Science.gov

Sample records for endoplasmic reticulum membrane

  1. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W.; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J.; Hand, Arthur R.; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used novel staining and automated ultra-thin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell. PMID:23870120

  2. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Hand, Arthur R; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W; Rapoport, Tom A; Kozlov, Michael M

    2013-07-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used improved staining and automated ultrathin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell.

  3. Plant Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2017-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a superhighway with multiple sideroads that connects the different membrane compartments including the ER to the plasma membrane (PM). ER-PM contact sites (EPCSs) are a common feature in eukaryotic organisms, but have not been studied well in plants owing to the lack of molecular markers and to the difficulty in resolving the EPCS structure using conventional microscopy. Recently, however, plant protein complexes required for linking the ER and PM have been identified. This is a further step towards understanding the structure and function of plant EPCSs. We highlight some recent studies in this field and suggest several hypotheses that relate to the possible function of EPCSs in plants.

  4. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels favors plasma membrane surface exposure of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Tufi, R; Panaretakis, T; Bianchi, K; Criollo, A; Fazi, B; Di Sano, F; Tesniere, A; Kepp, O; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Zitvogel, L; Piacentini, M; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2008-02-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can elicit apoptotic cancer cell death, thereby activating an anticancer immune response that influences therapeutic outcome. We previously reported that anthracyclins are particularly efficient in inducing immunogenic cell death, correlating with the pre-apoptotic exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the plasma membrane surface of anthracyclin-treated tumor cells. Here, we investigated the role of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis on CRT exposure. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) failed to expose CRT in response to anthracyclin treatment. This defect in CRT exposure could be overcome by the overexpression of Reticulon-1C, a manipulation that led to a decrease in the Ca(2+) concentration within the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The combination of Reticulon-1C expression and anthracyclin treatment yielded more pronounced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion than either of the two manipulations alone. Chelation of intracellular (and endoplasmic reticulum) Ca(2+), targeted expression of the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3) receptor and inhibition of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump reduced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load and promoted pre-apoptotic CRT exposure on the cell surface, in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells. These results provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels control the exposure of CRT.

  5. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  6. The endoplasmic reticulum and casein-containing vesicles contribute to milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Honvo-Houéto, Edith; Henry, Céline; Chat, Sophie; Layani, Sarah; Truchet, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    During lactation, mammary epithelial cells secrete huge amounts of milk from their apical side. The current view is that caseins are secreted by exocytosis, whereas milk fat globules are released by budding, enwrapped by the plasma membrane. Owing to the number and large size of milk fat globules, the membrane surface needed for their release might exceed that of the apical plasma membrane. A large-scale proteomics analysis of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets and secreted milk fat globule membranes was used to decipher the cellular origins of the milk fat globule membrane. Surprisingly, differential analysis of protein profiles of these two organelles strongly suggest that, in addition to the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory vesicles contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. Analysis of membrane-associated and raft microdomain proteins reinforces this possibility and also points to a role for lipid rafts in milk product secretion. Our results provide evidence for a significant contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to the milk fat globule membrane and a role for SNAREs in membrane dynamics during milk secretion. These novel aspects point to a more complex model for milk secretion than currently envisioned. PMID:27535430

  7. Effects of HIV-1 Nef on retrograde transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezo, Valérie; Mallard, Frédéric; Tenza, Danièle; Wiltz, Aimée; Saint-Pol, Agnès; Helft, Julie; Antony, Claude; Benaroch, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein down-regulates several important immunoreceptors through interactions with components of the intracellular sorting machinery. Nef expression is also known to induce modifications of the endocytic pathway. Here, we analyzed the effects of Nef on retrograde transport, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum using Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Nef expression inhibited access of STxB to the endoplasmic reticulum, but did not modify the surface expression level of STxB receptor, Gb3, nor its internalization rate as measured with a newly developed assay. Mutation of the myristoylation site or of a di-leucine motif of Nef involved in the interaction with the clathrin adaptor complexes AP1 and AP2 abolished the inhibition of retrograde transport. In contrast, mutations of Nef motifs known to interact with PACS-1, beta COP or a subunit of the v-ATPase did not modify the inhibitory activity of Nef on retrograde transport. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Nef was present in clusters located on endosomal or Golgi membranes together with internalized STxB. Furthermore, in strongly Nef-expressing cells, STxB accumulated in endosomal structures that labeled with AP1. Our observations show that Nef perturbs retrograde transport between the early endosome and the endoplasmic reticulum. The potential transport steps targeted by Nef are discussed.

  8. Characterization of Ca2+ Transport in Purified Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Vesicles from Lepidium sativum L. Roots

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from roots of Lepidium sativum L. cv Krause have been investigated. The concentration of free Ca2+ and ATP needed for half-maximal activity were 2.5 and 73 micromolar, respectively, and the enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. The pH maximum occurred at 7.5 and the activity was greatly reduced at either pH 7.0 or 8.0. The Ca2+-dependent modulation protein, calmodulin, was tested for its effect on Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Although the phenothiazine inhibitors chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and trifluoperazine all inhibited Ca2+ transport activity with a half-maximal effect at approximately 35 micromolar, authentic bovine brain calmodulin did not alter the activity at concentrations of 0.5 to 8 micrograms per milliliter. Calmodulin also showed no influence on the time-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ into vesicles. The membranes did not contain endogenously bound calmodulin since washing with (ethylenebis[oxyethylenenitrile])tetraacetic acid or fluphenazine, treatments which disrupt calmodulin binding, did not alter Ca2+ transport activity. The inhibition of Ca2+ transport by phenothiazine drugs was likely related to their nonspecific interaction with the membrane. Thus, there was no indication that calmodulin regulated Ca2+ uptake into root endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663981

  9. Ultrafast glycerophospholipid-selective transbilayer motion mediated by a protein in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Morrot, G; Fellmann, P; Seigneuret, M

    1996-03-22

    A relatively rapid transbilayer motion of phospholipids in the microsomal membrane seems to be required due to their asymmetric synthesis in the cytoplasmic leaflet. Marked discrepancies exist with regard to the rate and specificity of this flip-flop process. To reinvestigate this problem, we have used both spin-labeled and radioactively labeled long chain phospholipids with a new fast translocation assay. Identical results were obtained with both types of probes. Transbilayer motion of glycerophospholipids was found to be much more rapid than previously reported (half-time less than 25 s) and to occur identically for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Such transport is nonvectorial and leads to a symmetric transbilayer distribution of phospholipids. In contrast, transverse diffusion of sphingomyelin was 1 order of magnitude slower. Phospholipid flip-flop appears to occur by a protein-mediated transport process displaying saturable and competitive behavior. Proteolysis, chemical modification, and competition experiments suggest that this transport process may be related to that previously described in the endoplasmic reticulum for short-chain phosphatidylcholine (Bishop, W. R., and Bell, R. M. (1985) Cell 42, 51-60). The relationship between phospholipid flip-flop and nonbilayer structures occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum was also investigated by 31P-NMR. Several conditions were found under which the 31P isotropic NMR signal previously attributed to nonbilayer structures is decreased or abolished, whereas transbilayer diffusion is unaffected, suggesting that the flip-flop process is independent of such structures. It is concluded that flip-flop in the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by a bidirectional protein transporter with a high efficiency for glycerophospholipids and a low efficiency for sphingomyelin. In vivo, the activity of this transporter would be able to redistribute all changes in phospholipid composition due

  10. Amyloid-β peptides are generated in mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Bernadette; Hedskog, Louise; Wiehager, Birgitta; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are a hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Recent findings suggest that Aβ is generated intracellularly and potential production sites include endosomes and trans-Golgi network. We determined the production of Aβ in subcellular fractions isolated from mouse brain. We found that a considerable amount of Aβ is produced at mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites including outer mitochondrial membrane and mitochondria-associated ER membranes. Enhanced Aβ production at this site may disturb ER, mitochondrial and mitochondria-ER contact site function. This may be one key step in the cascade of events eventually leading to neurodegeneration in AD.

  11. Transbilayer movement of monohexosylsphingolipids in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes.

    PubMed

    Buton, Xavier; Hervé, Paulette; Kubelt, Janek; Tannert, Astrid; Burger, Koert N J; Fellmann, P; Müller, Peter; Herrmann, Andreas; Seigneuret, Michel; Devaux, Philippe F

    2002-10-29

    The transbilayer movement of glycosphingolipids has been characterized in Golgi, ER, plasma, and model membranes using spin-labeled and fluorescent analogues of the monohexosylsphingolipids glucosylceramide and galactosylceramide and of the dihexosylsphingolipid lactosylceramide. In large unilamellar lipid vesicles, monohexosylsphingolipids underwent a slow transbilayer diffusion (half-time between 2 and 5 h at 20 degrees C). Similarly, the inward redistribution of these sphingolipids in the plasma membrane of the hepatocyte-like cell line HepG2 and of erythrocytes was slow. However, in rat liver ER and Golgi membranes, we found a rapid transbilayer movement of spin-labeled monohexosylsphingolipids (half-time of approximately 3 min at 20 degrees C), which suggests the existence of a monohexosylsphingolipid flippase. The transbilayer movement of glucosylceramide in the Golgi and the ER displayed a saturable behavior, was inhibited by proteolysis, did not require Mg-ATP, and occurs in both directions. Treatment with DIDS inhibited the flip-flop of glucosylceramide but not that of phosphatidylcholine. These data suggest that the transbilayer movement of monoglucosylceramide in the ER and in the Golgi involves a protein that could be distinct from that previously evidenced for glycerophospholipids in the ER. In vivo, transbilayer diffusion should promote a symmetric distribution of monohexosylsphingolipids which are synthesized in the cytosolic leaflet. This should allow glucosylceramide rapid access to the lumenal leaflet where it is converted to lactosylceramide. No significant transbilayer movement of lactosylceramide occurred in both artificial and natural membranes over 1 h. Thus, lactosylceramide, in turn, is unable to diffuse to the cytosolic leaflet and remains at the lumenal leaflet where it undergoes the subsequent glycosylations.

  12. A Non-enveloped Virus Hijacks Host Disaggregation Machinery to Translocate across the Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Bagchi, Parikshit; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cytosolic Hsp110 family, in concert with the Hsc70:J-protein complex, functions as a disaggregation machinery to rectify protein misfolding problems. Here we uncover a novel role of this machinery in driving membrane translocation during viral entry. The non-enveloped virus SV40 penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to reach the cytosol, a critical infection step. Combining biochemical, cell-based, and imaging approaches, we find that the Hsp110 family member Hsp105 associates with the ER membrane J-protein B14. Here Hsp105 cooperates with Hsc70 and extracts the membrane-penetrating SV40 into the cytosol, potentially by disassembling the membrane-embedded virus. Hence the energy provided by the Hsc70-dependent Hsp105 disaggregation machinery can be harnessed to catalyze a membrane translocation event. PMID:26244546

  13. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  14. The coupling of plasma membrane calcium entry to calcium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    García-Sancho, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cross-talk between organelles and plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for modulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]C) signals, but such modulation may differ among cells. In chromaffin cells Ca2+ entry through voltage-operated channels induces calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that amplifies the signal. [Ca2+]C microdomains as high as 20–50 μm are sensed by subplasmalemmal mitochondria, which accumulate large amounts of Ca2+ through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria confine the high-Ca2+ microdomains (HCMDs) to beneath the plasma membrane, where exocytosis of secretory vesicles happens. Cell core [Ca2+]C is much smaller (1–2 μm). By acting as a Ca2+ sink, mitochondria stabilise the HCMD in space and time. In non-excitable HEK293 cells, activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry, triggered by ER Ca2+ emptying, also generated subplasmalemmal HCMDs, but, in this case, most of the Ca2+ was taken up by the ER rather than by mitochondria. The smaller size of the [Ca2+]C peak in this case (about 2 μm) may contribute to this outcome, as the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase has much higher Ca2+ affinity than MCU. It is also possible that the relative positioning of organelles, channels and effectors, as well as cytoskeleton and accessory proteins plays an important role. Key points Cross-talk between organelles and plasma membrane Ca2+ channels modulates cytosolic Ca2+ signals in different ways. In chromaffin cells Ca2+ entry through voltage-operated channels is amplified by Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and generates subplasmalemmal high Ca2+ microdomains (HCMDs) as high as 20–50 μm, which trigger exocytosis. Subplasmalemmal mitochondria take up Ca2+ from HCMDs and avoid progression of the Ca2+ wave towards the cell core. In non-excitable HEK293 cells activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry triggered by ER Ca2+ emptying also generates subplasmalemmal HCMDs of about 2 μm. In this case

  15. STARD3 mediates endoplasmic reticulum-to-endosome cholesterol transport at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Léa P; Wendling, Corinne; Védie, Benoît; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Tomasetto, Catherine; Drin, Guillaume; Alpy, Fabien

    2017-04-04

    StAR-related lipid transfer domain-3 (STARD3) is a sterol-binding protein that creates endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-endosome contact sites. How this protein, at the crossroad between sterol uptake and synthesis pathways, impacts the intracellular distribution of this lipid was ill-defined. Here, by using in situ cholesterol labeling and quantification, we demonstrated that STARD3 induces cholesterol accumulation in endosomes at the expense of the plasma membrane. STARD3-mediated cholesterol routing depends both on its lipid transfer activity and its ability to create ER-endosome contacts. Corroborating this, in vitro reconstitution assays indicated that STARD3 and its ER-anchored partner, Vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP), assemble into a machine that allows a highly efficient transport of cholesterol within membrane contacts. Thus, STARD3 is a cholesterol transporter scaffolding ER-endosome contacts and modulating cellular cholesterol repartition by delivering cholesterol to endosomes.

  16. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application.

  17. A novel cellular stress response characterised by a rapid reorganisation of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Bampton, E T W; Smalley, J L; Tanaka, K; Caves, R E; Butterworth, M; Wei, J; Pellecchia, M; Mitcheson, J; Gant, T W; Dinsdale, D; Cohen, G M

    2012-01-01

    Canonical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which occurs in many physiological and disease processes, results in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We now describe a new, evolutionarily conserved cellular stress response characterised by a striking, but reversible, reorganisation of ER membranes that occurs independently of the UPR, resulting in impaired ER transport and function. This reorganisation is characterised by a dramatic redistribution and clustering of ER membrane proteins. ER membrane aggregation is regulated, in part, by anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members, particularly MCL-1. Using connectivity mapping, we report the widespread occurrence of this stress response by identifying several structurally diverse chemicals from different pharmacological classes, including antihistamines, antimalarials and antipsychotics, which induce ER membrane reorganisation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of ER membrane aggregation to result in pathological consequences, such as the long-QT syndrome, a cardiac arrhythmic abnormality, arising because of a novel trafficking defect of the human ether-a-go-go-related channel protein from the ER to the plasma membrane. Thus, ER membrane reorganisation is a feature of a new cellular stress pathway, clearly distinct from the UPR, with important consequences affecting the normal functioning of the ER. PMID:22955944

  18. Transport route for synaptobrevin via a novel pathway of insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Kutay, U; Ahnert-Hilger, G; Hartmann, E; Wiedenmann, B; Rapoport, T A

    1995-01-01

    Synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein is one of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. It is proposed to provide specificity for the targeting and fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane. It belongs to a class of membrane proteins which lack a signal sequence and contain a single hydrophobic segment close to their C-terminus, leaving most of the polypeptide chain in the cytoplasm (tail-anchored). We show that in neuroendocrine PC12 cells, synaptobrevin is not directly incorporated into the target organelle, synaptic-like vesicles. Rather, it is first inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and is then transported via the Golgi apparatus. Its insertion into the ER membrane in vitro occurs post-translationally, is dependent on ATP and results in a trans-membrane orientation of the hydrophobic tail. Membrane integration requires ER protein(s) different from the translocation components needed for proteins with signal sequences, thus suggesting a novel mechanism of insertion. Images PMID:7835332

  19. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  20. Structure and 3D arrangement of endoplasmic reticulum membrane-associated ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Stefan; Brandt, Florian; Hrabe, Thomas; Lang, Sven; Eibauer, Matthias; Zimmermann, Richard; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-05

    In eukaryotic cells, cotranslational protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane requires an elaborate macromolecular machinery. While structural details of ribosomes bound to purified and solubilized constituents of the translocon have been elucidated in recent years, little structural knowledge of ribosomes bound to the complete ER protein translocation machinery in a native membrane environment exists. Here, we used cryoelectron tomography to provide a three-dimensional reconstruction of 80S ribosomes attached to functional canine pancreatic ER microsomes in situ. In the resulting subtomogram average at 31 Å resolution, we observe direct contact of ribosomal expansion segment ES27L and the membrane and distinguish several membrane-embedded and lumenal complexes, including Sec61, the TRAP complex and another large complex protruding 90 Å into the lumen. Membrane-associated ribosomes adopt a preferred three-dimensional arrangement that is likely specific for ER-associated polyribosomes and may explain the high translation efficiency of ER-associated ribosomes compared to their cytosolic counterparts.

  1. Structures linking the myonemes, endoplasmic reticulum, and surface membranes in the contractile ciliate Vorticella.

    PubMed

    Allen, R D

    1973-02-01

    An electron microscope investigation of the interface between the myonemes of Vorticella convallaria and their associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has revealed structures of a complex morphology linking these two organelles. These structures are named "linkage complexes". Each complex contains a spindle-shaped midpiece which lies in a groove of the ER membrane. Microfilaments splay out from the tips of the midpiece and may come in contact with the inner alveolar sac membrane. Three to six raillike structures lie on each side of the midpiece and parallel it. The ER membrane appears to pass through the sides of the rails. In the lumen of the ER these rails are associated with a meshwork of filaments. A cradle of five rods lies within the groove under the midpiece. The ER membrane also passes through these rods which contact the same meshwork. In the scopular region and in the stalk the microfilaments from the midpiece form a bundle which passes into the lumen of modified basal bodies. These basal bodies are connected to the alveolar sac which, in the stalk, passes as a flattened tube along its length. The parts of the dissociated linkage complex are scattered throughout the spasmoneme of the stalk along membranes of the intraspasmonemal tubules. Thus, both stalk and body contractile bundles have linkage complexes that link their associated membrane systems to the microfibrils and, in turn, connect this membrane-microfibrillar interface to the pellicular membranes. The arrangement of the linkage complex suggests an involvement in the control of the transport of calcium ions between ER and microfibrils, and possibly the transfer of a message from the surface membranes to the sites of calcium release to trigger myonemal contraction.

  2. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  3. Characterization of nuclear membranes and endoplasmic reticulum isolated from plant tissue

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Nuclei, nuclear membranes and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated from onion root tips and stems. Structural preservation and purity of the fractions was determined by electron microscopic and biochemical methods. Gross compositional data (protein, phospholipid, nonpolar lipids, sterols, RNA, DNA), phospholipid and fatty acid patterns, enzyme activities (ATPases, ADPase, IDPase, glucose-6- phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, acid phosphatase, and NADH- and NADPH- cytochrome C reductases), and cytochrome contents were determined. A stable, high salt-resistant attachment of some DNA with the nuclear membrane was observed as well as the association of some RNA with high salt-treated nuclear and rER membranes. The phospholipid pattern was identical for both nuclear and rER membranes and showed a predominance of lecithin (about 60%) and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20-24%). Special care was necessary to minimize lipid degradation by phospholipases during isolations. Nonpolar lipids, mostly sterols and triglycerides, accounted for 35-45% of the membrane lipids. Sterol contents were relatively high in both membrane fractions (molar ratios of sterols to phospholipids ranged from 0.12 to 0.43). Sitosterol accounted for about 80% of the total sterols. Palmitic, oleic, and linoleic acids were the most prevalent acids in membrane-bound lipids as well as in storage lipids and occurred in similar proportions in phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids of the membrane. About 80% of the fatty acids in membrane phospholipids and triglycerides were unsaturated. A cytochrome of the b5 type was characterized in these membranes, but P-450-like cytochromes could not be detected. Both NADH and NADPH-cytochrome c reductases were found in nuclear and rER membranes and appeared to be enriched in rER membranes. Among the phosphatases, Mg2+-ATPase and, to lesser extents, ADPase, IDPase and acid phosphatase activities occurred in the fractions, but significant amounts of

  4. Polypeptide and phospholipid composition of the membrane of rat liver peroxisomes: comparison with endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Membranes were isolated from highly purified peroxisomes, mitochondria, and rough and smooth microsomes of rat liver by the one-step Na2CO3 procedure described in the accompanying paper (1982, J. Cell Biol. 93:97-102). The polypeptide compositions of these membranes were determined by SDS PAGE and found to be greatly dissimilar. The peroxisomal membrane contains 12% of the peroxisomal protein and consists of three major polypeptides (21,700, 67,700 and 69,700 daltons) as well as some minor polypeptides. The major peroxisomal membrane proteins as well as most of the minor ones are absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Conversely, most ER proteins are absent from peroxisomes. By electron microscopy, purified peroxisomal membranes are approximately 6.8 nm thick and have a typical trilaminar appearance. The phospholipid/protein ratio of peroxisomal membranes is approximately 200 nmol/mg; the principal phospholipids are phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine as in ER and mitochondrial membranes. In contrast to the mitochondria, peroxisomal membranes contain no cardiolipin. All the membranes investigated contain a polypeptide band with a molecular mass of approximately 15,000 daltons. Whether this represents an exceptional common membrane protein or a coincidence is unknown. The implications of these results for the biogenesis of peroxisomes are discussed. PMID:7068748

  5. Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Thoudam, Themis; Jeon, Jae-Han; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Lee, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to be one of the most critical factors involved in the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. A few decades ago, the discovery of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) was followed by the identification of its roles in regulating cellular homeostatic processes, ranging from cellular bioenergetics to apoptosis. MAM provides an excellent platform for numerous signaling pathways; among them, inflammatory signaling pathways associated with MAM play a critical role in cellular defense during pathogenic infections and metabolic disorders. However, induction of MAM causes deleterious effects by amplifying mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation through increased calcium transfer from the ER to mitochondria, thereby causing mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial components into the cytosol as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These mitochondrial DAMPs rapidly activate MAM-resident inflammasome components and other inflammatory factors, which promote inflammasome complex formation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in pathological conditions. Long-term stimulation of the inflammasome instigates chronic inflammation, leading to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of MAM and its association with inflammation-mediated metabolic diseases.

  6. Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae-Han

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to be one of the most critical factors involved in the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. A few decades ago, the discovery of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) was followed by the identification of its roles in regulating cellular homeostatic processes, ranging from cellular bioenergetics to apoptosis. MAM provides an excellent platform for numerous signaling pathways; among them, inflammatory signaling pathways associated with MAM play a critical role in cellular defense during pathogenic infections and metabolic disorders. However, induction of MAM causes deleterious effects by amplifying mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation through increased calcium transfer from the ER to mitochondria, thereby causing mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial components into the cytosol as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These mitochondrial DAMPs rapidly activate MAM-resident inflammasome components and other inflammatory factors, which promote inflammasome complex formation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in pathological conditions. Long-term stimulation of the inflammasome instigates chronic inflammation, leading to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of MAM and its association with inflammation-mediated metabolic diseases. PMID:28074080

  7. Where the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondrion tie the knot: the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM).

    PubMed

    Raturi, Arun; Simmen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    More than a billion years ago, bacterial precursors of mitochondria became endosymbionts in what we call eukaryotic cells today. The true significance of the word "endosymbiont" has only become clear to cell biologists with the discovery that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) superorganelle dedicates a special domain for the metabolic interaction with mitochondria. This domain, identified in all eukaryotic cell systems from yeast to man and called the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), has a distinct proteome, specific tethers on the cytosolic face and regulatory proteins in the ER lumen of the ER. The MAM has distinct biochemical properties and appears as ER tubules closely apposed to mitochondria on electron micrographs. The functions of the MAM range from lipid metabolism and calcium signaling to inflammasome formation. Consistent with these functions, the MAM is enriched in lipid metabolism enzymes and calcium handling proteins. During cellular stress situations, like an altered cellular redox state, the MAM alters its set of regulatory proteins and thus alters MAM functions. Notably, this set prominently comprises ER chaperones and oxidoreductases that connect protein synthesis and folding inside the ER to mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, ER membranes associated with mitochondria also accommodate parts of the machinery that determines mitochondrial membrane dynamics and connect mitochondria to the cytoskeleton. Together, these exciting findings demonstrate that the physiological interactions between the ER and mitochondria are so bilateral that we are tempted to compare their relationship to the one of a married couple: distinct, but inseparable and certainly dependent on each other. In this paradigm, the MAM stands for the intracellular location where the two organelles tie the knot. Resembling "real life", the happy marriage between the two organelles prevents the onset of diseases that are characterized by disrupted metabolism and decreased lifespan

  8. A mutant cytochrome b5 with a lengthened membrane anchor escapes from the endoplasmic reticulum and reaches the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazzini, E; Villa, A; Borgese, N

    1996-01-01

    Many resident membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) do not have known retrieval sequences. Among these are the so-called tail-anchored proteins, which are bound to membranes by a hydrophobic tail close to the C terminus and have most of their sequence as a cytosolically exposed N-terminal domain. Because ER tail-anchored proteins generally have short (< or = 17 residues) hydrophobic domains, we tested whether this feature is important for localization, using cytochrome b5 as a model. The hydrophobic domain of cytochrome b5 was lengthened by insertion of five amino acids (ILAAV), and the localization of the mutant was analyzed by immunofluorescence in transiently transfected mammalian cells. While the wild-type cytochrome was localized to the ER, the mutant was relocated to the surface. This relocation was not due to the specific sequence introduced, as demonstrated by the ER localization of a second mutant, in which the original length of the membrane anchor was restored, while maintaining the inserted ILAAV sequence. Experiments with brefeldin A and with cycloheximide demonstrated that the extended anchor mutant reached the plasma membrane by transport along the secretory pathway. We conclude that the short membrane anchor of cytochrome b5 is important for its ER residency, and we discuss the relevance of this finding for other ER tail-anchored proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633042

  9. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  10. Oncogenic and oncosuppressive signal transduction at mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Oparka, Monika; Duszynski, Jerzy; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pinton, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The different mechanisms employed by proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death pathways are strictly linked to their localization. In addition to the canonical control of apoptosis at a transcriptional/nuclear level, intracellular zones are emerging as pivotal sites for the activities of several proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors. Here, we review the function of the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interface as a primary platform for decoding danger signals as well as a structural accommodation for several regulator or effector proteins. PMID:27308328

  11. Plasma membrane-cytoskeleton-endoplasmic reticulum complexes in neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lencesova, Lubomira; O'Neill, Andrea; Resneck, Wendy G; Bloch, Robert J; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2004-01-23

    The possibility that certain integral plasma membrane (PM) proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis form junctional units with adjacent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in neurons and glia was explored using immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry. Rat brain membranes were solubilized with the mild, non-ionic detergent, IGEPAL CA-630. Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger type 1 (NCX1), a key PM Ca(2+) transporter, was immunoprecipitated from the detergent-soluble fraction. Several abundant PM proteins co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1, including the alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms of the Na(+) pump catalytic (alpha) subunit, and the alpha2 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor. The adaptor protein, ankyrin 2 (Ank 2), and the cytoskeletal proteins, alpha-fodrin and beta-spectrin, also selectively co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1, as did the ER proteins, Ca(2+) pump type 2 (SERCA 2), and inositol-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP(3)R-1). In contrast, a number of other abundant PMs, adaptors, and cytoskeletal proteins did not co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1, including the Na(+) pump alpha1 isoform, PM Ca(2+) pump type 1 (PMCA1), beta-fodrin, and Ank 3. In reciprocal experiments, immunoprecipitation with antibodies to the Na(+) pump alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms, but not alpha1, co-immunoprecipitated NCX1; the antibodies to alpha1 did, however, co-immunoprecipitate PMCA1. Antibodies to Ank 2, alpha-fodrin, beta-spectrin and IP(3)R-1 all co-immunoprecipitated NCX1. Immunocytochemistry revealed partial co-localization of beta-spectrin with NCX1, Na(+) pump alpha3, and IP(3)R-1 in neurons and of alpha-fodrin with NCX1 and SERCA2 in astrocytes. The data support the idea that in neurons and glia PM microdomains containing NCX1 and Na(+) pumps with alpha2 or alpha3 subunits form Ca(2+) signaling complexes with underlying ER containing SERCA2 and IP(3)R-1. These PM and ER components appear to be linked through the cytoskeletal spectrin network, to which they are probably tethered by Ank 2.

  12. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane J Protein C18 Executes a Distinct Role in Promoting Simian Virus 40 Membrane Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Parikshit; Walczak, Christopher Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonenveloped simian virus 40 (SV40) hijacks the three endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-bound J proteins B12, B14, and C18 to escape from the ER into the cytosol en route to successful infection. How C18 controls SV40 ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration is the least understood of these processes. We previously found that SV40 triggers B12 and B14 to reorganize into discrete puncta in the ER membrane called foci, structures postulated to represent the cytosol entry site (C. P. Walczak, M. S. Ravindran, T. Inoue, and B. Tsai, PLoS Pathog 10:e1004007, 2014). We now find that SV40 also recruits C18 to the virus-induced B12/B14 foci. Importantly, the C18 foci harbor membrane penetration-competent SV40, further implicating this structure as the membrane penetration site. Consistent with this, a mutant SV40 that cannot penetrate the ER membrane and promote infection fails to induce C18 foci. C18 also regulates the recruitment of B12/B14 into the foci. In contrast to B14, C18's cytosolic Hsc70-binding J domain, but not the lumenal domain, is essential for its targeting to the foci; this J domain likewise is necessary to support SV40 infection. Knockdown-rescue experiments reveal that C18 executes a role that is not redundant with those of B12/B14 during SV40 infection. Collectively, our data illuminate C18's contribution to SV40 ER membrane penetration, strengthening the idea that SV40-triggered foci are critical for cytosol entry. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses (PyVs) cause devastating human diseases, particularly in immunocompromised patients. As this virus family continues to be a significant human pathogen, clarifying the molecular basis of their cellular entry pathway remains a high priority. To infect cells, PyV traffics from the cell surface to the ER, where it penetrates the ER membrane to reach the cytosol. In the cytosol, the virus moves to the nucleus to cause infection. ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration is a critical yet mysterious infection step. In

  13. C-terminal, endoplasmic reticulum-lumenal domain of prosurfactant protein C - structural features and membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Casals, Cristina; Johansson, Hanna; Saenz, Alejandra; Gustafsson, Magnus; Alfonso, Carlos; Nordling, Kerstin; Johansson, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) constitutes the transmembrane part of prosurfactant protein C (proSP-C) and is alpha-helical in its native state. The C-terminal part of proSP-C (CTC) is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and binds to misfolded (beta-strand) SP-C, thereby preventing its aggregation and amyloid fibril formation. In this study, we investigated the structure of recombinant human CTC and the effects of CTC-membrane interaction on protein structure. CTC forms noncovalent trimers and supratrimeric oligomers. It contains two intrachain disulfide bridges, and its secondary structure is significantly affected by urea or heat only after disulfide reduction. The postulated Brichos domain of CTC, with homologs found in proteins associated with amyloid and proliferative disease, is up to 1000-fold more protected from limited proteolysis than the rest of CTC. The protein exposes hydrophobic surfaces, as determined by CTC binding to the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate). Fluorescence energy transfer experiments further reveal close proximity between bound 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate) and tyrosine residues in CTC, some of which are conserved in all Brichos domains. CTC binds to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with low micromolar dissociation constants, and differential scanning calorimetry and CD analyses indicate that membrane-bound CTC is less structurally ordered than the unbound protein. The exposed hydrophobic surfaces and the structural disordering that result from interactions with phospholipid membranes suggest a mechanism whereby CTC binds to misfolded SP-C in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  14. ERdj5 Reductase Cooperates with Protein Disulfide Isomerase To Promote Simian Virus 40 Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa; Dosey, Annie; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonenveloped polyomavirus (PyV) simian virus 40 (SV40) traffics from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it penetrates the ER membrane to reach the cytosol before mobilizing into the nucleus to cause infection. Prior to ER membrane penetration, ER lumenal factors impart structural rearrangements to the virus, generating a translocation-competent virion capable of crossing the ER membrane. Here we identify ERdj5 as an ER enzyme that reduces SV40's disulfide bonds, a reaction important for its ER membrane transport and infection. ERdj5 also mediates human BK PyV infection. This enzyme cooperates with protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a redox chaperone previously implicated in the unfolding of SV40, to fully stimulate membrane penetration. Negative-stain electron microscopy of ER-localized SV40 suggests that ERdj5 and PDI impart structural rearrangements to the virus. These conformational changes enable SV40 to engage BAP31, an ER membrane protein essential for supporting membrane penetration of the virus. Uncoupling of SV40 from BAP31 traps the virus in ER subdomains called foci, which likely serve as depots from where SV40 gains access to the cytosol. Our study thus pinpoints two ER lumenal factors that coordinately prime SV40 for ER membrane translocation and establishes a functional connection between lumenal and membrane events driving this process. IMPORTANCE PyVs are established etiologic agents of many debilitating human diseases, especially in immunocompromised individuals. To infect cells at the cellular level, this virus family must penetrate the host ER membrane to reach the cytosol, a critical entry step. In this report, we identify two ER lumenal factors that prepare the virus for ER membrane translocation and connect these lumenal events with events on the ER membrane. Pinpointing cellular components necessary for supporting PyV infection should lead to rational therapeutic strategies for preventing and treating Py

  15. Glucuronide transport across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is inhibited by epigallocatechin gallate and other green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Révész, Katalin; Tütto, Anna; Margittai, Eva; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Magyar, Judit E; Mandl, József; Csala, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    Toxic endogenous or exogenous compounds can be inactivated by various conjugation reactions. Glucuronidation (i.e. conjugation with glucuronate) is especially important due to the large number of drugs and chemical carcinogens that are detoxified through this pathway. Stable and harmless glucuronides can be reactivated by enzymatic hydrolysis thus inhibitors of glucuronidase activity reduce the risk of chemical carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to reveal whether this mechanism contributes to the anti-cancer effect of green tea flavanols, which has been shown in various animal models. Therefore, we investigated the effect of these polyphenols on deglucuronidation in rat liver microsomes and in Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells, using 4-methylumbelliferyl glucuronide as model substrate. Tea flavanols inhibited beta-glucuronidase in intact vesicles, where glucuronide transport across the microsomal membrane is rate-limiting, but were almost ineffective in permeabilized vesicles. Epigallocatechin gallate, the major green tea flavanol was shown to have a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on both beta-glucuronidase activity and glucuronide transport in native vesicles. Epigallocatechin gallate also inhibited beta-glucuronidase activity in native Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells, while failed to affect the enzyme in alamethicin-permeabilized cells, where the endoplasmic membrane barrier was eliminated. Our findings indicate that tea flavanols inhibit deglucuronidation in the endoplasmic reticulum at the glucuronide transport stage. This phenomenon might potentially contribute to the cancer-preventing dietary or pharmacological effect attributed to these catechins.

  16. The GET System Inserts the Tail-Anchored Protein, SYP72, into Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zalisko, Benjamin E.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encodes homologs of the Guided Entry of Tail (GET)-anchored protein system for the posttranslational insertion of tail-anchored (TA) proteins into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. In yeast, TA proteins are loaded onto the cytosolic targeting factor Get3 and are then delivered to the membrane-associated Get1/2 complex for insertion into ER membranes. The role of the GET system in Arabidopsis was investigated by monitoring the membrane insertion of a tail-anchored protein, SYP72, a syntaxin. SYP72 bound to yeast Get3 in vitro, forming a Get3-SYP72 fusion complex that could be inserted into yeast GET1/2-containing proteoliposomes. The Arabidopsis GET system functioned in vivo to insert TA proteins into ER membranes as demonstrated by the fact that the YFP-tagged SYP72 localized to the ER in wild-type plants but accumulated as cytoplasmic inclusions in get1, get3, or get4 mutants. The GET mutants get1 and get3 were less tolerant of ER stress agents and showed symptoms of ER stress even under unstressed conditions. Hence, the GET system is responsible for the insertion of TA proteins into the ER in Arabidopsis, and mutants with GET dysfunctions are more susceptible to ER stress. PMID:27923985

  17. A Cytosolic Chaperone Complexes with Dynamic Membrane J-Proteins and Mobilizes a Nonenveloped Virus out of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Christopher Paul; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes that enable them to bind to, disrupt, and penetrate a biological membrane leading to successful infection. We assessed whether cytosolic factors play any role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane penetration of the nonenveloped SV40. We find the cytosolic SGTA-Hsc70 complex interacts with the ER transmembrane J-proteins DnaJB14 (B14) and DnaJB12 (B12), two cellular factors previously implicated in SV40 infection. SGTA binds directly to SV40 and completes ER membrane penetration. During ER-to-cytosol transport of SV40, SGTA disengages from B14 and B12. Concomitant with this, SV40 triggers B14 and B12 to reorganize into discrete foci within the ER membrane. B14 must retain its ability to form foci and interact with SGTA-Hsc70 to promote SV40 infection. Our results identify a novel role for a cytosolic chaperone in the membrane penetration of a nonenveloped virus and raise the possibility that the SV40-induced foci represent cytosol entry sites. PMID:24675744

  18. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  19. Development of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress during Experimental Oxalate Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Motin, Yu G; Lepilov, A V; Bgatova, N P; Zharikov, A Yu; Motina, N V; Lapii, G A; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural study of the kidney was performed in rats with oxalate nephrolithiasis. Specific features of endoplasmic reticulum stress were evaluated during nephrolithiasis and treatment with α-tocopherol. We observed the signs of endoplasmic reticulum stress with activation of proapoptotic pathways and injury to the cell lining in nephron tubules and collecting ducts. Ultrastructural changes were found in the organelles, nuclei, and cell membranes of epitheliocytes. A relationship was revealed between endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative damage, which developed at the early state of lithogenesis.

  20. Autophagosome formation from membrane compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and dynamically connected to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Axe, Elizabeth L; Walker, Simon A; Manifava, Maria; Chandra, Priya; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Habermann, Anja; Griffiths, Gareth; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2008-08-25

    Autophagy is the engulfment of cytosol and organelles by double-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes. Autophagosome formation is known to require phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) and occurs near the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the exact mechanisms are unknown. We show that double FYVE domain-containing protein 1, a PI(3)P-binding protein with unusual localization on ER and Golgi membranes, translocates in response to amino acid starvation to a punctate compartment partially colocalized with autophagosomal proteins. Translocation is dependent on Vps34 and beclin function. Other PI(3)P-binding probes targeted to the ER show the same starvation-induced translocation that is dependent on PI(3)P formation and recognition. Live imaging experiments show that this punctate compartment forms near Vps34-containing vesicles, is in dynamic equilibrium with the ER, and provides a membrane platform for accumulation of autophagosomal proteins, expansion of autophagosomal membranes, and emergence of fully formed autophagosomes. This PI(3)P-enriched compartment may be involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Its dynamic relationship with the ER is consistent with the idea that the ER may provide important components for autophagosome formation.

  1. Interaction of caldesmon with endoplasmic reticulum membrane: effects on the mobility of phospholipids in the membrane and on the phosphatidylserine base-exchange reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, P; Makuch, R; Sikorski, A F; Jezierski, A; Pikula, S; Dabrowska, R

    1997-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by tryptophan fluorescence the interaction of caldesmon with anionic phospholipid vesicles [Czurylo, Zborowski and Dabrowska (1993) Biochem. J. 291, 403-408]. In the present work we investigated the interaction of caldesmon with natural-membrane (rat liver endoplasmic reticulum) phospholipids by co-sedimentation assay. The results indicate that 1 mol of caldesmon binds approx. 170 mol of membrane phospholipids with a binding affinity constant of 7.3 x 10(6) M-1. The caldesmon-membrane phospholipid complex dissociates with increasing salt concentration and in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin. As indicated by EPR measurements of membrane lipids labelled with 5-doxyl stearate and TEMPO-phosphatidylethanolamine, binding of caldesmon results in an increase in mobility of the acyl chains (in the region of carbon 5) and a decrease in polar headgroup mobility of phospholipids. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids is accompanied by inhibition of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis via a phospholipid base-exchange reaction, with phosphatidylserine as substrate. This shows that, of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane phospholipids, the main target of caldesmon is phosphatidylserine. PMID:9371708

  2. Superresolution Imaging Identifies That Conventional Trafficking Pathways Are Not Essential for Endoplasmic Reticulum to Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Transport.

    PubMed

    Salka, Kyle; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Wilson, Kassandra; Bozidis, Petros; Mehta, Mansi; Rainey, Kristin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Patterson, George H; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2017-12-01

    Most nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins traffic from the cytosol to mitochondria. Some of these proteins localize at mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), where mitochondria are closely apposed with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus signal-anchored protein known as viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA) traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here, we have examined the host pathways by which vMIA traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the OMM. By disruption of phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 2 (PACS-2), mitofusins (Mfn1/2), and dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), we find these conventional pathways for ER to the mitochondria trafficking are dispensable for vMIA trafficking to OMM. Instead, mutations in vMIA that change its hydrophobicity alter its trafficking to mitochondria. Superresolution imaging showed that PACS-2- and Mfn-mediated membrane apposition or hydrophobic interactions alter vMIA's ability to organize in nanoscale clusters at the OMM. This shows that signal-anchored MAM proteins can make use of hydrophobic interactions independently of conventional ER-mitochondria pathways to traffic from the ER to mitochondria. Further, vMIA hydrophobic interactions and ER-mitochondria contacts facilitate proper organization of vMIA on the OMM.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum membrane-sorting protein of lymphocytes (BAP31) is highly expressed in neurons and discrete endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Manley, H A; Lennon, V A

    2001-10-01

    BAP31 is a transmembrane protein that associates with nascent membrane proteins in transit between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cis-Golgi. Its C-terminal dilysine (KKEE) motif, mediating return to the ER, is consistent with a role in early sorting of membrane proteins. An initiator caspase-binding site in the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is implicated in cytoplasmic membrane fragmentation events of apoptosis. Although BAP31 RNA is ubiquitous, the protein's anatomic localization has not been determined. To gain further insight into its possible functions, we localized BAP31 in primate tissues using monoclonal antibodies. Immunoreactivity was prominent in T- and B-lymphocytes in blood and in thymus, in cerebellar Purkinje neuron bodies and dendrites, in gonadotrophs of the anterior pituitary, ovarian thecal and follicular cells, active but not quiescent thyroid epithelium, adrenal cortex more than medulla, and proximal more than distal renal tubules. Blood vessels and skeletal muscle were nonreactive. The anatomic distribution of BAP31 and the nature of proteins identified thus far as its cargo exiting the ER, suggest an interaction with proteins assembling in macromolecular complexes en route to selected sites of exocytotic and signaling activities. Apoptotic associations in mature tissues could be physiological (lymphocytes, endocrine cells) or pathological (Purkinje neurons, renal tubules).

  4. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool.

  5. Vacuole Membrane Protein 1 Is an Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Required for Organelle Biogenesis, Protein Secretion, and Development

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Carilla-Latorre, Sergio; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Egea, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Vacuole membrane protein 1 (Vmp1) is membrane protein of unknown molecular function that has been associated with pancreatitis and cancer. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has a vmp1-related gene that we identified previously in a functional genomic study. Loss-of-function of this gene leads to a severe phenotype that compromises Dictyostelium growth and development. The expression of mammalian Vmp1 in a vmp1− Dictyostelium mutant complemented the phenotype, suggesting a functional conservation of the protein among evolutionarily distant species and highlights Dictyostelium as a valid experimental system to address the function of this gene. Dictyostelium Vmp1 is an endoplasmic reticulum protein necessary for the integrity of this organelle. Cells deficient in Vmp1 display pleiotropic defects in the secretory pathway and organelle biogenesis. The contractile vacuole, which is necessary to survive under hypoosmotic conditions, is not functional in the mutant. The structure of the Golgi apparatus, the function of the endocytic pathway and conventional protein secretion are also affected in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy of vmp1− cells showed the accumulation of autophagic features that suggests a role of Vmp1 in macroautophagy. In addition to these defects observed at the vegetative stage, the onset of multicellular development and early developmental gene expression are also compromised. PMID:18550798

  6. Integrated stereological and biochemical studies on hepatocytic membranes. I.V. Heterogeneous distribution of marker enzymes on endoplasmic reticulum membranes in fractions

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to consider quantitatively the relationships between the surface area of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and constituent marker enzyme activities, as they occur in fractions collected from rat liver homogenates. The ER surface area was estimated in five membrane-containing fractions by use of a combined cytochemical-stereological technique (5), while, at the same time, ER marker enzymes were assayed biochemically. Fraction/homogenate recoveries for the ER enzymes averaged 100%, total membrane surface area 98%, and ER surface area 96%. Relative specific activities, which compare the relative amounts of ER marker enzyme activities to the relative ER surface area in the membrane-containing fractions, indicate variable distributions for glucose-6-phosphatase and NADPH cytochrome c reductase, but not for esterase. PMID:6248565

  7. A Nucleotide Exchange Factor Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum-to-Cytosol Membrane Penetration of the Nonenveloped Virus Simian Virus 40

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonenveloped simian polyomavirus (PyV) simian virus 40 (SV40) hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control machinery to penetrate the ER membrane and reach the cytosol, a critical infection step. During entry, SV40 traffics to the ER, where host-induced conformational changes render the virus hydrophobic. The hydrophobic virus binds and integrates into the ER lipid bilayer to initiate membrane penetration. However, prior to membrane transport, the hydrophobic SV40 recruits the ER-resident Hsp70 BiP, which holds the virus in a transport-competent state until it is ready to cross the ER membrane. Here we probed how BiP disengages from SV40 to enable the virus to penetrate the ER membrane. We found that nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) Grp170 induces nucleotide exchange of BiP and releases SV40 from BiP. Importantly, this reaction promotes SV40 ER-to-cytosol transport and infection. The human BK PyV also relies on Grp170 for successful infection. Interestingly, SV40 mobilizes a pool of Grp170 into discrete puncta in the ER called foci. These foci, postulated to represent the ER membrane penetration site, harbor ER components, including BiP, known to facilitate viral ER-to-cytosol transport. Our results thus identify a nucleotide exchange activity essential for catalyzing the most proximal event before ER membrane penetration of PyVs. IMPORTANCE PyVs are known to cause debilitating human diseases. During entry, this virus family, including monkey SV40 and human BK PyV, hijacks ER protein quality control machinery to breach the ER membrane and access the cytosol, a decisive infection step. In this study, we pinpointed an ER-resident factor that executes a crucial role in promoting ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration of PyVs. Identifying a host factor that facilitates entry of the PyV family thus provides additional therapeutic targets to combat PyV-induced diseases. PMID:25653441

  8. A relay mechanism between EB1 and APC facilitate STIM1 puncta assembly at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sherry, Ryan; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-09-01

    The assembly of STIM1 protein puncta near endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) junctions is required for optimal activation of store-operated channels (SOC). The mechanisms controlling the translocation of STIM1 puncta to ER-PM junctions remain largely unknown. In the present study, we have explored the role of the microtubule binding protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), on STIM1 puncta and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). APC-depleted cells showed reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, instead puncta is found at the ER surrounding the cell nucleus. Reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions in APC-depleted cells correlates with a strong inhibition of SOCE and diminished Orai whole-cell currents. Immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy co-localization studies indicate that, upon depletion of the ER, STIM1 dissociates from EB1 and associates to APC. Deletion analysis identified an APC-binding domain in the carboxyl terminus of STIM1 (STIM1 650-685). These results together position APC as an important element in facilitating the translocation of STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, which in turn is required for efficient SOCE and Orai activation upon depletion of the ER.

  9. PIN6 auxin transporter at endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane mediates auxin homeostasis and organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sibu; Skůpa, Petr; Viaene, Tom; Zwiewka, Marta; Tejos, Ricardo; Klíma, Petr; Čarná, Mária; Rolčík, Jakub; De Rycke, Riet; Moreno, Ignacio; Dobrev, Petre I; Orellana, Ariel; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Plant development mediated by the phytohormone auxin depends on tightly controlled cellular auxin levels at its target tissue that are largely established by intercellular and intracellular auxin transport mediated by PIN auxin transporters. Among the eight members of the Arabidopsis PIN family, PIN6 is the least characterized candidate. In this study we generated functional, fluorescent protein-tagged PIN6 proteins and performed comprehensive analysis of their subcellular localization and also performed a detailed functional characterization of PIN6 and its developmental roles. The localization study of PIN6 revealed a dual localization at the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transport and metabolic profiling assays in cultured cells and Arabidopsis strongly suggest that PIN6 mediates both auxin transport across the PM and intracellular auxin homeostasis, including the regulation of free auxin and auxin conjugates levels. As evidenced by the loss- and gain-of-function analysis, the complex function of PIN6 in auxin transport and homeostasis is required for auxin distribution during lateral and adventitious root organogenesis and for progression of these developmental processes. These results illustrate a unique position of PIN6 within the family of PIN auxin transporters and further add complexity to the developmentally crucial process of auxin transport.

  10. Investigation of the Calcium-Transporting ATPases at the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Plasma Membrane of Red Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, L. J.; Xing, T.; Hall, J. L.; Williams, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases were compared in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and plasma membrane-enriched fractions of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue by measuring 45Ca uptake and calcium-dependent phosphoenzyme formation. The plasma membrane fraction was prepared by aqueous two-phase partitioning of a microsomal fraction and collecting the upper phase. The ER-enriched fraction was obtained by submitting a sucrose-gradient ER-enriched fraction to aqueous two-phase partitioning and collecting the lower phase; this reduced contaminating plasma membrane, which partitioned into the upper phase. The ATP-dependent calcium uptake observed in both fractions was released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium uptake showed saturation kinetics for calcium with Km values of 0.92 mmol m-3 for the ER fraction and 1.24 mmol m-3 for the plasma membrane fraction. Uptake into both fractions was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B, although the plasma membrane system was slightly more sensitive to both inhibitors. Cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin, at low concentrations, had no marked effect on uptake. The plasma membrane system was less substrate-specific for ATP than the ER system, since it was able to use GTP and ITP to drive calcium transport at up to 50% of the level obtained with ATP. Following phosphorylation with [[gamma]-32P]ATP, two high molecular mass, calcium-dependent phosphoproteins (119 and 124 kD) and a low molecular mass, calcium-independent phosphoprotein (17 kD) were observed in the plasma membrane fraction. The ER fraction showed one high molecular mass phosphoprotein (119 kD) in the presence of calcium and two low molecular mass phosphoproteins (17 and 20 kD) that showed no calcium dependence. The low molecular mass phosphoproteins were insensitive to hydroxyl-amine, but they did show turnover. The identity of these proteins is unknown, but they do not have the properties of phosphorylated intermediates of calcium-ATPases. In contrast, the high

  11. Tespa1 is a novel component of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes and affects mitochondrial calcium flux.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Shirasawa, Senji

    2013-04-12

    Regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is critical in numerous biological processes. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) functions as the Ca(2+) release channel on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Much attention has been dedicated to mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM) which is involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis; however, the molecular mechanisms that link the MAM to mitochondria still remain elusive. We previously reported that Tespa1 (thymocyte-expressed, positive selection-associated gene 1) expressed in lymphocytes physically interacts with IP3R. In this study, we first performed double-immunocytochemical staining of Tespa1 with a mitochondrial marker or an ER marker on an acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, Jurkat cells, by using anti-ATP synthase or anti-calnexin antibody, respectively, and demonstrated that Tespa1 was localized very close to mitochondria and the Tespa1 localization was overlapped with restricted portion of ER. Next, we examined the effects of Tespa1 on the T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation-induced Ca(2+) flux by using Ca(2+) imaging in Jurkat cells. Reduction of Tespa1 protein by Tespa1-specific siRNA diminished TCR stimulation-induced Ca(2+) flux into both mitochondria and cytoplasm through the analyses of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) indicator (Rhod-2) and the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) indicator (Fluo-4), respectively. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293 cells revealed that exogenous Tespa1 protein physically interacted with a MAM-associated protein, GRP75 (glucose-regulated protein 75), but not with an outer mitochondrial membrane protein, VDAC1 (voltage-dependent anion channel 1). All these results suggested that Tespa1 will participate in the molecular link between IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in the MAM compartment.

  12. Direct Formation of Vaccinia Virus Membranes from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Absence of the Newly Characterized L2-Interacting Protein A30.5

    PubMed Central

    Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Weisberg, Andrea S.

    2013-01-01

    Crescents consisting of a single lipoprotein membrane with an external protein scaffold comprise the initial structural elements of poxvirus morphogenesis. Crescents enlarge to form spherical immature virions, which enclose viroplasm consisting of proteins destined to form the cores of mature virions. Previous studies suggest that the L2 protein participates in the recruitment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived membranes to form immature virions within assembly sites of cytoplasmic factories. Here we show that L2 interacts with the previously uncharacterized 42-amino-acid A30.5 protein. An open reading frame similar in size to the one encoding A30.5 is at the same genome location in representatives of all chordopoxvirus genera. A30.5 has a putative transmembrane domain and colocalized with markers of the endoplasmic reticulum and with L2. By constructing a complementing cell line expressing A30.5, we isolated a deletion mutant virus that exhibits a defect in morphogenesis in normal cells. Large electron-dense cytoplasmic inclusions and clusters of scaffold protein-coated membranes that resemble crescents and immature virions devoid of viroplasm were seen in place of normal structures. Crescent-shaped membranes were continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and oriented with the convex scaffold protein-coated side facing the lumen, while clusters of completed spherical immature-virion-like forms were trapped within the expanded lumen. Immature-virion-like structures were more abundant in infected RK-13 cells than in BS-C-1 or HeLa cells, in which cytoplasmic inclusions were decorated with scaffold protein-coated membrane arcs. We suggest that the outer surface of the poxvirus virion is derived from the luminal side of the ER membrane. PMID:24027302

  13. The N-terminal anchor sequences of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases determine their orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Odermatt, A; Arnold, P; Stauffer, A; Frey, B M; Frey, F J

    1999-10-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (11beta- HSD) regulate the ratio of active endogenous glucocorticoids to their inactive keto-metabolites, thereby controlling the access of glucocorticoids to their cognate receptors. In this study, the topology and intracellular localization of 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 have been analyzed by immunohistochemistry and protease protection assays of in vitro transcription/translation products. 11beta-HSD constructs, tagged with the FLAG epitope, were transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells. The enzymatic characteristics of tagged and native enzymes were indistinguishable. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the localization of both 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. To examine the orientation of tagged 11beta-HSD enzymes within the ER membrane, we stained selectively permeabilized HEK-293 cells with anti-FLAG antibody. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the N terminus of 11beta-HSD1 is cytoplasmic, and the catalytic domain containing the C terminus is protruding into the ER lumen. In contrast, the N terminus of 11beta-HSD2 is lumenal, and the catalytic domain is facing the cytoplasm. Chimeric proteins where the N-terminal anchor sequences of 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 were exchanged adopted inverted orientation in the ER membrane. However, both chimeric proteins were not catalytically active. Furthermore, mutation of a tyrosine motif to alanine in the transmembrane segment of 11beta-HSD1 significantly reduced V(max). The subcellular localization of 11beta-HSD1 was not affected by mutations of the tyrosine motif or of a di-lysine motif in the N terminus. However, residue Lys(5), but not Lys(6), turned out to be critical for the topology of 11beta-HSD1. Mutation of Lys(5) to Ser inverted the orientation of 11beta-HSD1 in the ER membrane without loss of catalytic activity. Our results emphasize the importance of the N-terminal transmembrane segments of 11beta-HSD enzymes for

  14. Co-chaperone Specificity in Gating of the Polypeptide Conducting Channel in the Membrane of the Human Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, Stefan; Klein, Marie-Christine; Gamayun, Igor; Melnyk, Armin; Jung, Martin; Schäuble, Nico; Wang, Qian; Hemmis, Birgit; Bochen, Florian; Greiner, Markus; Lampel, Pavel; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Hassdenteufel, Sarah; Dudek, Johanna; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Wagner, Richard; Cavalié, Adolfo; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, signal peptide-dependent protein transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a dynamic polypeptide-conducting channel, the heterotrimeric Sec61 complex. Previous work has characterized the Sec61 complex as a potential ER Ca2+ leak channel in HeLa cells and identified ER lumenal molecular chaperone immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein (BiP) as limiting Ca2+ leakage via the open Sec61 channel by facilitating channel closing. This BiP activity involves binding of BiP to the ER lumenal loop 7 of Sec61α in the vicinity of tyrosine 344. Of note, the Y344H mutation destroys the BiP binding site and causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and diabetes in mice. Here, we systematically depleted HeLa cells of the BiP co-chaperones by siRNA-mediated gene silencing and used live cell Ca2+ imaging to monitor the effects on ER Ca2+ leakage. Depletion of either one of the ER lumenal BiP co-chaperones, ERj3 and ERj6, but not the ER membrane-resident co-chaperones (such as Sec63 protein, which assists BiP in Sec61 channel opening) led to increased Ca2+ leakage via Sec6 complex, thereby phenocopying the effect of BiP depletion. Thus, BiP facilitates Sec61 channel closure (i.e. limits ER Ca2+ leakage) via the Sec61 channel with the help of ERj3 and ERj6. Interestingly, deletion of ERj6 causes pancreatic β-cell failure and diabetes in mice and humans. We suggest that co-chaperone-controlled gating of the Sec61 channel by BiP is particularly important for cells, which are highly active in protein secretion, and that breakdown of this regulatory mechanism can cause apoptosis and disease. PMID:26085089

  15. The Machinery at Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites Contributes to Spatial Regulation of Multiple Legionella Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hubber, Andree; Arasaki, Kohei; Nakatsu, Fubito; Hardiman, Camille; Lambright, David; De Camilli, Pietro; Nagai, Hiroki; Roy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The Dot/Icm system of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila has the capacity to deliver over 270 effector proteins into host cells during infection. Important questions remain as to spatial and temporal mechanisms used to regulate such a large array of virulence determinants after they have been delivered into host cells. Here we investigated several L. pneumophila effector proteins that contain a conserved phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P)-binding domain first described in the effector DrrA (SidM). This PI4P binding domain was essential for the localization of effectors to the early L. pneumophila-containing vacuole (LCV), and DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV required PI4P-binding activity. It was found that the host cell machinery that regulates sites of contact between the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) modulates PI4P dynamics on the LCV to control localization of these effectors. Specifically, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIα (PI4KIIIα) was important for generating a PI4P signature that enabled L. pneumophila effectors to localize to the PM-derived vacuole, and the ER-associated phosphatase Sac1 was involved in metabolizing the PI4P on the vacuole to promote the dissociation of effectors. A defect in L. pneumophila replication in macrophages deficient in PI4KIIIα was observed, highlighting that a PM-derived PI4P signature is critical for biogenesis of a vacuole that supports intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila. These data indicate that PI4P metabolism by enzymes controlling PM-ER contact sites regulate the association of L. pneumophila effectors to coordinate early stages of vacuole biogenesis. PMID:24992562

  16. An endoplasmic reticulum-specific cyclophilin.

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, K W; Glass, J R; Godbout, M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1991-01-01

    Cyclophilin is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that is inhibited by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. A degenerate oligonucleotide based on a conserved cyclophilin sequence was used to isolate cDNA clones representing a ubiquitously expressed mRNA from mice and humans. This mRNA encodes a novel 20-kDa protein, CPH2, that shares 64% sequence identity with cyclophilin. Bacterially expressed CPH2 binds cyclosporin A and is a cyclosporin A-inhibitable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Cell fractionation of rat liver followed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that CPH2 is not cytosolic but rather is located exclusively in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest that cyclosporin A mediates its effect on cells through more than one cyclophilin and that cyclosporin A-induced misfolding of T-cell membrane proteins normally mediated by CPH2 plays a role in immunosuppression. Images PMID:1710767

  17. Structural organization of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Voeltz, Gia K.; Rolls, Melissa M.; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2002-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a continuous membrane system but consists of various domains that perform different functions. Structurally distinct domains of this organelle include the nuclear envelope (NE), the rough and smooth ER, and the regions that contact other organelles. The establishment of these domains and the targeting of proteins to them are understood to varying degrees. Despite its complexity, the ER is a dynamic structure. In mitosis it must be divided between daughter cells and domains must be re-established, and even in interphase it is constantly rearranged as tubules extend along the cytoskeleton. Throughout these rearrangements the ER maintains its basic structure. How this is accomplished remains mysterious, but some insight has been gained from in vitro systems. PMID:12370207

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article. PMID:28208663

  19. Membrane biogenesis during B cell differentiation: most endoplasmic reticulum proteins are expressed coordinately

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The induction of high-rate protein secretion entails increased biogenesis of secretory apparatus organelles. We examined the biogenesis of the secretory apparatus in the B cell line CH12 because it can be induced in vitro to secrete immunoglobulin (Ig). Upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CH12 cells increased secretion of IgM 12-fold. This induced secretion was accompanied by preferential expansion of the ER and the Golgi complex. Three parameters of the rough ER changed: its area and volume increased 3.3- and 3.7-fold, respectively, and the density of membrane-bound ribosomes increased 3.5-fold. Similarly, the area of the Golgi stack increased 3.3-fold, and its volume increased 4.1-fold. These changes provide sufficient biosynthetic capacity to account for the increased secretory activity of CH12. Despite the large increase in IgM synthesis, and because of the expansion of the ER, the concentration of IgM within the ER changed less than twofold during the differentiation process. During the amplification of the rough ER, the expression of resident proteins changed according to one of two patterns. The majority (75%) of rough microsomal (RM) proteins increased in proportion to the increase in rough ER size. Included in this group were both lumenal proteins such as Ig binding protein (BiP), and membrane proteins such as ribophorins I and II. In addition, the expression of a minority (approximately 9%) of RM polypeptides increased preferentially, such that their abundance within the RM of secreting CH12 cells was increased. Thus, the expansion of ER during CH12 differentiation involves preferential increases in the abundance of a few resident proteins, superimposed upon proportional increases in most ER proteins. PMID:2335560

  20. Valosin-containing Protein-interacting Membrane Protein (VIMP) Links the Endoplasmic Reticulum with Microtubules in Concert with Cytoskeleton-linking Membrane Protein (CLIMP)-63*

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Chikano; Kimura, Hana; Arasaki, Kohei; Matsushita, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in mammalian cells depend on both dynamic and static interactions of ER membrane proteins with microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63 is exclusively localized in sheet-like ER membranes, typical structures of the rough ER, and plays a pivotal role in the static interaction with MTs. Our previous study showed that the 42-kDa ER-residing form of syntaxin 5 (Syn5L) regulates ER structure through the interactions with both CLIMP-63 and MTs. Here, we extend our previous study and show that the valosin-containing protein/p97-interacting membrane protein (VIMP)/SelS is also a member of the family of proteins that shape the ER by interacting with MTs. Depletion of VIMP causes the spreading of the ER to the cell periphery and affects an MT-dependent process on the ER. Although VIMP can interact with CLIMP-63 and Syn5L, it does not interact with MT-binding ER proteins (such as Reep1) that shape the tubular smooth ER, suggesting that different sets of MT-binding ER proteins are used to organize different ER subdomains. PMID:25008318

  1. SYP71, a plant-specific Qc-SNARE protein, reveals dual localization to the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suwastika, I Nengah; Uemura, Tomohiro; Shiina, Takashi; Sato, Masa H; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    SNAREs ('Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors') play a critical role in the membrane fusion step of the vesicular transport system in eukaryotes. The number of the genes encoding SNARE proteins is estimated to be 64 in Arabidopsis thaliana. This number is much larger than those in other eukaryotes, suggesting a complex membrane trafficking in plants. The Arabidopsis SNAREs, the SYP7 group proteins, SYP71, SYP72, and SYP73, form a plant-specific SNARE subfamily with not-yet-identified functions. We have previously reported that the SYP7 subfamily proteins are predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in the Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells under transient expression condition. However, several proteomic analyzes indicated the plasma membrane localizations of one of SYP7 subfamily proteins, SYP71. In order to confirm the expression patterns and subcellular localization of SYP7, we performed combination analyses including promoter GUS analysis, a sucrose density gradient centrifugation analysis, as well as an observation on transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing GFP-fused SYP71 under control of its native promoter. From these analyses, we concluded that one of the SYP7 subfamily proteins, SYP71, is predominantly expressed in all vegetative tissues and mainly localized to the plasma membrane. We also found that SYP71 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in the dividing cells of various types of tissues.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases: biochemistry, physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2013-09-01

    The human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP) 1 and 2 proteins were initially identified as homologues of human placental leucine aminopeptidase/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase. They are categorized as a unique class of proteases based on their subcellular localization on the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum. ERAPs play an important role in the N-terminal processing of the antigenic precursors that are presented on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. ERAPs are also implicated in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological phenomena and pathogenic conditions. In this review, the current knowledge on ERAPs is summarized.

  3. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. )

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  5. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells.

  6. A LAPF/phafin1-like protein regulates TORC1 and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in response to endoplasmic reticulum membrane stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Adam; Cunningham, Kyle W.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is a poorly understood regulator of programmed cell death that involves leakage of luminal lysosomal or vacuolar hydrolases into the cytoplasm. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LMP can be induced by antifungals and endoplasmic reticulum stressors when calcineurin also has been inactivated. A genome-wide screen revealed Pib2, a relative of LAPF/phafin1 that regulates LMP in mammals, as a pro-LMP protein in yeast. Pib2 associated with vacuolar and endosomal limiting membranes in unstressed cells in a manner that depended on its FYVE domain and on phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) biosynthesis. Genetic experiments suggest that Pib2 stimulates the activity of TORC1, a vacuole-associated protein kinase that is sensitive to rapamycin, in a pathway parallel to the Ragulator/EGO complex containing the GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2. A hyperactivating mutation in the catalytic subunit of TORC1 restored LMP to the gtr1∆ and pib2∆ mutants and also prevented the synthetic lethality of the double mutants. These findings show novel roles of PI(3)P and Pib2 in the regulation of TORC1, which in turn promoted LMP and nonapoptotic death of stressed cells. Rapamycin prevented the death of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans during exposure to fluconazole plus a calcineurin inhibitor, suggesting that TORC1 broadly promotes sensitivity to fungistats in yeasts. PMID:26510498

  7. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chad D; Wong, Daniel S; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2015-09-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondrial network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients.

  8. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chad D.; Wong, Daniel S.; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondria network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients. PMID:26331984

  9. Continuous network of endoplasmic reticulum in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, M; Slater, N T; Fein, A; Schmidek, A; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Purkinje neurons in rat cerebellar slices injected with an oil drop saturated with 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate [DiIC16(3) or DiI] to label the endoplasmic reticulum were observed by confocal microscopy. DiI spread throughout the cell body and dendrites and into the axon. DiI spreading is due to diffusion in a continuous bilayer and is not due to membrane trafficking because it also spreads in fixed neurons. DiI stained such features of the endoplasmic reticulum as densities at branch points, reticular networks in the cell body and dendrites, nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia in low extracellular Ca2+. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, where optical conditions provide more detail, DiI labeled a clearly delineated network of endoplasmic reticulum in the cell body. We conclude that there is a continuous compartment of endoplasmic reticulum extending from the cell body throughout the dendrites. This compartment may coordinate and integrate neuronal functions. Images PMID:7519781

  10. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  11. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    PubMed Central

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  13. Membrane hyperpolarization induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress facilitates ca(2+) influx to regulate cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Ohya, Susumu; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of the Kir2.1 channel during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in t-BBEC117, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, caused a sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a facilitation of cell death. Expressions of Ca(2+) influx channels (TRPC, Orai1, STIM1) were unchanged by ER stress. The ER stress-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was mainly attributed to the deeper resting membrane potential due to Kir2.1 upregulation. ER stress arrested at the G2/M phase and it was attenuated by an inhibitor of Kir2.1. These results indicate that Kir2.1 upregulation by ER stress facilitates cell death via regulation of cell cycle progression in t-BBEC117.

  14. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  15. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane1

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W.; Slade, Susan E.; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  16. Vma21p is a yeast membrane protein retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by a di-lysine motif and is required for the assembly of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K J; Stevens, T H

    1994-01-01

    The yeast vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) is a multisubunit complex comprised of peripheral membrane subunits involved in ATP hydrolysis and integral membrane subunits involved in proton pumping. The yeast vma21 mutant was isolated from a screen to identify mutants defective in V-ATPase function. vma21 mutants fail to assemble the V-ATPase complex onto the vacuolar membrane: peripheral subunits accumulate in the cytosol and the 100-kDa integral membrane subunit is rapidly degraded. The product of the VMA21 gene (Vma21p) is an 8.5-kDa integral membrane protein that is not a subunit of the purified V-ATPase complex but instead resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. Vma21p contains a dilysine motif at the carboxy terminus, and mutation of these lysine residues abolishes retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and results in delivery of Vma21p to the vacuole, the default compartment for yeast membrane proteins. Our findings suggest that Vma21p is required for assembly of the integral membrane sector of the V-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum and that the unassembled 100-kDa integral membrane subunit present in delta vma21 cells is rapidly degraded by nonvacuolar proteases. Images PMID:7841520

  17. Integral membrane proteins Brr6 and Apq12 link assembly of the nuclear pore complex to lipid homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Hodg, Christine A.; Choudhary, Vineet; Wolyniak, Michael J.; Scarcelli, John J.; Schneiter, Roger; Col, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking Apq12, a nuclear envelope (NE)-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) integral membrane protein, are defective in assembly of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), possibly because of defects in regulating membrane fluidity. We identified BRR6, which encodes an essential integral membrane protein of the NE-ER, as a dosage suppressor of apq12 Δ. Cells carrying the temperature-sensitive brr6-1 allele have been shown to have defects in nucleoporin localization, mRNA metabolism and nuclear transport. Electron microscopy revealed that brr6-1 cells have gross NE abnormalities and proliferation of the ER. brr6-1 cells were hypersensitive to compounds that affect membrane biophysical properties and to inhibitors of lipid biosynthetic pathways, and displayed strong genetic interactions with genes encoding non-essential lipid biosynthetic enzymes. Strikingly, brr6-1 cells accumulated, in or near the NE, elevated levels of the two classes of neutral lipids, steryl esters and triacylglycerols, and over-accumulated sterols when they were provided exogenously. Although neutral lipid synthesis is dispensable in wild-type cells, viability of brr6-1 cells was fully dependent on neutral lipid production. These data indicate that Brr6 has an essential function in regulating lipid homeostasis in the NE-ER, thereby impacting NPC formation and nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:20016074

  18. Di-acidic Motifs in the Membrane-distal C Termini Modulate the Transport of Angiotensin II Receptors from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Dong, Chunmin; Wu, Qiong J.; Balch, William E.; Wu, Guangyu

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export and cell surface transport of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have just begun to be revealed and previous studies have shown that hydrophobic motifs in the putative amphipathic 8th α-helical region within the membrane-proximal C termini play an important role. In this study, we demonstrate that di-acidic motifs in the membrane-distal, nonstructural C-terminal portions are required for the exit from the ER and transport to the plasma membrane of angiotensin II receptors, but not adrenergic receptors. More interestingly, distinct di-acidic motifs dictate optimal export trafficking of different angiotensin II receptors and export ability of each acidic residue in the di-acidic motifs cannot be fully substituted by other acidic residue. Moreover, the function of the di-acidic motifs is likely mediated through facilitating the recruitment of the receptors onto the ER-derived COPII transport vesicles. Therefore, the di-acidic motifs located in the membrane-distal C termini may represent the first linear motifs which recruit selective GPCRs onto the COPII vesicles to control their export from the ER. PMID:21507945

  19. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis.

  20. Obesity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Yamini B.; Pandey, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    In obesity, the adipose cells behave as inflammatory source and result to low grade inflammation. This systemic inflammation along with oxidative stress is a silent killer and damages other vital organs also. High metabolic process, induced due to high nutritional intake, results to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial stress. This review describes the triggering factor and basic mechanism behind the obesity mediated these stresses in relation to inflammation. Efforts have been made to describe the effect-response cycle between adipocytes and non-adipocyte cells with reference to metabolic syndrome (MS). PMID:22891067

  1. Arabidopsis SYT1 maintains stability of cortical endoplasmic reticulum networks and VAP27-1-enriched endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Siao, Wei; Wang, Pengwei; Voigt, Boris; Hussey, Patrick J.; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane (ER–PM) contact sites in leaf and root cells. The ER–PM localization of Arabidopsis SYT1 resembles that of the extended synaptotagmins (E-SYTs) in animal cells. In mammals, E-SYTs have been shown to regulate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, and endocytosis. Arabidopsis SYT1 was reported to be essential for maintaining cell integrity and virus movement. This study provides detailed insight into the subcellular localization of SYT1 and VAP27-1, another ER–PM-tethering protein. SYT1 and VAP27-1 were shown to be localized on distinct ER–PM contact sites. The VAP27-1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (V-EPCSs) were always in contact with the SYT1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (S-EPCSs). The V-EPCSs still existed in the leaf epidermal cells of the SYT1 null mutant; however, they were less stable than those in the wild type. The polygonal networks of cortical ER disassembled and the mobility of VAP27-1 protein on the ER–PM contact sites increased in leaf cells of the SYT1 null mutant. These results suggest that SYT1 is responsible for stabilizing the ER network and V-EPCSs. PMID:27811083

  2. Immunological evidence for eight spans in the membrane domain of 3- hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: implications for enzyme degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have raised two monospecific antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from the membrane domain of the ER glycoprotein 3-hydroxy-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. This domain, which was proposed to span the ER membrane seven times (Liscum, L., J. Finer- Moore, R. M. Stroud, K. L. Luskey, M. S. Brown, and J. L. Goldstein. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260:522-538), plays a critical role in the regulated degradation of the enzyme in the ER in response to sterols. The antibodies stain the ER of cells and immunoprecipitate HMG-CoA reductase and HMGal, a chimeric protein composed of the membrane domain of the reductase fused to Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, the degradation of which is also accelerated by sterols. We show that the sequence Arg224 through Leu242 of HMG-CoA reductase (peptide G) faces the cytoplasm both in cultured cells and in rat liver, whereas the sequence Thr284 through Glu302 (peptide H) faces the lumen of the ER. This indicates that a sequence between peptide G and peptide H spans the membrane of the ER. Moreover, by epitope tagging with peptide H, we show that the loop segment connecting membrane spans 3 and 4 is sequestered in the lumen of the ER. These results demonstrate that the membrane domain of HMG-CoA reductase spans the ER eight times and are inconsistent with the seven membrane spans topological model. The approximate boundaries of the proposed additional transmembrane segment are between Lys248 and Asp276. Replacement of this 7th span in HMGal with the first transmembrane helix of bacteriorhodopsin abolishes the sterol-enhanced degradation of the protein, indicating its role in the regulated turnover of HMG-CoA reductase within the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:1374417

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulates rat mandibular cartilage thinning under compressive mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Wu, Tuo-Jiang; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wen, Juan; Li, Jie; Ma, Qiao-Ling; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2013-06-21

    Compressive mechanical stress-induced cartilage thinning has been characterized as a key step in the progression of temporomandibular joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying this loss have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we used an established animal model for loading compressive mechanical stress to induce cartilage thinning in vivo. The mechanically stressed mandibular chondrocytes were then isolated to screen potential candidates using a proteomics approach. A total of 28 proteins were identified that were directly or indirectly associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, including protein disulfide-isomerase, calreticulin, translationally controlled tumor protein, and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase protein. The altered expression of these candidates was validated at both the mRNA and protein levels. The induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by mechanical stress loading was confirmed by the activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, the elevation of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level, and the expansion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes. More importantly, the use of a selective inhibitor to block endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo reduced the apoptosis observed at the early stages of mechanical stress loading and inhibited the proliferation observed at the later stages of mechanical stress loading. Accordingly, the use of the inhibitor significantly restored cartilage thinning. Taken together, these results demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum stress is significantly activated in mechanical stress-induced mandibular cartilage thinning and, more importantly, that endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition alleviates this loss, suggesting a novel pharmaceutical strategy for the treatment of mechanical stress-induced temporomandibular joint diseases.

  4. The yeast split-ubiquitin membrane protein two-hybrid screen identifies BAP31 as a regulator of the turnover of endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase-like B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Pelletier, Jerry; Massaad, Michel J; Herscovics, Annette; Shore, Gordon C

    2004-04-01

    In the past decade, traditional yeast two-hybrid techniques have identified a plethora of interactions among soluble proteins operating within diverse cellular pathways. The discovery of associations between membrane proteins by genetic approaches, on the other hand, is less well established due to technical limitations. Recently, a split-ubiquitin system was developed to overcome this barrier, but so far, this system has been limited to the analysis of known membrane protein interactions. Here, we constructed unique split-ubiquitin-linked cDNA libraries and provide details for implementing this system to screen for binding partners of a bait protein, in this case BAP31. BAP31 is a resident integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it operates as a chaperone or cargo receptor and regulator of apoptosis. Here we describe a novel human member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like B (PTPLB) family, an integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with four membrane-spanning alpha helices, as a BAP31-interacting protein. PTPLB turns over rapidly through degradation by the proteasome system. Comparisons of mouse cells with a deletion of Bap31 or reconstituted with human BAP31 indicate that BAP31 is required to maintain PTPLB, consistent with a chaperone or quality control function for BAP31 in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  5. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane complex composed of SPFH1 and SPFH2 mediates the ER-associated degradation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Margaret M P; Wormer, Duncan B; Wilkens, Stephan; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2009-04-17

    How endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins that are substrates for the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway are recognized for polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation is largely unresolved. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) form tetrameric calcium channels in ER membranes, whose primary role is to control the release of ER calcium stores, but whose levels are also regulated, in an activation-dependent manner, by the ERAD pathway. Here we report that the ER membrane protein SPFH1 and its homolog SPFH2 form a heteromeric approximately 2 MDa complex that binds to IP(3)R tetramers immediately after their activation and is required for their processing. The complex is ring-shaped (diameter approximately 250A(),) and RNA interference-mediated depletion of SPFH1 and SPFH2 blocks IP(3)R polyubiquitination and degradation. We propose that this novel SPFH1/2 complex is a recognition factor that targets IP(3)Rs and perhaps other substrates for ERAD.

  6. Sulfatase modifying factor 1 trafficking through the cells: from endoplasmic reticulum to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zito, Ester; Buono, Mario; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Surace, Enrico Maria; Dierks, Thomas; Monti, Maria; Cozzolino, Marianna; Pucci, Piero; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-05-16

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) is the gene mutated in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) that encodes the formylglycine-generating enzyme, an essential activator of all the sulfatases. SUMF1 is a glycosylated enzyme that is resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although it is also secreted. Here, we demonstrate that upon secretion, SUMF1 can be taken up from the medium by several cell lines. Furthermore, the in vivo engineering of mice liver to produce SUMF1 shows its secretion into the blood serum and its uptake into different tissues. Additionally, we show that non-glycosylated forms of SUMF1 can still be secreted, while only the glycosylated SUMF1 enters cells, via a receptor-mediated mechanism. Surprisingly, following its uptake, SUMF1 shuttles from the plasma membrane to the ER, a route that has to date only been well characterized for some of the toxins. Remarkably, once taken up and relocalized into the ER, SUMF1 is still active, enhancing the sulfatase activities in both cultured cells and mice tissues.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  8. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Kanehara, Kazue

    2017-01-01

    Roots are the frontier of plant body to perceive underground environmental change. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response represents circumvention of cellular stress caused by various environmental changes; however, a limited number of studies are available on the ER stress responses in roots. Here, we report the tunicamycin (TM) -induced ER stress response in Arabidopsis roots by monitoring expression patterns of immunoglobulin-binding protein 3 (BiP3), a representative marker for the response. Roots promptly responded to the TM-induced ER stress through the induction of similar sets of ER stress-responsive genes. However, not all cells responded uniformly to the TM-induced ER stress in roots, as BiP3 was highly expressed in root tips, an outer layer in elongation zone, and an inner layer in mature zone of roots. We suggest that ER stress response in roots has tissue specificity. PMID:28298914

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-10-14

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  11. The Arabidopsis Synaptotagmin1 Is Enriched in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites and Confers Cellular Resistance to Mechanical Stresses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sancho, Jessica; Vanneste, Steffen; Lee, Eunkyoung; McFarlane, Heather E.; Esteban del Valle, Alicia; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) contact sites are evolutionarily conserved microdomains that have important roles in specialized metabolic functions such as ER-PM communication, lipid homeostasis, and Ca2+ influx. Despite recent advances in knowledge about ER-PM contact site components and functions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, relatively little is known about the functional significance of these structures in plants. In this report, we characterize the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phospholipid binding Synaptotagmin1 (SYT1) as a plant ortholog of the mammal extended synaptotagmins and yeast tricalbins families of ER-PM anchors. We propose that SYT1 functions at ER-PM contact sites because it displays a dual ER-PM localization, it is enriched in microtubule-depleted regions at the cell cortex, and it colocalizes with Vesicle-Associated Protein27-1, a known ER-PM marker. Furthermore, biochemical and physiological analyses indicate that SYT1 might function as an electrostatic phospholipid anchor conferring mechanical stability in plant cells. Together, the subcellular localization and functional characterization of SYT1 highlights a putative role of plant ER-PM contact site components in the cellular adaptation to environmental stresses. PMID:25792253

  12. A Fungal Sarcolemmal Membrane-Associated Protein (SLMAP) Homolog Plays a Fundamental Role in Development and Localizes to the Nuclear Envelope, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Nordzieke, Steffen; Zobel, Thomas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein (SLMAP) is a tail-anchored protein involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as myoblast fusion, cell cycle progression, and chromosomal inheritance. Further, SLMAP misexpression is associated with endothelial dysfunctions in diabetes and cancer. SLMAP is part of the conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex required for specific signaling pathways in yeasts, filamentous fungi, insects, and mammals. In filamentous fungi, STRIPAK was initially discovered in Sordaria macrospora, a model system for fungal differentiation. Here, we functionally characterize the STRIPAK subunit PRO45, a homolog of human SLMAP. We show that PRO45 is required for sexual propagation and cell-to-cell fusion and that its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is essential for these processes. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed that PRO45 binds to STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and SmMOB3, which are also required for sexual propagation. Superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) further established that PRO45 localizes to the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. SIM also showed that localization to the nuclear envelope requires STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and PRO22, whereas for mitochondria it does not. Taken together, our study provides important insights into fundamental roles of the fungal SLMAP homolog PRO45 and suggests STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-unrelated functions. PMID:25527523

  13. Mobility of ribosomes bound to microsomal membranes. A freeze-etch and thin-section electron microscope study of the structure and fluidity of the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The lateral mobility of ribosomes bound to rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) membranes was demonstrated under experimental conditions. High- salt-washed rough microsomes were treated with pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase) to cleave the mRNA of bound polyribosomes and allow the movement of individual bound ribosomesmfreeze-etch and thin-section electron microscopy demonstrated that, when rough microsomes were treated with RNase at 4 degrees C and then maintained at this temperature until fixation, the bound ribosomes retained their homogeneous distribution on the microsomal surface. However, when RNase- treated rough microsomes were brought to 24 degrees C, a temperature above the thermotropic phase transition of the microsomal phospholipids, bound ribosomes were no longer distributed homogeneously but, instead, formed large, tightly packed aggregates on the microsomal surface. Bound polyribosomes could also be aggregated by treating rough microsomes with antibodies raised against large ribosomal subunit proteins. In these experiments, extensive cross-linking of ribosomes from adjacent microsomes also occurred, and large ribosome-free membrane areas were produced. Sedimentation analysis in sucrose density gradients demonstrated that the RNase treatment did not release bound ribosomes from the membranes; however, the aggregated ribosomes remain capable of peptide bond synthesis and were released by puromycin. It is proposed that the formation of ribosomal aggregates on the microsomal surface results from the lateral displacement of ribosomes along with their attached binding sites, nascent polypeptide chains, and other associated membrane proteins; The inhibition of ribosome mobility after maintaining rough microsomes at 4 degrees C after RNase, or antibody, treatment suggests that the ribosome binding sites are integral membrane proteins and that their mobility is controlled by the fluidity of the RER membrane. Examination of the hydrophobic interior of microsomal

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulates Adipocyte Resistin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lefterova, Martina I.; Mullican, Shannon E.; Tomaru, Takuya; Qatanani, Mohammed; Schupp, Michael; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Resistin is a secreted polypeptide that impairs glucose metabolism and, in rodents, is derived exclusively from adipocytes. In murine obesity, resistin circulates at elevated levels but its gene expression in adipose tissue is paradoxically reduced. The mechanism behind the downregulation of resistin mRNA is poorly understood. We investigated whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is characteristic of obese adipose tissue, regulates resistin expression in cultured mouse adipocytes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of endoplasmic stress inducers on resistin mRNA and secreted protein levels were examined in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, focusing on the expression and genomic binding of transcriptional regulators of resistin. The association between downregulated resistin mRNA and induction of ER stress was also investigated in the adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet. RESULTS ER stress reduced resistin mRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of ER stress were transcriptional because of downregulation of CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ transcriptional activators and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor CAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein-10 (CHOP10). Resistin protein was also substantially downregulated, showing a close correspondence with mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as well as in the fat pads of obese mice. CONCLUSIONS ER stress is a potent regulator of resistin, suggesting that ER stress may underlie the local downregulation of resistin mRNA and protein in fat in murine obesity. The paradoxical increase in plasma may be because of various systemic abnormalities associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:19491212

  15. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  16. The catalytic activity of the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein microsomal epoxide hydrolase towards carcinogens is retained on inversion of its membrane topology.

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, T; Holler, R; Löllmann, B; Arand, M; Oesch, F

    1996-01-01

    Diol epoxides formed by the sequential action of cytochrome P-450 and the microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent an important class of ultimate carcinogenic metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The role of the membrane orientation of cytochrome P-450 and mEH relative to each other in this catalytic cascade is not known. Cytochrome P-450 is known to have a type I topology. According to the algorithm of Hartman, Rapoport and Lodish [(1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 5786-5790], which allows the prediction of the membrane topology of proteins, mEH should adopt a type II membrane topology. Experimentally, mEH membrane topology has been disputed. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast with the theoretical prediction, the rat mEH has exclusively a type I membrane topology. Moreover we show that this topology can be inverted without affecting the catalytic activity of mEH. Our conclusions are supported by the observation that two mEH constructs (mEHg1 and mEHg2), containing engineered potential glycosylation sites at two separate locations after the C-terminal site of the membrane anchor, were not glycosylated in fibroblasts. However, changing the net charge at the N-terminus of these engineered mEH proteins by +3 resulted in proteins (++mEHg1 and ++mEHg2) that became glycosylated and consequently had a type II topology. The sensitivity of these glycosylated proteins to endoglycosidase H indicated that, like the native mEH, they are still retained in the ER. The engineered mEH proteins were integrated into membranes as they were resistant to alkaline extraction. Interestingly, an insect mEH with a charge distribution in its N-terminus similar to ++mEHg1 has recently been isolated. This enzyme might well display a type II topology instead of the type I topology of the rat mEH. Importantly, mEHg1, having the natural cytosolic orientation, as well as ++mEHg1, having an artificial huminal orientation, displayed rather

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  18. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  19. Co-chaperones of the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Armin; Rieger, Heiko; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the rough endoplasmic reticulum or ER plays a central role in the biogenesis of most extracellular plus many organellar proteins and in cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, this organelle comprises molecular chaperones that are involved in import, folding/assembly, export, and degradation of polypeptides in millimolar concentrations. In addition, there are calcium channels/pumps and signal transduction components present in the ER membrane that affect and are affected by these processes. The ER lumenal Hsp70, termed immunoglobulin-heavy chain binding protein or BiP, is the central player in all these activities and involves up to seven different co-chaperones, i.e. ER-membrane integrated as well as ER-lumenal Hsp40s, which are termed ERj or ERdj, and two nucleotide exchange factors.

  20. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS.

  1. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qiong; Zhan Jinbiao . E-mail: jzhan2k@zju.edu.cn; Chen Xinhong; Zheng Shu

    2006-05-12

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. A role for protein kinase C in the regulation of membrane fluidity and Ca²(+) flux at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes of HEK293 and Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihong; Meng, Qingli; Jing, Xian; Xu, Pingxiang; Luo, Dali

    2011-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a prominent role in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions, including Ca²(+) signalling. In HEK293 and Jurkat cells, the Ca²(+) release and Ca²(+) uptake stimulated by several different activators were attenuated by activation of PKC with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) and potentiated by PKC inhibition with Gö6983 or knockdown of PKCα or PKCβ using shRNA. Immunostaining and Western blotting analyses revealed that PKCα and PKCβII accumulated at the plasma membrane (PM) and that these isoforms, along with PKCβI, also translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) upon activation with PMA. Measurements of membrane fluidity showed that, like the cell membrane stabilizers bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ursodeoxycholate (UDCA), PMA and OAG significantly reduced the fluidity of both the PM and ER membranes; these effects were blocked in PKC-knockdown cells. Interestingly, both BSA and UDCA inhibited the Ca²(+) responses to agonists to the same extent as PMA, whereas Tween 20, which increases membrane fluidity, raised the internal Ca²(+) concentration. Thus, activation of PKC induces both translocation of PKC to the PM and ER membranes and downregulation of membrane fluidity, thereby negatively modulating Ca²(+) flux.

  3. From endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria: absence of the Arabidopsis ATP antiporter endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 perturbs photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christiane; Plocharski, Bartolome; Haferkamp, Ilka; Leroch, Michaela; Ewald, Ralph; Bauwe, Hermann; Riemer, Jan; Herrmann, Johannes M; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2013-07-01

    The carrier Endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 (ER-ANT1) resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and acts as an ATP/ADP antiporter. Mutant plants lacking ER-ANT1 exhibit a dwarf phenotype and their seeds contain reduced protein and lipid contents. In this study, we describe a further surprising metabolic peculiarity of the er-ant1 mutants. Interestingly, Gly levels in leaves are immensely enhanced (26×) when compared with that of wild-type plants. Gly accumulation is caused by significantly decreased mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase (GDC) activity. Reduced GDC activity in mutant plants was attributed to oxidative posttranslational protein modification induced by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GDC activity is crucial for photorespiration; accordingly, morphological and physiological defects in er-ant1 plants were nearly completely abolished by application of high environmental CO(2) concentrations. The latter observation demonstrates that the absence of ER-ANT1 activity mainly affects photorespiration (maybe solely GDC), whereas basic cellular metabolism remains largely unchanged. Since ER-ANT1 homologs are restricted to higher plants, it is tempting to speculate that this carrier fulfils a plant-specific function directly or indirectly controlling cellular ROS production. The observation that ER-ANT1 activity is associated with cellular ROS levels reveals an unexpected and critical physiological connection between the ER and other organelles in plants.

  4. Rapid flip-flop of phospholipids in endoplasmic reticulum membranes studied by a stopped-flow approach.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, U; Lassmann, G; Holzhütter, H G; Wüstner, D; Müller, P; Höhlig, A; Kubelt, J; Herrmann, A

    2000-01-01

    The transbilayer movement of short-chain spin-labeled and fluorescent 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl (NBD) phospholipid analogs in rat liver microsomes is measured by stopped-flow mixing of labeled microsomes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. Extraction of analogs from the outer leaflet of microsomes to BSA can be directly monitored in conjunction with electron paramagnetic resonance or fluorescence spectroscopy by taking advantage of the fact that the signal of spin-labeled or fluorescent analogs bound to BSA is different from that of the analogs inserted into membranes. From the signal kinetics, the transbilayer movement and the distribution of analogs in microsomal membranes can be derived provided the extraction of analogs by BSA is much faster in comparison to the transbilayer movement of analogs. Half-times of the back-exchange for spin-labeled and fluorescent analogs were <3.5 and <9.5 s, respectively. The unprecedented time resolution of the assay revealed that the transbilayer movement of spin-labeled analogs is much faster than previously reported. The half-time of the movement was about 16 s or even less at room temperature. Transmembrane movement of NBD-labeled analogs was six- to eightfold slower than that of spin-labeled analogs. PMID:10777759

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium, Stress and Cell-to-Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Theodora

    2014-01-01

    Darier's Disease (DD) is caused by mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ ATPase ATP2A2 (protein SERCA2). Current treatment modalities are ineffective for many patients. This report shows that impaired SERCA2 function, both in DD keratinocytes and in normal keratinocytes treated with the SERCA2-inhibitor thapsigargin, depletes ER Ca2+ stores, leading to constitutive ER stress and increased sensitivity to ER stressors. ER stress, in turn, leads to abnormal cell-to-cell adhesion via impaired redistribution of desmoplakin, desmoglein 3, desmocollin 3 and E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. This report illustrates how ER Ca2+ depletion and the resulting ER stress are central to the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, the authors introduce a possible new therapeutic agent, Miglustat. PMID:24924761

  6. Stress Responses from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hironori; Nishitoh, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic organelle that is essential for multiple cellular functions. During cellular stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation and dysregulation of protein synthesis, unfolded/misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR also contributes to the regulation of various intracellular signaling pathways such as calcium signaling and lipid signaling. More recently, the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM), which is a site of close contact between the ER and mitochondria, has been shown to function as a platform for various intracellular stress responses including apoptotic signaling, inflammatory signaling, the autophagic response, and the UPR. Interestingly, in cancer, these signaling pathways from the ER are often dysregulated, contributing to cancer cell metabolism. Thus, the signaling pathway from the ER may be a novel therapeutic target for various cancers. In this review, we discuss recent research on the roles of stress responses from the ER, including the MAM. PMID:25941664

  7. Teaching the modes of Ca2+ transport between the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum using a classic paper by Kwan et al.

    PubMed

    Liang, Willmann

    2009-09-01

    This teaching article uses the report by Kwan et al., "Effects of methacholine, thapsigargin, and La(3+) on plasmalemmal and intracellular Ca(2+) transport in lacrimal acinar cells," where the effects of Ca(2+)-mobilizing agents in regulating Ca(2+) fluxes were examined under various conditions. Upper-level undergraduate and new graduate students in physiology are the targe audience. Teaching and learning points are put forth in this article to illustrate 1) the characteristics of methacholine- and thapsigargin-induced Ca(2+) responses, 2) the different endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores accessible to methacholine and thapsigargin, 3) the inhibitory effects of La(3+) on Ca(2+) extrusion and Ca(2+) influx, and 4) the facilitatory role of La(3+) on endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) recycling. Each of the above concepts is first explained with references to the figures adapted from the original article. A list of student learning questions then follows, where the answers are found in the teaching notes for the instructors. It is the objective of this article to make both teaching and learning Ca(2+) regulation a rewarding experience for all.

  8. Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump Expression during Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is involved in several essential cell functions including cell proliferation, protein synthesis, stress responses or secretion. Calcium uptake into the endoplasmic reticulum is performed by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases (SERCA enzymes). In order to study endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in situ in mammary tissue, in this work SERCA3 expression was investigated in normal breast and in its benign and malignant lesions in function of the cell type, degree of malignancy, and histological and molecular parameters of the tumors. Our data indicate, that although normal breast acinar epithelial cells express SERCA3 abundantly, its expression is strongly decreased already in very early non-malignant epithelial lesions such as adenosis, and remains low in lobular carcinomas. Whereas normal duct epithelium expresses significant amounts of SERCA3, its expression is decreased in several benign ductal lesions, as well as in ductal adenocarcinoma. The loss of SERCA3 expression is correlated with Elston-Ellis grade, negative hormone receptor expression or triple negative status in ductal carcinomas. The concordance between decreased SERCA3 expression and several histological, as well as molecular markers of ductal carcinogenesis indicates that endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is remodeled during tumorigenesis in the breast epithelium. PMID:21863130

  9. Unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum in cells of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parkin, J L; Brunning, R D

    1978-08-01

    An ultrastructural study of leukemia cells from 8 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia revealed several features that have not previously been emphasized: prominent dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and two unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The two membrane structures, multilaminar ER and complex stellate arrangements of ER, appeared to be morphogenetically related. The multilaminar ER was observed in every mitotic cell and less frequently in interphase cells. The stellate ER complex was observed only in interphase cells. Ultrastructural evidence is presented to support the possible evolution of the stellate ER complex from the multilaminar ER.

  10. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  11. Three-dimensional organization of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane around the mitochondrial constriction site in mammalian cells revealed by using focused-ion beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Keisuke; Okayama, Satoko; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria associate at multiple contact sites to form specific domains known as mitochondria-ER associated membranes (MAMs) that play a role in the regulation of various cellular processes such as Ca2+ transfer, autophagy, and inflammation. Recently, it has been suggested that MAMs are also involved in mitochondrial dynamics, especially fission events. Cytological analysis showed that ER tubules were frequently located close to each other in mitochondrial fission sites that accumulate fission-related proteins. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of ER-mitochondrial contacts in yeast mitochondria by using cryo-electron tomography also showed that ER tubules were attached near the constriction site, which is considered to be a fission site1). MAMs have been suggested to play a role in the initiation of mitochondrial fission, although the molecular relationships between MAMs and the mitochondrial fission process have not been established. Although an ER-mitochondrial membrane association has also been observed at the fission site in mammalian mitochondria, the detailed organization of MAMs around mammalian mitochondria remains to be established. To visualize the 3D distribution of the ER-mitochondrial contacts around the mitochondria, especially around the constriction site in mammalian cells, we attempted 3D structural analysis of the mammalian cytoplasm using high-resolution focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) tomography, and observed the distribution pattern of ER contacts around the mammalian mitochondrial constriction site.Rat hepatocytes and HeLa cells were used. Liver tissue was obtained from male rats (Wistar, 6W) fixed by transcardial perfusion of 2% paraformaldehyde and 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4) under deep anesthesia. HeLa cells were fixed with the same fixative. The specimens were then stained en bloc to enhance membrane contrast and embedded in epoxy resin2). The surface of

  12. High-resolution calcium mapping of the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi-exocytic membrane system. Electron energy loss imaging analysis of quick frozen-freeze dried PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Pezzati, R; Bossi, M; Podini, P; Meldolesi, J; Grohovaz, F

    1997-08-01

    The calcium pools segregated within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, exocytic, and other organelles are believed to participate in the regulation of a variety of cell functions. Until now, however, the precise intracellular distribution of the element had not been established. Here, we report about the first high-resolution calcium mapping obtained in neurosecretory PC12 cells by the imaging mode of the electron energy loss spectroscopy technique. The preparation procedure used included quick freezing of cell monolayers, followed by freeze-drying, fixation with OSO4 vapors, resin embedding, and cutting of very thin sections. Conventional electron microscopy and high-resolution immunocytochemistry revealed a high degree of structural preservation, a condition in which inorganic elements are expected to maintain their native distribution. Within these cells, calcium signals of nucleus, cytosol, and most mitochondria remained below detection, whereas in other organelles specific patterns were identified. In the endoplasmic reticulum, the distribution was heterogeneous with strongly positive cisternae (more often the nuclear envelope and stacks of parallel elements that are frequent in quick frozen preparations) lying in the proximity of or even in direct continuity with other, apparently negative cisternae. The Golgi complexes were labeled strongly and uniformly in all cisternae and part of their vesicles, with no appreciable differences along the cis-trans axis. Weaker or negative signals were recorded from the trans-Golgi network elements and from scattered vesicles, whereas in contrast secretion granules were strongly positive for calcium. These results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge about the mechanisms of calcium transport in the variations organelles, and about the processes and functions regulated by organelle lumenal calcium in eukaryotic cells.

  13. Mutations in the Polybasic Juxtamembrane Sequence of Both Plasma Membrane- and Endoplasmic Reticulum-localized Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Confer Ligand-independent Cell Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Kirsten L.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Baird, Barbara; Holowka, David

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of ErbB receptor-tyrosine kinases is a hallmark of many human cancers. Conserved in the ErbB family is a cluster of basic amino acid residues in the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region. We found that charge-silencing mutagenesis within this juxtamembrane region of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) results in the generation of a mutant receptor (EGFR Mut R1-6) that spontaneously transforms NIH 3T3 cells in a ligand-independent manner. A similar mutant with one additional basic residue, EGFR Mut R1-5, fails to exhibit ligand-independent transformation. The capacity of EGFR Mut R1-6 to mediate this transformation is maintained when this mutant is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum via a single point mutation, L393H, which we describe. We show that EGFR Mut R1-6 with or without L393H exhibits enhanced basal tyrosine phosphorylation when ectopically expressed, and the ligand-independent transforming activity of EGFR Mut R1-6 is sensitive to inhibition of EGFR kinase activity and is particularly dependent on PI3K and mTOR activity. Similar to EGFR Mut R1-6/L393H in NIH 3T3 cells, EGFR variant type III, a highly oncogenic mutant form of EGFR linked to human brain cancers, confers transforming activity while it is wholly endoplasmic reticulum-retained in U87 cells. Our findings highlight the importance of the polybasic juxtamembrane sequence in regulating the oncogenic potential of EGFR signaling. PMID:24142702

  14. De novo translation initiation on membrane-bound ribosomes as a mechanism for localization of cytosolic protein mRNAs to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Reid, David W; Cox, Amanda H; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-10-01

    The specialized protein synthesis functions of the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum compartments are conferred by the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, which directs the cotranslational trafficking of signal sequence-encoding mRNAs from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although subcellular mRNA distributions largely mirror the binary pattern predicted by the SRP pathway model, studies in mammalian cells, yeast, and Drosophila have also demonstrated that cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs are broadly represented on ER-bound ribosomes. A mechanism for such noncanonical mRNA localization remains, however, to be identified. Here, we examine the hypothesis that de novo translation initiation on ER-bound ribosomes serves as a mechanism for localizing cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs to the ER. As a test of this hypothesis, we performed single molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of subcellular mRNA distributions and report that a substantial fraction of mRNAs encoding the cytosolic protein GAPDH resides in close proximity to the ER. Consistent with these data, analyses of subcellular mRNA and ribosome distributions in multiple cell lines demonstrated that cytosolic protein mRNA-ribosome distributions were strongly correlated, whereas signal sequence-encoding mRNA-ribosome distributions were divergent. Ribosome footprinting studies of ER-bound polysomes revealed a substantial initiation codon read density enrichment for cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs. We also demonstrate that eukaryotic initiation factor 2α is bound to the ER via a salt-sensitive, ribosome-independent mechanism. Combined, these data support ER-localized translation initiation as a mechanism for mRNA recruitment to the ER.

  15. Cloning of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) from Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, S. C.; Meleshkevitch, E. A.; Mandal, P. K.; Boudko, D. Y.; Ahearn, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported on calcium transport mechanisms in American lobster, Homarus americanus, using 45Ca2+ coupled with vesicle preparations of hepatopancreatic endoplasmic reticulum. The active transport of calcium across membranes bordering calcium-sequestering stores such as sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by membrane-spanning proteins, the sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs). In the study described here we used advanced bioinformatics and molecular techniques to clone SERCA from the economically important Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. We report the complete cloning of a full-length SERCA from P. argus antenna cDNA (GenBank accession number AY702617). This cDNA has a 1020-amino acid residue open reading frame which is 90% identical to published sequences of other crustacean SERCA proteins. Our data support the hypothesis that one crustacean and three vertebrate genes controlling calcium transport were derived from a common ancestral gene. PMID:18825387

  16. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  17. Arachidonoyl-Specific Diacylglycerol Kinase ε and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Iseki, Ken; Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Goto, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA) serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG) to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology, and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER. PMID:27917381

  18. The Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation System

    PubMed Central

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.; Christianson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of synthesis for nearly one-third of the eukaryotic proteome and is accordingly endowed with specialized machinery to ensure that proteins deployed to the distal secretory pathway are correctly folded and assembled into native oligomeric complexes. Proteins failing to meet this conformational standard are degraded by ER-associated degradation (ERAD), a complex process through which folding-defective proteins are selected and ultimately degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ERAD proceeds through four tightly coupled steps involving substrate selection, dislocation across the ER membrane, covalent conjugation with polyubiquitin, and proteasomal degradation. The ERAD machinery shows a modular organization with central ER membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligases linking components responsible for recognition in the ER lumen to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cytoplasm. The core ERAD machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes and much of our basic understanding of ERAD organization has been derived from genetic and biochemical studies of yeast. In this article we discuss how the core ERAD machinery is organized in mammalian cells. PMID:23232094

  19. Reconstitution of Glucosylceramide Flip-Flop across Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chalat, Madhavan; Menon, Indu; Turan, Zeynep; Menon, Anant K.

    2012-01-01

    Most glycosphingolipids are synthesized by the sequential addition of monosaccharides to glucosylceramide (GlcCer) in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Because GlcCer is synthesized on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes, it must be flipped to the non-cytoplasmic face by a lipid flippase in order to nucleate glycosphingolipid synthesis. Halter et al. (Halter, D., Neumann, S., van Dijk, S. M., Wolthoorn, J., de Mazière, A. M., Vieira, O. V., Mattjus, P., Klumperman, J., van Meer, G., and Sprong, H. (2007) Pre- and post-Golgi translocation of glucosylceramide in glycosphingolipid synthesis. J. Cell Biol. 179, 101–115) proposed that this essential flipping step is accomplished via a complex trafficking itinerary; GlcCer is moved from the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by FAPP2, a cytoplasmic lipid transfer protein, flipped across the ER membrane, then delivered to the lumen of the Golgi complex by vesicular transport. We now report biochemical reconstitution studies to analyze GlcCer flipping at the ER. Using proteoliposomes reconstituted from Triton X-100-solubilized rat liver ER membrane proteins, we demonstrate rapid (t½ < 20 s), ATP-independent flip-flop of N-(6-((7-nitro-2–1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl)-d-glucosyl-β1–1′-sphingosine, a fluorescent GlcCer analog. Further studies involving protein modification, biochemical fractionation, and analyses of flip-flop in proteoliposomes reconstituted with ER membrane proteins from yeast indicate that GlcCer translocation is facilitated by well characterized ER phospholipid flippases that remain to be identified at the molecular level. By reason of their abundance and membrane bending activity, we considered that the ER reticulons and the related Yop1 protein could function as phospholipid-GlcCer flippases. Direct tests showed that these proteins have no flippase activity. PMID:22427661

  20. Mammalian vesicle trafficking proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Hay, J C; Hirling, H; Scheller, R H

    1996-03-08

    Vesicle traffic propagates and maintains distinct subcellular compartments and routes secretory products from their site of synthesis to their final destinations. As a basis for the specificity of vesicular transport reactions, each step in the secretory pathway appears to be handled by a distinct set of evolutionarily conserved proteins. Mammalian proteins responsible for vesicle trafficking at early steps in the secretory pathway are not well understood. In this report, we describe rat sec22 (rsec22) and rat bet1 (rbet1), mammalian sequence homologs of yeast proteins identified as mediators of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi protein transport. rsec22 and rbet1 were expressed widely in mammalian tissues, as anticipated for proteins involved in fundamental membrane trafficking reactions. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 proteins behaved as integral membrane components of 28 and 18 kDa, respectively, consistent with their primary structures, which contain a predicted transmembrane domain at or near the carboxyl terminus. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 had distinct subcellular localizations, with rsec22 residing on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and rbet1 found on Golgi membranes. Studies with brefeldin A and nocodazole indicated that rbet1 function might involve interaction with or retention in the intermediate compartment. The distinct localizations of rsec22 and rbet1 may reflect their participation in opposite directions of membrane flow between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

  1. Proteostasis: bad news and good news from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Noack, Julia; Brambilla Pisoni, Giorgia; Molinari, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an intracellular compartment dedicated to the synthesis and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins, totalling about 30% of the total eukaryotic cells proteome. The capacity to produce correctly folded polypeptides and to transport them to their correct intra- or extracellular destinations relies on proteostasis networks that regulate and balance the activity of protein folding, quality control, transport and degradation machineries. Nutrient and environmental changes, pathogen infection aging and, more relevant for the topics discussed in this review, mutations that impair attainment of the correct 3D structure of nascent polypeptide chains may compromise the activity of the proteostasis networks with devastating consequences on cells, organs and organisms' homeostasis. Here we present a review of mechanisms regulating folding and quality control of proteins expressed in the ER, and we describe the protein degradation and the ER stress pathways activated by the expression of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Finally, we highlight select examples of proteopathies (also known as conformational disorders or protein misfolding diseases) caused by protein misfolding in the ER and/or affecting cellular proteostasis and therapeutic interventions that might alleviate or cure the disease symptoms.

  2. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  3. The Role of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:23637287

  4. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  5. Association of Legionella pneumophila with the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Isberg, R R

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment that is studded with ribosomes. In this study we investigated whether these ribosomes originate from the cytoplasmic pool or are associated with host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopic localization studies of ER proteins in macrophages infected with L. pneumophila indicated that the bacteria reside in a compartment surrounded by ER. An L. pneumophila mutant that grows slowly in macrophages was slow to associate with host ER, providing genetic evidence in support of the hypothesis that this specialized vacuole is required for intracellular bacterial growth. Ultrastructural studies, in which the ER luminal protein BiP was labeled by immunoperoxidase cytochemistry, revealed that L. pneumophila replication vacuoles resemble nascent autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagy, increased association of the bacteria with the ER and enhanced bacterial growth. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that L. pneumophila exploits the autophagy machinery of macrophages to establish an intracellular niche favorable for replication. PMID:7642298

  6. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  7. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response: A link with tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongyong; Zhao, Deming; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide. The endoplasmic-reticulum stress (ERS) response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by mycobacterial infection that disturbs the folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced to suspend the synthesis of early proteins and reduce the accumulation of unfolded- or misfolded proteins in the ER restoring normal physiological cell function. Prolonged or uncontrolled ERS leads to the activation of three signaling pathways (IRE1, PERK and ATF6) which directs the cell towards apoptosis. The absence of this process facilitates spread of the mycobacteria within the body. We summarize here recent advances in understanding the signaling pathway diversity governing ERS in relation to TB.

  8. A high-molecular-weight complex of membrane proteins BAP29/BAP31 is involved in the retention of membrane-bound IgD in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Kuppig, Stephan; Becker, Bernd; Gimborn, Kerstin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Reth, Michael

    2003-08-19

    B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprising membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mIgs) and Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimers. In most cases, transport of mIgs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface requires assembly with the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta subunits. In addition to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta, mIg molecules also bind two ER-resident membrane proteins, BAP29 and BAP31, and the chaperone heavy chain binding protein (BiP). In this article, we show that neither Ig-alpha/Ig-beta nor BAP29/BAP31 nor BiP bind simultaneously to the same mIgD molecule. Blue native PAGE revealed that only a minor fraction of intracellular mIgD is associated with high-molecular-weight BAP29/BAP31 complexes. BAP-binding to mIgs was found to correlate with ER retention of chimeric mIgD molecules. On high-level expression in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, mIgD molecules were detected on the cell surface in the absence of Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. This aberrant transport was prevented by coexpression of BAP29 and BAP31. Thus, BAP complexes contribute to ER retention of mIg complexes that are not bound to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. Furthermore, the mechanism of ER retention of both BAP31 and mIgD is not through retrieval from a post-ER compartment, but true ER retention. In conclusion, BAP29 and BAP31 might be the long sought after retention proteins and/or chaperones that act on transmembrane regions of various proteins.

  9. CDIP1-BAP31 complex transduces apoptotic signals from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Namba, Takushi; Tian, Fang; Chu, Kiki; Hwang, So-Young; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Byun, Sanguine; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Mandinova, Anna; Lee, Sam W

    2013-10-31

    Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid) and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  10. Regulation of lipid metabolism via a connection between the endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka

    2017-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that store and supply lipids to regulate cellular lipid homeostasis. Fatty acids are packaged as triglyceride and cholesterol ester into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to synthesize LDs. Cytosolic LDs move dynamically and interact with organelles, including other LDs. In this process, functional proteins for metabolism are also transferred to LDs. In this review, I focus on interactions between the ER and LDs related to lipid metabolism.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: implications for inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the emerging role of cellular stress responses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent findings The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a primitive cellular pathway that is engaged when responding to endoplasmic reticulum stress and regulates autophagy. Highly secretory cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells in the intestines are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress and are exceedingly dependent upon a properly functioning UPR to maintain cellular viability and homeostasis. Primary genetic abnormalities within the components of the UPR (e.g. XBP1, ARG2, ORMDL3), genes that encode proteins reliant upon a robust secretory pathway (e.g. MUC2, HLAB27) and environmental factors that create disturbances in the UPR (e.g. microbial products and inflammatory cytokines) are important factors in the primary development and/or perpetuation of intestinal inflammation. Summary Endoplasmic reticulum stress is an important new pathway involved in the development of intestinal inflammation associated with IBD and likely other intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:20495455

  12. Nodal endoplasmic reticulum, a specialized form of endoplasmic reticulum found in gravity-sensing root tip columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Staehelin, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of columella root cap cells has been postulated to play a role in gravity sensing. We have re-examined the ultrastructure of columella cells in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root tips preserved by high-pressure freezing/freeze-substitution techniques to gain more precise information about the organization of the ER in such cells. The most notable findings are: the identification of a specialized form of ER, termed "nodal ER," which is found exclusively in columella cells; the demonstration that the bulk of the ER is organized in the form of a tubular network that is confined to a peripheral layer under the plasma membrane; and the discovery that this ER-rich peripheral region excludes Golgi stacks, vacuoles, and amyloplasts but not mitochondria. Nodal ER domains consist of an approximately 100-nm-diameter central rod composed of oblong subunits to which usually seven sheets of rough ER are attached along their margins. These domains form patches at the interface between the peripheral ER network and the ER-free central region of the cells, and they occupy defined positions within central and flanking columella cells. Over one-half of the nodal ER domains are located along the outer tangential walls of the flanking cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A cause an increase in size and a decrease in numbers of nodal ER domains. We postulate that the nodal ER membranes locally modulate the gravisensing signals produced by the sedimenting amyloplasts, and that the confinement of all ER membranes to the cell periphery serves to enhance the sedimentability of the amyloplasts in the central region of columella cells.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases.

  14. Association of active caspase 8 with the mitochondrial membrane during apoptosis: potential roles in cleaving BAP31 and caspase 3 and mediating mitochondrion-endoplasmic reticulum cross talk in etoposide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dhyan; Choy, Grace; Deng, Xiaodi; Bhatia, Bobby; Daniel, Peter; Tang, Dean G

    2004-08-01

    It was recently demonstrated that during apoptosis, active caspase 9 and caspase 3 rapidly accumulate in the mitochondrion-enriched membrane fraction (D. Chandra and D. G. Tang, J. Biol. Chem.278:17408-17420, 2003). We now show that active caspase 8 also becomes associated with the membranes in apoptosis caused by multiple stimuli. In MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells treated with etoposide (VP16), active caspase 8 is detected only in the membrane fraction, which contains both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as revealed by fractionation studies. Immunofluorescence microscopy, however, shows that procaspase 8 and active caspase 8 predominantly colocalize with the mitochondria. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that both procaspase 8 and active caspase 8 are localized mainly on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) as integral proteins. Functional analyses with dominant-negative mutants, small interfering RNAs, peptide inhibitors, and Fas-associated death domain (FADD)- and caspase 8-deficient Jurkat T cells establish that the mitochondrion-localized active caspase 8 results mainly from the FADD-dependent and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated death domain-dependent mechanisms and that caspase 8 activation plays a causal role in VP16-induced caspase 3 activation and cell death. Finally, we present evidence that the OMM-localized active caspase 8 can activate cytosolic caspase 3 and ER-localized BAP31. Cleavage of BAP31 leads to the generation of ER- localized, proapoptotic BAP20, which may mediate mitochondrion-ER cross talk through a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism.

  15. A subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum forms a cradle for autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Nishino, Mitsuko; Fujita, Naonobu; Noda, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yamamoto, Akitsugu

    2009-12-01

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation process in eukaryotic cells and has fundamental roles in cellular homeostasis.The origin and source of autophagosomal membranes are long-standing questions in the field. Using electron microscopy, we show that, in mammalian culture cells, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associates with early autophagic structures called isolation membranes (IMs). Overexpression of an Atg4B mutant, which causes defects in autophagosome formation, induces the accumulation of ER-IM complexes. Electron tomography revealed that the ER-IM complex appears as a subdomain of the ER that formed a cradle encircling the IM, and showed that both ER and isolation membranes are interconnected.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Groenendyk, Jody; Michalak, Marek

    2005-01-01

    The ER is one of the most important folding compartments within the cell, as well as an intracellular Ca(2+) storage organelle and it contains a number of Ca(2+) regulated molecular chaperones responsible for the proper folding of glycosylated as well as non-glycosylated proteins. The luminal environment of the ER contains Ca(2+) which is involved in regulating chaperones such as calnexin and calreticulin, as well as apoptotic proteins caspase-12 and Bap31, which may play an important role in determining cellular sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. The ER quality control system consists of several molecular chaperones, including calnexin, that assist in properly folding proteins and transporting them through the ER as well as sensing misfolded proteins, attempting to refold them and if this is not possible, targeting them for degradation. Accumulation of misfolded protein in the ER leads to activation of genes responsible for the expression of ER chaperones. The UPR mechanism involves transcriptional activation of chaperones by the membrane-localized transcription factor ATF6, in conjunction with the ER membrane kinase IRE1, as well as translational repression of protein synthesis by another ER membrane kinase PERK. When accumulation of misfolded protein becomes toxic, apoptosis is triggered, potentially with IRE1 involved in signaling via caspase-12. Both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways appear to culminate in the activation of caspases and this results in the recruitment of mitochondria in an essential amplifying manner. Bap31 may direct pro-apoptotic crosstalk between the ER and the mitochondria via Ca(2+) in conjunction with caspase-12 and calnexin. Accordingly, ER stress and the resultant Ca(2+) release must be very carefully regulated because of their effects in virtually all areas of cell function.

  17. Mitofusin 2 ablation increases endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Filadi, Riccardo; Greotti, Elisa; Turacchio, Gabriele; Luini, Alberto; Pozzan, Tullio; Pizzo, Paola

    2015-04-28

    The organization and mutual interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria modulate key aspects of cell pathophysiology. Several proteins have been suggested to be involved in keeping ER and mitochondria at a correct distance. Among them, in mammalian cells, mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), located on both the outer mitochondrial membrane and the ER surface, has been proposed to be a physical tether between the two organelles, forming homotypic interactions and heterocomplexes with its homolog Mfn1. Recently, this widely accepted model has been challenged using quantitative EM analysis. Using a multiplicity of morphological, biochemical, functional, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that Mfn2 ablation increases the structural and functional ER-mitochondria coupling. In particular, we show that in different cell types Mfn2 ablation or silencing increases the close contacts between the two organelles and strengthens the efficacy of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to mitochondria, sensitizing cells to a mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload-dependent death. We also show that the previously reported discrepancy between electron and fluorescence microscopy data on ER-mitochondria proximity in Mfn2-ablated cells is only apparent. By using a different type of morphological analysis of fluorescent images that takes into account (and corrects for) the gross modifications in mitochondrial shape resulting from Mfn2 ablation, we demonstrate that an increased proximity between the organelles is also observed by confocal microscopy when Mfn2 levels are reduced. Based on these results, we propose a new model for ER-mitochondria juxtaposition in which Mfn2 works as a tethering antagonist preventing an excessive, potentially toxic, proximity between the two organelles.

  18. Cell Cycle-dependent Changes in Localization and Phosphorylation of the Plasma Membrane Kv2.1 K+ Channel Impact Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Contact Sites in COS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Melanie M; Austin, Daniel C; Sack, Jon T; Trimmer, James S

    2015-12-04

    The plasma membrane (PM) comprises distinct subcellular domains with diverse functions that need to be dynamically coordinated with intracellular events, one of the most impactful being mitosis. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is conditionally localized to large PM clusters that represent specialized PM:endoplasmic reticulum membrane contact sites (PM:ER MCS), and overexpression of Kv2.1 induces more exuberant PM:ER MCS in neurons and in certain heterologous cell types. Localization of Kv2.1 at these contact sites is dynamically regulated by changes in phosphorylation at one or more sites located on its large cytoplasmic C terminus. Here, we show that Kv2.1 expressed in COS-1 cells undergoes dramatic cell cycle-dependent changes in its PM localization, having diffuse localization in interphase cells, and robust clustering during M phase. The mitosis-specific clusters of Kv2.1 are localized to PM:ER MCS, and M phase clustering of Kv2.1 induces more extensive PM:ER MCS. These cell cycle-dependent changes in Kv2.1 localization and the induction of PM:ER MCS are accompanied by increased mitotic Kv2.1 phosphorylation at several C-terminal phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv2.1 is significantly increased upon metaphase arrest in COS-1 and CHO cells, and in a pancreatic β cell line that express endogenous Kv2.1. The M phase clustering of Kv2.1 at PM:ER MCS in COS-1 cells requires the same C-terminal targeting motif needed for conditional Kv2.1 clustering in neurons. The cell cycle-dependent changes in localization and phosphorylation of Kv2.1 were not accompanied by changes in the electrophysiological properties of Kv2.1 expressed in CHO cells. Together, these results provide novel insights into the cell cycle-dependent changes in PM protein localization and phosphorylation.

  19. Mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum choreography: structure and signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2007-10-01

    Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have different roles in living cells but they interact both physically and functionally. A key aspect of the mitochondria-ER relationship is the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling during cell activation, which thus affects a variety of physiological processes. We focus here on the molecular aspects that control the dynamics of the organelle-organelle interaction and their relationship with Ca(2+) signals, also discussing the consequences that these phenomena have, not only for cell physiology but also in the control of cell death.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in the penumbra aggravates secondary damage in rats with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guo-zhu; Gao, Fen-fei; Zhao, Zong-mao; Sun, Hai; Xu, Wei; Wu, Li-wei; He, Yong-chang

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is mediated by intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways such as the membrane-mediated, mitochondrial, and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. Few studies have examined the endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis pathway in the penumbra after traumatic brain injury, and it remains unclear whether endoplasmic reticulum stress can activate the caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway in the traumatic penumbra. Here, we established rat models of fluid percussion-induced traumatic brain injury and found that protein expression of caspase-12, caspase-3 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein increased in the traumatic penumbra 6 hours after injury and peaked at 24 hours. Furthermore, numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the traumatic penumbra also reached peak levels 24 hours after injury. These findings suggest that caspase-12-mediated endoplasmic reticulum-related apoptosis is activated in the traumatic penumbra, and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury. PMID:27651773

  1. ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum IFN stimulator, activates innate immune signaling through dimerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenxiang; Li, Yang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Huihui; You, Fuping; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yi; Zhai, Zhonghe; Chen, Danying; Jiang, Zhengfan

    2009-05-26

    We report here the identification and characterization of a protein, ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) IFN stimulator, which is a strong type I IFN stimulator and plays a pivotal role in response to both non-self-cytosolic RNA and dsDNA. ERIS (also known as STING or MITA) resided exclusively on ER membrane. The ER retention/retrieval sequence RIR was found to be critical to retain the protein on ER membrane and to maintain its integrity. ERIS was dimerized on innate immune challenges. Coumermycin-induced ERIS dimerization led to strong and fast IFN induction, suggesting that dimerization of ERIS was critical for self-activation and subsequent downstream signaling.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-qing; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Lin-xi

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is a principal organelle responsible for folding, post-translational modifications and transport of secretory, luminal and membrane proteins, thus palys an important rale in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is a condition that is accelerated by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins after endoplasmic reticulum environment disturbance, triggered by a variety of physiological and pathological factors, such as nutrient deprivation, altered glycosylation, calcium depletion, oxidative stress, DNA damage and energy disturbance, etc. ERS may initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis or lead to apoptosis. Numerous studies have clarified the link between ERS and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on ERS-associated molecular mechanisms that participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes of heart and blood vessels. In addition, a number of drugs that regulate ERS was introduced, which may be used to treat cardiovascular diseases. This review may open new avenues for studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and discovering novel drugs targeting ERS. PMID:26838072

  3. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minchul; Ryou, Hee-Joo; Yun, Eun-Young; Goo, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)) from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF) of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26556347

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Quality Control Failure in Myelin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Vera G.; Touvier, Thierry; D'Antonio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Reaching the correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the proper function of a protein. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secreted and transmembrane proteins are synthesized and folded. To guarantee high fidelity of protein synthesis and maturation in the ER, cells have evolved ER-protein quality control (ERQC) systems, which assist protein folding and promptly degrade aberrant gene products. Only correctly folded proteins that pass ERQC checkpoints are allowed to exit the ER and reach their final destination. Misfolded glycoproteins are detected and targeted for degradation by the proteasome in a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The excess of unstructured proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive signal transduction pathway, called unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn potentiates ERQC activities in order to reduce the levels of aberrant molecules. When the situation cannot be restored, the UPR drives cells to apoptosis. Myelin-forming cells of the central and peripheral nervous system (oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells) synthesize a large amount of myelin proteins and lipids and therefore are particularly susceptible to ERQC failure. Indeed, deficits in ERQC and activation of ER stress/UPR have been implicated in several myelin disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher and Krabbe leucodystrophies, vanishing white matter disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. Here we discuss recent evidence underlying the importance of proper ERQC functions in genetic disorders of myelinating glia. PMID:28101003

  5. Resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in permeabilized neutrophils following phospholipase Cbeta activation: transport of the intermediate, phosphatidic acid, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum for phosphatidylinositol resynthesis is not dependent on soluble lipid carriers or vesicular transport.

    PubMed Central

    Whatmore, J; Wiedemann, C; Somerharju, P; Swigart, P; Cockcroft, S

    1999-01-01

    Receptor-mediated phospholipase C (PLC) hydrolysis of phosphoinositides is accompanied by the resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides occurs at the plasma membrane, and the resulting diacylglycerol (DG) is converted into phosphatidate (PA). Two enzymes located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function sequentially to convert PA back into PI. We have established an assay whereby the resynthesis of PI could be followed in permeabilized cells. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, DG generated by PLC activation accumulates label when converted into PA. The 32P-labelled PA is subsequently converted into labelled PI. The formation of labelled PI reports the arrival of labelled PA from the plasma membrane to the ER. Cytosol-depleted, permeabilized human neutrophils are capable of PI resynthesis following stimulation of PLCbeta (in the presence of phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein), provided that CTP and inositol are also present. We also found that wortmannin, an inhibitor of endocytosis, or cooling the cells to 15 degrees C did not stop PI resynthesis. We conclude that PI resynthesis is dependent neither on vesicular transport mechanisms nor on freely diffusible, soluble transport proteins. Phosphatidylcholine-derived PA generated by the ADP-ribosylation-factor-stimulated phospholipase D pathway was found to accumulate label, reflecting the rapid cycling of PA to DG, and back. This labelled PA was not converted into PI. We conclude that PA derived from the PLC pathway is selected for PI resynthesis, and its transfer to the ER could be membrane-protein-mediated at sites of close membrane contact. PMID:10393103

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Elif; Arlier, Sefa; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ekiz, Tugba; Semerci, Nihan; Larsen, Kellie; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles Joseph; Kayisli, Umit Ali

    2017-04-08

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprises 60% of the total cell membrane and interacts directly or indirectly with several cell organelles i.e., Golgi bodies, mitochondria and proteasomes. The ER is usually associated with large numbers of attached ribosomes. During evolution, ER developed as the specific cellular site of synthesis, folding, modification and trafficking of secretory and cell-surface proteins. The ER is also the major intracellular calcium storage compartment that maintains cellular calcium homeostasis. During the production of functionally effective proteins, several ER-specific molecular steps sense quantity and quality of synthesized proteins as well as proper folding into their native structures. During this process, excess accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER lumen results in ER stress, the homeostatic coping mechanism that activates an ER-specific adaptation program, (the unfolded protein response; UPR) to increase ER-associated degradation of structurally and/or functionally defective proteins, thus sustaining ER homeostasis. Impaired ER homeostasis results in aberrant cellular responses, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Both female and male reproductive tissues undergo highly dynamic cellular, molecular and genetic changes such as oogenesis and spermatogenesis starting in prenatal life, mainly controlled by sex-steroids but also cytokines and growth factors throughout reproductive life. These reproductive changes require ER to provide extensive protein synthesis, folding, maturation and then their trafficking to appropriate cellular location as well as destroying unfolded/misfolded proteins via activating ER-associated degradation mediated proteasomes. Many studies have now shown roles for ER stress/UPR signaling cascades in the endometrial menstrual cycle, ovarian folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis, fertilization, pre-implantation embryo development and pregnancy and parturition

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YFR041C/ERJ5 gene encoding a type I membrane protein with a J domain is required to preserve the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Famá, M. Carla; Raden, David; Zacchi, Nicolás; Lemos, Darío R.; Robinson, Anne S.; Silberstein, Susana

    2007-01-01

    YFR041C/ERJ5 was identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a gene regulated by the unfolded protein response pathway (UPR). The open reading frame of the gene has a J domain characteristic of the DnaJ chaperone family of proteins that regulate the activity of Hsp70 chaperones. We determined the expression and topology of Erj5p, a type I membrane protein with a J domain in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that colocalizes with Kar2p, the major Hsp70 in the yeast ER. We identified synthetic interactions of Δerj5 with mutations in genes involved in protein folding in the ER (kar2-159, Δscj1Δjem1) and in the induction of the unfolded protein response (Δire1). Loss of Erj5p in yeast cells with impaired ER protein folding capacity increased sensitivity to agents that cause ER stress. We identified the ERJ5 mRNA and confirmed that agents that promote accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER regulate its abundance. We found that loss of the non-essential ERJ5 gene leads to a constitutively induced UPR, indicating that ERJ5 is required for maintenance of an optimal folding environment in the yeast ER. PMID:17157937

  8. The (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-stimulated ATPase of the rat parotid endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajah, P; Lim, S C

    1986-01-01

    A membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum was prepared from rat parotid glands by using sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The fraction showed a 10-fold increase in specific activity of NADPH: cytochrome c reductase activity over that of tissue homogenates and minimal contamination with plasma membranes or mitochondria. The endoplasmic reticulum fraction possessed both Mg2+ -stimulated ATPase as well as Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase [( Ca2+ + Mg2+)-stimulated ATPase]activity. The Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase required 2-5 mM-Mg2+ for optimal activity and was stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of free Ca2+. The Km for free Ca2+ was 0.55 microM and the average Vmax. was 60 nmol/min per mg of protein. The Km for ATP was 0.11 mM. Other nucleotides, such as GTP, CTP or ADP, could not substitute for ATP in supporting the Ca2+-activated nucleotidase activity. Increasing the K+ concentration from 0 to 100 mM caused a 2-fold activation of the Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase. Trifluoperazine, W7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide] and vanadate inhibited the enzyme. The concentration of trifluoperazine and vanadate required for 50% inhibition of the ATPase were 52 microM and 28 microM respectively. Calmodulin, cyclic AMP, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate had no effect on the ATPase. The properties of the Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase were distinct from those of the Mg2+-ATPase, but comparable with those reported for the parotid endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-transport system [Kanagasuntheram & Teo (1982) Biochem. J. 208, 789-794]. The results suggest that the Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase is responsible for driving the ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation by this membrane. PMID:2943271

  9. Human homologs of the putative G protein-coupled membrane progestin receptors (mPRalpha, beta, and gamma) localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and are not activated by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Tom; Fernandes, Maria Sofia; Kero, Jukka; Lösel, Ralf; Heyens, Maria; Lam, Eric W-F; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Brosens, Jan J; Gellersen, Birgit

    2006-12-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone exerts pleiotrophic functions in many cell types. Although progesterone controls transcriptional activation through binding to its nuclear receptors, it also initiates rapid nongenomic signaling events. Recently, three putative membrane progestin receptors (mPRalpha, beta, and gamma) with structural similarity to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified. These mPR isoforms are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and belong to the larger, highly conserved family of progestin and adiponectin receptors found in plants, eubacteria, and eukaryotes. The fish mPRalpha has been reported to mediate progesterone-dependent MAPK activation and inhibition of cAMP production through coupling to an inhibitory G protein. To functionally characterize the human homologs, we established human embryonic kidney 293 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines that stably express human mPRalpha, beta, or gamma. For comparison, we also established cell lines expressing the mPRalpha cloned from the spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) and Japanese pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes). Surprisingly, we found no evidence that human or fish mPRs regulate cAMP production or MAPK (ERK1/2 or p38) activation upon progesterone stimulation. Furthermore, the mPRs did not couple to a highly promiscuous G protein subunit, Galpha(q5i), in transfection studies or provoke Ca(2+) mobilization in response to progesterone. Finally, we demonstrate that transfected mPRs, as well as endogenous human mPRalpha, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum, and that their expression does not lead to increased progestin binding either in membrane preparations or in intact cells. Our results therefore do not support the concept that mPRs are plasma membrane receptors involved in transducing nongenomic progesterone actions.

  10. Dense-cored vesicles, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria are closely associated with non-specialized parts of plasma membrane of nerve terminals: implications for exocytosis and calcium buffering by intraterminal organelles.

    PubMed

    Lysakowski, A; Figueras, H; Price, S D; Peng, Y Y

    1999-01-18

    To determine whether there are anatomical correlates for intraterminal Ca2+ stores to regulate exocytosis of dense-cored vesicles (DCVs) and whether these stores can modulate exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, we studied the spatial distributions of DCVs, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), and mitochondria in 19 serially reconstructed nerve terminals in bullfrog sympathetic ganglia. On average, each bouton had three active zones, 214 DCVs, 26 SER fragments (SERFs), and eight mitochondria. DCVs, SERFs and mitochondria were located, on average, 690, 624, and 526 nm, respectively, away from active zones. Virtually no DCVs were within "docking" (i.e., < or = 50 nm) distances of the active zones. Thus, it is unlikely that DCV exocytosis occurs at active zones via mechanisms similar to those for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because there were virtually no SERFs or mitochondria within 50 nm of any active zone, Ca2+ modulation by these organelles is unlikely to affect ACh release evoked by a single action potential. In contrast, 30% of DCVs and 40% of SERFs were located within 50 nm of the nonspecialized regions of the plasma membrane. Because each bouton had at least one SERF within 50 nm of the plasma membrane and most of these SERFs had DCVs, but not mitochondria, near them, it is possible for Ca2+ release from the SER to provide the Ca2+ necessary for DCV exocytosis. The fact that 60% of the mitochondria had some part within 50 nm of the plasma membrane means that it is possible for mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering to affect DCV exocytosis.

  11. [From endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus: a secretory pathway controlled by signal molecules].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus has long been known to be a central process for protein quality control and sorting. Recent studies have revealed that a large number of signal molecules are involved in regulation of membrane trafficking through ER, ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and Golgi apparatus. These molecules can significantly change the transport rate of proteins by regulating vesicle budding and fusion. Protein transport from ER to Golgi apparatus is not only controlled by signal pathways triggered from outside the cell, it is also regulated by feedback signals from the transport pathway.

  12. Interplay of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu; Arikkath, Jyothi; Yang, Lu; Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    The common underlying feature of most neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), prion diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) involves accumulation of misfolded proteins leading to initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and stimulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Additionally, ER stress more recently has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Autophagy plays an essential role in the clearance of aggregated toxic proteins and degradation of the damaged organelles. There is evidence that autophagy ameliorates ER stress by eliminating accumulated misfolded proteins. Both abnormal UPR and impaired autophagy have been implicated as a causative mechanism in the development of various neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights recent advances in the field on the role of ER stress and autophagy in AD, prion diseases, PD, ALS and HAND with the involvement of key signaling pathways in these processes and implications for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: The cause and solution to Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuwei; Chadwick, Sarah R; Lajoie, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of many human diseases, including several incurable neurological disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD). In HD, expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Htt) leads to Htt misfolding, aberrant protein aggregation, and progressive appearance of disease symptoms. Several studies in various organisms (from yeast to humans) have identified the accumulation of misfolded secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) as a crucial determinant of cellular toxicity in HD. In this review, we highlight the recent research linking HD to ER stress. We also discuss how the modulation of signaling pathways responsible for coping with misfolded protein accumulation in the ER may constitute attractive methods to reduce toxicity and identify new therapeutic targets for treatment of HD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  14. Trichoplein/mitostatin regulates endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria juxtaposition.

    PubMed

    Cerqua, Cristina; Anesti, Vassiliki; Pyakurel, Aswin; Liu, Dan; Naon, Deborah; Wiche, Gerhard; Baffa, Raffaele; Dimmer, Kai S; Scorrano, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Trichoplein/mitostatin (TpMs) is a keratin-binding protein that partly colocalizes with mitochondria and is often downregulated in epithelial cancers, but its function remains unclear. In this study, we report that TpMs regulates the tethering between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2)-dependent manner. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that TpMs is present at the interface between mitochondria and ER. The expression of TpMs leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and loosens tethering with ER, whereas its silencing has opposite effects. Functionally, the reduced tethering by TpMs inhibits apoptosis by Ca(2+)-dependent stimuli that require ER-mitochondria juxtaposition. Biochemical and genetic evidence support a model in which TpMs requires Mfn2 to modulate mitochondrial shape and tethering. Thus, TpMs is a new regulator of mitochondria-ER juxtaposition.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes: New insights of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Lenin, Raji; Monickaraj, Finny

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. Accumulating evidence suggests that ER stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, contributing to pancreatic β-cell loss and insulin resistance. ER stress may also link obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address the transition from physiology to pathology, namely how and why the physiological UPR evolves to a proapoptotic ER stress response in diabetes and its complications. Special attention was given to elucidate how ER stress could explain some of the 'clinical paradoxes' such as secondary sulfonylurea failure, initial worsening of retinopathy during tight glycemic control, insulin resistance induced by protease inhibitors and other clinically relevant observations.

  16. Assembly of MHC class I molecules within the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinan; Williams, David B

    2006-01-01

    MHC class I molecules bind cytosolically derived peptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. A major focus of our laboratory has been to understand the functions of the diverse proteins involved in the intracellular assembly of MHC class I molecules. These include the molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin, which enhance the proper folding and subunit assembly of class I molecules and also retain assembly intermediates within the ER; ERp57, a thiol oxidoreductase that promotes heavy chain disulfide formation and proper assembly of the peptide loading complex; tapasin, which recruits class I molecules to the TAP peptide transporter and enhances the loading of high affinity peptide ligands; and Bap31, which is involved in clustering assembled class I molecules at ER exit sites for export along the secretory pathway. This review describes our contributions to elucidating the functions of these proteins; the combined effort of many dedicated students and postdoctoral fellows.

  17. Pharmacological Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for correct protein folding, a step in protein synthesis that is critical for the functional conformation of proteins. ER stress is a primary feature of secretory cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, such as certain neurodegenerative and cardiometabolic disorders. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a defense mechanism to attenuate ER stress and maintain the homeostasis of the organism. Two major degradation systems, including the proteasome and autophagy, are involved in this defense system. If ER stress overwhelms the capacity of the cell’s defense mechanisms, apoptotic death may result. This review is focused on the various pharmacological modulators that can protect cells from damage induced by ER stress. The possible mechanisms for cytoprotection are also discussed. PMID:26840310

  18. Maternal obesity alters endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in offspring pancreas.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Jumpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Carter, Rebeca; Kapur, Sabrina R; Pombo, Joaquim; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) is increasing in parallel with obesity rates. Stress-related alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), are associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate ER imbalance in the pancreas of a mice model of adult and perinatal diet-induced obesity. Twenty female C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control (Con) or obesogenic (Ob) diets prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. Their offspring were weaned onto Con or Ob diets up to 6 months post-partum. Then, after sacrifice, plasma biochemical analyses, gene expression, and protein concentrations were measured in pancreata. Offspring of Ob-fed mice had significantly increased body weight (p < 0.001) and plasma leptin (p < 0.001) and decreased insulin (p < 0.01) levels. Maternal obesogenic diet decreased the total and phosphorylated Eif2α and increased spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Pancreatic gene expression of downstream regulators of UPR (EDEM, homocysteine-responsive endoplasmic reticulum-resident (HERP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy-related proteins (LC3BI/LC3BII) were differently disrupted by obesogenic feeding in both mothers and offspring (from p < 0.1 to p < 0.001). Maternal obesity and Ob feeding in their offspring alter UPR in NAFPD, with involvement of proapoptotic and autophagy-related markers. Upstream and downstream regulators of PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6 pathways were affected differently following the obesogenic insults.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum: The Favorite Intracellular Niche for Viral Replication and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular organelle. It forms a complex network of continuous sheets and tubules, extending from the nuclear envelope (NE) to the plasma membrane. This network is frequently perturbed by positive-strand RNA viruses utilizing the ER to create membranous replication factories (RFs), where amplification of their genomes occurs. In addition, many enveloped viruses assemble progeny virions in association with ER membranes, and viruses replicating in the nucleus need to overcome the NE barrier, requiring transient changes of the NE morphology. This review first summarizes some key aspects of ER morphology and then focuses on the exploitation of the ER by viruses for the sake of promoting the different steps of their replication cycles. PMID:27338443

  20. Compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum in the early C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Zuo Yen; Prouteau, Manoël

    2016-01-01

    The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is polarized to partition fate determinants between the cell lineages generated during its first division. Using fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we find that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the C. elegans embryo is physically continuous throughout the cell, but its membrane is compartmentalized shortly before nuclear envelope breakdown into an anterior and a posterior domain, indicating that a diffusion barrier forms in the ER membrane between these two domains. Using mutants with disorganized ER, we show that ER compartmentalization is independent of the morphological transition that the ER undergoes in mitosis. In contrast, compartmentalization takes place at the position of the future cleavage plane in a par-3–dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that the ER membrane is compartmentalized in cells as diverse as budding yeast, mouse neural stem cells, and the early C. elegans embryo. PMID:27597753

  1. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  2. A conserved region in the Closterovirus 1a polyprotein drives extensive remodeling of endoplasmic reticulum membranes and induces motile globules in Nicotiana benthamiana cells.

    PubMed

    Gushchin, V A; Karlin, D G; Makhotenko, A V; Khromov, A V; Erokhina, T N; Solovyev, A G; Morozov, S Yu; Agranovsky, A A

    2017-02-01

    In infected plant cells, closterovirus replicative polyproteins 1a and 1ab drive membrane remodeling and formation of multivesicular replication platforms. Polyprotein 1a contains a variable Central Region (CR) between the methyltransferase and helicase domains. In a previous study, we have found that transient expression of the Beet yellows virus CR-2 segment (aa 1305-1494) in Nicotiana benthamiana induces the formation of ~1µm mobile globules originating from the ER membranes. In the present study, sequence analysis has shown that a part of the CR named the "Zemlya region" (overlapping the CR-2), is conserved in all members of the Closterovirus genus and contains a predicted amphipathic helix (aa 1368-1385). By deletion analysis, the CR-2 region responsible for the induction of 1-μm globules has been mapped to aa 1368-1432. We suggest that the conserved membrane-modifying region of the BYV 1a may be involved in the biogenesis of closterovirus replication platforms.

  3. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...1 July 2015- 30 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation of TGF-beta-dependent calcium/NFAT

  4. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...COVERED 07/01/2014-06/30/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...NUMBER(S) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation

  5. Temperature-sensitive, Post-translational Regulation of Plant Omega-3 Fatty-acid Desaturases is Mediated by the Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation Pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in ambient temperature represent a major physiological challenge to poikilothermic organisms that requires rapid adjustments in the composition of cellular membranes in order to preserve overall membrane dynamics and integrity. In plants, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized omega-3 fatty ac...

  6. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM. PMID:28256459

  7. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Interacts With Inflammation in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Stewart Siyan; Luo, Katherine L; Shi, Lynn

    2016-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a critical organelle for normal cell function and homeostasis. Disturbance in the protein folding process in the ER, termed ER stress, leads to the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) that encompasses a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. The UPR can either restore ER homeostasis or activate pro-apoptotic pathways depending on the type of insults, intensity and duration of the stress, and cell types. ER stress and the UPR have recently been linked to inflammation in a variety of human pathologies including autoimmune, infectious, neurodegenerative, and metabolic disorders. In the cell, ER stress and inflammatory signaling share extensive regulators and effectors in a broad spectrum of biological processes. In spite of different etiologies, the two signaling pathways have been shown to form a vicious cycle in exacerbating cellular dysfunction and causing apoptosis in many cells and tissues. However, the interaction between ER stress and inflammation in many of these diseases remains poorly understood. Further understanding of the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology may enable the development of novel therapies that spontaneously target these pathogenic pathways.

  9. Protein quality control, retention, and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Benyair, Ron; Ron, Efrat; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2011-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular functions, all living cells, from bacteria to mammalian cells, must carry out a rigorous quality control process in which nascent and newly synthesized proteins are examined. An important role of this process is to protect cells against pathological accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has evolved as a staging ground for secretory protein synthesis with distinct sites for entry, quality control, and exit. In the ER, most proteins are N-glycosylated, a posttranslational modification that defines the quality control pathway that the protein will undergo. The folding state of glycoproteins is revealed by specific modifications of their N-glycans. Regardless of size and posttranslational modifications, the folding states of all proteins must be identified as unfolded, properly folded, or terminally misfolded and accordingly subjected to ER retention and continued folding attempts, export and maturation, or retrotranslocation to the cytosol for degradation. These processes involve specialized machineries that utilize molecular chaperones, protein- and N-glycan-modifying enzymes, and lectins for protein folding and quality control and ubiquitination and degradation machineries for disposal. All these machineries are regulated by a signaling pathway, the unfolded protein response, which upregulates ER functions when under the stress of high protein load. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms that are implicated and discuss recent data that underline the importance of compartmentalization in the segregation of the various functions of the ER for their correct function.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoxi; Ng, Benjamin S. H.; Thibault, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Stress pathways monitor intracellular systems and deploy a range of regulatory mechanisms in response to stress. One of the best-characterized pathways, the UPR (unfolded protein response), is an intracellular signal transduction pathway that monitors ER (endoplasmic reticulum) homoeostasis. Its activation is required to alleviate the effects of ER stress and is highly conserved from yeast to human. Although metazoans have three UPR outputs, yeast cells rely exclusively on the Ire1 (inositol-requiring enzyme-1) pathway, which is conserved in all Eukaryotes. In general, the UPR program activates hundreds of genes to alleviate ER stress but it can lead to apoptosis if the system fails to restore homoeostasis. In this review, we summarize the major advances in understanding the response to ER stress in Sc (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Sp (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and humans. The contribution of solved protein structures to a better understanding of the UPR pathway is discussed. Finally, we cover the interplay of ER stress in the development of diseases. PMID:24909749

  11. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  12. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  13. Microtubules and the endoplasmic reticulum are highly interdependent structures

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The interrelationships of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and intermediate filaments were studied in the peripheral regions of thin, spread fibroblasts, epithelial, and vascular endothelial cells in culture. We combined a fluorescent dye staining technique to localize the ER with immunofluorescence to localize microtubules or intermediate filaments in the same cell. Microtubules and the ER are sparse in the lamellipodia, but intermediate filaments are usually completely absent. These relationships indicate that microtubules and the ER advance into the lamellipodia before intermediate filaments. We observed that microtubules and tubules of the ER have nearly identical distributions in lamellipodia, where new extensions of both are taking place. We perturbed microtubules by nocodazole, cold temperature, or hypotonic shock, and observed the effects on the ER distribution. On the basis of our observations in untreated cells and our experiments with microtubule perturbation, we conclude that microtubules and the ER are highly interdependent in two ways: (a) polymerization of individual microtubules and extension of individual ER tubules occur together at the level of resolution of the fluorescence microscope, and (b) depolymerization of microtubules does not disrupt the ER network in the short term (15 min), but prolonged absence of microtubules (2 h) leads to a slow retraction of the ER network towards the cell center, indicating that over longer periods of time, the extended state of the entire ER network requires the microtubule system. PMID:3533956

  14. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM.

  15. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  16. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alcohol mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    George, Akash K; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Kelly, Kimberly E; Zhai, Yuankun; Tyagi, Neetu

    2017-02-14

    Alcohol is one of the most socially accepted addictive drugs in modern society. Its abuse affects virtually all organ systems with the central nervous system (CNS) being particularly vulnerable to excessive alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure also causes profound damage to both the adult and developing brain. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathophysiological stress responses, one of which is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcohol induced ER stress response are either directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which include toxic levels of acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Growing evidence suggests that H2S is the most recently recognized gasotransmitter with tremendous physiological protective functions against oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. In this review we address the alcohol induced oxidative stress mediated ER stress and the role of H2S in its mitigation in the context of alcohol neurotoxicity. Interruption of ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcohol mediated diseases and disorders.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  20. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Skallos, Patracia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M.; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by one dimensional SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. Gene ontology analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. PMID:25546123

  1. PERK-opathies: An Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mechanism Underlying Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michelle C; Meier, Shelby E; Ingram, Alexandria L; Abisambra, Jose F

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a vital role in maintaining cell homeostasis as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, prolonged UPR activity leads to cell death. This time-dependent dual functionality of the UPR represents the adaptive and cytotoxic pathways that result from ER stress. Chronic UPR activation in systemic and neurodegenerative diseases has been identified as an early sign of cellular dyshomeostasis. The Protein Kinase R-like ER Kinase (PERK) pathway is one of three major branches in the UPR, and it is the only one to modulate protein synthesis as an adaptive response. The specific identification of prolonged PERK activity has been correlated with the progression of disorders such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer, suggesting that PERK plays a role in the pathology of these disorders. For the first time, the term "PERK-opathies" is used to group these diseases in which PERK mediates detriment to the cell culminating in chronic disorders. This article reviews the literature documenting links between systemic disorders with the UPR, but with a specific emphasis on the PERK pathway. Then, articles reporting links between the UPR, and more specifically PERK, and neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Finally, a therapeutic perspective is discussed, where PERK interventions could be potential remedies for cellular dysfunction in chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from abnormal folding of newly synthesized proteins impairs metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and gene expression, and it is a key mechanism of cell injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. We evaluated the role for this phenomenon in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Endoplasmic reticulum stress manifest in upregulation of multiple components of unfolded protein response was identified in neural tissues (sciatic nerve, spinal cord) of streptozotocin diabetic rats and mice. A chemical chaperone, trimethylamine oxide, administered for 12 weeks after induction of diabetes (110 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, a prevention paradigm) attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, peripheral nerve dysfunction, intraepidermal nerve fiber loss, and sciatic nerve and spinal cord oxidative-nitrative stress in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Similar effects on diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and peripheral nerve dysfunction were observed with a structurally unrelated chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid (100 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, intraperitoneal). CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)−/− mice made diabetic with streptozotocin displayed less severe sciatic nerve oxidative-nitrative stress and peripheral neuropathy than the wild-type (C57Bl6/J) mice. Neither chemical chaperones nor CHOP gene deficiency reduced diabetic hyperglycemia. Our findings reveal an important role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and identify a potential new therapeutic target. PMID:23364451

  3. Separating mitochondrial protein assembly and endoplasmic reticulum tethering by selective coupling of Mdm10.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Lars; Opaliński, Łukasz; Becker, Lars; Krüger, Vivien; Mirus, Oliver; Straub, Sebastian P; Ebell, Katharina; Flinner, Nadine; Stiller, Sebastian B; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils; Schleiff, Enrico; Wagner, Richard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2016-10-10

    The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) connects the mitochondrial outer membrane with the ER. Multiple functions have been linked to ERMES, including maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, protein assembly and phospholipid homeostasis. Since the mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein Mdm10 is present in both ERMES and the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM), it is unknown how the ERMES functions are connected on a molecular level. Here we report that conserved surface areas on opposite sides of the Mdm10 β-barrel interact with SAM and ERMES, respectively. We generated point mutants to separate protein assembly (SAM) from morphology and phospholipid homeostasis (ERMES). Our study reveals that the β-barrel channel of Mdm10 serves different functions. Mdm10 promotes the biogenesis of α-helical and β-barrel proteins at SAM and functions as integral membrane anchor of ERMES, demonstrating that SAM-mediated protein assembly is distinct from ER-mitochondria contact sites.

  4. ATP-Dependent Formation of Phosphatidylserine-Rich Vesicles from the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Leek Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sturbois-Balcerzak, Bénédicte; Vincent, Patrick; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Duvert, Michel; Satiat-Jeunemaitre, Béatrice; Cassagne, Claude; Moreau, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Leek (Allium porrum) plasma membrane is enriched in phosphatidylserine (PS) by the vesicular pathway, in a way similar to that already observed in animal cells (B. Sturbois-Balcerzak, D.J. Morré, O. Loreau, J.P. Noel, P. Moreau, C. Cassagne [1995] Plant Physiol Biochem 33: 625–637). In this paper we document the formation of PS-rich small vesicles from leek endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes upon addition of ATP and other factors. The omission of ATP or its replacement by ATPγ-S prevents vesicle formation. These vesicles correspond to small structures (70–80 nm) and their phospholipid composition, characterized by a PS enrichment, is compatible with a role in PS transport. Moreover, the PS enrichment over phosphatidylinositol in the ER-derived vesicles is the first example, to our knowledge, of phospholipid sorting from the ER to ER-derived vesicles in plant cells. PMID:10318702

  5. Photodynamic action of porphyrin on Ca2+ influx in endoplasmic reticulum: a comparison with mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Ricchelli, F; Barbato, P; Milani, M; Gobbo, S; Salet, C; Moreno, G

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the distribution properties of haematoporphyrin (HP) and protoporphyrin (PP) in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum after isolation from rat liver. The photosensitizing efficiency of porphyrin on the Ca2+ influx function of microsomes has been compared with that obtained on Ca2+ uptake in mitochondria. HP and PP are accumulated in microsomes to a greater extent than in mitochondria, both porphyrins binding to membrane protein sites. The Ca2+ influx functions of mitochondria and microsomes, before and after irradiation in the presence of HP or PP, were studied by following the changes in the free Ca2+ concentration in the medium as revealed by the variations in fluorescence intensity of the Ca2+ indicator Calcium Green-1. For the same amount of incorporated porphyrin, the Ca2+ influx function of microsomes is degraded by irradiation more rapidly than that of mitochondria. The protective effect of dithiothreitol suggests that thiol groups in the Ca2+-transporting enzyme are the preferential targets of the photodynamic effect. These results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ movements are altered primarily by the endoplasmic reticulum rather than by mitochondrial damage, in good agreement with other observations made in porphyrin-loaded irradiated cells. PMID:9931319

  6. EpCAM associates with endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Salah-Eldin; Öjemalm, Karin; Vasquez, Patricia Lara; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Ericsson, Christer; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-09-20

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is an epithelial and cancer cell "marker" and there is a cumulative and growing evidence of its signaling role. Its importance has been recognized as part of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype, the tumorigenic breast cancer stem cell is EpCAM(+). In spite of its complex functions in normal cell development and cancer, relatively little is known about EpCAM-interacting proteins. We used breast cancer cell lines and performed EpCAM co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry in search for novel potentially interacting proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) was found to co-precipitate with EpCAM and to co-localize in the cytoplasm/ER and the plasma membrane. ERAP2 is a proteolytic enzyme set in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it plays a central role in the trimming of peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Expression of EpCAM and ERAP2 in vitro in the presence of dog pancreas rough microsomes (ER vesicles) confirmed N-linked glycosylation, processing in ER and the size of EpCAM. The association between ERAP2 and EpCAM is a unique and novel finding that provides new ideas on EpCAM processing and on how antigen presentation may be regulated in cancer.

  7. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase. PMID:25954808

  8. Alteration of ceramide synthase 6/C16-ceramide induces activating transcription factor 6-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis via perturbation of cellular Ca2+ and ER/Golgi membrane network.

    PubMed

    Senkal, Can E; Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Manevich, Yefim; Meyers-Needham, Marisa; Saddoughi, Sahar A; Mukhopadyay, Archana; Dent, Paul; Bielawski, Jacek; Ogretmen, Besim

    2011-12-09

    Mechanisms that regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells remain enigmatic. Recent data suggest that ceramide synthase1-6 (CerS1-6)-generated ceramides, containing different fatty acid chain lengths, might exhibit distinct and opposing functions, such as apoptosis versus survival in a context-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the activation of one of the major ER stress response proteins, ATF-6, and subsequent apoptosis by alterations of CerS6/C(16)-ceramide. Induction of wild type (WT), but not the catalytically inactive mutant CerS6, increased tumor growth in SCID mice, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of CerS6 induced ATF-6 activation and apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells. Down-regulation of CerS6/C(16)-ceramide, and not its further metabolism to glucosylceramide or sphingomyelin, activated ATF-6 upon treatment with ER stress inducers tunicamycin or SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid). Induction of WT-CerS6 expression, but not its mutant, or ectopic expression of the dominant-negative mutant form of ATF-6 protected cells from apoptosis in response to CerS6 knockdown and tunicamycin or SAHA treatment. Mechanistically, ATF-6 activation was regulated by a concerted two-step process involving the release of Ca(2+) from the ER stores ([Ca(2+)](ER)), which resulted in the fragmentation of Golgi membranes in response to CerS6/C(16)-ceramide alteration. This resulted in the accumulation of pro-ATF-6 in the disrupted ER/Golgi membrane network, where pro-ATF6 is activated. Accordingly, ectopic expression of a Ca(2+) chelator calbindin prevented the Golgi fragmentation, ATF-6 activation, and apoptosis in response to CerS6/C(16)-ceramide down-regulation. Overall, these data suggest a novel mechanism of how CerS6/C(16)-ceramide alteration activates ATF6 and induces ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-10-04

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies. PMID:27588471

  11. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  12. Sertraline induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Couch, Letha; Iyer, Advait; Wu, Yuanfeng; Li, Quan-Zhen; Guo, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Sertraline is used for the treatment of depression, and is also used for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity, with mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis being underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used microarray and other biochemical and molecular analyses to identify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a novel molecular mechanism. HepG2 cells were exposed to sertraline and subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that ER stress is among the significantly affected biological changes. We confirmed the increased expression of ER stress makers by real-time PCR and Western blots. The expression of typical ER stress markers such as PERK, IRE1α, and CHOP was significantly increased. To study better ER stress-mediated drug-induced liver toxicity; we established in vitro systems for monitoring ER stress quantitatively and efficiently, using Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as ER stress reporters. These in vitro systems were validated using well-known ER stress inducers. In these two reporter assays, sertraline inhibited the secretion of Gluc and SEAP. Moreover, we demonstrated that sertraline-induced apoptosis was coupled to ER stress and that the apoptotic effect was attenuated by 4-phenylbutyrate, a potent ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we showed that the MAP4K4-JNK signaling pathway contributed to the process of sertraline-induced ER stress. In summary, we demonstrated that ER stress is a mechanism of sertraline-induced liver toxicity.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Is Chronically Activated in Chronic Pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Garg, Sushil K.; Dixit, Ajay K.; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T−/−), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T−/− mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies. PMID:25077966

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is chronically activated in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Garg, Sushil K; Dixit, Ajay K; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K; Saluja, Ashok K

    2014-10-03

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T(-/-)), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T(-/-) mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Austin D; Boileau, Ryan M; Lantz, Brick A; Jewett, Brian A; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Dreyer, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common remediation for knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) and is performed 650,000 annually in the U.S. A tourniquet is commonly used during TKA which causes ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) to the lower limb but the effects of I/R on muscle are not fully understood. Previous reports suggest upregulation of cell stress and catabolism and downregulation of markers of cap-dependent translation during and after TKA. I/R has also been shown to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). We hypothesized that the UPR would be activated in response to ER stress during TKA. We obtained muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis at baseline, before TKA; at maximal ischemia, prior to tourniquet deflation; and during reperfusion in the operating room. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT decreased during ischemia (−28%, P < 0.05; −20%, P < 0.05, respectively) along with an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation (64%, P < 0.05) suggesting decreased translation initiation. Cleaved ATF6 protein increased in ischemia (39%, P = 0.056) but returned to baseline during reperfusion. CASP3 activation increased during reperfusion compared to baseline (23%, P < 0.05). XBP1 splicing assays revealed an increase in spliced transcript during ischemia (31%, P < 0.05) which diminished during reperfusion. These results suggest that in response to I/R during TKA all three branches of the ER stress response are activated. PMID:24159375

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population.

  17. Calcium trafficking integrates endoplasmic reticulum function with mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Randal J.; Malhotra, Jyoti D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is central to all cellular functions and has been studied for decades. Calcium acts as a critical second messenger for both extracellular and intracellular signaling and is fundamental in cell life and death decisions [1]. The calcium gradient in the cell is coupled with an inherent ability of the divalent cation to reversibly bind multiple target biological molecules to generate an extremely versatile signaling system [2]. Calcium signals are used by the cell to control diverse processes as development, neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, metabolism, autophagy and cell death. “Cellular calcium overload” is detrimental to cellular health, resulting in massive activation of proteases and phospholipases leading to cell death [3]. Historically, cell death associated with calcium ion perturbations has been primarily recognized as necrosis. Recent evidence clearly associate changes in calcium ion concentrations with more sophisticated forms of cellular demise, including apoptosis [4] [5] [6] [7]. Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves as the primary calcium store in the metazoan cell, dynamic calcium release to the cytosol, mitochondria, nuclei and other organelles orchestrate diverse coordinated responses. Most evidence supports that calcium transport from the ER to mitochondria plays a significant role in regulating cellular bioenergetics, production of reactive oxygen species, induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Recently, molecular identities that mediate calcium traffic between the ER and mitochondria have been discovered [8] [9] [10]. The next questions are how they are regulated for exquisite tight control of ER – mitochondrial calcium dynamics. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in the role of calcium in regulation of ER and mitochondrial function. PMID:24690484

  18. Mechanisms of alcohol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and organ injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol is readily distributed throughout the body in the blood stream and crosses biological membranes, which affect virtually all biological processes inside the cell. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathological stress responses, part of which is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. ER stress, a condition under which unfolded/misfolded protein accumulates in the ER, contributes to alcoholic disorders of major organs such as liver, pancreas, heart, and brain. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcoholic ER stress response are directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which includes toxic acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress, perturbations of calcium or iron homeostasis, alterations of S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Interruption of the ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcoholic disorders.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Glucosidase II Is Required for Pathogenicity of Ustilago maydisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schirawski, Jan; Böhnert, Heidi U.; Steinberg, Gero; Snetselaar, Karen; Adamikowa, Lubica; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-01-01

    We identified a nonpathogenic strain of Ustilago maydis by tagging mutagenesis. The affected gene, glucosidase1 (gas1), displays similarity to catalytic α-subunits of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidase II. We have shown that Gas1 localizes to the ER and complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking ER glucosidase II. gas1 deletion mutants were normal in growth and mating but were more sensitive to calcofluor and tunicamycin. Mutant infection hyphae displayed significant alterations in the distribution of cell wall material and were able to form appressoria and penetrate the plant surface but arrested growth in the epidermal cell layer. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that the plant–fungal interface between mutant hyphae and the plant plasma membrane was altered compared with the interface of penetrating wild-type hyphae. This may indicate that gas1 mutants provoke a plant response. PMID:16272431

  20. Elevated mitochondria-coupled NAD(P)H in endoplasmic reticulum of dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2016-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are redox coenzymes that are critical in bioenergetics, metabolism, and neurodegeneration. Here we use brain slice multiphoton microscopy to show that substantia nigra dopamine neurons, which are sensitive to stress in mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), display elevated combined NADH and NADPH (i.e., NAD(P)H) autofluorescence. Despite limited mitochondrial mass, organellar NAD(P)H is extensive because much of the signal is derived from the ER. Remarkably, even though pyridine nucleotides cannot cross mitochondrial and ER membranes, inhibiting mitochondrial function with an uncoupler or interrupting the electron transport chain with cyanide (CN−) alters ER NAD(P)H. The ER CN− response can occur without a change in nuclear NAD(P)H, raising the possibility of redox shuttling via the cytoplasm locally between neuronal mitochondria and the ER. We propose that coregulation of NAD(P)H in dopamine neuron mitochondria and ER coordinates cell redox stress signaling by the two organelles. PMID:27582392

  1. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells.

  2. [Calcium transport in endoplasmic reticulum of the rat liver during lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Gubskiĭ, Iu I; Kurskiĭ, M D; Zadorina, O V; Fedorov, A N; Briuzgina, T S; Iurzhenko, N N

    1990-01-01

    Some parameters of calcium transport in rat liver microsomes under conditions of lipoperoxidation activation modelled by antioxidant deficiency (AOD) were studied. This process was shown to be associated with a sharp stimulation of NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation in hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum. The activation of lipid peroxidation was accompanied by disturbances in the kinetic properties of Ca2(+)-ATPase. This was paralleled with a considerable decrease of the ATP-dependent 45Ca-accumulation, increase in the passive permeability of microsomal vesicles for Ca2+ and Ca2+ elevation in the microsomal fraction. The AOD-induced diminution of the Ca2(+)-pump efficiency was slightly prevented by injections of rats with the antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol acetate and ionol which enable Ca2+ compartmentation correction in liver cytosol and membrane fractions.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II is required for pathogenicity of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, Jan; Böhnert, Heidi U; Steinberg, Gero; Snetselaar, Karen; Adamikowa, Lubica; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-12-01

    We identified a nonpathogenic strain of Ustilago maydis by tagging mutagenesis. The affected gene, glucosidase1 (gas1), displays similarity to catalytic alpha-subunits of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidase II. We have shown that Gas1 localizes to the ER and complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking ER glucosidase II. gas1 deletion mutants were normal in growth and mating but were more sensitive to calcofluor and tunicamycin. Mutant infection hyphae displayed significant alterations in the distribution of cell wall material and were able to form appressoria and penetrate the plant surface but arrested growth in the epidermal cell layer. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that the plant-fungal interface between mutant hyphae and the plant plasma membrane was altered compared with the interface of penetrating wild-type hyphae. This may indicate that gas1 mutants provoke a plant response.

  4. Coordination of stress, Ca2+, and immunogenic signaling pathways by PERK at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Alexander R; Garg, Abhishek D; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the main coordinator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, protein synthesis, and folding. The ER is also implicated in the formation of contact sites with other organelles and structures, including mitochondria, plasma membrane (PM), and endosomes, thereby orchestrating through interorganelle signaling pathways, a variety of cellular responses including Ca2+ homeostasis, metabolism, and cell death signaling. Upon loss of its folding capacity, incited by a number of stress signals including those elicited by various anticancer therapies, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is launched to restore ER homeostasis. The ER stress sensor protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) is a key mediator of the UPR and its role during ER stress has been largely recognized. However, growing evidence suggests that PERK may govern signaling pathways through UPR-independent functions. Here, we discuss emerging noncanonical roles of PERK with particular relevance for the induction of danger or immunogenic signaling and interorganelle communication.

  5. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis.

  6. Cell biology of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smirle, Jeffrey; Au, Catherine E; Jain, Michael; Dejgaard, Kurt; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John

    2013-01-01

    Enriched endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi membranes subjected to mass spectrometry have uncovered over a thousand different proteins assigned to the ER and Golgi apparatus of rat liver. This, in turn, led to the uncovering of several hundred proteins of poorly understood function and, through hierarchical clustering, showed that proteins distributed in patterns suggestive of microdomains in cognate organelles. This has led to new insights with respect to their intracellular localization and function. Another outcome has been the critical testing of the cisternal maturation hypothesis showing overwhelming support for a predominant role of COPI vesicles in the transport of resident proteins of the ER and Golgi apparatus (as opposed to biosynthetic cargo). Here we will discuss new insights gained and also highlight new avenues undertaken to further explore the cell biology of the ER and the Golgi apparatus through tandem mass spectrometry.

  7. Physiological functions of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer OASIS in central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction by producing diverse signals from the ER to the cytosol or nucleus. These signaling pathways are collectively known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The canonical branches of the UPR are mediated by three ER membrane-bound proteins: double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). These ER stress transducers basically play important roles in cell survival after ER stress. Recently, novel types of ER stress transducers that share a region of high sequence similarity with ATF6 have been identified. They have a transmembrane domain, which allows them to associate with the ER, and possess a transcription-activation domain and a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. These membrane-bound bZIP transcription factors include OASIS, BBF2H7 CREBH, CREB4 and Luman, and are collectively referred to as OASIS family members. Despite their structural similarities with ATF6, differences in activating stimuli and tissue distribution indicate specialized functions of each member on regulating UPR signaling in specific organs and tissues. One of them, OASIS, is expressed preferentially in astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). OASIS temporally regulates the differentiation from neural precursor cells into astrocytes to promote the expression of Glial Cell Missing 1 through dynamic interactions among OASIS family members followed by accelerating demethylation of the Gfap promoter. This review is a summary of our current understanding of the physiological functions of OASIS in the CNS.

  8. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27999379

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure.

  10. Vesicular Trafficking of Incoming Human Papillomavirus 16 to the Golgi Apparatus and Endoplasmic Reticulum Requires γ-Secretase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kazakov, Teymur; Popa, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The route taken by papillomaviruses from the cell surface to the nucleus during infection is incompletely understood. Here, we developed a novel human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) pseudovirus in which the carboxy terminus of the minor capsid protein L2 is exposed on the exterior of the intact capsid prior to cell binding. With this pseudovirus, we used the proximity ligation assay immune detection technique to demonstrate that during entry HPV16 L2 traffics into and out of the early endosome prior to Golgi localization, and we demonstrated that L2 enters the endoplasmic reticulum during entry. The cellular membrane-associated protease, γ-secretase, is required for infection by HPV16 pseudovirus and authentic HPV16. We also showed that inhibition of γ-secretase does not interfere substantively with virus internalization, initiation of capsid disassembly, entry into the early endosome, or exit from this compartment, but γ-secretase is required for localization of L2 and viral DNA to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. These results show that incoming HPV16 traffics sequentially from the cell surface to the endosome and then to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum prior to nuclear entry. PMID:25227470

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  12. The Atlastin C-terminal Tail Is an Amphipathic Helix That Perturbs the Bilayer Structure during Endoplasmic Reticulum Homotypic Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Joseph E.; Desai, Tanvi; Verma, Avani; Ulengin, Idil; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Moss, Tyler J.; Betancourt-Solis, Miguel A.; Huang, Huey W.; Lee, Tina; McNew, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of tubular membranes is required to form three-way junctions found in reticular subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum. The large GTPase Atlastin has recently been shown to drive endoplasmic reticulum membrane fusion and three-way junction formation. The mechanism of Atlastin-mediated membrane fusion is distinct from SNARE-mediated membrane fusion, and many details remain unclear. In particular, the role of the amphipathic C-terminal tail of Atlastin is still unknown. We found that a peptide corresponding to the Atlastin C-terminal tail binds to membranes as a parallel α helix, induces bilayer thinning, and increases acyl chain disorder. The function of the C-terminal tail is conserved in human Atlastin. Mutations in the C-terminal tail decrease fusion activity in vitro, but not GTPase activity, and impair Atlastin function in vivo. In the context of unstable lipid bilayers, the requirement for the C-terminal tail is abrogated. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail of Atlastin locally destabilizes bilayers to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:25555915

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by aggregate-prone proteins containing homopolymeric amino acids.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Oma, Yoko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Tanida, Isei; Fujita, Eriko; Kouroku, Yoriko; Kuroda, Reiko; Momoi, Takashi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-11-01

    Many human proteins have homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts, but their physiological functions or cellular effects are not well understood. Previously, we expressed 20 HPAAs in mammalian cells and showed characteristic intracellular localization, in that hydrophobic HPAAs aggregated strongly and caused high cytotoxicity in proportion to their hydrophobicity. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of these aggregate-prone hydrophobic HPAAs, assuming that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in the same manner as other well-known aggregate-prone polyglutamine-containing proteins. Some highly hydrophobic HPAAs caused a deficiency in the ubiquitin proteasome system and excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to apoptosis. These results indicate that the property of causing excess endoplasmic reticulum stress by proteasome impairment may contribute to the strong cytotoxicity of highly hydrophobic HPAAs, and proteasome impairment and the resulting excess endoplasmic reticulum stress is not a common cytotoxic effect of aggregate-prone proteins such as polyglutamine.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum targeting and glycosylation of hybrid proteins in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Iturriaga, G; Jefferson, R A; Bevan, M W

    1989-01-01

    The correct compartmentation of proteins to the endomembrane system, mitochondria, or chloroplasts requires an amino-terminal signal peptide. The major tuber protein of potato, patatin, has a signal peptide in common with many other plant storage proteins. When the putative signal peptide of patatin was fused to the bacterial reporter protein beta-glucuronidase, the fusion proteins were translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum in planta and in vitro. In addition, translocated beta-glucuronidase was modified by glycosylation, and the signal peptide was correctly processed. In the presence of an inhibitor of glycosylation, tunicamycin, the enzymatically active form of beta-glucuronidase was assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum. This is the first report of targeting a cytoplasmic protein to the endoplasmic reticulum of plants using a signal peptide. PMID:2535509

  15. Myopathy in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome links endoplasmic reticulum chaperone dysfunction to nuclear envelope pathology.

    PubMed

    Roos, Andreas; Buchkremer, Stephan; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Labisch, Thomas; Gatz, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Brauers, Eva; Nolte, Kay; Schröder, J Michael; Kirschner, Janbernd; Jesse, Christopher Marvin; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Goswami, Anand; Zimmermann, Richard; Zahedi, René Peiman; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) features cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, cataracts, and progressive vacuolar myopathy with peculiar myonuclear alterations. Most MSS patients carry homozygous or compound heterozygous SIL1 mutations. SIL1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone BiP which controls a plethora of essential processes in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study we made use of the spontaneous Sil1 mouse mutant woozy to explore pathomechanisms leading to Sil1 deficiency-related skeletal muscle pathology. We found severe, progressive myopathy characterized by alterations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, mitochondrial changes, and prominent myonuclear pathology including nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina alterations. These abnormalities were remarkably similar to the myopathy in human patients with MSS. In particular, the presence of perinuclear membranous structures which have been reported as an ultrastructural hallmark of MSS-related myopathy could be confirmed in woozy muscles. We found that these structures are derived from the nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina and associate with proliferations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In line with impaired function of BiP secondary to loss of its nucleotide exchange factor Sil1, we observed activation of the unfolded protein response and the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation-pathway. Despite initiation of the autophagy-lysosomal system, autophagic clearance was found ineffective which is in agreement with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. This report identifies woozy muscle as a faithful phenocopy of the MSS myopathy. Moreover, we provide a link between two well-established disease mechanisms in skeletal muscle, dysfunction of chaperones and nuclear envelope pathology.

  16. Chlamydiae Assemble a Pathogen Synapse to Hijack the Host Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Dumoux, Maud; Clare, Daniel K; Saibil, Helen R; Hayward, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate within a specialized membrane-bound compartment, termed an ‘inclusion’. The inclusion membrane is a critical host–pathogen interface, yet the extent of its interaction with cellular organelles and the origin of this membrane remain poorly defined. Here we show that the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is specifically recruited to the inclusion, and that key rough ER (rER) proteins are enriched on and translocated into the inclusion. rER recruitment is a Chlamydia-orchestrated process that occurs independently of host trafficking. Generation of infectious progeny requires an intact ER, since ER vacuolation early during infection stalls inclusion development, whereas disruption post ER recruitment bursts the inclusion. Electron tomography and immunolabelling of Chlamydia-infected cells reveal ‘pathogen synapses’ at which ordered arrays of chlamydial type III secretion complexes connect to the inclusion membrane only at rER contact sites. Our data show a supramolecular assembly involved in pathogen hijack of a key host organelle. PMID:22901061

  17. Transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Riekhof, Wayne R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-02-01

    Over the past two decades, most of the genes specifying lipid synthesis and metabolism in yeast have been identified and characterized. Several of these biosynthetic genes and their encoded enzymes have provided valuable tools for the genetic and biochemical dissection of interorganelle lipid transport processes in yeast. One such pathway involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and its non-vesicular transport to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 (Psd2p) in membranes of the Golgi and endosomal sorting system. In this review, we summarize the identification and characterization of the yeast phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, and examine their role in studies of the transport-dependent pathways of de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). The emerging picture of the Psd2p-specific transport pathway is one in which the enzyme and its non-catalytic N-terminal domains act as a hub to nucleate the assembly of a multiprotein complex, which facilitates PtdSer transport at membrane contact sites between the ER and Golgi/endosome membranes. After transport to the catalytic site of Psd2p, PtdSer is decarboxylated to form PtdEtn, which is disseminated throughout the cell to support the structural and functional needs of multiple membranes.

  18. New insights in the role of Bcl-2 Bcl-2 and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Rudner, J; Jendrossek, V; Belka, C

    2002-10-01

    The oncogenic protein Bcl-2 which is expressed in membranes of different subcellular organelles protects cells from apoptosis induced by endogenic stimuli. Most of the results published so far emphasise the importance of Bcl-2 at the mitochondria. Several recent observations suggest a role of Bcl-2 at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Bcl-2 located at the ER was shown to interfere with apoptosis induction by Bax, ceramides, ionising radiation, serum withdrawal and c-myc expression. Although the detailed functions of Bcl-2 at the ER remain elusive, several speculative mechanisms may be supposed. For instance, Bcl-2 at the ER may regulate calcium fluxes between the ER and the mitochondria. In addition, Bcl-2 is able to interact with the endoplasmic protein Bap31 thus avoiding caspase activation at the ER. Bcl-2 may also abrogate the function of ER located pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 like proteins by heterodimerization. Current data on the function of Bcl-2 at the ER, its role for the modulation of calcium fluxes and its influence on caspase activation at the ER are reviewed.

  19. Lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in the antitumor action of the alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2014-05-01

    The so-called alkylphospholipid analogs (APLs) constitute a family of synthetic antitumor compounds that target cell membranes. The ether phospholipid edelfosine has been considered the long-standing prototype of these antitumor agents and promotes apoptosis in tumor cells by a rather selective way, while sparing normal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that edelfosine-induced apoptosis involves a number of subcellular structures in tumor cells, including plasma membrane lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Edelfosine has been shown to accumulate in plasma membrane lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in different tumor cells in a cell type-dependent way. Edelfosine induces apoptosis in several hematopoietic cancer cells by recruiting death receptor and downstream apoptotic signaling molecules into lipid rafts and displacing survival signaling molecules from these membrane domains. However, in vitro and in vivo evidences suggest that edelfosine-induced apoptosis in solid tumor cells is mediated through an ER stress response. Both raft- and ER-mediated proapoptotic responses require a mitochondrial-related step to eventually promote cell death, and overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL prevents edelfosine-induced apoptosis. Edelfosine can also interact with mitochondria leading to an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Edelfosine treatment also induced a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. The involvement of lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in the apoptotic response induced by edelfosine may provide new avenues for targeting cancer cells as well as new opportunities for cancer therapy.

  20. Unique Requirement for ESCRT Factors in Flavivirus Particle Formation on the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Keisuke; Arimoto, Masaru; Arakawa, Masashi; Nara, Atsuki; Saito, Kazunobu; Omori, Hiroko; Arai, Arisa; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Morita, Eiji

    2016-08-30

    Flavivirus infection induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane rearrangements to generate a compartment for replication of the viral genome and assembly of viral particles. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified several ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins that are recruited to sites of virus replication on the ER. Systematic small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening revealed that release of both dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis virus was dramatically decreased by single depletion of TSG101 or co-depletion of specific combinations of ESCRT-III proteins, resulting in ≥1,000-fold titer reductions. By contrast, release was unaffected by depletion of some core ESCRTs, including VPS4. Reintroduction of ESCRT proteins to siRNA-depleted cells revealed interactions among ESCRT proteins that are crucial for flavivirus budding. Electron-microscopy studies revealed that the CHMP2 and CHMP4 proteins function directly in membrane deformation at the ER. Thus, a unique and specific subset of ESCRT contributes to ER membrane biogenesis during flavivirus infection.

  1. Quantitative proteomics reveal proteins enriched in tubular endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinbo; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Haicheng; Shui, Wenqing; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    The tubular network is a critical part of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The network is shaped by the reticulons and REEPs/Yop1p that generate tubules by inducing high membrane curvature, and the dynamin-like GTPases atlastin and Sey1p/RHD3 that connect tubules via membrane fusion. However, the specific functions of this ER domain are not clear. Here, we isolated tubule-based microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae via classical cell fractionation and detergent-free immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged Yop1p, which specifically localizes to ER tubules. In quantitative comparisons of tubule-derived and total microsomes, we identified a total of 79 proteins that were enriched in the ER tubules, including known proteins that organize the tubular ER network. Functional categorization of the list of proteins revealed that the tubular ER network may be involved in membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, organelle contact, and stress sensing. We propose that affinity isolation coupled with quantitative proteomics is a useful tool for investigating ER functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23816.001 PMID:28287394

  2. Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum structure and integrity in lipotoxic cell death.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Han, Xianlin; Harp, Jeffrey D; Gale, Sarah E; Ory, Daniel S; Schaffer, Jean E

    2006-12-01

    Cell dysfunction and death induced by lipid accumulation in nonadipose tissues, or lipotoxicity, may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms leading to lipotoxic cell death are poorly understood. We recently reported that, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, lipid overload induced by incubation with 500 muM palmitate leads to intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which subsequently induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death. Here, we show that palmitate also impairs ER function through a more direct mechanism. Palmitate was rapidly incorporated into saturated phospholipid and triglyceride species in microsomal membranes of CHO cells. The resulting membrane remodeling was associated with dramatic dilatation of the ER and redistribution of protein-folding chaperones to the cytosol within 5 h, indicating compromised ER membrane integrity. Increasing beta-oxidation, through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, decreased palmitate incorporation into microsomes, decreased the escape of chaperones to the cytosol, and decreased subsequent caspase activation and cell death. Thus, palmitate rapidly increases the saturated lipid content of the ER, leading to compromised ER morphology and integrity, suggesting that impairment of the structure and function of this organelle is involved in the cellular response to fatty acid overload.

  3. Syntaxin 5 Overexpression and β-Amyloid 1–42 Accumulation in Endoplasmic Reticulum of Hippocampal Cells in Rat Brain Induced by Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and it is currently accepted that oxidative damage precedes the overproduction of A42 peptide. We have reported that ozone causes oxidative stress inducing neurodegeneration in the brain of rats. It is associated with A42 overproduction and intracellular accumulation in hippocampus. Organelles like mitochondria, intracellular membranes, and endoplasmic reticulum have been identified as sites of A42 production and accumulation affecting cellular metabolism. However whether ozone exposure induces overproduction and/or accumulation of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum has not been studied. We evaluated this effect in the endoplasmic reticulum of hippocampal cells of rats exposed chronically to low doses of ozone (0.25 ppm) at 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. The effect of the presence of A42 in endoplasmic reticulum was analyzed evaluating the expression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5. Our results show an accumulation of A42 peptide in this organelle. It was observed by immunofluorescence and by WB in endoplasmic fractions from hippocampal cells of rats at 60 and 90 days of treatment. Significant overexpression of the chaperone Syntaxin 5 at 60 and 90 days of treatment was observed (⁎P < 0.05). These results indicate that the exposure to environmental pollutants could be involved as a risk factor for neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27366738

  4. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  5. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate Receptors in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: a Single-channel Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Don-On Daniel; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    As an intracellular Ca2+ release channel at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) plays a crucial role in the generation, propagation and regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals that regulate numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review provides a concise account of the fundamental single-channel properties of the InsP3R channel: its conductance properties and its regulation by InsP3 and Ca2+, its physiological ligands, studied using nuclear patch clamp electrophysiology. PMID:25555684

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E.; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-01-01

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis. PMID:28335520

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  8. Mouse VAP33 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Skehel, P. A.; Fabian-Fine, R.; Kandel, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is a synaptic vesicle protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release. Intracellular injection of antisera against the Aplysia californica VAMP/synaptobrevin-binding protein ApVAP33 inhibited evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in cultured cells, suggesting that this association may regulate the function of VAMP/synaptobrevin. We have identified and characterized a mouse homologue of ApVAP33, mVAP33. The overall domain structure of the proteins is conserved, and they have similar biochemical properties. mVAP33 mRNA is detectable in all mouse tissues examined, in contrast to the more restricted expression seen in A. californica. We analyzed the cellular distribution of mVAP33 protein in brain slices and cultured cortical cells by light and electron microscopy. Although present at higher levels in neurons, immunoreactivity was detected throughout both neurons and glia in a reticular pattern similar to that of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins. mVAP33 does not colocalize with VAMP/synaptobrevin at synaptic structures, but expression overlaps with lower levels of VAMP/synaptobrevin in the soma. Ultrastructural analysis revealed mVAP33 associated with microtubules and intracellular vesicles of heterogeneous size. In primary neuronal cultures, large aggregates of mVAP33 are also detected in short filamentous structures, which are occasionally associated with intracellular membranes. There is no evidence for accumulation of mVAP33 on synaptic vesicles or at the plasma membrane. These data suggest that mVAP33 is an endoplasmic-reticulum–resident protein that associates with components of the cytoskeleton. Any functional interaction between mVAP33 and VAMP/synaptobrevin, therefore, most likely involves the delivery of components to synaptic terminals rather than a direct participation in synaptic vesicle exocytosis. PMID:10655491

  9. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T.; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P.; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J.; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5′-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment. PMID:27956623

  10. The reticulons: Guardians of the structure and function of the endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Di Sano, Federica; Bernardoni, Paolo; Piacentini, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of the nuclear envelope and a peripheral network of tubules and membrane sheets. The tubules are shaped by a specific class of curvature stabilizing proteins, the reticulons and DP1; however it is still unclear how the sheets are assembled. The ER is the cellular compartment responsible for secretory and membrane protein synthesis. The reducing conditions of ER lead to the intra/inter-chain formation of new disulphide bonds into polypeptides during protein folding assessed by enzymatic or spontaneous reactions. Moreover, ER represents the main intracellular calcium storage site and it plays an important role in calcium signaling that impacts many cellular processes. Accordingly, the maintenance of ER function represents an essential condition for the cell, and ER morphology constitutes an important prerogative of it. Furthermore, it is well known that ER undergoes prominent shape transitions during events such as cell division and differentiation. Thus, maintaining the correct ER structure is an essential feature for cellular physiology. Now, it is known that proper ER-associated proteins play a fundamental role in ER tubules formation. Among these ER-shaping proteins are the reticulons (RTN), which are acquiring a relevant position. In fact, beyond the structural role of reticulons, in very recent years new and deeper functional implications of these proteins are emerging in relation to their involvement in several cellular processes.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Transmembrane Protein Dpy19L1 Is Required for Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Bizen, Norihisa; Sato, Noboru; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), including the nuclear envelope, is a continuous and intricate membrane-bound organelle responsible for various cellular functions. In neurons, the ER network is found in cell bodies, axons, and dendrites. Recent studies indicate the involvement of the ER network in neuronal development, such as neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. However, the regulation of neural development by ER-localized proteins is not fully understood. We previously reported that the multi-transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is required for neuronal migration in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. A Dpy19L family member, Dpy19L2, which is a causative gene for human Globozoospermia, is suggested to act as an anchor of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope. In this study, we found that the patterns of exogenous Dpy19L1 were partially coincident with the ER, including the nuclear envelope in COS-7 cells at the level of the light microscope. The reticular distribution of Dpy19L1 was disrupted by microtubule depolymerization that induces retraction of the ER. Furthermore, Dpy19L1 showed a similar distribution pattern with a ER marker protein in embryonic mouse cortical neurons. Finally, we showed that Dpy19L1 knockdown mediated by siRNA resulted in decreased neurite outgrowth in cultured neurons. These results indicate that transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is localized to the ER membrane and regulates neurite extension during development. PMID:27959946

  12. Cellular Pathology of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Involving Chaperones Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins may lead to the production of aberrant polypeptides that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These mutant proteins have detrimental conformational changes or misfolding events, which result in the triggering of the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is a cellular pathway that reduces ER stress by generally inhibiting translation, increasing ER chaperones levels, or inducing cell apoptosis in severe ER stress. This process has been implicated in the cellular pathology of many neurological disorders, including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is a rare pediatric disorder characterized by the failure in the myelination process of the central nervous system (CNS). PMD is caused by mutations in the PLP1 gene, which encodes a major myelin membrane protein. Severe clinical PMD phenotypes appear to be the result of cell toxicity, due to the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins and not due to the lack of functional PLP1. Therefore, it is important to clarify the pathological mechanisms by which the PLP1 mutants negatively impact the myelin-generating cells, called oligodendrocytes, to overcome this devastating disease. This review discusses how PLP1 mutant proteins change protein homeostasis in the ER of oligodendrocytes, especially focusing on the reaction of ER chaperones against the accumulation of PLP1 mutant proteins that cause PMD. PMID:28286750

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Handling in Excitable Cells in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a morphologically and functionally diverse organelle capable of integrating multiple extracellular and internal signals and generating adaptive cellular responses. It plays fundamental roles in protein synthesis and folding and in cellular responses to metabolic and proteotoxic stress. In addition, the ER stores and releases Ca2+ in sophisticated scenarios that regulate a range of processes in excitable cells throughout the body, including muscle contraction and relaxation, endocrine regulation of metabolism, learning and memory, and cell death. One or more Ca2+ ATPases and two types of ER membrane Ca2+ channels (inositol trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors) are the major proteins involved in ER Ca2+ uptake and release, respectively. There are also direct and indirect interactions of ER Ca2+ stores with plasma membrane and mitochondrial Ca2+-regulating systems. Pharmacological agents that selectively modify ER Ca2+ release or uptake have enabled studies that revealed many different physiological roles for ER Ca2+ signaling. Several inherited diseases are caused by mutations in ER Ca2+-regulating proteins, and perturbed ER Ca2+ homeostasis is implicated in a range of acquired disorders. Preclinical investigations suggest a therapeutic potential for use of agents that target ER Ca2+ handling systems of excitable cells in disorders ranging from cardiac arrhythmias and skeletal muscle myopathies to Alzheimer disease. PMID:21737534

  14. Transport along the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum mediates the trafficking of GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, José I.; Jaureguiberry-Bravo, Matías; Salas, Daniela A.; Ramírez, Omar A.; Cornejo, Víctor H.; Lu, Hsiangmin E.; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Couve, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In neurons, secretory organelles within the cell body are complemented by the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi outposts (GOPs), whose role in neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is poorly understood. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B metabotropic receptors (GABABRs) regulate the efficacy of synaptic transmission throughout the brain. Their plasma membrane availability is controlled by mechanisms involving an ER retention motif and assembly-dependent ER export. Thus, they constitute an ideal molecular model to study ER trafficking, but the extent to which the dendritic ER participates in GABABR biosynthesis has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we show that GABAB1 localizes preferentially to the ER in dendrites and moves long distances within this compartment. Not only diffusion but also microtubule and dynein-dependent mechanisms control dendritic ER transport. GABABRs insert throughout the somatodendritic plasma membrane but dendritic post-ER carriers containing GABABRs do not fuse selectively with GOPs. This study furthers our understanding of the spatial selectivity of neurotransmitter receptors for dendritic organelles. PMID:24895402

  15. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-12-27

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5'-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment.

  16. Cotranslational Intersection between the SRP and GET Targeting Pathways to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Schäffer, Thea; Wölfle, Tina; Fitzke, Edith; Thiel, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of transmembrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proceeds via either the signal recognition particle (SRP) or the guided entry of tail-anchored proteins (GET) pathway, consisting of Get1 to -5 and Sgt2. While SRP cotranslationally targets membrane proteins containing one or multiple transmembrane domains, the GET pathway posttranslationally targets proteins containing a single C-terminal transmembrane domain termed the tail anchor. Here, we dissect the roles of the SRP and GET pathways in the sorting of homologous, two-membrane-spanning K+ channel proteins termed Kcv, Kesv, and Kesv-VV. We show that Kcv is targeted to the ER cotranslationally via its N-terminal transmembrane domain, while Kesv-VV is targeted posttranslationally via its C-terminal transmembrane domain, which recruits Get4-5/Sgt2 and Get3. Unexpectedly, nascent Kcv recruited not only SRP but also the Get4-5 module of the GET pathway to ribosomes. Ribosome binding of Get4-5 was independent of Sgt2 and was strongly outcompeted by SRP. The combined data indicate a previously unrecognized cotranslational interplay between the SRP and GET pathways. PMID:27354063

  17. Proteasome inhibition compromises direct retention of cytochrome P450 2C2 in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Szczesna-Skorupa, Elzbieta; Kemper, Byron

    2008-10-15

    To determine whether protein degradation plays a role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of cytochromes P450, the effects of proteasomal inhibitors on the expression and distribution of green fluorescent protein chimeras of CYP2C2 and related proteins was examined. In transfected cells, expression levels of chimeras of full-length CYP2C2 and its cytosolic domain, but not its N-terminal transmembrane sequence, were increased by proteasomal inhibition. Redistribution of all three chimeras from the reticular ER into a perinuclear compartment and, in a subset of cells, also to the cell surface was observed after proteasomal inhibition. Redistribution was blocked by the microtubular inhibitor, nocodazole, suggesting that redistribution to the cell surface followed the conventional vesicular transport pathway. Similar redistributions were detected for BAP31, a CYP2C2 binding chaperone; CYP2E1 and CYP3A4, which are also degraded by the proteasomal pathway; and for cytochrome P450 reductase, which does not undergo proteasomal degradation; but not for the ER membrane proteins, sec61 and calnexin. Redistribution does not result from saturation of an ER retention "receptor" since in some cases protein levels were unaffected. Proteasomal inhibition may, therefore, alter ER retention by affecting a protein critical for ER retention, either directly, or indirectly by affecting the composition of the ER membranes.

  18. Calcium homoeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1) reduces the calcium content of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and triggers ER stress.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Sandín, Sonia; Alonso, María Teresa; García-Sancho, Javier

    2011-08-01

    CALHM1 (calcium homoeostasis modulator 1), a membrane protein with similarity to NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor channels that localizes in the plasma membrane and the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of neurons, has been shown to generate a plasma-membrane Ca(2+) conductance and has been proposed to influence Alzheimer's disease risk. In the present study we have investigated the effects of CALHM1 on intracellular Ca(2+) handling in HEK-293T [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of SV40 (simian virus 40)] cells by using targeted aequorins for selective monitorization of Ca(2+) transport by organelles. We find that CALHM1 increases Ca(2+) leak from the ER and, more importantly, reduces ER Ca(2+) uptake by decreasing both the transport capacity and the Ca(2+) affinity of SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase). As a result, the Ca(2+) content of the ER is drastically decreased. This reduction in the Ca(2+) content of the ER triggered the UPR (unfolded protein response) with induction of several ER stress markers, such as CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein], ERdj4, GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa) and XBP1 (X-box-binding protein 1). Thus CALHM1 might provide a relevant link between Ca(2+) homoeostasis disruption, ER stress and cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Lynx1 Shifts α4β2 Nicotinic Receptor Subunit Stoichiometry by Affecting Assembly in the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Weston A.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Yu, Caroline; Parker, Rell L.; Richards, Christopher I.; Lester, Henry A.; Miwa, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neurotoxin-like receptor binding proteins, such as lynx modulators, are topologically positioned to exert pharmacological effects by binding to the extracellular portion of nAChRs. These actions are generally thought to proceed when both lynx and the nAChRs are on the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that lynx1 also exerts effects on α4β2 nAChRs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Lynx1 affects assembly of nascent α4 and β2 subunits and alters the stoichiometry of the receptor population that reaches the plasma membrane. Additionally, these data suggest that lynx1 shifts nAChR stoichiometry to low sensitivity (α4)3(β2)2 pentamers primarily through this interaction in the endoplasmic reticulum, rather than solely via direct modulation of activity on the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, these data represent the first test of the hypothesis that a lynx family member, or indeed any glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, could act within the cell to alter assembly of a multisubunit protein. PMID:25193667

  20. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  1. Genetic and molecular interactions of the Erv41p-Erv46p complex involved in transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Leah M; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles; Jensen, Ole N; Otte, Stefan

    2006-11-15

    Erv41p and Erv46p are integral membrane proteins conserved across species. They were originally identified as abundant constituents of COPII-coated vesicles, and form a complex which cycles between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Yeast strains lacking these proteins are viable but display subtle secretory phenotypes. In order to obtain information about possible biological roles of this protein complex in endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport, we employed the Synthetic Genetic Array approach to screen for synthetic genetic interactions with the erv46 null mutation. We identified synthetic interactions with vma12, vma21, vma22 and vps1 deletion mutations. The vma21Delta mutation exacerbates transport defects caused by the erv46Delta mutation. Unexpectedly, yeast strains lacking Vma21p fail to sort the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi v-SNARE, Bos1p, efficiently into COPII vesicles, yet these vesicles are fully fusion competent. In addition, we set out to identify, by a biochemical approach, proteins interacting with the Erv41p-Erv46p complex. We report a strong interaction between the Erv41p-Erv46p complex and endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II. Strains lacking a cycling Erv41p-Erv46p complex display a mild glycoprotein processing defect.

  2. The Aspergillus fumigatus metacaspases CasA and CasB facilitate growth under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Richie, Daryl L; Miley, Michael D; Bhabhra, Ruchi; Robson, Geoffrey D; Rhodes, Judith C; Askew, David S

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the contribution of metacaspases to the growth and stress response of the opportunistic human mould pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, based on increasing evidence implicating the yeast metacaspase Yca1p in apoptotic-like programmed cell death. Single metacaspase-deficient mutants were constructed by targeted disruption of each of the two metacaspase genes in A. fumigatus, casA and casB, and a metacaspase-deficient mutant, DeltacasA/DeltacasB, was constructed by disrupting both genes. Stationary phase cultures of wild-type A. fumigatus were associated with the appearance of typical markers of apoptosis, including elevated proteolytic activity against caspase substrates, phosphatidylserine exposure on the outer leaflet of the membrane, and loss of viability. By contrast, phosphatidylserine exposure was not observed in stationary phase cultures of the DeltacasA/DeltacasB mutant, although caspase activity and viability was indistinguishable from wild type. The mutant retained wild-type virulence and showed no difference in sensitivity to a range of pro-apoptotic stimuli that have been reported to initiate yeast apoptosis. However, the DeltacasA/DeltacasB mutant showed a growth detriment in the presence of agents that disrupt endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. These findings demonstrate that metacaspase activity in A. fumigatus contributes to the apoptotic-like loss of membrane phospholipid asymmetry at stationary phase, and suggest that CasA and CasB have functions that support growth under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  3. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  4. Selective Targeting of Proteins within Secretory Pathway for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, Lara; Petris, Gianluca; Bestagno, Marco; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) is a cellular quality control mechanism to dispose of misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway via proteasomal degradation. SEL1L is an ER-resident protein that participates in identification of misfolded molecules as ERAD substrates, therefore inducing their ER-to-cytosol retrotranslocation and degradation. We have developed a novel class of fusion proteins, termed degradins, composed of a fragment of SEL1L fused to a target-specific binding moiety located on the luminal side of the ER. The target-binding moiety can be a ligand of the target or derived from specific mAbs. Here, we describe the ability of degradins with two different recognition moieties to promote degradation of a model target. Degradins recognize the target protein within the ER both in secretory and membrane-bound forms, inducing their degradation following retrotranslocation to the cytosol. Thus, degradins represent an effective technique to knock-out proteins within the secretory pathway with high specificity. PMID:22523070

  5. A novel transmembrane protein defines the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death pathway.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tomoya; Kamatsuka, Kenta; Sato, Taku; Morooka, Shuntaro; Otsuka, Kosuke; Hattori, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2017-03-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) maintenance is physiologically critical in cells; its loss causes apoptotic signalling and cell death. Accumulating DNA mutations and unfolded proteins in stressed cells activate signalling pathways for cell death induction. Cancer cells often fail to die even in the presence of some death signalling proteins. Here, we report a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) with an artificial sequence, denoted Psi1 shRNA, which leads to ΔΨm loss in HCT116 cells. The Psi1 shRNA target gene was shown to encode transmembrane protein 117 (TMEM117). TMEM117 knockdown led to ΔΨm loss, increased reactive oxygen species levels, up-regulation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor C/EBP homologous protein and active caspase-3 expression, and cell growth impairment, altering homeostasis towards cell death. TMEM117 levels were down-regulated in response to the ER stressor thapsigargin and decreased when cells showed ΔΨm loss. These results suggested that TMEM117 RNAi allowed apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TMEM117 probably mediates the signalling of ΔΨm loss in ER stress-mediated mitochondria-mediated cell death.

  6. Miltirone exhibits antileukemic activity by ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling; Jiang, Lifeng; Xu, Maolei; Liu, Qun; Gao, Ning; Li, Ping; Liu, E-Hu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of miltirone in human leukemia cell lines, primary leukemia cells, and nude mice U937 xenograft. Treatment of cells with miltirone resulted in apoptosis, mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) collapses, increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and cytochrome c release. Miltirone triggered the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress identified through several key molecules of the unfolded protein response, including phosphorylated PERK, eIF2a, GRP78, GRP94, and caspase-12. Miltrone treatment also resulted in the release of Ca2+ from the ER stores and mitochondrial Ca2+ loading in the cells. Further research revealed that miltirone resulted in dose-dependent decrease in complex III activity and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in these cells. Miltirone-induced apoptosis, dissipation of MMP and ER stress were dramatically blocked by pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). In contrast, treatment with ER stress inhibitor TUDCA significantly attenuated miltirone-induced ROS and apoptosis in leukemia cells. Moreover, our in vivo findings showed that administration of miltirone markedly inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in U937 xenograft model with low systemic toxicity. Taken together, these findings indicate that miltirone may exert its antileukemic activity by inducing apoptosis through a ROS-dependent destructive cycle involving ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26848099

  7. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Justin J; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T; Fults, Eric S; Buchanan, Bryce W; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2015-07-24

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3'-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane.

  8. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Justin J.; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T.; Fults, Eric S.; Buchanan, Bryce W.; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G.; Rubenstein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3′-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane. PMID:26055716

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition attenuates hypertensive chronic kidney disease through reduction in proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Lu, Chao; Marway, Mandeep K.; Carlisle, Rachel E.; Ask, Kjetil; Lukic, Dusan; Krepinsky, Joan C.; Dickhout, Jeffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) development in patients and in animal models. Here we show that ER stress inhibition through 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) administration decreases blood pressure, albuminuria, and tubular casts in an angiotensin II/deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt murine model of CKD. Lower albuminuria in 4-PBA-treated mice was associated with higher levels of cubilin protein in renal tissue membrane fractions. 4-PBA decreased renal interstitial fibrosis, renal CD3+ T-cell and macrophage infiltration, mRNA expression of TGFβ1, Wnt signaling molecules, and ER stress-induced pro-inflammatory genes. CHOP deficient mice that underwent this model of CKD developed hypertension comparable to wild type mice, but had less albuminuria and tubular casts. CHOP deficiency resulted in higher nephrin levels and decreased glomerulosclerosis compared to wild type mice; this effect was accompanied by lower macrophage infiltration and fibrosis. Our findings portray ER stress inhibition as a means to alleviate hypertensive CKD by preserving glomerular barrier integrity and tubular function. These results demonstrate ER stress modulation as a novel target for preserving renal function in hypertensive CKD. PMID:28148966

  10. ROS mediated crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria by Phloxine B under environmental UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar; Srivastav, Ajeet Kumar; Chopra, Deepti; Pal, Manish Kumar; Arjaria, Nidhi; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-08-01

    Phloxine B (PhB) is a most commonly used dye in cosmetic products throughout the world. It shows an absorption in visible and ultraviolet radiations. PhB was photodegraded within 4h of UV exposure. It generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) photochemically and intracellularly. Photosensitized PhB caused dose dependent cell viability reduction of human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) which was measured through MTT (75.4%) and NRU (77.3%) assays. It also induces cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Photosensitized PhB induces Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It causes the upregulation of ER stress marker genes ATF6 (1.79 fold) and CHOP (1.93 fold) at transcription levels. The similar response of ATF6 (3.6 fold) and CHOP (2.38 fold) proteins was recorded at translation levels. CHOP targeted the mitochondria and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential analyzed through JC-1 staining. It further increases Bax/Bcl2 ratio (3.58 fold) and promotes the release of cytochrome c, finally leads to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Upregulation of APAF1 (1.79 fold) in PhB treated cells under UV B exposure supports the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death. The results support the involvement of ER and mitochondria in ROS mediated PhB phototoxicity. Therefore, the use of PhB in cosmetic products may be deleterious to users during sunlight exposure.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria interplay mediates apoptotic cell death: relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela Moniz; Esteves, A Raquel; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-09-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Many cellular mechanisms are thought to be involved in the death of these specific neurons in PD, including oxidative stress, changes of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Since recent studies have revealed that also endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in conjunction with abnormal protein degradation can contribute to the PD pathophysiology, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between ER and mitochondria and its relevance in the control of neuronal cell death in PD. We observed that MPP+ induced changes in the mitochondrial function, affecting mitochondrial membrane potential and electron transport chain function. Likewise, it was also evident the unfolded protein response activation by an overexpression of GRP78 protein. Moreover, stress stimuli caused the release of Ca2+ from the ER that consistently induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, with a rise of mitochondrial matrix free Ca2+. Besides, Ca2+ release inhibition prevented MPP+ mediated mitochondria-dependent caspases activation. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria are in a close communication, establishing a dynamic ER-Ca2+-mitochondria interconnection that can play a prominent role in the neuronal cell death induction under particular stressful circumstances of PD pathology.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum protein quality control and its relationship to environmental stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Xiang; Howell, Stephen H

    2010-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a sophisticated quality control (QC) system to eliminate improperly folded proteins from the secretory pathway. Given that protein folding is such a fastidious process and subject to adverse environmental conditions, the ER QC system appears to have been usurped to serve as an environmental sensor and responder in plants. Under stressful conditions, the ER protein folding machinery reaches a limit as the demands for protein folding exceed the capacity of the system. Under these conditions, misfolded or unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER, triggering an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR mitigates ER stress by upregulating the expression of genes encoding components of the protein folding machinery or the ER-associated degradation system. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ER stress is sensed and stress signals are transduced by membrane-bound transcription factors, which are activated and mobilized under environmental stress conditions. Under acute or chronic stress conditions, UPR can also lead to apoptosis or programmed cell death. Despite recent progress in our understanding of plant protein QC, discovering how different environmental conditions are perceived is one of the major challenges in understanding this system. Since the ER QC system is one among many stress response systems in plants, another major challenge is determining the extent to which the ER QC system contributes to various stress responses in plants.

  13. Junctate boosts phagocytosis by recruiting endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores near phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas; Nunes, Paula

    2015-11-15

    Local intracellular Ca(2+) elevations increase the efficiency of phagocytosis, a process that is essential for innate and adaptive immunity. These local Ca(2+) elevations are generated in part by the store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) sensor STIM1, which recruits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae to phagosomes and opens phagosomal Ca(2+) channels at ER-phagosome junctions. However, residual ER-phagosome contacts and periphagosomal Ca(2+) hotspots remain in Stim1(-/-) cells. Here, we tested whether junctate (also called ASPH isoform 8), a molecule that targets STIM1 to ER-plasma-membrane contacts upon Ca(2+)-store depletion, cooperates with STIM1 at phagosome junctions. Junctate expression in Stim1(-/-) and Stim1(-/-); Stim2(-/-) phagocytic fibroblasts increased phagocytosis and periphagosomal Ca(2+) elevations, yet with only a minimal impact on global SOCE. These Ca(2+) hotspots were only marginally reduced by the SOCE channel blocker lanthanum chloride (La(3+)) but were abrogated by inositol trisphosphate receptor inhibitors 2-APB and xestospongin-C, revealing that unlike STIM1-mediated hotspots, junctate-mediated Ca(2+) originates predominantly from periphagosomal Ca(2+) stores. Accordingly, junctate accumulates near phagosomes and elongates ER-phagosome junctions in Stim1(-/-) cells. Thus, junctate mediates an alternative mechanism for generating localized Ca(2+) elevations within cells, promoting Ca(2+) release from internal stores recruited to phagosomes, thereby boosting phagocytosis.

  14. Oncogenic Kit signals on endolysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum are essential for neoplastic mast cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Yuuki; Toyoshima, Shota; Wakamatsu, Ei; Suzuki, Shunichi; Ogawa, Shuhei; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Kit is a receptor-type tyrosine kinase found on the plasma membrane. It can transform mast cells through activating mutations. Here, we show that a mutant Kit from neoplastic mast cells from mice, Kit(D814Y), is permanently active and allows cells to proliferate autonomously. It does so by activating two signalling pathways from different intracellular compartments. Mutant Kit from the cell surface accumulates on endolysosomes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which requires Kit’s kinase activity. Kit(D814Y) is constitutively associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but the complex activates Akt only on the cytoplasmic surface of endolysosomes. It resists destruction because it is under-ubiquitinated. Kit(D814Y) also appears in the endoplasmic reticulum soon after biosynthesis, and there, can activate STAT5 aberrantly. These mechanisms of oncogenic signalling are also seen in rat and human mast cell leukemia cells. Thus, oncogenic Kit signalling occurs from different intracellular compartments, and the mutation acts by altering Kit trafficking as well as activation. PMID:25493654

  15. Golgi enzymes do not cycle through the endoplasmic reticulum during protein secretion or mitosis.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Julien; Duran, Juan; Scarpa, Margherita; Bassaganyas, Laia; Van Galen, Josse; Malhotra, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Golgi-specific sialyltransferase (ST) expressed as a chimera with the rapamycin-binding domain of mTOR, FRB, relocates to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells exposed to rapamycin that also express invariant chain (Ii)-FKBP in the ER. This result has been taken to indicate that Golgi-resident enzymes cycle to the ER constitutively. We show that ST-FRB is trapped in the ER even without Ii-FKBP upon rapamycin addition. This is because ER-Golgi-cycling FKBP proteins contain a C-terminal KDEL-like sequence, bind ST-FRB in the Golgi, and are transported together back to the ER by KDEL receptor-mediated retrograde transport. Moreover, depletion of KDEL receptor prevents trapping of ST-FRB in the ER by rapamycin. Thus ST-FRB cycles artificially by binding to FKBP domain-containing proteins. In addition, Golgi-specific O-linked glycosylation of a resident ER protein occurs only upon artificial fusion of Golgi membranes with ER. Together these findings support the consensus view that there is no appreciable mixing of Golgi-resident enzymes with ER under normal conditions.

  16. Nuclear pore complex integrity requires Lnp1, a regulator of cortical endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Amanda K.; Chen, Shuliang; Novick, Peter; Ferro-Novick, Susan; Wente, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are components of the same contiguous membrane system and yet have distinct cellular functions. Mounting evidence suggests roles for some ER proteins in the NE for proper nuclear pore complex (NPC) structure and function. In this study, we identify a NE role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Lnp1 and Sey1, proteins required for proper cortical ER formation. Both lnp1Δ and sey1Δ mutants exhibit synthetic genetic interactions with mutants in genes encoding key NPC structural components. Both Lnp1 and Sey1 physically associate with other ER components that have established NPC roles, including Rtn1, Yop1, Pom33, and Per33. Of interest, lnp1Δ rtn1Δ mutants but not rtn1Δ sey1Δ mutants exhibit defects in NPC distribution. Furthermore, the essential NPC assembly factor Ndc1 has altered interactions in the absence of Sey1. Lnp1 dimerizes in vitro via its C-terminal zinc finger motif, a property that is required for proper ER structure but not NPC integrity. These findings suggest that Lnp1's role in NPC integrity is separable from functions in the ER and is linked to Ndc1 and Rtn1 interactions. PMID:26041935

  17. Hyperglycemia magnifies bupivacaine-induced cell apoptosis triggered by mitochondria dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Ye, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ai-zhu; Zhou, Shu-qin; Liu, Hui; Liu, Zhong-jie; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2013-06-01

    Nerve cell injury associated with apoptosis plays an important role in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). However, it remains unclear whether preexisting or potential neurocyte damage induced by hyperglycemia increases sensitivity to local anesthetics. SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with a high concentration of glucose in vitro, to imitate DPN prior to administration of bupivacaine or placebo. Cell viability and apoptosis were investigated with a CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrially generated ROS, and activity of mitochondrial complexes I and III were studied to explore the molecular mechanism of bupivacaine-induced mitochondrial injury. Grp78 and caspase-12 expression were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, representing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Cell structure was also assessed via transmission electron microscopy. Incubation with bupivacaine decreased the activity of mitochondrial complexes I and III; increased ROS production at cell and mitochondrial levels, mitochondrial potential depolarization, and Grp78 and caspase-12 expression at both transcription and translation levels; and affected cell structure, which could be enhanced by glucose pretreatment. These findings indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress related to ROS are involved in bupivacaine-induced apoptosis and may be enhanced by glucose administration.

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Homocystinuria Patients with Remethylation Defects

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pizarro, Ainhoa; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén; Richard, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria is crucial for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction at either site as well as perturbation of mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs) have been linked to neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Previously, we have observed an increase in ROS and apoptosis levels in patient-derived fibroblasts with remethylation disorders causing homocystinuria. Here we show increased mRNA and protein levels of Herp, Grp78, IP3R1, pPERK, ATF4, CHOP, asparagine synthase and GADD45 in patient-derived fibroblasts suggesting ER stress and calcium perturbations in homocystinuria. In addition, overexpressed MAM-associated proteins (Grp75, σ-1R and Mfn2) were found in these cells that could result in mitochondrial calcium overload and oxidative stress increase. Our results also show an activation of autophagy process and a substantial degradation of altered mitochondria by mitophagy in patient-derived fibroblasts. Moreover, we have observed that autophagy was partially abolished by antioxidants suggesting that ROS participate in this process that may have a protective role. Our findings argue that alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis and autophagy may contribute to the development of this metabolic disorder and suggest a therapeutic potential in homocystinuria for agents that stabilize calcium homeostasis and/or restore the proper function of ER-mitochondria communications. PMID:26959487

  19. Autophagy requires endoplasmic reticulum targeting of the PI3-kinase complex via Atg14L.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kohichi; Morita, Eiji; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Izumi, Tetsuro; Noda, Takeshi; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2010-08-23

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that allows cells to digest their cytoplasmic constituents via autophagosome formation and lysosomal degradation. Recently, an autophagy-specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) complex, consisting of hVps34, hVps15, Beclin-1, and Atg14L, has been identified in mammalian cells. Atg14L is specific to this autophagy complex and localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Knockdown of Atg14L leads to the disappearance of the DFCP1-positive omegasome, which is a membranous structure closely associated with both the autophagosome and the ER. A point mutation in Atg14L resulting in defective ER localization was also defective in the induction of autophagy. The addition of the ER-targeting motif of DFCP1 to this mutant fully complemented the autophagic defect in Atg14L knockout embryonic stem cells. Thus, Atg14L recruits a subset of class III PI3-kinase to the ER, where otherwise phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) is essentially absent. The Atg14L-dependent appearance of PI3P in the ER makes this organelle the platform for autophagosome formation.

  20. Contribution of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction in insulin resistance: Distinct or interrelated roles?

    PubMed

    Rieusset, J

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulate numerous cellular processes, and are critical contributors to cellular and whole-body homoeostasis. More important, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress are both closely associated with hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, thereby playing crucial roles in altered glucose homoeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The accumulated evidence also suggests a potential interrelationship between alterations in both types of organelles, as mitochondrial dysfunction could participate in activation of the unfolded protein response, whereas ER stress could influence mitochondrial function. The fact that mitochondria and the ER are physically and functionally interconnected via mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) supports their interrelated roles in the pathophysiology of T2DM. However, the mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress, and its relevance to the control of glucose homoeostasis, are still unknown. This review evaluates the involvement of mitochondria and ER independently in the development of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as their potential roles in the disruption of organelle crosstalk at MAM interfaces in the alteration of insulin signalling.

  1. Chronic enrichment of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Pers, Benedicte M; Parlakgül, Güneş; Güney, Ekin; Inouye, Karen; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2014-12-01

    Proper function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria is crucial for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction at either site has been linked to pathophysiological states, including metabolic diseases. Although the ER and mitochondria play distinct cellular roles, these organelles also form physical interactions with each other at sites defined as mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs), which are essential for calcium, lipid and metabolite exchange. Here we show that in the liver, obesity leads to a marked reorganization of MAMs resulting in mitochondrial calcium overload, compromised mitochondrial oxidative capacity and augmented oxidative stress. Experimental induction of ER-mitochondria interactions results in oxidative stress and impaired metabolic homeostasis, whereas downregulation of PACS-2 or IP3R1, proteins important for ER-mitochondria tethering or calcium transport, respectively, improves mitochondrial oxidative capacity and glucose metabolism in obese animals. These findings establish excessive ER-mitochondrial coupling as an essential component of organelle dysfunction in obesity that may contribute to the development of metabolic pathologies such as insulin resistance and diabetes.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial crosstalk: a novel role for the mitochondrial peptide humanin

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Hinton, David R.; Kannan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    In this review, the interactive mechanisms of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are discussed with emphasis on the potential protective role of the mitochondria derived peptide humanin (HN) in ER stress. The ER and mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of modifying their structure and function in response to changing environmental conditions. The ER and mitochondria join together at multiple sites and form mitochondria-ER associated membranes that participate in signal transduction pathways that are under active investigation. Our laboratory previously showed that HN protects cells from oxidative stress induced cell death and more recently, described the beneficial role of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium cells and the involvement of ER-mitochondrial cross-talk in cellular protection. The protection was achieved, in part, by the restoration of mitochondrial glutathione that was depleted by ER stress. Thus, HN may be a promising candidate for therapy for diseases that involve both oxidative and ER stress. Developing novel approaches for retinal delivery of HN, its analogues as well as small molecular weight ER stress inhibitors would prove to be a valuable approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:28250736

  3. In vivo expression of mammalian BiP ATPase mutants causes disruption of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Hendershot, L M; Wei, J Y; Gaut, J R; Lawson, B; Freiden, P J; Murti, K G

    1995-01-01

    BiP possesses ATP binding/hydrolysis activities that are thought to be essential for its ability to chaperone protein folding and assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have produced a series of point mutations in a hamster BiP clone that inhibit ATPase activity and have generated a species-specific anti-BiP antibody to monitor the effects of mutant hamster BiP expression in COS monkey cells. The enzymatic inactivation of BiP did not interfere with its ability to bind to Ig heavy chains in vivo but did inhibit ATP-mediated release of heavy chains in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopy revealed vesiculation of the ER membranes in COS cells expressing BiP ATPase mutants. ER disruption was not observed when a "44K" fragment of BiP that did not include the protein binding domain was similarly mutated but was observed when the protein binding region of BiP was expressed without an ATP binding domain. This suggests that BiP binding to target proteins as an inactive chaperone is responsible for the ER disruption. This is the first report on the in vivo expression of mammalian BiP mutants and is demonstration that in vitro-identified ATPase mutants behave as dominant negative mutants when expressed in vivo. Images PMID:7612964

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Link with Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yan, Bryan P.; Chan, Yin W. F.; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrhythmias represent a significant problem globally, leading to cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. There is increasing evidence to suggest that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is elevated in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, can lead to arrhythmogenesis. Method: A literature review was undertaken to screen for articles that investigated the effects of ROS on cardiac ion channel function, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Results: Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress is observed in heart failure, leading to increased production of ROS. Mitochondrial ROS, which is elevated in diabetes and hypertension, can stimulate its own production in a positive feedback loop, termed ROS-induced ROS release. Together with activation of mitochondrial inner membrane anion channels, it leads to mitochondrial depolarization. Abnormal function of these organelles can then activate downstream signaling pathways, ultimately culminating in altered function or expression of cardiac ion channels responsible for generating the cardiac action potential (AP). Vascular and cardiac endothelial cells become dysfunctional, leading to altered paracrine signaling to influence the electrophysiology of adjacent cardiomyocytes. All of these changes can in turn produce abnormalities in AP repolarization or conduction, thereby increasing likelihood of triggered activity and reentry. Conclusion: ROS plays a significant role in producing arrhythmic substrate. Therapeutic strategies targeting upstream events include production of a strong reducing environment or the use of pharmacological agents that target organelle-specific proteins and ion channels. These may relieve oxidative stress and in turn prevent arrhythmic complications in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure. PMID:27536244

  5. Impact on the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of turnip mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Romain; Agbeci, Maxime; Chen, Jun; Grondin, Gilles; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    The impact of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) infection on the endomembranes of the host early secretory pathway was investigated using an infectious clone that has been engineered for tagging viral membrane structures with a fluorescent protein fused to the viral protein 6K(2). TuMV infection led to the amalgamation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, COPII coatamers, and chloroplasts into a perinuclear globular structure that also contained viral proteins. One consequence of TuMV infection was that protein secretion was blocked at the ER-Golgi interface. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments indicated that the perinuclear structure cannot be restocked in viral components but was dynamically connected to the bulk of the Golgi apparatus and the ER. Experiments with 6K(2) fused to photoactivable green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that production of motile peripheral 6K(2) vesicles was functionally linked to the perinuclear structure. Disruption of the early secretory pathway did not prevent the formation of the perinuclear globular structure, enhanced the clustering of peripheral 6K(2) vesicles with COPII coatamers, and led to inhibition of cell-to-cell virus movement. This suggests that a functional secretory pathway is not required for the formation of the TuMV perinuclear globular structure and peripheral vesicles but is needed for successful viral intercellular propagation.

  6. ATG5 defines a phagophore domain connected to the endoplasmic reticulum during autophagosome formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Romain; Marion, Jessica; Le Borgne, Rémi; Satiat-Jeunemaitre, Béatrice; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe

    2014-06-20

    Autophagosomes are the organelles responsible for macroautophagy and arise, in yeast and animals, from the sealing of a cup-shaped double-membrane precursor, the phagophore. How the phagophore is generated and grows into a sealed autophagosome is still not clear in detail, and unknown in plants. This is due, in part, to the scarcity of structurally informative, real-time imaging data of the required protein machinery at the phagophore formation site. Here we find that in intact living Arabidopsis tissue, autophagy-related protein ATG5, which is essential for autophagosome formation, is present at the phagophore site from early, sub-resolution stages and later defines a torus-shaped structure on a flat cisternal early phagophore. Movement and expansion of this structure are accompanied by the underlying endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting tight connections between the two compartments. Detailed real-time and 3D imaging of the growing phagophore are leveraged to propose a model for autophagosome formation in plants.

  7. The Role of p58IPK in Protecting the Stressed Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, D. Thomas; Kang, Sang-Wook; Goodman, Alan G.; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Taunton, Jack; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The preemptive quality control (pQC) pathway protects cells from acute endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by attenuating translocation of nascent proteins despite their targeting to translocons at the ER membrane. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that the DnaJ protein p58IPK plays an essential role in this process via HSP70 recruitment to the cytosolic face of translocons for extraction of translocationally attenuated nascent chains. Our analyses revealed that the heightened stress sensitivity of p58−/− cells was not due to an impairment of the pQC pathway or elevated ER substrate burden during acute stress. Instead, the lesion was in the protein processing capacity of the ER lumen, where p58IPK was found to normally reside in association with BiP. ER lumenal p58IPK could be coimmunoprecipitated with a newly synthesized secretory protein in vitro and stimulated protein maturation upon overexpression in cells. These results identify a previously unanticipated location for p58IPK in the ER lumen where its putative function as a cochaperone explains the stress-sensitivity phenotype of knockout cells and mice. PMID:17567950

  8. PACS-2 controls endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria communication and Bid-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Simmen, Thomas; Aslan, Joseph E; Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastassia D; Thomas, Laurel; Wan, Lei; Xiang, Yang; Feliciangeli, Sylvain F; Hung, Chien-Hui; Crump, Colin M; Thomas, Gary

    2005-02-23

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria form contacts that support communication between these two organelles, including synthesis and transfer of lipids, and the exchange of calcium, which regulates ER chaperones, mitochondrial ATP production, and apoptosis. Despite the fundamental roles for ER-mitochondria contacts, little is known about the molecules that regulate them. Here we report the identification of a multifunctional sorting protein, PACS-2, that integrates ER-mitochondria communication, ER homeostasis, and apoptosis. PACS-2 controls the apposition of mitochondria with the ER, as depletion of PACS-2 causes BAP31-dependent mitochondria fragmentation and uncoupling from the ER. PACS-2 also controls formation of ER lipid-synthesizing centers found on mitochondria-associated membranes and ER homeostasis. However, in response to apoptotic inducers, PACS-2 translocates Bid to mitochondria, which initiates a sequence of events including the formation of mitochondrial truncated Bid, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase-3, thereby causing cell death. Together, our results identify PACS-2 as a novel sorting protein that links the ER-mitochondria axis to ER homeostasis and the control of cell fate, and provide new insights into Bid action.

  9. Calcium transport in tonoplast and endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells. [Daucus carota Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, D.R.; Sze, H.

    1986-02-01

    Two active calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) transport systems have been identified and partially characterized in membrane vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers). Both transport systems required MgATP for activity and were enhanced by 10 millimolar oxalate. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in membrane vesicles derived from isolated vacuoles equilibrated at 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with Cl/sup -/-stimulated, NO/sub 3//sup -/-inhibited ATPase activity on sucrose density gradients. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in this system was insensitive to vanadate, but was inhibited by nitrate, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), and 4,4-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulfonic acid (DIDS). The K/sub m/ for MgATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ were 0.1 mM and 21 micromolar, respectively. The predominant Ca/sup 2 +/ transport system detectable in microsomal membrane preparations equilibrated at a density of 1.13 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker, antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport activity and the ER marker also shifted in parallel in ER shifting experiments. This transport system was inhibited by vanadate (I/sub 50/ = 12 micromolar) and was insensitive to nitrate, CCCP, DCCD, and DIDS. Transport exhibited cooperative MgATP dependent kinetics. Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent kinetics were complex with an apparent K/sub m/ ranging from 0.7 to 2 micromolar. We conclude that the vacuolar-derived system is a Ca/sup 2 +//H/sup +/ antiport located on the tonoplast and that the microsomal transport system is a Ca,Mg-ATPase enriched on the ER. These two Ca/sup 2 +/ transport systems are proposed to restore and maintain cytoplasmic Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis under changing cellular and environmental conditions.

  10. Focal calcium monitoring with targeted nanosensors at the cytosolic side of endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanyan; Arai, Satoshi; Takei, Yoshiaki; Murata, Atsushi; Takeoka, Shinji; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ca2+ distribution is spatially and temporally non-uniform inside cells due to cellular compartmentalization. However, Ca2+ sensing with small organic dyes, such as fura-2 and fluo-4, has been practically applied at a single cell level where the averaged signal from freely diffusing dye molecules is acquired. In this study, we aimed to target azide-functionalized fura-2 (N3-fura-2) to a specific site of subcellular compartments to realize focal Ca2+ sensing. Using scAVD (single-chain avidin)–biotin interaction and a copper-free click reaction system, we linked N3-fura-2 to specifically-targeted scAVD protein fused with a red fluorescent protein mCherry, so that Ca2+ sensors conjugated with four N3-fura-2 dyes with dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-PEG4-biotin as a linker were generated at subcellular compartments in living cells. In cytoplasm, N3-fura-2 showed a prolonged retention period after binding to scAVD. Furthermore, the reacted N3-fura-2 was retained inside cells even after free dyes were washed out by methanol fixation. When scAVD was overexpressed on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, N3-fura-2 was accumulated on ER membranes. Upon histamine stimulation, which increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, ER-localized N3-fura-2 successfully sensed the Ca2+ level changes at the cytosolic side of ER membrane. Our study demonstrated specific targeting of N3-fura-2 to subcellular compartments and the ability of sensing focal Ca2+ level changes with the specifically targeted Ca2+ sensors. PMID:27877882

  11. Focal calcium monitoring with targeted nanosensors at the cytosolic side of endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanyan; Arai, Satoshi; Takei, Yoshiaki; Murata, Atsushi; Takeoka, Shinji; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) distribution is spatially and temporally non-uniform inside cells due to cellular compartmentalization. However, Ca(2+) sensing with small organic dyes, such as fura-2 and fluo-4, has been practically applied at a single cell level where the averaged signal from freely diffusing dye molecules is acquired. In this study, we aimed to target azide-functionalized fura-2 (N3-fura-2) to a specific site of subcellular compartments to realize focal Ca(2+) sensing. Using scAVD (single-chain avidin)-biotin interaction and a copper-free click reaction system, we linked N3-fura-2 to specifically-targeted scAVD protein fused with a red fluorescent protein mCherry, so that Ca(2+) sensors conjugated with four N3-fura-2 dyes with dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-PEG4-biotin as a linker were generated at subcellular compartments in living cells. In cytoplasm, N3-fura-2 showed a prolonged retention period after binding to scAVD. Furthermore, the reacted N3-fura-2 was retained inside cells even after free dyes were washed out by methanol fixation. When scAVD was overexpressed on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, N3-fura-2 was accumulated on ER membranes. Upon histamine stimulation, which increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, ER-localized N3-fura-2 successfully sensed the Ca(2+) level changes at the cytosolic side of ER membrane. Our study demonstrated specific targeting of N3-fura-2 to subcellular compartments and the ability of sensing focal Ca(2+) level changes with the specifically targeted Ca(2+) sensors.

  12. Translocation of apolipoprotein B across the endoplasmic reticulum is blocked in a nonhepatic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Thrift, R N; Drisko, J; Dueland, S; Trawick, J D; Davis, R A

    1992-01-01

    To explore the process of lipoprotein assembly, plasmids encoding truncated forms of apolipoprotein B (apoB) were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts. (One, encoding apoB53, the N-terminal 53% of apoB100, can direct the assembly and secretion of lipoproteins when expressed in hepatoma cells, while the other, encoding the shorter apoB15, does not direct lipoprotein assembly.) Expression of apoB15 in CHO cells resulted in the accumulation of apoB15 protein in both medium and cells. In contrast, apoB was not detectable in medium or within CHO cells transfected with the plasmid encoding apoB53, despite the expression of apoB53 mRNA. ApoB53 did accumulate within transfected cells incubated with the thiol protease inhibitor N-acetylleucylleucylnorleucinal (ALLN), suggesting that it is synthesized but completely degraded in the absence of the inhibitor. ApoB53 was not secreted despite its presence within ALLN-treated cells. Essentially all the apoB53 that accumulated in microsomes from ALLN-treated cells was associated with the membrane and was susceptible to degradation by exogenous trypsin, indicating exposure on the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. Thus, translocation of apoB53 across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is blocked. However, the apoB53 bound to concanavalin A, suggesting that it is glycosylated and therefore partly exposed to the lumen as well. ApoB requires a unique process, not expressed in CHO fibroblasts, for its complete translocation and entrance into the secretory pathway. This process might account for the inability of abetalipoproteinemic patients to secrete apoB. Images PMID:1409618

  13. CSB ablation induced apoptosis is mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Manuela; Balzerano, Alessio; Arisi, Ivan; D’Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Bongiorni, Silvia; Brancorsini, Stefano; Frontini, Mattia; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The DNA repair protein Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) has been recently identified as a promising anticancer target. Suppression, by antisense technology, of this protein causes devastating effects on tumor cells viability, through a massive induction of apoptosis, while being non-toxic to non-transformed cells. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects observed after CSB ablation, global gene expression patterns were determined, to identify genes that were significantly differentially regulated as a function of CSB expression. Our findings revealed that response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and response to unfolded proteins were ranked top amongst the cellular processes affected by CSB suppression. The major components of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway, including pro-apoptotic factors downstream of the ATF3-CHOP cascade, were dramatically up-regulated. Altogether our findings add new pieces to the understanding of CSB mechanisms of action and to the molecular basis of CS syndrome. PMID:28253359

  14. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  15. Characteristics of endoplasmic reticulum-derived transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated vesicles that mediate protein transport from the ER to Golgi membranes in perforated yeast. These vesicles, which form de novo during in vitro incubations, carry lumenal and membrane proteins that include core-glycosylated pro-alpha-factor, Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1, but not ER-resident Kar2 or Sec61 proteins. Thus, lumenal and membrane proteins in the ER are sorted prior to transport vesicle scission. Inhibition of Ypt1p-function, which prevents newly formed vesicles from docking to cis-Golgi membranes, was used to block transport. Vesicles that accumulate are competent for fusion with cis-Golgi membranes, but not with ER membranes, and thus are functionally committed to vectorial transport. A 900-fold enrichment was developed using differential centrifugation and a series of velocity and equilibrium density gradients. Electron microscopic analysis shows a uniform population of 60 nm vesicles that lack peripheral protein coats. Quantitative Western blot analysis indicates that protein markers of cytosol and cellular membranes are depleted throughout the purification, whereas the synaptobrevin-like Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1 proteins are highly enriched. Uncoated ER-derived transport vesicles (ERV) contain twelve major proteins that associate tightly with the membrane. The ERV proteins may represent abundant cargo and additional targeting molecules. PMID:8063853

  16. GADD34 Keeps the mTOR Pathway Inactivated in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Related Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Holczer, Marianna; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Kapuy, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    The balance of protein synthesis and proteolysis (i.e. proteostasis) is maintained by a complex regulatory network in which mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin serine/threonine kinase) pathway and unfolded protein response are prominent positive and negative actors. The interplay between the two systems has been revealed; however the mechanistic details of this crosstalk are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the elements of crosstalk during endoplasmic reticulum stress and to verify the key role of GADD34 in the connection with the mTOR pathway. Here, we demonstrate that a transient activation of autophagy is present in endoplasmic reticulum stress provoked by thapsigargin or tunicamycin, which is turned into apoptotic cell death. The transient phase can be characterized by the elevation of the autophagic marker LC3II/I, by mTOR inactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation and increased GADD34 level. The switch from autophagy to apoptosis is accompanied with the appearance of apoptotic markers, mTOR reactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase inactivation and a decrease in GADD34. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine shortens the transient phase, while inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin or resveratrol prolongs it. Inhibition of GADD34 by guanabenz or transfection of the cells with siGADD34 results in down-regulation of autophagy-dependent survival and a quick activation of mTOR, followed by apoptotic cell death. The negative effect of GADD34 inhibition is diminished when guanabenz or siGADD34 treatment is combined with rapamycin or resveratrol addition. These data confirm that GADD34 constitutes a mechanistic link between endoplasmic reticulum stress and mTOR inactivation, therefore promotes cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:27992581

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  18. α-Synuclein controls mitochondrial calcium homeostasis by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Negro, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2012-05-25

    α-Synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but its physiological function and the mechanism leading to neuronal degeneration remain unknown. Because recent studies have highlighted a role for α-synuclein in regulating mitochondrial morphology and autophagic clearance, we investigated the effect of α-synuclein in HeLa cells on mitochondrial signaling properties focusing on Ca(2+) homeostasis, which controls essential bioenergetic functions. By using organelle-targeted Ca(2+)-sensitive aequorin probes, we demonstrated that α-synuclein positively affects Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria, augmenting the mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients elicited by agonists that induce endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. This effect is not dependent on the intrinsic Ca(2+) uptake capacity of mitochondria, as measured in permeabilized cells, but correlates with an increase in the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions. This action specifically requires the presence of the C-terminal α-synuclein domain. Conversely, α-synuclein siRNA silencing markedly reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, causing profound alterations in organelle morphology. The enhanced accumulation of α-synuclein into the cells causes the redistribution of α-synuclein to localized foci and, similarly to the silencing of α-synuclein, reduces the ability of mitochondria to accumulate Ca(2+). The absence of efficient Ca(2+) transfer from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria results in augmented autophagy that, in the long range, could compromise cellular bioenergetics. Overall, these findings demonstrate a key role for α-synuclein in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis in physiological conditions. Elevated α-synuclein expression and/or eventually alteration of the aggregation properties cause the redistribution of the protein within the cell and the loss of modulation on mitochondrial function.

  19. Sterol carrier protein-2 localization in endoplasmic reticulum and role in phospholipid formation.

    PubMed

    Starodub, O; Jolly, C A; Atshaves, B P; Roths, J B; Murphy, E J; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    2000-10-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2; also called nonspecific lipid transfer protein) binds fatty acids and fatty acyl-CoAs, its role in fatty acid metabolism is not fully understood. L-cell fibroblasts stably expressing SCP-2 were used to resolve the relationship between SCP-2 intracellular location and fatty acid transacylation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Indirect immunofluorescence double labeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy detected SCP-2 in peroxisomes > endoplasmic reticulum > mitochondria > lysosomes. SCP-2 enhanced incorporation of exogenous [(3)H]oleic acid into phospholipids and triacylglycerols of overexpressing cells 1.6- and 2.5-fold, respectively, stimulated microsomal incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleoyl-CoA into phosphatidic acid in vitro 13-fold, and exhibited higher specificity for unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl-CoA. SCP-2 enhanced the rate-limiting step in microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis mediated by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. SCP-2 also enhanced microsomal acyl-chain remodeling of phosphatidylethanolamine up to fivefold and phosphatidylserine twofold, depending on the specific fatty acyl-CoA, but had no effect on other phospholipid classes. In summary, these results were consistent with a role for SCP-2 in phospholipid synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  1. Redox-assisted regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum by disulfide reductase ERdj5

    PubMed Central

    Ushioda, Ryo; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Inoue, Michio; Watanabe, Satoshi; Okumura, Masaki; Maegawa, Ken-ichi; Uegaki, Kaiku; Fujii, Shohei; Fukuda, Yasuko; Umitsu, Masataka; Takagi, Junichi; Inaba, Kenji; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is an important second messenger that regulates numerous cellular functions. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) is strictly controlled by Ca2+ channels and pumps on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membranes. The ER calcium pump, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), imports Ca2+ from the cytosol into the ER in an ATPase activity-dependent manner. The activity of SERCA2b, the ubiquitous isoform of SERCA, is negatively regulated by disulfide bond formation between two luminal cysteines. Here, we show that ERdj5, a mammalian ER disulfide reductase, which we reported to be involved in the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins, activates the pump function of SERCA2b by reducing its luminal disulfide bond. Notably, ERdj5 activated SERCA2b at a lower ER luminal [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]ER), whereas a higher [Ca2+]ER induced ERdj5 to form oligomers that were no longer able to interact with the pump, suggesting [Ca2+]ER-dependent regulation. Binding Ig protein, an ER-resident molecular chaperone, exerted a regulatory role in the oligomerization by binding to the J domain of ERdj5. These results identify ERdj5 as one of the master regulators of ER calcium homeostasis and thus shed light on the importance of cross talk among redox, Ca2+, and protein homeostasis in the ER. PMID:27694578

  2. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism.

  3. Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex can occur during meiotic metaphase in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have previously shown that Xenopus oocytes arrested at second meiotic metaphase lost their characteristic multicisternal Golgi apparati and cannot secrete proteins into the surrounding medium. In this paper, we extend these studies to ask whether intracellular transport events affecting the movement of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus are also similarly inhibited in such oocytes. Using the acquisition of resistance to endoglycosidase H (endo H) as an assay for movement to the Golgi, we find that within 6 h, up to 66% of the influenza virus membrane protein, hemagglutinin (HA), synthesized from injected synthetic RNA, can move to the Golgi apparati in nonmatured oocytes; indeed after longer periods some correctly folded HA can be detected at the cell surface where it distributes in a nonpolarized fashion. In matured oocytes, up to 49% of the HA becomes endo H resistant in the same 6-h period. We conclude that movement from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi can occur in matured oocytes despite the dramatic fragmentation of the Golgi apparati that we observe to occur on maturation. This observation of residual protein movement during meiotic metaphase contrasts with the situation at mitotic metabphase in cultured mammalian cells where all movement ceases, but resembles that in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae where transport is unaffected. PMID:2793929

  4. The Natural Pesticide Dihydrorotenone Induces Human Plasma Cell Apoptosis by Triggering Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Activating p38 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Biyin; Zhang, Zubin; Li, Jie; Schimmer, Aaron D.; He, Sudan; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a natural pesticide widely used in farming industry, such as organic produces. DHR is a potent mitochondrial inhibitor and probably induces Parkinsonian syndrome, however, it is not known whether DHR is toxic to other systems. In the present study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of DHR on human plasma cells. As predicted, DHR impaired mitochondrial function by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential in plasma cells. Because mito-dysfunction leads to unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, we examined the signature proteins in ER stress, including GRP78, ATF4, and CHOP. After DHR treatment, these proteins were significantly upregulated. It is reported that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, in the subsequent study, DHR was found to activate p38 but not the JNK signaling. When pre-treated with p38 inhibitor SB203580, activation of p38 and cell apoptosis induced by DHR was partially blocked. Thus, we found that DHR induced human plasma cell death by activating the p38 but not the JNK signaling pathway. Because plasma cells are very important in the immune system, this study provided a new insight in the safety evaluation of DHR application. PMID:23922854

  5. Interaction between endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase 8 activation in retrovirus MoMuLV-ts1-infected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Wong, Paul K Y

    2006-05-10

    The murine retrovirus, MoMuLV-ts1, induces progressive paralysis and immune deficiency in FVB/N mice. We have reported previously that ts1 infection causes apoptosis in astrocytes via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress (Liu, N., Kuang, X., Kim, H.T., Stoica, G., Qiang, W., Scofield, V.L., Wong, P.K.Y. Wong. 2004. Possible involvement of both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-dependent pathways in MoMuLV-ts1-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. J. NeuroVirol. 10, 189-198). In the present study, we show that caspase 8 activation in these cells is mediated through ER stress-associated elevation of death receptor DR5 and the C/EBP homologous protein (GADD153/CHOP), an ER stress-initiated transcription factor, rather than through TNFalpha and TNF-R1 interactions on the cell surface. Treatment with Z-IETD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase 8 enzymatic activity, reduced ER stress by two mechanisms: by inhibiting caspase 8 activation, and by preventing cleavage of the ER-associated membrane protein BAP31 into BAP20, which exacerbates the ER stress response. These findings suggest that caspase 8- and ER stress-associated apoptotic pathways are linked in ts1-infected astrocytes.

  6. The procaspase-8 isoform, procaspase-8L, recruited to the BAP31 complex at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, David G; Nguyen, Mai; Kuppig, Stephan; Reth, Michael; Shore, Gordon C

    2002-04-02

    BAP31 is an integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and a substrate of caspase-8. Here, we describe the procaspase-8 isoform, procaspase-8L, which is ubiquitously expressed and selectively recruited to the BAP31 complex in response to apoptotic signaling by E1A. Procaspase-8L is characterized by the N-terminal extension (Nex) domain, which extends procaspase-8/a at the N terminus and is required for selective association of procaspase-8L with the BAP31 complex. Gene deletion identified BAP31 and related BAP29 as required for processing of procaspase-8L in response to E1A, by a FADD-independent mechanism that was blocked by BCL-2. Further, Bap29,31 deletion, as well as a Nex-domain dominant-negative mutant, curtailed the activation of downstream caspases (IETDase and DEVDase) and cell death in response to E1A. Preferential recruitment of procaspase-8L by the BAP31 complex at the endoplasmic reticulum suggests an additional pathway for regulating initiator caspase-8 during apoptosis.

  7. Calmodulin Activation Limits the Rate of KCNQ2 K+ Channel Exit from the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; Aivar, Paloma; Etxeberría, Ainhoa; Rodriguez-Alfaro, Jose Angel; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The potential regulation of protein trafficking by calmodulin (CaM) is a novel concept that remains to be substantiated. We proposed that KCNQ2 K+ channel trafficking is regulated by CaM binding to the C-terminal A and B helices. Here we show that the L339R mutation in helix A, which is linked to human benign neonatal convulsions, perturbs CaM binding to KCNQ2 channels and prevents their correct trafficking to the plasma membrane. We used glutathione S-transferase fused to helices A and B to examine the impact of this and other mutations in helix A (I340A, I340E, A343D, and R353G) on the interaction with CaM. The process appears to require at least two steps; the first involves the transient association of CaM with KCNQ2, and in the second, the complex adopts an “active” conformation that is more stable and is that which confers the capacity to exit the endoplasmic reticulum. Significantly, the mutations that we have analyzed mainly affect the stability of the active configuration of the complex, whereas Ca2+ alone appears to affect the initial binding step. The spectrum of responses from this collection of mutants revealed a strong correlation between adopting the active conformation and channel trafficking in mammalian cells. These data are entirely consistent with the concept that CaM bound to KCNQ2 acts as a Ca2+ sensor, conferring Ca2+ dependence to the trafficking of the channel to the plasma membrane and fully explaining the requirement of CaM binding for KCNQ2 function. PMID:19494108

  8. Identification, characterization, and expression of the BiP endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperonins in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, T T; Buck, G A

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated, characterized, and examined the expression of the genes encoding BiP endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperonins responsible for transport, maturation, and proper folding of membrane and secreted proteins from two divergent strains of Pneumocystis carinii. The BiP genes, Pcbip and Prbip, from the P. c. carinii (prototype) strain and the P. c. rattus (variant) strain, respectively, are single-copy genes that reside on chromosomes of approximately 330 and approximately 350 kbp. Both genes encode approximately 72.5-kDa proteins that are most homologous to BiP genes from other organisms and exhibit the amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal ER retention sequences that are hallmarks of BiP proteins. We established short-term P. carinii cultures to examine expression and induction of Pcbip in response to heat shock, glucose starvation, inhibition of protein transport or N-linked glycosylation, and other conditions known to affect proper transport, glycosylation, and maturation of membrane and secreted proteins. These studies indicated that Pcbip mRNA is constitutively expressed but induced under conditions known to induce BiP expression in other organisms. In contrast to mammalian BiP genes but like other fungal BiP genes, P. carinii BiP mRNA levels are induced by heat shock. Finally, the Prbip and Pcbip coding sequences surprisingly exhibit only approximately 83% DNA and approximately 90% amino acid sequence identity and show only limited conservation in noncoding flanking and intron sequences. Analyses of the P. carinii BiP gene sequences support inclusion of P. carinii among the fungi but suggest a large divergence and possible speciation among P. carinii strains infecting a given host. PMID:8890193

  9. Protrudin regulates endoplasmic reticulum morphology and function associated with the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yutaka; Shirane, Michiko; Matsuzaki, Fumiko; Saita, Shotaro; Ohnishi, Takafumi; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2014-05-09

    Protrudin is a membrane protein that regulates polarized vesicular trafficking in neurons. The protrudin gene (ZFYVE27) is mutated in a subset of individuals with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and protrudin is therefore also referred to as spastic paraplegia (SPG) 33. We have now generated mice that express a transgene for dual epitope-tagged protrudin under control of a neuron-specific promoter, and we have subjected highly purified protrudin-containing complexes isolated from the brain of these mice to proteomics analysis to identify proteins that associate with protrudin. Protrudin was found to interact with other HSP-related proteins including myelin proteolipid protein 1 (SPG2), atlastin-1 (SPG3A), REEP1 (SPG31), REEP5 (similar to REEP1), Kif5A (SPG10), Kif5B, Kif5C, and reticulon 1, 3, and 4 (similar to reticulon 2, SPG12). Membrane topology analysis indicated that one of three hydrophobic segments of protrudin forms a hydrophobic hairpin domain similar to those of other SPG proteins. Protrudin was found to localize predominantly to the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and forced expression of protrudin promoted the formation and stabilization of the tubular ER network. The protrudin(G191V) mutant, which has been identified in a subset of HSP patients, manifested an increased intracellular stability, and cells expressing this mutant showed an increased susceptibility to ER stress. Our results thus suggest that protrudin contributes to the regulation of ER morphology and function, and that its deregulation by mutation is a causative defect in HSP.

  10. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  11. Endocytosis of simian virus 40 into the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The endocytosis of SV-40 into CV-1 cells we studied using biochemical and ultrastructural techniques. The half-time of binding of [35S]methionine-radiolabeled SV-40 to CV-1 cells was 25 min. Most of the incoming virus particles remained undegraded for several hours. Electron microscopy showed that some virus entered the endosomal/lysosomal pathway via coated vesicles, while the majority were endocytosed via small uncoated vesicles. After infection at high multiplicity, one third of total cell-associated virus was observed to enter the ER, starting 1-2 h after virus application. The viruses were present in large, tubular, smooth membrane networks generated as extentions of the ER. The results describe a novel and unique membrane transport pathway that allows endocytosed viral particles to be targeted from the plasma membrane to the ER. PMID:2556405

  12. BAP31 and BiP are essential for dislocation of SV40 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Roger; Andritschke, Daniel; Friebe, Sarah; Herzog, Fabian; Luisoni, Stefania; Heger, Thomas; Helenius, Ari

    2011-09-25

    How non-enveloped viruses overcome host cell membranes is poorly understood. Here, we show that after endocytosis and transport to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but before crossing the ER membrane to the cytosol, incoming simian virus 40 particles are structurally remodelled leading to exposure of the amino-terminal sequence of the minor viral protein VP2. These hydrophobic sequences anchor the virus to membranes. A negatively charged residue, Glu 17, in the α-helical, membrane-embedded peptide is essential for infection, most likely by introducing an 'irregularity' recognized by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) system for membrane proteins. Using a siRNA-mediated screen, the lumenal chaperone BiP and the ER-membrane protein BAP31 (both involved in ERAD) were identified as being essential for infection. They co-localized with the virus in discrete foci and promoted its ER-to-cytosol dislocation. Virus-like particles devoid of VP2 failed to cross the membrane. The results demonstrated that ERAD-factors assist virus transport across the ER membrane.

  13. Molecular Species of Phosphatidylinositol-Cycle Intermediates in the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Plasma Membrane†

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Myers, David S.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Brown, H. Alex; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is a process requiring both the plasma and ER membranes. We have determined the distribution of phosphatidic acid (PA) and PI and their acyl chain compositions in these two subcellular membranes using mass spectrometry. We assessed the role of PI cycling in determining the molecular species and quantity of these lipids by comparing the compositions of the two membranes isolated from embryonic fibroblasts obtained from diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKε) knock out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. In the KO cells the conversion of arachidonoyl-rich DAG to PA is blocked by the absence of DGKε, resulting in reducing the rate of PI-cycling. The acyl chain composition is very similar for PI or PA in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) vs. plasma membrane (PM) and for WT vs. KO. However, the acyl chain profile for PI is very different from that for PA. This indicates that DGKε is not facilitating the direct transfer of a specific species of PA between the PM and the ER. About 20% of the PA in the ER membrane has one short acyl chain of 14 carbons or less. These species of PA are not converted into PI but may play a role in stabilizing regions of high positive curvature in the ER. There are also PI species in both the ER and PM for which there is no detectable PA precursor, indicating that these species of PI are unlikely to arise via the PI-cycle. We find that in the PM of KO cells the levels of PI and of PA are decreased about three-fold in comparison with either the PM of WT cells or in comparison with the ER of KO cells. The PI-cycle is slowed in the KO cells, hence the lipid intermediates of the PI-cycle can no longer be interconverted and are depleted from the PI-cycle by conversion to other species. There is less of an effect of the depletion in the ER where de novo synthesis of PA occurs in comparison with the PM. PMID:20000336

  14. Subcellular calcium localization and AT0-dependent Ca2+-uptake by smooth endoplasmic reticulum in an invertebrate photoreceptor cell. An ultrastrucutral, cytochemical and X-ray microanalytical study.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1979-10-01

    In Hirudo medicinalis an extensive and highly elaborate three dimensional network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae is found in very close structural relationship to the receptive (microvillar) membrane, as reported for many other invertebrates. A variant of the potassium pyroantimonate technique showed that these submicrovillar endoplasmic reticulum cisternae (SMC) and mitochondria are major intracellular calcium stores. Furthermore, using saponine-skinned photoreceptors for an in situ accumulation experiment, calcium oxalate precipitates in SMC demonstrate that this organelle is able to accumulate Ca2+ from a concentration of 2 x 10(-5) M, when ATP, Mg2+, and oxalate ions are present in the accumulation medium. This result provides direct evidence for the hypothesis that SMC may play a particularly important role in the regulation of intracellular ionized calcium in invertebrate photoreceptor cells. Morphological evidence supports this view.

  15. Laminin β2 Gene Missense Mutation Produces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying Maggie; Zhou, Yuefang; Go, Gloriosa; Marmerstein, Joseph T.; Kikkawa, Yamato

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the laminin β2 gene (LAMB2) cause Pierson syndrome, a severe congenital nephrotic syndrome with ocular and neurologic defects. LAMB2 is a component of the laminin-521 (α5β2γ1) trimer, an important constituent of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The C321R-LAMB2 missense mutation leads to congenital nephrotic syndrome but only mild extrarenal symptoms; the mechanisms underlying the development of proteinuria with this mutation are unclear. We generated three transgenic mouse lines, in which rat C321R-LAMB2 replaced mouse LAMB2 in the GBM. During the first postnatal month, expression of C321R-LAMB2 attenuated the severe proteinuria exhibited by Lamb2−/− mice in a dose-dependent fashion; proteinuria eventually increased, however, leading to renal failure. The C321R mutation caused defective secretion of laminin-521 from podocytes to the GBM accompanied by podocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, likely resulting from protein misfolding. Moreover, ER stress preceded the onset of significant proteinuria and was manifested by induction of the ER-initiated apoptotic signal C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), ER distention, and podocyte injury. Treatment of cells expressing C321R-LAMB2 with the chemical chaperone taurodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), which can facilitate protein folding and trafficking, greatly increased the secretion of the mutant LAMB2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mild variant of Pierson syndrome caused by the C321R-LAMB2 mutation may be a prototypical ER storage disease, which may benefit from treatment approaches that target the handling of misfolded proteins. PMID:23723427

  16. Neuronal calcium wave propagation varies with changes in endoplasmic reticulum parameters: a computer model

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; McDougal, Robert A.; Sherif, Mohamed A.; Fall, Christopher P.; Hines, Michael L.; Lytton, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) waves provide a complement to neuronal electrical signaling, forming a key part of a neuron’s second messenger system. We developed a reaction-diffusion model of an apical dendrite with diffusible inositol triphosphate (IP3), diffusible Ca2+, IP3 receptors (IP3Rs), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ leak, and ER pump (SERCA) on ER. Ca2+ is released from ER stores via IP3Rs upon binding of IP3 and Ca2+. This results in Ca2+-induced-Ca2+-release (CICR) and increases Ca2+ spread. At least two modes of Ca2+ wave spread have been suggested: a continuous mode based on presumed relative homogeneity of ER within the cell; and a pseudo-saltatory model where Ca2+ regeneration occurs at discrete points with diffusion between them. We compared the effects of three patterns of hypothesized IP3R distribution: 1. continuous homogeneous ER, 2. hotspots with increased IP3R density (IP3R hotspots), 3. areas of increased ER density (ER stacks). All three modes produced Ca2+ waves with velocities similar to those measured in vitro (~50–90µm /sec). Continuous ER showed high sensitivity to IP3R density increases, with time to onset reduced and speed increased. Increases in SERCA density resulted in opposite effects. The measures were sensitive to changes in density and spacing of IP3R hotspots and stacks. Increasing the apparent diffusion coefficient of Ca2+ substantially increased wave speed. An extended electrochemical model, including voltage gated calcium channels and AMPA synapses, demonstrated that membrane priming via AMPA stimulation enhances subsequent Ca2+ wave amplitude and duration. Our modeling suggests that pharmacological targeting of IP3Rs and SERCA could allow modulation of Ca2+ wave propagation in diseases where Ca2+ dysregulation has been implicated. PMID:25734493

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heat- and Shake-Induced Injury in the Rat Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Peng; Xu, Jianqin; He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Yin, Jie; Wan, Changrong; mei, Chen; Yin, Yulong; Xu, Xiaolong; Xia, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying damage to rat small intestine in heat- and shake-induced stress. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 3-day stressed group treated 2 h daily for 3 days on a rotary platform at 35°C and 60 r/min. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained paraffin sections of the jejunum following stress revealed shedding of the villus tip epithelial cells and lamina propria exposure. Apoptosis increased at the villus tip and extended to the basement membrane. Photomicrographs revealed that the microvilli were shorter and sparser; the nuclear envelope invaginated and gaps in the karyolemma increased; and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) swelled significantly. Gene microarray analysis assessed 93 differentially expressed genes associated with apoptosis, ER stress, and autophagy. Relevant genes were compiled from the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Forty-one genes were involved in the regulation of apoptosis, fifteen were related to autophagy, and eleven responded to ER stress. According to KEGG, the apoptosis pathways, mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK) signaling pathway, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and regulation of autophagy were involved. Caspase3 (Casp3), caspase12 (Casp12), and microtubule-associate proteins 1 light chain 3(LC3) increased significantly at the villus tip while mTOR decreased; phosphorylated-AKT (P-AKT) decreased. ER stress was involved and induced autophagy and apoptosis in rat intestinal damage following heat and shake stress. Bioinformatic analysis will help determine the underlying mechanisms in stress-induced damage in the small intestine. PMID:26636675

  18. Crocetin prevents retinal degeneration induced by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses via inhibition of caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Imai, Shunsuke; Nakanishi, Tomohiro; Umigai, Naofumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2011-01-10

    Crocetin is a carotenoid that is the aglicone of crocin, which are found in saffron stigmas (Crocus sativus L.) and gardenia fruit (Gardenia jasminoides Ellis). In this study, we investigated the effects of crocetin on retinal damage. To examine whether crocetin affects stress pathways, we investigated intracellular oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and caspases activation. In vitro, we employed cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5, a mouse ganglion cell-line transformed using E1A virus). Cell damage was induced by tunicamycin or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) exposure. Crocetin at a concentration of 3μM showed the inhibitory effect of 50-60% against tunicamycin- and H(2)O(2)-induced cell death and inhibited increase in caspase-3 and -9 activity. Moreover, crocetin inhibited the enzymatic activity of caspase-9 in a cell-free system. In vivo, retinal damage in mice was induced by exposure to white light at 8000lx for 3h after dark adaptation. Photoreceptor damage was evaluated by measuring the outer nuclear layer thickness at 5days after light exposure and recording the electroretinogram (ERG). Retinal cell damage was also detected with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining at 48h after light exposure. Crocetin at 100mg/kg, p.o. significantly inhibited photoreceptor degeneration and retinal dysfunction and halved the expression of TUNEL-positive cells. These results indicate that crocetin has protective effects against retinal damage in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the mechanism may inhibit increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities after retinal damage.

  19. Nongenomic STAT5-dependent effects on Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason E; Yang, Yang-Ming; Liang, Feng-Xia; Gough, Daniel J; Levy, David E; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2012-03-01

    We report unexpected nongenomic functions of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 species in the cytoplasm aimed at preserving the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in vascular cells. Immunoimaging and green fluorescent protein-tagged-STAT5a protein localization studies showed the constitutive association of nonphosphorylated STAT5a, and to a lesser extent STAT5b, with the Golgi apparatus and of STAT5a with centrosomes in human pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Acute knockdown of STAT5a/b species using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), including in the presence of an mRNA synthesis inhibitor (5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole), produced a dramatic phenotype within 1 day, consisting of dilatation and fragmentation of Golgi cisternae, a marked tubule-to-cyst change in the ER, increased accumulation of reticulon-4 (RTN4)/Nogo-B and atlastin-3 (ATL3) at cyst-zone boundaries, cystic separation of the outer and inner nuclear membranes, accompanied by scalloped/lunate distortion of the nucleus, with accumulation of RTN4 on convex sides of distorted nuclei. These cells showed inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein glycoprotein trafficking, mitochondrial fragmentation, and reduced mitochondrial function. STAT5a/b(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts also showed altered ER/Golgi dynamics. RTN4 knockdown using siRNA did not affect development of the cystic phenotype; ATL3 siRNA led to effacement of cyst-zone boundaries. In magnetic-bead cross-immunopanning assays, ATL3 bound both STAT5a and STAT5b. Remarkably, this novel cystic ER/lunate nucleus phenotype was characteristic of vascular cells in arterial lesions of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension, an unrelentingly fatal human disease. These data provide evidence of a STAT-family protein regulating the structure of a cytoplasmic organelle and implicate this mechanism in the pathogenesis of a human disease.

  20. Ca2+ uptake by endoplasmic reticulum of renal cortex. I. Ionic requirements and regulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, D W; Hruska, K A

    1992-07-01

    A subcellular fraction enriched in cytochrome c reductase (7.9-fold) and relatively de-enriched (0.64-fold) in Na+/K(+)-ATPase was prepared from canine kidney cortex by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. It was shown by electron microscopy to consist primarily of a light fraction of endoplasmic reticulum (LER). LER vesicles displayed ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake that was insensitive to 10 mM KCN or NaN3, and was promptly released by 20 microM A23187 or ionomycin. Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) appeared to produce a time-dependent release of 45Ca2+. Vanadate inhibited 45Ca2+ uptake with a Ki approximately 0.3 mM, further suggesting that the activity resided in the ER rather than the plasma membrane. 45Ca2+ uptake by LER, at 5 microM total [Ca2+], displayed a strong dependence on divalent cations (Mg2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Mn2+ much greater than Ba2+ greater than or equal to Cd2+ greater than or equal to Sr2+, present at 2 mM) as well as on monovalent cations (Na+ greater than or equal to K+ + Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+ greater than choline +), and anions (Cl- greater than acetate- greater than or equal to NO3- greater than or equal to F- greater than H2PO4- much greater than gluconate- greater than or equal to oxalate= much greater than SO4=). It had a fairly narrow pH optimum (7.25-7.50). Preincubation (10 min) of LER vesicles with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulated LER Ca2+ uptake; this effect was enhanced in the presence of renal cytosol [5% (vol/vol)].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dynamics of Transitional Endoplasmic Reticulum Sites in Vertebrate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Adam T.; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2000-01-01

    A typical vertebrate cell contains several hundred sites of transitional ER (tER). Presumably, tER sites generate elements of the ER–Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), and ERGIC elements then generate Golgi cisternae. Therefore, characterizing the mechanisms that influence tER distribution may shed light on the dynamic behavior of the Golgi. We explored the properties of tER sites using Sec13 as a marker protein. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that tER sites are long-lived ER subdomains. tER sites proliferate during interphase but lose Sec13 during mitosis. Unlike ERGIC elements, tER sites move very little. Nevertheless, when microtubules are depolymerized with nocodazole, tER sites redistribute rapidly to form clusters next to Golgi structures. Hence, tER sites have the unusual property of being immobile, yet dynamic. These findings can be explained by a model in which new tER sites are created by retrograde membrane traffic from the Golgi. We propose that the tER–Golgi system is organized by mutual feedback between these two compartments. PMID:10982397

  2. Temperature- and acceptor-specificity of cell-free vesicular transfer from transitional endoplasmic reticulum to the cis Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Dunkle, S; Reust, T; Nowack, D D; Waits, L; Paulik, M; Morre, D M; Morre, D J

    1992-01-01

    The temperature dependence and specificity of transfer of membrane constituents from donor transitional endoplasmic reticulum to the cis Golgi apparatus were investigated using a cell-free system from rat liver. The radiolabelled transitional endoplasmic reticulum donors were prepared from slices of rat liver prelabelled with [14C]leucine. The acceptor Golgi apparatus elements were unlabelled and immobilized on nitrocellulose. When Golgi apparatus stacks were separated by preparative free-flow electrophoresis into subfractions enriched in cisternae derived from the cis, medial and trans portions of the stack respectively, efficient specific transfer was observed only to cis elements. Trans elements were devoid of specific acceptor capacity. Similarly, when transfer was determined as a function of temperature, a transition was observed in transfer activity between 12 degrees C and 18 degrees C similar to that seen in vivo for formation of the so-called 16 degrees C cis Golgi-located membrane compartment. Transfer at temperatures below 16 degrees C and transfer to trans Golgi apparatus compartments at temperatures either above or below 16 degrees C was similar and unspecific. The unspecific transfer at low temperature was pH independent, whereas specific transfer was greatest at the physiological pH of 7, and was reduced to 10% and 18% of that occurring at pH 8 and pH 5.5 respectively. These findings show that the cell-free system derived from rat liver exhibits a high degree of fidelity to transfer in vivo, an efficiency approaching that observed in vivo, and a nearly absolute acceptor specificity for cis Golgi apparatus. The acceptor-, temperature- and pH-specificity of the cell-free transfer, as well as the saturation kinetics exhibited with respect to acceptor Golgi apparatus, support the concept of transition-vesicle-specific docking sites of finite number associated with cis Golgi apparatus cisternae. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1472010

  3. Segregation of the polypeptide translocation apparatus to regions of the endoplasmic reticulum containing ribophorins and ribosomes. I. Functional tests on rat liver microsomal subfractions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A preparation of rat liver microsomes containing 70% of the total cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes was subfractionated by isopycnic density centrifugation. Twelve subfractions of different ribosome content ranging in density from 1.06 to 1.29 were obtained and analyzed with respect to marker enzymes, RNA, and protein content, as well as the capacity of these membranes to bind 80S ribosomes in vitro. After removal of native polysomes from these microsomal subfractions by puromycin in a buffer of high ionic strength their capacity to rebind 80S ribosomes approached levels found in the corresponding native membranes before ribosome stripping. This indicates that in vitro rebinding of ribosomes occurs to the same sites occupied in the cell by membrane-bound polysomes. Microsomes in the microsomal subfractions were also tested for their capacity to effect the translocation of nascent secretory proteins into the microsomal lumen utilizing a rabbit reticulocyte translation system programmed with mRNA coding for the precursor of human placental lactogen. Membranes from microsomes with the higher isopycnic density and a high ribosome content showed the highest translocation activity, whereas membranes derived from smooth microsomes had only a very low translocation activity. These results indicate the membranes of the rough and smooth portions of the endoplasmic reticulum are functionally differentiated so that sites for ribosome binding and the translocation of nascent polypeptides are segregated to the rough domain of the organelle. PMID:6501423

  4. A novel subfamily of Hsp70s in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    A, R; Tyson, J R; Stirling, C J

    1997-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum contains a number of proteins involved in the processing of secretory polypeptides. These include BiP, which is an Hsp70-family member highly conserved throughout evolution. BiP is known to be intimately involved in several aspects of protein biogenesis, but our understanding of these events has been complicated by the recent description of a novel Hsp70-related protein in yeast, Lhauthorp, whose functions overlap with those of BiP. Current indications are that this protein is distributed widely among eukaryotes and that it represents a distinct subfamily of the Hsp70 class of molecular chaperones.

  5. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  6. FrontiERs: movers and shapers of the higher plant cortical endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Imogen; Hawes, Chris; Frigerio, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in higher plants performs many important functions, yet our understanding of how its intricate network shape and dynamics relate to function is very limited. Recent work has begun to unpick key molecular players in the generation of the pleomorphic, highly dynamic ER network structure that pervades the entire cytoplasm. ER movement is acto-myosin dependent. ER shape is dependent on RHD3 (Root Hair Defective 3) and a family of proteins called reticulons. The major challenge that lies ahead is understanding how factors that control ER shape and movement are regulated and how this relates to the numerous functions of the ER.

  7. The metabolomic signature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy reveals endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Simard, Gilles; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Safiedeen, Zainab; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chupin, Stéphanie; Gadras, Cédric; Tessier, Lydie; Gueguen, Naïg; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Ferré, Marc; Bris, Céline; Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Miléa, Dan; Bonneau, Dominique; Lenaers, Guy; Martinez, M Carmen; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (MIM#535000), the commonest mitochondrial DNA-related disease, is caused by mutations affecting mitochondrial complex I. The clinical expression of the disorder, usually occurring in young adults, is typically characterized by subacute, usually sequential, bilateral visual loss, resulting from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. As the precise action of mitochondrial DNA mutations on the overall cell metabolism in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is unknown, we investigated the metabolomic profile of the disease. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 188 metabolites in fibroblasts from 16 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and eight healthy control subjects. Latent variable-based statistical methods were used to identify discriminating metabolites. One hundred and twenty-four of the metabolites were considered to be accurately quantified. A supervised orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis model separating patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy from control subjects showed good predictive capability (Q(2)cumulated = 0.57). Thirty-eight metabolites appeared to be the most significant variables, defining a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy metabolic signature that revealed decreased concentrations of all proteinogenic amino acids, spermidine, putrescine, isovaleryl-carnitine, propionyl-carnitine and five sphingomyelin species, together with increased concentrations of 10 phosphatidylcholine species. This signature was not reproduced by the inhibition of complex I with rotenone or piericidin A in control fibroblasts. The importance of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines in the Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy signature, together with the decreased amino acid pool, suggested an involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum. This was confirmed by the significantly increased phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α, as well as

  8. Isolation and fractionation of the endoplasmic reticulum from castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm for proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Simon, William J; Maltman, Daniel J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the preparation and isolation of highly purified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from the endosperm of developing and germinating castor bean (Ricinus communis) seeds to provide a purified organelle fraction for differential proteomic analyses. The method uses a two-step ultracentrifugation protocol first described by Coughlan (1) and uses sucrose density gradients and a sucrose flotation step to yield purified ER devoid of other contaminating endomembrane material. Using a combination of one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis the complexity and reproducibility of the protein profile of the purified organelle is evaluated prior to detailed proteomic analyses using mass spectrometry based techniques.

  9. The impact of the endoplasmic reticulum protein-folding environment on cancer development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Kaufman, Randal J

    2014-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle in eukaryotic cells for the storage and regulated release of calcium and as the entrance to the secretory pathway. Protein misfolding in the ER causes accumulation of misfolded proteins (ER stress) and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which has evolved to maintain a productive ER protein-folding environment. Both ER stress and UPR activation are documented in many different human cancers. In this Review, we summarize the impact of ER stress and UPR activation on every aspect of cancer and discuss outstanding questions for which answers will pave the way for therapeutics.

  10. Regulation of Protein Secretion Through Controlled Aggregation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Xiurong; Wardwell, Scott; Courage, Nancy L.; Volchuk, Allen; Keenan, Terence; Holt, Dennis A.; Gilman, Michael; Orci, Lelio; Cerasoli, Frank; Rothman, James E.; Clackson, Tim

    2000-02-01

    A system for direct pharmacologic control of protein secretion was developed to allow rapid and pulsatile delivery of therapeutic proteins. A protein was engineered so that it accumulated as aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum. Secretion was then stimulated by a synthetic small-molecule drug that induces protein disaggregation. Rapid and transient secretion of growth hormone and insulin was achieved in vitro and in vivo. A regulated pulse of insulin secretion resulted in a transient correction of serum glucose concentrations in a mouse model of hyperglycemia. This approach may make gene therapy a viable method for delivery of polypeptides that require rapid and regulated delivery.

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  12. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  13. The rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus visualized using specific antibodies in normal and tumoral prolactin cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies directed against membrane components of dog pancreas rough endoplasmic reticulum (A-RER) and rat liver Golgi apparatus (A-Golgi) (Louvard, D., H. Reggio, and G. Warren, 1982, J. Cell Biol. 92:92-107) have been applied to cultured rat prolactin (PRL) cells, either normal cells in primary cultures, or clonal GH3 cells. In normal PRL cells, the A-RER stained the membranes of the perinuclear cisternae as well as those of many parallel RER cisternae. The A-Golgi stained part of the Golgi membranes. In the stacks it stained the medial saccules and, with a decreasing intensity, the saccules of the trans side, as well as, in some cells, a linear cisterna in the center of the Golgi zone. It also stained the membrane of many small vesicles as well as that of lysosomelike structures in all cells. In contrast, it never stained the secretory granule membrane, except at the level of very few segregating granules on the trans face of the Golgi zone. In GH3 cells the A-RER stained the membrane of the perinuclear cisternae, as well as that of short discontinuous flat cisternae. The A-Golgi stained the same components of the Golgi zone as in normal PRL cells. In some cells of both types the A-Golgi also stained discontinuous patches on the plasma membrane and small vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. Immunostaining of Golgi membranes revealed modifications of membrane flow in relation to either acute stimulation of PRL release by thyroliberin or inhibition of basal secretion by monensin. PMID:6404908

  14. ER reorganization is remarkably induced in COS-7 cells accumulating transmembrane protein receptors not competent for export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Massimo; Crespi, Arianna; Polishchuk, Elena; Generoso, Serena; Martire, Gianluca; Colombo, Sara Francesca; Bonatti, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    The newly synthesized mutant L501fsX533 Frizzled-4 form and the alpha3beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in the absence of nicotine accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of COS-7 cells and induce the formation of large areas of smooth and highly convoluted cisternae. This results in a generalized block of the transport to the Golgi complex of newly synthesized proteins. Intriguingly, both effects happen peculiarly in COS-7 cells; HeLa, Huh-7, and HEK293 cells expressing the two receptors at similar level than COS-7 cells show normal ER and normal transport toward the plasma membrane. These results question the conclusion that a dominant-negative mechanism would explain the dominance of the mutant L501fsX533 Fz4 allele in the transmission of a form of Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Moreover, they indicate that the coordination of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in COS-7 cells is particularly error prone. This finding suggests that COS-7 cells may be extremely useful to study the molecular mechanisms regulating endoplasmic reticulum size and architecture.

  15. Analysis of a novel double-barreled anion channel from rat liver rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Morier, N; Sauvé, R

    1994-01-01

    The presence of anionic channels in stripped rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rat hepatocytes was investigated by fusing microsomes from these membranes to a planar lipid bilayer. Several types of anion-selective channels were observed including a voltage-gated Cl- channel, the activity of which appeared in bursts characterized by transitions among three distinct conductance levels of 0 pS (0 level), 160 pS (O1 level), and 320 pS (O2 level), respectively, in 450 mM (cis) 50 mM (trans) KCl conditions. A chi 2 analysis on current records where interburst silent periods were omitted showed that the relative probability of current levels 0 (baseline), O1, and O2 followed a binomial statistic. However, measurements of the conditional probabilities W(level 0 at tau/level O2 at 0) and W(level O2 at tau/level 0 at 0) provided clear evidence of direct transitions between the current levels 0 and O2 without any detectable transitions to the intermediate level O1. It was concluded on the basis of these results that the observed channel was controlled by at least two distinct gating processes, namely 1) a voltage-dependent activation mechanism in which the entire system behaves as two independent monomeric channels of 160 pS with each channel characterized by a simple Open-Closed kinetic, and 2) a slow voltage-dependent process that accounts for both the appearance of silent periods between bursts of channel activity and the transitions between the current levels 0 and O2. Finally, an analysis of the relative probability for the system to be in levels 0, O1, and O2 showed that our results are more compatible with a model in which all the states resulting from the superposition of the two independent monomeric channels have access at different rates to a common inactivated state than with a model where a simple Open-Closed main gate either occludes or exposes simultaneously two independent 160-pS monomers. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 PMID:7524709

  16. CARTS biogenesis requires VAP-lipid transfer protein complexes functioning at the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi interface.

    PubMed

    Wakana, Yuichi; Kotake, Richika; Oyama, Nanako; Murate, Motohide; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Arasaki, Kohei; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2015-12-15

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident integral membrane protein that controls a nonvesicular mode of ceramide and cholesterol transfer from the ER to the Golgi complex by interacting with ceramide transfer protein and oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), respectively. We report that VAP and its interacting proteins are required for the processing and secretion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor, whose transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the cell surface is mediated by transport carriers called "carriers of the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface" (CARTS). In VAP-depleted cells, diacylglycerol level at the TGN was decreased and CARTS formation was impaired. We found that VAP forms a complex with not only OSBP but also Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase at specialized ER subdomains that are closely apposed to the trans-Golgi/TGN, most likely reflecting membrane contact sites. Immobilization of ER-Golgi contacts dramatically reduced CARTS production, indicating that association-dissociation dynamics of the two membranes are important. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the ER-Golgi contacts play a pivotal role in lipid metabolism to control the biogenesis of transport carriers from the TGN.

  17. The Reticulon and Dp1/Yop1p Proteins Form Immobile Oligomers in the Tubular Endoplasmic Reticulum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yoko; Voss, Christiane; Rist, Julia M.; Hu, Junjie; Rapoport, Tom A.; Prinz, William A.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2008-01-01

    We recently identified a class of membrane proteins, the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, which shape the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast and mammalian cells. These proteins are highly enriched in the tubular portions of the ER and virtually excluded from other regions. To understand how they promote tubule formation, we characterized their behavior in cellular membranes and addressed how their localization in the ER is determined. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that yeast Rtn1p and Yop1p are less mobile in the membrane than normal ER proteins. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and cross-linking analyses show that they form oligomers. Mutants of yeast Rtn1p, which no longer localize exclusively to the tubular ER or are even totally inactive in inducing ER tubules, are more mobile and oligomerize less extensively. The mammalian reticulons and DP1 are also relatively immobile and can form oligomers. The conserved reticulon homology domain that includes the two membrane-embedded segments is sufficient for the localization of the reticulons to the tubular ER, as well as for their diffusional immobility and oligomerization. Finally, ATP depletion in both yeast and mammalian cells further decreases the mobilities of the reticulons and DP1. We propose that oligomerization of the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p is important for both their localization to the tubular domains of the ER and for their ability to form tubules. PMID:18442980

  18. The delicate balance between secreted protein folding and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Christopher J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding "problem," as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates.

  19. p53 and Ca(2+) signaling from the endoplasmic reticulum: partners in anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Bultynck, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the mitochondria critically controls cell survival and cell death decisions. Different oncogenes and deregulation of tumor suppressors exploit this mechanism to favor the survival of altered, malignant cells. Two recent studies of the Pinton team revealed a novel, non-transcriptional function of cytosolic p53 in cell death. During cell stress, p53 is recruited to the ER and the ER-mitochondrial contact sites. This results in augmented ER Ca(2+) levels by enhancing sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity, ultimately promoting mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. The boosting of "toxic" Ca(2+) signaling by p53 appears to be a critical component of the cell death-inducing properties of chemotherapeutic agents and anti-cancer treatments, like photodynamic stress. Strikingly, the resistance of p53-deficient cancer cells to these treatments could be overcome by facilitating Ca(2+) transfer between the ER and the mitochondria via overexpression of SERCA or of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Importantly, these concepts have also been supported by in vivo Ca(2+) measurements in tumor masses in mice. Collectively, these studies link for the first time the major tumor suppressor, p53, to Ca(2+) signaling in dictating cell-death outcomes and by the success of anti-cancer treatments.

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-03

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes.

  1. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin Is a NADPH Oxidase NOX4 Interacting Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Kim-Kristin; Wittig, Ilka; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Groenendyk, Jody; Weissmann, Norbert; Michalak, Marek; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Shah, Ajay M.; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of NADPH oxidases, NOX4 is unique as it is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, has constitutive activity, and generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We hypothesize that these features are consequences of a so far unidentified NOX4-interacting protein. Two-dimensional blue native (BN) electrophorese combined with SDS-PAGE yielded NOX4 to reside in macromolecular complexes. Interacting proteins were screened by quantitative SILAC (stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture) co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) in HEK293 cells stably overexpressing NOX4. By this technique, several interacting proteins were identified with calnexin showing the most robust interaction. Calnexin also resided in NOX4-containing complexes as demonstrated by complexome profiling from BN-PAGE. The calnexin NOX4 interaction could be confirmed by reverse Co-IP and proximity ligation assay, whereas NOX1, NOX2, or NOX5 did not interact with calnexin. Calnexin deficiency as studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from calnexin−/− mice or in response to calnexin shRNA reduced cellular NOX4 protein expression and reactive oxygen species formation. Our results suggest that endogenous NOX4 forms macromolecular complexes with calnexin, which are needed for the proper maturation, processing, and function of NOX4 in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26861875

  2. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin Is a NADPH Oxidase NOX4 Interacting Protein.

    PubMed

    Prior, Kim-Kristin; Wittig, Ilka; Leisegang, Matthias S; Groenendyk, Jody; Weissmann, Norbert; Michalak, Marek; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Shah, Ajay M; Brandes, Ralf P

    2016-03-25

    Within the family of NADPH oxidases, NOX4 is unique as it is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, has constitutive activity, and generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We hypothesize that these features are consequences of a so far unidentified NOX4-interacting protein. Two-dimensional blue native (BN) electrophorese combined with SDS-PAGE yielded NOX4 to reside in macromolecular complexes. Interacting proteins were screened by quantitative SILAC (stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture) co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) in HEK293 cells stably overexpressing NOX4. By this technique, several interacting proteins were identified with calnexin showing the most robust interaction. Calnexin also resided in NOX4-containing complexes as demonstrated by complexome profiling from BN-PAGE. The calnexin NOX4 interaction could be confirmed by reverse Co-IP and proximity ligation assay, whereas NOX1, NOX2, or NOX5 did not interact with calnexin. Calnexin deficiency as studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from calnexin(-/-)mice or in response to calnexin shRNA reduced cellular NOX4 protein expression and reactive oxygen species formation. Our results suggest that endogenous NOX4 forms macromolecular complexes with calnexin, which are needed for the proper maturation, processing, and function of NOX4 in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays critical role in brain damage after chronic intermittent hypoxia in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Hong; Li, Xiu-Cui; Jin, Sheng-Wei; Liang, Dong-Shi; Wen, Zheng-Wang; Cao, Hong-Chao; Mei, Hong-Fang; Wu, Ying; Lin, Zhong-Dong; Wang, Liang-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) in children is associated with multiple system morbidities. Cognitive dysfunction as a result of central nervous system complication has been reported in children with OSAHS. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-related apoptosis plays an important role in various diseases of the central nervous system, but very little is known about the role of ERS in mediating pathophysiological reactions to cognitive dysfunction in OSAHS. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) exposures, modeling OSAHS, across 2 and 4weeks in growing rats made more reference memory errors, working memory errors and total memory errors in the 8-Arm radial maze task, increased significantly TUNEL positive cells, upregulated the unfolded protein response in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, inositol-requiring enzyme l and some downstream products. A selective inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor-2a dephosphorylation, salubrinal, prevented C/EBP-homologous protein activation in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex throughout hypoxia/reoxygenation exposure. Our findings suggest that ERS mediated cell apoptosis may be one of the underlying mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in OSAHS children. Further, a specific ERS inhibitor Salubrinal should be tested for neuroprotection against CIH-induced injury.

  4. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules reverse leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Uddin, Md Jamal; Rhew, Hyunyul; Kim, Taeksang; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-04-01

    Leptin, a circulating hormone, regulates food intake and body weight. While leptin resistance represents a major cause of obesity, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can contribute to leptin resistance. Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, exerts antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of tissue injury. We hypothesized that CO could inhibit leptin resistance during ER stress. Thapsigargin or tunicamycin was used to induce ER stress in human cells expressing the leptin receptor. These agents markedly inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, confirming that ER stress induces leptin resistance. The CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 blocked the ER stress-dependent inhibition of leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. CORM-2 treatment induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α and enhanced PERK phosphorylation during ER stress. Furthermore, CORM-2 inhibited X-box binding protein-1 expression, activating transcription factor-6 cleavage, and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE)1α phosphorylation induced by ER stress. IRE1α knockdown rescued leptin resistance, whereas PERK knockdown blocked CO-dependent regulation of IRE1α. In vivo, CO inhalation normalized body weight in animals fed high-fat diets. Furthermore, CO modulated ER stress pathways and rescued leptin resistance in vivo. In conclusion, the pathological mechanism of leptin resistance may be ameliorated by the pharmacological application of CO.

  5. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  6. THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN SECRETED PROTEIN FOLDING AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION IN HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding “problem,” as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates. PMID:22535891

  7. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E.; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. PMID:26511317

  8. Autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tao; Chen, Lei; Huang, Zhixin; Mao, Zhangfan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Boyou; Xu, Yao; Pan, Shize; Hu, Hao; Geng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To study the impact of autophagy on alveolar macrophage apoptosis and its mechanism in the early stages of hypoxia, we established a cell hypoxia-reoxygenation model and orthotopic left lung ischemia-reperfusion model. Rat alveolar macrophages stably expressing RFP-LC3 were treated with autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3-MA) or autophagy promoter (rapamycin), followed by hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment 2 h, 4 h or 6 h later. Twenty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into four different groups: no blocking of left lung hilum (model group), left lung hilum blocked for 1h with DMSO lavage (control group), left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg 3-MA (5 μmol/L) lavage (3-MA group), and left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg rapamycin (250 nmol/L) lavage (rapamycin group). Rapamycin decreased the unfolded protein response, which reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in the presence of oxygen deficiency. Rapamycin increased superoxide dismutase activities and decreased malondialdehyde levels, whereas 3-MA decreased superoxide dismutase activities and increased malondialdehyde levels. Thus, autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in the early stage of hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. This could represent a new approach to protecting against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27888631

  9. Selenoprotein K modulate intracellular free Ca(2+) by regulating expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Ruimin; Huang, Yalan; Wang, Miao; Yang, Fan; Huang, Dana; Wu, Chunli; Li, Yue; Tang, Yijun; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2017-03-18

    Selenoprotein K (SelK) is an 11-kDa selenoprotein, which may be involved in the regulation of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and immune response. To explore the function of SelK in the process of immune response, several short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were designed for the construction of recombinant plasmids to down-regulate the expression of SelK gene in vitro. These shRNAs specifically and efficiently interfered with the expression of SelK at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were significantly down-regulated in anti-CD3 stimulated SelK-knockdown cells. The expression of Interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain (IL-2Rα) and the secretion of Interleukin 4 (IL-4), which play a significant role in the process of T cell activation and proliferation, were also reduced in SelK-knockdown cells. Selenomethionine (Se-Met) at an optimum concentration of 5 μM could up-regulate SelK expression and reverse the change of the expression of CHERP and the intracellular free calcium caused by SelK-knockdown. These results hereby imply SelK may regulate the release of Ca(2+) by CHERP and play an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of T cell by TCR stimulation.

  10. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and metabolism. Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the calcium-depleted lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular respiration. Calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis and the unfolded protein response are tightly intertwined and the consequences of facing calcium starvation are determined by whether cellular energy production is balanced with demands for anabolic functions. Our findings confirm that the connections linking disturbance of ER calcium equilibrium to ER stress and UPR signaling are evolutionary conserved and highlight the crucial role of metabolism in modulating the effects induced by calcium shortage. PMID:27305947

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated hippocampal neuron apoptosis involved in diabetic cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Xu, Linhao; He, Daqiang; Ling, Shucai

    2013-01-01

    Poor management of DM causes cognitive impairment while the mechanism is still unconfirmed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of C/EBP Homology Protein (CHOP), the prominent mediator of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis under hyperglycemia. We employed streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats to explore the ability of learning and memory by the Morris water maze test. The ultrastructure of hippocampus in diabetic rats and cultured neurons in high glucose medium were observed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. TUNEL staining was also performed to assess apoptotic cells while the expression of CHOP was assayed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay in these hippocampal neurons. Six weeks after diabetes induction, the escape latency increased and the average frequency in finding the platform decreased in diabetic rats (P < 0.05). The morphology of neuron and synaptic structure was impaired; the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the expression of CHOP in hippocampus of diabetic rats and high glucose medium cultured neurons were markedly altered (P < 0.05). The present results suggested that the CHOP-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced hippocampal synapses and neurons impairment and promote the diabetic cognitive impairment.

  12. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Folch-Puy, Emma; Panisello, Arnau; Oliva, Joan; Lopez, Alexandre; Castro Benítez, Carlos; Adam, René; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes. PMID:27231901

  13. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  14. Spike, a novel BH3-only protein, regulates apoptosis at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Mund, Thomas; Gewies, Andreas; Schoenfeld, Nicole; Bauer, Manuel K A; Grimm, Stefan

    2003-04-01

    We have isolated Spike, a novel and evolutionary conserved BH3-only protein. BH3-only proteins constitute a family of apoptosis inducers that mediate proapoptotic signals. In contrast to most proteins of this family, Spike was not found to be associated with mitochondria. Furthermore, unlike the known BH3-only proteins, Spike could not interact with all tested Bcl-2 family members, despite its BH3 domain being necessary for cell killing. Our findings indicate that Spike is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle that has only recently been implicated in regulation of apoptosis. At this locale, Spike interacts with Bap31, an adaptor protein for pro-caspase-8 and Bcl-XL. In doing so, Spike is able to inhibit the formation of a complex between Bap31 and the antiapoptotic Bcl-XL protein. Furthermore, Spike transmits the signal of specific death receptors. Its down-regulation in certain tumors suggests that Spike may also play a role in tumorigenesis. Our findings add new insight for how BH3-only and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins regulate cell death.

  15. Characterization of a novel HMG-CoA lyase enzyme with a dual location in endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol.

    PubMed

    Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Gil-Rodríguez, María C; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Casals, Nuria; Casale, César H; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-10-01

    A novel lyase activity enzyme is characterized for the first time: HMG-CoA lyase-like1 (er-cHL), which is a close homolog of mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase (mHL). Initial data show that there are nine mature transcripts for the novel gene HMGCLL1, although none of them has all its exons. The most abundant transcript is called "variant b," and it lacks exons 2 and 3. Moreover, a three-dimensional model of the novel enzyme is proposed. Colocalization studies show a dual location of the er-cHL in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosol, but not in mitochondria or peroxisomes. Furthermore, the dissociation experiment suggests that it is a nonendoplasmic reticulum integral membrane protein. The kinetic parameters of er-cHL indicate that it has a lower V(max) and a higher substrate affinity than mHL. Protein expression and lyase activity were found in several tissues, and were particularly strong in lung and kidney. The occurrence of er-cHL in brain is surprising, as mHL has not been found there. Although mHL activity is clearly associated with energy metabolism, the results suggest that er-cHL is more closely related to another metabolic function, mostly at the pulmonary and brain level.

  16. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    LIN, PINGDONG; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; MA, YUHUAN; CHEN, HOUHUANG; SHAO, XIANG; ZHENG, WENWEI; LIU, XIANXIANG; YE, HONGZHI; LI, XIHAI

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)-stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). We found that 4-PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), caspase-9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase-9, caspase-3

  17. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingdong; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Ma, Yuhuan; Chen, Houhuang; Shao, Xiang; Zheng, Wenwei; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi; Li, Xihai

    2015-12-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type Ⅱ collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)‑stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4‑PBA). We found that 4‑PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM‑induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X‑box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP‑homologous protein (Chop), caspase‑9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase

  18. Role of N-oligosaccharide endoplasmic reticulum processing reactions in glycoprotein folding and degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, A J

    2000-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the subcellular site where proteins following the secretory pathway acquire their proper tertiary and, in certain cases, quaternary structures. Species that are not yet properly folded are prevented from exit to the Golgi apparatus and, if permanently misfolded, are transported to the cytosol, where they are degraded in the proteasomes. This review deals with a mechanism, applicable to proteins that are N-glycosylated in the ER, by which the quality control of folding is performed. Protein-linked monoglucosylated glycans, formed by glucosidase I- and glucosidase II-dependent partial deglucosylation of the oligosaccharides transferred from dolichol diphosphate derivatives in N-glycosylation (Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)), mediate glycoprotein recognition by two ER-resident lectins, membrane-bound calnexin (CNX) and its soluble homologue, calreticulin (CRT). A still not yet fully confirmed interaction between the lectins and the protein moieties of folding glycoproteins may occur after lectin recognition of monoglucosylated structures. Further deglucosylation of glycans by glucosidase II, and perhaps also by a change in CNX/CRT and/or in the substrate glycoprotein conformation, liberates the glycoproteins from their CNX/CRT anchors. Glycans may be then reglucosylated by the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (GT), and thus be recognized again by CNX/CRT, but only when linked to not yet properly folded protein moieties, as this enzyme behaves as a sensor of glycoprotein conformation. Deglucosylation/reglucosylation cycles catalysed by the opposing activities of glucosidase II and GT only stop when proper folding is achieved. The interaction between CNX/CRT and a monoglucosylated glycan is one of the alternative mechanisms by which cells retain not yet properly folded glycoproteins in the ER; in addition, it enhances folding efficiency by preventing protein aggregation and thus allowing intervention of classical chaperones and other

  19. Severe Injury Is Associated With Insulin Resistance, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response, and Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Song, Juquan; Boehning, Darren; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Baker, Henry V.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We determined whether postburn hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) activation leading to impaired insulin receptor signaling. Background Inflammation and cellular stress, hallmarks of severely burned and critically ill patients, have been causally linked to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes via induction of ER stress and the UPR. Methods Twenty severely burned pediatric patients were compared with 36 nonburned children. Clinical markers, protein, and GeneChip analysis were used to identify transcriptional changes in ER stress and UPR and insulin resistance–related signaling cascades in peripheral blood leukocytes, fat, and muscle at admission and up to 466 days postburn. Results Burn-induced inflammatory and stress responses are accompanied by profound insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Genomic and protein analysis revealed that burn injury was associated with alterations in the signaling pathways that affect insulin resistance, ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and cell growth/apoptosis up to 466 days postburn. Conclusion Burn-induced insulin resistance is associated with persistent ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR and subsequent suppressed insulin receptor signaling over a prolonged period of time. PMID:22241293

  20. Calcium Efflux From the Endoplasmic Reticulum Leads to β-Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Takashi; Mahadevan, Jana; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Hara, Mariko; Lu, Simin

    2014-01-01

    It has been established that intracellular calcium homeostasis is critical for survival and function of pancreatic β-cells. However, the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis in β-cell survival and death is not clear. Here we show that ER calcium depletion plays a critical role in β-cell death. Various pathological conditions associated with β-cell death, including ER stress, oxidative stress, palmitate, and chronic high glucose, decreased ER calcium levels and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2b expression, leading to β-cell death. Ectopic expression of mutant insulin and genetic ablation of WFS1, a causative gene for Wolfram syndrome, also decreased ER calcium levels and induced β-cell death. Hyperactivation of calpain-2, a calcium-dependent proapoptotic protease, was detected in β-cells undergoing ER calcium depletion. Ectopic expression of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2b, as well as pioglitazone and rapamycin treatment, could prevent calcium efflux from the ER and mitigate β-cell death under various stress conditions. Our results reveal a critical role of ER calcium depletion in β-cell death and indicate that identification of pathways and chemical compounds restoring ER calcium levels will lead to novel therapeutic modalities and pharmacological interventions for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and other ER-related diseases including Wolfram syndrome. PMID:24424032

  1. ERManI (Endoplasmic Reticulum Class I α-Mannosidase) Is Required for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Degradation via Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Protein Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Frabutt, Dylan A; Moremen, Kelley W; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2015-09-04

    Previously, we reported that the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) induces HIV-1 envelope (Env) degradation via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, but the mechanism was not clear. Here we investigated how the four ER-associated glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) α-mannosidases, ERManI, and ER-degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like (EDEM) proteins 1, 2, and 3, are involved in the Env degradation process. Ectopic expression of these four α-mannosidases uncovers that only ERManI inhibits HIV-1 Env expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, genetic knock-out of the ERManI gene MAN1B1 using CRISPR/Cas9 technology disrupts the TSPO-mediated Env degradation. Biochemical studies show that HIV-1 Env interacts with ERManI, and between the ERManI cytoplasmic, transmembrane, lumenal stem, and lumenal catalytic domains, the catalytic domain plays a critical role in the Env-ERManI interaction. In addition, functional studies show that inactivation of the catalytic sites by site-directed mutagenesis disrupts the ERManI activity. These studies identify ERManI as a critical GH47 α-mannosidase in the ER-associated protein degradation pathway that initiates the Env degradation and suggests that its catalytic domain and enzymatic activity play an important role in this process.

  2. Quercetin attenuates the effects of H2O2 on endoplasmic reticulum morphology and tyrosinase export from the endoplasmic reticulum in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cuiping; Xu, Wen; Hong, Weisong; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Fu, Lifang; Liu, Dongyin; Xu, Aie

    2015-06-01

    Swollen endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is commonly observed in the melanocytes of vitiligo patients; however, the cause and proteins involved in this remain to be elucidated. Oxidative stress has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo and previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced melanocyte apoptosis, whereas quercetin exhibited cytoprotective activities against the effects of H2O2. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the role of H2O2 in the ER of melanocytes as well as its role in the export of tyrosinase from ER; in addition, the present study aimed to determine the mechanism by which quercetin protects against the effects of H2O2. The results demonstrated that melanocyte cells treated with H2O2 presented with swollen ER; however, a normal ER configuration was observed in untreated cells as well as quercetin/H2O2‑treated cells. Furthermore, H2O2 inhibited tyrosinase export from the ER and decreased expression levels of tyrosinase; however, quercetin was found to attenuate the effects induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the results of the present study confirmed the hypothesis that H2O2 induced ER dilation and hindered functional tyrosinase export from the ER of melanocytes. It was also found that quercetin significantly weakened these effects mediated by H2O2, therefore it may have the potential for use in the treatment of vitiligo.

  3. gp78 functions downstream of Hrd1 to promote degradation of misfolded proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Yue; Liu, Yanfen; Ye, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells eliminate misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via a conserved process termed ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Central regulators of the ERAD system are membrane-bound ubiquitin ligases, which are thought to channel misfolded proteins through the ER membrane during retrotranslocation. Hrd1 and gp78 are mammalian ubiquitin ligases homologous to Hrd1p, an ubiquitin ligase essential for ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the functional relevance of these proteins to Hrd1p is unclear. In this paper, we characterize the gp78-containing ubiquitin ligase complex and define its functional interplay with Hrd1 using biochemical and recently developed CRISPR-based genetic tools. Our data show that transient inactivation of the gp78 complex by short hairpin RNA–mediated gene silencing causes significant stabilization of both luminal and membrane ERAD substrates, but unlike Hrd1, which plays an essential role in retrotranslocation and ubiquitination of these ERAD substrates, knockdown of gp78 does not affect either of these processes. Instead, gp78 appears to act downstream of Hrd1 to promote ERAD via cooperation with the BAG6 chaperone complex. We conclude that the Hrd1 complex forms an essential retrotranslocation module that is evolutionarily conserved, but the mammalian ERAD system uses additional ubiquitin ligases to assist Hrd1 during retrotranslocation. PMID:26424800

  4. The resident endoplasmic reticulum protein, BAP31, associates with gamma-actin and myosin B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Axel; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-01-01

    BAP31 is a 28-kDa integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum whose cytosolic domain contains two caspase recognition sites that are preferentially cleaved by initiator caspases, such as caspase-8. Recently, we reported that the caspase-resistant BAP31 inhibited Fas-mediated apoptotic membrane fragmentation and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in KB epithelial cells (Nguyen M., Breckenridge G., Ducret A & Shore G. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol.20, 6731-6740). We describe here the characterization by capillary liquid chromatography microelectrospray tandem MS of a BAP31 immunocomplex isolated from a HepG2 cell lysate in the absence of a death signal. We show that BAP31 specifically associates with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B and nonmuscle gamma-actin, two components of the cytoskeleton actomyosin complex. Collectively, these data confirm that BAP31, in addition to its potential role as a chaperone, may play a fundamental role in the structural organization of the cytoplasm. Here we also show that Fas stimulation of apoptosis releases BAP31 associations with these motor proteins, a step that may contribute to extranuclear events, such as membrane remodelling, during the execution phase of apoptosis.

  5. Sphingosylphosphocholine modulates the ryanodine receptor/calcium-release channel of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Betto, R; Teresi, A; Turcato, F; Salviati, G; Sabbadini, R A; Krown, K; Glembotski, C C; Kindman, L A; Dettbarn, C; Pereon, Y; Yasui, K; Palade, P T

    1997-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphocholine (SPC) modulates Ca2+ release from isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes; 50 microM SPC induces the release of 70 80% of the accumulated calcium. SPC release calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor, since the release is inhibited by the ryanodine receptor channel antagonists ryanodine. Ruthenium Red and sphingosine. In intact cardiac myocytes, even in the absence of extracellular calcium. SPC causes a rise in diastolic Ca2+, which is greatly reduced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum is depleted of Ca2+ by prior thapsigargin treatment. SPC action on the ryanodine receptor is Ca(2+)-dependent. SPC shifts to the left the Ca(2+)-dependence of [3H]ryanodine binding, but only at high pCa values, suggesting that SPC might increase the sensitivity to calcium of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism. At high calcium concentrations (pCa 4.0 or lower), where [3H]ryanodine binding is maximally stimulated, no effect of SPC is observed. We conclude that SPC releases calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by activating the ryanodine receptor and possibly another intracellular Ca(2+)-release channel, the sphingolipid Ca(2+)-release-mediating protein of endoplasmic reticulum (SCaMPER) [Mao, Kim, Almenoff, Rudner, Kearney and Kindman (1996) Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. U.S.A 93, 1993-1996], which we have identified for the first time in cardiac tissue. PMID:9078280

  6. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  7. Nuclear receptor LRH-1/NR5A2 is required and targetable for liver endoplasmic reticulum stress resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results in toxicity that contributes to multiple human disorders. We report a stress resolution pathway initiated by the nuclear receptor LRH-1 that is independent of known unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Like mice lacking primary UPR components, h...

  8. Noninvasive measurement of the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum at rest and during calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hong; Johannes, Ludger; Goud, Bruno; Antony, Claude; Lingwood, Clifford A.; Daneman, Richard; Grinstein, Sergio

    1998-01-01

    The pH within individual organelles of the secretory pathway is believed to be an important determinant of their biosynthetic activity. However, little is known about the determinants and regulation of the pH in the secretory organelles, which cannot be readily accessed by [H+]-sensitive probes. We devised a procedure for the dynamic, noninvasive measurement of pH in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum in intact mammalian cells. A recombinant form of the B subunit of Shiga toxin, previously modified to include a carboxyl-terminal KDEL sequence and a pH-sensitive fluorophore, was used for a two-stage delivery strategy. Retrograde traffic of endogenous lipids was harnessed to target this protein to the Golgi complex, followed by retrieval to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by KDEL receptors. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy were used to verify the subcellular localization of the modified B fragment. Fluorescence ratio imaging and two independent calibration procedures were applied to determine the pH of the ER in situ. We found that the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum is near neutral and is unaffected during agonist-induced release of calcium. The ER was found to be highly permeable to H+ (equivalents), so that the prevailing [H+] is susceptible to alterations in the cytosolic pH. Plasmalemmal acid-base transporters were shown to indirectly regulate the endoplasmic reticulum pH. PMID:9501204

  9. Cis-element of the rice PDIL2-3 promoter is responsible for inducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Wang, Shuyi; Hayashi, Shimpei; Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2014-05-01

    A protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family oxidoreductase, PDIL2-3, is involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in rice. We identified a critical cis-element required for induction of the ER stress response. The activation of PDIL2-3 in response to ER stress strongly depends on the IRE1-OsbZIP50 signaling pathway.

  10. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, a new wrestler, in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yi; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Wu, Guorao; Xiang, Xudong; Gong, Quan; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Yang, Ping; Ren, Boxu

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has attracted extensive attention for its unexplained progressive lung scarring, short median survival and its unresponsiveness to traditional therapies. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying IPF pathoetiologies, however, remain poorly understood. Recent advances delineated a potential function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in meeting the need of fibrotic response, which pinpointed a critical role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways in IPF pathogenesis. In this review, we highlight the effect of ER stress and the activation of UPR on the survival, differentiation, function and proliferation of major profibrotic cells in lung tissues during the course of IPF, and discuss the feasibility whether targeting UPR components could be an orientation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against this devastating disorder in clinical settings. PMID:28337301

  13. Targeting the hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D; Maes, Hannelore; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is at the center of a number of vital cellular processes such as cell growth, death, and differentiation, crosstalk with immune or stromal cells, and maintenance of proteostasis or homeostasis, and ER functions have implications for various pathologies including cancer. Recently, a number of major hallmarks of cancer have been delineated that are expected to facilitate the development of anticancer therapies. However, therapeutic induction of ER stress as a strategy to broadly target multiple hallmarks of cancer has been seldom discussed despite the fact that several primary or secondary ER stress-inducing therapies have been found to exhibit positive clinical activity in cancer patients. In the present review we provide a brief historical overview of the major discoveries and milestones in the field of ER stress biology with important implications for anticancer therapy. Furthermore, we comprehensively discuss possible strategies enabling the targeting of multiple hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced ER stress. PMID:27308392

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Improves Vascular Calcification in Rats by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Teng, Xu; Li, Hui; Xue, Hong-Mei; Guo, Qi; Xiao, Lin; Wu, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the vitamin D3 plus nicotine (VDN) model of rats was used to prove that H2S alleviates vascular calcification (VC) and phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Besides, H2S can also inhibit endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) of calcified aortic tissues. The effect of H2S on alleviating VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC can be blocked by TM, while PBA also alleviated VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC that was similar to the effect of H2S. These results suggest that H2S may alleviate rat aorta VC by inhibiting ERS, providing new target and perspective for prevention and treatment of VC. PMID:27022436

  15. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  17. Targeting the hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Maes, Hannelore; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is at the center of a number of vital cellular processes such as cell growth, death, and differentiation, crosstalk with immune or stromal cells, and maintenance of proteostasis or homeostasis, and ER functions have implications for various pathologies including cancer. Recently, a number of major hallmarks of cancer have been delineated that are expected to facilitate the development of anticancer therapies. However, therapeutic induction of ER stress as a strategy to broadly target multiple hallmarks of cancer has been seldom discussed despite the fact that several primary or secondary ER stress-inducing therapies have been found to exhibit positive clinical activity in cancer patients. In the present review we provide a brief historical overview of the major discoveries and milestones in the field of ER stress biology with important implications for anticancer therapy. Furthermore, we comprehensively discuss possible strategies enabling the targeting of multiple hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced ER stress.

  18. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  19. Structural reorganization of the fungal endoplasmic reticulum upon induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Broz, Karen Lisa; Purvine, Samuel Owen; Chrisler, William Byron; Nicora, Carrie Diana; Connolly, Lanelle Reine; Freitag, Michael; Baker, Scott Edward; Kistler, Harold Corby

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways to particular organelles is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Knowledge of the development of organelles and attendant pathways under different metabolic states has been advanced by live cell imaging and organelle specific analysis. Nevertheless, relatively few studies have addressed the cellular localization of pathways for synthesis of fungal secondary metabolites, despite their importance as bioactive compounds with significance to medicine and agriculture. When triggered to produce sesquiterpene (trichothecene) mycotoxins, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum is reorganized both in vitro and in planta. Trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes accumulate in organized smooth ER with pronounced expansion at perinuclear- and peripheral positions. Fluorescence tagged trichothecene biosynthetic proteins co-localize with the modified ER as confirmed by co-fluorescence and co-purification with known ER proteins. We hypothesize that changes to the fungal ER represent a conserved process in specialized eukaryotic cells such as in mammalian hepatocytes and B-cells. PMID:28287158

  20. Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R.; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:22474423

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Mammalian Oocytes and Embryos: Life in the Balance

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes and embryos are exquisitely sensitive to a wide range of insults related to physical stress, chemical exposure, and exposures to adverse maternal nutrition or health status. Although cells manifest specific responses to various stressors, many of these stressors intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum, where disruptions in protein folding and production of reactive oxygen species initiate downstream signaling events. These signals modulate mRNA translation and gene transcription, leading to recovery, activation of autophagy, or with severe and prolonged stress, apoptosis. ER stress signaling has recently come to the fore as a major contributor to embryo demise. Accordingly, agents that modulate or inhibit ER stress signaling have yielded beneficial effects on embryo survival and long-term developmental potential. We review here the mechanisms of ER stress signaling, their connections to mammalian oocytes and embryos, and the promising indications that interventions in this pathway may provide new opportunities for improving mammalian reproduction and health. PMID:25805126

  3. The roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress response in female mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanzhou; Pei, Xiuying; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Yanrong; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) activates a protective pathway, called the unfold protein response, for maintaining cellular homeostasis, but cellular apoptosis is triggered by excessive or persistent ERS. Several recent studies imply that the ERS response might have broader physiological roles in the various reproductive processes of female mammals, including embryo implantation, decidualization, preimplantation embryonic development, follicle atresia, and the development of the placenta. This review summarizes the existing data concerning the molecular and biological roles of the ERS response. The study of the functions of the ERS response in mammalian reproduction might provide novel insights into and an understanding of reproductive cell survival and apoptosis under physiological and pathological conditions. The ERS response is a novel signaling pathway for reproductive cell survival and apoptosis. Infertility might be a result of disturbing the ERS response during the process of female reproduction.

  4. Sc65-Null Mice Provide Evidence for a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Complex Regulating Collagen Lysyl Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Weis, MaryAnn; Rai, Jyoti; Hudson, David M.; Dimori, Milena; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Hogue, William R.; Swain, Frances L.; Burdine, Marie S.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Suva, Larry J.; Eyre, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and its integrity is essential for connective tissue and organ function. The importance of proteins involved in intracellular collagen post-translational modification, folding and transport was recently highlighted from studies on recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here we describe the critical role of SC65 (Synaptonemal Complex 65, P3H4), a leprecan-family member, as part of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) complex with prolyl 3-hydroxylase 3. This complex affects the activity of lysyl-hydroxylase 1 potentially through interactions with the enzyme and/or cyclophilin B. Loss of Sc65 in the mouse results in instability of this complex, altered collagen lysine hydroxylation and cross-linking leading to connective tissue defects that include low bone mass and skin fragility. This is the first indication of a prolyl-hydroxylase complex in the ER controlling lysyl-hydroxylase activity during collagen synthesis. PMID:27119146

  5. Synthesis of Fluorophores that Target Small Molecules to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Living Mammalian Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Meinig, J.; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R.

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays critical roles in the processing of secreted and transmembrane proteins. To deliver small molecules to this organelle, we synthesized fluorinated hydrophobic analogues of the fluorophore rhodol. These cell-permeable fluorophores are exceptionally bright, with quantum yields of ~ 0.8, and specifically accumulate in the ER of living HeLa cells, as imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy. To target a biological pathway controlled by the ER, we linked a fluorinated hydrophobic rhodol to 5-nitrofuran-2-acrylaldehyde. In contrast to an untargeted nitrofuran warhead, delivery of this electrophilic nitrofuran to the ER by the rhodol resulted in cytotoxicity comparable to the ER-targeted cytotoxin eeyarestatin I, and specifically inhibited protein processing by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Fluorinated hydrophobic rhodols represent outstanding fluorophores that enable delivery of small molecules for targeting of ER-associated proteins and pathways. PMID:26118368

  6. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  7. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in pancreatic islet inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meyerovich, Kira; Ortis, Fernanda; Allagnat, Florent; Cardozo, Alessandra K

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells are extremely dependent on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with the oscillatory requirement of secreted insulin to maintain normoglycemia. Insulin translation and folding rely greatly on the unfolded protein response (UPR), an array of three main signaling pathways designed to maintain ER homeostasis and limit ER stress. However, prolonged or excessive UPR activation triggers alternative molecular pathways that can lead to β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. An increasing number of studies suggest a role of these pro-apoptotic UPR pathways in the downfall of β-cells observed in diabetic patients. Particularly, the past few years highlighted a cross talk between the UPR and inflammation in the context of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this article, we describe the recent advances in research regarding the interplay between ER stress, the UPR, and inflammation in the context of β-cell apoptosis leading to diabetes.

  9. Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in M1-polarized macrophages during mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Ji; Yi, Min-Hee; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Junghwan; Han, Ji-Ye; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Woon; Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of macrophage function has an important regulatory impact on the survival of intracellular mycobacteria. We found that macrophages infected with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Ra had elevated expression of M1-related molecules, whereas the M2 phenotype was dominant in macrophages infected with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Further, the TLR signalling pathway played an important role in modulating macrophage polarization against Mtb infection. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was significantly increased in M1 polarized macrophages and these macrophages effectively removed intracellular Mtb, indicating that ER stress may be an important component of the host immune response to Mtb in M1 macrophages. This improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate macrophage polarization could provide new therapeutic strategies for tuberculosis. PMID:27845414

  10. Flurbiprofen ameliorated obesity by attenuating leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Rie; Noji, Kikuko; Matsuo, Suguru; Baba, Sachiko; Toyoda, Keisuke; Suezawa, Takahiro; Kayano, Takaaki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins, is involved in the development of obesity. We demonstrated that flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), exhibited chaperone activity, which reduced protein aggregation and alleviated ER stress-induced leptin resistance, characterized by insensitivity to the actions of the anti-obesity hormone leptin. This result was further supported by flurbiprofen attenuating high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. The other NSAIDs tested did not exhibit such effects, which suggested that this anti-obesity action is mediated independent of NSAIDs. Using ferriteglycidyl methacrylate beads, we identified aldehyde dehydrogenase as the target of flurbiprofen, but not of the other NSAIDs. These results suggest that flurbiprofen may have unique pharmacological properties that reduce the accumulation of unfolded proteins and may represent a new class of drug for the fundamental treatment of obesity. Subject Categories Metabolism; Pharmacology & Drug Discovery PMID:24421337

  11. Calcium release from intra-axonal endoplasmic reticulum leads to axon degeneration through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L; Court, Felipe A

    2014-05-21

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions.

  12. Involvement of VAT-1 in Phosphatidylserine Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Junker, Mirco; Rapoport, Tom A

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria receive phosphatidylserine (PS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but how PS is moved from the ER to mitochondria is unclear. Current models postulate a physical link between the organelles, but no involvement of cytosolic proteins. Here, we have reconstituted PS transport from the ER to mitochondria in vitro using Xenopus egg components. Transport is independent of ER proteins, but is dependent on a cytosolic factor that has a preferential affinity for PS. Crosslinking with a photoactivatable PS analog identified VAT-1 as a candidate for a cytosolic PS transport protein. Recombinant, purified VAT-1 stimulated PS transport into mitochondria and depletion of VAT-1 from Xenopus cytosol with specific antibodies led to a reduction of transport. Our results suggest that cytosolic factors have a role in PS transport from the ER to mitochondria, implicate VAT-1 in the transport process, and indicate that physical contact between the organelles is not essential.

  13. Modulation of calcium signalling by the endoplasmic reticulum in Carassius neurons.

    PubMed

    Lukyanets, Igor A; Lukyanetz, Elena A

    2013-04-19

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum (ER), being a calcium store participates in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration. Ca-ATPase of the ER is one of the crucial agents providing the calcium-accumulating function of this intracellular structure. We studied the role of the ER in modulation of calcium signalling in Carassius neurons using a Ca2+-imaging technique. We tested the role of the ER in the maintenance of a steady state calcium level in the cytoplasm and in modulation of Ca2+ transients evoked by cell depolarizations. The ER calcium stores were depleted using inhibitors of ER Ca-ATPase, which provided blocking of Ca2+ uptake by the ER. Our experiments firstly showed that the ER can significantly modulate the characteristics of intracellular calcium signals in Carassius neurons during their activity. These findings also indicate that the ER modulates the shape of Ca2+ signals rather than the basal level of intracellular Ca2+ in these neurons.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein quality control and degradation: genome-wide screen for ERAD components.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Antje; Wolf, Dieter H

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter, a genetic approach is presented that leads to the isolation of mutants and to the identification of proteins involved in protein quality control and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The method makes use of a genomic screen of a yeast deletion library (EUROSCARF). Transformation of each of the approx 5000 strains deleted in one nonvital gene each with a CPY* chimera containing CPY* C-terminally fused to a transmembrane domain and the cytosolic Leu2 protein (3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase) constitutes the basic screening procedure. Because of a Leu2p deficiency in all deletion strains, cells can grow only when the CTL* chimera is present. As the CPY* module of CTL* will be recognized in ERAD-proficient cells, CTL* will be degraded and the strain is unable to grow. Therefore the absence of genes necessary for ER quality control and ERAD will allow cell growth and indicate the necessity of the respective gene for these processes.

  15. Soluble forms of polyQ-expanded huntingtin rather than large aggregates cause endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitman, Julia; Ulrich Hartl, F.; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z.

    2013-11-01

    In Huntington’s disease, as in other neurodegenerative diseases, it was initially thought that insoluble protein aggregates are the toxic species. However, growing evidence implicates soluble oligomeric polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin in cytotoxicity. Here we show that pathogenic huntingtin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and induces ER stress before its aggregation into visible inclusions. All three branches of the unfolded protein response are activated. ER stress can be compensated by overexpression of p97/VCP, suggesting its sequestration by pathogenic huntingtin as a main cause. Stress correlates with the presence of huntingtin oligomers and is independent of continual huntingtin synthesis. Stress levels, measured in striatal neurons, are stabilized but only slowly subside on huntingtin aggregation into inclusions. Our results can be explained by the constant conversion of huntingtin monomers to toxic oligomers; large aggregates sequester the former, precluding further conversion, whereas pre-existing toxic oligomers are only gradually depleted.

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: possible involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress?

    PubMed

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and its effects on renal tubular cells apoptosis in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Min; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Han, Yafei; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Jisheng

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia is the most frequent cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is characterized by apoptosis of renal tubular cell. A common result of ischemia in AKI is dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which causes the protein-folding capacity to lag behind the protein-folding load. The abundance of misfolded proteins stressed the ER and results in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). While the UPR is an adaptive response, over time it can result in apoptosis when cells are unable to recover quickly. Recent research suggests that ER stress is a major factor in renal tubular cell apoptosis resulting from ischemic AKI. Thus, ER stress may be an important new progression factor in the pathology of ischemic AKI. In this article, we review UPR signaling, describe pathology and pathophysiology mechanisms of ischemic AKI, and highlight the dual function of ER stress on renal tubular cell apoptosis.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a primary pathogenic mechanism leading to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Libby, Richard T; Gould, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multi-factorial disease and a leading cause of blindness. Proteomic and genetic data suggest that activation or de-repression of the alternate complement cascade of innate immunity is involved in end-stage disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that production of reactive oxygen species and chronic oxidative stress lead to protein and lipid modifications that initiate the complement cascade. Understanding the triggers of these pathogenic pathways and the site of the primary insult will be important for development of targeted therapeutics. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress from misfolded mutant proteins and other sources are an important potential tributary mechanism. We propose that misfolded-protein-induced ER stress in the retinal-pigmented epithelium and/or choroid could lead to chronic oxidative stress, complement deregulation and AMD. Small molecules targeted to ER stress and oxidative stress could allow for a shift from disease treatment to disease prevention.

  19. Salubrinal Alleviates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shilpa; Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Cho, Chunghee; Kim, Do Han

    2017-01-01

    Pathological hypertrophy of the heart is closely associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), leading to maladaptations such as myocardial fibrosis, induction of apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunctions. Salubrinal is a known selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex involving dephosphorylation of phospho-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit (p-eIF2)-α, the key signaling process in the ERS pathway. In this study, the effects of salubrinal were examined on cardiac hypertrophy using the mouse model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and cell model of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Treatment of TAC-induced mice with salubrinal (0.5 mg·kg−1·day−1) alleviated cardiac hypertrophy and tissue fibrosis. Salubrinal also alleviated hypertrophic growth in endothelin 1 (ET1)-treated NRVMs. Therefore, the present results suggest that salubrinal may be a potentially efficacious drug for treating pathological cardiac remodeling. PMID:28152298

  20. How viruses use the endoplasmic reticulum for entry, replication, and assembly.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2013-01-01

    To cause infection, a virus enters a host cell, replicates, and assembles, with the resulting new viral progeny typically released into the extracellular environment to initiate a new infection round. Virus entry, replication, and assembly are dynamic and coordinated processes that require precise interactions with host components, often within and surrounding a defined subcellular compartment. Accumulating evidence pinpoints the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a crucial organelle supporting viral entry, replication, and assembly. This review focuses on the molecular mechanism by which different viruses co-opt the ER to accomplish these crucial infection steps. Certain bacterial toxins also hijack the ER for entry. An interdisciplinary approach, using rigorous biochemical and cell biological assays coupled with advanced microscopy strategies, will push to the next level our understanding of the virus-ER interaction during infection.

  1. Brain death is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cao, S; Wang, T; Yan, B; Lu, Y; Zhao, Y; Zhang, S

    2014-12-01

    Cell death pathways initiated by stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have been implicated in a variety of common diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the contribution of ER stress to apoptosis and liver injury after brain death is not known. In the present study, we found that brain death induces a variety of signature ER stress markers, including ER stress-specific X box-binding protein 1 and up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78. Furthermore, brain death causes up-regulation of C/EBP homologous protein and caspase-12. Consistent with this, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick-end labeling assay and transmission electron microscopy confirmed apoptosis in the liver after brain death. Taken together, the present study provides strong evidence supporting the presence and importance of ER stress and response in mediating brain death-induced apoptosis and liver injury.

  2. Real-time Redox Measurements during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Reveal Interlinked Protein Folding Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merksamer, Philip I.; Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes unfolded proteins to accumulate, triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR outputs in turn decrease ER unfolded proteins to close a negative feedback loop. However, because it is infeasible to directly measure the concentration of unfolded proteins in vivo, cells are generically described as experiencing “ER stress” whenever the UPR is active. Because ER redox potential is optimized for oxidative protein folding, we reasoned that measureable redox changes should accompany unfolded protein accumulation. To test this concept, we employed fluorescent protein reporters to dynamically measure ER redox status and UPR activity in single cells. Using these tools, we show that diverse stressors, both experimental and physiological, compromise ER protein oxidation when UPR-imposed homeostatic control is lost. Using genetic analysis we uncovered redox heterogeneities in isogenic cell populations, and revealed functional interlinks between ER protein folding, modification, and quality control systems. PMID:19026441

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response: Dynamics and Metabolic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Wang, Zhao V.; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A.; Jaimovich, Enrique; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic intracellular organelle with multiple functions essential for cellular homeostasis, development, and stress responsiveness. In response to cellular stress, a well-established signaling cascade, the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated. This intricate mechanism is an important means of reestablishing cellular homeostasis and alleviating the inciting stress. Now, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the UPR influences cellular metabolism through diverse mechanisms, including calcium and lipid transfer, raising the prospect of involvement of these processes in the pathogenesis of disease, including neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the distinct functions of the ER and UPR from a metabolic point of view, highlighting their association with prevalent pathologies. PMID:23317820

  4. Interplays Between Covalent Modifications in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Increase Conformational Diversity in Nascent Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP), the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it undergoes numerous covalent modifications. Here we investigate the interdependence and regulation of PrP oxidative folding, N-glycosylation and GPI addition in diverse ER conditions. Our results show that formation of the single disulphide bond is a pivotal event, essential for PrP transport, and can occur post-translationally. Retarding its formation enhances N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. In contrast, lowering ER Ca2+ concentration inhibits N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. These data reveal tight interplays between the different ER covalent modifications, which collectively increase of PrP conformational diversity and may be important for its propagation. PMID:19164910

  5. Tumor Hypoxia Blocks Wnt Processing and Secretion through the Induction of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Verras, Meletios; Papandreou, Ioanna; Lim, Ai Lin; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Poorly formed tumor blood vessels lead to regions of microenvironmental stress due to depletion of oxygen and glucose and accumulation of waste products (acidosis). These conditions contribute to tumor progression and correlate with poor patient prognosis. Here we show that the microenvironmental stresses found in the solid tumor are able to inhibit the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, tumor cells harboring common β-catenin pathway mutations, such as loss of adenomatous polyposis coli, are insensitive to this novel hypoxic effect. The underlying mechanism responsible is hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that inhibits normal Wnt protein processing and secretion. ER stress causes dissociation between GRP78/BiP and Wnt, an interaction essential for its correct posttranslational processing. Microenvironmental stress can therefore block autocrine and paracrine signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and negatively affect tumor growth. This study provides a general paradigm relating oxygen status to ER function and growth factor signaling. PMID:18824543

  6. Crystal structures reveal transient PERK luminal domain tetramerization in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Marta; Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R; Ali, Maruf Mu

    2015-06-03

    Stress caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicits a cellular unfolded protein response (UPR) aimed at maintaining protein-folding capacity. PERK, a key upstream component, recognizes ER stress via its luminal sensor/transducer domain, but the molecular events that lead to UPR activation remain unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structures of mammalian PERK luminal domains captured in dimeric state as well as in a novel tetrameric state. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) supports the existence of both crystal structures also in solution. The salient feature of the tetramer interface, a helix swapped between dimers, implies transient association. Moreover, interface mutations that disrupt tetramer formation in vitro reduce phosphorylation of PERK and its target eIF2α in cells. These results suggest that transient conversion from dimeric to tetrameric state may be a key regulatory step in UPR activation.

  7. Changes in cellular infrastructure after induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Basso, Tatiana Setenta; Vita-Santos, Evelyn; Marisco, Gabriele; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Moniliophthora perniciosa is a basidiomycete fungus that causes witches' broom disease in Theobroma cacao We analyzed the morphology and survival of fungal hyphae and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling in either glucose- or glycerol-grown M. perniciosa after treatment with ER stress-inducing chemicals dithiothreitol (DTT) or tunicamycin (TM). Changes in intracellular redox potential can cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress due to diminished efficiency in protein folding that could in turn reduce cell survival. Such stress diminishes protein-folding efficiency that could in turn reduce cell survival. Light microscopy revealed morphological changes in hyphae after TM but not after DTT treatment, regardless of the media carbon source. Decrease in fungal survival, after both TM and DTT treatments, was dose-dependent and glycerol-grown cells showed a higher resistance to both chemicals compared to glucose-grown cells. Electron microscopy showed TM and DDT-induced ER stress in M. perniciosa as evidenced by structural alterations of the organelle. The volume of ER structures increased as a typical consequence of unfolded protein stress, and the number of autophagosomes was higher. In glycerol-grown fungus DTT treatment slightly induced expression of molecular chaperone BiP. The TM exposure-induced expression of gene MpIRE1, involved in signaling of the unfolded protein response, was higher in glycerol than glucose-grown cells. Such difference was not observable with expression of gene MpATG8, encoding a key protein in autosome formation, that was induced 1.4-fold and 1.2-fold in glucose or glycerol-grown cells, respectively. DHE-based fluorescence assay showed M. perniciosa oxidative stress induced by H2O2, and treated cells had a higher level of oxidative stress compared to control. A comprehensive study of remodeling of ER is important in understanding M. perniciosa fungus resistance to oxidative stress and its ability to implement a successful infection in T

  8. Depletion of Cyclophilins B and C Leads to Dysregulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Redox Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Stocki, Pawel; Chapman, Daniel C.; Beach, Lori A.; Williams, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum is assisted by molecular chaperones and folding catalysts that include members of the protein-disulfide isomerase and peptidyl-prolyl isomerase families. In this report, we examined the contributions of the cyclophilin subset of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases to protein folding and identified cyclophilin C as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cyclophilin in addition to cyclophilin B. Using albumin and transferrin as models of cis-proline-containing proteins in human hepatoma cells, we found that combined knockdown of cyclophilins B and C delayed transferrin secretion but surprisingly resulted in more efficient oxidative folding and secretion of albumin. Examination of the oxidation status of ER protein-disulfide isomerase family members revealed a shift to a more oxidized state. This was accompanied by a >5-fold elevation in the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione. This “hyperoxidation” phenotype could be duplicated by incubating cells with the cyclophilin inhibitor cyclosporine A, a treatment that triggered efficient ER depletion of cyclophilins B and C by inducing their secretion to the medium. To identify the pathway responsible for ER hyperoxidation, we individually depleted several enzymes that are known or suspected to deliver oxidizing equivalents to the ER: Ero1αβ, VKOR, PRDX4, or QSOX1. Remarkably, none of these enzymes contributed to the elevated oxidized to total glutathione ratio induced by cyclosporine A treatment. These findings establish cyclophilin C as an ER cyclophilin, demonstrate the novel involvement of cyclophilins B and C in ER redox homeostasis, and suggest the existence of an additional ER oxidative pathway that is modulated by ER cyclophilins. PMID:24990953

  9. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  10. Tributyltin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and its Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Isomura, Midori; Kotake, Yaichiro Masuda, Kyoichi; Miyara, Masatsugu; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Samizo, Shigeyoshi; Sanoh, Seigo; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    Organotin compounds, especially tributyltin chloride (TBT), have been widely used in antifouling paints for marine vessels, but exhibit various toxicities in mammals. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle that controls post-translational modification and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. When the capacity of the quality control system of ER is exceeded under stress including ER Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis disruption, ER functions are impaired and unfolded proteins are accumulated in ER lumen, which is called ER stress. Here, we examined whether TBT causes ER stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that 700 nM TBT induced ER stress markers such as CHOP, GRP78, spliced XBP1 mRNA and phosphorylated eIF2α. TBT also decreased the cell viability both concentration- and time-dependently. Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not induce ER stress markers. We hypothesized that TBT induces ER stress via Ca{sup 2+} depletion, and to test this idea, we examined the effect of TBT on intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration using fura-2 AM, a Ca{sup 2+} fluorescent probe. TBT increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration in a TBT-concentration-dependent manner, and Ca{sup 2+} increase in 700 nM TBT was mainly blocked by 50 μM dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist (about 70% inhibition). Dantrolene also partially but significantly inhibited TBT-induced GRP78 expression and cell death. These results suggest that TBT increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by releasing Ca{sup 2+} from ER, thereby causing ER stress. - Highlights: • We established that tributyltin induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. • Tributyltin induces ER stress markers in a concentration-dependent manner. • Tributyltin increases Ca{sup 2+} release from ER, thereby causing ER stress. • Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not increase GRP78 or intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  11. Excessive training is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress but not apoptosis in the hypothalamus of mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Paula; da Rocha, Alisson Luiz; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Oliveira, Luciana da Costa; Morais, Gustavo Paroschi; Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2016-12-05

    Downhill running-based overtraining model increases the hypothalamic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, SOCS3, and pSAPK-JNK. The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of 3 overtraining protocols on the levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), pPERK (Thr981), pelF2α (Ser52), ATF-6, GRP-94, caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) proteins in the mouse hypothalamus. The mice were randomized into the control, overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up), and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR) groups. After the overtraining protocols (i.e., at the end of week 8), hypothalamus was removed and used for immunoblotting. The OTR/down group exhibited increased levels of all of the analyzed endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. The OTR/up and OTR groups exhibited increased levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), and pPERK (Thr981) in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. There were no significant differences in the levels of caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) between the experimental groups at the end of week 8. In conclusion, the 3 overtraining protocols increased the endoplasmic reticulum stress at the end of week 8.

  12. Rescue of Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration by Differentially Modulating Neuronal Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Li, Shaohua; Miao, Linqing; Huang, Haoliang; Liang, Feisi; Teng, Xiuyin; Xu, Lin; Wang, Qizhao; Xiao, Weidong; Ridder, William H.; Ferguson, Toby A.; Chen, Dong Feng; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury is an early event in neurodegenerative diseases that often leads to retrograde neuronal cell death and progressive permanent loss of vital neuronal functions. The connection of these two obviously sequential degenerative events, however, is elusive. Deciphering the upstream signals that trigger the neurodegeneration cascades in both neuronal soma and axon would be a key step toward developing the effective neuroprotectants that are greatly needed in the clinic. We showed previously that optic nerve injury-induced neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Using two in vivo mouse models of optic neuropathies (traumatic optic nerve injury and glaucoma) and adeno-associated virus–mediated RGC-specific gene targeting, we now show that differential manipulation of unfolded protein response pathways in opposite directions—inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α-C/EBP homologous protein and activation of X-box binding protein 1—promotes both RGC axons and somata survival and preserves visual function. Our results indicate that axon injury-induced neuronal ER stress plays an important role in both axon degeneration and neuron soma death. Neuronal ER stress is therefore a promising therapeutic target for glaucoma and potentially other types of neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuron soma and axon degeneration have distinct molecular mechanisms although they are clearly connected after axon injury. We previously demonstrated that axon injury induces neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and that manipulation of ER stress molecules synergistically promotes neuron cell body survival. Here we investigated the possibility that ER stress also plays a role in axon degeneration and whether ER stress modulation preserves neuronal function in neurodegenerative diseases. Our results suggest that neuronal ER stress is a general mechanism of degeneration for both neuronal

  13. Identification and functional characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α gene in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Kai; Yue, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, full-length sequence of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α (LvERO1-α) was cloned from Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that LvERO1-α was highly expressed in hemocytes, gills, and intestines. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge was performed, and the expression of LvERO1-α and two other downstream genes of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase-eIF2α (PERK-α) pathway, namely, homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein (LvHERP) and acylamino-acid-releasing enzyme (LvAARE), strongly increased in the hemocytes. Flow cytometry assay results indicated that the apoptosis rate of L. vannamei hemocytes in the LvERO1-α knockdown group was significantly lower than that of the controls. Moreover, shrimps with knockdown expression of LvERO1-α exhibited decreased cumulative mortality upon WSSV infection. Downregulation of L. vannamei immunoglobulin-binding protein (LvBip), which had been proven to induce unfolded protein response (UPR) in L. vannamei, did not only upregulate LvERO1-α, LvHERP, and LvAARE in hemocytes, but also increased their apoptosis rate, as well as the shrimp cumulative mortality. Furthermore, reporter gene assay results showed that the promoter of LvERO1-α was activated by L. vannamei activating transcription factor 4, thereby confirming that LvERO1-α was regulated by the PERK-eIF2α pathway. These results suggested that LvERO1-α plays a critical role in WSSV-induced apoptosis, which likely occurs through the WSSV-activated PERK-eIF2α pathway.

  14. Astragalus polysaccharides attenuate PCV2 infection by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hongxia; Gan, Fang; Qian, Gang; Hu, Junfa; Hao, Shu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections and its mechanism in vivo and vitro. First, fifty 2-week-old mice were randomly divided into five groups: a group without PCV2 infection and groups with PCV2 infections at 0, 100, 200 or 400 mg/kg APS treatments. The trial lasted for 28 days. The results showed that APS treatments at 200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the pathological injury of tissues, inhibited PCV2 infection and decreased glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and GADD153/CHOP gene mRNA and protein expression significantly (P < 0.05). Second, a study on endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanism was carried out in PK15 cells. APS treatments at 15 and 45 μg/mL significantly reduced PCV2 infection and GRP78 mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Tunicamycin supplementation increased GRP78 mRNA and protein expression and significantly attenuated the APS-induced inhibition of PCV2 infection (P < 0.05). Tauroursodeoxycholic acid supplementation decreased GRP78 mRNA and protein expression and significantly inhibited PCV2 infection (P < 0.05). In addition, fifty 2-week-old mice were randomly divided into five groups: Con, PCV2, APS + PCV2, TM + PCV2 and TM + APS + PCV2. The results were similar to those in PK15 cells. Taken together, it could be concluded that APS suppresses PCV2 infection by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:28071725

  15. HMGB1 induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells via the RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Ying; Li, Shu-Jun; Yang, Jian; Qiu, Yuan-Zhen; Chen, Fang-Ping

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Mechanisms of inflammatory response induced by HMGB1 are incompletely understood. •We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress mediate the inflammatory response induced by HMGB1. •RAGE-mediated ERS pathways are involved in those processes. •We reported a new mechanism for HMGB1 induced inflammatory response. -- Abstract: The high mobility group 1B protein (HMGB1) mediates chronic inflammatory responses in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. The goal of our study was to identify the effects of HMGB1 on the RAGE-induced inflammatory response in endothelial cells and test the possible involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Our results showed that incubation of endothelial cells with HMGB1 (0.01–1 μg/ml) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducers, as assessed by PERK and IRE1 protein expression. Moreover, HMGB1 also promoted nuclear translocation of ATF6. HMGB1-mediated ICAM-1 and P-selectin production was dramatically suppressed by PERK siRNA or IRE1 siRNA. However, non-targeting siRNA had no such effects. HMGB1-induced increases in ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression were also inhibited by a specific eIF2α inhibitor (salubrinal) and a specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Importantly, a blocking antibody specifically targeted against RAGE (anti-RAGE antibody) decreased ICAM-1, P-selectin and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecule (PERK, eIF2α, IRE1 and JNK) protein expression levels. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that HMGB1 promotes an inflammatory response by inducing the expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin via RAGE-mediated stimulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  16. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    SciTech Connect

    Brüning, Ansgar Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  17. VAP, a Versatile Access Point for the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Review and analysis of FFAT-like motifs in the VAPome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah E; Levine, Tim P

    2016-08-01

    Dysfunction of VAMP-associated protein (VAP) is associated with neurodegeneration, both Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Here we summarize what is known about the intracellular interactions of VAP in humans and model organisms. VAP is a simple, small and highly conserved protein on the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It is the sole protein on that large organelle that acts as a receptor for cytoplasmic proteins. This may explain the extremely wide range of interacting partners of VAP, with components of many cellular pathways binding it to access the ER. Many proteins that bind VAP also target other intracellular membranes, so VAP is a component of multiple molecular bridges at membrane contact sites between the ER and other organelles. So far approximately 100 proteins have been identified in the VAP interactome (VAPome), of which a small minority have a "two phenylalanines in an acidic tract" (FFAT) motif as it was originally defined. We have analyzed the entire VAPome in humans and yeast using a simple algorithm that identifies many more FFAT-like motifs. We show that approximately 50% of the VAPome binds directly or indirectly via the VAP-FFAT interaction. We also review evidence on pathogenesis in genetic disorders of VAP, which appear to arise from reduced overall VAP levels, leading to ER stress. It is not possible to identify one single interaction that underlies disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  18. Sec31 encodes an essential component of the COPII coat required for transport vesicle budding from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Salama, N R; Chuang, J S; Schekman, R W

    1997-01-01

    The COPII vesicle coat protein promotes the formation of endoplasmic reticulum- (ER) derived transport vesicles that carry secretory proteins to the Golgi complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This coat protein consists of Sar1p, the Sec23p protein complex containing Sec23p and Sec24p, and the Sec13p protein complex containing Sec13p and a novel 150-kDa protein, p150. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the p150 gene. p150 is encoded by an essential gene. Depletion of this protein in vivo blocks the exit of secretory proteins from the ER and causes an elaboration of ER membranes, indicating that p150 is encoded by a SEC gene. Additionally, overproduction of the p150 gene product compromises the growth of two ER to Golgi sec mutants: sec16-2 and sec23-1. p150 is encoded by SEC31, a gene isolated in a genetic screen for mutations that accumulate unprocessed forms of the secretory protein alpha-factor. The sec31-1 mutation was mapped by gap repair, and sequence analysis revealed an alanine to valine change at position 1239, near the carboxyl terminus. Sec31p is a phosphoprotein and treatment of the Sec31p-containing fraction with alkaline phosphatase results in a 50-75% inhibition of transport vesicle formation activity in an ER membrane budding assay. Images PMID:9190202

  19. Yeast 1,3-beta-glucan synthase activity is inhibited by phytosphingosine localized to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Nishida, I; Minemura, M; Qadota, H; Seyama, Y; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y

    2001-07-20

    1,3-beta-D-Glucan, a major filamentous component of the cell wall in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is synthesized by 1,3-beta-glucan synthase (GS). Although a yeast gene whose product is required for GS activity in vitro, GNS1, was isolated and characterized, its role in GS function has remained unknown. In the current study we show that Deltagns1 cells accumulate a non-competitive and non-proteinous inhibitor(s) in the membrane fraction. Investigations of inhibitory activity on GS revealed that the inhibitor(s) is mainly present in the sphingolipid fraction. It is shown that Deltagns1 cells contain phytosphingosine (PHS), an intermediate in the sphingolipid biosynthesis, 30-fold more than wild-type cells do. The membrane fraction isolated from Deltasur2 cells contains an increased amount of dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and also exhibits reduced GS activity. Among constituents of the sphingolipid fraction, PHS and DHS show striking inhibition in a non-competitive manner. The intracellular level of DHS is much lower than that of PHS in wild-type cells, suggesting that PHS is the primary inhibitor of GS in vivo. The localization of PHS to the endoplasmic reticulum in wild-type cells coincides with that of the inhibitor(s) in Deltagns1 cells. Taken together, our results indicate that PHS is a potent inhibitor of yeast GS in vivo.

  20. PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE1 and 2 Regulate Phospholipid Synthesis at the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, Peter J.; Quettier, Anne-Laure; Kroon, Johan T.M.; Craddock, Christian; Adams, Nicolette; Slabas, Antoni R.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is essential for the construction of most eukaryotic cell membranes, but how this process is regulated in plants remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, two Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolases called PAH1 and PAH2 act redundantly to repress phospholipid biosynthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Leaves from pah1 pah2 double mutants contain ~1.8-fold more phospholipid than the wild type and exhibit gross changes in ER morphology, which are consistent with massive membrane overexpansion. The net rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) is ~1.8-fold greater in the double mutant, and the transcript abundance of several key genes that encode enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis is increased. In particular, we show that PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (PEAMT1) is upregulated at the level of transcription in pah1 pah2 leaves. PEAMT catalyzes the first committed step of choline synthesis in Arabidopsis and defines a variant pathway for PC synthesis not found in yeasts or mammals. Our data suggest that PAH1/2 play a regulatory role in phospholipid synthesis that is analogous to that described in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the target enzymes differ, and key components of the signal transduction pathway do not appear to be conserved. PMID:20699392

  1. GPRC5A suppresses protein synthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum to prevent radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Farris, Alton B.; Xu, Kaiming; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Duong, Duc M.; Yi, Hong; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Sun, Shi-Yong; Wang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    GPRC5A functions as a lung tumour suppressor to prevent spontaneous and environmentally induced lung carcinogenesis; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we reveal that GPRC5A at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane suppresses synthesis of the secreted or membrane-bound proteins including a number of oncogenes, the most important one being Egfr. The ER-located GPRC5A disturbs the assembly of the eIF4F-mediated translation initiation complex on the mRNA cap through directly binding to the eIF4F complex with its two middle extracellular loops. Particularly, suppression of EGFR by GPRC5A contributes significantly to preventing ionizing radiation (IR)-induced lung tumorigenesis. Thus, GPRC5A deletion enhances IR-promoted EGFR expression through an increased translation rate, thereby significantly increasing lung tumour incidence in Gprc5a−/− mice. Our findings indicate that under-expressed GPRC5A during lung tumorigenesis enhances any transcriptional stimulation through an active translational status, which can be used to control oncogene expression and potentially the resulting related disease. PMID:27273304

  2. Astragaloside IV Attenuates Podocyte Apoptosis Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Upregulating Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2 Expression in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hengjiang; Cao, Aili; Chu, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Zang, Yingjun; Mao, Xiaodong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yunman; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. This protein has been recognized as a potential target for diabetic therapy. In this study, we identified astragaloside IV (AS-IV) as a potent modulator of SERCA inhibiting renal injury in diabetic status. Increasing doses of AS-IV (2, 6, and 18 mg kg-1 day-1) were administered intragastrically to db/db mice for 8 weeks. Biochemical and histopathological approaches were conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of AS-IV. Cultured mouse podocytes were used to further explore the underlying mechanism in vitro. AS-IV dose-dependently increased SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression, and suppressed ER stress-mediated and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in db/db mouse kidney. AS-IV also normalized glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, improved renal function, and ameliorated glomerulosclerosis and renal inflammation in db/db mice. In palmitate stimulated podocytes, AS-IV markedly improved inhibitions of SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression, restored intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and attenuated podocyte apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with a concomitant abrogation of ER stress as evidenced by the downregulation of GRP78, cleaved ATF6, phospho-IRE1α and phospho-PERK, and the inactivation of both ER stress-mediated and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, SERCA2b knockdown eliminated the effect of AS-IV on ER stress and ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway, whereas its overexpression exhibited an anti-apoptotic effect. Our data obtained from in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that AS-IV attenuates renal injury in diabetes subsequent to inhibiting ER stress-induced podocyte apoptosis through restoring SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression. PMID:28066247

  3. Uncleaved BAP31 in association with A4 protein at the endoplasmic reticulum is an inhibitor of Fas-initiated release of cytochrome c from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Stojanovic, Marina; Clemons, Paul A; Kuppig, Stephan; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-04-18

    BAP31 is a polytopic integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and, like BID, is a preferred substrate of caspase-8. Upon Fas/CD95 stimulation, BAP31 is cleaved within its cytosolic domain, generating proapoptotic p20 BAP31. In human KB epithelial cells expressing the caspase-resistant mutant crBAP31, Fas stimulation resulted in cleavage of BID and insertion of BAX into mitochondrial membrane, but subsequent oligomerization of BAX and BAK, egress of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and apoptosis were impaired. Bap31-null mouse cells expressing crBAP31 cannot generate the endogenous p20 BAP31 cleavage product, yet crBAP31 conferred resistance to cellular condensation and cytochrome c release in response to activation of ectopic FKBPcasp8 by FK1012z. Full-length BAP31, therefore, is a direct inhibitor of these caspase-8-initiated events, acting independently of its ability to sequester p20, with which it interacts. Employing a novel split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen for BAP31-interacting membrane proteins, the putative ion channel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, A4, was detected and identified as a constitutive binding partner of BAP31 in human cells. Ectopic A4 that was introduced into A4-deficient cells cooperated with crBAP31 to resist Fas-induced egress of cytochrome c from mitochondria and cytoplasmic apoptosis.

  4. Adenovirus Modulates Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling by Reprogramming ORP1L-VAP Protein Contacts for Cholesterol Transport from Endosomes to the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Cianciola, Nicholas L; Chung, Stacey; Manor, Danny; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2017-03-15

    Human adenoviruses (Ads) generally cause mild self-limiting infections but can lead to serious disease and even be fatal in high-risk individuals, underscoring the importance of understanding how the virus counteracts host defense mechanisms. This study had two goals. First, we wished to determine the molecular basis of cholesterol homeostatic responses induced by the early region 3 membrane protein RIDα via its direct interaction with the sterol-binding protein ORP1L, a member of the evolutionarily conserved family of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs). Second, we wished to determine how this interaction regulates innate immunity to adenovirus. ORP1L is known to form highly dynamic contacts with endoplasmic reticulum-resident VAP proteins that regulate late endosome function under regulation of Rab7-GTP. Our studies have demonstrated that ORP1L-VAP complexes also support transport of LDL-derived cholesterol from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it was converted to cholesteryl esters stored in lipid droplets when ORP1L was bound to RIDα. The virally induced mechanism counteracted defects in the predominant cholesterol transport pathway regulated by the late endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick disease type C protein 1 (NPC1) arising during early stages of viral infection. However, unlike NPC1, RIDα did not reconstitute transport to endoplasmic reticulum pools that regulate SREBP transcription factors. RIDα-induced lipid trafficking also attenuated proinflammatory signaling by Toll-like receptor 4, which has a central role in Ad pathogenesis and is known to be tightly regulated by cholesterol-rich "lipid rafts." Collectively, these data show that RIDα utilizes ORP1L in a way that is distinct from its normal function in uninfected cells to fine-tune lipid raft cholesterol that regulates innate immunity to adenovirus in endosomes.IMPORTANCE Early region 3 proteins encoded by human adenoviruses that attenuate immune

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidative Stress Triggers Tgf-Beta-Dependent Muscle Dysfunction by Accelerating Ascorbic Acid Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Pozzer, Diego; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Bolis, Marco; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Solagna, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Zito, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are two related phenomena that have important metabolic consequences. As many skeletal muscle diseases are triggered by oxidative stress, we explored the chain of events linking a hyperoxidized ER (which causes ER and oxidative stress) with skeletal muscle dysfunction. An unbiased exon expression array showed that the combined genetic modulation of the two master ER redox proteins, selenoprotein N (SEPN1) and endoplasmic oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1), led to an SEPN1-related myopathic phenotype due to excessive signalling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. The increased TGF-beta activity in the genetic mutants was caused by accelerated turnover of the ER localized (anti-oxidant) ascorbic acid that affected collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix. In a mouse mutant of SEPN1, which is dependent on exogenous ascorbic acid, a limited intake of ascorbic acid revealed a myopathic phenotype as a consequence of an altered TGF-beta signalling. Indeed, systemic antagonism of TGF-beta re-established skeletal muscle function in SEPN1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study sheds new light on the molecular mechanism of SEPN1-related myopathies and indicates that the TGF-beta/ERO1/ascorbic acid axis offers potential for their treatment. PMID:28106121

  6. The phagosome containing Legionella pneumophila within the protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis is surrounded by the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Abu Kwaik, Y

    1996-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular parasite of protozoa and human phagocytes. To examine adaptation of this bacterium to parasitize protozoa, the sequence of events of the intracellular infection of the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis was examined. The previously described uptake phenomenon of coiling phagocytosis by human monocytes was not detected. A 1 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, mitochondria were observed within the vicinity of the phagosome. At 2.5 h postinfection, numerous vesicles surrounded the phagosomes and mitochondria were in close proximity to the phagosome. At 5 h postinfection, the bacterium was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane. Bacterial multiplication was evident by 8 h postinfection, and the phagosome was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane until 15 h postinfection. The recruitment of organelles and formation of the ribosome-studded phagosome was defective in an isogenic attenuated mutant of L. pneumophila (strain AA101A) that failed to replicate within amoebae. At 20 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, numerous bacteria were present in the phagosome and ribosome were not detected around the phagosome. These data showed that, at the ultrastructural level, the intracellular infection of protozoa by L. pneumophila is highly similar to that of infection of macrophages. Immunocytochemical studies provided evidence that at 5 h postinfection the phagosome containing L. pneumophila acquired an abundant amount of the endoplasmic reticulum-specific protein (BiP). Similar to phagosomes containing heat-killed wild-type L. pneumophila, the BiP protein was not detectable in phagosomes containing the mutant strain AA101A. In addition to the absence of ribosomes and mitochondria, the BiP protein was not detected in the phagosomes at 20 h postinfection with wild-type L. pneumophila. The data indicated that the ability of L. pneumophila to establish the intracellular infection of amoebae is

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E. Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R.; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects. STUDY DESIGN A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. RESULTS Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin

  8. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH. PMID:28255266

  9. Host endoplasmic reticulum COPII proteins control cell-to-cell spread of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gianfelice, Antonella; Le, Phuong H B; Rigano, Luciano A; Saila, Susan; Dowd, Georgina C; McDivitt, Tina; Bhattacharya, Nilakshee; Hong, Wanjin; Stagg, Scott M; Ireton, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that uses actin-dependent motility to spread between human cells. Cell-to-cell spread involves the formation by motile bacteria of plasma membrane-derived structures termed 'protrusions'. In cultured enterocytes, the secreted Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and inhibiting the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Here we demonstrate that protrusions are controlled by human COPII components that direct trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum. Co-precipitation experiments indicated that the COPII proteins Sec31A and Sec13 interact directly with a Src homology 3 domain in Tuba. This interaction was antagonized by InlC. Depletion of Sec31A or Sec13 restored normal protrusion formation to a Listeria mutant lacking inlC, without affecting spread of wild-type bacteria. Genetic impairment of the COPII component Sar1 or treatment of cells with brefeldin A affected protrusions similarly to Sec31A or Sec13 depletion. These findings indicated that InlC relieves a host-mediated restriction of Listeria spread otherwise imposed by COPII. Inhibition of Sec31A, Sec13 or Sar1 or brefeldin A treatment also perturbed the structure of cell-cell junctions. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an important role for COPII in controlling Listeria spread. We propose that COPII may act by delivering host proteins that generate tension at cell junctions.

  10. A critical role of DDRGK1 in endoplasmic reticulum homoeostasis via regulation of IRE1α stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Wang, Ying; Song, Lizhi; Zeng, Linghua; Yi, Weiwei; Liu, Ting; Chen, Huanzhen; Wang, Miao; Ju, Zhenyu; Cong, Yu-Sheng

    2017-01-27

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homoeostasis induces ER stress and leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is an adaptive reaction that promotes cell survival or triggers apoptosis, when homoeostasis is not restored. DDRGK1 is an ER membrane protein and a critical component of the ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1) system. However, the functions and mechanisms of DDRGK1 in ER homoeostasis are largely unknown. Here, we show that depletion of DDRGK1 induces ER stress and enhances ER stress-induced apoptosis in both cancer cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Depletion of DDRGK1 represses IRE1α-XBP1 signalling and activates the PERK-eIF2α-CHOP apoptotic pathway by targeting the ER-stress sensor IRE1α. We further demonstrate that DDRGK1 regulates IRE1α protein stability via its interaction with the kinase domain of IRE1α, which is dependent on its ufmylation modification. Altogether, our results provide evidence that DDRGK1 is essential for ER homoeostasis regulation.

  11. In Vivo Crystallization of Human IgG in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Engineered Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Haruki; Wendling, John; He, Feng; Trilisky, Egor; Stevenson, Riki; Franey, Heather; Kinderman, Francis; Li, Gary; Piedmonte, Deirdre Murphy; Osslund, Timothy; Shen, Min; Ketchem, Randal R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis and secretion are essential to cellular life. Although secretory activities may vary in different cell types, what determines the maximum secretory capacity is inherently difficult to study. Increasing protein synthesis until reaching the limit of secretory capacity is one strategy to address this key issue. Under highly optimized growth conditions, recombinant CHO cells engineered to produce a model human IgG clone started housing rod-shaped crystals in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. The intra-ER crystal growth was accompanied by cell enlargement and multinucleation and continued until crystals outgrew cell size to breach membrane integrity. The intra-ER crystals were composed of correctly folded, endoglycosidase H-sensitive IgG. Crystallizing propensity was due to the intrinsic physicochemical properties of the model IgG, and the crystallization was reproduced in vitro by exposing a high concentration of IgG to a near neutral pH. The striking cellular phenotype implicated the efficiency of IgG protein synthesis and oxidative folding exceeded the capacity of ER export machinery. As a result, export-ready IgG accumulated progressively in the ER lumen until a threshold concentration was reached to nucleate crystals. Using an in vivo system that reports accumulation of correctly folded IgG, we showed that the ER-to-Golgi transport steps became rate-limiting in cells with high secretory activity. PMID:21464137

  12. Sequestration of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin into inclusion bodies is a cell-protective mechanism to maintain endoplasmic reticulum function.

    PubMed

    Granell, Susana; Baldini, Giovanna; Mohammad, Sameer; Nicolin, Vanessa; Narducci, Paola; Storrie, Brian; Baldini, Giulia

    2008-02-01

    A variant alpha1-antitrypsin with E342K mutation has a high tendency to form intracellular polymers, and it is associated with liver disease. In the hepatocytes of individuals carrying the mutation, alpha1-antitrypsin localizes both to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to membrane-surrounded inclusion bodies (IBs). It is unclear whether the IBs contribute to cell toxicity or whether they are protective to the cell. We found that in hepatoma cells, mutated alpha1-antitrypsin exited the ER and accumulated in IBs that were negative for autophagosomal and lysosomal markers, and contained several ER components, but not calnexin. Mutated alpha1-antitrypsin induced IBs also in neuroendocrine cells, showing that formation of these organelles is not cell type specific. In the presence of IBs, ER function was largely maintained. Increased levels of calnexin, but not of protein disulfide isomerase, inhibited formation of IBs and lead to retention of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin in the ER. In hepatoma cells, shift of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin localization to the ER by calnexin overexpression lead to cell shrinkage, ER stress, and impairment of the secretory pathway at the ER level. We conclude that segregation of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin from the ER to the IBs is a protective cell response to maintain a functional secretory pathway.

  13. Retention of chimeric Tat2-Gap1 permease in the endoplasmic reticulum induces unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kimata, Yukio; Uemura, Satoshi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high-affinity tryptophan import is performed by subtle mechanisms involving tryptophan permease Tat2. We have shown that Tat2 requires 15 amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) for its import activity, whereas leucine permease Bap2 requires only seven corresponding residues for its leucine import. For this reason, the structure of Tat2 is elaborately designed to transport the hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan. Newly synthesized cell surface proteins first undergo endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated quality check before entering the secretory pathway. In this study, we used domain replacement with general amino acid permease Gap1 to show that Tat2 chimeric proteins were dysfunctional when TMD10 or TMD11 was replaced. These chimeras formed large 270-800-kDa protein complexes and were stably retained in the ER membrane without efficient degradation. In contrast, Tat2 chimeras of TMD9 or TMD12 retained some of their tryptophan import activity and underwent vacuolar degradation as observed with wild-type Tat2. Thus, ours results suggest that TMD10 and TMD11 are essential for the correct folding of Tat2, probably because of their interdomain interactions. Notably, overexpression of Tat2-Gap1 chimera of TMD10 activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) element-lacZ reporter, suggesting that ER retention of the protein aggregates induces the UPR.

  14. Saturated lipids decrease mitofusin 2 leading to endoplasmic reticulum stress activation and insulin resistance in hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Brenda; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Tovar, Armando; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Camacho, Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria dysfunction contribute to insulin resistance generation during obesity and diabetes. ER and mitochondria interact through Mitofusin 2 (MTF2), which anchors in the outer mitochondrial and ER membranes regulating energy metabolism. Ablation of MTF2 leads to ER stress activation and insulin resistance. Here we determine whether lipotoxic insult induced by saturated lipids decreases MTF2 expression leading to ER stress response in hypothalamus and its effects on insulin sensitivity using in vitro and in vivo models. We found that lipotoxic stimulation induced by palmitic acid, but not the monounsaturated palmitoleic acid, decreases MTF2 protein levels in hypothalamic mHypoA-CLU192 cells. Also, palmitic acid incubation activates ER stress response evidenced by increase in the protein levels of GRP78/BIP marker at later stage than MTF2 downregulation. Additionally, we found that MTF2 alterations induced by palmitic, but not palmitoleic, stimulation exacerbate insulin resistance in hypothalamic cells. Insulin resistance induced by palmitic acid is prevented by pre-incubation of the anti-inflammatory and the ER stress release reagents, sodium salicylate and 4 phenylbutirate, respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that lipotoxic insult induced by high fat feeding to mice decreases MTF2 proteins levels in arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. Our data indicate that saturated lipids modulate MTF2 expression in hypothalamus coordinating the ER stress response and the susceptibility to insulin resistance.

  15. Dysregulated interactions between lamin A and SUN1 induce abnormalities in the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum in progeric laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Jie; Wang, Wan-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ching; Wang, Jing-Ya; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Tai, Lin-Ai; Liou, Gan-Guang; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2014-04-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a human progeroid disease caused by a point mutation on the LMNA gene. We reported previously that the accumulation of the nuclear envelope protein SUN1 contributes to HGPS nuclear aberrancies. However, the mechanism by which interactions between mutant lamin A (also known as progerin or LAΔ50) and SUN1 produce HGPS cellular phenotypes requires further elucidation. Using light and electron microscopy, this study demonstrated that SUN1 contributes to progerin-elicited structural changes in the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. We further identified two domains through which full-length lamin A associates with SUN1, and determined that the farnesylated cysteine within the CaaX motif of lamin A has a stronger affinity for SUN1 than does the lamin A region containing amino acids 607 to 656. Farnesylation of progerin enhanced its interaction with SUN1 and reduced SUN1 mobility, thereby promoting the aberrant recruitment of progerin to the ER membrane during postmitotic assembly of the nuclear envelope, resulting in the accumulation of SUN1 over consecutive cellular divisions. These results indicate that the dysregulated interaction of SUN1 and progerin in the ER during nuclear envelope reformation determines the progression of HGPS.

  16. GOLGI TRANSPORT 1B Regulates Protein Export from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Rice Endosperm Cells[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Xi; Wang, Di; Zhu, Xiaopin; Jing, Ruonan; Wu, Mingming; Hao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Chunming

    2016-01-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) mediates the first step of anterograde transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to other endomembrane compartments in eukaryotes. A group of evolutionarily conserved proteins (Sar1, Sec23, Sec24, Sec13, and Sec31) constitutes the basic COPII coat machinery; however, the details of how the COPII coat assembly is regulated remain unclear. Here, we report a protein transport mutant of rice (Oryza sativa), named glutelin precursor accumulation4 (gpa4), which accumulates 57-kD glutelin precursors and forms two types of ER-derived abnormal structures. GPA4 encodes the evolutionarily conserved membrane protein GOT1B (also known as GLUP2), homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GOT1p. The rice GOT1B protein colocalizes with Arabidopsis thaliana Sar1b at Golgi-associated ER exit sites (ERESs) when they are coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, GOT1B physically interacts with rice Sec23, and both proteins are present in the same complex(es) with rice Sar1b. The distribution of rice Sar1 in the endomembrane system, its association with rice Sec23c, and the ERES organization pattern are significantly altered in the gpa4 mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that GOT1B plays an important role in mediating COPII vesicle formation at ERESs, thus facilitating anterograde transport of secretory proteins in plant cells. PMID:27803308

  17. Human papillomavirus E5 oncoproteins bind the A4 endoplasmic reticulum protein to regulate proliferative ability upon differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotnik Halavaty, Katarina; Regan, Jennifer; Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and link their life cycles to epithelial differentiation. The HPV E5 protein plays a role in the productive phase of the HPV life cycle but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We identify a new binding partner of E5, A4, using a membrane-associated yeast-two hybrid system. The A4 protein co-localizes with HPV 31 E5 in perinuclear regions and forms complexes with E5 and Bap31. In normal keratinocytes, A4 is found primarily in basal cells while in HPV positive cells high levels of A4 are seen in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Reduction of A4 expression by shRNAs, enhanced HPV genome amplification and increased cell proliferation ability following differentiation but this was not seen in cells lacking E5. Our studies suggest that the A4 protein is an important E5 binding partner that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation ability upon differentiation. - Highlights: • A4 associates with HPV 31 E5 proteins. • A4 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum. • HPV proteins induce A4 expression in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. • E5 is important for proliferation ability of differentiating HPV positive cells.

  18. Osh proteins regulate COPII-mediated vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kentaro; Ikeda, Atsuko; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Castillon, Guillaume A; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Hanada, Kentaro; Riezman, Howard; Muñiz, Manuel; Funato, Kouichi

    2014-01-15

    Lipids synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are delivered to the Golgi by vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. ER-to-Golgi transport is crucial for maintaining the different membrane lipid composition and identities of organelles. Despite their importance, mechanisms regulating transport remain elusive. Here we report that in yeast coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle-mediated transport of ceramide from the ER to the Golgi requires oxysterol-binding protein homologs, Osh proteins, which have been implicated in lipid homeostasis. Because Osh proteins are not required to transport proteins to the Golgi, these results indicate a specific requirement for the Osh proteins in the transport of ceramide. In addition, we provide evidence that Osh proteins play a negative role in COPII vesicle biogenesis. Together, our data suggest that ceramide transport and sphingolipid levels between the ER and Golgi are maintained by two distinct functions of Osh proteins, which negatively regulate COPII vesicle formation and positively control a later stage, presumably fusion of ceramide-enriched vesicles with Golgi compartments.

  19. A critical role of DDRGK1 in endoplasmic reticulum homoeostasis via regulation of IRE1α stability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang; Wang, Ying; Song, Lizhi; Zeng, Linghua; Yi, Weiwei; Liu, Ting; Chen, Huanzhen; Wang, Miao; Ju, Zhenyu; Cong, Yu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homoeostasis induces ER stress and leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is an adaptive reaction that promotes cell survival or triggers apoptosis, when homoeostasis is not restored. DDRGK1 is an ER membrane protein and a critical component of the ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1) system. However, the functions and mechanisms of DDRGK1 in ER homoeostasis are largely unknown. Here, we show that depletion of DDRGK1 induces ER stress and enhances ER stress-induced apoptosis in both cancer cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Depletion of DDRGK1 represses IRE1α-XBP1 signalling and activates the PERK-eIF2α-CHOP apoptotic pathway by targeting the ER-stress sensor IRE1α. We further demonstrate that DDRGK1 regulates IRE1α protein stability via its interaction with the kinase domain of IRE1α, which is dependent on its ufmylation modification. Altogether, our results provide evidence that DDRGK1 is essential for ER homoeostasis regulation. PMID:28128204

  20. Diallyl trisulfide induces apoptosis of human basal cell carcinoma cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress and the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsieh, Shu-Chen; Yang, Jen-Hung; Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), an active component of garlic oil, has attracted much attention because of its anticancer effect on several types of cancers. However, the mechanism of DATS-induced apoptosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is not fully understood. In the present study, we revealed that DATS-mediated dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in BCC cells was associated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation and disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential. Western analysis demonstrated concordant expression of molecules involved in mitochondrial apoptosis, including DATS-associated increases in phospho-p53, proapoptotic Bax, and decreases in antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl in BCC cells. Moreover, DATS induced the release of cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and HtrA2/Omi into the cytoplasm, and activated factors downstream of caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis, including nuclear translocation of apoptotic-inducing factor and endonuclease G and the caspase cascade. These results were confirmed by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk), the latter of which did not completely enhance the viability of DATS-treated BBC cells. Exposure to DATS additionally induced endogenous endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and intracellular Ca2⁺ mobilization, upregulation of Bip/GRP78 and CHOP/GADD153, and activation of caspase-4. Our findings suggest that DATS exerts chemopreventive potential via ER stress and the mitochondrial pathway in BCC cells.

  1. Apoptosis and necrosis induced by novel realgar quantum dots in human endometrial cancer cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Zhengyun; Gou, Ying; Qin, Yu; Xu, Yaze; Liu, Jie; Wu, Jin-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Realgar (AS4S4) has been used in traditional medicines for malignancy, but the poor water solubility is still a major hindrance to its clinical use. Realgar quantum dots (RQDs) were therefore synthesized with improved water solubility and bioavailability. Human endometrial cancer JEC cells were exposed to various concentrations of RQDs to evaluate their anticancer effects and to explore mechanisms by the MTT assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Results revealed that the highest photoluminescence quantum yield of the prepared RQDs was up to approximately 70%, with the average size of 5.48 nm. RQDs induced antipro-liferative activity against JEC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In light microscopy and TEM examinations, RQDs induced vacuolization and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dilation in JEC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. ER stress by RQDs were further confirmed by increased expression of GADD153 and GRP78 at both mRNA and protein levels. ER stress further led to JEC cell apoptosis and necrosis, as evidenced by flow cytometry and mitochondrial membrane potential detection. Our findings demonstrated that the newly synthesized RQDs were effective against human endometrial cancer cells. The underlying mechanism appears to be, at least partly, due to ER stress leading to apoptotic cell death and necrosis. PMID:26357474

  2. Apoptosis and necrosis induced by novel realgar quantum dots in human endometrial cancer cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Zhengyun; Gou, Ying; Qin, Yu; Xu, Yaze; Liu, Jie; Wu, Jin-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Realgar (AS4S4) has been used in traditional medicines for malignancy, but the poor water solubility is still a major hindrance to its clinical use. Realgar quantum dots (RQDs) were therefore synthesized with improved water solubility and bioavailability. Human endometrial cancer JEC cells were exposed to various concentrations of RQDs to evaluate their anticancer effects and to explore mechanisms by the MTT assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Results revealed that the highest photoluminescence quantum yield of the prepared RQDs was up to approximately 70%, with the average size of 5.48 nm. RQDs induced antipro-liferative activity against JEC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In light microscopy and TEM examinations, RQDs induced vacuolization and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dilation in JEC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. ER stress by RQDs were further confirmed by increased expression of GADD153 and GRP78 at both mRNA and protein levels. ER stress further led to JEC cell apoptosis and necrosis, as evidenced by flow cytometry and mitochondrial membrane potential detection. Our findings demonstrated that the newly synthesized RQDs were effective against human endometrial cancer cells. The underlying mechanism appears to be, at least partly, due to ER stress leading to apoptotic cell death and necrosis.

  3. GPI anchor attachment is required for Gas1p transport from the endoplasmic reticulum in COP II vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Doering, T L; Schekman, R

    1996-01-01

    Inositol starvation of auxotrophic yeast interrupts glycolipid biosynthesis and prevents lipid modification of a normally glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked protein, Gas1p. The unanchored Gas1p precursor undergoes progressive modification in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but is not modified by Golgi-specific glycosylation. Starvation-induced defects in anchor assembly and protein processing are rapid, and occur without altered maturation of other proteins. Cells remain competent to manufacture anchor components and to process Gas1p efficiently once inositol is restored. Newly synthesized Gas1p is packaged into vesicles formed in vitro from perforated yeast spheroplasts incubated with either yeast cytosol or the purified Sec proteins (COP II) required for vesicle budding from the ER. In vitro synthesized vesicles produced by inositol-starved membranes do not contain detectable Gas1p. These studies demonstrate that COP II components fulfill the soluble protein requirements for packaging a GPI-anchored protein into ER-derived transport vesicles. However, GPI anchor attachment is required for this packaging to occur. Images PMID:8598201

  4. Houttuynia cordata Thunb fraction induces human leukemic Molt-4 cell apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Prommaban, Adchara; Kodchakorn, Kanchanok; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Banjerdpongchai, Ratana

    2012-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is a native herb found in Southeast Asia which features various pharmacological activities against allergy, inflammation, viral and bacterial infection, and cancer. The aims of this study were to determine the cytotoxic effect of 6 fractions obtained from silica gel column chromatography of alcoholic HCT extract on human leukemic Molt-4 cells and demonstrate mechanisms of cell death. Six HCT fractions were cytotoxic to human lymphoblastic leukemic Molt-4 cells in a dose-dependent manner by MTT assay, fraction 4 exerting the greatest effects. Treatment with IC50 of HCT fraction 4 significantly induced Molt-4 apoptosis detected by annexinV-FITC/propidium iodide for externalization of phosphatidylserine to the outer layer of cell membrane. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential was reduced in HCT fraction 4-treated Molt-4 cells. Moreover, decreased expression of Bcl-xl and increased levels of Smac/Diablo, Bax and GRP78 proteins were noted on immunoblotting. In conclusion, HCT fraction 4 induces Molt-4 apoptosis cell through an endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  5. Overexpression of TCL1 activates the endoplasmic reticulum stress response: a novel mechanism of leukemic progression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kriss, Crystina L.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier A.; Mailloux, Adam W.; Powers, John J.; Tang, Chih-Hang Anthony; Kang, Chang Won; Zanesi, Nicola; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represents 30% of adult leukemia. TCL1 is expressed in ∼ 90% of human CLL. Transgenic expression of TCL1 in murine B cells (Eμ-TCL1) results in mouse CLL. Here we show for the first time that the previously unexplored endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is aberrantly activated in Eμ-TCL1 mouse and human CLL. This includes activation of the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway and the transcriptionally up-regulated expression of Derlin-1, Derlin-2, BiP, GRP94, and PDI. TCL1 associates with the XBP-1 transcription factor, and causes the dysregulated expression of the transcription factors, Pax5, IRF4, and Blimp-1, and of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. In addition, TCL1-overexpressing CLL cells manufacture a distinctly different BCR, as we detected increased expression of membrane-bound IgM and altered N-linked glycosylation of Igα and Igβ, which account for the hyperactive BCR in malignant CLL. To demonstrate that the ER stress-response pathway is a novel molecular target for the treatment of CLL, we blocked the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway using a novel inhibitor, and observed apoptosis and significantly stalled growth of CLL cells in vitro and in mice. These studies reveal an important role of TCL1 in activating the ER stress response in support for malignant progression of CLL. PMID:22692508

  6. Glycation of paraoxonase 1 by high glucose instigates endoplasmic reticulum stress to induce endothelial dysfunction in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; Liu, Xiaoli; Feng, Liru; Yang, Hui; Yu, Weiye; Feng, Tiejian; Wang, Shuangxi; Wang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) modulates low-density lipoprotein and cell membrane oxidation through the action of paraoxonase-1 (PON1). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to a wide range of human pathologies including diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Previous studies have reported that PON1 is glycated in diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how PON1 glycation contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. ER stress markers were monitored by western blot. Endothelial function was determined by organ bath. Incubation of recombinant PON1 proteins with high glucose increased PON1 glycation and reduced PON1 activity. Exposure of HUVECs to glycated PON1 induced prolonged ER stress and reduced SERCA activity, which were abolished by tempol, apocynin, BAPTA, and p67 and p22 siRNAs. Chronic administration of amino guanidine or 4-PBA prevented endothelial dysfunction in STZ-injected rats. Importantly, injection of glycated PON1 but not native PON1 induced aberrant ER stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats, which were attenuated by tempol, BAPTA, and 4-PBA. In conclusion, glycation of PON1 by hyperglycemia induces endothelial dysfunction through ER stress. In perspectives, PON1 glycation is a novel risk factor of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, inhibition of oxidative stress, chelating intracellular Ca2+, and ER chaperone would be considered to reduce vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:28374834

  7. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  8. Interaction between caspase-8 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced apoptotic HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Toru; Tsuji, Mayumi; Oyamada, Hideto; Morio, Yuri; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2007-11-30

    The accumulation of hydrophobic bile acid, such as glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA), in the liver has been thought to induce hepatocellular damage in human chronic cholestatic liver diseases. We previously reported that GCDCA-induced apoptosis was promoted by both mitochondria-mediated and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathways in rat hepatocytes. In this study, we elucidated the relationship between these pathways in GCDCA-induced apoptotic HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were treated with GCDCA (100-500microM) with or without a caspase-8 inhibitor, Z-IETD-fluoromethyl ketone (Z-IETD-FMK) (30microM) for 3-24h. We demonstrated the presence of both apoptotic pathways in these cells; that is, we showed increases in cleaved caspase-3 proteins, the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the expression of ER resident molecular chaperone Bip mRNA and ER stress response-associated transcription factor Chop mRNA. On the other hand, pretreatment with Z-IETD-FMK significantly reduced the increases, compared with treatment with GCDCA alone. Immunofluorescence microscopic analysis showed that treatment with GCDCA increased the cleavage of BAP31, an integral membrane protein of ER, and pretreatment with Z-IETD-FMK suppressed the increase of caspase-8 and BAP31 cleavage. In conclusion, these results suggest that intact activated caspase-8 may promote and amplify the ER stress response by cleaving BAP31 in GCDCA-induced apoptotic cells.

  9. Regulation of calnexin sub-cellular localization modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Delom, Frédéric; Fessart, Delphine; Chevet, Eric

    2007-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the cellular compartment where proteins enter the secretory pathway, undergo post-translational modifications and acquire a correct conformation. If these functions are chronically altered, specific ER stress signals are triggered to promote cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Here, we show that tunicamycin causes significant alteration of calnexin sub-cellular distribution in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, this correlates with the absence of both tunicamycin-induced calnexin phosphorylation as well as tunicamycin-induced cell death. Under these conditions, calnexin-associated Bap31, an ER integral membrane protein, is subjected to a caspase-8 cleavage pattern within a specific sub-compartment of the ER. These results suggest that MCF-7 resistance to ER stress-induced apoptosis is partially mediated by the expression level of calnexin which in turn controls its sub-cellular localization, and its association with Bap31. These data may delineate a resistance mechanism to the ER stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  10. Spontaneous and Fas-induced apoptosis of low-grade MDS erythroid precursors involves the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Gyan, E; Frisan, E; Beyne-Rauzy, O; Deschemin, J-C; Pierre-Eugene, C; Randriamampita, C; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A; Garrido, C; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Solary, E; Fontenay, M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous apoptosis of bone marrow erythroid precursors accounts for the anemia that characterizes most low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We have shown that death of these precursors involved the Fas-dependent activation of caspase-8. To explore the pathway leading from caspase-8 activation to apoptosis, we transduced MDS bone marrow CD34(+) cells with a lentivirus encoding wild-type (WT) or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted Bcl-2 protein before inducing their erythroid differentiation. Both WT-Bcl-2 and ER-targeted Bcl-2 prevented spontaneous and Fas-dependent apoptosis in MDS erythroid precursors. ER-targeted Bcl-2 inhibited mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release in MDS erythroid precursors undergoing apoptosis, indicating a role for the ER in the death pathway, upstream of the mitochondria. MDS erythroid precursors demonstrated elevated ER Ca(2+) stores and these stores remained unaffected by ER-targeted Bcl-2. The ER-associated protein Bcl-2-associated protein (BAP) 31 was cleaved by caspase-8 in MDS erythroid precursors undergoing apoptosis. The protective effect of ER-targeted Bcl-2 toward spontaneous and Fas-induced apoptosis correlated with inhibition of BAP31 cleavage. A protective effect of erythropoietin against Fas-induced BAP31 cleavage and apoptosis was observed. We propose that apoptosis of MDS erythroid precursors involves the ER, downstream of Fas and upstream of the mitochondria, through the cleavage of the ER-associated BAP31 protein.

  11. Mutations in NGLY1 Cause an Inherited Disorder of the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation (ERAD) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Gregory M.; Shashi, Vandana; Bainbridge, Matthew; Gambello, Michael J.; Zahir, Farah R.; Bast, Thomas; Crimian, Rebecca; Schoch, Kelly; Platt, Julia; Cox, Rachel; Bernstein, Jonathan; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Rhonda S.; Bibb, Audrey; Jones, Melanie; Hegde, Madhuri; Graham, Brett H.; Need, Anna C.; Oviedo, Angelica; Schaaf, Christian P.; Boyle, Sean; Butte, Atul J.; Chen, Rong; Clark, Michael J.; Haraksingh, Rajini; Cowan, Tina M.; He, Ping; Langlois, Sylvie; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Snyder, Michael; Gibbs, Richard; Freeze, Hudson H.; Goldstein, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway is responsible for the translocation of misfolded proteins across the ER membrane into the cytosol for subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In order to understand the spectrum of clinical and molecular findings in a complex neurological syndrome, we studied a series of eight patients with inherited deficiency of N-glycanase 1 (NGLY1), a novel disorder of cytosolic ERAD dysfunction. Methods Whole-genome, whole-exome or standard Sanger sequencing techniques were employed. Retrospective chart reviews were performed in order to obtain clinical data. Results All patients had global developmental delay, a movement disorder, and hypotonia. Other common findings included hypo- or alacrima (7/8), elevated liver transaminases (6/7), microcephaly (6/8), diminished reflexes (6/8), hepatocyte cytoplasmic storage material or vacuolization (5/6), and seizures (4/8). The nonsense mutation c.1201A>T (p.R401X) was the most common deleterious allele. Conclusions NGLY1 deficiency is a novel autosomal recessive disorder of the ERAD pathway associated with neurological dysfunction, abnormal tear production, and liver disease. The majority of patients detected to date carry a specific nonsense mutation that appears to be associated with severe disease. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to enlarge as cases with a more broad range of mutations are detected. PMID:24651605

  12. Different redox sensitivity of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation clients suggests a novel role for disulphide bonds in secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Medraño-Fernandez, Iria; Fagioli, Claudio; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Otsu, Mieko; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    To maintain proteostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), terminally misfolded secretory proteins must be recognized, partially unfolded, and dislocated to the cytosol for proteasomal destruction, in a complex process called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Dislocation implies reduction of inter-chain disulphide bonds. When in its reduced form, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can act not only as a reductase but also as an unfoldase, preparing substrates for dislocation. PDI oxidation by Ero1 favours substrate release and transport across the ER membrane. Here we addressed the redox dependency of ERAD and found that DTT stimulates the dislocation of proteins with DTT-resistant disulphide bonds (i.e., orphan Ig-μ chains) but stabilizes a ribophorin mutant (Ri332) devoid of them. DTT promotes the association of Ri332, but not of Ig-µ, with PDI. This discrepancy may suggest that disulphide bonds in cargo proteins can be utilized to oxidize PDI, hence facilitating substrate detachment and degradation also in the absence of Ero1. Accordingly, Ero1 silencing retards Ri332 degradation, but has little if any effect on Ig-µ. Thus, some disulphides can increase the stability and simultaneously favour quality control of secretory proteins.

  13. SLY1 and Syntaxin 18 specify a distinct pathway for procollagen VII export from the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Cristina; Erlmann, Patrik; Villeneuve, Julien; Santos, António JM; Martínez-Alonso, Emma; Martínez-Menárguez, José Ángel; Malhotra, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    TANGO1 binds and exports Procollagen VII from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we report a connection between the cytoplasmic domain of TANGO1 and SLY1, a protein that is required for membrane fusion. Knockdown of SLY1 by siRNA arrested Procollagen VII in the ER without affecting the recruitment of COPII components, general protein secretion, and retrograde transport of the KDEL-containing protein BIP, and ERGIC53. SLY1 is known to interact with the ER-specific SNARE proteins Syntaxin 17 and 18, however only Syntaxin 18 was required for Procollagen VII export. Neither SLY1 nor Syntaxin 18 was required for the export of the equally bulky Procollagen I from the ER. Altogether, these findings reveal the sorting of bulky collagen family members by TANGO1 at the ER and highlight the existence of different export pathways for secretory cargoes one of which is mediated by the specific SNARE complex containing SLY1 and Syntaxin 18. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02784.001 PMID:24842878

  14. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits apoptosis by proteasome-mediated degradation of Bax at endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion contacts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiping; Hildreth, Richard L; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2013-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes the UL37 exon 1 protein (pUL37x1), which is the potent viral mitochondrion-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA), to increase survival of infected cells. HCMV vMIA traffics from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to ER subdomains, which are physically linked to mitochondria known as mitochondrion-associated membranes (MAM), and to mitochondria. The antiapoptotic function of vMIA is thought to primarily result from its ability to inhibit Bax-mediated permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here, we establish that vMIA retargets Bax to the MAM as well as to the OMM from immediate early through late times of infection. However, MAM localization of Bax results in its increased ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Surprisingly, HCMV infection does not increase OMM-associated degradation (OMMAD) of Bax, even though the ER and mitochondria are physically connected at the MAM. It was recently found that lipid rafts at the plasma membrane can connect extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways and can serve as sites of apoptosome assembly. In transfected permissive human fibroblasts, vMIA mediates, through its cholesterol affinity, association of Bax and apoptosome components with MAM lipid rafts. While Bax association with MAM lipid rafts was detected in HCMV-infected cells, association of apoptosome components was not. These results establish that Bax recruitment to the MAM and its MAM-associated degradation (MAMAD) are a newly described antiapoptotic mechanism used by HCMV infection to increase cell survival for its growth.

  15. EBS7 is a plant-specific component of a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yidan; Zhang, Congcong; Wang, Dinghe; Su, Wei; Liu, Linchuan; Wang, Muyang; Li, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is an essential part of an ER-localized protein quality-control system for eliminating terminally misfolded proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ERAD machinery is conserved among yeast, animals, and plants; however, it remains unknown if the plant ERAD system involves plant-specific components. Here we report that the Arabidopsis ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 suppressor 7 (EBS7) gene encodes an ER membrane-localized ERAD component that is highly conserved in land plants. Loss-of-function ebs7 mutations prevent ERAD of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-9 (bri1-9) and bri1-5, two ER-retained mutant variants of the cell-surface receptor for brassinosteroids (BRs). As a result, the two mutant receptors accumulate in the ER and consequently leak to the plasma membrane, resulting in the restoration of BR sensitivity and phenotypic suppression of the bri1-9 and bri1-5 mutants. EBS7 accumulates under ER stress, and its mutations lead to hypersensitivity to ER and salt stresses. EBS7 interacts with the ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Arabidopsis thaliana HMG-CoA reductase degradation 1a (AtHrd1a), one of the central components of the Arabidopsis ERAD machinery, and an ebs7 mutation destabilizes AtHrd1a to reduce polyubiquitination of bri1-9. Taken together, our results uncover a plant-specific component of a plant ERAD pathway and also suggest its likely biochemical function. PMID:26371323

  16. BAP31 is involved in the retention of cytochrome P450 2C2 in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Szczesna-Skorupa, Elzbieta; Kemper, Byron

    2006-02-17

    Microsomal cytochrome P450 2C2 is an integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein that is directly retained in the ER and excluded from transport vesicles. We have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation to show that a ubiquitous ER membrane protein (BAP31) interacts with P450 2C2 in transfected COS-1 cells. A chimera containing only the N-terminal signal anchor of P450 2C1 (P450 2C1-(1-29)) also interacted with BAP31, which is consistent with interaction of the two proteins via their transmembrane domains. Down-regulation of BAP31 expression with small interfering RNA resulted in redistribution of green fluorescent protein-tagged P450 2C2 or P450 2C1-(1-29) from the ER into the nuclear membrane and compact perinuclear compartment structures as well as the cell surface in a small fraction of the cells. In Bap31-null embryonic stem cells, a significant fraction of P450 2C2 or P450 2C1-(1-29) was detected at the cell surface and nuclear envelope, but was redistributed to the ER by expression of BAP31. The expression level of P450 2C2 was significantly increased in COS-1 cells with repressed levels of BAP31. Formation of the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment of BAP31 was detected in transfected COS-1 cells expressing P450 2C2, and annexin V staining was consistent with the activation of an apoptotic pathway in these cells. Down-regulation of BAP31 with small interfering RNA partially reversed the apoptosis. These results suggest that interaction of P450 2C2 with BAP31 is important for its ER retention and expression level and that BAP31 may be involved in the regulation of apoptosis induced by the ER overload response to increased expression of P450.

  17. Cationic polystyrene nanospheres induce autophagic cell death through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Xia, Tian; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Wan; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Furthermore, NH2-PS could induce autophagic cell death. NH2-PS increased autophagic flux due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by misfolded protein aggregation. The inhibition of ER stress decreased cytotoxicity and autophagy in the NH2-PS-treated cells. In addition, the Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of NH2-PS-triggered autophagic cell death. These results suggest an important role of autophagy in cationic NP-induced cell death and provide mechanistic insights into the inhibition of the toxicity and safe material design.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung

  18. Panax quinquefolium saponin attenuates cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by thapsigargin through inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Xue, Mei; Wang, Xiao-Reng; Tao, Tian-Qi; Xu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Hua; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of many cardiovascular diseases, and Panax quinquefolium saponin (PQS) is able to inhibit excessive ER stress-related apoptosis of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia/reoxygenation and myocardial infarction. However, the pathway by which PQS inhibits the ER stress-related apoptosis is not well understood. To further investigate the protective effect of PQS against ER stress-related apoptosis, primary cultured cardiomyocytes were stimulated with thapsigargin (TG), which is widely used to model cellular ER stress, and it could induce apoptotic cell death in sufficient concentration. Methods Primary cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were exposed to TG (1 µmol/L) treatment for 24 h, following PQS pre-treatment (160 µg/mL) for 24 h or pre-treatment with small interfering RNA directed against protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (Si-PERK) for 6 h. The viability and apoptosis rate of cardiomyocytes were detected by cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometry respectively. ER stress-related protein expression, such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin, PERK, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were assayed by western blotting. Results Both PQS pre-treatment and PERK knockdown remarkably inhibited the cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by TG, increased cell viability, decreased phosphorylation of both PERK and eIF2α, and decreased protein levels of both ATF4 and CHOP. There was no statistically significant difference between PQS pre-treatment and PERK knockdown in the cardioprotective effect. Conclusions Our data indicate that the PERK-eIF2α-ATF4-CHOP pathway of ER stress is involved in the apoptosis induced by TG, and PQS might prevent TG-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through a mechanism involving the suppression of this pathway. These findings

  19. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress.

  20. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Mu-Yun; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shu-Yi; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Peng, Yu-Ta; Chang, Chia-Che

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified as an

  1. Moderate endoplasmic reticulum stress activates a PERK and p38-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lumley, Emily C; Osborn, Acadia R; Scott, Jessica E; Scholl, Amanda G; Mercado, Vicki; McMahan, Young T; Coffman, Zachary G; Brewster, Jay L

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has the ability to signal organelle dysfunction via a complex signaling network known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). In this work, hamster fibroblast cells exhibiting moderate levels of ER stress were compared to those exhibiting severe ER stress. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation was accomplished via a temperature-sensitive mutation in the Dad1 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex or by direct inhibition with tunicamycin (Tm). Temperature shift (TS) treatment generated weak activation of ER stress signaling when compared to doses of Tm that are typically used in ER stress studies (500-1000 nM). A dose-response analysis of key ER stress signaling mediators, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and protein kinase R (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), revealed 20-40 nM of Tm to generate activation intensity similar to TS treatment. In parental BHK21 cells, moderate (20-40 nM) and high doses (200-1000 nM) of Tm were compared to identify physiological and signaling-based differences in stress response. Inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release via ITPR activity with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or Xestospongin C (XeC) was sufficient to protect against apoptosis induced by moderate but not higher doses of Tm. Analysis of kinase activation over a range of Tm exposures revealed the p38 stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) to display increasing activation with Tm dosage. Interestingly, Tm induced the extracellular regulated kinases (Erk1/2) only at moderate doses of Tm. Inhibition of ER transmembrane stress sensors (IRE1, PERK) or cytosolic signaling mediators (p38, Jnk1, Erk1/2) was used to evaluate pathways involved in apoptosis activation during ER stress. Inhibition of either PERK or p38 was sufficient to reduce cell death and apoptosis induced by moderate, but not high, doses of Tm. During ER stress, cells exhibited a rapid decline in anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and survivin proteins. Inhibition of

  2. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in aging and age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marishka K.; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum(ER) is a multifunctional organelle within which protein folding, lipid biosynthesis, and calcium storage occurs. Perturbations such as energy or nutrient depletion, disturbances in calcium or redox status that disrupt ER homeostasis lead to the misfolding of proteins, ER stress and up-regulation of several signaling pathways coordinately called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is characterized by the induction of chaperones, degradation of misfolded proteins and attenuation of protein translation. The UPR plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and thus is central to normal physiology. However, sustained unresolved ER stress leads to apoptosis. Aging linked declines in expression and activity of key ER molecular chaperones and folding enzymes compromise proper protein folding and the adaptive response of the UPR. One mechanism to explain age associated declines in cellular functions and age-related diseases is a progressive failure of chaperoning systems. In many of these diseases, proteins or fragments of proteins convert from their normally soluble forms to insoluble fibrils or plaques that accumulate in a variety of organs including the liver, brain or spleen. This group of diseases, which typically occur late in life includes Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, type II diabetes and a host of less well known but often equally serious conditions such as fatal familial insomnia. The UPR is implicated in many of these neurodegenerative and familial protein folding diseases as well as several cancers and a host of inflammatory diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis. This review will discuss age-related changes in the ER stress response and the role of the UPR in age-related diseases. PMID:22934019

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Signal-Dependent Glycylation of the Hsp70/Grp170-Related Pgp1p in Tetrahymena▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Rong; Clark, Kathleen M.; Gorovsky, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    Glycylation is an uncommon posttranslational modification. It has been found that tubulin glycylation is essential for cell survival in Tetrahymena. Here we describe PGP1, a Tetrahymena gene encoding an Hsp70 homologue that is a novel glycylated protein. Pgp1p is a conserved glycoprotein that localizes within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that PGP1 is essential for viability and present evidence that both glycosylation and ER retention are necessary but not sufficient for glycylation. PMID:17189490

  4. Neuropeptide accretions in the endoplasmic reticulum of oxytocinergic neurons in cats, monkeys and rabbits: a widespread phenomenon.

    PubMed Central

    Pow, D V

    1992-01-01

    Light microscopic observations using Nomarski optics on the aldehyde-fixed hypothalamus of normal adult cats, monkeys and rabbits revealed the presence of cells in the supraoptic, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei which possessed yellow birefringent inclusions. Immunogold labelling showed that in each species the cells displayed oxytocin-like immunoreactivity, both in electron-dense inclusions within some (but not all) cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum and in secretory granules. The cells in cats and rabbits were in all respects indistinguishable from the homologous 'birefringent' cells previously described in rats, but in monkeys, cells frequently contained additional inclusions in cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum which did not display oxytocin or vasopressin-like immunoreactivity, even after trypsin, pepsin or chymotrypsin treatment of sections. Observations on cats and rabbits using fluorescence microscopy revealed that the birefringent cells possessed bright autofluorescence which facilitated the identification of more cells than were seen using Nomarski optics alone. Autofluorescence was abolished when sections were mounted in glycerol, or when exposed to light for protracted periods of time. Attempts to label for monoamines in these cells were not successful, suggesting that the fluorescence is not due to aldehyde-induced amine fluorescence. It is not clear why neuropeptides are retained in some rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns. It is possible that these birefringent cells contain a peptide, or peptides, which are abnormal in some manner, or which may be other members of the oxytocin gene family. Alternatively, the processing of neuropeptides to permit their export to the Golgi apparatus may be deficient. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry revealed that, unlike other oxytocin neurons, cells with intracellular accretions lacked detectable acetyl cholinesterase. As AChE is a known peptidase, it may be involved in regulating

  5. Dysfunction in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria crosstalk underlies SIGMAR1 loss of function mediated motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Azzedine, Hamid; Chrast, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Sigma 1 receptor (SIGMAR1) have been previously identified in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disruption of Sigmar1 in mouse leads to locomotor deficits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying motor phenotypes in human and mouse with disturbed SIGMAR1 function have not been described so far. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of SIGMAR1 in motor neuron biology. Characterization of Sigmar1(-/-) mice revealed that affected animals display locomotor deficits associated with muscle weakness, axonal degeneration and motor neuron loss. Using primary motor neuron cultures, we observed that pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIGMAR1 led to motor neuron axonal degeneration followed by cell death. Disruption of SIGMAR1 function in motor neurons disturbed endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts, affected intracellular calcium signalling and was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and defects in mitochondrial dynamics and transport. These defects were not observed in cultured sensory neurons, highlighting the exacerbated sensitivity of motor neurons to SIGMAR1 function. Interestingly, the inhibition of mitochondrial fission was sufficient to induce mitochondria axonal transport defects as well as axonal degeneration similar to the changes observed after SIGMAR1 inactivation or loss. Intracellular calcium scavenging and endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition were able to restore mitochondrial function and consequently prevent motor neuron degeneration. These results uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration mediated by loss of SIGMAR1 function and provide therapeutically relevant insight into motor neuronal diseases.

  6. Re-evaluation of the Role of Calcium Homeostasis Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein (CHERP) in Cellular Calcium Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Sebastian, Peter J.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Sampson, Natalie D.; Hewitt, Jane E.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, resulting from activation of intracellular Ca2+ channels within the endoplasmic reticulum, regulate several aspects of cellular growth and differentiation. Ca2+ homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that has been proposed as a regulator of both major families of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs), with resulting effects on mitotic cycling. However, the manner by which CHERP regulates intracellular Ca2+ channels to impact cellular growth is unknown. Here, we challenge previous findings that CHERP acts as a direct cytoplasmic regulator of IP3Rs and RyRs and propose that CHERP acts in the nucleus to impact cellular proliferation by regulating the function of the U2 snRNA spliceosomal complex. The previously reported effects of CHERP on cellular growth therefore are likely indirect effects of altered spliceosomal function, consistent with prior data showing that loss of function of U2 snRNP components can interfere with cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest. PMID:23148228

  7. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  8. ATM deficiency induces oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Stoica, George; Yan, Mingshan; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Lynn, William S; Wong, Paul K Y

    2005-12-01

    ATM kinase, the product of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene, is activated by genomic damage. ATM plays a crucial role in cell growth and development. Here we report that primary astrocytes isolated from ATM-deficient mice grow slowly, become senescent, and die in culture. However, before reaching senescence, these primary Atm(-/-) astrocytes, like Atm(-/-) lymphocytes, show increased spontaneous DNA synthesis. These astrocytes also show markers of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including increased levels of heat shock proteins (HSP70 and GRP78), malondialdehyde adducts, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, procaspase 12 cleavage, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). In addition, HSP70 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are upregulated in the cerebella of ATM-deficient mice. This increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation is seen primarily in cerebellar astrocytes, or Bergmann glia, near degenerating Purkinje cells. ERK1/2 activation and astrogliosis are also found in other parts of the brain, for example, the cortex. We conclude that ATM deficiency induces intrinsic growth defects, oxidative stress, ER stress, and ERKs activation in astrocytes.

  9. Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causes dysregulation of the cholesterol and triglyceride biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Werstuck, Geoff H.; Lentz, Steven R.; Dayal, Sanjana; Hossain, Gazi S.; Sood, Sudesh K.; Shi, Yuan Y.; Zhou, Ji; Maeda, Nobuyo; Krisans, Skaidrite K.; Malinow, M. Rene; Austin, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in patients having severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to deficiency for cystathionine β-synthase. However, the mechanism by which homocysteine promotes the development and progression of hepatic steatosis is unknown. We report here that homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates both the unfolded protein response and the sterol regulatory element–binding proteins (SREBPs) in cultured human hepatocytes as well as vascular endothelial and aortic smooth muscle cells. Activation of the SREBPs is associated with increased expression of genes responsible for cholesterol/triglyceride biosynthesis and uptake and with intracellular accumulation of cholesterol. Homocysteine-induced gene expression was inhibited by overexpression of the ER chaperone, GRP78/BiP, thus demonstrating a direct role of ER stress in the activation of cholesterol/triglyceride biosynthesis. Consistent with these in vitro findings, cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the livers, but not plasmas, of mice having diet-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. This effect was not due to impaired hepatic export of lipids because secretion of VLDL-triglyceride was increased in hyperhomocysteinemic mice. These findings suggest a mechanism by which homocysteine-induced ER stress causes dysregulation of the endogenous sterol response pathway, leading to increased hepatic biosynthesis and uptake of cholesterol and triglycerides. Furthermore, this mechanism likely explains the development and progression of hepatic steatosis and possibly atherosclerotic lesions observed in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:11375416

  10. A major proportion of N-glycoproteins are transiently glucosylated in the endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Ganan, S.; Cazzulo, J.J.; Parodi, A.J. )

    1991-03-26

    N-Linked, high-mannose-type oligosaccharides lacking glucose residues may be transiently glucosylated directly from UDP-Glc in the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian, plant, fungal, and protozoan cells. The products formed have been identified as N-linked Glc{sub 1}Man{sub 5-9}GlcNAc{sub 2} and glucosidase II is apparently the enzyme responsible for the in vivo deglucosylation of the compounds. As newly glucosylated glycoproteins are immediately deglucosylated, it is unknown whether transient glucosylation involves all or nearly all N-linked glycoproteins or if, on the contrary, it only affects a minor proportion of them. In order to evaluate the molar proportion of N-linked oligosaccharides that are glucosylated, cells of the trypanosomatid protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (a parasite transferring Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2} in protein N-glycosylation) were grown in the presence of ({sup 14}C)glucose and concentrations of the glucosidase II inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine that were more than 1,000-fold higher than those required to produce a 50% inhibition of the T. cruzi enzyme. No evidence for the presence of an endomannosidase yielding GlcMan from the glucosylated compounds was obtained. As the average number of N-linked oligosaccharides per molecule in glycoproteins is higher than one, these results indicate that more than 52-33% of total glycoproteins are glucosylated and that transient glucosylation is a major event in the normal processing of glycoproteins.

  11. Green fluorescent protein-based monitoring of endoplasmic reticulum redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Julia; Ramming, Thomas; Odermatt, Alex; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pathological endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is tightly linked to the accumulation of reactive oxidants, which can be both upstream and downstream of ER stress. Accordingly, detrimental intracellular stress signals are amplified through establishment of a vicious cycle. An increasing number of human diseases are characterized by tissue atrophy in response to ER stress and oxidative injury. Experimental monitoring of stress-induced, time-resolved changes in ER reduction-oxidation (redox) states is therefore important. Organelle-specific examination of redox changes has been facilitated by the advent of genetically encoded, fluorescent probes, which can be targeted to different subcellular locations by means of specific amino acid extensions. These probes include redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs) and the yellow fluorescent protein-based redox biosensor HyPer. In the case of roGFPs, variants with known specificity toward defined redox couples are now available. Here, we review the experimental framework to measure ER redox changes using ER-targeted fluorescent biosensors. Advantages and drawbacks of plate-reader and microscopy-based measurements are discussed, and the power of these techniques demonstrated in the context of selected cell culture models for ER stress. PMID:23781233

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Thiol Oxidase Deficiency Leads to Ascorbic Acid Depletion and Noncanonical Scurvy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Ester; Hansen, Henning Gram; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Fujii, Junichi; Ron, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thiol oxidases initiate a disulfide relay to oxidatively fold secreted proteins. We found that combined loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding the ER thiol oxidases ERO1α, ERO1β, and PRDX4 compromised the extracellular matrix in mice and interfered with the intracellular maturation of procollagen. These severe abnormalities were associated with an unexpectedly modest delay in disulfide bond formation in secreted proteins but a profound, 5-fold lower procollagen 4-hydroxyproline content and enhanced cysteinyl sulfenic acid modification of ER proteins. Tissue ascorbic acid content was lower in mutant mice, and ascorbic acid supplementation improved procollagen maturation and lowered sulfenic a