Science.gov

Sample records for endonucleolytic rec12 removal

  1. Ctp1 and the MRN-complex are required for endonucleolytic Rec12 removal with release of a single class of oligonucleotides in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Maja; Kohli, Jürg; Ludin, Katja

    2009-11-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed during meiosis by the action of the topoisomerase-like Spo11/Rec12 protein, which remains covalently bound to the 5' ends of the broken DNA. Spo11/Rec12 removal is required for resection and initiation of strand invasion for DSB repair. It was previously shown that budding yeast Spo11, the homolog of fission yeast Rec12, is removed from DNA by endonucleolytic cleavage. The release of two Spo11 bound oligonucleotide classes, heterogeneous in length, led to the conjecture of asymmetric cleavage. In fission yeast, we found only one class of oligonucleotides bound to Rec12 ranging in length from 17 to 27 nucleotides. Ctp1, Rad50, and the nuclease activity of Rad32, the fission yeast homolog of Mre11, are required for endonucleolytic Rec12 removal. Further, we detected no Rec12 removal in a rad50S mutant. However, strains with additional loss of components localizing to the linear elements, Hop1 or Mek1, showed some Rec12 removal, a restoration depending on Ctp1 and Rad32 nuclease activity. But, deletion of hop1 or mek1 did not suppress the phenotypes of ctp1Delta and the nuclease dead mutant (rad32-D65N). We discuss what consequences for subsequent repair a single class of Rec12-oligonucleotides may have during meiotic recombination in fission yeast in comparison to two classes of Spo11-oligonucleotides in budding yeast. Furthermore, we hypothesize on the participation of Hop1 and Mek1 in Rec12 removal.

  2. Ctp1CtIP and Rad32Mre11 nuclease activity are required for Rec12Spo11 removal, but Rec12Spo11 removal is dispensable for other MRN-dependent meiotic functions.

    PubMed

    Hartsuiker, Edgar; Mizuno, Kenichi; Molnar, Monika; Kohli, Juerg; Ohta, Kunihiro; Carr, Antony M

    2009-04-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex is involved in various aspects of meiosis. Whereas available evidence suggests that the Mre11 nuclease activity might be responsible for Spo11 removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this has not been confirmed experimentally. This study demonstrates for the first time that Mre11 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad32(Mre11)) nuclease activity is required for the removal of Rec12(Spo11). Furthermore, we show that the CtIP homologue Ctp1 is required for Rec12(Spo11) removal, confirming functional conservation between Ctp1(CtIP) and the more distantly related Sae2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we show that the MRN complex is required for meiotic recombination, chromatin remodeling at the ade6-M26 recombination hot spot, and formation of linear elements (which are the equivalent of the synaptonemal complex found in other eukaryotes) but that all of these functions are proficient in a rad50S mutant, which is deficient for Rec12(Spo11) removal. These observations suggest that the conserved role of the MRN complex in these meiotic functions is independent of Rec12(Spo11) removal.

  3. Meiotic DNA double-strand break repair requires two nucleases, MRN and Ctp1, to produce a single size class of Rec12 (Spo11)-oligonucleotide complexes.

    PubMed

    Milman, Neta; Higuchi, Emily; Smith, Gerald R

    2009-11-01

    Programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in meiosis are formed by Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast), a topoisomerase II-like protein, which becomes covalently attached to DNA 5' ends. For DSB repair through homologous recombination, the protein must be removed from these DNA ends. We show here that Rec12 is endonucleolytically removed from DSB ends attached to a short oligonucleotide (Rec12-oligonucleotide complex), as is Spo11 in budding yeast. Fission yeast, however, has only one size class of Rec12-oligonucleotide complexes, whereas budding yeast has two size classes, suggesting different endonucleolytic regulatory mechanisms. Rec12-oligonucleotide generation strictly requires Ctp1 (Sae2 nuclease homolog), the Rad32 (Mre11) nuclease domain, and Rad50 of the MRN complex. Surprisingly, Nbs1 is not strictly required, indicating separable roles for the MRN subunits. On the basis of these and other data, we propose that Rad32 nuclease has the catalytic site for Rec12-oligonucleotide generation and is activated by Ctp1, which plays an additional role in meiotic recombination.

  4. A DNA binding motif of meiotic recombinase Rec12 (Spo11) defined by essential glycine-202, and persistence of Rec12 protein after completion of recombination.

    PubMed

    DeWall, K Mark; Davidson, Mari K; Sharif, Wallace D; Wiley, Charla A; Wahls, Wayne P

    2005-08-15

    The Rec12 (Spo11) protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a meiosis-specific ortholog of the catalytic subunit of type VI topoisomerases and is thought to catalyze double-strand DNA breaks that initiate recombination. We tested the hypothesis that the rec12-117 allele affects the choice of pathways by which recombination is resolved. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single missense mutation in the coding region (rec12-G202E). The corresponding glycine-202 residue of Rec12 protein is strictly conserved in proteins of the Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family. It maps to the base of the DNA binding pocket in the crystal structure of the archaeal ortholog, Top6A. The rec12-G202E mutants lacked crossover and non-crossover recombination, demonstrating that rec12-G202E does not affect choice of resolution pathway. Like rec12-D15 null mutants, the rec12-G202E mutants suffered chromosome segregation errors in meiosis I. The Rec12-G202E protein was as stable as wild-type Rec12, demonstrating that glycine-202 is essential for a biochemical activity of Rec12 protein, rather than for its stability. These findings suggest that Rec12 facilitates binding of the meiotic recombinase to its substrate, DNA. Interestingly, the bulk of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase I, and a portion of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase II, after which it was undetectable. This suggests that Rec12 protein has additional meiotic functions after completion of recombination in prophase, as inferred previously from genetic studies [Sharif, W.D., Glick, G.G., Davidson, M.K., Wahls, W.P., 2002. Distinct functions of S. pombe Rec12 (Spo11) protein and Rec12-dependent crossover recombination (chiasmata) in meiosis I; and a requirement for Rec12 in meiosis II. Cell Chromo. 1, 1].

  5. A DNA binding motif of meiotic recombinase Rec12 (Spo11) defined by essential glycine-202, and persistence of Rec12 protein after completion of recombination

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, K. Mark; Davidson, Mari K.; Sharif, Wallace D.; Wiley, Charla A.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2011-01-01

    The Rec12 (Spo11) protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a meiosis-specific ortholog of the catalytic subunit of type VI topoisomerases and is thought to catalyze double-strand DNA breaks that initiate recombination. We tested the hypothesis that the rec12-117 allele affects the choice of pathways by which recombination is resolved. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single missense mutation in the coding region (rec12-G202E). The corresponding glycine-202 residue of Rec12 protein is strictly conserved in proteins of the Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family. It maps to the base of the DNA binding pocket in the crystal structure of the archaeal ortholog, Top6A. The rec12-G202E mutants lacked crossover and non-crossover recombination, demonstrating that rec12-G202E does not affect choice of resolution pathway. Like rec12-D15 null mutants, the rec12-G202E mutants suffered chromosome segregation errors in meiosis I. The Rec12-G202E protein was as stable as wild-type Rec12, demonstrating that glycine-202 is essential for a biochemical activity of Rec12 protein, rather than for its stability. These findings suggest that Rec12 facilitates binding of the meiotic recombinase to its substrate, DNA. Interestingly, the bulk of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase I, and a portion of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase II, after which it was undetectable. This suggests that Rec12 protein has additional meiotic functions after completion of recombination in prophase, as inferred previously from genetic studies. PMID:16009511

  6. Distinct functions of S. pombe Rec12 (Spo11) protein and Rec12-dependent crossover recombination (chiasmata) in meiosis I; and a requirement for Rec12 in meiosis II.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Wallace D; Glick, Gloria G; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2002-09-19

    BACKGROUND: In most organisms proper reductional chromosome segregation during meiosis I is strongly correlated with the presence of crossover recombination structures (chiasmata); recombination deficient mutants lack crossovers and suffer meiosis I nondisjunction. We report that these functions are separable in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. RESULTS: Intron mapping and expression studies confirmed that Rec12 is a member of the Spo11/Top6A topoisomerase family required for the formation of meiotic dsDNA breaks and recombination. rec12-117, rec12-D15 (null), and rec12-Y98F (active site) mutants lacked most crossover recombination and chromosomes segregated abnormally to generate aneuploid meiotic products. Since S. pombe contains only three chromosome pairs, many of those aneuploid products were viable. The types of aberrant chromosome segregation were inferred from the inheritance patterns of centromere linked markers in diploid meiotic products. The rec12-117 and rec12-D15 mutants manifest segregation errors during both meiosis I and meiosis II. Remarkably, the rec12-Y98F (active site) mutant exhibited essentially normal meiosis I segregation patterns, but still exhibited meiosis II segregation errors. CONCLUSIONS: Rec12 is a 345 amino acid protein required for most crossover recombination and for chiasmatic segregation of chromosomes during meiosis I. Rec12 also participates in a backup distributive (achiasmatic) system of chromosome segregation during meiosis I. In addition, catalytically-active Rec12 mediates some signal that is required for faithful equational segregation of chromosomes during meiosis II.

  7. Purification, folding, and characterization of Rec12 (Spo11) meiotic recombinase of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Gao, Jun; Sharif, Wallace D; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2004-11-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by controlled dsDNA breaks (DSBs). Rec12 (Spo11) protein of fission yeast is essential for the formation of meiotic DSBs in vivo, for meiotic recombination, and for segregation of chromosomes during meiosis I. Rec12 is orthologous to Top6A topoisomerase of Archaea and is likely the catalytic subunit of a meiotic recombinase that introduces recombinogenic DSBs. However, despite intensive effort, it has not been possible to produce Rec12 protein in a soluble form required to permit biochemical analyses of function. To obtain purified Rec12 protein for in vitro studies, a rec12(+) cDNA was generated, cloned into vector pET15b(+), and expressed in Escherichia coli. Rec12 protein was produced at moderate levels and it partitioned into insoluble fractions of whole-cell extracts. The protein was enriched based upon its differential solubility in two different denaturants and was further purified by column chromatography. A combinatorial, fractional, factorial approach was used to identify conditions under which Rec12 protein could be refolded. Four parameters were most important and, following optimization, soluble Rec12 protein was obtained. Gel filtration demonstrated that refolded Rec12 protein exists as a monomer in solution, suggesting that additional proteins may be required to assemble biologically-active Rec12 dimers, as inferred previously from genetic data [Cell Chromosome 1 (2002) 1]. The production of refolded Rec12 in a soluble form will allow for characterization in vitro of this key meiotic recombination enzyme.

  8. Sites of strong Rec12/Spo11 binding in the fission yeast genome are associated with meiotic recombination and with centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Katja; Mata, Juan; Watt, Stephen; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Bähler, Jürg; Kohli, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination arises from Rec12/Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their subsequent repair. We identified Rec12-binding peaks across the S. pombe genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation after reversible formaldehyde cross-linking combined with whole-genome DNA microarrays. Strong Rec12-binding coincided with previously identified DSBs at the recombination hotspots ura4A, mbs1, and mbs2, and correlated with DSB formation at a new site. In addition, Rec12-binding corresponded to eight novel conversion hotspots and correlated with crossover density in segments of chromosome I. Notably, Rec12-binding inversely correlated with GC content, contrary to findings in S. cerevisiae. Although both replication origins and Rec12-binding sites preferred AT-rich gene-free regions, they seemed to exclude each other. We also uncovered a connection between binding sites of Rec12 and meiotic cohesin Rec8. Rec12-binding peaks lay often within 2.5 kb of a Rec8-binding peak. Rec12-binding showed preference for large intergenic regions and was found to bind preferentially near to genes expressed strongly in meiosis. Surprisingly, Rec12-binding was also detected in centromeric core regions, which raises the intriguing possibility that Rec12 plays additional roles in meiotic chromosome dynamics. PMID:18449558

  9. Sites of strong Rec12/Spo11 binding in the fission yeast genome are associated with meiotic recombination and with centromeres.

    PubMed

    Ludin, Katja; Mata, Juan; Watt, Stephen; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Bähler, Jürg; Kohli, Jürg

    2008-10-01

    Meiotic recombination arises from Rec12/Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their subsequent repair. We identified Rec12-binding peaks across the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation after reversible formaldehyde cross-linking combined with whole-genome DNA microarrays. Strong Rec12 binding coincided with previously identified DSBs at the recombination hotspots ura4A, mbs1, and mbs2 and correlated with DSB formation at a new site. In addition, Rec12 binding corresponded to eight novel conversion hotspots and correlated with crossover density in segments of chromosome I. Notably, Rec12 binding inversely correlated with guanine-cytosine (GC) content, contrary to findings in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although both replication origins and Rec12-binding sites preferred AT-rich gene-free regions, they seemed to exclude each other. We also uncovered a connection between binding sites of Rec12 and meiotic cohesin Rec8. Rec12-binding peaks lay often within 2.5 kb of a Rec8-binding peak. Rec12 binding showed preference for large intergenic regions and was found to bind preferentially near to genes expressed strongly in meiosis. Surprisingly, Rec12 binding was also detected in centromeric core regions, which raises the intriguing possibility that Rec12 plays additional roles in meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  10. Endonucleolytic processing of covalent protein-linked DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Neale, Matthew J; Pan, Jing; Keeney, Scott

    2005-08-18

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with protein covalently attached to 5' strand termini are formed by Spo11 to initiate meiotic recombination. The Spo11 protein must be removed for the DSB to be repaired, but the mechanism for removal is unclear. Here we show that meiotic DSBs in budding yeast are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage that releases Spo11 attached to an oligonucleotide with a free 3'-OH. Two discrete Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes were found in equal amounts, differing with respect to the length of the bound DNA. We propose that these forms arise from different spacings of strand cleavages flanking the DSB, with every DSB processed asymmetrically. Thus, the ends of a single DSB may be biochemically distinct at or before the initial processing step-much earlier than previously thought. SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes were identified in extracts of mouse testis, indicating that this mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. Oligonucleotide-topoisomerase II complexes were also present in extracts of vegetative yeast, although not subject to the same genetic control as for generating Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes. Our findings suggest a general mechanism for repair of protein-linked DSBs.

  11. Endonucleolytic cleavages by RNase E generate the mature 3′ termini of the three proline tRNAs in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Bijoy K.; Petree, Jessica R.; Kushner, Sidney R.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate here for the first time that proline tRNA 3′ end maturation in Escherichia coli employs a one-step endonucleolytic pathway that does not involve any of the six 3′ → 5′ exonucleases (RNase T, RNase PH, RNase D, RNase BN, RNase II and polynucleotide phosphorylase [PNPase]) to generate the mature CCA terminus. Rather, RNase E is primarily responsible for the endonucleolytic removal of the entire Rho-independent transcription terminator associated with the proK, proL and proM primary transcripts by cleaving immediately downstream of the CCA determinant. In the absence of RNase E, RNase G and RNase Z are weakly able to process the proK and proM transcripts, while PNPase and RNase P are utilized in the processing of proL. The terminator fragment derived from the endonucleolytic cleavage of proL transcript is degraded through a PNPase-dependent pathway. It is not clear which enzymes degrade the proK and proM terminator fragments. Our data also suggest that the mature 5′ nucleotide of the proline tRNAs may be responsible for the cleavage specificity of RNase E at the 3′ terminus. PMID:27288443

  12. Activation of an alternative, rec12 (spo11)-independent pathway of fission yeast meiotic recombination in the absence of a DNA flap endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Farah, Joseph A; Cromie, Gareth; Davis, Luther; Steiner, Walter W; Smith, Gerald R

    2005-12-01

    Spo11 or a homologous protein appears to be essential for meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and recombination in all organisms tested. We report here the first example of an alternative, mutationally activated pathway for meiotic recombination in the absence of Rec12, the Spo11 homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rad2, a FEN-1 flap endonuclease homolog, is involved in processing Okazaki fragments. In its absence, meiotic recombination and proper segregation of chromosomes were restored in rec12Delta mutants to nearly wild-type levels. Although readily detectable in wild-type strains, meiosis-specific DSBs were undetectable in recombination-proficient rad2Delta rec12Delta strains. On the basis of the biochemical properties of Rad2, we propose that meiotic recombination by this alternative (Rec*) pathway can be initiated by non-DSB lesions, such as nicks and gaps, which accumulate during premeiotic DNA replication in the absence of Okazaki fragment processing. We compare the Rec* pathway to alternative pathways of homologous recombination in other organisms.

  13. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of nonstop mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-06-17

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3' ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3' end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA.

  14. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of nonstop mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3′ end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  15. The rate-limiting step in yeast PGK1 mRNA degradation is an endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3'-terminal part of the coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Vreken, P; Raué, H A

    1992-01-01

    Insertion of an 18-nucleotide-long poly(G) tract into the 3'-terminal untranslated region of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1) mRNA increases its chemical half-life by about a factor of 2 (P. Vreken, R. Van der Veen, V. C. H. F. de Regt, A. L. de Maat, R. J. Planta, and H. A. Raué, Biochimie 73:729-737, 1991). In this report, we show that this insertion also causes the accumulation of a degradation intermediate extending from the poly(G) sequence down to the transcription termination site. Reverse transcription and S1 nuclease mapping experiments demonstrated that this intermediate is the product of shorter-lived primary fragments resulting from endonucleolytic cleavage immediately downstream from the U residue of either of two 5'-GGUG-3' sequences present between positions 1100 and 1200 close to the 3' terminus (position 1251) of the coding sequence. Similar endonucleolytic cleavages appear to initiate degradation of wild-type PGK1 mRNA. Insertion of a poly(G) tract just upstream from the AUG start codon resulted in the accumulation of a 5'-terminal degradation intermediate extending from the insertion to the 1100-1200 region. RNase H degradation in the presence of oligo(dT) demonstrated that the wild-type and mutant PGK1 mRNAs are deadenylated prior to endonucleolytic cleavage and that the half-life of the poly(A) tail is three- to sixfold lower than that of the remainder of the mRNA. Thus, the endonucleolytic cleavage constitutes the rate-limiting step in degradation of both wild-type and mutant PGK1 transcripts, and the resulting fragments are degraded by a 5'----3' exonuclease, which appears to be severely retarded by a poly(G) sequence. Images PMID:1320194

  16. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  17. High-Throughput Genotyping of Green Algal Mutants Reveals Random Distribution of Mutagenic Insertion Sites and Endonucleolytic Cleavage of Transforming DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Armbruster, Ute; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2014-04-01

    A high-throughput genetic screening platform in a single-celled photosynthetic eukaryote would be a transformative addition to the plant biology toolbox. Here, we present ChlaMmeSeq (Chlamydomonas MmeI-based insertion site Sequencing), a tool for simultaneous mapping of tens of thousands of mutagenic insertion sites in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We first validated ChlaMmeSeq by in-depth characterization of individual insertion sites. We then applied ChlaMmeSeq to a mutant pool and mapped 11,478 insertions, covering 39% of annotated protein coding genes. We observe that insertions are distributed in a manner largely indistinguishable from random, indicating that mutants in nearly all genes can be obtained efficiently. The data reveal that sequence-specific endonucleolytic activities cleave the transforming DNA and allow us to propose a simple model to explain the origin of the poorly understood exogenous sequences that sometimes surround insertion sites. ChlaMmeSeq is quantitatively reproducible, enabling its use for pooled enrichment screens and for the generation of indexed mutant libraries. Additionally, ChlaMmeSeq allows genotyping of hits from Chlamydomonas screens on an unprecedented scale, opening the door to comprehensive identification of genes with roles in photosynthesis, algal lipid metabolism, the algal carbon-concentrating mechanism, phototaxis, the biogenesis and function of cilia, and other processes for which C. reinhardtii is a leading model system.

  18. Transcriptome-wide characterization of miRNA-directed and non-miRNA-directed endonucleolytic cleavage using Degradome analysis under low ambient temperature in Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana.

    PubMed

    An, Feng-Ming; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2012-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana is an orchid species native to Taiwan, which has high economic value and a high frequency of floral polymorphism. To date, few studies have focused on the regulatory roles of miRNAs and functional small RNAs (sRNAs) in orchids although understanding the regulation of flower development and flowering time is potentially important. Here, we combined analyses of the transcriptome, sRNAs and the degradome to identify sRNA-directed transcript cleavages in Phalaenopsis. Degradome analysis provided large-scale evidence of conserved and novel miRNA-directed cleavage of target transcripts, and 46 abundant sRNA groups and their target transcripts were identified. Low temperature-responsive sRNAs were validated with normalized reads from an sRNA library and quantitative stem-loop reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. According to gene ontology (GO) categorization, target transcripts of the novel miRNAs and sRNAs are functionally involved in metabolic processes or responses to stress. One particular homologous gene, Allcontig28452, which encodes digalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase 2 (DGD2), was found to be targeted by natural antisense transcripts (NATs) unique to Phalaenopsis. In summary, comprehensive analyses of the transcriptome, sRNAs and degradome using deep sequencing technology provided a useful platform for investigating miRNA-directed and non-miRNA-directed endonucleolytic cleavage in a non-model plant, the orchid Phalaenopsis.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing protein TbMP42 (band VI) is crucial for the endonucleolytic cleavages but not the subsequent steps of U-deletion and U-insertion

    PubMed Central

    Law, Julie A.; O'Hearn, Sean F.; Sollner-Webb, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosome mitochondrial mRNAs achieve their coding sequences through RNA editing. This process, catalyzed by ∼20S protein complexes, involves large numbers of uridylate (U) insertions and deletions within mRNA precursors. Here we analyze the role of the essential TbMP42 protein (band VI/KREPA2) by individually examining each step of the U-deletional and U-insertional editing cycles, using reactions in the approximately linear range. We examined control extracts and RNA interference (RNAi) extracts prepared soon after TbMP42 was depleted (when primary effects should be most evident) and three days later (when precedent shows secondary effects can become prominent). This analysis shows TbMP42 is critical for cleavage of editing substrates by both the U-deletional and U-insertional endonucleases. However, on simple substrates that assess cleavage independent of editing features, TbMP42 is similarly required only for the U-deletional endonuclease, indicating TbMP42 affects the two editing endonucleases differently. Supplementing RNAi extract with recombinant TbMP42 partly restores these cleavage activities. Notably, we find that all the other editing steps (the 3′-U-exonuclease [3′-U-exo] and ligation steps of U-deletion and the terminal-U-transferase [TUTase] and ligation steps of U-insertion) remain at control levels upon RNAi induction, and hence are not dependent on TbMP42. This contrasts with an earlier report that TbMP42 is a 3′-U-exo that may act in U-deletion and additionally is critical for the TUTase and/or ligation steps of U-insertion, observations our data suggest reflect indirect effects of TbMP42 depletion. Thus, trypanosomes require TbMP42 for both endonucleolytic cleavage steps of RNA editing, but not for any of the subsequent steps of the editing cycles. PMID:18441050

  20. Adenoid removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... This does not cause problems most of the time. Alternative Names Adenoidectomy; Removal of adenoid glands Images Adenoid removal - series References Wetmore RF. Tonsils and adenoids. In: Kliegman ...

  1. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  2. Fishhook removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection such as redness, swelling, pain, or drainage. Wire cutting method: First, wash your hands with soap ... cut it off just behind the barb with wire cutters. Remove the rest of the hook by ...

  3. Kidney removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and medical centers are doing this surgery using robots . Why the Procedure is Performed Kidney removal may ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Tick removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... are small, insect-like creatures that live in woods and fields. They attach to you as you ... your clothes and skin often while in the woods. After returning home: Remove your clothes. Look closely ...

  5. Cataract removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... incision. Extracapsular extraction: The doctor uses a small tool to remove the cataract in mostly one piece. This procedure uses a larger incision. Laser surgery: The doctor guides a machine that uses laser energy to make the incisions ...

  6. Tick Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers ... for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of Vector- ...

  7. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Burris, Katy; Kim, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Tattoos have been a part of costume, expression, and identification in various cultures for centuries. Although tattoos have become more popular in western culture, many people regret their tattoos in later years. In this situation, it is important to be aware of the mechanisms of tattoo removal methods available, as well as their potential short- and long-term effects. Among the myriad of options available, laser tattoo removal is the current treatment of choice, given its safety and efficacy.

  8. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal.

  9. Hair removal.

    PubMed

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices.

  10. Mode of action of RNase BN/RNase Z on tRNA precursors: RNase BN does not remove the CCA sequence from tRNA.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Tanmay; Deutscher, Murray P

    2010-07-23

    RNase BN, the Escherichia coli homolog of RNase Z, was previously shown to act as both a distributive exoribonuclease and an endoribonuclease on model RNA substrates and to be inhibited by the presence of a 3'-terminal CCA sequence. Here, we examined the mode of action of RNase BN on bacteriophage and bacterial tRNA precursors, particularly in light of a recent report suggesting that RNase BN removes CCA sequences (Takaku, H., and Nashimoto, M. (2008) Genes Cells 13, 1087-1097). We show that purified RNase BN can process both CCA-less and CCA-containing tRNA precursors. On CCA-less precursors, RNase BN cleaved endonucleolytically after the discriminator nucleotide to allow subsequent CCA addition. On CCA-containing precursors, RNase BN acted as either an exoribonuclease or endoribonuclease depending on the nature of the added divalent cation. Addition of Co(2+) resulted in higher activity and predominantly exoribonucleolytic activity, whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), RNase BN was primarily an endoribonuclease. In no case was any evidence obtained for removal of the CCA sequence. Certain tRNA precursors were extremely poor substrates under any conditions tested. These findings provide important information on the ability of RNase BN to process tRNA precursors and help explain the known physiological properties of this enzyme. In addition, they call into question the removal of CCA sequences by RNase BN.

  11. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  12. Ctp1-dependent clipping and resection of DNA double-strand breaks by Mre11 endonuclease complex are not genetically separable

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kristi L.; Russell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair of programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires endonucleolytic clipping of Rec12Spo11-oligonucleotides from 5′ DNA ends followed by resection to generate invasive 3′ single-stranded DNA tails. The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) endonuclease and Ctp1 (CtIP and Sae2 ortholog) are required for both activities in fission yeast but whether they are genetically separable is controversial. Here, we investigate the mitotic DSB repair properties of Ctp1 C-terminal domain (ctp1-CD) mutants that were reported to be specifically clipping deficient. These mutants are sensitive to many clastogens, including those that create DSBs devoid of covalently bound proteins. These sensitivities are suppressed by genetically eliminating Ku nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) protein, indicating that Ctp1-dependent clipping by MRN is required for Ku removal from DNA ends. However, this rescue requires Exo1 resection activity, implying that Ctp1-dependent resection by MRN is defective in ctp1-CD mutants. The ctp1-CD mutants tolerate one but not multiple broken replication forks, and they are highly reliant on the Chk1-mediated cell cycle checkpoint arrest, indicating that HR repair is inefficient. We conclude that the C-terminal domain of Ctp1 is required for both efficient clipping and resection of DSBs by MRN and these activities are mechanistically similar. PMID:27325741

  13. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    DOEpatents

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  14. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOEpatents

    Krawiec, Donald F.; Kraf, Robert J.; Houser, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  15. Wart remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wart removers are medicines used to get rid of warts. Warts are small growths on the skin that are caused by a virus. They are usually painless. Wart remover poisoning occurs when someone swallows or uses ...

  16. Spider Vein Removal

    MedlinePlus

    Spider veins: How are they removed? I have spider veins on my legs. What options are available ... M.D. Several options are available to remove spider veins — thin red lines or weblike networks of ...

  17. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  18. Removal program priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The directive contains general policy guidelines regarding removal program priorities as it specifically relates to the 10 regional offices. Emphasis is placed on addressing the most serious public health and environmental threats (classic emergencies, time-critical removals at NPL sites, and time-critical removals at non-NPL sites). Regions are urged to pursue cleanup by the responsible parties (RP) and manage the removal program within the boundaries of their resources.

  19. Weakly supervised glasses removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie

    2015-03-01

    Glasses removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of glasses. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove glasses more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various glasses to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.

  20. ARSENIC REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies. T...

  1. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  2. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  3. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  4. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  5. Device for removing blackheads

    DOEpatents

    Berkovich, Tamara

    1995-03-07

    A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

  6. Removal of broken hardware.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; McElvany, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    Despite advances in metallurgy, fatigue failure of hardware is common when a fracture fails to heal. Revision procedures can be difficult, usually requiring removal of intact or broken hardware. Several different methods may need to be attempted to successfully remove intact or broken hardware. Broken intramedullary nail cross-locking screws may be advanced out by impacting with a Steinmann pin. Broken open-section (Küntscher type) intramedullary nails may be removed using a hook. Closed-section cannulated intramedullary nails require additional techniques, such as the use of guidewires or commercially available extraction tools. Removal of broken solid nails requires use of a commercial ratchet grip extractor or a bone window to directly impact the broken segment. Screw extractors, trephines, and extraction bolts are useful for removing stripped or broken screws. Cold-welded screws and plates can complicate removal of locked implants and require the use of carbide drills or high-speed metal cutting tools. Hardware removal can be a time-consuming process, and no single technique is uniformly successful.

  7. Gallbladder removal - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... the surgeon needs to switch to an open surgery if laparoscopic surgery cannot be successfully continued. Other reasons for removing the gallbladder by open surgery: Unexpected bleeding during the laparoscopic operation Obesity Pancreatitis (inflammation in the pancreas) Pregnancy ( ...

  8. Asbestos Removal Case History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Stanley J.

    1986-01-01

    The engineer for a California school district describes the asbestos removal from the ceilings of El Camino High School. Discusses forming a design team, use of consultants, specifications, relations with contractors, and staff notification. (MLF)

  9. Mechanical Foam Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streech, Neil

    1994-01-01

    Filter removes foam from soapy water stream discharged by primary phase separator of water-reclamation system. Uses no antifoam chemicals, contains no moving parts and requires no energy input other than small energy needed to pump water through filter.

  10. Paint removal using lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Garmire, E

    1995-07-20

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 10(7) in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m(2) area of paint 14 µm thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  11. Paint removal using lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Katherine; Garmire, Elsa

    1995-07-01

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 107 in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m2 area of paint 14 mu m thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  12. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid hormone medicine ... natural thyroid hormone. You may not need hormone replacement if only part of your thyroid was removed. ...

  13. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  14. Removing Images From Microfilm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    Film softened, scraped, and then dried. Unwanted images removed from microfilm for softening base film with hot water, scraping film and drying with isopropyl alcohol. Method simple and no visible damage to film.

  15. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  16. Sulfur removal from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Lompa-Krzymien, L.

    1985-01-01

    Coal is treated to remove both pyritic and organic sulfur by contacting with an aqueous solution comprising cupric ions at temperatures of about 140/sup 0/ C.-200/sup 0/ C. under autogenic pressure, until substantial amounts of the sulfur are solubilized, separating the coal solids, and washing the solids with water to remove soluble forms of sulfur, iron and copper therefrom. The copper can be recovered and recycled as a cupric salt.

  17. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  18. Endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA at 5' endogenous stem structures by human flap endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A

    1998-10-20

    Structure-specific nucleases called 5' flap endonucleases cleave unannealed 5' arms of template-primer DNA model substrates at the start of the duplex and are involved in Okazaki fragment processing during DNA synthesis. To determine the possible use of the enzymes in RNA structure analysis, the cleavage of synthetic and native RNAs was examined using flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) of HeLa cells. RNAs are cleaved at about 20% of the rate of DNA model substrates, and most of the cleavage sites are within 200 nucleotides of the 5' end. Hydrolysis of MFA2 mRNA of yeast shows that the cleavages are at the start of five possible stem structures of a folded secondary structure predicted on the basis of both chemical and enzymatic structure probing. 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli is cleaved at several 5' stem structures of its phylogenetically predicted folded structure. This type of RNA cleavage specificity may be very useful in secondary structure analysis in the future and also may be used by cells for specific 5' end-geared RNA cleavages.

  19. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been numerous advances in hair laser removal that utilize melanin as a chromophore. All of the devices on the market may be used in patients with light skin (phototypes I-III) and yield hair reduction near 75%. The ruby (694 nm) laser, alexandrite (755 nm) laser, and diode (810 nm) laser, as well as intense pulsed light are commonly used devices for hair laser removal. The long-pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser represents the safest device for hair removal in dark-skinned patients because of its long wavelength, although the diode laser, alexandrite laser, and intense pulse light may be used. For treatment of light hair, combination radiofrequency and optical devices as well as photodynamic therapy are under investigation.

  20. Arsenic removal from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  1. Dry removal of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Elias, J D

    1981-08-01

    A method for the dry removal of friable asbestos has been developed. The Workplace Safety and Health Branch in Manitoba's Limited have co-operated in the production of an improved procedure. It was employed for the first time in the fall of 1979 when the Industrial Hygiene Section was asked for advice about removal of asbestos from a Winnipeg School Division warehouse. Fans were used to maintain the work area under negative pressure to prevent the spread of asbestos throughout the building. The exhaust air was filtered to prevent environmental contamination, and special precautions were taken to protect workers.

  2. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.

    1994-01-01

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith.

  3. Quickly Removable Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, John S.

    1988-01-01

    Unit removed with minimal disturbance. Valve inlet and outlet ports adjacent to each other on same side of valve body. Ports inserted into special manifold on fluid line. Valve body attached to manifold by four bolts or, alternatively, by toggle clamps. Electromechanical actuator moves in direction parallel to fluid line to open and close valve. When necessary to clean valve, removed simply by opening bolts or toggle clamps. No need to move or separate ports of fluid line. Valve useful where disturbance of fluid line detrimental or where fast maintenance essential - in oil and chemical industries, automotive vehicles, aircraft, and powerplants.

  4. Optimising Laser Tattoo Removal

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal. PMID:25949018

  5. Drum lid removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Pella, Bernard M.; Smith, Philip D.

    2010-08-24

    A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

  6. Optimising laser tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal.

  7. Parathyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and will remove the diseased glands with the instruments. Endoscopic parathyroidectomy: Your surgeon will make two or three small cuts in the front of your neck and one cut above the top of your collarbone. This reduces visible scarring, pain, and recovery time. This cut is less than ...

  8. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  9. Bunion removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean and dry until it is removed. Take sponge baths or cover your foot and dressing with a plastic bag when you take showers if it is OK with your health care provider. Make sure water cannot leak into the bag.

  10. Improved Paint Removal Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-25

    4 (Phenol)1: p1P4 ji:i Condition of Point Surface Condition of Paint: Surface 4 after 45 minutes ufter 25 minutes Ten~t Pronsidure No. I. on~ Tent ...the ,.I .- pit so high velume water flow can be used to flush the pit floor clean at I the end of each day. Installation of removable grating is also

  11. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Omar A; Avram, Mathew M; Hanke, C William; Kilmer, Suzanne L; Anderson, R Rox

    2011-01-01

    The extended theory of selective photothermolysis enables the laser surgeon to target and destroy hair follicles, thereby leading to hair removal. Today, laser hair removal (LHR) is the most commonly requested cosmetic procedure in the world and is routinely performed by dermatologists, other physicians, and non-physician personnel with variable efficacy. The ideal candidate for LHR is fair skinned with dark terminal hair; however, LHR can today be successfully performed in all skin types. Knowledge of hair follicle anatomy and physiology, proper patient selection and preoperative preparation, principles of laser safety, familiarity with the various laser/light devices, and a thorough understanding of laser-tissue interactions are vital to optimizing treatment efficacy while minimizing complications and side effects.

  12. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, John E.

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  13. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  14. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  15. Runaway Rubber Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    16, No. 1, Jan 1944, pp. 53-68. 4. Moore, D.F., The Friction of Pneumatic Tyres , Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam, The Netherlands...timing of rubber removal are addressed. i’ ’ - " " - . 1.3 The Method of Research. A literature review first investigates the history , mechanics...mechanics of tire-pavement friction are fundamental to any study of the runway rubber process. In this section the history and two main components of

  16. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  17. Laser removal of tattoos.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Fatuzzo, G; Narcisi, A; Abruzzese, C; Caperchi, C; Gamba, A; Parisella, F R; Persechino, S

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries the phenomenon of "tattooing" is expanding and tattoos are considered a new fashion among young people. In this paper we briefly trace the history of tattooing, the techniques used, the analysis of pigments used, and their possible adverse reactions. We also carried out a review of the international literature on the use of Q-switched laser in tattoo removal and its complications, and we describe our experience in the use of this technique.

  18. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  19. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  20. Mower/Litter Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Burg Corporation needed to get more power out of the suction system in their Vac 'N Bag grass mower/litter remover. The president submitted a problem statement to the Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Transfer Office, which devised a way to guide heavier items of trash to a point where suction was greatest, and made changes to the impeller and the exhaust port, based on rocket propulsion technology. The improved system is used by highway departments, city governments and park authorities, reducing work time by combining the tasks of grass cutting and vacuuming trash and grass clippings.

  1. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  2. Mercury removal sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  3. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  4. Engine Removal Projection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2005-06-02

    The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

  5. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  6. Black hole hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair — degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  7. Rubber stopper remover

    DOEpatents

    Stitt, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    A device for removing a rubber stopper from a test tube is mountable to an upright wall, has a generally horizontal splash guard, and a lower plate spaced parallel to and below the splash guard. A slot in the lower plate has spaced-apart opposing edges that converge towards each other from the plate outer edge to a narrowed portion, the opposing edges shaped to make engagement between the bottom of the stopper flange and the top edge of the test tube to wedge therebetween and to grasp the stopper in the slot narrowed portion to hold the stopper as the test tube is manipulated downwardly and pulled from the stopper. The opposing edges extend inwardly to adjoin an opening having a diameter significantly larger than that of the stopper flange.

  8. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  9. Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-16

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal January 16, 2014 Approved for public release...17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Proanthocyanidin-based Endotoxin Removal Brandy J. White, James B. Delehanty, Baochuan Lin, and George P. Anderson Naval...Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified SAR 20 Brandy J. White (202) 404-6100 The application of proanthocyanidins (PACs) to the capture and removal of

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a long term performance study of two iron removal water treatment plants to remove arsenic from drinking water sources. Performance information was collected from one system located in midwest for one full year and at the second system located in the farwest...

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  12. Barnacle removal process and product

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, T.L.

    1984-07-24

    Barnacles from marine vessels are removed by spraying the surfaces thereof with a mixture the active ingredients of which are a hydrocarbon liquid oil; a surfactant; alcohol; a metal hypochlorite; and an alkyl, dialkyl benzyl ammonium salt. After the solution has been applied to the surfaces for about 20 minutes, the barnacles are removed by power spraying the surfaces with water.

  13. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  14. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2010-07-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  15. Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kanti L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the sources and effects of nutrients in wastewater, and the methods of their removal in wastewater treatment. In order to conserve water resources and eliminate the cost of nutrient removal, treated effluent should be used wherever possible for irrigation, since it contains all the ingredients for proper plant growth. (JR)

  16. Laser assisted hair-removal.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, S; Elsaie, M L; Nouri, K

    2009-10-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the hair follicle by targeting melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Laser hair removal is achieved through follicular unit destruction based on selective photothermolysis. The principle of selective photothermolysis predicts that the thermal injury will be restricted to a given target if there is sufficient selective absorption of light and the pulse duration is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the target. This review will focus on the mechanisms of laser assisted hair removal and provide an update on the newer technologies emerging in the field of lasers assisted hair removal.

  17. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  18. USGS Dam Removal Science Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellmore, J. Ryan; Vittum, Katherine; Duda, Jeff J.; Greene, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    This database is the result of an extensive literature search aimed at identifying documents relevant to the emerging field of dam removal science. In total the database contains 179 citations that contain empirical monitoring information associated with 130 different dam removals across the United States and abroad. Data includes publications through 2014 and supplemented with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Inventory of Dams database, U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System and aerial photos to estimate locations when coordinates were not provided. Publications were located using the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Clearinghouse for Dam Removal Information.

  19. Documentation for POTW Removal Rates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Table VI of the RFI presents removal and destruction rates for toxic chemicals sent to POTWs, based on experimental and estimated data compiled by the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) Program.

  20. Spleen removal - laparoscopic - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneeze to ease discomfort and protect your incision. Wound Care If stitches, staples, or glue were used ... 57 Read More Spleen removal Patient Instructions Surgical wound care - open Review Date 3/13/2015 Updated ...

  1. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  2. Removing Silicone Grease from Glassware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas H.

    1997-07-01

    A recent note in this Journal (1) described the use of 5% aqueous hydrofluoric acid for removing silicone grease residues from round-bottom flasks. A safer and more convenient alternative is a saturated solution of sodium hydroxide in ethanol.

  3. Article removal device for glovebox

    DOEpatents

    Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

    1973-12-01

    An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

  4. Electronic Commerce Removing Regulatory Impediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    AD-A252 691 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Removing Regulatory Impediments ~DuiG A% ELECTE I JUL1 8 1992 0 C D Daniel J. Drake John A. Ciucci ... - ""N ST AT KE...Management Institute 6400 Goldsboro Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817-5886 92 LMI Executive Summary ELECTRONIC COMMERCE : REMOVING REGULATORY IMPEDIMENTS... Electronic Commerce techniques, such as electronic mail and electronic data interchange (EDI), enable Government agencies to conduct business without the

  5. Paint Removal from Family Housing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    chloride, but these are less effective. Multiple component paints that cure by chemical reaction (e.g., epoxies, coal tar epoxies, polyurethanes, and...surface of the coating, and a fresh coat of remover was applied to the underlying coating. The reaction then continued until the base wood was exposed...Both products were also tested for removing a baked finish from aluminum siding. In this test, the 700-W was more effective than 667-W, probably

  6. Innovative approach to asbestos removal

    SciTech Connect

    Kahal, E J

    1984-01-01

    The most common asbestos materials used at the Savannah River site include: steam pipe insulation; powerhouse boiler insulation; wallboards; roofing materials; and cement products. Asbestos was also found in a number of other materials: aprons; gaskets; laboratory hot pads; and talcum powder used for gloves. Techniques for removal; personnel training; mechanical ventilation; and personnel isolation techniques are described for completing asbestos removal safely and without boiler downtime. (PSB)

  7. Guidelines for laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Casey, Angela S; Goldberg, David

    2008-03-01

    Requests for removal of unwanted body hair are common in dermatologic and surgical practices. Technology continues to improve the achievement of a more permanent reduction through the use of lasers. Despite the increased use of lasers, to date, few guidelines exist in terms of how to approach laser hair removal. Specifically, one must understand the mechanism of hair growth and how lasers work to target the hair follicle. There is significant variation among practitioners in pre-and post-laser recommendations to patients as well as intervals between treatment sessions. We performed a thorough review of the literature in order to determine evidence for the ideal interval between treatment sessions and the ideal number of sessions. We also sought to establish, based on published reports, the recommendations for shaving, plucking, waxing or other hair removal methods prior to laser hair removal and the guidelines for sun exposure before and after laser treatments. Finally, we searched the literature to find out whether there are areas that should not be treated with laser hair removal. The evidence and recommendations in this article aim to help guide practitioners in their approach to laser hair removal.

  8. Removal of unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shenenberger, Donald W; Utecht, Lynn M

    2002-11-15

    Unwanted facial hair is a common problem that is seldom discussed in the primary care setting. Although men occasionally request removal of unwanted facial hair, women most often seek help with this condition. Physicians generally neglect to address the problem if the patient does not first request help. The condition may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders, and should be properly evaluated. Options for hair removal vary in efficacy, degree of discomfort, and cost. Clinical studies on the efficacy of many therapies are lacking. Short of surgical removal of the hair follicle, the only permanent treatment is electrolysis. However, the practice of electrolysis lacks standardization, and regulation of the procedure varies from state to state. Shaving, epilation, and depilation are the most commonly attempted initial options for facial hair removal. Although these methods are less expensive, they are only temporary. Laser hair removal, although better studied than most methods and more strictly regulated, has yet to be proved permanent in all patients. Eflornithine, a topical treatment, is simple to apply and has minimal side effects. By the time most patients consult a physician, they have tried several methods of hair removal. Family physicians can properly educate patients and recommend treatment for this common condition if they are armed with basic knowledge about the treatment options.

  9. How Effective are Existing Arsenic Removal Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize the system performance results of the technologies demonstrated in the arsenic demonstration program. The technologies include adsorptive media, iron removal, iron removal with iron additions, iron removal followed by adsorptive media, coagulatio...

  10. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  11. Removal - An alternative to clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A.; Kunze, V.

    2007-07-01

    This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and

  12. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  13. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  14. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  15. Designing successful removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Daher, Tony; Hall, Dan; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-03-01

    In today's busy dental offices, removable partial denture design is often abdicated by dentists, both as a result of a lack of experience and consensus of design and because of educational failure on the part of dental schools. The result is delegation of the clinical design process to the lab technician. The lack of clinical data provided to the dental technician jeopardizes the quality of care. This article will focus on a logical and simple approach to this problem, making removable partial denture design simple and predictably achievable. The clinical evidence related to removable partial denture design will be described, along with a checklist to simplify the process and make it practical and applicable to everyday clinical practice.

  16. Alternative strategies for removing bromate

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. ); Amy, G.; Ozekin, K.; Zhai, W.; Westerhoff, P. )

    1994-10-01

    Stage 1 of the Disinfectants-Disinfection By-Products Rule specifies a maximum contaminant level of 10[mu]g/L for bromate ion, a by-product of the ozonation of natural water containing bromide ion. Several options for removing bromate after its formation are evaluated: reduction with ferrous iron (Fe[sup 2+]), reduction on the surface of activated carbon, ultraviolet irradiation, and high-energy electron beam irradiation. For all the processes, bromide was found in the treated water, which indicates that the dominating mechanism of bromate removal is chemical reduction. If Fe[sup 2+] is introduced after preozonation, it may function both as a reducing agent for bromate and as a coagulant for dissolved organic carbon removal.

  17. Hair removal on dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Delibasis, Kostantinos

    2015-08-01

    Digital Dermoscopy is a tool commonly used by dermatologists for assisting the diagnosis of skin lesions. The presence of hair in such dermoscopic images frequently occludes significant diagnostic information and reduces their value. In this work we propose algorithms that successfully identify and remove hair from the dermoscopic images. The proposed algorithms consist of two parts; the first deals with the identification of hair, while the second part concerns the image restoration using interpolation. For the evaluation of the algorithms we used ground truth images with synthetic hair and compared the results with the commonly used in the literature DullRazor tool. According to the experimental results the proposed hair removal algorithms can be used successfully in the detection and removal of both dark and light colored hair.

  18. Laser Tattoo Removal: An Update.

    PubMed

    Naga, Lina I; Alster, Tina S

    2017-02-01

    Tattoo art has been around for thousands of years in every culture and is currently flourishing in all age groups, social classes, and occupations. Despite the rising popularity of tattoos, demand for their removal has also increased. While various treatments, including surgical excision, dermabrasion, and chemical destruction have historically been applied, over the past 2 decades, lasers have revolutionized the way tattoos are treated and have become the gold standard of treatment. To achieve optimal cosmetic outcome of treatment, lasers emitting high energies and short pulses are required to adequately destroy tattoo ink. We review the history of laser tattoo removal, outlining the challenges inherent in developing lasers that can most effectively remove tattoo particles while safely protecting skin from unwanted injury.

  19. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  20. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  1. MICROBIOLOGICAL REMOVAL BY FILTRATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration ws originally used to remove contaminants that affect the appearance, odor, and taste of drinking water. Later it was demonstrated that bacteria in drinking water were causative agents of disease. Water treatment technology improved with the addition of disinfection, c...

  2. Waterjet processes for coating removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Fletcher; Cosby, Steve; Hoppe, David

    1995-01-01

    USBI and NASA have been testing and investigating the use of high pressure water for coating removal for approximately the past 12 years at the Automated TPS (Thermal Protection System - ablative materials used for thermal protection during ascent and descent of the solid rocket boosters) Removal Facility located in the Productivity Enhancement Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally the task was to develop and automate the removal process and transfer the technology to a production facility at Kennedy Space Center. Since that time more and more applications and support roles for the waterjet technology have been realized. The facility has become a vital part of development activities ongoing at MSFC. It supports the development of environmentally compliant insulations, sealants, and coatings. It also supports bonding programs, test motors, and pressure vessels. The most recent role of the cell is supporting Thiokol Corporation's solid rocket motor program in the development of waterjet degreasing and paint stripping methods. Currently vapor degreasing methods use 500,000 lbs. of ozone depleting chemicals per year. This paper describes the major cell equipment, test methods practiced, and coatings that have been removed.

  3. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Tiziana; Figoli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs) look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s) plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration. PMID:25826756

  4. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected.

  5. GLYPHOSATE REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated-carbon, oxidation, conventional-treatment, filtration, and membrane studies are conducted to determine which process is best suited to remove the herbicide glyphosate from potable water. Both bench-scale and pilot-scale studies are completed. Computer models are used ...

  6. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  7. Mercury Removal from Waste Organics

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, R.L.; Klasson, T.; Taylor, P.A.

    1999-02-28

    Mercury was effectively removed from the oil via sorption using SAMMS.The method was demonstrated on a large scale using ORNL waste oil contaminated with mercury. This technology is ready for further demonstration and implementation when the SAMMS material is available in large quantities.

  8. Removable singularities of holomorphic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirka, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Several sufficient conditions for the removability of singular sets with area zero are obtained for holomorphic functions in plane domains and on Riemann surfaces, under certain metric and topological assumptions about cluster sets of these functions and the limit sets of their graphs. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  9. Jail Removal Cost Study. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This second volume of the jail removal cost study provides a detailed report of the study findings which examine the costs, experiences, and ramifications of removing children from adult jails and lockups. The foreword supplies background information and hypothetical removal cost estimates. The approach used to conduct the jail removal cost study…

  10. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  11. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  12. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  13. 27 CFR 25.251 - Authorized removals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removal of Brewer's Yeast and Other Articles § 25.251 Authorized removals. (a) Brewer's yeast. A brewer may remove brewer's yeast, in liquid or solid form containing not... including the words “Brewer's Yeast.” (c) Pipeline. If brewer's yeast is removed by pipeline, the...

  14. Microalgae removal with Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Barrado-Moreno, M M; Beltran-Heredia, J; Martín-Gallardo, J

    2016-02-01

    Moringa oleifera seed extract was tested for algae (Chlorella, Microcystis, Oocystis and Scenedesmus) removal by Jar-test technique. This coagulant can be used in drinking water treatment. Jar-test has been carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of this natural coagulant agent inside real surface water matrix. The influence of variables has been studied in this process, including operating parameters such as coagulant dosage, initial algae concentration, pH, agitation time and water matrix. Removal capacity is verified for water with high contamination of algae while the process is not affected by the pH and water matrix. Coagulation process may be modelling through Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption hypothesis, so acceptable r2 coefficients are obtained.

  15. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  16. Thorium removal by different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Michail; Kasselouri-Rigopoulou, Vasilia; Galiatsatou, Polymnia; Konstantopoulou, Cathrine; Oikonomou, Dimitrios

    2003-02-28

    The removal of radiotoxic Th(4+) from aqueous solutions has been explored using two different groups of adsorptive materials (e.g. two activated carbons and four zeolites-two natural and two synthetic). The activated carbons were prepared from solvent extracted olive pulp (SEOP) and olive stone (OS) by a two-step physical activation method with steam. They were characterized by N(2) at 77K adsorption, Hg porosimetry and by determination of their iodine number. All carbons prepared are of the H-type (e.g. contain mainly basic surface oxides) confirmed by the results of the Boehm's method. The natural zeolites, clinoptilolite (NaCLI) and mordenite (NaMOR), were pretreated with Na(+) before the adsorption experiments, while the synthetic ones, NaX and NaA, were provided in their commercial sodium form. The natural zeolites, NaCLI and NaMOR, utilized 11.5 and 38.6% of the theoretical ion-exchange capacity, based on Al content, respectively, while NaX and NaA utilized 41.5 and 45.9%, respectively. The activated carbons showed better removal capability than NaCLI. NaMOR, showed comparable results to the carbon originated from OS, but lower removal capability than the carbon originated from SEOP. The synthetic zeolites showed the highest removal ability for thorium ions due to their increased ion-exchange capacity because of their cleaner and larger framework channels and their higher number of ion-exchange sites. The carbons adsorption capacity mainly depends on the content and nature of functional surface groups. The adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The former achieved best fits and was further applied to obtain the respective Langmuir constant and maximum adsorption capacity for each system.

  17. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-06

    Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. 30 Abductions by N. Korea not...3007. 33 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions, International Herald Tribune, September 4, 2007, p. 5...spring of 2007 to smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri

  18. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-10

    and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. Korea’s nuclear programs and...the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 30 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions...including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan navy intercepted and

  19. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  20. Environmentally Compliant Coating Remover Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    Penetrating Lubricants 16 10 Metalworking Fluids 62 8 Sorbents 72 17 Adhesive and Mastic Removers 25 19 Greases 18 5 Glass Cleaners 11 11 Firearm...Lubricants 8 2 Chain, Cable, and Gear Lubricants 33 13 Corrosion Preventatives 19 10 Industrial and Multipurpose Cleaners 114 40 Parts Wash Solutions...AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for

  1. METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

  2. Contaminant Removal From Natural Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Geiger, Cheri L. (Inventor); Reinhart, Debra (Inventor); Fillpek, Laura B. (Inventor); Coon, Christina (Inventor); Devor, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles is used to remediate contaminated natural resources, such as groundwater and soil. In a preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion removes heavy metals, such as lead (pb), from contaminated natural resources. In another preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion is a bimetallic emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles doped with a catalytic metal to remediate halogenated aromatic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from natural resources.

  3. Dye removal by immobilised fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Couto, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Dyes are widely used within the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, textile and leather industries. This has resulted in the discharge of highly coloured effluents that affect water transparency and gas solubility in water bodies. Furthermore, they pose a problem because of their carcinogenicity and toxicity. Therefore, removal of such dyes before discharging them into natural water streams is essential. For this, appropriate treatment technologies are required. The treatment of recalcitrant and toxic dyes with traditional technologies is not always effective or may not be environmentally friendly. This has impelled the search for alternative technologies such as biodegradation with fungi. In particular, ligninolytic fungi and their non-specific oxidative enzymes have been reported to be responsible for the decolouration of different synthetic dyes. Thus, the use of such fungi is becoming a promising alternative to replace or complement the current technologies for dye removal. Processes using immobilised growing cells seem to be more promising than those with free cells, since the immobilisation allows using the microbial cells repeatedly and continuously. This paper reviews the application of fungal immobilisation to dye removal.

  4. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  5. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  6. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Women)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Removing Pubic Hair Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 March 2017. +Related Content Key Facts Removing pubic hair is a personal preference. There are no health ...

  7. Self Insuring against Asbestos Removal Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slutzky, Lorence H.

    1987-01-01

    Asbestos removal is costly and many contractors have difficulty in obtaining insurance coverage. Presents a case for self insuring if contractors perform the removal work in compliance with state and federal regulations. Includes a reference list. (MD)

  8. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention install...

  9. THE REMOVAL OF GLYPHOSATE FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of granulated activated carbon (GAC), packed activated carbon (PAC), conventional treatment, membranes, and oxidation for removing glyphosate from natural waters is evaluated. Results indicate that GAC and PAC are not effective in removing glyphosate, while oxid...

  10. Designing Bioretention Systems to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention systems effectively remove many stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate removal performance is highly variable. Bioretention media is typically coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which...

  11. How to Remove a Stuck Ring Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  12. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-06

    ct/rls/crt/2006/82736.htm] at p. 147. 28 Yi Sang-il and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet...Interview of the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 32 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions...smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan

  13. Spikes removal in surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podulka, P.; Pawlus, P.; Dobrzański, P.; Lenart, A.

    2014-03-01

    Several cylinder surface topographies made from grey cast iron were measured by Talysurf CCI white light interferometer with and without use of spikes filter. They were plateau honed by abrasive stones. Measured area was 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm, height resolution was 0.01 nm. The forms were eliminated using polynomial of the 3rd degree. After it, spikes were removed using four methods. These approaches were compared. Parameters of the smaller and highest sensitivity on spikes presence were selected.

  14. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J.

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  15. Non-Time-Critical Removal Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Removal responses are used to address contamination that poses an immediate threat to human health and the environment. The documents below are a partial list of EPA's guidance for removals, with a focus on Non-Time-Critical Removal Actions (NTCRA).

  16. Apparatus Removes Organic Contaminants From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic-oxidation apparatus removes low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionizable organic contaminants from wastewater. Wastewater stream, previously treated by multifiltration process, pumped through apparatus for removal of trace organic contaminants. After injection of oxygen, flow preheated and enters catalytic reactor, where organic contaminants broken down into carbon dioxide and water. Carbon dioxide and unused oxygen removed in degasser.

  17. 10 CFR 850.35 - Medical removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.35 Medical removal. (a) Medical removal protection. The responsible employer must offer a beryllium-associated worker medical removal from exposure to beryllium if the SOMD determines in a written medical opinion that it...

  18. 10 CFR 850.35 - Medical removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.35 Medical removal. (a) Medical removal protection. The responsible employer must offer a beryllium-associated worker medical removal from exposure to beryllium if the SOMD determines in a written medical opinion that it...

  19. 10 CFR 850.35 - Medical removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.35 Medical removal. (a) Medical removal protection. The responsible employer must offer a beryllium-associated worker medical removal from exposure to beryllium if the SOMD determines in a written medical opinion that it...

  20. 10 CFR 850.35 - Medical removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.35 Medical removal. (a) Medical removal protection. The responsible employer must offer a beryllium-associated worker medical removal from exposure to beryllium if the SOMD determines in a written medical opinion that it...

  1. 10 CFR 850.35 - Medical removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.35 Medical removal. (a) Medical removal protection. The responsible employer must offer a beryllium-associated worker medical removal from exposure to beryllium if the SOMD determines in a written medical opinion that it...

  2. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If sewage removal fittings or adapters are provided with the device, they must be of either 11/2″ or 4″ nominal...

  3. 40 CFR 403.7 - Removal credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... removal credit. If granting removal credits forces a POTW to incur greater sludge management costs than would be incurred in the absence of granting removal credits, the additional sludge management costs... to be the limit of measurement, and those data may be used by the POTW at its discretion and...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.106 - Paint removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Paint removers. 3201.106 Section 3201.106 Agriculture... Items § 3201.106 Paint removers. (a) Definition. Products formulated to loosen and remove paint from painted surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have...

  5. 8 CFR 250.2 - Removal authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal authorization. 250.2 Section 250.2 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REMOVAL OF ALIENS WHO HAVE FALLEN INTO DISTRESS § 250.2 Removal authorization. If the district director grants the application...

  6. Hardware Removal after Osseous Free Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Day, Kristine E.; Desmond, Renee; Magnuson, J. Scott; Carroll, William R.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying risk factors for hardware removal in patients undergoing mandibular reconstruction with vascularized osseous free flaps remains a challenge. The purpose of this study is to identify potential risk factors, including osteocutaneous radial forearm versus fibular flap, for need for removal and to describe the fate of implanted hardware. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Two hundred thirteen patients undergoing 227 vascularized osseous mandibular reconstructions between the years 2004 and 2012. Data were compiled through a manual chart review, and patients incurring hardware removals were identified. Results Thirty-four of 213 evaluable vascularized osseous free flaps (16%) underwent surgical removal of hardware. The average length of time to removal was 16.2 months (median 10 months), with the majority of removals occurring within the first year. Osteocutaneous radial forearm free flaps (OCRFFF) incurred a slightly higher percentage of hardware removals (9.9%) compared to fibula flaps (6.1%). Partial removal was performed in 8 of 34 cases, and approximately 38% of these required additional surgery for removal. Conclusion Hardware removal was associated with continued tobacco use after mandibular reconstruction (P = .03). Removal of the supporting hardware most commonly occurs from infection or exposure in the first year. In the majority of cases the bone is well healed and the problem resolves with removal. PMID:24201061

  7. System for Removing Pollutants from Incinerator Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, David t.; Bahr, James; Dubovik, Rita; Gebhard, Steven C.; Lind, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A system for removing pollutants -- primarily sulfur dioxide and mixed oxides of nitrogen (NOx) -- from incinerator exhaust has been demonstrated. The system is also designed secondarily to remove particles, hydrocarbons, and CO. The system is intended for use in an enclosed environment, for which a prior NOx-and-SO2-removal system designed for industrial settings would not be suitable.

  8. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  9. 5 CFR 359.403 - Removal: Conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal: Conduct. 359.403 Section 359.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Removal of Career Appointees...

  10. 5 CFR 359.403 - Removal: Conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removal: Conduct. 359.403 Section 359.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Removal of Career Appointees...

  11. 14 CFR 25.31 - Removable ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Removable ballast. 25.31 Section 25.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.31 Removable ballast. Removable ballast may...

  12. 14 CFR 25.31 - Removable ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Removable ballast. 25.31 Section 25.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.31 Removable ballast. Removable ballast may...

  13. 14 CFR 25.31 - Removable ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Removable ballast. 25.31 Section 25.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.31 Removable ballast. Removable ballast may...

  14. 14 CFR 25.31 - Removable ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removable ballast. 25.31 Section 25.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.31 Removable ballast. Removable ballast may...

  15. 14 CFR 25.31 - Removable ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removable ballast. 25.31 Section 25.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.31 Removable ballast. Removable ballast may...

  16. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  17. Fuel removal, transport, and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) which damaged the core of the reactor resulted in numerous scientific and technical challenges. Some of those challenges involve removing the core debris from the reactor, packaging it into canisters, loading canisters into a rail cask, and transporting the debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for storage, examination, and preparation for final disposal. This paper highlights how some challenges were resolved, including lessons learned and benefits derived therefrom. Key to some success at TMI was designing, testing, fabricating, and licensing two rail casks, which each provide double containment of the damaged fuel. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Removing EDB with GAC filters

    SciTech Connect

    Narbaitz, R.M.; Baratta, A.; Parsons, F.Z. )

    1994-08-01

    Nearly 1,000 point-of-entry granular activated carbon (GAC) filters are efficiently removing ethylene dibromide (EDB) from contaminated groundwater throughout Florida. This article discusses the design, performance, and operational problems of the filters and assesses the possibility of extending the interval between GAC replacement from the current six months. Few breakthroughs have occurred in these filters, and most were caused by desorption during periods of sharp decreases in well-water EDB concentrations. Because GAC loading data from the literature described the program data very well, they were used in conjunction with the equilibrium column model to predict the performance of the program's filters for different GAC replacement periods. Based on the most conservative estimates, maintenance for 50% of the filters could be extended to every nine months.

  19. Space Station trash removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A trash removal system for space stations is described. The system is comprised of a disposable trash bag member and an attached, compacted large, lightweight inflatable balloon element. When the trash bag member is filled, the astronaut places the bag member into space through an airlock. Once in the vacuum of space, the balloon element inflates. Due to the large cross-sectional area of the balloon element relative to its mass, the combined balloon element and the trash bag member are slowed by atmospheric drag to a much greater extent than the Space Station's. The balloon element and bag member lose altitude and re-enter the atmosphere, and the elements and contents are destroyed by aerodynamic heating. The novelty of this system is in the unique method of using the vacuum of space and aerodynamic heating to dispose of waste material with a minimum of increase in orbital debris.

  20. Removal of uranium by biosorption

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Bonner, J.D.; Munroe, N.D.; Bloomingburg, G.F.

    1993-06-01

    The technology developed here will exploit the ability of microorganisms to remove dissolved metals from aqueous solutions. Microbial sorbents for uranium will be immobilized biosorbents will be deployed ex situ within flow-through reactors for the continuous or semicontinuous treatment of recovered wastewaters. The proposed technology will primarily be applied within a pump-and-treat process using immobilized biosorbents for the large-scale, long-term remediation of uranium-laden surface water or groundwater impoundments (environmental restoration). The technology may be equally useful as an ``end-of-pipe`` treatment of process effluents (waste management). Successful operation of this process will achieve immobilization of the targeted waste and accompanying volume reduction.

  1. THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Miller, O.E.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

  2. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  3. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  4. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  5. Hardware Removal in Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Thomas J.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Allori, Alexander C.; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Powers, David; Erdmann, Detlev; Hollenbeck, Scott T.; Levinson, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Craniomaxillofacial (CMF) fractures are typically treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Open reduction and internal fixation can be complicated by hardware exposure or infection. The literature often does not differentiate between these 2 entities; so for this study, we have considered all hardware exposures as hardware infections. Approximately 5% of adults with CMF trauma are thought to develop hardware infections. Management consists of either removing the hardware versus leaving it in situ. The optimal approach has not been investigated. Thus, a systematic review of the literature was undertaken and a resultant evidence-based approach to the treatment and management of CMF hardware infections was devised. Materials and Methods A comprehensive search of journal articles was performed in parallel using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect electronic databases. Keywords and phrases used were maxillofacial injuries; facial bones; wounds and injuries; fracture fixation, internal; wound infection; and infection. Our search yielded 529 articles. To focus on CMF fractures with hardware infections, the full text of English-language articles was reviewed to identify articles focusing on the evaluation and management of infected hardware in CMF trauma. Each article’s reference list was manually reviewed and citation analysis performed to identify articles missed by the search strategy. There were 259 articles that met the full inclusion criteria and form the basis of this systematic review. The articles were rated based on the level of evidence. There were 81 grade II articles included in the meta-analysis. Result Our meta-analysis revealed that 7503 patients were treated with hardware for CMF fractures in the 81 grade II articles. Hardware infection occurred in 510 (6.8%) of these patients. Of those infections, hardware removal occurred in 264 (51.8%) patients; hardware was left in place in 166 (32.6%) patients; and in 80 (15.6%) cases

  6. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  7. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  8. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  9. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  10. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  11. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  12. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  13. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Karpuk, M.E.

    1992-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test a regenerable stannic oxide-based sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from hot coal gases while producing sulfur as the only product. The detailed technical objectives in support of this are: (1) Develop mechanically strong and chemically inert support materials which will retain their properties through multiple absorption regeneration cycles. (2) Develop mathematical models to predict the performance of large-scale systems from benchscale results. (3) Test the durability of the best sorbent/support combinations. (4) Conduct a bench-scale proof of concept test with the best stannic-oxide sorbent. Several approaches are being used to develop long-life sorbents. The investigators have tested sorbents produced by agglomeration, pressing, and extrusion. To date over 50 formulations have been tested, with several showing promise. Table II presents the results on five of these formulations; all of these formulations had surface areas in excess of 2 m{sup 2}/gm. All of the formulations meet the goals for porosity, tin content, and surface area. The crush strength for a 1/8inches dia. by 1/8inches long sorbent is significantly affected by the method of preparing the sorbent.

  14. Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants

    DOEpatents

    Small, James H.; Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

  15. Removal of plutonium from hepatic tissue

    DOEpatents

    Lindenbaum, Arthur; Rosenthal, Marcia W.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for removing plutonium from hepatic tissues by introducing into the body and blood stream a solution of the complexing agent DTPA and an adjunct thereto. The adjunct material induces aberrations in the hepatic tissue cells and removes intracellularly deposited plutonium which is normally unavailable for complexation with the DTPA. Once the intracellularly deposited plutonium has been removed from the cell by action of the adjunct material, it can be complexed with the DTPA present in the blood stream and subsequently removed from the body by normal excretory processes.

  16. 7 CFR 1220.208 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.208 Removal. If...

  17. 7 CFR 1220.208 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.208 Removal. If...

  18. 7 CFR 1220.208 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.208 Removal. If...

  19. 7 CFR 1220.208 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.208 Removal. If...

  20. 7 CFR 1220.208 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.208 Removal. If...

  1. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. DBPs removal in GAC filter-adsorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkeun; Kang, Byeongsoo

    2008-01-01

    A rapid sand filter and granular activated carbon filter-adsorber (GAC FA) were compared in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) removal. A water treatment plant (WTP) that had a high ammonia concentration and DOC in raw water, which, in turn, led to a high concentration of DBPs because of a high dose of pre-chlorination, was investigated. To remove DBPs and DOC simultaneously, a conventional rapid sand filter had been retrofitted to a GAC FA at the Buyeo WTP in Korea. The overall removal efficiency of DBPs and DOC was higher in the GAC FA than in the sand filter, as expected. Breakthrough of trihalomethanes (THMs) was noticed after 3 months of GAC FA operation, and then removal of THMs was minimal (<10%). On the other hand, the removal efficiency of five haloacetic acids (HAA(5)) in the GAC FA was better than that of THMs, though adsorption of HAA(5) decreased rapidly after 3.5 months of GAC FA operation. And then, gradual improvement (>90%) in HAA(5) removal efficiency was again observed, which could be attributed to biodegradation. At the early stage of GAC FA operation, HAA(5) removal was largely due to physical adsorption, but later on biodegradation appeared to prevail. Biodegradation of HAA(5) was significantly influenced by water temperature. Similar turbidity removal was noticed in both filters, while better manganese removal was confirmed in the sand filter rather than in the GAC FA.

  3. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  4. 27 CFR 25.201 - Removal by pipeline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Removal of Beer to A Contiguous Distilled Spirits Plant § 25.201 Removal by pipeline. A brewer may remove beer from the brewery,...

  5. DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.

    1960-04-19

    A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

  6. Thermal removal of asbestos pipeline coating

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, W.H.

    1997-03-01

    A heat (thermal) technique, not previously used in the US for removing external pipe coating was used to remove asbestos-wrapped coating from 17 miles of 24-inch-diameter pipe. The process was conducted in compliance with all asbestos and air quality regulations, and produced asbestos-free pipe at timely and cost-effective rates.

  7. Removing Bonded Integrated Circuits From Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Small resistance heater makes it easier, faster, and cheaper to remove integrated circuit from hybrid-circuit board, package, or other substrate for rework. Heater, located directly in polymeric bond interface or on substrate under integrated-circuit chip, energized when necessary to remove chip. Heat generated softens adhesive or solder that bonds chip to substrate. Chip then lifted easily from substrate.

  8. EVALUATION OF REMOVABLE FILM CORROSION PREVENTIVES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report covers the evaluation of some 12 pressure sensitive tapes and one strippable vinyl plastisol material for possible use as a removable film...fungus resistance) and ease of removal of any of the tapes tested. A weather resistant polyvinyl fluoride backed tape and the strippable vinyl plastisol were the two most corrosive materials tested. (Author)

  9. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section 159.87 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If...

  10. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section 159.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The...

  11. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section 159.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The...

  12. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section 159.87 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If...

  13. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section 159.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The...

  14. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section 159.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The...

  15. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section 159.87 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If...

  16. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section 159.87 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If...

  17. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section 159.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The...

  18. TECHNOLOGIES FOR RADON AND RADIONUCLIDE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a summary of the technologies that are currently being used to remove radionuclides from drinking water. The radionuclides that are featured are the radionuclides currently regulated by EPA; radium, radon and uranium. Tehnologies effective for removal of eac...

  19. REMOVAL OF RADIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes processes for removal of radium from drinking water. Ion exchange, including strong acid and weak acid resin, is discussed. Both processes remove better than 95 percent of the radium from the water. Weak acid ion exchange does not add sodium to the water...

  20. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  1. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  2. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  3. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  4. 50 CFR 600.230 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Removal. 600.230 Section 600.230 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.230 Removal. The...

  5. 50 CFR 600.230 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Removal. 600.230 Section 600.230 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.230 Removal. The...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  7. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  8. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  9. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  10. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  11. Method And Apparatus For Arbitrarily Large Capacity Removable Media

    DOEpatents

    Milligan, Charles A.; Hughes, James P.; Debiez; Jacques

    2003-04-08

    A method and apparatus to handle multiple sets of removable media within a storage system. A first set of removable media are mounted on a set of drives. Data is accepted until the first set of removable media is filled. A second set of removable media is mounted on the drives, while the first set of removable media is removed. When the change in removable media is complete, writing of data proceeds on the second set of removable media. Data may be buffered while the change in removable media occurs. Alternatively, two sets of removable media may be mounted at the same time. When the first set of removable media is filled to a selected amount, the second set of removable media may then be used to write the data. A third set of removable media is set up or mounted for use, while the first set of removable media is removed.

  12. Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

    2003-11-24

    Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

  13. Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.

    1984-01-01

    Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

  14. Effectiveness of decanter modifications on organic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    1992-08-20

    A series of runs were planned in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) at the Savannah River Plant to determine the effectiveness of equipment and process modifications on the PHEF decanter organic removal efficiency. Runs 54-59 were planned to test the effectiveness of spray recirculation, a new decanter, heated organic recirculation and aqueous drawoff on organic removal efficiency in the revised HAN flowsheet. Runs 60-63 were planned to provide a comparison of the original and new decanter designs on organic removal efficiency in the late wash flowsheet without organic recirculation. Operational problems were experienced in both the PHEF and IDMS pilot facilities because of the production of high boiling organics and the low organic removal efficiency of the PHEF decanters. To prevent these problems in the DWPF Salt and Chemical Cells, modifications were proposed to the decanter and flowsheet to maximize the organic removal efficiency and minimize production of high boiling organics.

  15. Test Plan for the overburden removal demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.; Thompson, D.; Winberg, M.; Skaggs, J.

    1993-06-01

    The removal of soil overburdens from contaminated pits and trenches involves using equipment that will remove a small layer of soil from 3 to 6 in. at any time. As a layer of soil is removed, overburden characterization techniques perform surveys to a depth that exceeds each overburden removal layer to ensure that the removed soil will be free of contamination. It is generally expected that no contamination will be found in the soil overburden, which was brought in after the waste was put in place. It is anticipated that some containers in the waste zone have lost their integrity, and the waste leakage from those containers has migrated by gravity downward into the waste zone. To maintain a safe work environment, this method of overburden removal should allow safe preparation of a pit or trench for final remediation. To demonstrate the soil overburden techniques, the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program has contracted vendor services to provide equipment and techniques demonstrating soil overburden removal technology. The demonstration will include tests that will evaluate equipment performance and techniques for removal of overburden soil, control of contamination spread, and dust control. To evaluate the performance of these techniques, air particulate samples, physical measurements of the excavation soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and time versus volume (rate) of soil removal data will be collected during removal operations. To provide a medium for sample evaluation, the overburden will be spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers. This test plan will be describe the objectives of the demonstration, data quality objectives, methods to be used to operate the equipment and use the techniques in the test area, and methods to be used in collecting data during the demonstration.

  16. Removal of metals in constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, R.W.; Watson, R.C.; Williams, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Trace metals are difficult to remove from municipal wastewater by conventional wastewater treatment methods. Constructed wetlands have the potential to trap and remove metals from the water column. Long term removal is expected to occur by accumulation and burial in the plant detritus in a manner similar to the removal of phosphorus. Few data are available in the literature on removal of metals by constructed wetlands. A free water surface constructed wetland at Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant treating secondary municipal effluent has been operating since the spring of 1994. Removal data for 13 metals are presented for the period from August 1994 to May 1995. About 3,785 m{sup 3}/d (1 mgd) of pure oxygen activated sludge effluent, disinfected using UV light, is further treated through a 8 ha (20 acre) constructed wetlands Ten separate, parallel treatment cells are available to demonstrate the effects of detention time, vegetation management, and application frequency on the removal of metals, organics and ammonia. Detention time can be varied from 3 to 13 days by varying the flow and the water depth. The vegetation, primarily bulrush with some cattails, will be managed by different techniques to minimize mosquito production. Application frequency varies from continuous flow to batch flow (1 to 2 days of loading with 1 day of discharge).

  17. Efficacy of Biofilm Removal From Hemodialysis Piping

    PubMed Central

    Isakozawa, Yutaka; Migita, Heihachi; Takesawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Background Central dialysate fluid delivery systems (CDDS) are used by dialysis centers in Japan, and although these systems are effective at delivering dialysate, they have a complex piping network with numerous sites where contamination can develop. In Japan, cleaning disinfectants have been clinically evaluated based on endotoxin levels and bacterial counts, but there have been no published studies evaluating the biofilm removal efficacy of these agents at the electron microscope level. Objectives In this study, we used electron microscopy to evaluate the effectiveness of various cleaning disinfectants in removing biofilms from hemodialysis piping. Methods Liquid nitrogen was used to sever a section of dialysis piping on which a biofilm had formed during clinical use. Sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, and peracetic acid were used at stock-solution concentrations as cleaning disinfectants. These disinfectants were tested at room temperature and when heated (80°C). After cleaning and disinfection, biofilm removal from the surface of the piping was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results Sodium hypochlorite did not show good biofilm removal at room temperature or when heated. Acetic acid was more effective at biofilm removal when heated than at room temperature. Peracetic acid was highly effective at biofilm removal at both room temperature and when heated Conclusions Cleaning and disinfection using a disinfectant at a high temperature and high concentration effectively removes biofilms from hemodialysis piping. However, long-term exposure to disinfectants may affect the piping material. PMID:27878114

  18. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems.

  19. Metals removal and recovery from municipal sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.L.; Scheybeler, B.J.; Smith, M.L.; Baird, R.; Lo, M.P.; Haug, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of metals removal from municipal sludges that may be disposed of on agricultural land was studied. Heavy metal accumulation in such vegetables as lettuce and heavy metal toxicity to such crops as oats, beans, corn, and radishes is of concern. The purpose of the study was to assess metal removal systems for sludges obtained from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, Carson, Calif. Primary sludge, waste activated sludge, and their anaerobically digested counterparts were dosed with sulfuric acid and the chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), to effect metal solubilization. Seven metals were examined for removal from sludge: Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. Recovery of metals from the sludges was also examined. Using an acid dosage to effect pH decrease to pH 2 and a-stirring time of 24 hours, the removal efficiencies for Fe, Zn, Ni, and Cr were found to be upwards of 75%. Removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were less, at about 30 to 70%. At less than 10%, Cu was hardly removed. Metal extraction using EDTA gave slightly higher removal efficiencies for Cd, Pb, and Cu. The recovery of solubilized metals from solution with lime was very successful at greater than 90% efficiencies. Examination of the dewaterability of the acid-treated sludge found no significant difference between treated and untreated. Preliminary estimates indicated that about 0.5 metric ton of acid would be required for each dry metric ton of sludge solids to effect significant metal removal of better than 50% of the cadmium and 33% of the lead. To precipitate the metals from the acid filtrate, 1 metric ton of lime per dry metric ton of sludge would be needed. Considering the chemical costs and metal removal efficiency by sludge acidification, it would seem that industrial source control would be a more practical approach, although its full economic impact on the industries has not been estimated.

  20. Heavy metal removal from sediments by biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, C N; Yong, R N; Gibbs, B F

    2001-07-30

    Batch washing experiments were used to evaluate the feasibility of using biosurfactants for the removal of heavy metals from sediments. Surfactin from Bacillus subtilis, rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and sophorolipid from Torulopsis bombicola were evaluated using a metal-contaminated sediment (110mg/kg copper and 3300mg/kg zinc). A single washing with 0.5% rhamnolipid removed 65% of the copper and 18% of the zinc, whereas 4% sophorolipid removed 25% of the copper and 60% of the zinc. Surfactin was less effective, removing 15% of the copper and 6% of the zinc. The technique of ultrafiltration and zeta potential measurements were used to determine the mechanism of metal removal by the surfactants. It was then postulated that metal removal by the biosurfactants occurs through sorption of the surfactant on to the soil surface and complexation with the metal, detachment of the metal from the soil into the soil solution and hence association with surfactant micelles. Sequential extraction procedures were used on the sediment to determine the speciation of the heavy metals before and after surfactant washing. The carbonate and oxide fractions accounted for over 90% of the zinc present in the sediments. The organic fraction constituted over 70% of the copper. Sequential extraction of the sediments after washing with the various surfactants indicated that the biosurfactants, rhamnolipid and surfactin could remove the organically-bound copper and that the sophorolipid could remove the carbonate and oxide-bound zinc. Therefore, heavy metal removal from sediments is feasible and further research will be conducted.

  1. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  2. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee , Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2008-04-22

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  3. Induced elephant (Loxodonta africana) tusk removal.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Martin; Gould, Alan R; Clark, Thomas J; Burns, Roy

    2003-03-01

    Elephant tusk removal usually requires costly surgical procedures that are time-consuming and present a significant risk to the animal when performed using general anesthesia. Such techniques require gauges, chisels, and forceps to remove the tusk. This article reports the simple removal of the tusk of an 18-yr-old African elephant (Loxodonta africana) without the use of surgical instruments and anesthesia. Rubber elastics were placed around a tusk, causing loss of alveolar bone with subsequent exfoliation of the tusk within 3 wk. The healing process was uneventful.

  4. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Brady, Patrick V.

    1997-01-01

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

  5. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1997-10-14

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

  6. Removal of hexavalent chromium using distillery sludge.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, K; Manonmani, S; Pattabhi, S

    2003-09-01

    Batch mode experiments were conducted to study the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous and industrial effluent using distillery sludge. Effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of Cr(VI) were studied. The data obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 5.7 mg/g. Freundlich constants K(f) and n were 2.05 [mg/g(L/mg)(n)] and 3.9, respectively. Desorption studies indicated the removal of 82% of the hexavalent chromium. The efficiency of adsorbent towards the removal of chromium was also tested using chromium-plating wastewater.

  7. Enhancing biological phosphorus removal with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Sparling, R; Lagasse, P; Lee, Y M; Taniguchi, D; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    An enhanced biological phosphorus removal process (EBPR) was successfully operated in presence of acetate. When glycerol was substituted for acetate in the feed the EBPR process failed. Subsequently waste activated sludge (WAS) from the reactor was removed to an off-line fermenter. The same amount of glycerol was added to the WAS fermenter which led to significant volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. By supplying the system with the VFA-enriched supernatant of the fermentate, biological phosphorus removal was enhanced. It was concluded that, if glycerol was to be used as an external carbon source in EBPR, the effective approach was to ferment glycerol with waste activated sludge.

  8. Laser tattoo removal, precautions, and unwanted effects.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Yvonne; Rubin, Agneta Troilius

    2015-01-01

    Laser tattoo removal uses the physical properties of photoselective thermolysis in order to remove tattoo pigment. The technique has gradually improved over the years with the development of Q-switched lasers, with overall good results and a relatively low degree of adverse effects. However, lasers cannot always erase the unwanted tattoo completely, and there are still risks of unwanted effects such as scarring, pigment changes, ink darkening, and potential aggravation of latent skin conditions. This chapter will discuss the precautions that have to be taken and what pitfalls to avoid before starting the procedure of laser tattoo removal.

  9. Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

  10. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Men)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Removing Pubic Hair Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 March 2017. +Related Content Some guys trim their pubic hair, others prefer to shave or wax, and most ...

  11. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.

  12. Legality of Non-Cooperative Satellite Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siqing

    2013-09-01

    Uncontrolled growth of non-functional satellites has imposed significant threats on the space environment. However, out of various concerns, not all States are willing to adopt measures to minimize the debris caused by their own space activities. This article analyzes whether the threatened States are entitled to the right to remove space debris of another State without prior consent. Firstly, the author examines who exercises jurisdiction over the non-functional satellites; then, by analyzing Article IX of the Outer Space Treaty and the IADC Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines, the author finds that there is a forthcoming debris removal obligation under international law; further, the author suggests two legal basis for the non-cooperative removal: Article IX of the Outer Space Treaty and the Precautionary Principle. In conclusion, it is neither justifiable nor efficient to absolutely prohibit the threatened States to remove non-functional satellites without prior consent.

  13. REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE IONS FROM WATERS

    DOEpatents

    Silker, W.B.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing neutron-reaction products, such as phosphorus, arsenic, manganese, copper, zinc, lanthanides, and actinides, from aqueous solutions by sorption on particles of aluminum metal is described. (AEC)

  14. Removing Ambiguities In Remotely Sensed Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Scott J.; Dunbar, Roy S.; Hsiao, Shuchi V.; Long, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Algorithm removes ambiguities in choices of candidate ocean-surface wind vectors estimated from measurements of radar backscatter from ocean waves. Increases accuracies of estimates of winds without requiring new instrumentation. Incorporates vector-median filtering function.

  15. A new technique for removing intramedullary cement.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jason A; Vosburg, Caleb; Murtha, Yvonne M; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Crist, Brett D

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of infected long bone fractures or nonunions requires stability for bony union, yet retained implants can lead to persistent infection. Antibiotic cement intramedullary nails, in addition to external fixation, are commonly used to deliver intramedullary antibiotics in infected long bone fractures and provide temporary stability. However, the retrieval of these nails can result in debonding of antibiotic cement, which can require significant time and effort to remove. A variety of methods, including intramedullary hooks, reverse curettes, flexible osteotomes, and stacked guide rods, are commonly used to remove cement fragments. When these methods fail to allow access to the entire length of the canal, the Reamer Irrigator Aspirator system (Synthes, Paoli, PA) serves as an effective method for removing retained intramedullary cement. The surgical technique is described, and three cases illustrate the successful use of the Reamer Irrigator Aspirator system for removal of an antibiotic cement intramedullary nail.

  16. Superfund Removal Guidance for Preparing Action Memoranda

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dated September 2009, this updates and replaces previous documents. An Action Memo (AM) should substantiate need for removal action based upon criteria in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Includes AM template.

  17. Removable preheater elements improve oxide induction furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1964-01-01

    Heat and corrosion resistant preheater elements are used in oxide induction furnaces to raise the temperature to the level for conducting electricity. These preheater elements are then removed and the induction coil energized.

  18. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Gus T.; Holshouser, Stephen K.; Coleman, Richard M.; Harless, Charles E.; Whinnery, III, Walter N.

    1983-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  19. Catalyst removal demonstrations using radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.A.

    2000-07-19

    Tests examined the efficacy of a number of processing steps in reducing catalytic activity of High Level Waste tetraphenylborate slurries. These steps included removal of sludge, treatment with bismuthate and ferrous sulfide.

  20. Removing the Shackles of Euclid: 1 Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David S.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach to classifying quadrilaterals is presented that tries to classify all possible combinations of shapes and angles by removing the traditional Euclidean viewpoints. The document concludes with a brief look at other types of polygons. (MP)

  1. Sediment Pond Removal and Enhanced Designs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment Pond Removal Considerations; Scheduling, Baseflow diversion, Dewatering provisions, Sediment handling, Potential to discharge sediment, Down‐gradient sediment control(s), Erosion control(s), Stream reconstruction, Riparian vegetation.

  2. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  3. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOEpatents

    Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

    1982-03-17

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  4. Debris Removal: An Opportunity for Cooperative Research?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    Space debris mitigation practices will be insufficient to prevent the continued growth of the Earth satellite population. Removal of orbital debris can improve the reliability of present and future space systems. The challenges of developing an effective, affordable debris removal capability are considerable. The time is right for a new look at space remediation concepts. In concert with or following the current IAA study An international approach to the remediation of the near-Earth space environment will likely be required.

  5. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  6. Newer Trends in Laser Tattoo Removal

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Swapnil D; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J

    2015-01-01

    Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal. PMID:25949019

  7. Laser Tattoo Removal: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Stephanie GY; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos. PMID:25949017

  8. Laser tattoo removal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Ho, Stephanie Gy; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos.

  9. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  10. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  11. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xin-Hua; Jin, Jian; He, Ping; Liu, Yong; Wang, Da-Hui

    2005-05-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitrate removal when both are removed simultaneously. Even a little amount of copper can enhance nitrate removal efficiently. Different mechanisms of these contaminants removal by iron metal were also discussed.

  12. Engineering Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 10 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in engineering, technology development, and operations. This paper outlines a conceptual end-to-end debris removal operation, including launch, precision tracking, rendezvous, stabilization (of the tumbling targets), capture, and deorbit of the targets; and highlights major challenges associated with the operations. Pros and cons of several proposed removal techniques are also evaluated.

  13. Removal of cypermethrin with seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Yue, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    The removal of cypermethrin with a red macroalga, Gracilaria lemaneiformis, was studied under laboratory conditions. Results showed that the residue contents with G. lemaneiformis were significantly lower than those corresponding groups without the algal thalli after 96 h treatment. The removal rates decreased with increasing concentrations, which were about 50% without G. lemaneiformis after 96 h exposure, and increased to 89%, 73%, and 66% in flasks with G. lemaneiformis at the concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 µg L-1, respectively. The amount of biosorption (absorption and adsorption) by G. lemaneiformis increased with the increasing concentration and exposure time. Adsorption was the main process for the removal by G. lemaneiformis, which accounted for 75%-97% of the total biosorption. However, biosorption only contributed 0.5%-19.3% to the total losses of cypermethrin, which was more efficient under the low concentration. Natural losses contributed the largest portion of losses, which was over 65% in all treatments during the experiment. The unknown pathway of removal, which might be the bio-decomposed by microorganisms attaching the algal thalli, also contributed a lot to the total removal. The results suggested that cultivation of G. lemaneiformis could significantly remove cypermethrin, especially at low concentrations, and large-scale cultivation of G. lemaneiformis has considerable potential of biorestoration of eutrophic and cypermethrin-polluted coastal sea areas.

  14. Beam shaping for cosmetic hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Tuttle, Tracie

    2007-09-01

    Beam shaping has the potential to provide comfort to people who require or seek laser based cosmetic skin procedures. Of immediate interest is the procedure of aesthetic hair removal. Hair removal is performed using a variety of wavelengths from 480 to 1200 nm by means of filtered Xenon flash lamps (pulsed light) or 810 nm diode lasers. These wavelengths are considered the most efficient means available for hair removal applications, but current systems use simple reflector designs and plane filter windows to direct the light to the surface being exposed. Laser hair removal is achieved when these wavelengths at sufficient energy levels are applied to the epidermis. The laser energy is absorbed by the melanin (pigment) in the hair and hair follicle which in turn is transformed into heat. This heat creates the coagulation process, which causes the removal of the hair and prevents growth of new hair [1]. This paper outlines a technique of beam shaping that can be applied to a non-contact based hair removal system. Several features of the beam shaping technique including beam uniformity and heat dispersion across its operational treatment area will be analyzed. A beam shaper design and its fundamental testing will be discussed in detail.

  15. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A Erdem; Boncukcuoğlu, Recep; Kocakerim, M Muhtar; Yilmaz, M Tolga; Paluluoğlu, Cihan

    2008-05-01

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm(2), but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%.

  16. Marmot Dam Removal: Predictions and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Orr, B. K.; Wilcox, A.; Vick, J.; Podolak, C.; Wilcox, P.

    2008-12-01

    The 14-m tall Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon was removed in the summer of 2007, allowing the approximately 730,000 cubic meters of sand and gravel to remain in the river for natural erosion by the flow. Pre-dam removal studies included sediment transport modeling that simulated several dam removal alternatives and provided key pieces of information that allowed a diverse stakeholder group to unanimously agree on the "blow-and-go" alternative, allowing a large amount of sediment to be released to a major salmonid-bearing river in the Columbia River basin. Although it is still too early to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the model performance because morphological responses in the downstream reaches, if any, are likely years away, observations to date (one year after dam removal) indicate that model predictions are generally accurate. Here we present some of the key findings of pre-dam-removal sediment transport modeling predictions and compare them with post-removal observations.

  17. Enzymes Enhance Biofilm Removal Efficiency of Cleaners.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Philipp; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Schneider, Jana; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Rosenberg, Urs; Ren, Qun

    2016-06-01

    Efficient removal of biofilms from medical devices is a big challenge in health care to avoid hospital-acquired infections, especially from delicate devices like flexible endoscopes, which cannot be reprocessed using harsh chemicals or high temperatures. Therefore, milder solutions such as enzymatic cleaners have to be used, which need to be carefully developed to ensure efficacious performance. In vitro biofilm in a 96-well-plate system was used to select and optimize the formulation of novel enzymatic cleaners. Removal of the biofilm was quantified by crystal violet staining, while the disinfecting properties were evaluated by a BacTiter-Glo assay. The biofilm removal efficacy of the selected cleaner was further tested by using European standard (EN) for endoscope cleaning EN ISO 15883, and removal of artificial blood soil was investigated by treating TOSI (Test Object Surgical Instrument) cleaning indicators. Using the process described here, a novel enzymatic endoscope cleaner was developed, which removed 95% of Staphylococcus aureus and 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the 96-well plate system. With a >99% reduction of CFU and a >90% reduction of extracellular polymeric substances, this cleaner enabled subsequent complete disinfection and fulfilled acceptance criteria of EN ISO 15883. Furthermore, it efficiently removed blood soil and significantly outperformed comparable commercial products. The cleaning performance was stable even after storage of the cleaner for 6 months. It was demonstrated that incorporation of appropriate enzymes into the cleaner enhanced performance significantly.

  18. 27 CFR 25.195 - Removals for analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Removals for Analysis, Research, Development Or Testing § 25.195 Removals for analysis. A brewer may remove beer, without payment of tax, to a... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removals for analysis....

  19. 27 CFR 25.195 - Removals for analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Removals for analysis. 25..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Removals for Analysis, Research, Development Or Testing § 25.195 Removals for analysis. A brewer may remove beer, without payment of tax, to...

  20. A clinical overview of removable prostheses: 1. Factors to consider in planning a removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    McCord, J Fraser; Grey, Nick J A; Winstanley, Raymond B; Johnson, Anthony

    2002-10-01

    This is the first article in a series on the prescription of removable partial dentures. It addresses basic clinical and patient-related factors involved in decision-making before commencing active prosthodontic treatment. Further papers will outline a variety of impression techniques for primary and definitive impression, discuss designing principles, give an overview of some technological aspects of removable partial denture-making and provide guidelines on how to diagnose and manage common clinical problems associated with removable partial dentures.

  1. Removal of PAHs with surfactant-enhanced soil washing: influencing factors and removal effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jiajun

    2011-02-01

    PAH removal with surfactant enhanced washing was investigated through a series of laboratory tests to examine the effect of stirring speed, washing time, surfactant concentration, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, and on-and-off mode. The first four factors show significant influence on the PAH removal while the latter two do not. Total removal ratio and a new proposed parameter, solubilization percentage, are used to evaluate the effectiveness quantitatively.

  2. Economic impact of syndesmosis hardware removal.

    PubMed

    Lalli, Trapper A J; Matthews, Leslie J; Hanselman, Andrew E; Hubbard, David F; Bramer, Michelle A; Santrock, Robert D

    2015-09-01

    Ankle syndesmosis injuries are commonly seen with 5-10% of sprains and 10% of ankle fractures involving injury to the ankle syndesmosis. Anatomic reduction has been shown to be the most important predictor of clinical outcomes. Optimal surgical management has been a subject of debate in the literature. The method of fixation, number of screws, screw size, and number of cortices are all controversial. Postoperative hardware removal has also been widely debated in the literature. Some surgeons advocate for elective hardware removal prior to resuming full weightbearing. Returning to the operating room for elective hardware removal results in increased cost to the patient, potential for infection or complication(s), and missed work days for the patient. Suture button devices and bioabsorbable screw fixation present other options, but cortical screw fixation remains the gold standard. This retrospective review was designed to evaluate the economic impact of a second operative procedure for elective removal of 3.5mm cortical syndesmosis screws. Two hundred and two patients with ICD-9 code for "open treatment of distal tibiofibular joint (syndesmosis) disruption" were identified. The medical records were reviewed for those who underwent elective syndesmosis hardware removal. The primary outcome measurements included total hospital billing charges and total hospital billing collection. Secondary outcome measurements included average individual patient operative costs and average operating room time. Fifty-six patients were included in the study. Our institution billed a total of $188,271 (USD) and collected $106,284 (55%). The average individual patient operating room cost was $3579. The average operating room time was 67.9 min. To the best of our knowledge, no study has previously provided cost associated with syndesmosis hardware removal. Our study shows elective syndesmosis hardware removal places substantial economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system.

  3. Advanced CO2 Removal Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Verma, Sunita; Forrest, Kindall; LeVan, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced CO2 Removal Technical Task Agreement covers three active areas of research and development. These include a study of the economic viability of a hybrid membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system, sorbent materials development, and construction of a database of adsorption properties of important fixed gases on several adsorbent material that may be used in CO2 removal systems. The membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system was proposed as a possible way to reduce the energy consumption of the four-bed molecular sieve system now in use. Much of the energy used by the 4BMS is used to desorb water removed in the device s desiccant beds. These beds might be replaced by a desiccating membrane that moves the water from [he incoming stream directly into the outlet stream. The approach may allow the CO2 removal beds to operate at a lower temperature. A comparison between models of the 4BMS and hybrid systems is underway at Vanderbilt University. NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating a Ag-exchanged zeolites as a possible improvement over currently used Ca and Na zeolites for CO2 removal. Silver ions will complex with n:-bonds in hydrocarbons such as ethylene, giving remarkably improved selectivity for adsorption of those materials. Bonds with n: character are also present in carbon oxides. NASA Ames is also continuing to build a database for adsorption isotherms of CO2, N2, O2, CH4, and Ar on a variety of sorbents. This information is useful for analysis of existing hardware and design of new processes.

  4. 21 CFR 882.4200 - Clip removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4200 Clip removal instrument. (a) Identification. A clip removal instrument is a device used to remove surgical clips from the patient....

  5. Value analysis for orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Leonard; Mense, Allan

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents methods for deriving first order monetary benefits from removing individual debris objects in high value sun-synchronous orbits. These analyses are intended to serve as an economic metric by which competing debris removal methods can be evaluated. Orbital debris flux level estimates from NASA’s updated ORDEM2000 model are used to establish small debris population estimates. When combined with the replacement cost of satellites in sun-synchronous orbit, the present value of removing individual small (0.5 cm-2.0 cm) objects from orbit is derived. Large object removal value is more complicated due to the necessity of incorporating effects of impact fragmentation observed with any object about 10 cm or larger. Breakup models published by NASA (Johnson, N.L., Krisko, P.H., Liou, J.C., Anz-Meador, P.D. NASA’s new breakup model of evolve 4.0. Adv. Space Res. 28 (9), 1377-1384, 2001.) provide a basis for establishing fragmentation statistics. Assuming the current population of operational sun-synchronous satellites, removal value is then derived via present value analysis.

  6. Biomass fermentation to augment biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    A combination of a lab scale biological phosphorus removal sequencing batch reactor (called mother reactor) and a side-stream biomass fermenter was setup. It was found that when fermented biomass was recirculated back into the mother reactor as volatile fatty acid (VFA) supplement, the phosphate concentration in the effluent decreased from 6 in the control reactor to 4.5 mgL(-1) in the effluent from mother reactor. The addition of the fermentation effluent into the mother reactor increased the phosphate and ammonium loads and resulted in deterioration of nitrification. Phosphorus removal and nitrification improved when the fermented biomass was separated from the liquid phase using an up-flow system, followed by the addition of MgO to the supernatant to precipitate phosphate and ammonium. Phosphorus removal was further improved by delaying the time of VFA addition into mother reactor during the anaerobic period as soon as denitrification ceased. Biomass fermentation was found to generate 157 mg VFA-COD by fermenting 1g of biomass at a solids retention time of 5d. Acetate (78% of generated COD) and propionic acid (10%) were the major components of the produced VFA. It was concluded that biomass fermentation to augment a biological nutrient removal process can be effective if generated phosphate and ammonia are removed, e.g. through struvite precipitation.

  7. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gregory J

    1997-05-12

    Column biooxidation tests with Kentucky coal confirmed results of earlier shake flask tests showing significant removal from the coal of arsenic, selenium, cobalt, manganese, nickel and cadmium. Rates of pyrite biooxidation in Kentucky coal were only slightly more than half the rates found previously for Indiana and Pittsburgh coals. Removal of pyrite from Pittsburgh coal by ferric ion oxidation slows markedly as ferrous ions accumulate in solution, requiring maintenance of high redox potentials in processes designed for removal of pyrite and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors by circulation of ferric solutions through coal. The pyrite oxidation rates obtained in these tests were used by Unifield Engineering to support the conceptual designs for alternative pyrite and HAP precursor bioleaching processes for the phase 2 pilot plant. Thermophilic microorganisms were tested to determine if mercury could be mobilized from coal under elevated growth temperatures. There was no evidence for mercury removal from coal under these conditions. However, the activity of the organisms may have liberated mercury physically. It is also possible that the organisms dissolved mercury and it readsorbed to the clay preferentially. Both of these possibilities are undergoing further testing. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) slurry column reactor was operated and several batches of feed coal, product coal, waste solids and leach solutions were submitted to LBL for HAP precursor analysis. Results to date indicate significant removal of mercury, arsenic and other HAP precursors in the combined physical-biological process.

  8. Stability and removal of spironolactone from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Saleh; Khamis, Mustafa; Nir, Shlomo; Lelario, Filomena; Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino A; Karaman, Rafik

    2015-01-01

    Stability and removal of spironolactone (SP) from wastewater produced at Al-Quds University Campus were investigated. Kinetic studies on both pure water and wastewater coming from secondary treatment (activated sludge) demonstrated that the potassium-sparing diuretic (water pill), spironolactone, underwent degradation to its hydrolytic derivative, canrenone, in both media. The first-order hydrolysis rate of SP in activated sludge at 25°C (3.80 × 10(-5) s(-1)) was about 49-fold larger than in pure water (7.4 × 10(-7) s(-1)). The overall performance of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) installed in the University Campus was assessed showing that more than 90% of spiked SP was removed together with its newly identified metabolites. In order to look for a technology to supplement or replace ultra-filtration membranes, the effectiveness of adsorption and filtration by micelle-clay filters for removing SP was tested in comparison with activated charcoal. Batch adsorption in aqueous suspensions was well described by Langmuir isotherms, showing a better removal by the micelle-clay material. Filtration of SP water solutions by columns filled with a mixture of sand and a micelle-clay complex showed complete removal of the drug at concentrations higher than in sand/activated-charcoal filled filters.

  9. Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table

    SciTech Connect

    M. Johnson

    2005-06-27

    The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

  10. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present.

  11. Removal of ciprofloxacin from water by birnessite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Teh; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Ya-Siang; Tsai, Yolin; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Li, Zhaohui; Krukowski, Keith

    2013-04-15

    With more pharmaceuticals and personal care products detected in the surface and waste waters, studies on interactions between these contaminants and soils or sediments have attracted great attention. In this study, the removal of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, by birnessite, a layered manganese oxide, in aqueous solution was investigated by batch studies supplemented by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared analyses. Stoichiometric release of exchangeable cations accompanying CIP removal from water confirmed cation exchange as the major mechanism for CIP uptake by birnessite. Interlayer expansion after CIP adsorption on birnessite as revealed by XRD analyses indicated that intercalation contributed significantly to CIP uptake in addition to external surface adsorption. Correlation of CIP adsorption to specific surface area and cation exchange capacity suggested that the former was the limiting factor for CIP uptake. At the adsorption maximum, CIP molecules formed a monolayer on the birnessite surfaces. The adsorbed CIP could be partially removed using a cationic surfactant at a low initial concentration and mostly removed by AlCl3 at a higher initial concentration, which further supported the cation exchange mechanism for CIP removal by birnessite. The results indicated that the presence of layered Mn-oxide in the soil and waste water treatment systems may provide host for CIP accumulation.

  12. Design of equipment for lunar dust removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belden, Lacy; Cowan, Kevin; Kleespies, Hank; Ratliff, Ryan; Shah, Oniell; Shelburne, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    NASA has a long range goal of constructing a fully equipped, manned lunar base on the near side of the moon by the year 2015. During the Apollo Missions, lunar dust coated and fouled equipment surfaces and mechanisms exposed to the lunar environment. In addition, the atmosphere and internal surfaces of the lunar excursion module were contaminated by lunar dust which was brought in on articles passed through the airlock. Consequently, the need exists for device or appliance to remove lunar dust from surfaces of material objects used outside of the proposed lunar habitat. Additionally, several concepts were investigated for preventing the accumulation of lunar dust on mechanisms and finished surfaces. The character of the dust and the lunar environment present unique challenges for the removal of contamination from exposed surfaces. In addition to a study of lunar dust adhesion properties, the project examines the use of various energy domains for removing the dust from exposed surfaces. Also, prevention alternatives are examined for systems exposed to lunar dust. A concept utilizing a pressurized gas is presented for dust removal outside of an atmospherically controlled environment. The concept consists of a small astronaut/robotic compatible device which removes dust from contaminated surfaces by a small burst of gas.

  13. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  14. Automatic eyeglasses removal from face images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenyu; Liu, Ce; Shum, Heung-Yueng; Xu, Ying-Qing; Zhang, Zhengyou

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we present an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel-level editing, filling in the deleted eyeglasses region with the right content is a difficult problem. Our approach works at the object level where the eyeglasses are automatically located, removed as one piece, and the void region filled. Our system consists of three parts: eyeglasses detection, eyeglasses localization, and eyeglasses removal. First, an eye region detector, trained offline, is used to approximately locate the region of eyes, thus the region of eyeglasses. A Markov-chain Monte Carlo method is then used to accurately locate key points on the eyeglasses frame by searching for the global optimum of the posterior. Subsequently, a novel sample-based approach is used to synthesize the face image without the eyeglasses. Specifically, we adopt a statistical analysis and synthesis approach to learn the mapping between pairs of face images with and without eyeglasses from a database. Extensive experiments demonstrate that our system effectively removes eyeglasses.

  15. Removal of organics from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Lykins, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Organic contamination of drinking water is basically caused by two general classes of organics; man-made synthetic organics and disinfection of naturally occurring organics (disinfection by-products). Many volatile and non-volatile synthetic organics at trace concentrations are being detected in surface and ground waters. Contaminated ground water usually contains two or more predominant organic compounds and several other identifiable ones at lesser concentrations. Surface waters, such as rivers, generally contain many organic compounds in low concentrations. The document summarizes the treatment technologies that EPA's Drinking Water Research Division (DWRD) is evaluating for removal of VOCs, SOCs, and disinfection by-products from water supplies. Carbon adsorption is effective for removing both VOCs and SOCs. Packed-tower and diffused aeration are best suited for removing VOCs. Of the technologies that show promise and are being tested at the bench and pilot scales, conventional treatment with powdered activated carbon (PAC) is effective for removing a few of the SOCs, ozone oxidation is effective for removing certain classes of VOCs and SOCs, and certain reverse osmosis membranes and ultraviolet treatment are also potentially effective against VOCs and SOCs.

  16. Gasless laparoscopic removal of retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Viani, M P; Poggi, R V; Pinto, A; Maruotti, R A

    1995-02-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor originating from the smooth muscular tissue in any part of the organism. The only therapy is its complete removal. We describe herein the operative treatment of a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma with gasless laparoscopic complete removal. The procedure was successfully performed in a consenting woman with an abdominal mass. Gasless laparoscopic removal was performed with a mechanical retractor (Laparolift, Origin Medsystem Inc.), obviating the creation of the pneumoperitoneum and of the sealed environment. The technique is a simple, safe, and effective surgical method. Gasless technique guarantees a clear vision, makes possible continuous suction of smoke and fluids, and allows the use of conventional instruments and easy management of suturing. The present case has proved to be another abdominal procedure that can be carried out with all the advantages of gasless miniinvasive surgery.

  17. Laser Removal of Protective Treatments on Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Heras, M.; Rebollar, E.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Oujja, M.; Fort, R.; Castillejo, M.

    This work presents an investigation of the laser removal of polymeric materials acting as consolidants and water-repellents on limestone used on buildings of architectural and artistic value. The removal of the consolidant Paraloid B-72 and the water-repellent product Tegosivin HL-100, applied on samples of Colmenarand Bateig limestone, was studied as a function of the laser wavelength, by using the four harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm). Elimination of the coatings and subsequent surface modifications were monitored through colorimetry, roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fundamental laser radiation was effective in removing the treatments, although thermal alteration processes were induced on the calcite crystals of the limestone. The best results were obtained by irradiation in the near UV at 355 nm.

  18. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  19. Removal of heavy metals from waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.D.; Kozaruk, J.M.; Melvin, M.; Gardocki, S.M.

    1988-07-19

    A method for removing heavy metals from effluent water is described comprising performing sequentially the following steps: (a) adding from 7-333 ppm of an anionic surfactant to the effluent water to provide coagulatable heavy metal ion; (b) adjusting the effluent water pH to within the range of 8 to 10, (c) providing from 10-200 ppm of a cationic coagulant to coagulate the heavy metal ion, (d) providing from 0.3 to 5.0 ppm of a polymeric flocculant whereby a heavy metal containing floc is formed for removal from the effluent water, and, (e) then removing the floc from the effluent water, wherein the anionic surfactant is sodium lauryl ether sulfate. The cationic coagulant is selected from the group consisting of diallyl dimethylammonium chloride polymer, epichlorohydrin dimethylamine polymer, ethylene amine polymer, polyaluminum chloride, and alum; and the flocculant is an acrylamide/sodium acrylate copolymer having an RSV greater than 23.

  20. Contamination removal using various solvents and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeppsen, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Critical and non-critical bonding surfaces must be kept free of contamination that may cause potential unbonds. For example, an aft-dome section of a redesigned solid rocket motor that had been contaminated with hydraulic oil did not appear to be sufficiently cleaned when inspected by the optically stimulated electron emission process (Con Scan) after it had been cleaned using a hand double wipe cleaning method. As a result, current and new cleaning methodologies as well as solvent capability in removing various contaminant materials were reviewed and testing was performed. Bonding studies were also done to verify that the cleaning methods used in removing contaminants provide an acceptable bonding surface. The removal of contaminants from a metal surface and the strength of subsequent bonds were tested using the Martin Marietta and double-wipe cleaning methods. Results are reported.

  1. Successful laparoscopic removal of an ingested toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Karim; Shaunak, Shalin; Kalsi, Sarandeep; Nehra, Dhiren

    2013-07-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies will pass through the gastrointestinal tract without any problems. On the other hand long, slender objects such as a toothbrush will rarely be able to negotiate the angulated and fixed retroperitoneal duodenal loop. Spontaneous toothbrush passage has never been described and therefore endoscopic or surgical removal is always required. Here we describe an asymptomatic young female presenting to out-patient clinic with a history of unintentional toothbrush ingestion 4 years prior. Endoscopic removal was unsuccessful because the toothbrush was partially embedded in to the gastric mucosa. We describe the second case to date of laparoscopic removal of a toothbrush via a gastrotomy with subsequent intra-corporeal repair of the defect.

  2. Fatal Phenol Toxicity Following Attempted Tattoo Removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Huang; Li, Shu-Hua; Byard, Roger W

    2016-07-01

    Tattoo removal is increasingly required as the number of, particularly young, people acquiring tattoos is increasing. A 21-year-old man is reported who underwent attempted removal of large dragon tattoo utilizing a tattoo machine that injected a phenol-containing solution. At the end of the 3-h procedure, he collapsed and died. At autopsy, large areas of white skin discoloration with focal necrosis and sloughing were present overlying areas of previous tattooing. Histological examination showed collections of eosinophilic fluid with a minimal chronic inflammatory infiltrate in better preserved areas, with focal areas of dermal necrosis. Toxicology was positive for phenol in cardiac blood and liver tissue. There were no underlying organic disease or injuries present which could have caused or contributed to death. This idiosyncratic method of tattoo removal involving subcutaneous injection of phenol had resulted in death most likely from cardiotoxicity.

  3. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.; Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  4. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  5. General technique of third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Farish, Sam E; Bouloux, Gary F

    2007-02-01

    The most commonly performed surgical procedure in most oral and maxillofacial surgery practices is the removal of impacted third molars. Extensive training, skill, and experience allow this procedure to be performed in an atraumatic fashion with local anesthesia, sedation, or general anesthesia. The decision to remove symptomatic third molars is not usually difficult, but the decision to remove asymptomatic third molars is sometimes less clear and requires clinical experience. A wide body of literature (discussed elsewhere in this issue) attempts to establish clinical practice guidelines for dealing with impacted teeth. Data is beginning to accumulate from third molar studies, which hopefully will provide surgeons and their patients with evidence-based guidelines regarding elective third molar surgery.

  6. Bonded Invar Clip Removal Using Foil Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T.; Tuttle, James G.

    2009-01-01

    A new process uses local heating and temperature monitoring to soften the adhesive under Invar clips enough that they can be removed without damaging the composite underneath or other nearby bonds. Two 1x1 in. (approx.2.5x2.5 cm), 10-W/sq in. (approx.1.6-W/sq cm), 80-ohm resistive foil Kapton foil heaters, with pressure-sensitive acrylic adhesive backing, are wired in parallel to a 50-V, 1-A limited power supply. At 1 A, 40 W are applied to the heater pair. The temperature is monitored in the clip radius and inside the tube, using a dual thermocouple readout. Several layers of aluminum foil are used to speed the heat up, allowing clips to be removed in less than five minutes. The very local heating via the foil heaters allows good access for clip removal and protects all underlying and adjacent materials.

  7. Mercury removal from solid mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

    1994-12-31

    The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

  8. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  9. Nasal foreign body removal in children.

    PubMed

    Kiger, James R; Brenkert, Timothy E; Losek, Joseph D

    2008-11-01

    Nasal foreign bodies in children are often managed in the pediatric emergency department. The child is usually between 2 and 4 years old, and the foreign body is most commonly a plastic toy or bead. Nasal foreign bodies are removed by a number of techniques. Positive-pressure expulsion is accomplished by orally applied pressure via a parent's mouth or an Ambu bag or by nasally applied pressure via a catheter or an oxygen source. The object can be washed out with nasally applied saline. Direct mechanical extraction is possible with a variety of tools, including forceps, hooks, or balloon-tipped catheters. Each method carries its own risks and benefits. Serious complications of nasal foreign bodies include posterior dislodgement and aspiration, trauma caused by the object itself or removal attempts, infection, and choanal stenosis. Magnets and button batteries require emergent removal as they carry the risk of septal perforation or necrosis, which may develop within a relatively short time.

  10. Iron removal from brackish water by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mourad Ben Sik; Ennigrou, Dorra Jellouli; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the removal of iron from brackish water using electrodialysis (ED). Experiments were carried out on synthetic brackish water solutions using a laboratory-scale ED cell. The influence of several parameters on process efficiency was studied. This efficiency is expressed by the removal rate, transport flux, current efficiency and power consumption. The applied voltage, the feed flow rate, the pH and iron initial concentration ofthe feed solution have a significant effect on the process efficiency and mainly on the iron transfer from dilute to concentrate compartment. Nevertheless, feed ionic strength does not have an effect on the iron removal. However, the effect is only noted on the specific power consumption.

  11. Paracetamol removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Verlicchi, Paola; Young, Thomas M.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryIn this study two pilot scale Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands (HSFCWs) near Lecce, Italy, planted with different macrophytes ( Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia) and an unplanted control were assessed for their effectiveness in removing paracetamol. Residence time distributions (RTDs) for the two beds indicated that the Typha bed was characterized by a void volume fraction (porosity) of 0.16 and exhibited more ideal plug flow behavior (Pe = 29.7) than the Phragmites bed (Pe = 26.7), which had similar porosity. The measured hydraulic residence times in the planted beds were 35.8 and 36.7 h when the flow was equal to 1 m 3/d. The Phragmites bed exhibited a range of paracetamol removals from 51.7% for a Hydraulic Loading Rate (HLR) of 240 mm/d to 87% with 120 mm/d HLR and 99.9% with 30 mm/d. The Typha bed showed a similar behavior with percentages of removal slightly lower, ranging from 46.7% (HLR of 240 mm/d) to >99.9% (hydraulic loading rate of 30 mm/d). At the same HLR values the unplanted bed removed between 51.3% and 97.6% of the paracetamol. In all three treatments the paracetamol removal was higher with flow of 1 m 3/d and an area of approx. 7.5 m 2 (half bed) than in the case of flow equal to 0.5 m 3/d with a surface treatment of approx. 3.75 m 2. A first order model for paracetamol removal was evaluated and half lives of 5.16 to 10.2 h were obtained.

  12. Boron removal by electrocoagulation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Ahmed, Zubair; Magram, Saleh Faraj; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2014-03-15

    This work investigated the removal of boron from wastewater and its recovery by electrocoagulation and hydrothermal mineralization methods respectively. The experimental design was developed using Box-Behnken Model. An initial study was performed based on four preselected variables (pH, current density, concentration and time) using synthetic wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the effect of process variables and their interaction on boron removal. The optimum conditions were obtained as pH 6.3, current density 17.4 mA/cm(2), and time 89 min. At these applied optimum conditions, 99.7% boron removal from an initial concentration of 10.4 mg/L was achieved. The process was effectively optimized by RSM with a desirability value of 1.0. The results showed that boron removal efficiency enhanced with increase in current density and treatment time. Removal efficiency also increased when pH was increased from 4 to 7 and subsequently decreased at pH 10. Adsorption kinetics study revealed that the reaction followed pseudo second order kinetic model; evidenced by high correlation and goodness of fit. Thermodynamics study showed that mechanism of boron adsorption was chemisorption and the reaction was endothermic in nature. Furthermore, the adsorption process was spontaneous as indicated by negative values of the adsorption free energy. Treatment of real produced water using electrocoagulation resulted in 98% boron removal. The hydrothermal mineralization study showed that borate minerals (Inyoite, Takadaite and Nifontovite) can be recovered as recyclable precipitate from electrocoagulation flocs of produced water.

  13. Electrolytic removal of nitrate from crop residues.

    PubMed

    Colon, G; Sager, J C

    2001-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) resource recovery system, which is a waste-processing system,uses aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plants nutrients and secondary foods from the inedible biomass. Crop residues contain a significant amount of nitrate. There are actually two major problems concerning nitrate: 1) both CELSS biomass production and resource recovery consume large quantities of nitric acid, and 2) nitrate causes a variety of problems in both aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors. The nitrate anion causes several problems in the resource recovery system in such a way that removal prior to the process is highly desirable. The technique proposed to remove nitrate from potato inedible biomass leachate and to satisfy the nitric acid demand was a four-compartment electrolytic cell. In order to establish the electrolytic cell performance variables, experiments were carried out using potato crop residue aqueous leachate as the diluate solution. The variables studied were the potato biomass leachate composition and electrical properties, preparation of compartment solutions to be compatible with the electrolytic system, limiting current density, nutrients removal rates as a function of current density, fluid hydrodynamic conditions, applied voltage, and process operating time during batch recirculation operation. Results indicated that the limiting current density (maximum operating current density) was directly proportional to the solution electrical conductivity an a power function of the linear fluid velocity in the range between 0.083 and 0.403 m/s. During the electrolytic cell once-through operation, the nitrate, potassium, and other nutrient removal rates were proportional to the current density and were inversely proportional to fluid velocity. The removal of monovalent ions was found to be higher than divalent ones. Under batch recirculation operation at constant applied voltage of 4.5 and 8.5 V, it was found that the nutrient

  14. Pegasus International, Inc. coating removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Pegasus Coating Removal System (PCRS) was demonstrated at Florida International University (FIU) where it was being evaluated for efficiency and cost. In conjunction with the FIU testing demonstration, a human factors assessment was conducted to assess the hazards and associated safety and health issues of concern for workers utilizing this technology. The PCRS is a chemical paste that is applied to the surface using a brush, roller, or airless sprayer. After the type of PCRS, thickness, and dwell time have been determined, a laminated backed material is placed on top of the chemical paste to slow down the drying process and to provide a mechanism to strip-off the chemical. After the dwell time is reached, the chemical substrate can be removed. Scrapers may be used to break-loose the layers as necessary or to break-loose the layers that are not removed when the laminated paper is picked up. Residue may also be cleaned off of the surface with a damp sponge with an agitating motion, absorbent sponges, or a vacuum, as needed. The paint and removal agent is then placed in drums for disposal at a later time. During the assessment sampling was conducted for organic vapors and general observational techniques were conducted for ergonomics. Recommendations for improved worker safety and health during application and removal of the PCRS include: (1) work practices that reflect avoidance of exposure or reducing the risk of exposure; (2) assuring all PPE and equipment are compatible with the chemicals being used; (3) work practices that reduce the worker`s need to walk on the slippery surface caused by the chemical or the use of special anti-slip soles; (4) careful control of overspray (if a spray application is used); and (5) the use of ergonomically designed long-handled tools to apply and remove the chemical (to alleviate some of the ergonomic concerns).

  15. Hydraulic gradient control for groundwater contaminant removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Atwood D.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colarado, U.S.A., is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. The simulation-management model eliminates wells far from the plume perimeter and activates wells near the perimeter as the plume decreases in size. This successfully stablizes the hydraulic gradient during aquifer cleanup.The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colorado, USA, is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. Refs.

  16. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN. PROJECT SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an eight page summary of the final report on arsenic demonstration project at Climax, MN (EPA/600/R-06/152). The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of the Kinetico iron removal system in removing arsenic to meet the new arsenic maximum co...

  17. Removal of arsenic and iron removal from drinking water using coagulation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC), biological aerated filter (BAF), alum coagulation and Moringa oleifera coagulation were investigated to remove iron and arsenic contaminants from drinking water. At an initial dose of 5 mg/L, the removal efficiency for arsenic and iron was 63% and 58% respectively using alum, and 47% and 41% respectively using Moringa oleifera. The removal of both contaminants increased with the increase in coagulant dose and decrease in pH. Biological processes were more effective in removing these contaminants than coagulation. Compared to BAF, BAC gave greater removal of both arsenic and iron, removing 85% and 74%, respectively. Longer contact time for both processes could reduce the greater concentration of arsenic and iron contaminants. The addition of coagulation (at 5 mg/L dosage) and a biological process (with 15 or 60 min contact time) could significantly increase removal efficiency, and the maximum removal was observed for the combination of alum and BAC treatment (60 min contact time), with 100% and 98.56% for arsenic and iron respectively. The reduction efficiency of arsenic and iron reduced with the increase in the concentration of dissolved organics in the feedwater due to the adsorption competition between organic molecules and heavy metals.

  18. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL METHOD OF ILLEGAL PARKING BICYCLES BASED ON THE QUANTITATIVE CHANGE AFTER REMOVAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, Satoshi; Kajita, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Shuichirou

    This study aims to find an effective removal method of illegal parking bicycles based on the analysis on the numerical change of illegal bicycles. And then, we built the time and space quantitative distribution model of illegal parking bicycles after removal, considering the logistic increase of illegal parking bicycles, several behaviors concerning of direct return or indirect return to the original parking place and avoidance of the original parking place, based on the investigation of real condition of illegal bicycle parking at TENJIN area in FUKUOKA city. Moreover, we built the simulation model including above-mentioned model, and calculated the number of illegal parking bicycles when we change the removal frequency and the number of removal at one time. The next interesting four results were obtained. (1) Recovery speed from removal the illegal parking bicycles differs by each zone. (2) Thorough removal is effective to keep the number of illegal parking bicycles lower level. (3) Removal at one zone causes the increase of bicycles at other zones where the level of illegal parking is lower. (4) The relationship between effects and costs of removing the illegal parking bicycles was clarified.

  19. Removable Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, James P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a platform comprising a window pane, a retention frame, and a biasing system. The window pane may be configured to contact a sealing system. The retention frame may be configured to contact the sealing system and hold the window pane against the support frame. The biasing system may be configured to bias the retention frame toward the support frame while the support frame and the retention frame are in a configuration that holds the window pane. Removal of the biasing system may cause the retention frame and the window pane to be removable.

  20. Dragline bucket wire rope terminations removal

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, G.K.

    1984-02-01

    Paper presents project results investigating current techniques for dragline wire rope removal and the development of less hazardous means of performing the task. The cannon is the most prevalent method used in American surface mines. A cannon test program was conducted that used 40-and 50-grain primer cord to establish force produced using a 56-pound projectile. Socket/wedges were separated to establish separation force data. Two alternative removal methods, pendulum ram and portable hydraulic pusher, were developed and tested. Both provide sufficient force to effect separations under normal conditions on draglines with up to 78cubic yard buckets.

  1. Process for removing ash from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Ogino, E.; Yoshida, N.

    1983-06-21

    A process for removing ash from coal comprising the steps of pulverizing the coal to fine particles, admixing water with the finely divided coal to prepare an ash-containing slurry of finely divided coal, mixing with the slurry an oil and seeds in the form of oleophilic solid grains and serving as granulating nuclei to granulate the finely divided coal, separating the resulting granules from the mixture and washing the granules with water to remove the ash, and disintegrating the washed granules to obtain a deashed coal and recover the seeds for reuse.

  2. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  3. Arsenic removal in conjunction with lime softening

    DOEpatents

    Khandaker, Nadim R.; Brady, Patrick V.; Teter, David M.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2004-10-12

    A method for removing dissolved arsenic from an aqueous medium comprising adding lime to the aqueous medium, and adding one or more sources of divalent metal ions other than calcium and magnesium to the aqueous medium, whereby dissolved arsenic in the aqueous medium is reduced to a lower level than possible if only the step of adding lime were performed. Also a composition of matter for removing dissolved arsenic from an aqueous medium comprising lime and one or more sources of divalent copper and/or zinc metal ions.

  4. Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, Howard; Seltzer, Steven F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

  5. Translabyrinthine approach for acoustic tumor removal. 1992.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Derald E; Green, J Douglas

    2008-04-01

    The translabyrinthine approach is the most direct route to the cerebellopontine angle. It is the preferred approach for removal of all tumors in patients with poor hearing and for large tumors when the likelihood of hearing preservation is slight. This approach offers the advantages of minimum cerebellar retraction, identification of the facial nerve proximally and medially, and the ability to repair immediately the facial nerve if it is severed during acoustic tumor removal. This approach has the lowest morbidity with regard to spinal fluid leaks and also postoperative headaches.

  6. Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

  7. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants.

    PubMed

    Koenig, D W; Mishra, S K; Pierson, D L

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  8. Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, Francis Stephen

    2016-09-27

    Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil are provided. In an embodiment, a method comprises the steps of combining a sulfuric acid-aqueous solution that has a pH of about 1 or less with a contaminant-containing algal oil at treatment conditions effective to form an effluent. The effluent comprises a treated algal oil phase and contaminants in an acidic aqueous phase. The contaminants comprise metals, phosphorus, or combinations thereof. The acidic aqueous phase is removed from the effluent to form a contaminant-depleted algal oil.

  9. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  10. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  11. Symptom removal: the nineteenth century experience.

    PubMed

    Weitzenhoffer, Andre

    2002-10-01

    It has been said that traditional clinical hypnotists, essentially those practicing before 1900, made excessive use of symptom removal to the detriment of their patients. However, statements of this kind have never been documented. This article is based on a search of the relevant literature that examines the hypnotic methods and results of that era. One finding is that available clinical data support the claim that clinical hypnotists practicing before 1900 made considerable use of symptom removal. The data also indicate that they achieved substantial success without any detrimental effects. This information is considered relevant for the scientifically based practice of hypnosis.

  12. Balanced ultrafiltration: inflammatory mediator removal capacity.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yulong; Wan, Caihong; Wang, Shigang; Sun, Peng; Long, Cun

    2012-10-01

    Ultrafiltration with a hemoconcentrator may remove excess fluid load and alleviate tissue edema and has been universally adopted in extracorporeal circulation protocols during pediatric cardiac surgery. Balanced ultrafiltration is advocated to remove inflammatory mediators generated during surgery. However, whether balanced ultrafiltration can remove all or a portion of the inflammatory mediator load remains unclear. The inflammatory mediator removal capacity of zero-balanced ultrafiltration was measured during pediatric extracorporeal circulation in vitro. Extracorporeal circulation was composed of cardiotomy reservoir, D902 Lilliput 2 membrane oxygenator, and Capiox AF02 pediatric arterial line filter. The Hemoconcentrator BC 20 plus was placed between arterial purge line and oxygenator venous reservoir. Fresh donor human whole blood was added into the circuit and mixed with Ringer's solution to obtain a final hematocrit of 24-28%. After 2 h of extracorporeal circulation, zero-balanced ultrafiltration was initiated and arterial line pressure was maintained at approximately 100 mmHg with Hoffman clamp. The rate of ultrafiltration (12 mL/min) was controlled by ultrafiltrate outlet pressure. Identical volume of plasmaslyte A was dripped into the circuit to maintain stable hematocrit during the 45 min of the experiment. Plasma and ultrafiltrate samples were drawn every 5 min, and concentrations of inflammatory mediators including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, neutrophil elastase (NE), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. All assayed inflammatory mediators were detected in the ultrafiltrate, demonstrating that the ultrafiltrator may remove inflammatory mediators. However, dynamic observations suggested that the concentration of NE was highest among the five inflammatory mediators in both plasma and ultrafiltrate (P < 0.001). IL-1β had the lowest concentration in plasma, whereas the concentration of TNF-α was the lowest in ultrafiltrate (P

  13. Non-Thermal Removal of Gaseous Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S.; McGowan, J. William; Chiu, K. C. Ray

    1995-01-01

    The removal of fluorine based exhaust gases such as CFC's, PFC's, NF3, and SF6 used for plasma etching of and deposition on semi-conductors is a subject of increasing interest because of safety, air pollution, and global warming issues. Conventional treatment methods for removing exhaust gas pollutants are wet scrubbing, carbon and resin adsorption, catalytic oxidation, and thermal incineration. However, there are drawbacks associated with each of these methods which include difficulties in implementation, problems with the disposal of solid and liquid pollutant waste, large water and fuel consumption, and additional pollutants such as NOx emissions which are generated in thermal incineration processes.

  14. Focused-Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    AD-A270 852 SIll II 111111111 lillI I ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Focused -Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates by Bruce GeOl ARL-MR-1 14 September 1993 93...DATES COVERED September 1993 Summary, January 1991-present 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Focused -Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates PE: 91A 6...AUTHOR( S ) Bruce Geil 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army Research Laboratory REPORT NUMBER Attn

  15. Process for removing metals from water

    DOEpatents

    Napier, John M.; Hancher, Charles M.; Hackett, Gail D.

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a flocculating agent, separating precipitate-containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions.

  16. Process for removing metals from water

    DOEpatents

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  17. Removal of pathogens using riverbank filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, M. M.; Emelko, M. B.; Thomson, N. R.

    2003-04-01

    Although more than hundred years old, in situ or Riverbank Filtration (RBF) has undergone a renewed interest in North America because of its potential as a surface water pre-treatment tool for removal of pathogenic microorganisms. A new RBF research field site has been constructed along the banks of the Grand River in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada to assess factors influencing pathogen removal in the subsurface. Implementation of RBF and appropriate design of subsequent treatment (UV, chlorination, etc.) processes requires successful quantification of in situ removals of Cryptosporidium parvum or a reliable surrogate parameter. C.~parvum is often present in surface water at low indigenous concentrations and can be difficult to detect in well effluents. Since releases of inactivated C.~parvum at concentrations high enough for detection in well effluents are cost prohibitive, other approaches for demonstrating effective in situ filtration of C.~parvum must be considered; these include the use of other microbial species or microspheres as indicators of C.~parvum transport in the environment. Spores of Bacillus subtilis may be considered reasonable indicators of C.~parvum removal by in situ filtration because of their size (˜1 μm in diameter), spherical shape, relatively high indigenous concentration is many surface waters, and relative ease of enumeration. Based on conventional particle filtration theory and assuming equivalent chemical interactions for all particle sizes, a 1 μm B.~subtilis spore will be removed less readily than a larger C. parvum oocyst (4-6 μm) in an ideal granular filter. Preliminary full-scale data obtained from a high rate RBF production well near the new RBF test site demonstrated greater than 1 log removal of B.~subtilis spores. This observed spore removal is higher than that prescribed by the proposed U.S. Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule for C.~parvum. To further investigate the removal relationship between C

  18. Removal of Books from School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Judith K.

    This report reviews the seven times that the courts have considered the question of whether school boards can remove books from school libraries. Because the first and the three most recent cases upheld the rights of boards, while the other three cases were won by plaintiffs who had filed their cases against the boards, the differences in the…

  19. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-09-15

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  20. Eye Removal Surgeries in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kathryn A; McKinnon, Jo-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article covers considerations and techniques of eye removal surgeries in exotic pets. After issues including surgical indications, anesthesia, patient preparation, and instrumentation are explored, surgical techniques are described. Enucleation/exenteration and modified evisceration are discussed, with species-specific nuances of small mammals, birds, reptiles, snakes, amphibians, and fish highlighted.

  1. Removing Silicon Monoxide From Nickel Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaniewski, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Combination of polishing tool and polishing mixture used to remove adherent fragments of silicon monoxide protective coatings from nickel/aluminum mirrors without altering shapes or harming polishes of mirror surfaces. Polishing technique developed to prepare stained mirrors for recoating to restore high reflectance.

  2. REMOVAL OF MTBE FROM WATER WITH ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE has impacted public drinking water wells from releases of gasoline making the water non-potable. MTBE is highly soluble in water, has a low volatility, does not adsorb strongly to soil, and is not thought to be easily biodegradable. Traditional methods of removing organics ...

  3. West Valley waste removal system study

    SciTech Connect

    Janicek, G P

    1981-04-01

    This study addresses the specific task of removing high-level wastes from underground tanks at Western New York Nuclear Center and delivering them to an onsite waste solidification plant. It begins with a review of the design and construction features of the waste storage tanks pertinent to the waste removal task with particular emphasis on the unique and complex tank internals which severely complicate the task of removal. It follows with a review of tank cleaning techniques used and under study at both Hanford and Savannah River and previous studies proposing the use of these techniques at West Valley. It concludes from these reviews that existing techniques are not directly transferable to West Valley and that a new approach is required utilizing selected feature and attributes from existing methodology. The study also concludes, from an investigation of the constraints imposed by the processing facility, that waste removal will be intermittent, requiring batch transfer over the anticipated 3 years of processing operations. Based on these reviews and conclusions, the study proposes that the acid waste be processed first and that one of the 15,000-gallon acid tanks then be used for batch feeding the neutralized waste. The proposed system would employ commercially available pumping equipment to transfer the wastes from the batch tank to processing via existing process piping. A commercially available mixed-flow pump and eight turbine pumps would homogenize the neutralized waste in conjunction with eight custom-fabricated sluicers for periodic transfer to the batch tank.

  4. Athletes with Disabilities. Removing Medical Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, David M.; McKeag, Douglas B.

    1994-01-01

    Disability-related conditions such as bladder problems or pressure sores need not keep people from activity. Although active individuals with disabilities require some specialized management, they mainly need medical care for sports-related cuts, sprains, and strains. Physicians can help remove medical barriers to participation for active…

  5. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

    1995-07-11

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

  6. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Derzon, Dora K.; Nelson, Jill S.; Rand, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

  7. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224 Section 206.224 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FEDERAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE Public Assistance Eligibility §...

  8. Scalpel safety and new scalpel blade remover.

    PubMed

    Hajipour, Babak

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous injuries to surgical staff carry a reciprocal risk for patients, with potential for infection transmission from provider to patient. The operating room is the highest-risk setting for this mode of transmission because open wounds are susceptible to contamination, and injury to the hands of surgical staff resulting in bleeding is not uncommon. The traditional scalpel (surgical knife) has been extensively used in surgery for a number of years and would be the most widely used surgical instrument in the world at present. A conventional surgical scalpel comprises a reusable, sterile handle having a tang at one end on which a replaceable slotted blade is mounted. The handle is intended to be used repeatedly, but the blade is normally discarded after each instance of use. Removal devices are designed to protect the user and downstream staff from accidental injury when removing a scalpel blade from a reusable handle. Passing tray and single-handed scalpel blade remover. It is a primary object of the present invention (Patent No. 62851- 40294) to reduce or substantially eliminate the risk of changing scalpel blades. It is a further object of the present invention to simplify the removal of a scalpel blade from its handle.

  9. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Raza, Md Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-08

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  10. Removing Preconceptions with a "Learning Cycle."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gang, Su

    1995-01-01

    Describes a teaching experiment that uses the Learning Cycle to achieve the reorientation of physics' students conceptual frameworks away from commonsense perspectives toward scientifically rigorous outlooks. Uses Archimedes' principle as the content topic while using the Learning Cycle to remove students' nonscientific preconceptions. (JRH)

  11. Removal of Radon from Household Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    By far, the greatest risk to health from radon occurs when the gas enters the house from underlying soil and is inhaled. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying ways to reduce radon in houses, including methods to remove the gas from water to prevent its release in houses when the water is used. While this research has not…

  12. Removing Biostatic Agents From Fermentation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid carbon dioxide inexpensive solvent. Inexpensive process proposed for removing such poisons as furfural and related compounds from fermentation baths of biomass hydrolysates. New process based on use of liquid carbon dioxide as extraction solvent. Liquid CO2 preferable to such other liquid solvents as ether or methylene chloride.

  13. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  14. Removing hexazinone from groundwater with microbial bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Shaner, Dale L

    2012-05-01

    Hexazinone, a triazine herbicide that is often detected as a ground and surface water contaminant, inhibits electron transport in photosynthetic organisms and is toxic to primary producers that serve as the base of the food chain. This laboratory study evaluated the ability of two types of microbial reactors, i.e., a vegetable oil-based nitrogen-limiting biobarrier and an aerobic slow sand filter, as methods for removing hexazinone from simulated groundwater. The N-limiting biobarriers degraded hexazinone, but did so with a 52 week incubation period and a removal efficiency that varied greatly among replicates, with one biobarrier showing a removal efficiency of ~95% and the other an efficiency of ~50%. More consistent degradation was obtained with the aerobic sand biobarriers. Four aerobic biobarriers were evaluated and all behaved in a similar manner degrading hexazinone with removal efficiencies of ~97%; challenging two of the aerobic biobarriers with large amounts of influent hexazinone showed that these barriers are capable of efficiently remediating large amounts (>100 mg L(-1)) of hexazinone at high efficiency. The remediation process was due to biological degradation rather than abiotic processes. The long lag phase observed in both types of reactors suggests that an acclimation process, where microorganisms capable of degrading hexazinone increased in numbers, was required. Also, the isolation of bacteria that show a positive growth response to the presence of hexazinone in their growth media suggests biological degradation.

  15. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  16. RELIABILITY OF SURROGATES FOR DETERMINING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing of field-scale bag filtration systems yielded results indicating that 4-6-um polystyrene microspheres can be used as a reliable surrogate for determining Cryptosporidium oocyst removal in bag filtration process. A nearly perfect linear correlation was observed between log...

  17. How to perform digital removal of faeces.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Rationale and key points This article provides practitioners with information about how to perform digital removal of faeces in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner, promoting privacy and dignity. Passing faecal matter is essential to enable the elimination of waste. For some people, however, defecation is not possible without some form of intervention; this could be the administration of oral medication or an enema, insertion of suppositories or digital removal of faeces. ▶ Bowel care is a fundamental aspect of patient care. ▶ Digital removal of faeces should be performed by a practitioner competent in this skill. ▶ Digital removal of faeces is an invasive procedure and should only be carried out when necessary following holistic patient assessment. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will improve your practice. 2. How the patient receiving the care you delivered might have felt. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  18. When to Remove a Chest Tube.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Nuria M; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge about the pleural physiology after lung resection, most practices around chest tube removal are dictated by personal preferences and experience. This article discusses recently published data on the topic and suggests opportunities for further investigation and future improvements.

  19. METHOD OF REMOVING RADIOACTIVE IODINE FROM GASES

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, L.

    1962-01-23

    A method of removing radioactive iodine from a gaseous medium is given in which the gaseous medium is adjusted to a temperature not exceeding 400 deg C and then passed over a copper fibrous pad having a coating of cupric sulfide deposited thereon. An ionic exchange on the pad results in the formation of cupric iodide and the release of sulfur. (AEC)

  20. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  1. 7 CFR 1260.213 - Removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal. 1260.213 Section 1260.213 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH...

  2. Symptom removal: the twentieth century experience.

    PubMed

    Weitzenhoffer, André M

    2004-01-01

    The twentieth century hypnosis literature regarding the use of direct symptom removal with hypnosis is in strong contrast with that of the nineteenth. It shows much ambivalence about the use of symptom removal. Objections, largely based on conclusions drawn from psychoanalytic theory, led many twentieth century psychotherapists to reject direct symptom removal. However, a certain amount of empirical evidence, scattered through the literature, has accumulated during the twentieth century to support this rejection. The lack of satisfactory twentieth century statistics and of nineteenth century details concerning hypnotic interventions that were used, makes it impossible to satisfactorily account for the discrepancy in experiences of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Although therapists did not altogether abandon working directly with symptoms, many opted instead for modifying and manipulating them by suggestion instead of completely removing them, usually allowing the patient to retain a psychodynamically suitable substitute. Here again a lack of adequate statistics prevents one from being able to properly appraise the effectiveness of this approach which has remained the preferred one for a number of therapists.

  3. Strontium Removal: Full-Scale Ohio Demonstrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this presentation are to present a brief overview of past bench-scale research to evaluate the impact lime softening on strontium removal from drinking water and present full-scale drinking water treatment studies to impact of lime softening and ion exchange sof...

  4. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention installation is coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which facilitates high infiltration rates but fails to provide the anaerobic conditions and carbon availability necessary to promote nitrate removal by denitrification. EPA's research at the Urban Watershed Research Facility investigates the effects of media carbon amendments, introduced internal storage zones, plant type, and media volume on nitrogen removal. Initial bench-scale tests informed media and carbon amendment choices. A locally-available, sandy media with low organic matter content was added to eight experimental, pilot-scale rain gardens above a shallow pea gravel drainage layer. The media was separated from the pea gravel with a nonwoven geotextile. Double-shredded hardwood wood chips were chosen as a carbon amendment and added as a 20-cm layer 10 cm above the geotextile in four of the eight pilot-scale rain gardens; the other four did not receive the mulch layer. Four rain gardens were constructed with an elevated outlet pipe to create an internal storage zone; the other four drain freely. Pilot-scale rain gardens were constructed in tanks of two sizes to test the effects of media volume. After initial hydrologic

  5. 40 CFR 403.7 - Removal credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pretreatment Standard(s). The POTW may grant a removal credit equal to or, at its discretion, less than its... may not be used. Where the number of samples with concentrations equal to or above the limit of... samples with concentrations equal to or above the limit of measurement, the Approval Authority may...

  6. Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

  7. Process for removing carbon from uranium

    DOEpatents

    Powell, George L.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

  8. 77 FR 4271 - Special Permit Marking Removal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    .... SUMMARY: On January 25, 2011, FRA published a Federal Register document stating that markings on tank cars...) rulemaking were required to be removed or obliterated by January 25, 2012, or at each subject tank car's first shopping event, whichever occurred first. This document relieves tank car owners from...

  9. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  10. Method of removing cesium from steam

    DOEpatents

    Carson, Jr., Neill J.; Noland, Robert A.; Ruther, Westly E.

    1991-01-01

    Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

  11. Electrokinetic removal of caesium from kaolin.

    PubMed

    Al-Shahrani, S S; Roberts, E P L

    2005-06-30

    Soil, in the form of kaolin and a sample of natural soil from an industrial site, was artificially contaminated with caesium and subjected to electrokinetic treatment. The effect of catholyte pH control on the process was investigated using different acids to control the catholyte pH. During treatment the in situ pH distribution, the current flow, and the potential distribution were monitored. At the end of the treatment the pore fluid conductivity and the caesium concentration distribution was measured. The results of these experiments showed that for caesium contamination, catholyte pH control is essential in order to create a suitable environment throughout the soil to enable contaminant removal. It was found that the type of acid used to control the catholyte pH affected the rate of caesium removal (nitric, sulphuric, acetic and citric acids were tested). All of the acids tested were effective, but the highest caesium extraction was achieved when nitric acid was used to control the catholyte pH. The relatively high adsorption capacity of the soil for caesium was found to significantly reduce the rate of removal. After 240 h of treatment at 1 Vcm(-1) (using sulphuric acid to control the catholyte pH), less than 80% of the caesium was removed from a 30 cm long sample of kaolin. Electrokinetic treatment of the industrial soil sample was slower than for the kaolin, but a significant extraction rate for caesium was achieved.

  12. Heat exchanger with a removable tube section

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

    1975-07-29

    A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

  13. NNSA B-Roll: Fuel Removals

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-21

    The National Nuclear Security Administration established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world, as quickly as possible, that pose a threat to the United States and the international community.

  14. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-04-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), that will perform effectively in all possible future cases. Strategies that cannot perform effectively, because of this uncertainty, risk either not achieving their intended purpose, or becoming a hindrance to the efforts of spacecraft manufactures and operators to address the challenges posed by space debris. One method to tackle this uncertainty is to create a strategy that can adapt and respond to the space debris population. This work explores the concept of an adaptive strategy, in terms of the number of objects required to be removed by ADR, to prevent the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population from growing in size. This was demonstrated by utilising the University of Southampton’s Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) tool to investigate ADR rates (number of removals per year) that change over time in response to the current space environment, with the requirement of achieving zero growth of the LEO population. DAMAGE was used to generate multiple Monte Carlo projections of the future LEO debris environment. Within each future projection, the debris removal rate was derived at five-year intervals, by a new statistical debris evolutionary model called the Computational Adaptive Strategy to Control Accurately the Debris Environment (CASCADE) model. CASCADE predicted the long-term evolution of the current DAMAGE population with a variety of different ADR rates in order to identify a removal rate that produced a zero net

  15. 43 CFR 5463.1 - Time for cutting and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time for cutting and removal. 5463.1... Cutting and Removal § 5463.1 Time for cutting and removal. Time for cutting and removal of timber or other vegetative resources sold shall not exceed a period of thirty-six months except that such time for...

  16. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  17. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  18. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  19. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  20. 8 CFR 241.7 - Self-removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-removal. 241.7 Section 241.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Post-hearing Detention and Removal § 241.7 Self-removal. A district director,...

  1. 36 CFR 62.8 - Natural landmark designation removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... decision to remove the national natural landmark designation. (d) Removal from the registry. (1) The Director reviews the information about a recommended removal from the Registry and determines whether the... reviews the submitted information and recommends the removal from or retention of the area in the...

  2. 27 CFR 25.206 - Removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of beer. 25.206... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Beer for Personal Or Family Use § 25.206 Removal of beer. Beer made under § 25.205 may be removed from the premises where made for personal...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4200 - Clip removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clip removal instrument. 882.4200 Section 882.4200...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4200 Clip removal instrument. (a) Identification. A clip removal instrument is a device used to remove surgical clips from the patient....

  4. 21 CFR 882.4200 - Clip removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clip removal instrument. 882.4200 Section 882.4200...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4200 Clip removal instrument. (a) Identification. A clip removal instrument is a device used to remove surgical clips from the patient....

  5. 40 CFR 1066.620 - Removed water correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removed water correction. 1066.620... CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.620 Removed water correction. Correct for removed water if water removal occurs upstream of a concentration measurement and downstream of a flow...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.659 - Removed water correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removed water correction. 1065.659... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.659 Removed water correction. (a) If you remove water upstream of a concentration measurement, x, correct for the removed...

  7. Fecal Coliform Removal by River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens are a major cause of water quality impairment in the United States. Freshwater ecosystems provide the ecosystem service of reducing pathogen levels by diluting and removing pathogens as water flows from source areas through the river network. However, the integration of field-scale monitoring data and watershed-scale hydrologic models to estimate pathogen loads and removal in varied aquatic ecosystems is still limited. In this study we applied a biogeochemical river network model (the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in the Earth System or FrAMES) and utilized available field data the Oyster R. watershed, a small (51.7 km2) draining coastal New Hampshire (NH, USA), to quantify pathogen removal at the river network scale, using fecal coliform as an indicator. The Oyster R. Watershed is comprised of various land use types, and has had its water quality monitored for fecal coliform, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity since 2001. Water samples were also collected during storm events to account for storm responses. FrAMES was updated to incorporate the dominant processes controlling fecal coliform concentrations in aquatic ecosystems: spatially distributed terrestrial loading, in-stream removal, dilution, and downstream transport. We applied an empirical loading function to estimate the terrestrial loading of fecal coliform across flow conditions. Data was collected from various land use types across a range of hydrologic conditions. The loading relationship includes total daily precipitation, antecedent 24-hour rainfall, air temperature, and catchment impervious surface percentage. Attenuation is due to bacterial "die-off" and dilution processes. Results show that fecal coliform input loads varied among different land use types. At low flow, fecal coliform concentrations were similar among watersheds. However, at high flow the concentrations were significantly higher in urbanized watersheds than forested watersheds. The mainstem had lower fecal coliform

  8. Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Choy, Christine Chin; Korfiatis, George P; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2006-08-10

    Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 10(4) Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter <0.075 mm, total DU 7732 mg/kg (9.61 x 10(4) Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 10(4) Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 10(4) Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%.

  9. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid.

  10. Manual Snow Removal and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Skavić, Petar; Stemberga, Valter; Duraković, Din

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to analyze the causes of sudden death in middle-aged and elderly men during manual snow removal. During snowy winter months in Zagreb, from January 2013 to January 2014, four males aged 52, 65, 72 and 81, died suddenly while manually removing snow. They were all autopsied. All of them have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, and one suffered from metabolic syndrome. The cause of death in two was probable malignant ventricular arrhythmia. In the third who fell down on the icy surface, consequences were cerebral contusion and neck vertebral luxation. In the fourth who fell down from the top of a 15 m tall building during snow removal, the cause of death were multiple injuries: fractures of both clavicles, ribs and vertebrae's Th5, Th6, hematothorax, cardiac contusion, hematopericardium, thoracic aorta rupture, contusions and ruptures of both lungs, rupture of the diaphragm, liver rupture, hematoperitoneum and cerebral edema. The estimated death rate in the City of Zagreb for males aged 30-64 years is 5.44/1,000,000 inhabitants, which is less than in those aged 65-85 years (40.03/1,000,000; p = 0.2269). Sudden strenuous physical effort due to manual snow removal in two non-trained persons, who have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, was the cause of sudden death. Manual snow removal is an important cause of sudden death, as it is a very arduous effort in non-adapted middle-aged and elderly persons.

  11. Removal and factors influencing removal of sulfonamides and trimethoprim from domestic sewage in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dan A; Yang, Yang; Dai, Yu-nv; Chen, Chun-xing; Wang, Su-yu; Tao, Ran

    2013-10-01

    Twelve pilot-scale constructed wetlands with different configurations were set up in the field to evaluate the removal and factors that influence removal of sulfonamides (sulfadiazine, sulfapyridine, sulfacetamide, sulfamethazine and sulfamethoxazole) and trimethoprim from domestic sewage. The treatments included four flow types, three substrates, two plants and three hydraulic loading rates across two seasons (summer and winter). Most target antibiotics were efficiently removed by specific constructed wetlands; in particular, all types of constructed wetlands performed well for the degradation of sulfapyridine. Flow types were the most important influencing factor in this study, and the best removal of sulfonamides was achieved in vertical subsurface-flow constructed wetlands; however, the opposite phenomenon was found with trimethoprim. Significant relationships were observed between antibiotic degradation and higher temperature and redox potential, which indicated that microbiological pathways were the most probable degradation route for sulfonamides and trimethoprim in constructed wetlands.

  12. 78 FR 79600 - Removal of Person From the Entity List Based on a Removal Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... decision to remove this person took into account this person's cooperation with the U.S. Government, as... interagency deliberation and result from review of public and non- public sources, including sensitive...

  13. Integrating organic micropollutant removal into tertiary filtration: Combining PAC adsorption with advanced phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Johannes; Sperlich, Alexander; Jekel, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Direct addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to a deep-bed filter was investigated at pilot-scale as a single advanced treatment stage for simultaneous removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) and phosphorus from secondary effluent. PAC doses of 10-50 mg/L were assessed with regard to their impacts on filter performance and removal of 15 selected OMPs over a period of 18 months. The PAC was effectively retained by the filter and had no negative effect on filter head loss. Filter runtime until particle breakthrough depended mainly on coagulant dose and did not decrease significantly due to the additional PAC load. Removal of suspended solids and phosphorus by coagulation was effective independent of the PAC dose. A PAC dose of 35 mg/L PAC was suitable to remove well-adsorbing OMPs (e.g. carbamazepine, diclofenac) by >80% and medium adsorbing OMPs (e.g. primidone, sulfamethoxazole) by 50-80%. Median removals were 50-80% for well-adsorbing and 30-50% for medium adsorbing OMPs with 20 mg/L PAC. Abatement of all OMPs was low (<50%) with 10 mg/L PAC, possibly because of the high effluent organic matter content (median dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 11.2 mg/L). In addition to adsorptive removal, relevant concentration decreases of certain OMPs (e.g. 4-formylaminoantipyrine) were attributed to biological transformation in the filter. Adsorption onto accumulating PAC in the top layer of the filter bed led to improved OMP adsorption with increasing filter runtime. The comparison of OMP removal in the pilot filter with laboratory adsorption tests demonstrates that batch test results can be applied to estimate adsorptive OMP removal in real applications.

  14. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  15. Fluoride in drinking water and its removal.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi; Maheshwari, R C

    2006-09-01

    Excessive fluoride concentrations have been reported in groundwaters of more than 20 developed and developing countries including India where 19 states are facing acute fluorosis problems. Various technologies are being used to remove fluoride from water but still the problem has not been rooted out. In this paper, a broad overview of the available technologies for fluoride removal and advantages and limitations of each one have been presented based on literature survey and the experiments conducted in the laboratory with several processes. It has been concluded that the selection of treatment process should be site specific as per local needs and prevailing conditions as each technology has some limitations and no one process can serve the purpose in diverse conditions.

  16. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery.

    PubMed

    Machnicka, Alicja; Grubel, Klaudiusz; Suschka, Jan

    2008-07-01

    Activated sludge systems designed for enhanced nutrient removal are based on the principle of altering anaerobic and aerobic conditions for growth of microorganisms with a high capacity of phosphorus accumulation. Most often, filamentous bacteria constitute a component of the activated sludge microflora. The filamentous microorganisms are responsible for foam formation and activated sludge bulking. The results obtained confirm unanimously that the filamentous bacteria have the ability of phosphorus uptake and accumulation as polyphosphates. Hydrodynamic disintegration of the foam microorganisms results in the transfer of phosphorus and metal cations and ammonium-nitrogen into the liquid phase. It was demonstrated that the disintegration of foam permits the removal of a portion of the nutrients in the form of struvite.

  17. Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachtenberg, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the mutants to be almost identical to the wild type save at higher pH. Both native enzyme and mutant enzymes were immobilized to different supports including nylons, glasses, sepharose, methacrylate, titanium and nickel. Mutant enzyme could be attached and removed from metal ligand supports and the supports reused at least five times. Membrane systems were constructed to test CO2 selectivity. These included proteic membranes, thin liquid films and enzyme-immobilized teflon membranes. Selectivity ratios of more than 200:1 were obtained for CO2 versus oxygen with CO2 at 0.1%. The data indicate that a membrane based bioreactor can be constructed which could bring CO2 levels close to Earth.

  18. Groundwater removal near heat dissipating waste packages

    SciTech Connect

    Manteufel, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    The thermohydrologic environment of heat-dissipating nuclear waste packages in a subsurface repository is affected by ventilation of the facility prior to permanent closure. Heat dissipated by the waste will raise the temperature of host rock and vaporize groundwater. Ventilation will remove some heat and water vapor from the subsurface, creating a desiccated region surrounding the waste packages. The resulting hot, dry environment will tend to favorably extend the containment time of the waste. This work evaluates the transient temperature field near emplacement drifts and predicts the extent of rock dryout and removal of groundwater. For two hypothetical ventilation schemes with 30-yr-old fuel and repository loading of 40 metric tons of uranium (MTU) per acre, about 4 to 5 m of rock surrounding the drifts are predicted to be dried during the preclosure period.

  19. Method of arsenic removal from water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-10-26

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  20. Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  1. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  2. Biomolecules for removal of heavy metal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-02-23

    Heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to review research work and patents related to adsorption through biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, lignin etc. and bio-sorption by biological material that are used for heavy metal removal. Biomolecules are cost effective and there have been significant progresses in the remediation of heavy metals but, still there are some problems that need to be rectified for its application at industrial processes.

  3. A comparative study of staff removal algorithms.

    PubMed

    Dalitz, Christoph; Droettboom, Michael; Pranzas, Bastian; Fujinaga, Ichiro

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative comparison of different algorithms for the removal of stafflines from music images. It contains a survey of previously proposed algorithms and suggests a new skeletonization based approach. We define three different error metrics, compare the algorithms with respect to these metrics and measure their robustness with respect to certain image defects. Our test images are computer-generated scores on which we apply various image deformations typically found in real-world data. In addition to modern western music notation our test set also includes historic music notation such as mensural notation and lute tablature. Our general approach and evaluation methodology is not specific to staff removal, but applicable to other segmentation problems as well.

  4. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.; London, Richard A.; Maitland, IV, Duncan J.; Esch, Victor C.

    2002-01-01

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  5. Lipid Removal from Human Serum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnold R.; Morrill, William E.; Pope, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of lipid removal from human serum samples obtained by using Cleanascite HC, a commercially available product, was compared to that obtained by the standard chloroform method. Separate samples of 21 frozen, banked human serum samples used in the preparation of samples for proficiency testing were treated with either Cleanascite HC or chloroform. The lipid content was measured before and after treatment. The total percentages of lipid removed ranged from 61 to 70% with Cleanascite HC and from 60 to 62% with chloroform. The advantage of Cleanascite HC over chloroform is based on the simplicity of the procedure with Cleanascite HC without the environmental concerns inherent in the use of chloroform. In 15 serum samples known to contain antibodies to treponemal and nontreponemal syphilis antigens, Cleanascite HC bound some immunoglobulin, but with only minimal loss of reactivity in the serologic tests for syphilis. Cleanascite HC is therefore an acceptable alternative to chloroform for lipid reduction in human serum samples. PMID:10702492

  6. Enhanced Molecular Sieve CO2 Removal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Susan; ElSherif, Dina; MacKnight, Allen

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to quantitatively characterize the performance of two major types of molecular sieves for two-bed regenerative carbon dioxide removal at the conditions compatible with both a spacesuit and station application. One sorbent is a zeolite-based molecular sieve that has been substantially improved over the materials used in Skylab. The second sorbent is a recently developed carbon-based molecular sieve. Both molecular sieves offer the potential of high payoff for future manned missions by reducing system complexity, weight (including consumables), and power consumption in comparison with competing concepts. The research reported here provides the technical data required to improve CO2 removal systems for regenerative life support systems for future IVA and EVA missions.

  7. Fluid jet polishing: removal process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faehnle, Oliver W.; van Brug, Hedser H.

    1999-09-01

    This paper reports on a new finishing process, Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP), that resembles the kinetic process employed in ASJ systems in that it is guiding a pre-mixed slurry to the surface, but within FJP low pressures are applied. Since FJP employs a fluid for machining, no tool wear occurs and the tool is cooling and removing debris in process. Using slurry that contained water with grinding abrasives, the FJP finishing process has been demonstrated. On flat glass samples, the surface roughness of a previously ground surface has been reduced from 475 nm rms to 5 nm rms and a prepolished surface has been shaped without increasing its roughness of 1.6 nm rms. Experiments are described showing that the final surface roughness depends on slurry characteristics and that the material removal spot can be adjusted by varying process parameters, e.g. the angle of the incident ray.

  8. Removal of mercury by adsorption: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yue, Bao-Yu; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Liu, Qi; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to natural and production activities, mercury contamination has become one of the major environmental problems over the world. Mercury contamination is a serious threat to human health. Among the existing technologies available for mercury pollution control, the adsorption process can get excellent separation effects and has been further studied. This review is attempted to cover a wide range of adsorbents that were developed for the removal of mercury from the year 2011. Various adsorbents, including the latest adsorbents, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancements on their preparation, modification technologies, and strategies. By comparing their adsorption capacities, it is evident from the literature survey that some adsorbents have shown excellent potential for the removal of mercury. However, there is still a need to develop novel, efficient adsorbents with low cost, high stability, and easy production and manufacture for practical utility.

  9. Optodynamic monitoring of laser tattoo removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Grad, Ladislav; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this research is to use the information contained in the mechanisms occurring during the laser tattoo removal process. We simultaneously employed a laser-beam deflection probe (LBDP) to measure the shock wave and a camera to detect the plasma radiation, both originating from a high-intensity laser-pulse interaction with a tattoo. The experiments were performed in vitro (skin phantoms), ex vivo (marking tattoos on pig skin), and in vivo (professional and amateur decorative tattoos). The LBDP signal includes the information about the energy released during the interaction and indicates textural changes in the skin, which are specific for different skin and tattoo conditions. Using both sensors, we evaluated a measurement of threshold for skin damage and studied the effect of multiple pulses. In vivo results show that a prepulse reduces the interaction strength and that a single strong pulse produces better removal results.

  10. Removing shadows from Google Earth satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianhong; Gong, Peng; Liang, Lu

    2007-06-01

    June 2005, Google has released its geographic search tool "Google earth", a new application that combines local search with satellite images and maps from around the globe. It is designed to make every person owned a computer easily "fly" to aerial views of many locations on the planet. However, just as ordinary satellite images, there inevitably exist shadows in it, made some ground objects obscure, even unidentifiable. According to the basic thinking of Radiative Transfer Theory, this paper built a image shadow removal model, which using the Radiative Transfer Theory combined with preknowledge to compensate the lost shadow area information. The results shows: shadows in images were successfully removed and the target objects were returned to their original scenes.

  11. Retracted: Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-02-15

    "Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal", by Falk Schwendicke The above article, published online on 15 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.llll/jerd.12201), has been retracted by agreement between the author, Dr. Falk Schwendicke, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Harald O. Heymann, Associate Editor, Dr. Edward Swift and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed as the article was published in advance of other companion work which should have had precedence. The article pages have been replaced by the Retraction Statement and the article condensed accordingly. Schwendicke, F. Swift, EJ. Modern concepts for caries tissue removal. Dent J Esthet Rest 2016; 28:1; DOI: 10.1111/jerd.12201.

  12. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  13. Carbon removal from trenches on EUV reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, N. B.; Geluk, C. P. E. C.; Versloot, T. W.; Janssen, J. P. B.; Fleming, Y.; Wirtz, T.

    2014-10-01

    We report on our investigation of dry cleaning of reticles with a microwave induced hydrogen plasma on dummy reticles. The dummy reticles were manufactured with 70 nm ALD grown TaN on a Ru surface and test structures were patterned with lines and spaces ranging between 250 and 400 nm. After processing the test structures were contaminated with e-beam grown carbon and exposed in our plasma facility to remove the carbon with the aid of a hydrogen plasma. Analysis of the samples was performed with SEM/EDX and with SIMS-SPM to verify the complete removal of carbon from the bottom of the trench. Analysis showed that there are small traces of carbon still present on the samples. This can be contributed to contamination which has occurred during transport and storage or that the grown carbon has some edges which are higher due to localized high intensity in the focus of the e-beam.

  14. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  15. REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Kerry A.; Bellamy, J. Steve; Chandler, Greg T.; Iyer, Natraj C.; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D.; Hackney, B.; Leduc, Dan R.; McClard, J. W.

    2013-08-18

    U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

  16. Removing Chlorides From Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, W. C.; Coleman, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Process for making low-cost silicon for solar cells is further improved. Silane product recycled to feed stripper column converts some of heavy impurities to volatile ones that pass off at top of column with light wastes. Impurities--chlorides of arsenic, phosphorus, and boron-would otherwise be carried to subsequent distillations where they would be difficult to remove. Since only a small amount of silane is recycled, silicon production efficiency remains high.

  17. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  18. Surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kefeng; Deletic, Ana; Page, Declan; McCarthy, David T

    2015-09-15

    Real time monitoring of suitable surrogate parameters are critical to the validation of any water treatment processes, and is of particularly high importance for validation of natural stormwater treatment systems. In this study, potential surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters (also known as stormwater bio-retention or rain-gardens) were assessed using field challenge tests and matched laboratory column experiments. Differential UV absorbance at 254mn (ΔUVA254), total phosphorus (ΔTP), dissolved phosphorus (ΔDP), total nitrogen (ΔTN), ammonia (ΔNH3), nitrate and nitrite (ΔNO3+NO2), dissolved organic carbon (ΔDOC) and total suspended solids (ΔTSS) were compared with glyphosate, atrazine, simazine and prometryn removal rates. The influence of different challenge conditions on the performance of each surrogate was studied. Differential TP was significantly and linearly related to glyphosate reduction (R(2) = 0.75-0.98, P < 0.01), while ΔTP and ΔUVA254 were linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.44-0.84, P < 0.05) to the reduction of triazines (atrazine, simazine and prometryn) in both field and laboratory tests. The performance of ΔTP and ΔUVA254 as surrogates for herbicides were reliable under normal and challenge dry conditions, but weaker correlations were observed under challenge wet conditions. Of those tested, ΔTP is the most promising surrogate for glyphosate removal and ΔUVA254 is a suitable surrogate for triazines removal in stormwater biofilters.

  19. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  20. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  1. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  2. Removing autocorrelation in spectral optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a new algorithm and configuration for removing the autocorrelation of the object wave in spectral optical coherence tomography. The self-interferogram of the object wave is acquired synchronously with the standard interferogram of the recombined object and reference waves. The former is then subtracted from the latter after Fourier transformation. The algorithm is validated by numerical simulation and by experimental measurement of a USAF target and a feline eye.

  3. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

    1985-03-04

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  4. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Makarewicz, Mark A.; Meredith, Paul F.

    1986-01-01

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  5. Palliative Care with Attachment Hybrid Removable Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abutment injury, unsatisfactory aesthetics and lesser retention exist with the cast partial denture. Though these constraints exist in the Removable Partial Denture (RPD) it is still widely used because of the simplicity in design, fabrication, economics and patient comfort. This clinical report describes a hybrid RPD technique which uses extra coronal attachment that reduces the limitations and provides better comfort for the patient. PMID:28274077

  6. Endoscopic Removal of 15 Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Savran, Bircan; Zeren, Sezgin; Coşgun, Süleyman; Adigüzel, Ünal; Öztürk, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion occurs commonly in children, elderly, mentally impaired or alcoholic, and psychiatric patients. We present a 15-year-old boy with mental retardation and uncontrolled psychiatric disorder admitted to the hospital with abdominal and chest pain. He was diagnosed with foreign body ingestion and 15 foreign objects, including a sharp knife, were successfully removed endoscopically by using an over-tube. PMID:26623255

  7. Process for removing carbonate from wells

    SciTech Connect

    Derowisch, R.W.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a method of removing carbonate deposited in a water supply well by inflowing groundwater. It comprises: treating a supply of water by means of a membrane system for desalinization which places the water in an aggressive state of chemical inequilibrium and ion imbalance having a keen affinity for carbonate; pumping a fluid comprising the treated supply of water, without restabilization, into the well to react with the deposited carbonate; and flushing the product of the reaction from the well.

  8. Copper removal using electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Amir; Safari, Salman; Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-06-03

    Removal of heavy metal ions such as copper using an efficient and low-cost method with low ecological footprint is a critical process in wastewater treatment, which can be achieved in a liquid phase using nanoadsorbents such as inorganic nanoparticles. Recently, attention has turned toward developing sustainable and environmentally friendly nanoadsorbents to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media. Electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC), which can be prepared from wood fibers through periodate/chlorite oxidation, has been shown to have a high charge content and colloidal stability. Here, we show that ENCC scavenges copper ions by different mechanisms depending on the ion concentration. When the Cu(II) concentration is low (C0≲200 ppm), agglomerates of starlike ENCC particles appear, which are broken into individual starlike entities by shear and Brownian motion, as evidenced by photometric dispersion analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. On the other hand, at higher copper concentrations, the aggregate morphology changes from starlike to raftlike, which is probably due to the collapse of protruding dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) chains and ENCC charge neutralization by copper adsorption. Such raftlike structures result from head-to-head and lateral aggregation of neutralized ENCCs as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to starlike aggregates, the raftlike structures grow gradually and are prone to sedimentation at copper concentrations C0≳500 ppm, which eliminates a costly separation step in wastewater treatment processes. Moreover, a copper removal capacity of ∼185 mg g(-1) was achieved thanks to the highly charged DCC polyanions protruding from ENCC. These properties along with the biorenewability make ENCC a promising candidate for wastewater treatment, in which fast, facile, and low-cost removal of heavy metal ions is desired most.

  9. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  10. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  11. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, Tetsuo; Squires, Thomas G.; Venier, Clifford G.

    1985-02-05

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  12. Biocathodic nitrous oxide removal in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Desloover, Joachim; Puig, Sebastià; Virdis, Bernardino; Clauwaert, Peter; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2011-12-15

    Anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions represent up to 40% of the global N(2)O emission and are constantly increasing. Mitigation of these emissions is warranted since N(2)O is a strong greenhouse gas and important ozone-depleting compound. Until now, only physicochemical technologies have been applied to mitigate point sources of N(2)O, and no biological treatment technology has been developed so far. In this study, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) with an autotrophic denitrifying biocathode was considered for the removal of N(2)O. The high N(2)O removal rates obtained ranged between 0.76 and 1.83 kg N m(-3) net cathodic compartment (NCC) d(-1) and were proportional to the current production, resulting in cathodic coulombic efficiencies near 100%. Furthermore, our experiments suggested the active involvement of microorganisms as the catalyst for the reduction of N(2)O to N(2), and the optimal cathode potential ranged from -200 to 0 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) in order to obtain high conversion rates. Successful operation of the system for more than 115 days with N(2)O as the sole cathodic electron acceptor strongly indicated that N(2)O respiration yielded enough energy to maintain the biological process. To our knowledge, this study provides for the first time proof of concept of biocathodic N(2)O removal at long-term without the need for high temperatures and expensive catalysts.

  13. Target Injector and Sabot Remover for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Kameyama, Nobukazu

    2012-10-01

    Target injectors for IFE are required to inject targets to the reactor center at a velocity of over 100 m/s with accuracy of several millimeters. A target injector system with a magnetic sabot remover is developed to demonstrate injection of polystyrene targets. A typical target used in this study is 4.0 mm in diameter and 0.8 mg in weight. It is inserted in to an aluminum sabot that is 9.2 mm in outer diameter and 40 mm in length. They are accelerated together by a pneumatic gun. Before injection into the reactor, the sabot is removed for laser irradiation. The sabot remover is composed of Neodymium magnets array that generates Lorentz force as a result of interaction between the magnets' field and induced current on the sabot. The Neodymium magnets are 14 mm at inner diameter and 316 mT on its surface. The magnetic array is designed and optimized its magnets number for complete target extraction. The theoretically and experimentally confirmed deceleration rate of the sabot is 60.2 m/s/s per one meter. The targets are shot into the vacuum chamber after extraction from the sabot at accelerated velocity of 30 m/s. The experimentally obtained injection accuracy is 5.3 mm in horizontal direction and 4.8 mm in vertical direction.

  14. Nitrogen removal in recirculated duckweed ponds system.

    PubMed

    Benjawan, L; Koottatep, T

    2007-01-01

    Duckweed-based ponds (DWBPs) have the potential for nitrogen (N) removal from wastewater; however, operational problems such as duckweed die-off regularly occur. In this study, effluent recirculation was applied to the DWBPs to solve the above problem as well as to investigate N removal mechanisms. Two pilot scale recirculated DWBPs were employed to treat municipal wastewater. The average removal efficiencies for TN, TKN and NH4-N were 75%, 89% and 92%, respectively at TN loading of 1.3 g/m2.d and were 73%, 74% and 76%, respectively at TN loading of 3.3 g/m2.d. The effluent of the system under both operational conditions had stable quality and met the effluent standard. Duckweed die-off was not observed during the study, which proves the system stability and effluent recirculation which is thought to be a reason. N-mass balance revealed that nitrification-denitrification and duckweed uptake play major roles in these recirculated DWBPs. The rates of nitrification-denitrification were increased as TN loading was higher, which might be an influence from an abundance of N and a suitable condition. The rates of N uptake by duckweed were found similar and did not depend on the higher TN loading applied, as the duckweed has limited capacity to assimilate it.

  15. Nitrogen Removal from Landfill Leachate by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sérgio F. L.; Gonçalves, Ana L.; Moreira, Francisca C.; Silva, Tânia F. C. V.; Vilar, Vítor J. P.; Pires, José C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Landfill leachates result from the degradation of solid residues in sanitary landfills, thus presenting a high variability in terms of composition. Normally, these effluents are characterized by high ammoniacal-nitrogen (N–NH4+) concentrations, high chemical oxygen demands and low phosphorus concentrations. The development of effective treatment strategies becomes difficult, posing a serious problem to the environment. Phycoremediation appears to be a suitable alternative for the treatment of landfill leachates. In this study, the potential of Chlorella vulgaris for biomass production and nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from different compositions of a landfill leachate was evaluated. Since microalgae also require phosphorus for their growth, different loads of this nutrient were evaluated, giving the following N:P ratios: 12:1, 23:1 and 35:1. The results have shown that C. vulgaris was able to grow in the different leachate compositions assessed. However, microalgal growth was higher in the cultures presenting the lowest N–NH4+ concentration. In terms of nutrients uptake, an effective removal of N–NH4+ and phosphorus was observed in all the experiments, especially in those supplied with phosphorus. Nevertheless, N–NO3− removal was considered almost negligible. These promising results constitute important findings in the development of a bioremediation technology for the treatment of landfill leachates. PMID:27869676

  16. Chabazite biofilter for enhanced stormwater nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel P

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced nitrogen removal from stormwater using chabazite, a natural cation exchanger, was evaluated in a pilot-plant biofilter operated for 216 days. A parallel sand filter served as the control. The biofilters were subject to various operating modes including baseline periods of steady flowrate and loading, simulated high flowrate (storm) events following steady flowrates, high flowrates following extended no-flow periods, and with limited influent dissolved oxygen. Under steady-flow operation, chabazite removed 93% of ammonium and sand removed 87%; total inorganic nitrogen was reduced 35% by chabazite versus 15% by sand. In a simulated storm event following steady-flow operation, 97% of cumulative ammonia mass was retained by the chabazite biofilter versus 70% for sand. Following a 40 day no-flow period, the chabazite biofilter retained 98% of influent ammonium in a storm event while sand exhibited high effluent ammonium. Chabazite ammonium retention was high under limited influent dissolved oxygen, verses significant breakthrough by the sand biofilter. Chabazite media provided superior performance resiliency under dynamic conditions that typify stormwater treatment.

  17. Sulfate removal from waste chemicals by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Cláudia Telles; Tavares, Célia Regina Granhen; Lenzi, Ervim

    2009-01-01

    Chemical oxidation using Fenton's reagent has proven to be a viable alternative to the oxidative destruction of organic pollutants in mixed waste chemicals, but the sulfate concentration in the treated liquor was still above the acceptable limits for effluent discharge. In this paper, the feasibility of sulfate removal from complex laboratory wastewaters using barium and calcium precipitation was investigated. The process was applied to different wastewater cases (two composite samples generated in different periods) in order to study the effect of the wastewater composition on the sulfate precipitation. The experiments were performed with raw and oxidized wastewater samples, and carried out according to the following steps: (1) evaluate the pH effect upon sulfate precipitation on raw wastewaters at pH range of 2-8; (2) conduct sulfate precipitation experiments on raw and oxidized wastewaters; and (3) characterize the precipitate yielded. At a concentration of 80 g L(-1), barium precipitation achieved a sulfate removal up to 61.4% while calcium precipitation provided over 99% sulfate removal in raw and oxidized wastewaters and for both samples. Calcium precipitation was chosen to be performed after Fenton's oxidation; hence this process configuration favors the production of higher quality precipitates. The results showed that, when dried at 105 degrees C, the precipitate is composed of hemidrate and anhydrous calcium sulfate ( approximately 99.8%) and trace metals ( approximately 0.2%: Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ag, Mg, K, Na), what makes it suitable for reuse in innumerous processes.

  18. [Sulfide removal from wastewater by nanoscale iron].

    PubMed

    Xi, Hong-bo; Yang, Qi; Shang, Hai-tao; Hao, Chun-bo; Li, Zhi-ling

    2008-09-01

    Influencing factors, adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics and preliminary discussion on the mechanism of sulfide adsorption by nanoscale iron prepared in laboratory were studied using manual simulation sulfide wastewater. Experimental results indicate that the removal efficiency of S2- increases with increasing iron dosage and decreases with increasing initial S2- concentration and pH values. The removal efficiency of S2- is 100% when initial concentration is less than 100 mg x L(-1) and are 87.34%, 65.80% and 44.61% at pH 2, 7 and 13. The temperature at 25 degrees C favors the maximum adsorption of S2- with 19.17 mg x g(-1) of equilibrium adsorption quantity and the adsorption capacity decreas at higher or lower temperature. The adsorption data fit well to the Langmuir equation and the Freundlich equation. The sulfide adsorption follows the pseudo second order equation with the maximum initial sorption rate(h) is 1.575 3 mg x (g x mg)(-1) at 25 degrees C and the adsorption rate constant increases with the increasing of temperature. The activation energy(Ea) is 8.22 kJ x mol(-1). The mechanism of sulfide removal is being sorbed onto the iron nanoparticles via formation of surface compleses, FeOSH and iron sulfides (FeS, FeS2, FeSn).

  19. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  20. The picosecond laser for tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Vincent M; Aldahan, Adam S; Mlacker, Stephanie; Shah, Vidhi V; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of tattoos continues to grow as modern society's stigma towards this form of body art shifts towards greater acceptance. Approximately one third of Americans aged 18-25 and 40 % of Americans aged 26-40 are tattooed. As tattoos continue to rise in popularity, so has the demand for an effective method of tattoo removal such as lasers. The various colors of tattoo inks render them ideal targets for specific lasers using the principle of selective photothermolysis. Traditional laser modalities employed for tattoo removal operate on pulse durations in the nanosecond domain. However, this pulse duration range is still too long to effectively break ink into small enough particles. Picosecond (10(-12)) lasers have emerged at the forefront of laser tattoo removal due to their shorter pulse lengths, leading to quicker heating of the target chromophores, and consequently, more effective tattoo clearance. Recent studies have cited more effective treatment outcomes using picosecond lasers. Future comparative studies between picosecond lasers of various settings are necessary to determine optimal laser parameters for tattoo clearance.

  1. Electrochemical removal of dyes from textile wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrich, K.D. )

    1988-09-01

    There are many technologies available for treating wastewater from the textile industry. Included are (1) biological treatment, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) carbon absorption, (4) ultrafiltration, and (5) oxidation with ozone. The main drawback of these technologies is that they generally lack the broad scope of treatment efficiency required to reduce all types of pollutants present in textile wastewater. However, when one approach does look promising, its capital costs or operating costs often become prohibitive when applied to the large water needs common to this industry. It has recently been shown that an electrochemical technology developed in the 1970s by Andco Environmental Processes, Inc. effectively removes many of the contaminants including toxic dye species and heavy metals along with significant BOD and COD reduction across many types of textile wastewater and dye species. The removal of dyes and other pollutants in textile wastewater can be accomplished very efficiently with the electrochemical process. Actual operating data, along with actual water samples, will be presented along with economics and operating characteristics of this type of a system. Additional considerations such as removal of other components such as BOD and COD, theoretical interpretations, and the possibility of water reuse will also be discussed.

  2. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  3. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  4. Enhanced nitrogen removal in trickling filter plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Constantinou, A; Griffiths, P

    2013-01-01

    The Beaudesert Sewage Treatment Plant (STP), originally built in 1966 and augmented in 1977, is a typical biological trickling filter (TF) STP comprising primary sedimentation tanks (PSTs), TFs and humus tanks. The plant, despite not originally being designed for nitrogen removal, has been consistently achieving over 60% total nitrogen reduction and low effluent ammonium concentration of less than 5 mg NH3-N/L. Through the return of a NO3(-)-rich stream from the humus tanks to the PSTs and maintaining an adequate sludge age within the PSTs, the current plant is achieving a substantial degree of denitrification. Further enhanced denitrification has been achieved by raising the recycle flows and maintaining an adequate solids retention time (SRT) within the PSTs. This paper describes the approach to operating a TF plant to achieve a high degree of nitrification and denitrification. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated through the pilot plant trial. The results from the pilot trial demonstrate a significant improvement in nitrogen removal performance whilst maximising the asset life of the existing infrastructure. This shows great potential as a retrofit option for small and rural communities with pre-existing TFs that require improvements in terms of nitrogen removal.

  5. Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-18

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (α-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

  6. Fixed film phosphorus removal--flexible enough?

    PubMed

    Rogalla, F; Johnson, T L; McQuarrie, J

    2006-01-01

    While biological phosphorus removal (BPR) has been practised for 30 years, up to recently it has been restricted mainly to activated sludge processes, with the corresponding need for large basin volumes. Yet, research with biofilm reactors showed that the principle of alternate anaerobic and aerated conditions was applicable to fixed bacteria by changing the conditions in time rather than in space. Attached growth enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems are attractive because of their compactness and capability to retain high biomass levels. However, the phosphorus extraction depends on backwashes to enhance the phosphorus-rich attached biomass, and correct control of unsteady effluent quality created by frequently modified process conditions. Accordingly, EBPR remains a challenging task in terms of combining nitrogen and phosphorus removal using attached growth systems. Nevertheless, a combination of activated sludge and biofilm carriers, in the integrated fixed-film activated sludge system, provides treatment opportunities not readily available using suspended growth systems. Current practice is only at the beginning of exploiting the full potential of this combination, but the first full-scale results show that compact tankage and low nutrient results based on biological principles are possible.

  7. Evaluation of a satellite constellation for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, Hironori

    2014-12-01

    This paper analyzes an example of a three-dimensional constellation of debris removal satellites and proposes an effective constellation using a delta-V analysis that discusses the advisability of rendezvousing satellites with space debris. Lambert's Equation was used to establish a means of analysis to construct a constellation of debris removal satellites, which has a limit of delta-V injection by evaluating the amount of space debris that can be rendezvoused by a certain number of removal satellite. Consequently, we determine a constellation of up to 38 removal satellites for debris removal, where the number of space debris rendezvoused by a single removal satellite is not more than 25, removing up to 584 pieces of debris total. Even if we prepare 38 removal satellites in their respective orbits, it is impossible to remove all of the space debris. Although many removal satellites, over 100 for example, can remove most of the space debris, this method is economically disproportionate. However, we can also see the removal satellites are distributed nearly evenly. Accordingly, we propose a practical two-stage strategy. The first stage is to implement emergent debris removal with the 38 removal satellites. When we find a very high probability of collision between a working satellite and space debris, one of the removal satellites in the constellation previously constructed in orbit initiates a maneuver of emergent debris removal. The second stage is a long-term space debris removal strategy to suppress the increase of space debris derived from collisions among the pieces of space debris. The constellation analyzed in this paper, which consists of the first 38 removal satellites, can remove half of the over 1000 dangerous space debris among others, and then the constellation increases the number of the following removal satellites in steps. At any rate, an adequate orbital configuration and constellation form is very important for both space debris removal and

  8. Removal of organic contaminants from lithographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, Wayne M.

    One of the critical issues still facing the implementation of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into mainstream manufacturing for integrated circuit (IC) production is cleanliness. EUV photons at 13.5 nm are easily absorbed by many species, including dust, thin-film layers, and other debris present in the path of the photons. Carrying out EUVL inside a vacuum helps reduce the amount of photon loss for illumination, however contamination in the sys- tem is unavoidable, especially due to carbon growth on the multilayer mirror collectors and to soft defects in the form of organic contamination on the mask. Traditional cleaning methods employ the use of wet chemicals to etch contamination off of a surface, however this is limited in the sub-micron range of contaminant particles due to lack of transport of sufficient liquid chemical to the surface in order to achieve satisfactory particle removal. According to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the photomask must be particle free at inspection below 30 nm. However, when analyzing the ability of traditional methods to meet the cleaning needs set forth by the ITRS, these methods fall short and often add more contamination to the surface targeted for cleaning. With that in mind, a new cleaning method is being developed to supplant these traditional methods. Preliminary research into a plasma-based method to clean organic contaminants from lithographic materials constructed an experimental device that demonstrated the removal of both polystyrene latex nanoparticles (representing hydrocarbon contamination) in the range of 30 nm to 500 nm, as well as the removal of 30 nm carbon film layers on silicon wafers. This research, called the Plasma-Assisted Cleaning by Metastable Atomic Neutralization (PACMAN) process is being developed with semiconductor manufacturing cleaning in mind. A model of the helium metastable density within the processing chamber has been developed in addition to

  9. Sulphates Removal from Acid Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luptáková, Alena; Mačingová, Eva; Kotuličová, Ingrida; Rudzanová, Dominika

    2016-10-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) are a worldwide problem leading to ecological destruction in river basins and the contamination of water sources. AMD are characterized by low pH and high content of heavy metals and sulphates. In order to minimize negative impacts of AMD appropriate treatment techniques has to be chosen. Treatment processes are focused on neutralizing, stabilizing and removing pollutants. From this reason efficient and environmental friendly methods are needed to be developed in order to reduce heavy metals as well as sulphates. Various methods are used for remediation of acid mine drainage, but any of them have been applied under commercial-scale conditions. Their application depends on geochemical, technical, natural, financial, and other factors. The aim of the present work was to interpret the study of biological methods for sulphates removal from AMD out-flowing from the shaft Pech of the deposit Smolmk in Slovak Republic. In the experimental works AMD were used after removal of heavy metals by precipitation and sorption using the synthetic sorbent Slovakite. The base of the studied method for the sulphates elimination was the anaerobic bacterial sulphate reduction using sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera Desulfovibrio. SRB represent a group of bacteria that uses sulphates as a terminal electron acceptor for their metabolism. These bacteria realize the conversion of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide under anaerobic conditions. For the purposes of experiments a few variants of the selective medium DSM-63 culture media were used in term of the sulphates and sodium lactate contents in the selective medium as well as sulphates in the studied AMD.

  10. Seawater bicarbonate removal during hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurowski, G. K.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S. P.; Reeves, E.; Lilley, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    High temperature fluids sampled at hydrothermal vents represent a complex alteration product of water-rock reactions on a multi-component mixture of source fluids. Sources to high-temperature hydrothermal samples include the 'original' seawater present in the recharge limb of circulation, magmatically influenced fluids added at depth as well as any seawater entrained during sampling. High-temperature hydrothermal fluids are typically enriched in magmatic volatiles, with CO2 the dominant species, characterized by concentrations of 10's-100's of mmol/kg (1, 2). Typically, the high concentration of CO2 relative to background seawater bicarbonate concentrations (~2.3 mmol/kg) obscures a full analysis of the fate of seawater bicarbonate during high-temperature hydrothermal circulation. Here we present data from a suite of samples collected over the past 15 years from high-temperature hydrothermal vents at 9N, Endeavour, Lau Basin, and the MAR that have endmember CO2 concentrations less than 10 mmol/kg. Using stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements these samples provide a unique opportunity to examine the balance between 'original' seawater bicarbonate and CO2 added from magmatic sources. Multiple lines of evidence from multiple hydrothermal settings consistently points to the removal of ~80% of the 'original' 2.3 mmol/kg seawater bicarbonate. Assuming that this removal occurs in the low-temperature, 'recharge' limb of hydrothermal circulation, this removal process is widely occurring and has important contributions to the global carbon cycle over geologic time. 1. Lilley MD, Butterfield DA, Lupton JE, & Olson EJ (2003) Magmatic events can produce rapid changes in hydrothermal vent chemistry. Nature 422(6934):878-881. 2. Seewald J, Cruse A, & Saccocia P (2003) Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 216(4):575-590.

  11. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-09-01

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

  12. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  13. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  14. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN HAZARDOUS METAL REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature by using synthetic zeolites. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants including arseni...

  15. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  16. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  17. FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS (THE LATTER FLOOR WAS REMOVED MANY YEARS AGO), See also PA-1436 B-12 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Removal of cyanobacterial metabolites through wastewater treatment plant filters.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lionel; Hoefel, Daniel; Grasset, Charlotte; Palazot, Sebastien; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P; Brookes, Justin D

    2012-01-01

    Wastewaters have the potential to proliferate excessive numbers of cyanobacteria due to high nutrient levels. This could translate to the production of metabolites, such as the saxitoxins, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), which can impair the quality of wastewater destined for re-use. Biological sand filtration was assessed for its ability to remove these metabolites from a wastewater. Results indicated that the sand filter was incapable of effectively removing the saxitoxins and in some instances, the effluent of the sand filter displayed greater toxicity than the influent. Conversely, the sand filter was able to effectively remove geosmin and MIB, with removal attributed to biodegradation. Granular activated carbon was employed as an alternative filter medium to remove the saxitoxins. Results showed similar removals to previous drinking water studies, where efficient removals were initially observed, followed by a decrease in the removal; a consequence of the presence of competing organics which reduced adsorption of the saxitoxins.

  19. FFTF/IEM cell fuel pin removal equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel pin removal device used for pin removal from irradiated fuel assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). After irradiation in the FFTF, selected fuel assemblies are remotely disassembled in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell. The remote disassembly, following sodium removal, consists of slitting and removing the duct and then removing the fuel pins one-at-a-time by sliding the pins from parallel attachment rails. All pins are removed from one rail before starting on the next. The new pin removal equipment has been used very successfully on the last three fuel experiments disassembled in the IEM cell, including one assembly containing residual sodium. Pin removal time has been cut in half, and this once tedious and time-consuming activity has been turned into an almost effortless evolution.

  20. 23. POWELLTYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. POWELL-TYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through grip removal door into interior of a Powell-type cable car. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  2. Reformer operation improved by feed sulfur removal

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Clung, R.G. )

    1990-10-08

    This paper reports how reduction of sulfur in catalytic reforming feeds below that typically obtainable with naphtha hydrotreating improves the reformer operation significantly. In evaluations of pilot-plant and commercial operations, high-rhenium content reforming catalysts have been used with low-sulfur naphtha feeds and have been shown to dramatically affect catalyst cycle length, gasoline yield, and stability. The consequences of insufficient removal of sulfur include shorter cycle length, more rapid reactor temperature rise to maintain octane, and as a result of that increase, more rapid catalyst deactivation.

  3. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, M.L.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-01-01

    A method is given for dissolving reactor fuel elements in which the uranium is associated with a relatively inert chromium-containing alloy such as stainless steel. An aqueous mixture of acids comprising 2 to 2.5 molar hydrochloric acid and 4 to 8 molar nitric acid is employed in dissolving the fuel element. In order io reduce corrosion in subsequent processing of the resulting solution, chloride values are removed from the solution by contacting it with concentrated nitric acid at an elevated temperature.

  4. Regenerative CO2 removal for PLSS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Woods, R. R.; Schubert, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    Various concepts for the design of the nonelectrochemical absorber were defined and evaluated. A preliminary design based on the use of hollow fiber membranes was developed. Small scale bench testing demonstrated the carbon dioxide removal capability and provided design data for scale-up to the one person level. A full scale conceptual design of the absorbent regeneration hardware using six electrochemical cells was also completed. The design was supported by single cell testing and showed that a full scale regeneration system, operating continuously over 24 hours, can regenerate the absorbent from one extravehicular activity mission. The single cell regeneration hardware was operated for over 800 hours.

  5. Ultracapacitor having residual water removed under vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; Day, James

    2002-10-15

    A multilayer cell is provided that comprises two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the current collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying pores in the electrodes and separator. The mutilayer cell is electrolyzed to disassociate water within the cell to oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. A vacuum is applied to the cell substantially at the same time as the electrolyzing step, to remove the oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. The cell is then sealed to form a ultracapacitor substantially free from water.

  6. Biological nutrient removal from dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Danalewich, J.R.; Papagiannis, T.G.; Gerards, R.; Vriens, L.; Belyea, R.; Tumbleson, M.E.; Raskin, L.

    1998-07-01

    The authors developed a synthetic wastewater which closely represents actual milk processing wastewater. The design of this synthetic wastewater was facilitated by the collection of composite wastewater samples from 15 milk processing plants in the Upper Midwest. These samples, milk, and milk products were analyzed for various chemical parameters. Based on these results, they diluted evaporated milk and cottage cheese, as well as a number of dry chemicals to create a synthetic wastewater. The concentrations in the resulting synthetic wastewater matched average concentrations of 15 composite wastewater samples. Four continuous-flow activated sludge treatment systems are currently being operated to evaluate biological nutrient removal using this synthetic wastewater as an influent.

  7. RAPID REMOVAL OF A GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT PLUME.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L. Jeff; Gorelick, Steven M.; ,

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater management model is used to design an aquifer restoration system that removes a contaminant plume from a hypothetical aquifer in four years. The design model utilizes groundwater flow simulation and mathematical optimization. Optimal pumping and injection strategies achieve rapid restoration for a minimum total pumping cost. Rapid restoration is accomplished by maintaining specified groundwater velocities around the plume perimeter towards a group of pumping wells located near the plume center. The model does not account for hydrodynamic dispersion. Results show that pumping costs are particularly sensitive to injection capacity. An 8 percent decrease in the maximum allowable injection rate may lead to a 29 percent increase in total pumping costs.

  8. Liquid Nitrogen Removal of Critical Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, Donald E.; Merrick, Jason; Hayes, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Identification of innovative solutions to unique materials problems is an every-day quest for members of the aerospace community. Finding a technique that will minimize costs, maximize throughput, and generate quality results is always the target. United Space Alliance Materials Engineers recently conducted such a search in their drive to return the Space Shuttle fleet to operational status. The removal of high performance thermal coatings from solid rocket motors represents a formidable task during post flight disassembly on reusable expended hardware. The removal of these coatings from unfired motors increases the complexity and safety requirements while reducing the available facilities and approved processes. A temporary solution to this problem was identified, tested and approved during the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) return to flight activities. Utilization of ultra high-pressure liquid nitrogen (LN2) to strip the protective coating from assembled space shuttle hardware marked the first such use of the technology in the aerospace industry. This process provides a configurable stream of liquid nitrogen (LN2) at pressures of up to 55,000 psig. The performance of a one-time certification for the removal of thermal ablatives from SRB hardware involved extensive testing to ensure adequate material removal without causing undesirable damage to the residual materials or aluminum substrates. Testing to establish appropriate process parameters such as flow, temperature and pressures of the liquid nitrogen stream provided an initial benchmark for process testing. Equipped with these initial parameters engineers were then able to establish more detailed test criteria that set the process limits. Quantifying the potential for aluminum hardware damage represented the greatest hurdle for satisfying engineers as to the safety of this process. Extensive testing for aluminum erosion, surface profiling, and substrate weight loss was performed. This successful project clearly

  9. BOA: Pipe asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Schnorr, W.

    1995-12-31

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  10. Bullet removal from the infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Merza, Ahmed Maki

    2016-01-01

    War injuries are the cornerstone of maxillofacial surgery, and it led to the initiation and development of this specialty, and each case represents a challenge to the surgeon who deals with it. In this article, we present a 30-year-old male patient who was referred to our emergency department complaining of gunshot wound, severe pain, and limitation in mouth opening. Preoperative imaging showed a bullet with a very long path lodged in the infratemporal fossa. Three different approaches with the aid of C-arm imaging system were used for the removal of this bullet; the last approach was the successful one. PMID:28299274

  11. Turning points in removable partial denture philosophy.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    This article discusses key turning points in removable partial denture (RPD) philosophy. Early advancements tended to focus upon improving the technical quality of the prosthesis itself. The beginning of the 20th century brought significant public pressure upon the dental profession due to consequences associated with poor quality fixed prostheses. The result was dramatic improvement and heavy demand for RPDs. Technical and efficiency issues conspired to temper this enthusiasm, eventually resulting in reduced respect for RPDs. By highlighting key writings and technical issues during these periods of change it is hoped the reader will gain a more precise understanding of the current status of RPD philosophy.

  12. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  13. Method for removal of methane from coalbeds

    DOEpatents

    Pasini, III, Joseph; Overbey, Jr., William K.

    1976-01-01

    A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

  14. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  15. Optodynamic monitoring of laser tattoo removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezersek, Matija; Grad, Ladislav; Požar, Tomaž; Cencic, Boris; Bacak, Irena; Mozina, Janez

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this research is to use the information contained in the mechanisms occurring during laser tattoo removal process. We employed a fast laser beam deflection probe (BDP) to measure the cracking sound that originates from the dye explosions in the process known as selective photothermolysis. The experiments were performed in vitro (skin phantoms), ex vivo (marking tattoos on pig skin) and in vivo (professional and amateur decorative tattoos on several patients). The signal includes the information about the energy released during the interaction, specific for different skin and tattoo conditions.

  16. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal employing EDTA disodium

    SciTech Connect

    Bojinova, D.; Velkova, R.

    1996-12-31

    The biological phosphorus removal is a promising alternative to the conventional chemical technologies for processing of phosphate raw materials. The object of this study was the effect of EDTA disodium on the biotreatment of tunisian phosphorite with the strain of Aspergillus niger. The incubation was carried out in two nutritive mediums, with different phosphate content. The experimental results showed that the additives of EDTA disodium in the nutritive medium increased the rate of extraction of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and shortened significantly the time for biological leaching. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  18. Modeling Heavy Metal Removal in Wetlands.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    per cent) as 0.0333 (Salix nigra L .), 0.0362 (Pyrus malus L .), and 0.0062 (Lemna minor L .); Cowgill cited a mean copper concentration (as a per cent...found that copper toxicity to Elodea Canadensis occurred at a copper concentration of about 3 mg/ L after 4 weeks. Available research has demonstrated that...except for silver (.10 mg/ L ). In a study of copper and lead removal using a "thin-film nutrient" technique by aquatic macrophytes, copper was found to

  19. Tide effects removed from well tests

    SciTech Connect

    Aase, E.P.B.; Jelmert, T.A.; Vik, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    To avoid distorted data when analyzing well pressure tests of permeable offshore reservoirs, one needs to account for periodic ocean tidal stress. Quartz-crystal bottom hole pressure recorders provide a high resolution of reservoir pressure but also measures pressure fluctuations from tidal effects during well testing. Periodic oscillations in the reservoir pressure are due to the three mechanisms: solid earth tide; barometric tide/effect; and ocean tide. The paper uses sample data from an offshore reservoir to illustrate how tide effects can be identified in the data and the correction procedure to use to remove these effects.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nudurupati, S; Janjua, M; Singh, P; Aubry, N

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop's poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  2. Latest innovations for tattoo and permanent makeup removal.

    PubMed

    Mao, Johnny C; DeJoseph, Louis M

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this article is to reveal the latest techniques and advances in laser removal of both amateur and professional tattoos, as well as cosmetic tattoos and permanent makeup. Each pose different challenges to the removing physician, but the goal is always the same: removal without sequelae. The authors' technique is detailed, and discussion of basic principles of light reflection, ink properties, effects of laser energy and heat, and outcomes and complications of tattoo removal are presented.

  3. Compositions and methods for removal of toxic metals and radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuero, Raul G. (Inventor); McKay, David S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for the removal of toxic metals or radionuclides from source materials. Toxic metals may be removed from source materials using a clay, such as attapulgite or highly cationic bentonite, and chitin or chitosan. Toxic metals may also be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan. Radionuclides may be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan.

  4. Optimization of removal function in computer controlled optical surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Guo, Peiji; Ren, Jianfeng

    2010-10-01

    The technical principle of computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) and the common method of optimizing removal function that is used in CCOS are introduced in this paper. A new optimizing method time-sharing synthesis of removal function is proposed to solve problems of the removal function being far away from Gaussian type and slow approaching of the removal function error that encountered in the mode of planet motion or translation-rotation. Detailed time-sharing synthesis of using six removal functions is discussed. For a given region on the workpiece, six positions are selected as the centers of the removal function; polishing tool controlled by the executive system of CCOS revolves around each centre to complete a cycle in proper order. The overall removal function obtained by the time-sharing process is the ratio of total material removal in six cycles to time duration of the six cycles, which depends on the arrangement and distribution of the six removal functions. Simulations on the synthesized overall removal functions under two different modes of motion, i.e., planet motion and translation-rotation are performed from which the optimized combination of tool parameters and distribution of time-sharing synthesis removal functions are obtained. The evaluation function when optimizing is determined by an approaching factor which is defined as the ratio of the material removal within the area of half of the polishing tool coverage from the polishing center to the total material removal within the full polishing tool coverage area. After optimization, it is found that the optimized removal function obtained by time-sharing synthesis is closer to the ideal Gaussian type removal function than those by the traditional methods. The time-sharing synthesis method of the removal function provides an efficient way to increase the convergence speed of the surface error in CCOS for the fabrication of aspheric optical surfaces, and to reduce the intermediate- and high

  5. Differences in the removal mechanisms of Undaria pinnatifida and Phragmites australis as biomaterials for lead removal.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rios, Paula Cecilia; Nakano, Kazunori; Leon-Romero, Marco; Aikawa, Yoshio; Arai, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    This study offers the opportunity to utilize Undaria pinnatifida and Phragmites australis to remove lead from water in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology. Its efficacy was tested using batch experiments and PRB column systems. From the batch experiment results, a higher adsorption capacity was observed for Undaria pinnatifida. Nevertheless, Phragmites australis in the column system efficiently removed lead and the breakthrough occurred at the same time for both biomaterials. To dissipate this difference, a sequential extraction for metal speciation analysis was used for both columns. The results have shown that each biomaterial has a dominant mechanism. Phragmites australis removed lead by physical adsorption, whereas Undaria pinnatifida showed a higher tendency to bind lead due to organic matter, primary and secondary minerals.

  6. Toward policies and decision-making for dam removal.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Harbor, Jon M; Stanley, Emily H

    2003-04-01

    Dam removal has emerged as a critical issue in environmental management. Agencies responsible for dams face a drastic increase in the number of potential dam removals in the near future. Given limited resources, these agencies need to develop ways to decide which dams should be removed and in what order. The underlying science of dam removal is relatively undeveloped and most agencies faced with dam removal lack a coherent purpose for removing dams. These shortcomings can be overcome by the implementation of two policies by agencies faced with dam removal: (1) the development and adoption of a prioritization scheme for what constitutes an important dam removal, and (2) the establishment of minimum levels of analysis prior to decision-making about a dam removal. Federal and state agencies and the scientific community must encourage an initial experimental phase of dam removal during which only a few dams are removed, and these are studied intensively. This will allow for the development of the fundamental scientific understanding needed to support effective decision-making in the future and minimize the risk of disasters arising from poorly thought out dam removal decisions.

  7. 7 CFR 2902.55 - Ink removers and cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ink removers and cleaners. 2902.55 Section 2902.55... Items § 2902.55 Ink removers and cleaners. (a) Definition. Chemical products designed to remove ink, haze, glaze, and other residual ink contaminants from the surfaces of equipment, such as rollers,...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.76 - Asphalt and tar removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Asphalt and tar removers. 3201.76 Section 3201.76... Designated Items § 3201.76 Asphalt and tar removers. (a) Definition. Cleaning agents designed to remove asphalt or tar from equipment, roads, or other surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The...

  9. 7 CFR 3201.76 - Asphalt and tar removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Asphalt and tar removers. 3201.76 Section 3201.76... Designated Items § 3201.76 Asphalt and tar removers. (a) Definition. Cleaning agents designed to remove asphalt or tar from equipment, roads, or other surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The...

  10. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  11. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  12. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  13. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  14. 5 CFR 359.405 - Removal: Reduction in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal: Reduction in force. 359.405... Appointees During Probation § 359.405 Removal: Reduction in force. (a) Coverage. This section covers the removal of a career appointee from the SES during the probationary period under a reduction in force....

  15. 5 CFR 359.405 - Removal: Reduction in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removal: Reduction in force. 359.405... Appointees During Probation § 359.405 Removal: Reduction in force. (a) Coverage. This section covers the removal of a career appointee from the SES during the probationary period under a reduction in force....

  16. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... removal actions. (a) States may undertake Fund-financed removal actions pursuant to a cooperative agreement with EPA. State-lead removal actions taken pursuant to cooperative agreements must be conducted...

  17. 30 CFR 7.508 - Harmful gas removal components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... effective procedures shall be provided so that the average carbon dioxide concentration in the occupied.... (i) Carbon dioxide removal components shall be used with breathable air cylinders or oxygen cylinders. (ii) Carbon dioxide removal components shall remove carbon dioxide at a rate of 1.08 cubic feet...

  18. 30 CFR 7.508 - Harmful gas removal components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... effective procedures shall be provided so that the average carbon dioxide concentration in the occupied.... (i) Carbon dioxide removal components shall be used with breathable air cylinders or oxygen cylinders. (ii) Carbon dioxide removal components shall remove carbon dioxide at a rate of 1.08 cubic feet...

  19. 30 CFR 7.508 - Harmful gas removal components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... effective procedures shall be provided so that the average carbon dioxide concentration in the occupied.... (i) Carbon dioxide removal components shall be used with breathable air cylinders or oxygen cylinders. (ii) Carbon dioxide removal components shall remove carbon dioxide at a rate of 1.08 cubic feet...

  20. 30 CFR 7.508 - Harmful gas removal components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... effective procedures shall be provided so that the average carbon dioxide concentration in the occupied.... (i) Carbon dioxide removal components shall be used with breathable air cylinders or oxygen cylinders. (ii) Carbon dioxide removal components shall remove carbon dioxide at a rate of 1.08 cubic feet...