surgical window, causing greater injury. A significant advantage of the subtemporal approach is the improved access to the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery. Conversely, the endonasal approach provided improved access to the anterior and medial portions of the superior parapharyngeal space. Endoscopic endonasal access utilizing a transmaxillary/transpterygoid approach provides a sufficient surgical window for tumor extirpation. Utilization of this approach obviates some of the morbidity associated with an open procedure. 5. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. [Endoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Rushfeldt, Christian; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Aabakken, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the stomach/gastrointestinal tract was developed in the 1990s in Japan as a minimally invasive method of removing early-stage tumours, using a gastro-/coloscope instead of open or laparoscopic surgery. Its advantages are obvious, in that the patient is spared more major surgery, the hospital saves on resources as well as admission to a ward, and society is spared the costs of days of sickness absence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is considered the most difficult technique, but it allows for the accurate dissection of large tumours. In 1999, Japanese surgeon Takuji Gotoda and his team were the first to perform these types of dissections of early cancers in the rectum using a diathermic needle and a flexible scope.

  5. Endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Phillip E; Anand, Vijay K

    2006-02-01

    The two most recent significant advances in pituitary surgery have been the endonasal endoscopic approach and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI). Each provides improved visualization of intra- and parasellar anatomy with the goal of attaining a complete resection. The combination of the two techniques has not been previously reported in the literature. We performed endoscopic, endonasal resection of pituitary macroadenomas in 15 patients using the Polestar N-10 (0.12T) IMRI (Odin Medical Technologies, Inc., Newton, MA). Eleven patients had nonfunctioning tumors, three had acromegaly, and one had a medication-resistant prolactinoma. The effect of the magnetic field on the cathode ray tube screen and the image quality of the IMRI images were assessed. The presence of residual tumor on IMRI was noted and then re-examined with the endoscope. Although the Polestar N-10 is a low Tesla magnet, the IMRI caused significant distortion of the cathode ray tube screen regardless of the viewing angle. This was overcome with the use of a wall-mounted plasma screen. IMRI images were obtained in all cases and were of sufficiently high quality to demonstrate adequate decompression of the optic chiasm and the removal of all suprasellar tumor. In three cases, residual tumor was found with IMRI that was resected endoscopically before the completion of surgery. In four other cases, potential residual tumor was examined endoscopically and found to be normal postoperative change. In eight cases no residual intrasellar tumor was seen on the IMRI. Preresection visual deficits improved in all cases and the insulin-like growth factor levels normalized in two of three cases. There were no delayed cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Combining intraoperative endoscopy and IMRI is feasible and distortion of the cathode ray tube screen can be overcome with the use of either a plasma or liquid crystal display screen. Each technology provides complementary information, which can assist the

  6. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  7. Automated objective routine examination of optical quality of rigid endoscopes in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Rens; Noordmans, Herke J; van der Eijk, Jerine A J; van den Brink, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Rigid endoscopes degrade during clinical use due to sterilization, ionizing radiation and mechanical forces. Despite visual checks on functionality at the department of sterilization, surgeons are still confronted with suboptimal instruments as it is difficult to assess this degradation in an objective manner. To guarantee that endoscopes have sufficient optical quality for minimal invasive surgery, an experimental opto-electronic test bench has been developed in order to be used at the department of sterilization. Transmission of illumination fibres and lens contrast values are stored in a database to enable empirical criteria to reject endoscope for further clinical usage or to accept endoscopes after repair. Results of the test bench are given for an eight month period, where a trained operator performed 1599 measurements on 46 different types. Stability of the system, trends in quality of clinical endoscopes, and effect of repair or replacement were assessed. Although the period was too short to draw firm conclusions, a slow downwards trend in quality of clinically used endoscopes could be observed. Also, endoscopes generally improve in quality after repair or replacement, while endoscope replacement seems to slightly outperform endoscope repair. To optimize the measurement process, a new system is being developed requiring less user interaction and measuring more optical parameters of an endoscope. By commercializing this system, we hope that measurements at different hospitals will give improved insight which acceptance and rejection criteria to use and which factors (usage, cleaning protocol, and brands) determine the economic lifetime of endoscopes.

  8. Automated Objective Routine Examination of Optical Quality of Rigid Endoscopes in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Rens; Noordmans, Herke J.; van der Eijk, Jerine A. J.; van den Brink, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Rigid endoscopes degrade during clinical use due to sterilization, ionizing radiation and mechanical forces. Despite visual checks on functionality at the department of sterilization, surgeons are still confronted with suboptimal instruments as it is difficult to assess this degradation in an objective manner. To guarantee that endoscopes have sufficient optical quality for minimal invasive surgery, an experimental opto-electronic test bench has been developed in order to be used at the department of sterilization. Transmission of illumination fibres and lens contrast values are stored in a database to enable empirical criteria to reject endoscope for further clinical usage or to accept endoscopes after repair. Results of the test bench are given for an eight month period, where a trained operator performed 1599 measurements on 46 different types. Stability of the system, trends in quality of clinical endoscopes, and effect of repair or replacement were assessed. Although the period was too short to draw firm conclusions, a slow downwards trend in quality of clinically used endoscopes could be observed. Also, endoscopes generally improve in quality after repair or replacement, while endoscope replacement seems to slightly outperform endoscope repair. To optimize the measurement process, a new system is being developed requiring less user interaction and measuring more optical parameters of an endoscope. By commercializing this system, we hope that measurements at different hospitals will give improved insight which acceptance and rejection criteria to use and which factors (usage, cleaning protocol, and brands) determine the economic lifetime of endoscopes. PMID:23555715

  9. Muller's muscle, no longer vestigial in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    De Battista, Juan Carlos; Zimmer, Lee A; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Froelich, Sebastien C; Theodosopoulos, Philip V; DePowell, John J; Keller, Jeffrey T

    2011-01-01

    As a thin filmy covering overlaying the inferior orbital fissure (IOF), Muller's muscle was considered a vestigial structure in humans, and for this reason, its anatomical significance was neglected. Because of increasing interest in endonasal approaches to the skull base that encompasses this region, we re-examined this structure's role as an anatomical landmark from an endoscopic perspective. In 10 cadaveric specimens, microanatomical dissections were performed (n = 5); endoscopic dissections were performed (n = 5) via approaches of the middle turbinate or inferior turbinate, and via the Caldwell-Luc approach through the maxillary sinus. Histological examinations were performed in 20 human fetuses (Embryology Institute, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain). In cadaveric dissections, Muller's muscle was demonstrated in all specimens, serving as a bridge-like structure that spanned the entire IOF and separated the orbit from the temporal, infratemporal, and pterygopalatine fossas. Depending on which endoscopic corridor was used, a different aspect of the IOF and Muller's muscle was identified. In our endoscopic and microscopic observations, Muller's muscle was extensive, not only spanning the IOF but also extending posteriorly to reach the superior orbital fissure (SOF) and anterior confluence of the cavernous sinus. Histological analysis identified many anastomotic connections between the ophthalmic venous system and pterygoid plexus that may explain how infection or tumor spreads between these regions. Muller's muscle serves as an anatomical landmark in the IOF and facilitates anatomical orientation in this region for endoscopic skull base approaches. Its recognition during endoscopic approaches allows for a better three-dimensional understanding of this anterior cranial base region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of endoscopic sinus surgery on voice quality.

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Göde, U; Dunker, J E; Eysholdt, U

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with documented chronic paranasal sinusitis and in need of endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery were subjected to voice analysis. Tape recordings of different sustained vowels were performed pre- and postoperatively. All voice samples were examined with a sound spectrographic analysis system. Patients having known nasal obstruction detected by active anterior rhinomanometry were excluded from further study. Analysis of pre- and postoperative spectrograms focused on changes in center frequency or bandwidth of the first four formants, as well as variations in specific differences of the formant frequencies and amplitudes. The different subgroups of patients revealed a series of significant changes in the parameters studied. The vowels [a:] and [i:] showed inverse changes in measured values, while evaluation of the vowel [u:] was restricted due to artifactual scattering of individual values. In general, band-width diminished and energy peaks of formants increased postoperatively. In 6 of 21 patients (approximately one-third of the cases), patients or other individuals detected perceptual changes of speech postoperatively. Based on our data, we recommend informing all patients, and voice professionals in particular, about the possible effects of endonasal sinus surgery on altering speech.

  11. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  12. An Experimental Feasibility Study on Robotic Endonasal Telesurgery

    PubMed Central

    Wirz, Raul; Torres, Luis; Swaney, Philip; Gilbert, Hunter; Alterovitz, Ron; Webster, Robert J.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Russell, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel robots have recently been developed specifically for endonasal surgery. They can deliver several thin, tentacle-like surgical instruments through a single nostril. Among the many potential advantages of such a robotic system is the prospect of telesurgery over long distances. Objective To describe a phantom pituitary tumor removal done by a surgeon in Nashville, Tennessee, controlling a robot located approximately 800 km away in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This is the first remote telesurgery experiment involving tentacle-like concentric tube manipulators. Methods A phantom pituitary tumor removal experiment was conducted twice – once locally and once remotely – using the robotic system. Robot commands and video were transmitted across the Internet. The latency of the system was evaluated quantitatively in both local and remote cases to determine the effect of the 800 km between the surgeon and robot. Results We measured a control and video latency of less than 100 ms in the remote case. Qualitatively, the surgeon was able to carry out the experiment easily, and observed no discernable difference between the remote and local cases. Conclusion Telesurgery over long distances is feasible with this robotic system. In the longer term, this may enable expert skull base surgeons to help many more patients by performing surgeries remotely over long distances. PMID:25599203

  13. An experimental feasibility study on robotic endonasal telesurgery.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Raul; Torres, Luis G; Swaney, Philip J; Gilbert, Hunter; Alterovitz, Ron; Webster, Robert J; Weaver, Kyle D; Russell, Paul T

    2015-04-01

    Novel robots have recently been developed specifically for endonasal surgery. They can deliver several thin, tentacle-like surgical instruments through a single nostril. Among the many potential advantages of such a robotic system is the prospect of telesurgery over long distances. To describe a phantom pituitary tumor removal done by a surgeon in Nashville, Tennessee, controlling a robot located approximately 800 km away in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the first remote telesurgery experiment involving tentacle-like concentric tube manipulators. A phantom pituitary tumor removal experiment was conducted twice, once locally and once remotely, with the robotic system. Robot commands and video were transmitted across the Internet. The latency of the system was evaluated quantitatively in both local and remote cases to determine the effect of the 800-km distance between the surgeon and robot. We measured a control and video latency of < 100 milliseconds in the remote case. Qualitatively, the surgeon was able to carry out the experiment easily and observed no discernable difference between the remote and local cases. Telesurgery over long distances is feasible with this robotic system. In the longer term, this may enable expert skull base surgeons to help many more patients by performing surgeries remotely over long distances.

  14. [Therapeutic methods of scar prevention at the site of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy].

    PubMed

    At'kova, E L; Root, A O; At'kova, E L; Root, A O

    2015-01-01

    Success rate of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) varies from 82% to 91%. The bulk of unsatisfactory results is due to excessive scarring at the site of the created opening (dacryostoma, DS). Mitomycin C is the most extensively studied drug of those affecting regeneration processes, however, the data on its efficacy at DS site is contradictory. Despite ongoing search for new agents able to interfere in the physiological process of scarring, the number of relevant studies is yet insufficient. Thus, development of methods of scarring prevention after endonasal DCR takes the highest priority in dacryology.

  15. Endoscopic Skull Base Reconstruction: An Evolution of Materials and Methods.

    PubMed

    Sigler, Aaron C; D'Anza, Brian; Lobo, Brian C; Woodard, Troy; Recinos, Pablo F; Sindwani, Raj

    2017-03-31

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has developed rapidly over the last decade, in large part because of the expanding armamentarium of endoscopic repair techniques. This article reviews the available technologies and techniques, including vascularized and nonvascularized flaps, synthetic grafts, sealants and glues, and multilayer reconstruction. Understanding which of these repair methods is appropriate and under what circumstances is paramount to achieving success in this challenging but rewarding field. A graduated approach to skull base reconstruction is presented to provide a systematic framework to guide selection of repair technique to ensure a successful outcome while minimizing morbidity for the patient.

  16. Quality of Life Following Endoscopic Resection of Skull Base Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cavel, Oren; Abergel, Avraham; Margalit, Nevo; Fliss, Dan M.; Gil, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate patients' quality of life (QOL) after endoscopic resection of skull base tumors. We estimated the QOL of 41 patients who underwent surgery for removal of skull base tumors via the expanded endonasal approach (EEA). The Anterior Skull Base Surgery Questionnaire (ASBS-Q), a multidimensional, disease-specific instrument containing 36 items was used. The rate of meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid leak was 1.4 and 0%, respectively. There was one case of uniocular visual impairment. The internal consistency of the instrument had a correlation coefficient (α-Cronbach score) of 0.8 to 0.92. Of 41 patients, 30 (75%) reported improvement or no change in overall QOL. Improved scores were reported in the physical function domain and worse scores in the specific symptoms domain. The most significant predictor of poor QOL was female gender, which led to a significant decrease in scores of all domains. Site of surgery, histology, age and comorbidity were not significant predictors of outcome. This paper further validates the use of the ASBS-Q for patients undergoing endoscopic skull base resection. The overall QOL of patients following endoscopic extirpation of skull base tumors is good. Female patients experience a significant decline in QOL compared with males. PMID:23542557

  17. Outcomes and Resource Utilization of Endoscopic Mass-Closure Technique for Laryngeal Clefts.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; Cheng, Esther; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Sidell, Douglas R; Hart, Catherine K; Rutter, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    To compare resource utilization and clinical outcomes between endoscopic mass-closure and open techniques for laryngeal cleft repair. Case series with chart review. Tertiary academic children's hospital. Pediatric patients undergoing repair for Benjamin-Inglis type 1-3 laryngeal clefts over a 15-year period. All 20 patients undergoing endoscopic repair were included. Eight control patients undergoing open repair were selected using matching by age and cleft type. Demographic, clinical, and resource utilization data were collected. Twenty-eight patients were included (20 endoscopic, 8 open). Mean age, rates of tracheostomy and vocal fold immobility, and distribution of cleft types were not different between the 2 groups (all P > .2). Mean operative time (P = .004) and duration of hospital stay (P < .001) were significantly shorter in the endoscopic group. All repairs were intact in both groups at final postoperative endoscopy. Rates of persistent laryngeal penetration or aspiration on swallow study were not different between groups (P = 1.000), although results were available for only 11 patients. Endoscopic laryngeal cleft repair using a mass-closure technique provides a durable result while requiring significantly shorter operative times and hospital stays than open repair and avoiding the potential morbidity of laryngofissure. However, open repair may allow the simultaneous performance of other airway reconstructive procedures and may be a useful salvage technique when endoscopic repair fails. Postoperative swallowing results require further study. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  18. The endonasal approach for treatment of cerebral aneurysms: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Heiferman, Daniel M.; Somasundaram, Aravind; Alvarado, Alexis J.; Zanation, Adam M.; Pittman, Amy L.; Germanwala, Anand V.

    2015-01-01

    The last two decades of neurosurgery have seen flourishing use of the endonasal approach for the treatment of skull base tumors. Safe and effective resections of neoplasms requiring intracranial arterial dissection have been performed using this technique. Recently, there have been a growing number of case reports describing the use of the endonasal approach to surgically clip cerebral aneurysms. We review the use of these approaches in intracranial aneurysm clipping and analyze its advantages, limitations, and consider future directions. Three major electronic databases were queried using relevant search terms. Pertinent case studies of unruptured and ruptured aneurysms were considered. Data from included studies were analyzed. 8 case studies describing 9 aneurysms (4 ruptured and 5 unruptured) treated by the endonasal approach met inclusion criteria. All studies note the ability to gain proximal and distal control and successful aneurysm obliteration was obtained for 8 of 9 aneurysms. 1 intraoperative rupture occurred and was controlled, and delayed complications of cerebrospinal fluid leak, vasospasm, and hydrocephalus occurred in 1, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. Described limitations of this technique include aneurysm orientation and location, the need for lower profile technology, and challenges with handling intraoperative rupture. The endonasal approach for clipping of intracranial aneurysms can be an effective approach in only very select cases as demonstrated clinically and through cadaveric exploration. Further investigation with lower profile clip technology and additional studies need to be performed. Options of alternative therapy, limitations of this approach, and team experience must first be considered. PMID:25974398

  19. The Medpor sheet as a sellar buttress after endonasal transsphenoidal surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaechan; Guthikonda, Murali

    2004-05-01

    A technique to use the Medpor (porous high-density polyethylene) sheet as an optimal implant to reconstruct the sellar floor or the sphenoid rostrum in endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is described. After endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, a 0.4-mm thick Medpor sheet is cut with scissors to a round or elliptical piece, which is placed in the sellar epidural space to reconstruct the sellar floor and buttress the pituitary gland and the sellar packing. In cases of a complete absence of the sellar floor, the sphenoid sinus is packed with autologous fat and fibrin glue, which are buttressed at the defect of the sphenoid rostrum with the Medpor sheet. Ten patients underwent the reconstruction using the Medpor sheet in endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, and were then evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance images (MR) postoperatively. The Medpor sheet was easy to cut with scissors and flexible to introduce through a small nostril. It was also sufficiently stiff to buttress the packing material in the sellar cavity or the sphenoid sinus. On MRI, the low-signal intensity of the implant was so remarkable without artifact helping to understand the postoperative image around the reconstructed area. There was no infection or granulomatous tissue reaction related to the implant. The Medpor sheet can be an optimal implant to reconstruct the sellar floor or the sphenoid rostrum after endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

  20. Assessment of Abdominal Fat Graft to Repair Anterior Skull Base after Malignant Sinonasal Tumor Extirpation.

    PubMed

    Fonmarty, David; Bastier, Pierre-Louis; Lechot, Amandine; Gimbert, Edouard; de Gabory, Ludovic

    2016-03-01

    Adult abdominal fat, which is known to contain pluripotent stem cells, is frequently used to treat cerebrospinal fluid leak. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and reliability of abdominal fat graft to close large skull base defects after extirpation of malignant sinonasal tumors. Case series with chart review performed between 2009 and 2014. Twenty-nine cases were included of consecutive patients who were suffering from malignant sinonasal tumors, operated by an endoscopic endonasal approach with anterior skull base extirpation and surgically induced cerebrospinal fluid leak. Skull base was repaired by 1 layer of "en bloc" autologous fat graft used as a plug in the onlay position. Epidemiologic data, medical history, defect size, length of hospitalization, and morbidity were analyzed. Radiotherapy was given pre- and postoperatively in 4 (13.8%) and 23 (79.3%) patients, respectively. Mean defect size was 4.47 ± 2.9 cm(2) (range, 0.24-9.1 cm(2)). Mean operative time was 210 ± 86 minutes. Mean length of hospitalization was 8.6 ± 3.7 days and 4.9 ± 2 days in the intensive care unit. No lumbar drain was used in this study. There was 1 case of cerebrospinal fluid leak (3.5%) and 2 cases of meningitis (6.9%), which resolved after medical treatment. Mean follow-up was 17 ± 13 months (range, 3-53 months). Abdominal fat graft is a safe and reliable material to close the anterior skull base after extirpation of malignant sinonasal tumors. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  1. Traumatic sinolacrimocutaneous fistula managed with endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy and anterior ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Shams, Pari N; Selva, Dinesh

    2012-10-01

    A 31-year-old man with epiphora and mucous discharge from a traumatic lacrimal fistula underwent a computed tomographic dacryocystogram, revealing a fistula extending from the anterior ethmoid air cells through the lacrimal sac to the overlying skin with coexisting nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy enabled complete marsupialization of the lacrimal sac and agger nasi air cell, removing the tract between these structures. Simultaneous probing of the common canaliculus and fistula tract under direct visualization allowed the identification of the internal fistula origin in relation to the internal ostium on the lateral sac wall. The fistula was excised with a trephine over a guide wire via an external approach. Use of the endoscopic technique for excision of acquired lacrimal fistulas may be especially helpful in cases with coexisting nasolacrimal duct obstruction where the fistula extends to the sinus cavity or suspected foreign bodies.

  2. Independent analysis of Olympus flexible ureteroscope repairs.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Gleason, Joseph M; Hicks, Nathan; Monga, Manoj

    2007-07-01

    To conduct a systematic review of repairs of Olympus flexible ureteroscopes using an independent database to compare and contrast with the published data obtained from ureteroscope manufacturers. The repair data from 2000 to 2004 were extracted from a computer database obtained through Precision Endoscopy of America, an independent endoscope repair company. All endoscopes submitted for repair underwent a detailed 16 to 32-point inspection using a set protocol for each endoscope make and model, as determined by the manufacturer. A total of 341 repairs were performed on the Olympus URF-P (4%), URF-P2 (47%), and URF-P3 (47%) flexible ureteroscopes. The distal segment was the most common repair site requiring repair (30%), with 87% of these repairs requiring replacement of the bending rubber. The repairs also included the deflection apparatus (14%) and hand control segment (9%) and image-related repairs (9%). The between-group assessment showed a statistically significant decrease in deflection apparatus repairs for the URF-P2 (20%) compared with the URF-P3 (7%; P <0.001, chi-square = 11.96). The results of our study have shown that the loss of deflection is less common with the newer Olympus ureteroscopes. The distal deflection tip, specifically the outer bending rubber, is the most common site of damage to Olympus flexible ureteroscopes. Improvements in form and function of the distal tip should decrease the maintenance expenses and increase ureteroscope longevity.

  3. Endoscopic approaches to brainstem cavernous malformations: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Thawani, Jayesh P.; Sanborn, Matthew R.; Storm, Phillip B.; Lee, John Y.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic cavernous malformations involving the brainstem are frequently difficult to access via traditional methods. Conventional skull-base approaches require significant brain retraction or bone removal to provide an adequate operative corridor. While there has been a trend toward limited employment of the most invasive surgical approaches, recent advances in endoscopic technology may complement existing methods to access these difficult to reach areas. Case Descriptions: Four consecutive patients were treated for symptomatic, hemorrhagic brainstem cavernous malformations via fully endoscopic approaches (endonasal, transclival; retrosigmoid; lateral supracerebellar, infratentorial; endonasal, transclival). Together, these lesions encompassed all three segments of the brainstem. Three of the patients had complete resection of the cavernous malformation, while one patient had stable residual at long-term follow up. Associated developmental venous anomalies were preserved in the two patients where one was identified preoperatively. Three of the four patients maintained stable or improved neurological examinations following surgery, while one patient experienced ipsilateral palsies of cranial nerves VII and VIII. The first transclival approach resulted in a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak requiring re-operation, but the second did not. Although there are challenges associated with endoscopic approaches, relative to our prior microsurgical experience with similar cases, visualization and illumination of the surgical corridors were superior without significant limitations on operative mobility. Conclusion: The endoscope is a promising adjunct to the neurosurgeon's ability to approach difficult to access brainstem cavernous malformations. It allows the surgeon to achieve well-illuminated, panoramic views, and by combining approaches, can provide minimally invasive access to most regions of the brainstem. PMID:25984383

  4. Survival outcomes for stage-matched endoscopic and open resection of olfactory neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard J; Nalavenkata, Sunny; Sacks, Raymond; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Purkey, Michael T; Schlosser, Rodney J; Snyderman, Carl; Wang, Eric W; Woodworth, Bradford A; Smee, Robert; Havas, Tom; Gallagher, Richard

    2017-09-25

    Advanced-stage olfactory neuroblastoma requires multimodal therapy for optimal outcomes. Debate exists over endoscopic endonasal surgery in this situation. Stage-matched open and endoscopic surgical therapy were compared. Patients from 6 cancer institutions were assessed. Stratification included dural involvement, Kadish stage, nodal disease, Hyams' grade, approach, and margin status. At follow-up, local control, nodal status, and evidence of distant metastases were recorded with any subsequent therapy. Statistical analyses to identify risk factors for developing recurrence and survival differences were performed. One hundred nine patients were assessed (age 49.2 ± 13.0 years; 46% women) representing Kadish A stage (10%), Kadish B stage (25%), and Kadish C stage (65%). The majority of the patients (61.5%) underwent endoscopic resection, 53.5% within Kadish C stage. Within-stage survival analysis favored endoscopic subgroup for Kadish C stage (log-rank P = .017) nonsignificant for Kadish B stage (log-rank P = .39). Stage-matched survival was better for the endoscopically treated group compared to the open surgery group, with high negative margin resections obtained. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression through a pterional port.

    PubMed

    Beer-Furlan, André; Evins, Alexander I; Rigante, Luigi; Burrell, Justin C; Anichini, Giulio; Stieg, Philip E; Bernardo, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Since the first description of the intradural removal of the anterior clinoid process, numerous refinements and modifications have been proposed to simplify and enhance the safety of the technique. The growing use of endoscopes in endonasal and transcranial approaches has changed the traditional management of many skull base lesions. We describe an endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression through a minimally invasive pterional port. Minimally invasive optic nerve decompression, with endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy, through a pterional keyhole craniotomy was performed on five preserved cadaveric heads. The endoscopic pterional port provided a shorter and more direct route to the anterior clinoid region, and helped avoid unnecessary and extensive bone removal. An extradural approach helped minimize complications associated with infraction of the subdural space and allowed for the maintenance of visibility while drilling with continuous irrigation. Adequate 270° bone decompression of the optic canal was achieved in all specimens. Endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression is feasible through a single minimally invasive pterional port.

  6. Validation of a chicken wing training model for endoscopic microsurgical dissection.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel J; Vaz-Guimaraes, Francisco; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Snyderman, Carl H

    2015-03-01

    To determine if training with a chicken wing model improves performance of endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) with microvascular dissection. Randomized experimental study. A single-blinded randomized clinical trial of trainees with various levels of endoscopic experience was conducted to determine if prior training on a nonhuman model augments endoscopic skill and efficiency in a surrogate model for live surgery. Medical students, residents, and fellows were randomized to two groups: a control group that performed an endoscopic transantral internal maxillary artery dissection on a silicone-injected anatomical specimen, and an interventional group that underwent microvascular dissection training on a chicken wing model prior to performing the anatomic dissection on the cadaver specimen. Time to completion and quality of dissection were measured. A Mann-Whitney test demonstrated a significant improvement in time and quality outcomes respectively across all interventional groups, with the greatest improvements seen in participants with less endoscopic experience: medical students (P = .032, P = .008), residents and fellows (P = .016, P = .032). Prior training on the chicken wing model improves surgical performance in a surrogate model for live EES. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Endoscopic versus Open Approach to the Infratemporal Fossa: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ahmed; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Tantawy, Ahmed; Ibraheim, Ahmed; Solares, Arturo C.; Otto, Bradley A.; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Filho, Leo Ditzel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Various lateral and anterior approaches to access the infratemporal fossa (ITF) have been described. We provide our observations regarding the endoscopic transpterygoid and preauricular subtemporal approaches, listing their respective advantages and limitations through cadaveric dissection. Methods A cadaver study was performed on five adult specimens. An endoscopic transpterygoid approach to the ITF was completed bilaterally in three specimens, and an open preauricular ITF approach was performed bilaterally in two specimens. Results After completing the cadaveric dissections, we studied differences between the endoscopic transpterygoid approach and open preauricular subtemporal approaches in regard to exposure and ease of dissection of different structures in the ITF. Conclusions In comparison with a lateral approach, the endonasal endoscopic transpterygoid approach provides better visualization and more direct exposure of median structures such as the nasopharynx, eustachian tube, sella, and clivus. We concluded that the endoscopic transpterygoid approach can be utilized to resect benign lesions and some select group of malignancies involving the infratemporal and middle cranial fossae. Open approaches continue to play an important role, especially in the resection of extensive malignant tumors extending to these regions. PMID:26401477

  8. Endoscopic approach to the resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity: case report and own experience.

    PubMed

    Wardas, Piotr; Tymowski, Michał; Piotrowska-Seweryn, Agnieszka; Kaspera, Wojciech; Ślaska-Kaspera, Aleksandra; Markowski, Jarosław

    2015-12-12

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant tumor that might occur in nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. It is characteristic for poor prognosis, especially the solid histopathological subtype of the tumor. ACC might spread along nerves and fascias and it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging together with fine-needle biopsy are the gold standards in the diagnostic procedure of the cancer. Surgery with adjuvant therapy are the most common methods of treatment. Among the surgical approaches, the functional endonasal sinus surgery seems to be the most appropriate and favorable way of treatment. In the study, the authors present a case of a 62-year-old patient with T4aN0M0 ACC tumor treated endoscopically at the Department of Laryngology and ENT Oncology, WSS No. 5 in Sosnowiec. The authors indicate the usefulness of FESS procedure in the treatment of malignancies of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. They also review the recent publications on endonasal versus open approach in similar cases. In conclusions, the authors favor endonasal approach as a mini-invasive method of surgical treatment of ACC of paranasal sinuses that results in satisfactory oncological outcome and high quality of patient's life.

  9. Endoscopic orientation correction.

    PubMed

    Höller, Kurt; Penne, Jochen; Schneider, Armin; Jahn, Jasper; Guttiérrez Boronat, Javier; Wittenberg, Thomas; Feussner, Hubertus; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    An open problem in endoscopic surgery (especially with flexible endoscopes) is the absence of a stable horizon in endoscopic images. With our "Endorientation" approach image rotation correction, even in non-rigid endoscopic surgery (particularly NOTES), can be realized with a tiny MEMS tri-axial inertial sensor placed on the tip of an endoscope. It measures the impact of gravity on each of the three orthogonal accelerometer axes. After an initial calibration and filtering of these three values the rotation angle is estimated directly. Achievable repetition rate is above the usual endoscopic video frame rate of 30 Hz; accuracy is about one degree. The image rotation is performed in real-time by digitally rotating the analog endoscopic video signal. Improvements and benefits have been evaluated in animal studies: Coordination of different instruments and estimation of tissue behavior regarding gravity related deformation and movement was rated to be much more intuitive with a stable horizon on endoscopic images.

  10. Acquired fistula of the lacrimal sac and laisser-faire approach. Description of the natural history of acquired fistulas between the lacrimal sac and the skin occurring before planned endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) and without any treatment of the fistula.

    PubMed

    Pison, A; Fau, J-L; Racy, E; Fayet, B

    2016-10-01

    The formation of a fistula between the lacrimal sac and the skin is a classic outcome of resistant lacrimal sac abscesses. There is currently no consensus about treatment in such cases. The goal of this study was to describe the natural history of acquired fistulas between the lacrimal sac and the skin, occurring before planned endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) and without any treatment of the fistula. This prospective study was only descriptive and included patients between 1999 and 2012. The patients included were adults with a nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction that was planned to be treated with endonasal DCR. A resistant lacrimal sac abscess appeared a few days before the planned surgery, and fistulized spontaneously despite medical treatment. The surgery was not delayed. The DCR was endoscopic. Nothing was done for the fistula. Its healing was spontaneous. The exclusion criteria were the following: congenital fistulas, post-traumatic and/or iatrogenic fistulas, fistulas which had regressed by the day of the surgery, postoperative follow-up less than 5 months, post-traumatic and/or iatrogenic fistulas, any history of previous DCR or any other lacrimal surgery, children. Twenty adults (25 cases) were included in the analysis. Mean age was 79 years old (from 41 to 90). The mean follow-up was 41 months (from 5 to 108 months). The fistula spontaneously disappeared in all cases, less than one month after it had appeared and in a permanent fashion. No unsightly scar developed. Spontaneously acquired fistulas between the lacrimal sac and the skin may occur in the natural course of abscessed acute dacryocystitis. Our study showed spontaneous healing of the fistula post-endoscopic DCR. Fistula excision in fistulous acute dacryocystitis does not seem essential to its healing. The laisser-faire approach appears adequate for aesthetic outcomes as well as for functional outcomes of DCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplasia repair; Spinal dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... If your child has hydrocephalus, a shunt (plastic tube) will be put in the child's brain to ...

  12. Orbital endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Selva, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive "keyhole" surgery performed using endoscopic visualization is increasing in popularity and is being used by almost all surgical subspecialties. Within ophthalmology, however, endoscopic surgery is not commonly performed and there is little literature on the use of the endoscope in orbital surgery. Transorbital use of the endoscope can greatly aid in visualizing orbital roof lesions and minimizing the need for bone removal. The endoscope is also useful during decompression procedures and as a teaching aid to train orbital surgeons. In this article, we review the history of endoscopic orbital surgery and provide an overview of the technique and describe situations where the endoscope can act as a useful adjunct to orbital surgery.

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding: indications and management.

    PubMed

    Slater, Rebecca

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has become one of the most useful and established enteral nutrition techniques available to patients requiring nutritional support worldwide. Good nutrition and the receiving of essential nutrients and electrolytes are vital for growth, healing, repair and delivery of essential energy to carry out daily tasks. The article looks specifically at PEG as a form of enteral nutrition delivery, how it is undertaken, and the care needs of the patient post-insertion of a PEG tube.

  14. Recent Advanced Endoscopic Management of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Related Duodenal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Mee

    2016-01-01

    The management strategy for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related duodenal perforation can be determined based on the site and extent of injury, the patient’s condition, and time to diagnosis. Most cases of perivaterian or bile duct perforation can be managed with a biliary stent or nasobiliary drainage. Duodenal wall perforations had been treated with immediate surgical repair. However, with the development of endoscopic devices and techniques, endoscopic closure has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment that uses through-the-scope clips, ligation band, fibrin glue, endoclips and endoloops, an over-the-scope clipping device, suturing devices, covering luminal stents, and open-pore film drainage. Endoscopic therapy could be instituted in selected patients in whom perforation was identified early or during the procedure. Early diagnosis, proper conservative management, and effective endoscopic closure are required for favorable outcomes of non-surgical management. If endoscopic treatment fails, or in the cases of clinical deterioration, prompt surgical management should be considered. PMID:27484814

  15. Lateral intercrural suture in the caucasian nose: Decreased domal divergence angle in endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Mocelin, Marcos; Soares, Caio Márcio Correia; Pasinato, Rogério; Frota, Andreia Ellery

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Several techniques can be performed to improve nasal tip definition such as cartilage resection, tip grafts, or sutures. Objctive: To evaluate the outcome of lateral intercrural suture at the lower lateral cartilage by endonasal rhinoplasty with a basic technique without delivery in decreasing the angle of domal divergence and improving the nasal tip definition. Method: This prospective study was performed in 64 patients in which a suture was made on the board head of the lower lateral cartilage in the joint between the dome and lateral crus, using polydioxanone (PDS) with sharp, curved needle. Results: In all of the cases, better definition of the nasal tip was achieved by intercrural suturing for at least 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Lateral intercrural suture of the lower lateral cartilage provides improved nasal tip definition and can be performed by endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery in the Caucasian nose. PMID:25991941

  16. Efficacy of Tonimer gel spray on postoperative nasal care after endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ibrahim; Cakir, Burak Omur; Ozcelik, Muge; Turgut, Suat

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the addition of Tonimer gel spray into nasal mucosa care on nasal mucosal findings and patient comfort in the postoperative period of endonasal surgery. 40 patients who underwent endonasal surgery were included in the study. For the postoperative nasal care, isotonic saline was applied to both nasal cavities, and subsequently, Tonimer nasal gel spray was additionally applied to the right nasal cavity. Patients were examined on the 2nd, 7th, and 15th postoperative days. The findings of the examinations were scored with respect to crusting and the patient nasal comfort was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS). The VAS values which measure patient comfort and crusting were significantly lower on the Tonimer side compared to control (p < 0.01). Tonimer and saline combination was found to be superior to saline per se in decreasing crusting and improving patient nasal comfort in the postoperative period. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Improvement of nasal breathing and patient satisfaction by the endonasal dilator Airmax®.

    PubMed

    Hellings, P W; Nolst Trenite, G J

    2014-03-01

    Patients suffering from nasal obstruction due to external nasal valve dysfunction may benefit from either corrective surgery or a conservative approach with a nasal dilator. At present, devices for widening the external nasal valve region can be applied externally or endonasally. It remains unknown to what extent the en dona sal dilator Airmax® objectively improves the nasal flow and can be offered as an alternative for surgery. Thirty patients suffering from nasal obstruction due to external nasal valve problems were proposed to use the nasal dilator for 4 weeks as an alternative for corrective surgery. The improvement of nasal flow by the dilator was evaluated by measuring the peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF). Then, patients were asked for their willingness to continue to use the nasal dilator or to undergo nasal valve surgery. The endonasal dilator improved the mean PNIF from baseline values with a mean increase of 176.1 o/o. After a 4 week trial period, 19 of 30 patients expressed the intention to continue the use of the nasal dilator. Inappropriate size, local irritation and/or aesthetic nasal complaints were mentioned by the other patients as reasons for discontinuation of using the nasal dilator. The endonasal dilator Airmax® represents a powerful device to improve nasal breathing in the target patients and therefore represents a good alternative for corrective surgery.

  18. A noncontact laser-guided system for endoscopic computer-assisted sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Martin; Kosmecki, Barotsz; Reutter, Andreas; Ozbek, Christopher; Keeve, Erwin; Olze, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    The limited size of the nose leads to frequent instrument changes in navigated endonasal sinus surgery. Tracked instruments provide limited accuracy, and the pointer gives no navigation information during tissue removal. To overcome information loss, laser triangulation was integrated into navigation information. Accuracy and reliability of the laser-assisted distance-measuring system were evaluated within the distance of 0 and 20 mm. System accuracy of the laser endoscope was compared with a standard pointer using registration via bone screws and surface matching. Accuracy of the laser was 0.12 mm ± 0.12 mm with a reliability of 0.2 mm. The system accuracy of the laser endoscope was 0.59 mm ± 0.16 mm using bone screw registration and 0.64 mm ± 0.22 mm using surface matching. Additionally, laser endoscope is more accurate compared with the pointer using bone screw registration. Overall, navigation information was successfully integrated into an endoscope by laser triangulation with encouraging results.

  19. Prognostic value of Helicobacter pylori sinonasal colonization for efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Jelavic, Boris; Grgić, Marko; Cupić, Hrvoje; Kordić, Mirko; Vasilj, Mirjana; Baudoin, Tomislav

    2012-10-01

    Compared with rhinologic patients without chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), a higher prevalence of sinonasal Helicobacter pylori (HP) in patients with CRS was found. This study investigated if HP sinonasal colonization has a prognostic value for efficacy of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Nasal polyps of 40 patients with CRS, undergoing FESS, were analyzed for presence of HP using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Patients were categorized as to whether the IHC was positive (HP+ group) or negative (HP- group). HP+ group and HP- group were compared according to the nasal polyp eosinophil density, and to the improvement (difference between pre- and post-operative scores) of the subjective symptom scores, and the nasal endoscopic scores. Nasal polyps in 28 (70%) patients were positive for HP. There were no significant differences between HP+ group and HP- group comparing the eosinophils, and the improvement of the single symptom and the total symptom scores. HP+ group had significantly greater improvement of the nasal endoscopic scores (F[1.38] = 6.212; P = 0.017). There is no influence of sinonasal HP on tissue eosinophilia and on CRS symptoms. There is a prognostic value for endonasal findings: CRS patients with HP have statistically significant greater improvement of the postoperative endoscopic scores.

  20. Transnasal endoscopic removal of malformation of the odontoid process in a patient with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bonali, M; Ruscitti, F; Marchioni, D; Pinna, G; Cunsolo, E M; Presutti, L

    2011-08-01

    The endoscopic endonasal approach is emerging as a feasible alternative to the trans-oral route for the resection of the odontoid process, when the latter produces a compression of the brainstem and cervicomedullary junction. This type of approach has some advantages, such as excellent pre-vertebral exposure of the cranio-vertebral junction in patients with small oral cavities and the possibility to avoid the use of mouth retractors. A typical case of a 24-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of type I Arnold-Chiari Malformation, suffering from a posterior dislocation of the odontoid process causing severe anterior compression of the brainstem, is presented to stress the potential of this technique. Trans-nasal endoscopic removal of the odontoid process was performed and resolution of the ventral compression of the brainstem was achieved. This report demonstrates that in selected cases, an endoscopic endonasal approach should now be considered an excellent alternative to the traditional trans-oral approach.

  1. Anatomical landmarks for transnasal endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Kishore; Monnier, Philippe; Pasche, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Resection of midline skull base lesions involve approaches needing extensive neurovascular manipulation. Transnasal endoscopic approach (TEA) is minimally invasive and ideal for certain selected lesions of the anterior skull base. A thorough knowledge of endonasal endoscopic anatomy is essential to be well versed with its surgical applications and this is possible only by dedicated cadaveric dissections. The goal in this study was to understand endoscopic anatomy of the orbital apex, petrous apex and the pterygopalatine fossa. Six cadaveric heads (3 injected and 3 non injected) and 12 sides, were dissected using a TEA outlining systematically, the steps of surgical dissection and the landmarks encountered. Dissection done by the "2 nostril, 4 hands" technique, allows better transnasal instrumentation with two surgeons working in unison with each other. The main surgical landmarks for the orbital apex are the carotid artery protuberance in the lateral sphenoid wall, optic nerve canal, lateral optico-carotid recess, optic strut and the V2 nerve. Orbital apex includes structures passing through the superior and inferior orbital fissure and the optic nerve canal. Vidian nerve canal and the V2 are important landmarks for the petrous apex. Identification of the sphenopalatine artery, V2 and foramen rotundum are important during dissection of the pterygopalatine fossa. In conclusion, the major potential advantage of TEA to the skull base is that it provides a direct anatomical route to the lesion without traversing any major neurovascular structures, as against the open transcranial approaches which involve more neurovascular manipulation and brain retraction. Obviously, these approaches require close cooperation and collaboration between otorhinolaryngologists and neurosurgeons.

  2. Histopathological comparison of bone healing effects of endonasal and percutaneous lateral osteotomy methods in rabbit rhinoplasty model.

    PubMed

    Öğreden, Şahin; Rüzgar, Sedat; Tansuker, Hasan Deniz; Taşkın, Ümit; Alimoğlu, Yalçın; Aydın, Salih; Oktay, Mehmet Faruk; İzol, Uğur

    2017-07-17

    Lateral osteotomy is mainly performed either endonasally or percutaneously in rhinoplasty which is a frequently performed operation for the correction of nasal deformities. Both techniques have both advantages and disadvantages relative to each other. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effects of endonasal and percutaneous osteotomy techniques performed in rhinoplasty on bone healing and nasal stability in an experimental animal model. Eight one year-old New Zealand white rabbits were included. Xylazine hydrocloride and intramuscular ketamine anesthesia were administered to the rabbits. Endonasal osteotomy (8 bones) was performed in Group 1 (n=4), and percutaneous osteotomy (8 bones) in Group 2 (n=4). One month later the rabbits were sacrificed. Bone healing of the rabbits was staged according to the bone healing score of Huddleston et al. In both groups, nasal bone integrity was assessed subjectively. In the percutaneous osteotomy group, Grade 1 bone healing was observed in two samples (25%), Grade 2 bone healing in two samples (25%), Grade 3 bone healing in four samples (50%). In the endonasal osteotomy group, Grade 1 bone healing was observed in 6 samples (75%) and Grade 2 bone healing was observed in 2 samples (25%). In the percutaneous group, fibrous tissue was observed in 2, predominantly fibrous tissue and a lesser amount of cartilage was observed in 2 and an equal amount of fibrous tissue and cartilage was observed in 4 samples. In the endonasal group, fibrous tissue was observed in 6 samples, and predominantly fibrous tissue with a lesser amount of cartilage was observed in 2 samples. In both groups, when manual force was applied to the nasal bones, subjectively the same resistance was observed. Percutaneous lateral osteotomy technique was found to result in less bone and periost trauma and better bone healing compared to the endonasal osteotomy technique. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia

  3. Endoscopic management of intraoperative small bowel laceration during natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery: a blinded porcine study.

    PubMed

    Fyock, Christopher J; Forsmark, Chris E; Wagh, Mihir S

    2011-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently gained great enthusiasm, but there is concern regarding the ability to endoscopically manage complications purely via natural orifices. To assess the feasibility of endoscopically managing enteral perforation during NOTES using currently available endoscopic accessories. Twelve pigs underwent transgastric or transcolonic endoscopic exploration. Full-thickness enterotomies were intentionally created to mimic accidental small bowel lacerations during NOTES. These lacerations were then closed with endoclips. In the blinded arm of the study, small bowel repair was performed by a second blinded endoscopist. Adequate closure of the laceration was confirmed with a leak test. Primary access sites were closed with endoclips or T-anchors. At necropsy, the peritoneal cavity was inspected for abscesses, bleeding, or damage to surrounding structures. The enterotomy site was examined for adequacy of closure, adhesions, or evidence of infection. Fifteen small bowel lacerations were performed in 12 animals. Successful closure was achieved in all 10 cases in the nonblinded arm. Survival animals had an uncomplicated postoperative course and all enterotomy sites were well healed without evidence of necrosis, adhesions, abscess, or bleeding at necropsy. Leak test was negative in all animals. In the blinded arm, both small intestinal lacerations could not be identified by the blinded endoscopist. Necropsy revealed open small bowel lacerations. Small intestinal injuries are difficult to localize with currently available flexible endoscopes and accessories. Endoscopic clips, however, may be adequate for closure of small bowel lacerations if the site of injury is known.

  4. Dorsal augmentation with diced cartilage enclosed with temporal fascia in secondary endonasal rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Harel, Marcos; Margulis, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Placement of diced cartilage enclosed within an autologous fascia sleeve (DC-F) for nasal dorsum reconstruction is common in open rhinoplasty, but there are no data regarding its use in closed rhinoplasty (the endonasal approach). The authors describe a technique for augmenting the nasal dorsum in secondary rhinoplasty with DC-F grafts via an endonasal approach. In this study, the authors retrospectively review the cases of 18 patients who underwent closed rhinoplasty with the authors' technique between 2008 and 2011. Cartilage harvested from the septum, rib, or concha was diced into 0.5- to 1-mm cubes. A rectangle of deep temporal fascia (approximately 5 × 5 cm) was harvested by means of a single V-shaped incision overlying the temporal fossa, then wrapped around another 1-mL syringe and secured. The fascial cylinder was filled with the desired amount of diced cartilage and then sutured closed at both ends. This graft was placed into the dorsum of the nose via the endonasal approach. Average age of the patients was 32 years. The patients were followed for a minimum of 15 months. Donor site for cartilage harvest was conchal in 8 patients, septal and conchal in 6 cases, and costal in 4. Complications were encountered in 3 patients, only 1 of whom required surgical revision for contour irregularity. No resorption of cartilage was encountered in any patient after 15 months. Smooth continuity of the nasal dorsum was achieved in all our patients. Despite the lack of a large volume of patients for overwhelming and conclusive results, our study provides further confirmation that this technique is indeed an attractive option for nasal dorsum reconstruction.

  5. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  6. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy as treatment for lower lacrimal pathway obstructions in adults: Review article

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Grigori; Tuomilehto, Henri; Kaarniranta, Kai; Seppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Obstruction of the lacrimal pathway is manifested by epiphora, infection, and blurred vision as well as ocular and facial pain. Conservative treatments only achieve temporary relief of symptoms, thus surgery is the treatment of choice. Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is recognized as the most suitable treatment for patients with obstructions of the lacrimal system at the level of the sac or in the nasolacrimal duct. The aim of this operation is to create a bypass between the lacrimal sac and the nasal cavity. During the past 2 decades, advances in rigid endoscopic equipment and other instruments have made it possible to obtain more information about the anatomic landmarks of the nasolacrimal system, which led to the development of less-invasive and safer endoscopic techniques. However, many parts of the treatment process related to endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR) still remain controversial. This article reviews the published literature about the technical issues associated with the success of EN-DCR, and clarifies the pros and cons of different pre- and postoperative procedures in adults with lower lacrimal pathway obstructions. PMID:25860166

  7. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  8. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in the popular media may not reflect reality. Although useful, balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. In many cases standard endoscopic sinus surgery or medical therapy may be the best treatment. However, in some ...

  9. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  10. Endoscopic sinus surgery dissection courses using a real simulator: the benefits of this training.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Bibiana; Balsalobre, Leonardo; Weber, Raimar; Stamm, Raquel; Stamm, Aldo; Oto, Fernando; Coronel, Nathália

    2016-01-01

    Endonasal surgeries are among the most common procedures performed in otolaryngology. Due to difficulty in cadaver acquisition and the intrinsic risks of training residents during operations on real patients, nasosinusal endoscopic dissection courses utilizing real simulators, such as the Sinus Model Otorhino Neuro Trainer are being developed as a new technique to facilitate the acquisition of better anatomical knowledge and surgical skill. To evaluate the efficacy of nasosinusal endoscopic dissection courses with the Sinus Model Otorhino Neuro Trainer simulator in the training of otolaryngology surgeons. A prospective, longitudinal cohort study was conducted with 111 otolaryngologists who participated in a theoretical and practical course of endoscopic surgery dissection using the Sinus Model Otorhino Neuro Trainer simulator, with application of questionnaires during and after the course. From the ten procedures performed utilizing the simulator, the evaluation revealed mean scores from 3.1 to 4.1 (maximum of 5). Seventy-seven participants answered the questionnaire six months after the end of the course. 93% of them reported that they could perform the procedures more safely following the course, 98% reported an improvement in their anatomical and clinical knowledge, and 85% related an improvement in their surgical ability. After the course, the number of endoscopic surgeries increased in 40% of the respondents. Endoscopic sinus dissection courses using the Sinus Model Otorhino Neuro Trainer simulator proved to be useful in the training of otolaryngologists. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Fully endoscopic combined transsphenoidal and supraorbital keyhole approach for parasellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuichi; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nagatani, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Kazuhito; Chu, Jonsu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2017-04-28

    OBJECTIVE Parasellar tumors that extend far laterally beyond the internal carotid artery or that are fibrous and adhere firmly to critical structures are difficult to remove totally via the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach alone. In such cases, a combined transsphenoidal-transcranial approach is effective to achieve maximal resection in a single stage. In this paper, a new minimally invasive surgical technique for complicated parasellar lesions, a fully endoscopic combined transsphenoidal-supraorbital keyhole approach, is presented. METHODS A retrospective review of patients who had been treated via a fully endoscopic combined transsphenoidal-supraorbital keyhole approach for complicated parasellar lesions was performed. The data for resection rate, perioperative mortality and morbidity, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS A total of 12 fully endoscopic combined transsphenoidal-supraorbital keyhole approaches were performed from March 2013 to February 2016; 10 were for pituitary adenomas and 2 were for craniopharyngiomas. Gross-total resection or near-total resection was achieved in 7 of 12 cases. Among the 11 patients who had presented with preoperative visual disturbances, 7 had visual improvement. However, 1 patient showed deterioration in visual function. No patient experienced postoperative hemorrhage, needed additional surgical treatment, or had postoperative CSF leakage. CONCLUSIONS In the combined transsphenoidal and transcranial approach, safe and effective cooperative manipulation with 2 surgical corridors can be performed for complicated parasellar lesions. The goal of this procedure is not to achieve gross-total resection, but to achieve safe resection. Moreover, this new surgical approach offers neurosurgeons a simpler operative field with less invasiveness than the conventional microscopic combined approach. The fully endoscopic combined endonasal-supraorbital keyhole approach is an efficacious procedure for complicated parasellar

  12. Craniovertebral junction 360°: A combined microscopic and endoscopic anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Jhawar, Sukhdeep Singh; Nunez, Maximiliano; Pacca, Paolo; Voscoboinik, Daniel Seclen; Truong, Huy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) can be approached from various corridors depending on the location and extent of disease. A three-dimensional understanding of anatomy of CVJ is paramount for safe surgery in this region. Aim of this cadaveric study is to elucidate combined microscopic and endoscopic anatomy of critical neurovascular structures in this area in relation to bony and muscular landmarks. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric heads injected with color silicon were used for this study. A stepwise dissection was done from anterior, posterior, and lateral sides with reference to bony and muscular landmarks. Anterior approach was done endonasal endoscopically. Posterior and lateral approaches were done with a microscope. In two specimens, both anterior and posterior approaches were done to delineate the course of vertebral artery and lower cranial nerves from ventral and dorsal aspects. Results: CVJ can be accessed through three corridors, namely, anterior, posterior, and lateral. Access to clivus, foreman magnum, occipital cervical joint, odontoid, and atlantoaxial joint was studied anteriorly with an endoscope. Superior and inferior clival lines, supracondylar groove, hypoglossal canal, arch of atlas and body of axis, and occipitocervical joint act as useful bony landmarks whereas longus capitis and rectus capitis anterior are related muscles to this approach. In posterior approach, spinous process of axis, arch of atlas, C2 ganglion, and transverse process of atlas and axis are bony landmarks. Rectus capitis posterior major, superior oblique, inferior oblique, and rectus capitis lateralis (RCLa) are muscles related to this approach. Occipital condyles, transverse process of atlas, and jugular tubercle are main bony landmarks in lateral corridor whereas RCLa and posterior belly of digastric muscle are the main muscular landmarks. Conclusion: With advances in endoscopic and microscopic techniques, access to lesions and bony anomalies

  13. Outcomes of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy: Experience of a fellowship trainee at a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Saurabh; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to report a single trainee's experience of learning and performing endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (En-DCR). Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective, interventional case series. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients presenting at a tertiary eye care center over 1 year were included in the study. All cases underwent endoscopic DCR with mitomycin-C and silicone intubation. The parameters studied included demographics, clinical features, intraoperative details, and postoperative ostium evaluation. Stent removal and nasal endoscopy were performed at 6 weeks and a further ostium evaluation at 3 and 6 months following surgery. Anatomical success rate was defined as patent irrigation, and functional success rate was defined as positive functional endoscopic dye test and absence of epiphora. Results: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients were operated, and three cases were lost to follow-up after surgery. The mean age at presentation was 34 (4–75) years. Clinical diagnosis included primary acquired nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction in 72% (39/54), acute dacryocystitis in 15% (8/54), failed DCR in 7% (4/54), and persistent congenital NLD obstruction in 5% (3/54). The first five cases needed intervention by the mentor for superior osteotomy. Common variations in anatomical landmarks were posterior location of sac, large ethmoidal bulla, high internal common opening, and thick maxillary bone. Surgical time taken in the last 27 eyes was significantly lesser compared to the surgical duration taken in the initial 27 cases (P < 0.05). Anatomical and functional success rate was 94% (48/51) at 6 months follow-up period. Conclusions: Endoscopic En-DCR has a good success rate when performed by oculoplastic surgery trainees. Nasal anatomical variations, instrument handling, and adaptation to monocular view of endoscope are few of the challenges for beginners. Structured skill transfer can help trainees to learn and perform

  14. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Moraites, Eleni; Vaughn, Olushola Akinshemoyin; Hill, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a surgical technique most commonly used in the treatment of severe palmar hyperhidrosis in selected patients. The procedure also has limited use in the treatment axillary and craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is associated with a high rate of the development of compensatory hyperhidrosis, which may affect patient satisfaction with the procedure and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound hemostasis techniques.

    PubMed

    Artifon, Everson L A; Aparicio, Dayse P S; Otoch, Jose P; Carvalho, Paulo B; Marson, Fernando P; Fernandes, Kaie; Tchekmedyian, Asadur J

    2014-04-01

    Since its development, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a simple diagnostic technique to an important therapeutic tool for interventional endoscopy. EUS analysis provides real-time imaging of most major thoracic and abdominal vessels, and the possibility to use needle puncture with a curved linear array echoendoscope as a vascular intervention. In this review, we describe the endoscopic ultrasound approach to vascular therapy outside of the gastrointestinal wall.

  16. Endoscopic Transmaxillary Transposition of Temporalis Flap for Recurrent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Closure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Regi; Girishan, Shabari; Chacko, Ari George

    2016-12-01

    Objective To describe the technique of endoscopic transmaxillary temporalis muscle flap transposition for the repair of a persistent postoperative sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid leak. Design The repair of a recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak for a patient who had undergone endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of an invasive silent corticotroph Hardy C and Knosp Grade IV pituitary adenoma was undertaken. The patient had completed postoperative radiotherapy for the residual tumor and presented with cerebrospinal fluid leak, 1 year later. The initial two attempts to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with free grafts failed. Therefore, an endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis muscle flap was attempted to stop the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Results The endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the vascularized temporalis muscle flap onto the cerebrospinal fluid leak repair site resulted in successful closure of the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis flap resulted in closure of recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with recurrent pituitary adenoma, who had undergone previous surgery and radiotherapy. This technique has advantages over the endoscopic transpterygoid transposition of the same flap and could be used as a complementary technique in selected patients.

  17. Endonasal Skull Base Tumor Removal Using Concentric Tube Continuum Robots: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Swaney, Philip J; Gilbert, Hunter B; Webster, Robert J; Russell, Paul T; Weaver, Kyle D

    2015-03-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the use of concentric tube continuum robots in endonasal skull base tumor removal. This new type of surgical robot offers many advantages over existing straight and rigid surgical tools including added dexterity, the ability to scale movements, and the ability to rotate the end effector while leaving the robot fixed in space. In this study, a concentric tube continuum robot was used to remove simulated pituitary tumors from a skull phantom. Design The robot was teleoperated by experienced skull base surgeons to remove a phantom pituitary tumor within a skull. Percentage resection was measured by weight. Resection duration was timed. Setting Academic research laboratory. Main Outcome Measures Percentage removal of tumor material and procedure duration. Results Average removal percentage of 79.8 ± 5.9% and average time to complete procedure of 12.5 ± 4.1 minutes (n = 20). Conclusions The robotic system presented here for use in endonasal skull base surgery shows promise in improving the dexterity, tool motion, and end effector capabilities currently available with straight and rigid tools while remaining an effective tool for resecting the tumor.

  18. [Low-intensity helium-neon laser in the treatment of patients after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy].

    PubMed

    Beloglazov, V G; At'kova, E L; Nurieva, S M; Khvedelidze, E P

    2004-01-01

    Described in the paper is an efficiency study of using, postoperatively, the low-intensity helium-neon laser (LIHNL) in patients with obstruction of the lacrimal tracts. Eighty patients were examined after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy. They were shared between 2 groups with respect to a postoperative course: group 1--experimental, 40 patients, and group 2--control, 40 patients. The experimental patients received, apart from the traditional postoperative therapy, a course of LIHNL therapy. The controls received only the traditional postoperative treatment. The efficiency of postoperative treatment was evaluated by clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination methods. The study denoted that the use of LIHNL in the early postoperative period after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy had a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect, speeded up the wound healing, prevented the growth of granulation tissues and the merging of the shaped lacrimal-sac fistula with the nasal cavity. LIHNL contributed to a complete recovery of the functional activity of the nasal mucous tunic. Thus, the LIHNL therapy essentially facilitates the postoperative management of patients, cuts the rehabilitation period and enhances the treatment results.

  19. Anatomical and subjective success rates of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy over a seven-year period.

    PubMed

    Beshay, N; Ghabrial, R

    2016-11-01

    PurposeEndonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (END-DCR) is a relatively novel approach that has recently been shown in some studies to provide similar success rates to the more traditional external approach for the treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). However, a range of success rates using this approach are reported within the literature and the majority of oculoplastic surgeons are still favouring the external approach. The purpose of this study was to review the anatomical and subjective success rates of END-DCRs performed over a 7-year period.Patients and methodsWe provide a review of the success rates of 288 END-DCRs for the treatment of acquired NLDO performed over a 7-year period by a single oculoplastic surgeon in Sydney, Australia. We describe the operative technique used and define anatomical success as demonstrated patency of the nasolacrimal drainage system at 10 weeks postoperatively while subjective success is defined as complete resolution or significant improvement of symptoms as reported by patients at the same time point.ResultsIn our study, we were able to demonstrate that out of 288 END-DCRs, an average anatomical success rate of 89.6% and an average subjective success rate of 81.3% were achievable.ConclusionsWe conclude that the success rates using our endonasal approach remain similar to those obtained using the external approach, as reported within the literature, and may be considered as a primary treatment option for acquired NLDO.

  20. Value of anatomical landmarks in single-nostril endonasal transnasal-sphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    WEI, LIANG-FENG; ZHANG, JINCHAO; CHEN, HONG-JIE; WANG, RUMI

    2013-01-01

    The sphenoid sinus occupies a central location in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). It is important to identify relevant anatomical landmarks to enter the sphenoid sinus and sellar region properly. The aim of this study was to identify anatomical landmarks and their value in single-nostril endonasal TSS. A retrospective study was performed to review 148 cases of single-nostril endonasal TSS for pituitary lesions. The structure of the nasal cavities and sphenoid sinus, the position of apertures of the sphenoid sinus and relevant arteries and the morphological characteristics of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus and sellar floor were observed and recorded. The important anatomical landmarks included the mucosal aperture of the sphenoid sinus, a blunt longitudinal prominence on the posterior nasal septum, the osseocartilaginous junction of the nasal septum, the ‘bow sign’ of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, the osseous aperture and its relationship with the nutrient arteries, the bulge of the sellar floor and the carotid protuberance. These landmarks outlined a clear route to the sella turcica with an optimal view and lesser tissue damage. Although morphological variation may exist, the position of these landmarks was generally consistent. Locating the sphenoid sinus aperture is the gold standard to direct the surgical route of TSS. The ‘bow sign’ and the sellar bulge are critical landmarks for accurate entry into the sphenoid sinus and sella fossa, respectively. PMID:23596471

  1. Endoscope drying and its pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, J

    2017-07-17

    Inadequate drying of endoscope channels is a possible cause of replication and survival of remaining pathogens during storage. The presence during storage of potentially contaminated water in endoscope channels may promote bacterial proliferation and biofilm formation. An incomplete drying procedure or lack of drying and not storing in a vertical position are the most usual problems identified during drying and endoscope storage. Inadequate drying and storage procedures, together with inadequate cleaning and disinfection, are the most important sources of endoscope contamination and post-endoscopic infection. Flexible endoscopes may be dried in automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs), manually, or in drying/storage cabinets. Flushing of the endoscope channels with 70-90% ethyl or isopropyl alcohol followed by forced air drying is recommended by several guidelines. Current guidelines recommend that flexible endoscopes are stored in a vertical position in a closed, ventilated cupboard. Drying and storage cabinets have a drying system that circulates and forces the dry filtered air through the endoscope channels. Endoscope reprocessing guidelines are inconsistent with one another or give no exact recommendations about drying and storage of flexible endoscopes. There is no conclusive evidence on the length of time endoscopes can be safely stored before requiring re-disinfection and before they pose a contamination risk. To minimize the risk of disease transmission and nosocomial infection, modification and revision of guidelines are recommended as required to be consistent with one another. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for cavernous sinus biopsy: illustration of 3 cases and discussion.

    PubMed

    Graillon, T; Fuentes, S; Metellus, P; Adetchessi, T; Gras, R; Dufour, H

    2014-01-01

    Advances in transsphenoidal surgery and endoscopic techniques have opened new perspectives for cavernous sinus (CS) approaches. The aim of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach, as performed in pituitary adenoma surgery, for CS tumor biopsy illustrated with three clinical cases. The first case was a 46-year-old woman with a prior medical history of parotid adenocarcinoma successfully treated 10 years previously. The cavernous sinus tumor was revealed by right third and sixth nerve palsy and increased over the past three years. A tumor biopsy using a limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach revealed an adenocarcinoma metastasis. Complementary radiosurgery was performed. The second case was a 36-year-old woman who consulted for diplopia with right sixth nerve palsy and amenorrhea with hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonist treatment was used to restore the patient's menstrual cycle. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a right sided CS tumor. CS biopsy, via a limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach, confirmed a meningothelial grade 1 meningioma. Complementary radiosurgery was performed. The third case was a 63-year-old woman with progressive installation of left third nerve palsy and visual acuity loss, revealing a left cavernous sinus tumor invading the optic canal. Surgical biopsy was performed using an enlarged endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to the decompress optic nerve. Biopsy results revealed a meningothelial grade 1 meningioma. Complementary radiotherapy was performed. In these three cases, no complications were observed. Mean hospitalization duration was 4 days. Reported anatomical studies and clinical series have shown the feasibility of reaching the cavernous sinus using an endoscopic endonasal approach. Trans-foramen ovale CS percutaneous biopsy is an interesting procedure but only provides cell analysis results, and not tissue analysis. However, radiotherapy and

  3. Intravesical explosions during transurethral endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Masood, J; Ghei, M; Kasmani, Z; Ball, A J; Miller, R

    2007-01-01

    Every Urologist, during the course of fulguration treatment of bladder tumours, has at some time or another experienced small intravesical explosions usually manifesting as a "pop". Major intravesical explosions are rare but potentially devastating complications of transurethral endoscopic resections. The damage to the bladder can range from small mucosal tears to bladder rupture, which can either be intraperitoneal (requiring laparotomy and open bladder repair) or extraperitoneal. We review the literature on intravesical explosions to determine the aetiology of these explosions and suggest strategies to prevent these. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline and Ovid to obtain information using search terms: intravesical explosions, transurethral procedures, endoscopic procedures, diathermyIntravesical explosions occur due to the production of explosive gases during use of diathermy on human tissues. The most dangerous combination is hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen alone is not explosive and it only becomes explosive when admixed with oxygen. Oxygen is not produced in sufficient quantity during diathermy to cause explosions but can enter into the bladder from the atmosphere during endoscopic procedures. Careful operative technique (correct use of the Ellick evacuator bulb and reducing the frequency of manual irrigations of the bladder) with minimisation of the operative time and using the coagulation current at moderate power as well as judicious coagulation of tissues can reduce the risk of this dangerous complication arising.

  4. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  5. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  6. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  7. Sterilization of endoscopic instruments.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Bhattu, Amit; Vijaykumar, Mohankumar

    2014-03-01

    Sterilization of endoscopic instruments is an important but often ignored topic. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the sterilization of endoscopic instruments and elaborate on the appropriate sterilization practices. Autoclaving is an economic and excellent method of sterilizing the instruments that are not heat sensitive. Heat sensitive instruments may get damaged with hot sterilization methods. Several new endoscopic instruments such as flexible ureteroscopes, chip on tip endoscopes, are added in urologists armamentarium. Many of these instruments are heat sensitive and hence alternative efficacious methods of sterilization are necessary. Although ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide are excellent methods of sterilization, they have some drawbacks. Gamma irradiation is mainly for disposable items. Various chemical agents are widely used even though they achieve high-level disinfection rather than sterilization. This article reviews various methods of endoscopic instrument sterilization with their advantages and drawbacks. If appropriate sterilization methods are adopted, then it not only will protect patients from procedure-related infections but prevent hypersensitive allergic reactions. It will also protect instruments from damage and increase its longevity.

  8. [A clinic study on treatment of chronic frontal sinusitis with endoscopic surgery and permanent implantation of a place holder].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhishen; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Shilong

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the characteristics of chronic frontal sinusitis and to improve the clinical therapeutic efficacy. Sixty-eight patients (130 sides) who underwent endoscopic frontal sinus surgery in our department were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 included 23 patients (43 operations) underwent endonasal sinus surgery with the frontal sinus opened and drained by two pipes of silicone for 6 months. Group 2 included 24 patients (45 operations) treated as group 1 but added injection of beclomethasone (approximately 1 cc, 94 mcg/100 microliters). Group 3 included 21 patients (42 operations) with only frontal sinus opened. After an average follow-up of 18 months, the cure rate in group 1, group 2 and group 3 was 93%, 93% and 71% respectively. The ultimate success or failure of frontal sinus surgical procedures, whether they are endonasal or external, depends on the restenosis of the frontal sinus outflow tract or neo-ostium postoperatively. Long-term stenting for a period of several months will significantly reduce the possibility of restenosis. We recommend that this type of management be considered in difficult revision cases and before performing an external operation.

  9. Endoscopic fibrin sealant closure of duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Yeh; Chen, Jui-Hao

    2015-12-07

    Traditionally, perivaterian duodenal perforation can be managed conservatively or surgically. If a large volume of leakage results in fluid collection in the retroperitoneum, surgery may be necessary. Our case met the surgical indication for perivaterian duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation. The patient developed a retroperitoneal abscess after the procedures, and a perivaterian perforation was suggested on computed tomography (CT). CT-guided abscess drainage was performed immediately. We unsuccessfully attempted to close the perforation with hemoclips initially. Subsequently, we used fibrin sealant (Tisseel) injection to occlude the perforation. Fibrin sealant injections have been previously used during endoscopy for wound closure and fistula repair. Based on our report, fibrin sealant injection can be considered as an alternative method for the treatment of ERCP-related type II perforations.

  10. Feasibility of transcranial photoacoustic imaging for interventional guidance of endonasal surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Ostrowski, Anastasia K.; Kazanzides, Peter; Boctor, Emad

    2014-03-01

    Endonasal surgeries to remove pituitary tumors incur the deadly risk of carotid artery injury due to limitations with real-time visualization of blood vessels surrounded by bone. We propose to use photoacoustic imaging to overcome current limitations. Blood vessels and surrounding bone would be illuminated by an optical fiber attached to the endonasal drill, while a transducer placed on the pterional region outside of the skull acquires images. To investigate feasibility, a plastisol phantom embedded with a spherical metal target was submerged in a water tank. The target was aligned with a 1-mm optical fiber coupled to a 1064nm Nd:YAG laser. An Ultrasonix L14-5W/60 linear transducer, placed approximately 1 cm above the phantom, acquired photoacoustic and ultrasound images of the target in the presence and absence of 2- and 4-mm-thick human adult cadaveric skull specimens. Though visualized at 18 mm depth when no bone was present, the target was not detectable in ultrasound images when the 4-mm thick skull specimen was placed between the transducer and phantom. In contrast, the target was visible in photoacoustic images at depths of 17-18 mm with and without the skull specimen. To mimic a clinical scenario where cranial bone in the nasal cavity reduces optical transmission prior to drill penetration, the 2-mm-thick specimen was placed between the phantom and optical fiber, while the 4-mm specimen remained between the phantom and transducer. In this case, the target was present at depths of 15-17 mm for energies ranging 9-18 mJ. With conventional delay-and-sum beamforming, the photoacoustic signal-tonoise ratios measured 15-18 dB and the contrast measured 5-13 dB. A short-lag spatial coherence beamformer was applied to increase signal contrast by 11-27 dB with similar values for SNR at most laser energies. Results are generally promising for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgeries.

  11. Microstructure inspection endoscope design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Jing, Chao; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Yimo; Jing, Wencai; Zhou, Ge

    2005-02-01

    A microstructure inspection endoscope, based on directly imaging, is proposed. It is designed for detecting defects on the surface of optical fiber end. It is matched with FC or SC female fiber connector. The inspection head of the endoscope can be put into a 2.5-millimeter-diameter micro-pore. Its numerical aperture is not restricted by tiny dimension of object lenses. System resolution is increased to 600 line-pairs per millimeter. The endoscope consists of object lenses, scanner slab and kohler illumination system. The design provides possibility of various utilities such as aiming at a smaller subject by micro optical scanner and modeling the surface by tri-dimensional vision. And the optical system includes low-magnification lenses and high-magnification zoom lenses. Rough observation at low-magnification and particularly inspection at high-magnification are provided. The instrument has the advantages of high identification, compact configuration and flexible manipulation.

  12. Endoscopic Closure of Duodenal Perforation with the Over-the-scope-clipping System

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyahara, Ryoji; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for superficial non-ampullary duodenal tumors is technically difficult and challenging due to the anatomical characteristics of the duodenum. It is frequently complicated by procedural accidents, such as perforation. Surgical repair has long been the standard treatment for acute iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforation. However, endoscopic closure has recently emerged as an attractive alternative. In the patient presented herein, the over-the-scope-clipping system (OTSC system) was found to be useful for closing a duodenal perforation that had occurred during endoscopic submucosal dissection. For endoscopists who perform endoscopic treatment of the duodenum, endoscopic closure with the OTSC system is considered to be a technique that is necessary to master. PMID:27803406

  13. Advances in balloon endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    In September 2003, a double-balloon endoscope (DBE) composed of balloons attached to a scope and an overtube was released in Japan prior to becoming available in other parts of the world. The DBE was developed by Dr. Yamamoto (1), and 5 different types of scopes with different uses have already been marketed. In April 2007, a single-balloon small intestinal endoscope was released with a balloon attached only to the overtube as a subsequent model. This article presents a detailed account of the development of these scopes up to the present time.

  14. Olecranon extrabursal endoscopic bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chen G; McGuire, Duncan T; Morse, Levi P; Bain, Gregory I

    2013-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis is a common clinical problem. It is often managed conservatively because of the high rates of wound complications with the conventional open surgical technique. Conventional olecranon bursoscopy utilizes an arthroscope and an arthroscopic shaver, removing the bursa from inside-out. We describe an extrabursal endoscopic technique where the bursa is not entered but excised in its entirety under endoscopic vision. A satisfactory view is obtained with less morbidity than the open method, while still avoiding a wound over the sensitive point of the olecranon.

  15. Surgical treatment of obstruction of the nasolacrimal ducts in patients with anatomical endonasal variants.

    PubMed

    Savino, Gustavo; Messina, Lorenzo; Colucci, Daniela; Balia, Laura; Balestrazzi, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of anatomical endonasal variants (concha bullosa, nasal septal deviation, or hypertrophic turbinates) may cause more complications in patients with epiphora who have external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). The purpose of this study was to assess the results of surgical placement of a stent in 28 patients. They were randomised into two groups and had either DCR or placement of a Song's polyurethane stent. They were followed up for 18 months. Twenty-six patients had a good result. The success rate was 13/14 for those who had DCR and 13/14 for those who had a stent. Operating time was significantly less for placing a stent (mean (SD) 15 (2) minutes) compared with 40 (3) minutes for DCR (p <0.01). Placement of a polyurethane stent is an effective and short procedure for nasolacrimal obstruction, which is suitable for patients with unusual intranasal conditions.

  16. Initial Experiments with the Leap Motion as a User Interface in Robotic Endonasal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, T A; Swaney, P J; Weaver, Kyle D; Webster, R J

    The Leap Motion controller is a low-cost, optically-based hand tracking system that has recently been introduced on the consumer market. Prior studies have investigated its precision and accuracy, toward evaluating its usefulness as a surgical robot master interface. Yet due to the diversity of potential slave robots and surgical procedures, as well as the dynamic nature of surgery, it is challenging to make general conclusions from published accuracy and precision data. Thus, our goal in this paper is to explore the use of the Leap in the specific scenario of endonasal pituitary surgery. We use it to control a concentric tube continuum robot in a phantom study, and compare user performance using the Leap to previously published results using the Phantom Omni. We find that the users were able to achieve nearly identical average resection percentage and overall surgical duration with the Leap.

  17. Paraffin induced sclerosing lipogranuloma of eyelids and anterior orbit following endonasal sinus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Witschel, H; Geiger, K

    1994-01-01

    During the past 5 years we have seen 10 patients who had developed sclerosing lipogranuloma of the lid and orbit after endonasal sinus surgery with subsequent ipsilateral monocular haematoma. The histopathological examination of all and the additional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic examination of four surgical specimens in combination with the typical clinical course led to the conclusion that the granulomas were caused by small paraffin droplets. These in turn stemmed from the ointment plugs applied to the sinuses at the end of the operation, and were washed out into the surrounding tissues by the postoperative haemorrhage. As the chronic and recurring granulomas can lead to considerable cosmetic and functional impairment, the application of ointment plugs at the end of sinus surgery should be abandoned, especially when peri- or postoperative bleeding occurs. Images PMID:8110702

  18. Initial Experiments with the Leap Motion as a User Interface in Robotic Endonasal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, T. A.; Swaney, P. J.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Webster, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Leap Motion controller is a low-cost, optically-based hand tracking system that has recently been introduced on the consumer market. Prior studies have investigated its precision and accuracy, toward evaluating its usefulness as a surgical robot master interface. Yet due to the diversity of potential slave robots and surgical procedures, as well as the dynamic nature of surgery, it is challenging to make general conclusions from published accuracy and precision data. Thus, our goal in this paper is to explore the use of the Leap in the specific scenario of endonasal pituitary surgery. We use it to control a concentric tube continuum robot in a phantom study, and compare user performance using the Leap to previously published results using the Phantom Omni. We find that the users were able to achieve nearly identical average resection percentage and overall surgical duration with the Leap. PMID:26752501

  19. Lateral intercrural suture in the caucasian nose: Decreased domal divergence angle in endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery.

    PubMed

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Mocelin, Marcos; Soares, Caio Márcio Correia; Pasinato, Rogério; Frota, Andreia Ellery

    2012-04-01

    Introdução: Diversas técnicas podem ser realizadas para melhorar a definição da ponta nasal como ressecção cartilaginosa, colocação de enxertos ou suturas. A realização de suturas na ponta nasal proporciona resultados estéticos satisfatórios com menor morbidade 1-5.Objetivo: Avaliar a sutura intercrura lateral realizada na cartilagem lateral inferior, através de rinosseptoplastia endonasal por técnica básica sem delivery, para diminuição do ângulo de divergência domal no nariz caucasiano e consequente melhora na definição da ponta nasal.Método: Realizado estudo prospectivo com 64 casos nos quais foi confeccionada sutura no bordo cefálico da cartilagem lateral inferior na junção entre a cúpula e crus lateral, utilizando-se fio P.D.S. (Polydioxanorie(®)) incolor 4"0" com agulha curva cortante.Resultado: Foram analisadas e comparadas as fotos do pré - operatório e do pós -operatório com 6 meses de evolução. Em todos os casos foi atingida uma melhora na definição da ponta através da sutura intercrura lateral.Conclusão: A sutura intercrura lateral da cartilagem lateral inferior mostrou ser factível para uma melhor definição da ponta no nariz caucasiano podendo ser realizada por rinoplastia endonasal sem delivery.

  20. [Endoscopic surgery and reconstruction for extensive osteoradionecrosis of skull base after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Qiu, Q H; Zhan, J B; Zhu, Z C; Peng, Y; Liu, H

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy of endoscopic surgery for extensive osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of skull base in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy. Methods: Seventeen patients diagnosed as ORN of skull base after radiotherapy for NPC and underwent endoscopic surgery were retrospectively studied with their clinic data. Results: Based on the CT and endoscopic examination, all patients had large skull base defects with bone defects averaged 7.02 cm(2) (range, 3.60 - 14.19 cm(2)). Excepting for curetting the sequestra, endoscopic surgery was also used to repair the wound or to protect the internal carotid artery with flap in 12 patients. No bone reconstructions were conducted in all patients with the bone defects of skull base. CT examinations were taken after endoscopic surgery when required. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 8 months to 6 years (average, 14 months). Aside from 1 patient with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), others had no related complications. Conclusions: The patients with extensive ORN can be treated with endoscopic surgery to curette the necrotic bone of skull base, and endoscopic reconstruction provides an alternative technique. It may not be necessary to reconstruct the bone defects at skull base, however, the exposed important structures of skull base, such as internal carotid artery, need to repair with soft tissue such as flap.

  1. Endoscope field of view measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanzeng; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Leiner, Dennis; Shafer, David; Zobel, Jurgen

    2017-01-01

    The current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard (ISO 8600-3: 1997 including Amendment 1: 2003) for determining endoscope field of view (FOV) does not accurately characterize some novel endoscopic technologies such as endoscopes with a close focus distance and capsule endoscopes. We evaluated the endoscope FOV measurement method (the FOVWS method) in the current ISO 8600-3 standard and proposed a new method (the FOVEP method). We compared the two methods by measuring the FOV of 18 models of endoscopes (one device for each model) from seven key international manufacturers. We also estimated the device to device variation of two models of colonoscopes by measuring several hundreds of devices. Our results showed that the FOVEP method was more accurate than the FOVWS method, and could be used for all endoscopes. We also found that the labelled FOV values of many commercial endoscopes are significantly overstated. Our study can help endoscope users understand endoscope FOV and identify a proper method for FOV measurement. This paper can be used as a reference to revise the current endoscope FOV measurement standard. PMID:28663840

  2. Endoscope field of view measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanzeng; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Leiner, Dennis; Shafer, David; Zobel, Jurgen

    2017-03-01

    The current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard (ISO 8600-3: 1997 including Amendment 1: 2003) for determining endoscope field of view (FOV) does not accurately characterize some novel endoscopic technologies such as endoscopes with a close focus distance and capsule endoscopes. We evaluated the endoscope FOV measurement method (the FOVWS method) in the current ISO 8600-3 standard and proposed a new method (the FOVEP method). We compared the two methods by measuring the FOV of 18 models of endoscopes (one device for each model) from seven key international manufacturers. We also estimated the device to device variation of two models of colonoscopes by measuring several hundreds of devices. Our results showed that the FOVEP method was more accurate than the FOVWS method, and could be used for all endoscopes. We also found that the labelled FOV values of many commercial endoscopes are significantly overstated. Our study can help endoscope users understand endoscope FOV and identify a proper method for FOV measurement. This paper can be used as a reference to revise the current endoscope FOV measurement standard.

  3. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area to see if there are any injuries to nerves and blood vessels. When the repair is complete, the wound is closed. If the tendon damage is too severe, the repair and reconstruction ... to repair part of the injury. Another surgery will be done at a later ...

  4. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  5. Transoral Endoscopic Adenoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    El-Badrawy, Amr; Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Adenoid curette guided by an indirect transoral mirror and a headlight is a simple and quick procedure that has already been in use for a long time, but this method carries a high risk of recurrence unless done by a well-experienced surgeon. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy in relieving the obstructive nasal symptoms. Methods. 300 children underwent transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy using the classic adenoid curette and St Claire Thomson forceps with a 70∘ Hopkins 4-mm nasal endoscope introduced through the mouth and the view was projected on a monitor. Telephone questionnaire was used to follow-up the children for one year. Flexible nasopharyngoscopy was carried out for children with recurrent obstructive nasal symptoms to detect adenoid rehypertrophy. Results. No cases presented with postoperative complications. Only one case developed recurrent obstructive nasal symptoms due to adenoid regrowth and investigations showed that he had nasal allergy which may be the cause of recurrence. Conclusion. Transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy is the recent advancement of classic curettage adenoidectomy with direct vision of the nasopharynx that enables the surgeon to avoid injury of important structures as Eustachian tube orifices, and also it gives him the chance to completely remove the adenoidal tissues. PMID:20111586

  6. Transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    El-Badrawy, Amr; Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Adenoid curette guided by an indirect transoral mirror and a headlight is a simple and quick procedure that has already been in use for a long time, but this method carries a high risk of recurrence unless done by a well-experienced surgeon. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy in relieving the obstructive nasal symptoms. Methods. 300 children underwent transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy using the classic adenoid curette and St Claire Thomson forceps with a 70( composite function) Hopkins 4-mm nasal endoscope introduced through the mouth and the view was projected on a monitor. Telephone questionnaire was used to follow-up the children for one year. Flexible nasopharyngoscopy was carried out for children with recurrent obstructive nasal symptoms to detect adenoid rehypertrophy. Results. No cases presented with postoperative complications. Only one case developed recurrent obstructive nasal symptoms due to adenoid regrowth and investigations showed that he had nasal allergy which may be the cause of recurrence. Conclusion. Transoral endoscopic adenoidectomy is the recent advancement of classic curettage adenoidectomy with direct vision of the nasopharynx that enables the surgeon to avoid injury of important structures as Eustachian tube orifices, and also it gives him the chance to completely remove the adenoidal tissues.

  7. European position paper on endoscopic management of tumours of the nose, paranasal sinuses and skull base.

    PubMed

    Lund, Valerie J; Stammberger, Heinz; Nicolai, Piero; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Beal, Tim; Beham, Alfred; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Braun, Hannes; Cappabianca, Paola; Carrau, Ricardo; Cavallo, Luigi; Clarici, George; Draf, Wolfwang; Esposito, Felice; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan; Fokkens, Wytske; Gardner, Paul; Gellner, Verena; Hellquist, Henrik; Hermann, Phillipe; Hosemann, Werner; Howard, David; Jones, Nick; Jorissen, Mark; Kassam, Amin; Kelly, Daniel; Kurschel-Lackner, Senta; Leong, Samuel; McLaughlin, Nancy; Maroldi, Roberto; Minovi, Amir; Mokry, Michael; Onerci, Metin; Ong, Yew Kwang; Prevedello, Daniel; Saleh, Hesham; Sehti, Dharambir S; Simmen, Daniel; Snyderman, Carl; Solares, Auturo; Spittle, Magaret; Stamm, Aldo; Tomazic, Peter; Trimarchi, Matteo; Unger, Frank; Wormald, Peter-John; Zanation, Adam

    2010-06-01

    Tumours affecting the nose, paranasal sinuses and adjacent skull base are fortunately rare. However, they pose significant problems of management due their late presentation and juxtaposition to important anatomical structures such eye and brain. The increasing application of endonasal endoscopic techniques to their excision offers potentially similar scales of resection but with reduced morbidity. The present document is intended to be a state-of-the art review for any specialist with an interest in this area 1. to update their knowledge of neoplasia affecting the nose, paranasal sinuses and adjacent skull base; 2. to provide an evidence-based review of the diagnostic methods; 3. to provide an evidence-based review of endoscopic techniques in the context of other available treatments; 4. to propose algorithms for the management of the disease; 5. to propose guidance for outcome measurements for research and encourage prospective collection of data. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach, adherence to oncologic principles with intent to cure and need for long-term follow-up is emphasised.

  8. Synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and growth-hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma: combined open and endoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Costanza J; Tewfik, Marc A; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Background Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium. In this article we report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma presenting concomitantly with a growth-hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Results A 52 year old woman underwent surgery for suspected nasal polyps. Intralesional debulking of an intranasal tumor disclosed a low-grade esthesioneuroblastoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large nasal and intracranial tumor, in addition to a separate sellar and suprasellar tumor. The patient was frankly acromegalic. She underwent a first-stage gross total resection of the esthesioneuroblastoma via a combined extended subfrontal and extended endonasal approach, followed by focused radiation therapy. She then returned for endoscopic removal of the GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Conclusion The combined open and endoscopic management of this patient is described and a review of the literature presented. To our knowledge this is the first case of synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and macroadenoma, in this case GH secreting, described in the literature.

  9. Endoscopic ligation of the internal maxillary artery for treatment of intractable posterior epistaxis.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J B; Caldarelli, D D; Panje, W R

    1998-02-01

    Lack of universal success with both transantral ligation of the internal maxillary artery and percutaneous embolization of the distal branches of the internal maxillary distribution has led to consideration of alternative techniques to control intractable posterior epistaxis. One such technique takes advantage of advances in endoscopic technology and instrumentation, as well as a nearly constant anatomic configuration. The internal maxillary artery divides into terminal branches within the pterygomaxillary fossa, sending branches through the bony maxilla to exit the posterolateral nasal wall in the posterior aspect of the middle meatus. Endoscopic identification and ligation of these terminal branches of the internal maxillary artery (the sphenopalatine and nasopalatine arteries) as they exit the maxilla has been performed on 10 patients with a 100% success rate and no morbidity or mortality associated with the procedure. These results compare favorably to the average reported success rates of 89% for transantral ligation and 94% for percutaneous embolization, and average complication rates of 28% and 27%, respectively. This endonasal procedure has been performed for spontaneous epistaxis as well as postsurgical nasal bleeding with equal success. The ascending scale of treatment previously outlined in the literature may be amended, as a potentially definitive procedure is available, and we believe that this technique is easier to perform, has less associated morbidity, and has equal efficacy in comparison to transantral ligation or percutaneous embolization in the treatment of intractable posterior epistaxis.

  10. Development of the McGill simulator for endoscopic sinus surgery: a new high-fidelity virtual reality simulator for endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rickul; Frenkiel, Saul; Nguyen, Lily H P; Young, Meredith; Del Maestro, Rolando; Zeitouni, Anthony; Tewfik, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    The technical challenges of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and the high risk of complications support the development of alternative modalities to train residents in these procedures. Virtual reality simulation is becoming a useful tool for training the skills necessary for minimally invasive surgery; however, there are currently no ESS virtual reality simulators available with valid evidence supporting their use in resident education. Our aim was to develop a new rhinology simulator, as well as to define potential performance metrics for trainee assessment. The McGill simulator for endoscopic sinus surgery (MSESS), a new sinus surgery virtual reality simulator with haptic feedback, was developed (a collaboration between the McGill University Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, the Montreal Neurologic Institute Simulation Lab, and the National Research Council of Canada). A panel of experts in education, performance assessment, rhinology, and skull base surgery convened to identify core technical abilities that would need to be taught by the simulator, as well as performance metrics to be developed and captured. The MSESS allows the user to perform basic sinus surgery skills, such as an ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy, through the use of endoscopic tools in a virtual nasal model. The performance metrics were developed by an expert panel and include measurements of safety, quality, and efficiency of the procedure. The MSESS incorporates novel technological advancements to create a realistic platform for trainees. To our knowledge, this is the first simulator to combine novel tools such as the endonasal wash and elaborate anatomic deformity with advanced performance metrics for ESS.

  11. Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Won-Ju; Park, Chang-Hwan; Chung, Kyoung-Myeun; Park, Seon-Young; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Ki, Ho-seok; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.

  12. Future Development of Endoscopic Accessories for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has recently been accepted as a standard treatment for patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), without lymph node metastases. Given the rise in the number of ESDs being performed, new endoscopic accessories are being developed and existing accessories modified to facilitate the execution of ESD and reduce complication rates. This paper examines the history underlying the development of these new endoscopic accessories and indicates future directions for the development of these accessories. PMID:28609819

  13. Propofol use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny G; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are often lengthier and more complex, thus requiring higher doses of sedatives for patient comfort and compliance. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with information regarding the use, safety profile, and merits of propofol for sedation in advanced endoscopic procedures like ERCP and EUS, based on the current literature. PMID:24833847

  14. Surgical nuances for nasoseptal flap reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Schmidt, Richard F; Choudhry, Osamah J; Shukla, Pratik A; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Extended endoscopic endonasal approaches have allowed for a minimally invasive solution for removal of a variety of ventral skull base lesions, including intradural tumors. Depending on the location of the pathological entity, various types of surgical corridors are used, such as transcribriform, transplanum transtuberculum, transsellar, transclival, and transodontoid approaches. Often, a large skull base dural defect with a high-flow CSF leak is created after endoscopic skull base surgery. Successful reconstruction of the cranial base defect is paramount to separate the intracranial contents from the paranasal sinus contents and to prevent postoperative CSF leakage. The vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF) has become the workhorse for cranial base reconstruction after endoscopic skull base surgery, dramatically reducing the rate of postoperative CSF leakage since its implementation. In this report, the authors review the surgical technique and describe the operative nuances and lessons learned for successful multilayered PNSF reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow CSF leaks created after endoscopic skull base surgery. The authors specifically highlight important surgical pearls that are critical for successful PNSF reconstruction, including target-specific flap design and harvesting, pedicle preservation, preparation of bony defect and graft site to optimize flap adherence, multilayered closure technique, maximization of the reach of the flap, final flap positioning, and proper bolstering and buttressing of the PNSF to prevent flap dehiscence. Using this technique in 93 patients, the authors' overall postoperative CSF leak rate was 3.2%. An illustrative intraoperative video demonstrating the reconstruction technique is also presented.

  15. Endoscopic vertical band gastroplasty with an endoscopic sewing machine.

    PubMed

    Awan, Amjad N; Swain, C P

    2002-02-01

    Vertical band gastroplasty is an accepted surgical operation for the treatment of obesity. It is performed by means of an open technique. This is a description of a new endoscopic technique for gastroplasty. An endoscopic sewing machine was mounted on a flexible upper endoscope. On a postmortem specimen of porcine gastroesophageal tissue an area of the stomach, about 8-cm long and 4-cm wide, extending from and in line with the esophagus, was marked. A flexible plastic ring about 3 cm in diameter was sutured to the stomach along the lesser curvature at 8 cm from the gastroesophageal junction with an endoscopic sewing machine. Vertical gastroplasty was accomplished by suturing together the anterior and posterior walls of the stomach with the endoscopic sewing machine. Hence, a gastroplasty was fashioned as an 8-cm-long tube along the lesser curvature of the stomach extending from the gastroesophageal junction to the outlet ring. An endoscopic gastroplasty for obesity was successfully performed by using an endoscopic sewing machine on a postmortem specimen of porcine stomach. The technical feasibility of endoscopic vertical ring gastroplasty should be tested in a live animal model. This will serve as the next phase in the development of this interventional endoscopic technique, which has potential for clinical applicability.

  16. Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalapathy, Suresh; Nayar, Manu K

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is now firmly established as one of the essential tools for diagnosis in most gastrointestinal MDTs across the UK. However, the ability to provide therapy with EUS has resulted in a significant impact on the management of the patients. These include drainage of peripancreatic collections, EUS-guided endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, EUS-guided coeliac plexus blocks, etc. The rapid development of this area in endoscopy is a combination of newer tools and increasing expertise by endosonographers to push the boundaries of intervention with EUS. However, the indications are limited and we are at the start of the learning curve for these high-risk procedures. These therapies should, therefore, be confined to centres with a robust multidisciplinary team, including interventional endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. PMID:28261439

  17. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  18. Upper Digestive Endoscopic Scene Analyze

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es...one of endoscopic semiology (disease descriptions) and one of endoscopic exams (patients’ iconography). A Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) [2] whose...knowledge of these Scenes. B) Object Information Lesions or any element of interest, i.e. the "endoscopic findings", constitute the objects to be

  19. Instrumentation: endoscopes and equipment.

    PubMed

    Gaab, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The technology and instrumentation for neuroendoscopy are described: endoscopes (principles, designs, applications), light sources, instruments, accessories, holders, and navigation. Procedures for cleaning, sterilizing, and storing are included. The description is based on the author's own technical development and neuroendoscopic experience, published technology and devices, and publications on endoscopic surgery. The main work horses in neuroendoscopy are rigid glass rod endoscopes (Hopkins optics) due to the optical quality, which allows full high-definition video imaging, different angles of view, and autoclavability, which is especially important in neuroendoscopy due to the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection. Applications are endoscopy assistance to microsurgery, stand-alone endoscopy controlled approaches such as transnasal skull base, ventriculoscopy, and cystoscopy in the cranium. Rigid glass rod optics are also applicable in spinal endoscopy and peripheral nerve decompression using special tubes and cannulas. Rigid minifiberoptics with less resolution may be used in less complex procedures (ventriculoscopy, cystoscopy, endoscopy assistance with pen-designs) and have the advantages of smaller diameters and disposable designs. Flexible fiberoptics are usually used in combination with rigid scopes and can be steered, e.g. through the ventricles, in spinal procedures for indications including syringomyelia and multicystic hydrocephalus. Upcoming flexible chip endoscopes ("chip-in-the-tip") may replace flexible fiberoptics in the future, offering higher resolution and cold LED-illumination, and may provide for stereoscopic neuroendoscopy. Various instruments (mechanical, coagulation, laser guides, ultrasonic aspirators) and holders are available. Certified methods for cleaning and sterilization, with special requirements in neuroapplications, are important. Neuroendoscopic instrumentation is now an established technique in neurosurgical practice and

  20. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Saclarides, Theodore John

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer. PMID:26491409

  1. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  2. Endoscopic valvuloplasty for GERD.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Serna, T; Davis, R E; Mason, R; Perdikis, G; Filipi, C J; Lehman, G; Nigro, J; Watson, P

    2000-11-01

    The transoral, endoscopic route has been suggested as a possible approach for the correction of severe gastroesophageal reflux. Such a procedure would involve no mobilization of the cardia or other structures. The optimal placement, number, and configuration of sutures remains undefined. With the use of a previously developed endoscopic sewing machine, this study was undertaken in baboons with two suture arrangements immediately below the lower esophageal sphincter. A linear arrangement (group I) and a circular arrangement (group II) were compared. During the 6 months after the procedure, the animals were evaluated using manometry, fluoroscopic barium swallow, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and a pressure volume test. A significant increase in lower esophageal sphincter length was demonstrated only in group II (p = 0. 010). A significant increase in lower esophageal sphincter pressure was demonstrated only in group I animals (p = 0.008). The abdominal length increased in group I (p = 0.004) and group II (p = 0.004). The yield pressure and yield volume did not differ significantly from those measured previously in control animals. No evidence of reflux, stricture formation, esophagitis, or other pathology was noted. Some manometric parameters associated with gastroesophageal reflux are altered by the endoscopic placement of sutures below the gastroesophageal junction, with no associated serious complications.

  3. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited.

  4. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  5. Clubfoot repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clubfoot release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer ... complete blood count and check electrolytes or clotting factors) Always tell your child's provider: What drugs your ...

  6. Initial Results of Endoscopic Gastrocutaneous Fistula Closure in Children Using an Over-the-Scope Clip

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Robert; Abrajano, Claire; Koppolu, Raji; Stevens, Megan; Nyznyk, Sarah; Chao, Stephanie; Bruzoni, Matias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrocutaneous fistula (GCF) occurs commonly in pediatric patients after removal of long-term gastrostomy tubes. Although open repair is generally successful, endoscopic approaches may offer benefits in terms of incisional complications, postoperative pain, and procedure time. In addition, endoscopic approaches may offer particular benefit in patients with varied degrees of skin irritation or erosion surrounding a GCF, making surgical repair difficult, or patients with significant comorbidities, making minimal intervention and anesthesia time preferable. Over-the-scope (OSC) clips are a new technology that enables endoscopic closure of intestinal fistulas up to 2 cm in diameter. Six pediatric patients underwent endoscopic GCF closure using OSC clips under Institutional Review Board approval. The procedure was technically successful in 5 of 6 cases with an average operating time of 29 minutes. The technical failure required an open revision, whereas all other patients reported full healing of the GCF site at 1 month. All successful cases were performed as outpatients without postoperative narcotics. In addition, all patients reported high satisfaction with the procedure and cosmetic results. Endoscopic GCF closure using an OSC clip is technically feasible in the pediatric population. Based on limited cases with a 1-month follow-up, the functional and cosmetic results of technically successful cases are excellent. Endoscopic GCF closure is a potential alternative to standard surgical closure in patients with skin irritation or erosion and/or significant comorbidities. PMID:25531644

  7. Characteristics of meningitis following transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery: a case series and a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Caggiano, Chiara; Ascione, Tiziana; Solari, Domenico; Di Flumeri, Giusy; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tortora, Fabio; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2017-08-03

    Meningitis occurs in 0.8-1.5% of patients undergoing neurosurgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate the characteristics of meningitis after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS) comparing the findings retrieved to those highlighted by literature search. Patients treated by EETS during an 18-year period in the Department of Neurosurgery of 'Federico II' University of Naples were evaluated and included in the study if they fulfilled criteria for meningitis. Epidemiological, demographic, laboratory, and microbiological findings were evaluated. A literature research according to PRISMA methodology completed the study. EETS was performed on 1450 patients, 8 of them (0.6%) had meningitis [median age 46 years (range 33-73)]. Endoscopic surgery was performed 1-15 days (median 4 days) before diagnosis. Meningeal signs were always present. CSF examination revealed elevated cells [median 501 cells/μL (range 30-5728)], high protein [median 445 mg/dL (range 230-1210)], and low glucose [median 10 mg/dL (range 1-39)]. CSF culture revealed Gram-negative bacteria in four cases (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes spp., and Haemophilus influenzae), Streptococcus pneumoniae in two cases, Aspergillus fumigatus in one case. An abscess occupying the surgical site was observed in two cases. Six cases reported a favorable outcome; two died. Incidence of meningitis approached to 2%, as assessed by the literature search. Incidence of meningitis after EETS is low despite endoscope goes through non-sterile structures; microorganisms retrieved are those present within sinus microenvironment. Meningitis must be suspected in patients with persistent fever and impaired conscience status after EETS.

  8. Endoscopic transsphenoidal approach versus microscopic approach in children.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Mario; Massimi, Luca; Parrilla, Claudio; Galli, Jacopo; Caldarelli, Massimo; Di Rocco, Concezio; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    To confirm the efficacy and safeness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal (ETS) approach in the treatment of sellar and parasellar lesions in children compared with the conventional microscopic transsphenoidal approach (CTS). Case series with chart review. A. Gemelli - University Hospital - Catholic University of Sacred Heart - Rome. We retrospectively evaluate 21 children (mean age 8.3 years) affected by sellar/parasellar lesions: 11 were treated via microscopic sublabial approach between 1995 and 2005 and 10 were treated with ETS approach between 2006 and 2009. The past series (group A) comprised all sellar/suprasellar lesions and we observed: gross total surgical excision in 81.2% of cases, permanent morbidity in 1/11 patients, CSF fistula in 1/11 patients, mean hospitalization time of 5.8 days and PICU was required. The present series (group B) included 8 sellar/suprasellar and 2 clival lesions and we observed: GTS excision in 80% of the cases, no permanent morbidity, a mean hospitalization time of 4.1 days (P=0.01), CSF fistula in 2/10 patients and the PICU was not required. 10/11 patient of group A underwent to blood transfusion vs 4/10 of the group B (P=0.008). The mean pain score of group A was 5.8 ± 1.7 on the contrary in the group B it was 4.1 ± 1.5 (P=0.006). The ETS approach to the sellar and parasellar region has proved its reliability and effectiveness in the adults. The minimal invasiveness makes it ideal for the treatment of pediatric lesion of this region, in which it is essential to preserve the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and of the naso-facial structures to assure the correct growth of the child. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Single incision endoscopic surgery for lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Shimizu, Satsuki; Shin, Hisato; Matsunoki, Aika; Watanabe, Go

    2011-01-01

    Single Incision Endoscopic Surgery (SIES) has emerged as a less invasive surgery among laparoscopic surgeries, and this approach for incisional hernia was reported recently. This is the first report of SIES for an incisional lumbar hernia. A 66-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our institution because of a left flank hernia that developed after left iliac crest bone harvesting. A 20-mm incision was created on the left side of the umbilicus and all three trocars (12, 5, and 5 mm) were inserted into the incision. The hernial defect was 14 × 9 cm and was repaired with intraperitoneal onlay mesh and a prosthetic graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. SIES for lumbar hernia offers a safe and effective outcome equivalent compared to laparoscopic surgery. In addition, SIES is less invasive and has a cosmetic benefit.

  10. Three-dimensional endoscopic visualization in functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tobias; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter K; Simon, Christian; Sertel, Serkan

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stereoscopic vision in sinus surgery has been achieved with the microscope so far. The introduction of two-dimensional (2D) endoscopes set a milestone in the visualization of the surgical field and paved the way to functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), although the 2D endoscopes cannot provide a stereoscopic visualization. The latest technology of 3D endoscopes allows stereoscopic vision. We provide a clinical investigation of all commercially available 3D endoscopes in FESS to compare their clinical value and efficacy to routinely used conventional 2D HD endoscopes. In this prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study, 46 patients with polypoid chronic rhinosinusitis underwent FESS with one of the following three endoscopes: 2D 0° high definition (HD), 3D 0° standard definition (SD) and 3D 0° HD. Four surgeons qualitatively assessed endoscopes on stereoscopic depth perception (SDP) of the surgeon, sharpness and brightness of the image, as well as their comfort in use during surgery. Surgeons assessed the brightness of the control (2D HD) significantly better than 3D SD (p = 0.009) and brightness of 3D HD was rated significantly better than 3D SD (p = 0.038). Stereoscopic depth perception (SDP) of 3D SD was assessed highly significantly better than the control (2D HD) (p = 0.021), whereas 3D HD displayed best SDP (p = 0.0001). The comfort in use was rated significantly higher in the 3D HD group compared to the control group (p = 0.025). No significant differences in sharpness could be seen among all endoscopes. 3D HD endoscopy provides an improvement in SDP and brightness of the surgical field. It enhances the intraoperative visualization and is therefore an important and efficient development in endoscopic sinus surgery.

  11. Olfaction in chronic rhinosinusitis: comparing two different endonasal steroid application methods.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sophia C; Batashev, Islam; Reden, Jens; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Limited olfactory improvement after topical steroid therapy in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients might result from restricted drug access to the olfactory cleft. The aim of our study was to investigate the difference between two methods to topically administer steroids with respect to olfaction: (1) conventional nasal spray and (2) a device using pressure and vibration to distribute steroid aerosol endonasally. A prospective study was performed in patients with olfactory impairment due to chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps. While the first group used the conventional dexamethasone nasal spray, the second group used the device over a period of 12 days. Olfactory testing was done at 0, 2, and 8 weeks using Sniffin' Sticks test. A significant olfactory improvement was found after 2 weeks of treatment with either steroid (p = 0.005). However, there was no significant difference between the different methods of steroid application. There is a significant olfactory improvement in CRS patients following topical dexamethasone therapy, but no obvious superiority of one of the two ways to administer the steroid.

  12. Coagulative and ablative characteristics of a novel diode laser system (1470nm) for endonasal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, C. S.; Havel, M.; Janda, P.; Leunig, A.; Sroka, R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Being practical, efficient and inexpensive, fibre guided diode laser systems are preferable over others for endonasal applications. A new medical 1470 nm diode laser system is expected to offer good ablative and coagulative tissue effects. Methods: The new 1470 nm diode laser system was compared to a conventional 940 nm system with regards to laser tissue effects (ablation, coagulation, carbonization zones) in an ex vivo setup using fresh liver and muscle tissue. The laser fibres were fixed to a computer controlled stepper motor, and the light was applied using comparable power settings and a reproducible procedure under constant conditions. Clinical efficacy and postoperative morbidity was evaluated in two groups of 10 patients undergoing laser coagulation therapy of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. Results: In the experimental setup, the 1470 nm laser diode system proved to be more efficient in inducing tissue effects with an energy factor of 2-3 for highly perfused hepatic tissue to 30 for muscular tissue. In the clinical case series, the higher efficacy of the 1470 nm diode laser system led to reduced energy settings as compared to the conventional system with comparable clinical results. Postoperative crusting was less pronounced in the 1470 nm laser group. Conclusion: The 1470 nm diode laser system offers a highly efficient alternative to conventional diode laser systems for the coagulation of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. According to the experimental results it can be furthermore expected that it disposes of an excellent surgical potential with regards to its cutting abilities.

  13. [Endoscopic treatments for Barrett oesophagus].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Ariane; Prat, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    High grade dysplasia and superficial carcinomas (with no extension under muscularis mucosae) can be indications for endoscopic treatments of Barrett oesophagus. When an endoscopic treatment is considered, a gastroscopy with use of acetic acid and planimetry and the confirmation of high-grade dysplasia by a new examination after PPI treatment and a pathologic second confirmation is needed. For high-grade dysplasia in focalised and visible lesions, an endoscopic resection by EMR or ESD should be proposed: it allows a more accurate pathologic examination and can be an effective curative treatment. After endoscopic resection of visible high grade dysplasia lesions, a complete eradication of Barrett oesophagus may be proposed to prevent dysplasia recurrence. In case of extensive high-grade dysplasia or to eradicate Barrett oesophagus residual lesions, radiofrequency ablation is the preferred endoscopic technique. Photodynamic therapy may also be proposed for more invasive lesions or after other endoscopic techniques with mucosal scars. Surgical oesophagus resection is still recommended for diffuse high-grade dysplasia in young patients or in case of pathologic pejorative criteria in endoscopic resection specimen. In case of Low-grade dysplasia, either endoscopic surveillance should be performed every six or 12 months or radiofrequency ablation could be proposed in the yield of prospective studies.

  14. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  15. Rinsability of Orthophthalaldehyde from Endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Norman; Harris, Valerie; Lukomski, Natalie; Ebron, Towanda

    2012-01-01

    Orthophthalaldehyde high level disinfectants are contraindicated for use with urological instruments such as cystoscopes due to anaphylaxis-like allergic reactions during surveillance of bladder cancer patients. Allergic reactions and mucosal injuries have also been reported following colonoscopy, laryngoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography with devices disinfected using orthophthalaldehyde. Possibly these endoscopes were not adequately rinsed after disinfection by orthophthalaldehyde. We examined this possibility by means of a zone-of-inhibition test, and also a test to extract residues of orthophthalaldehyde with acetonitrile, from sections of endoscope insertion tube materials, to measure the presence of alkaline glutaraldehyde, or glutaraldehyde plus 20% w/w isopropanol, or ortho-phthalaldehyde that remained on the endoscope materials after exposure to these disinfectants followed by a series of rinses in water, or by aeration overnight. Zones of any size indicated the disinfectant had not been rinsed away from the endoscope material. There were no zones of inhibition surrounding endoscope materials soaked in glutaraldehyde or glutaraldehyde plus isopropanol after three serial water rinses according to manufacturers' rinsing directions. The endoscope material soaked in orthophthalaldehyde produced zones of inhibition even after fifteen serial rinses with water. Orthophthalaldehyde was extracted from the rinsed endoscope material by acetonitrile. These data, and other information, indicate that the high level disinfectant orthophthalaldehyde, also known as 1,2-benzene dialdehyde, cannot be rinsed away from flexible endoscope material with any practical number of rinses with water, or by drying overnight. PMID:22665966

  16. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  18. Endoscopic retroauricular thyroidectomy: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Holsinger, F Christopher; Tufano, Ralph P; Park, Jae Hong; Sim, Nam Suk; Kim, Won Shik; Choi, Eun Chang; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2016-01-01

    We sought to seek the potential role of endoscopic thyroidectomy with the retroauricular (RA) approach prior to future comparative study with the robotic RA thyroidectomy. Therefore, this study aims to verify the surgical feasibility of endoscopic RA thyroidectomy. Eighteen patients who underwent endoscopic RA thyroidectomy for clinically suspicious papillary thyroid carcinoma or benign lesions from January to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. All endoscopic operations via RA or modified facelift approach were successfully performed, without any significant intraoperative complications or conversion to open surgery. Based on patient-reported outcome questionnaires, all patients were satisfied with their postoperative surgical scars. Endoscopic RA thyroidectomy is technically feasible and safe with satisfactory cosmetic results for patients where indicated.

  19. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  20. Endoscopic mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo Ha; Konda, Vani; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Komanduri, Sri; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Pannala, Rahul; Thosani, Nirav C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-08-01

    EMR has become an established therapeutic option for premalignant and early-stage GI malignancies, particularly in the esophagus and colon. EMR can also aid in the diagnosis and therapy of subepithelial lesions localized to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa. Several dedicated EMR devices are available to facilitate these procedures. Adverse event rates, particularly bleeding and perforation, are higher after EMR relative to other basic endoscopic interventions but lower than adverse event rates for ESD. Endoscopists performing EMR should be knowledgeable and skilled in managing potential adverse events resulting from EMR.

  1. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  2. Endoscopically assisted enucleation of a large mandibular periapical cyst.

    PubMed

    Nestal Zibo, Heleia; Miller, Ene

    2011-01-01

    Enucleation of large cysts in the jaws is an invasive method that might be associated with complications. Marsupialization is a less invasive alternative method but it involves a prolonged and uncomfortable healing period. This study addresses a contemporaneous and less invasive surgical technique for treating larger mandibular cysts. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A 48-year-old woman presented with a large mandibular apical cyst involving the left parasymphysis, body, ramus and condylar neck, with involvement of the alveolar inferior nerve. The cystic lesion was enucleated using a 30° 4.0 mm endoscopic scope and endoscopic instruments through two small accesses: the ostectomy site of previously performed marsupialization and the alveolus of the involved third molar extracted of the time of the enucleation of the cyst. RESULTS. The endoscopic scope provided good visualization of the whole cystic cavity allowing the removal of any residual pathologic tissue and preservation of the integrity of the involved inferior alveolar nerve. The morbidity of the surgical procedure was extremely reduced. At a 6-month follow-up the patient did not present any symptom of inflammation and a panoramic X-ray showed good bone repair and remodelation. CONCLUSIONS. Endoscopically assisted enucleation proved to be effective method of treating a large mandibular cyst, providing total enucleation with a minimal invasive technique.

  3. Endoscopic vs external dacryocystorhinostomy-comparison from the patients' aspect

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Serdar; Ozer, Pinar A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM To compare the success and complication rates, duration of surgeries and clinical comfort after endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (END-DCR) or external dacryocystorhinostomy (EXT-DCR). METHODS Fifty patients who underwent EXT- or END-DCR between January 2010-2012 were involved in the study. A questionnaire was applied to patients preoperatively, and postoperatively. Subjective success was defined by absence of epiphora, objective success by a normal nasolacrimal lavage and a positive functional endoscopic dye test (FEDT). Postoperative pain and cosmetic result of surgery were interpreted by the patients, who were also asked whether they would offer this surgery to a friend or would prefer this surgery once more if necessary. RESULTS Twenty-five patients underwent END-DCR and 25 underwent EXT-DCR. Mean duration of surgeries were 35min both for EXT-DCR (30-50) and END-DCR (35-50) (P=0.778). Intraoperative bleeding were documented in 48% of EXT-DCR and 4% of END-DCR cases (P<0.001). In total 96% of EXT-DCR and 100% of END-DCR patients had subjective success. Objective success was 100% in each group. There was no significant difference between the epiphora scorings and FDDT results in postoperative visits among the groups. END-DCR group reported less pain in first week and month (P<0.05, P<0.05). More patients in END-DCR group were happy with the cosmetic result in first week and month (P<0.001, P<0.001). More patients in END-DCR group offered this surgery to a friend (P<0.001). All patients in END-DCR group preferred this surgery once more if necessary, only 48% in EXT-DCR preferred the same method (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Although both END- and EXT-DCRs provide satisfactory outcomes with similar objective and subjective success rates, we demonstrated that the endonasal approach caused significantly less pain in early postoperative period than the external approach. Clinical comfort defined by the patients was quite higher in END-DCR group, in which patients mainly

  4. Analysis of 137 Patients Who Underwent Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Pituitary Adenoma Resection Under High-Field Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaping; Wang, Fuyu; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhou, Dingbiao

    2017-08-01

    Pure endoscopic resection has become the most popular surgical approach for pituitary adenoma. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) systems have been in use for endoscopic resection of pituitary adenomas. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of iMRI and neuroimaging navigation techniques during endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery of pituitary adenomas. Data from 137 patients who underwent resection of endoscopic pituitary adenoma under 1.5T iMRI navigation were collected and analyzed. Of patients, 92 underwent complete resection and 45 had residual tumor on real-time iMRI. Twenty-three patients underwent further surgery, and total resection was achieved in 19. Extent of total resection increased from 67.15% to 81.02%. iMRI revealed 3 patients with bleeding in the surgical area, which was successfully treated during the surgery. Review images obtained 3 months after surgery showed 26 patients with residual tumor; 14 patients had the same volume as intraoperatively, and 12 patients had a volume less than that observed intraoperatively. Residual tumor volume in the suprasellar region was less than that seen intraoperatively in 11 of 15 (73.3%) patients. The use of iMRI and neuronavigation not only leads to a higher rate of tumor resection but also helps in detecting and removing hematomas in the surgical area. Follow-up examinations of extent of residual tumor at 3 months postoperatively were consistent with intraoperative results. Residual tumor volume in the suprasellar region was usually less than that observed intraoperatively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. [Endoscope-assisted microsurgery for invasive endo- and suprasellar pituitary macroadenomas: a consecutive retrospective study with 13 patients].

    PubMed

    Baussart, B; Aghakhani, N; Portier, F; Chanson, Ph; Tadié, M; Parker, F

    2005-11-01

    Surgery of invasive endo- and suprasellar pituitary macroadenomas remains difficult. The records of 13 consecutive patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery were analyzed in order to evaluate advantages and limitations of endoscopy for surgery of invasive pituitary macroadenomas. A transseptal transsphenoidal intersepto-columellar approach was performed with a nasal 0-degree endoscope. Removal of the macroadenoma was performed under the control of a microscope. When the tumor seemed to be completely removed with microscope, a rigid 30-degree endoscope was inserted in the intrasellar and suprasellar regions in order to detect residual adenoma tissue. These residues were removed when technically possible. No rhinologic complication was noted. In 7 patients, the intra- and suprasellar endoscopic view detected a tumor residue which could be removed in each case. Two cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred during the complementary tumor resection. Two cases of diabetes insipidus and two of rhinorrhea were reported postoperatively. The analysis of the postoperative MRIs showed a complete removal in 23% of the patients (3/13), 75 to 100% removal in 54% of the patients (7/13), 50 to 75% removal in 8% of the patients (1/13) and 50% removal in 15% of the patients (2/13). More than 75% removal was thus achieved in 77% of the patients (10/13). The mean follow-up was 27.2 months. Rhinologic morbidity was reduced with the endoscopic endonasal approach. Endoscopy complemented with a microscope offered an optimal view of the intra- and suprasellar regions. Endoscopy also improved tumor resection of the invasive endo- and suprasellar pituitary macroadenomas by visualizing hidden suprasellar tumor residues. However, endoscopy was associated with a higher rate of postoperative rhinorrhea.

  6. High-level endoscope disinfection processes in emerging economies: financial impact of manual process versus automated endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Funk, S E; Reaven, N L

    2014-04-01

    The use of flexible endoscopes is growing rapidly around the world. Dominant approaches to high-level disinfection among resource-constrained countries include fully manual cleaning and disinfection and the use of automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs). Suboptimal reprocessing at any step can potentially lead to contamination, with consequences to patients and healthcare systems. To compare the potential results of guideline-recommended AERs to manual disinfection along three dimensions - productivity, need for endoscope repair, and infection transmission risk in India, China, and Russia. Financial modelling using data from peer-reviewed published literature and country-specific market research. In countries where revenue can be gained through productivity improvements, conversion to automated reprocessing has a positive direct impact on financial performance, paying back the capital investment within 14 months in China and seven months in Russia. In India, AER-generated savings and revenue offset nearly all of the additional operating costs needed to support automated reprocessing. Among endoscopy facilities in India and China, current survey-reported practices in endoscope reprocessing using manual soaking may place patients at risk of exposure to pathogens leading to infections. Conversion from manual soak to use of AERs, as recommended by the World Gastroenterology Organization, may generate cost and revenue offsets that could produce direct financial gains for some endoscopy units in Russia and China. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  8. Endoscopic egomotion computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, Tobias; Ruthotto, Steffen; Rupp, Stephan; Winter, Christian; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Computer assistance in Minimally Invasive Surgery is a very active field of research. Many systems designed for Computer Assisted Surgery require information about the instruments' positions and orientations. Our main focus lies on tracking a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to generate 3D ultrasound volumes. State-of-the-art tracking methods such as optical or electromagnetic tracking systems measure pose with respect to a fixed extra-body coordinate system. This causes inaccuracies of the reconstructed ultrasound volume in the case of patient motion, e.g. due to respiration. We propose attaching an endoscopic camera to the ultrasound probe and calculating the camera motion from the video sequence with respect to the organ surface. We adapt algorithms developed for solving the relative pose problem to recreate the camera path during the ultrasound sweep over the organ. By this image-based motion estimation camera motion can only be determined up to an unknown scale factor, known as the depth-speed-ambiguity. We show, how this problem can be overcome in the given scenario, exploiting the fact, that the distance of the camera to the organ surface is fixed and known. Preprocessing steps are applied to compensate for endoscopic image quality deficiencies.

  9. Endoscopic Treatment for Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic resection has been accepted as a curative modality for early gastric cancer (EGC). Since conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been introduced, many improvements in endoscopic accessories and techniques have been achieved. Recently, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using various electrosurgical knives has been performed for complete resection of EGC and enables complete resection of EGC, which is difficult to completely resect in the era of conventional EMR. Currently, ESD is accepted as the standard method for endoscopic resection of EGC in indicated cases. In this review, the history of endoscopic treatment for EGC, overall ESD procedures, and indications and clinical results of endoscopic treatment will be presented. PMID:22076219

  10. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms Cardiologists at the Texas Heart Institute were among the first to use ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... photographic accessories for endoscope, miscellaneous bulb adapter for endoscope, binocular attachment for endoscope, eyepiece attachment for prescription lens, teaching attachment, inflation bulb, measuring device...

  12. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... photographic accessories for endoscope, miscellaneous bulb adapter for endoscope, binocular attachment for endoscope, eyepiece attachment for prescription lens, teaching attachment, inflation bulb, measuring device...

  13. Complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1987-11-01

    A consecutive series of 90 patients undergoing endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy was reviewed. There were 26 complications (29%) in 19 patients in this group. Eight complications (8%) including CSF leak, temporary blindness, and hemorrhage were considered major with the latter occurring most commonly. Synechiae were the most commonly occurring minor complications. Endoscopic nasal sinus surgery performed by inexperienced operators carries with it the same risks and complications as traditional intranasal sinus surgery. Any surgeon who does not routinely perform traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy should accrue endoscopic experience through appropriate didactic training and multiple cadaver dissections (akin to otologic training).

  14. Endoscopic ultrasonography: equipment and technique.

    PubMed

    Röesch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    By definition, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) combines endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound, incorporating a small ultrasonic transducer into the tip of endoscopes. For the upper gastrointestinal tract, mostly oblique-viewing endoscopes are used, although recently, forward viewing instruments have become available. For colorectal EUS, rigid probes for the rectum and a flexible forward-viewing echocolonoscope are available. EUS generates ultrasound either mechanically or electronically, depending on the type of instrument used. The electronic technique potentially allows the incorporation of (color) Doppler ultrasound, which allows for additional processing and postprocessing functions. This generally is considered the EUS technique of the future.

  15. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  16. Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Dagle, Alicia B.; Kazanzides, Peter; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    Endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is an effective approach for pituitary adenoma resection, yet it poses the serious risk of internal carotid artery injury. We propose to visualize these carotid arteries, which are hidden by bone, with an optical fiber attached to a surgical tool and a transcranial ultrasound probe placed on the patient's temple (i.e. intraoperative photoacoustic imaging). To investigate energy requirements for vessel visualization, experiments were conducted with a phantom containing ex vivo sheep brain, ex vivo bovine blood, and 0.5-2.5 mm thick human cadaveric skull specimens. Photoacoustic images were acquired with 1.2-9.3 mJ laser energy, and the resulting vessel contrast was measured at each energy level. The distal vessel boundary was difficult to distinguish at the chosen contrast threshold for visibility (4.5 dB), which was used to determine the minimum energies for vessel visualization. The blood vessel was successfully visualized in the presence of the 0-2.0 mm thick sphenoid and temporal bones with up to 19.2 dB contrast. The minimum energy required ranged from 1.2-5.0 mJ, 4.2-5.9 mJ, and 4.6-5.2 mJ for the 1.0 temporal and 0-1.5 mm sphenoid bones, 1.5 mm temporal and 0-0.5 mm sphenoid bones, and 2.0 mm temporal and 0-0.5 mm sphenoid bones, respectively, which corresponds to a fluence range of 4-21 mJ/cm2. These results hold promise for vessel visualization within safety limits. In a separate experiment, a mock tool tip was placed, providing satisfactory preliminary evidence that surgical tool tips can be visualized simultaneously with blood vessels.

  17. Practice patterns in endoscopic skull base surgery: survey of the American Rhinologic Society.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jivianne T; Kingdom, Todd T; Smith, Timothy L; Setzen, Michael; Brown, Seth; Batra, Pete S

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of advanced endoscopic techniques has facilitated significant growth in the field of endoscopic skull base surgery (SBS). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of endoscopic SBS on the clinical practice patterns of the American Rhinologic Society (ARS) membership. A 23-item survey vetted by the ARS Board of Directors was electronically disseminated to the ARS membership from February 5, 2013, to March 31, 2013. The target group encompassed 982 ARS members. A total of 152 physicians (15.5%) completed the survey. Open and endoscopic skull base procedures were performed by 41% and 94% of the respondents, respectively. During a typical year, the number of endoscopic skull base cases ranged from 0 to 20 in 56%, 21 to 50 in 26%, 51 to 100 in 9%, and >100 in 8%. Endoscopic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair (96%) and transsphenoidal pituitary surgery (81%) were the most commonly performed procedures, followed by transcribriform (68.4%), transplanum (54.4%), and transclival (49.6%) approaches. Overall, 69.6% used endoscopy for resections of malignant sinus/skull base lesions. Considerable variation in Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding philosophy was observed, with open skull base (32%), unlisted endoscopic (29%), sinus surgery (24%), and unlisted neurosurgical (15%) codes employed by surgeons. Only 29% of physicians reported adequate reimbursement in ≥75% of cases. Eighty-five percent of respondents supported creation of dedicated endoscopic SBS codes. This study illustrates the widespread integration of endoscopic SBS procedures into rhinologic clinical practice among survey respondents. However, current variability in coding strategies and inadequate reimbursement may warrant development of specific guidelines to standardize coding and billing processes in the future. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Utility of endoscopic therapy in the management of Boerhaave syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, K. J.; Buttar, N.; Wong Kee Song, L. M.; Gostout, C. J.; Cassivi, S. D.; Allen, M. S.; Nichols, F. C.; Shen, K. R.; Wigle, D. A.; Blackmon, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims: The optimal intervention for Boerhaave perforation has not been determined. Options include surgical repair with/without a pedicled muscle flap, T tube placement, esophageal resection or diversion, or an endoscopic approach. All management strategies require adequate drainage and nutritional support. Our aim was to evaluate outcomes following Boerhaave perforation treated with surgery, endoscopic therapy, or both. Patients and methods: We performed a 10-year review of our prospectively maintained databases of adult patients with Boerhaave perforations. We documented clinical presentation, extent of injury, primary intervention, “salvage” treatment (any treatment for persistent leak), and outcome. Results were analyzed using the Fisher’s exact and Kruskal – Wallis tests. Results: Between October 2004 and October 2014, 235 patients presented with esophageal leak/fistula with 17 Boerhaave perforations. Median age was 68 years. Median length of perforation was 1.25 cm (range 0.8 – 5 cm). Four patients presented with systemic sepsis (two treated with palliative stent and two surgically). Primary endotherapy was performed for eight (50 %) and primary surgery for eight (50 %) patients. Two endotherapy patients required multiple stents. Median stent duration was 61 days (range 56 – 76). “Salvage” intervention was required in 2/8 (25 %) endotherapy patients and 1/8 (13 %) surgery patient (stent). All patients healed without resection/reconstruction. There were no deaths in the surgically treated group and two in the endotherapy group (stented with palliative intent due to poor systemic condition). Readmission within 30 days occurred in 3/6 of alive endotherapy patients (50 %) and 0/8 surgery patients. Re-intervention within 30 days was required for one endotherapy patient. Conclusion: Endoscopic repair of Boerhaave perforations can be useful in carefully selected patients without evidence of systemic sepsis

  19. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  20. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant; Agarwal, Moneet

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of long term follow

  1. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  2. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Tridimensional (3D) endoscopic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, M J; Muñoz Agel, F; Abad Belando, R

    2007-01-01

    A review and update on 3D endoscopic ultrasonography is included regarding all of this technique s aspects, technical details, and current indications. Images from our own clinical experience are presented.

  4. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  5. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion.

  6. Powered Endoscopic Nasal Septal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Aderito de; Iniciarte, Livia; Levine, Howard

    2005-01-01

    While nasal endoscopy is typically used for diagnosis and sinus surgery, endoscopy can be combined with powered instrumentation to perform nasal septal surgery. Powered Endoscopic Nasal Septum Surgery (PENSS) is an easy, effective and quick alternative to traditional headlight approaches to septoplasty. PENSS limits the dissection to the area of the deviation and markedly reduces the extent of subperichondrial dissection. This is particularly valuable in patients who have undergone prior septal cartilage resection. PENSS was used in 2,730 patients over 8 years. Surgical indications and technique are discussed. These patients had either isolated nasal septal deformities associated with other rhinologic pathology (sinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy polyps and external nasal deformity). PENSS was utilized with video assistance to allow an enhanced view of the endoscopic operative field. These patients were operated upon in an outpatient surgical suite and were seen for a post-operative video endoscopic evaluation at 5, 10, 15 and 20 days after surgery. The patients who had associated functional endoscopic sinus surgery were evaluated as needed until 6 weeks after surgery. There were no delayed complications. Endoscopic resection of septal spurs, deformities and deviations can be performed safely alone or in combination with endoscopic sinus surgery with minimal additional morbidity.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal.

  8. Endoscopic Management of Esophageal Anastomotic Leaks Following Surgery for Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Eugene; Markowitz, Arnold J.; Bains, Manjit S.; Gerdes, Hans; Ludwig, Emmy; Mendelsohn, Robin B.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Shah, Pari; Strong, Vivian E.; Schattner, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophageal anastomotic leaks following cancer surgery remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic interventions, including covered metal stents (cSEMS), clips, and direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (dPEJ) tubes are increasingly used despite limited published data regarding their utility in this setting. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of a multi-modality endoscopic approach to anastomotic leak management following surgery for esophageal or gastric cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases of gastric and esophageal operations at our hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Included patients had surgery for esophageal or gastric cancer, demonstrated evidence of an anastomotic leak at the esophageal anastomosis, and underwent attempted endoscopic therapy. Healing was defined as clinical and radiographic leak resolution. Results Forty-nine patients with leaks underwent endoscopic management. Of the 49 patients, 31 (63%) received cSEMS, 40 (82%) had dPEJ tubes inserted, and 3 (6%) received clips. Twenty-three (47%) patients underwent a combined approach. Overall, 88% of patients achieved healing in a median of 83 days. Twenty-two of 23 patients (96%) who underwent a multi-modality endoscopic approach healed. Only one patient had a major complication associated with stent erosion into the pulmonary artery, which was successfully treated with operative repair. Conclusions Esophageal anastomotic leaks following esophageal and gastric cancer surgery can be managed successfully and safely with endoscopic therapy. Combining cSEMS for leak control and dPEJ tube placement for nutrition support was highly effective in achieving healing, without need for surgical repair. PMID:26428689

  9. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  10. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery Using a 3D High-Definition Endoscopic System.

    PubMed

    Ruttkay, Tamas; Götte, Julia; Walle, Ulrike; Doll, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We describe a minimally invasive heart surgery application of the EinsteinVision 2.0 3D high-definition endoscopic system (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) in an 81-year-old man with severe tricuspid valve insufficiency. Fourteen years ago, he underwent a Ross procedure followed by a DDD pacemaker implantation 4 years later for tachy-brady-syndrome. His biventricular function was normal. We recommended minimally invasive tricuspid valve repair. The application of the aformentioned endoscopic system was simple, and the impressive 3D depth view offered an easy and precise manipulation through a minimal thoracotomy incision, avoiding the need for a rib spreading retractor.

  11. Endoscopic Septoplasty-Two Handed Technique with Endoscope Holder: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubarak M; Parab, Sapna R

    2016-12-01

    The popularity of endoscopes has been expanding not only in diagnostics but also in therapeutics. The traditional septal surgery also has come under the purview of endoscopic surgery in the last few decades. Endoscopic septoplasty has definitely many advantages over the conventional procedure. But the only disadvantage of endoscopic surgery is that it is a single handed technique as the other hand is used for holding the endoscope which may compromise the overall surgical time as the hemostasis and suctioning of the surgical field off the blood cannot be done simultaneously, in addition to the surgeon fatigue associated with holding the endoscope in the left hand. Endoscope holder allows both hands of the surgeon to be free for surgical manipulation and also imitates more or less same actions of the left hand. To report the preliminary use of Khan's endoscope holder for endoscopic septoplasty. Prospective Non Randomized Clinical Study. Khan's Endoscope Holder, which was primarily designed for endoscopic ear surgery, has been used for two handed technique of endoscopic septoplasty. The design of the Endoscope holder is described in detail. A total of 49 endoholder assisted endoscopic septoplasties were operated from Nov 2014 to Jan 2015 in MIMER Medical College and Sushrut ENT Hospital, Talegaon D, Pune, India. Our Endoscope Holder is a good option for two handed technique in Endoscopic Septoplasty due to its advantages. The study reports the successful usage and applicability of the endo holder for endoscopic Septoplasty. Level of evidence IV.

  12. Endoscopic laser dacryocystorhinostomy. An unusual post-operative finding: re-opening of the nasolacrimal duct.

    PubMed

    Arullendran, P; Robson, A K; Bearn, M

    2001-12-01

    Endoscopic laser dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is a recognized technique for the surgical treatment of epiphora. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is surgically bypassed by creating a passage from the lacrimal sac to the nasal cavity (rhinostomy). Some patients have undergone endonasal laser-assisted DCR, and were found to have an obstructed rhinostomy at follow-up. However, they reported a subjective improvement in their symptoms. Five such patients, at six months follow-up, were found to have a non-functioning rhinostomy with fluorescein dye emerging from under the inferior turbinate. These five patients along with four controls had post-operative macrodacryocystograms (MDCG) to delineate the anatomical passage by which tears were entering the nasal cavity. In the control group, clear passage of contrast into the middle meatus was demonstrated in three of the four subjects. In the study group, passage of dye to the inferior meatus, via the nasolacrimal duct was demonstrated in four of the five subjects. It is well recognized that a proportion of patients suffering from epiphora will have a natural resolution of their symptoms. Our results demonstrate that the resolution of epiphora in some operated patients was due to a re-opening of the nasolacrimal duct, and not because of a patent rhinostomy.

  13. Clinical outcome of endoscopic management of duodenal Dieulafoy's lesions: endoscopic band ligation versus endoscopic hemoclip placement.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jeong-Seon; Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Sung Soo; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Cho, Hyunjung; Cho, Young-Seok

    2016-08-01

    The most appropriate type of endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding due to duodenal Dieulafoy's lesions (DLs) is not yet established. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of mechanical endoscopic hemostasis for duodenal DLs and long-term outcome after successful hemostasis, as well as to compare the efficacy and safety of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and endoscopic hemoclip placement (EHP). Patients admitted to the emergency unit with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding from duodenal DLs were enrolled in this study. The data were collected prospectively, but data analysis was performed retrospectively. Twenty-four patients with duodenal DLs were treated with EBL (n = 11) or EHP (n = 13). There were no significant differences between groups with respect to clinical or endoscopic characteristics, apart from the number of epinephrine (three cases with EBL vs. 11 cases with EHP; p = 0.011). Primary hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Recurrent bleeding was observed in one patient (9.1 %) from the EBL group and in five patients (38.5 %) from the EHP group (p = 0.166). The recurrent bleeding in the patient from the EBL group was treated by EHP. In the EHP group, all five patients achieved successful secondary hemostasis by endoscopic treatment (EBL in two patients and EHP in three patients). There were no differences in secondary outcomes between the two groups, including the number of endoscopic sessions required, need for angiographic embolization or emergent surgery, transfusion requirements, or length of hospital stay. No complications occurred, and there was no recurrence of bleeding in either group during the follow-up period. Mechanical endoscopic treatments are effective and safe for the treatment of bleeding duodenal DLs. A large-scale, randomized, controlled study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of EBL and EHP for the management of bleeding duodenal DLs.

  14. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  15. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  16. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  17. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  18. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  19. A technique with manipulator-assisted endoscope guidance for functional endoscopic sinus surgery: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Milos; Gröbner, Christina; Dietz, Andreas; Krinninger, Maximillian; Lüth, Tim C; Strauss, Gero

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the theoretical feasibility of a new manipulator system for endoscope guidance in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The accuracy of endoscope positioning and time of endoscope movement with an endoscope manipulator system were determined with an artificial sinus model. A laboratory trial was performed. The time for 60 repetitions of manual compared to manipulator-assisted endoscope movements directed at 3 different target positions was evaluated. In addition, the alignment of the position vector for each endoscope movement was examined. A zero-degree Hopkins II telescope with a camera was used to head for the target positions. First, the endoscope movements were done manually, and afterward the endoscope manipulator system was used for endoscope guidance. The alignment of the position vector of the endoscope was measured with a portable measuring arm. There was no statistical difference between the time for manual and manipulator-assisted endoscope movements for all target positions. The alignment of the position vector of the endoscope was statistically different at 2 target positions: anterior ethmoid left side and ostium of maxillary sinus left side. There was no statistical difference at all other positions. The endoscope manipulator system has the potential to be integrated into the operating workflow without extending the time for endoscope guidance. The surgeon will be able to use both hands for the manipulation of the instruments. Less frequent endoscope movements and instrument changes may be expected after technical modification.

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Maple, John T; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Konda, Vani; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    ESD is an established effective treatment modality for premalignant and early-stage malignant lesions of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum. Compared with EMR, ESD is generally associated with higher rates of en bloc, R0, and curative resections and a lower rate of local recurrence. Oncologic outcomes with ESD compare favorably with competing surgical interventions, and ESD also serves as an excellent T-staging tool to identify noncurative resections that will require further treatment. ESD is technically demanding and has a higher rate of adverse events than most endoscopic procedures including EMR. As such,sufficient training is critical to ensure safe conduct and high-quality resections. A standardized training model for Western endoscopists has not been clearly established,but will be self-directed and include courses, animal model training, and optimally an observership at an expert center.Numerous dedicated ESD devices are now available in the United States from different manufacturers. Although the use of ESD in the United States is increasing, issues related to technical difficulty, limited training opportunities and mentors, risk of adverse events, long procedure duration,and suboptimal reimbursement may limit ESD adoption in the United States to a modest number of academic referral centers for the foreseeable future.

  1. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  2. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the design of endoscopes to ensure patient safety. Quality Assurance and Training Any facility in which gastrointestinal endoscopy is performed must have an effective quality assurance program in place to ensure that endoscopes ...

  3. Endoscopic capacity in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Perl, Daniel; Leddin, Desmond; Bizos, Damon; Veitch, Andrew; N'Dow, James; Bush-Goddard, Stephanie; Njie, Ramou; Lemoine, Maud; Anderson, Suzanne T; Igoe, John; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Shah, Brijen

    2016-03-01

    Levels of endoscopic demand and capacity in West Africa are unclear. This paper aims to: 1. describe the current labor and endoscopic capacity, 2. quantify the impact of a mixed-methods endoscopy course on healthcare professionals in West Africa, and 3. quantify the types of diagnoses encountered. In a three-day course, healthcare professionals were surveyed on endoscopic resources and capacity and were taught through active observation of live cases, case discussion, simulator experience and didactics. Before and after didactics, multiple-choice exams as well as questionnaires were administered to assess for course efficacy. Also, a case series of 23 patients needing upper GI endoscopy was done. In surveying physicians, less than half had resources to perform an EGD and none could perform an ERCP, while waiting time for emergency endoscopy in urban populations was at least one day. In assessing improvement in medical knowledge among participants after didactics, objective data paired with subjective responses was more useful than either alone. Of 23 patients who received endoscopy, 7 required endoscopic intervention with 6 having gastric or esophageal varices. Currently the endoscopic capacity in West Africa is not sufficient. A formal GI course with simulation and didactics improves gastrointestinal knowledge amongst participants.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  5. Management of urine leak after laparoscopic cyst decortication with retrograde endoscopic fibrin glue application and ureteral stent placement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mang L; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Matoka, Derek J; Ost, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Urine leakage is an uncommon complication after renal cyst decortication that typically resolves with adequate drainage. With prolonged large volume urine leakage from a perinephric drain, however, consideration for open surgical repair must be taken into account. We present the successful management of persistent urine leakage after laparoscopic cyst decortication with endoscopic retrograde fibrin glue injection and ureteral stent placement.

  6. Post traumatic pituitary apoplexy with contiguous intra cerebral hematoma operated through endonasal route--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dev, Ravi; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Mahesh Chandra; Khetan, Prakash; Chugh, Ashish

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome occurring as a consequence of fulminant expansion of pituitary tumor due to massive infarction, necrosis, and hemorrhage. Its association with head injury is rare and only few reports are available. Shear forces on st