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Sample records for endoscopic laser lithotripsy

  1. Kidney stones - lithotripsy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Laser lithotripsy - discharge; Percutaneous lithotripsy - discharge; Endoscopic lithotripsy - discharge; ESWL - ...

  2. Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laser lithotripsy; Percutaneous lithotripsy; Endoscopic lithotripsy; ESWL; Renal calculi-lithotripsy ... Lingeman JE. Surgical management of upper urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ...

  3. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic laser lithotripsy for urinary stone treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Ibrahim; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin; Arayici, Yilmaz; Isler, Burak; Otcu, Selcuk

    2012-12-01

    We reviewed our 6 years of experience with endoscopic holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy for treatment of urinary stones in different locations in 111 children. A retrospective review was performed on endoscopic holmium: YAG laser lithotripsy procedures performed to treat stones in children between March 2006 and March 2012. In total, 120 laser lithotripsy procedures were performed to treat 131 stones in 111 children (80 males and 31 females; age range, 11 months to 16 years; median age, 6 years). Stones were located in the kidney in 48 cases (36.7 %), ureter in 52 (39.7 %), bladder in 21 (16.0 %), and urethra in 10 (7.6 %). Stone size ranged from 4 to 30 mm (mean, 12.8 mm), and anesthesia duration was 10-170 min (mean, 56 min). Forty-four ureters required balloon dilation, and 61 double J stents were inserted. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 75 months (mean, 35 months). Complete stone clearance was achieved at the end of the procedure in 102 (91.9 %) patients (age < 7 years, 93.3 % vs. age ≥ 7 years, 90.2 %; p > 0.05). The success rate was 81.3 % for kidney stones (<10 mm, 90.9 % vs. ≥ 10 mm, 78.4 %; p > 0.05) and 100 % for the ureter, bladder, and urethral stones. Overall success rate with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was 100 %. No major complications were encountered during or after the procedures. These results confirm the effectiveness and safety of holmium laser lithotripsy for treating all urinary stone locations in children of all ages.

  4. Percutaneous Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Management of Complicated Biliary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kelly; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Spivey, James; Martin, Louis; Nieh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Advances in endoscopic techniques have transformed the management of urolithiasis. We sought to evaluate the role of such urological interventions for the treatment of complex biliary calculi. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n=9) undergoing percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy for complicated biliary calculi over a 4-year period (12/2003 to 12/2007). All previously failed standard techniques include ERCP with sphincterotomy (n=6), PTHC (n=7), or both of these. Access to the biliary system was obtained via an existing percutaneous transhepatic catheter or T-tube tracts. Endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy was performed via a flexible cystoscope or ureteroscope. Stone clearance was confirmed intra- and postoperatively. A percutaneous transhepatic drain was left indwelling for follow-up imaging. Results: Mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 38 to 92). Total stone burden ranged from 1.7 cm to 5 cm. All 9 patients had stones located in the CBD, with 2 patients also having additional stones within the hepatic ducts. All 9 patients (100%) were visually stone-free after one endoscopic procedure. No major perioperative complications occurred. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days. At a mean radiological follow-up of 5.4 months (range, 0.5 to 21), no stone recurrence was noted. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy is a minimally invasive alternative to open salvage surgery for complex biliary calculi refractory to standard approaches. This treatment is both safe and efficacious. Success depends on a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:19660213

  5. Endoscopic lithotripsy for bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Leung, J W

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy and common duct stone extraction is successful in 85-90% of patients using conventional balloons and baskets. However, most patients with biliary stones > 2 cm will require mechanical, electrohydraulic, or laser lithotripsy prior to stone extraction. Mechanical lithotripsy is inexpensive, easy to perform, and effective in 80-90% of cases. Most failures result from inability to entrap the stone in the lithotripsy basket. These cases may be successfully treated using either electrohydraulic or laser lithotripsy (intraductal shockwave lithotripsy). In most cases, intraductal shockwave lithotripsy requires direct visual control. Due to difficulty with peroral cholangioscopy, these techniques will not be widely used until a smaller, more maneuverable "mother and baby scope" system is developed. We recommend mechanical lithotripsy as the initial treatment for large biliary stones. Failed cases should be referred to specialized centers for a repeat attempt with intraductal shockwave lithotripsy. With this approach, an experienced endoscopist is successful in removing biliary stones in over 95% of patients. Long term biliary stenting remains a viable option for the high risk patients with large common bile duct stones.

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  7. [Endoscopic lithotripsy of a urinary bladder calculus with the aid of a holmium-YAG-laser in a gelding].

    PubMed

    Simhofer, H; Riedelberger, K

    2002-09-01

    A 6 year old Haflinger gelding was presented to the reporting clinics with a history of chronic dysuria. A large cystic calculus (12 x 9 x 9 cm) was diagnosed cystoscopically. Lithotripsy was carried out endoscopically in the standing, sedated patient with a Holmium:YAG surgical laser (2100 nm, 0.5-3.5 J/pulse, 3-60 pulses/sec.). The endoscope was inserted into the bladder via perineal urethrostomy. Fragmentation of the urolith was carried out with a laser fiber (core diameter 600 microns) in contact mode. Healing proceeded uneventfully. On follow up examination 8 weeks post surgery, no signs of recurrence, cystitis or strictures of the urethra were present. PMID:12395576

  8. [Laser lithotripsy of ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Schmeller, N; Ehsan, A; Kriegmair, M; Muschter, R; Liedl, B; Hofstetter, A

    1994-07-01

    A total of 149 patients with 152 ureteral stones were treated with intraureteral lithotripsy by Dye-laser (83.55%), Alexandrite-laser (41.27%), electrohydraulic lithotripsy adapted for use in the ureter (25.16%) or neodymium: YAG laser with optomechanic coupling (3.2%). The Dye-laser has an automatic pulse shut-off mechanism with spectral analysis of the reflected laser beam, so that effective laser pulses can only be released by contact with a stone. Most (127 of 83.5%) of the stones could be completely fragmented, so that no further treatment was necessary. In 16 cases (10.5%) the stone was too hard for fragmentation and had to be removed by alternative techniques. Intraureteral lithotripsy is a save and effective method of treating ureteral stones that cannot be reached or have not been treated successfully by shockwave lithotripsy. No significant differences in outcome were found between the different lasers or electrohydraulic lithotripsy. In selected cases endoscopic treatment may be recommended as treatment of first choice.

  9. [Laser lithotripsy of the upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Miller, K

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 10% of all stone patients require an endoscopic stone treatment. With the advent of laserlithotripters a new technology became available, featuring extremely thin (200 microns) and flexible lithotripsy probes. As a consequence, miniscopes have been developed for endoscopic stone manipulation in the ureter. These miniscopes greatly facilitate ureteroscopy and expectantly will reduce complications associated with this procedure. The success rates of laserlithotripsy are in the 90% range, the only serious drawback are the high purchase costs of the laser. Independent from these new possibilities for intracorporeal lithotripsy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) remains the first therapy of choice for ureteral calculi.

  10. Laser lithotripsy for ureteric stones.

    PubMed

    Foo, K T; Wujanto, R; Wong, M Y

    1994-01-01

    The use of laser is a relatively new modality of treatment in urology. With the advent of the pulse-dye laser lithotripter and a finer 7.2 ureteroscope (miniscope), we found that it was more effective for treating ureteric stones than the conventional ultrasound lithotripsy. Between May 1989 and December 1991, 239 patients (162 males, 77 females) with 259 ureteric stones were treated endoscopically by this modality. Their ages ranged from 19 to 81 years (mean 46.3). The stones were mostly of 5 to 10 mm in their transverse diameters. They were situated in the upper ureter in 59, middle ureter in 39, and lower ureter in 161 cases. The miniscope was inserted into the ureter without prior dilatation and under direct vision. Stone fragmentation was performed using the 504-nm pulse-dye laser of 30 to 60 mJ energy. Complete fragmentation of the stone using the Candela laser lithotripter was achieved in 202 patients (85%). The average hospital stay was two days. Of the 37 unsuccessful cases, 11 were due to failed ureteroscopy, ten due to poor visibility from bleeding, 14 due to stone migrating up to the kidneys and two were monohydrate calculi which did not fragment with laser lithotripsy. Open ureterolithotomies were necessary in 14 patients (5.9%). Significant morbidity was perforation of the ureters which occurred in three patients (1.3%). This was due to ureteroscopy rather than the laser lithotripsy itself. With the availability of the new shockwave lithotripter (ESWL) which can treat ureteric stones in even less invasive ways, without anaesthesia and as outpatient, we are now reserving laser lithotripsy for those who failed ESWL. Generally they are the stones which cause severe obstruction to the ureter.

  11. Holmium laser lithotripsy of a complicated biliary calculus.

    PubMed

    Monga, M; Gabal-Shehab, L L; Kamarei, M; D'Agostino, H

    1999-09-01

    More than 500,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and endoscopic laser lithotripsy have been used for the management of common bile duct calculi, which complicate 10% of cases. We report the first successful clinical application of the Ho:YAG laser to a complex biliary calculus case.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of the PolyScope™ endoscope system combined with holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary calculi with a diameter of less than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Gu, Si-Ping; Huang, Yun-Teng; You, Zhi-Yuan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Yi-Jin; He, Cao-Hui; Qi, Juan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the PolyScope™ endoscope system in the treatment of upper urinary calculi with a diameter of <2 cm. A total of 86 patients hospitalized with upper urinary tract calculi were included. The patients were placed under general or spinal anesthesia and in a lithotomy position. Following the dilation of the ureter, a guide wire was inserted under the direct vision of an F8/9.8 rigid ureteroscope, and an F12/14 flexible ureteral access sheath was positioned along the guide wire. Holmium laser lithotripsy was subsequently performed, using an F8.0 'PolyScope' modular flexible ureteroscope. Plain film of the kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) was performed 1 day subsequent to the surgery, in order to determine the result of the lithotripsy and the position of the double-J stent which was inserted after after holmium laser lithotripsy. In addition, in certain patients, KUB radiography was performed 2-4 weeks subsequent to the surgery, and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was performed if the diameter of the residual stones was >6 mm. Lithotripsy was successful in 77 patients and the duration of the surgery ranged between 25 and 80 min (mean duration, 42 min). Little bleeding was observed. Three patients presented with a slight fever following the surgery; however, no ureteral perforation, high fever or septicemia was observed among the patients following anti-inflammatory treatment. The stone-free rate (SFR) of the single-pass lithotripsy was 89.5% (77/86) and the SFR with ESWL was 96.5% (83/86). The study demonstrated that the F8 modular flexible ureteroscope was safe, convenient and effective for the lithotripsy of upper-tract calculi.

  13. Calculus fragmentation in laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Kang, H W; Lee, H; Teichman, J M H

    2004-03-01

    The intracorporeal treatment of urinary calculi with lasers is presented, which describes laser-calculus interactions associated with lithotripsy. Reliable fragmentation of calculi with diverse compositions and minimal collateral tissue damage are primarily contingent upon laser parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, and pulse energy) and physical properties of calculi (optical, mechanical, and chemical). The pulse duration governs the dominant mechanism in calculi fragmentation, which is either photothermal or photoacoustical/photomechanical. Lasers with long pulse durations (i.e. > tens of micros) induce a temperature rise in the laser-affected zone with minimal acoustic waves; material is removed by means of vaporization, melting, mechanical stress, and/or chemical decomposition. Short-pulsed laser ablation (i.e. < 10 micros), on the other hand, produces shock waves, and the resultant mechanical energy fragments calculi. Work continues throughout the world to evaluate the feasibility of advanced lasers in lithotripsy and to optimize laser parameters and light delivery systems pertinent to efficient fragmentation of calculi.

  14. Successful endoscopic treatment of colonic gallstone ileus using electrohydraulic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D; Ferreira, Lincoln E; Baron, Todd H

    2010-01-01

    The surgical management of gallstone ileus is complex and potentially highly morbid. Initial management requires enterolithotomy and is generally followed by fistula resection at a later date. There have been reports of gallstone extraction using various endoscopic modalities to relieve the obstruction, however, to date, there has never been a published case of endoscopic stone extraction from the colon using electrohydraulic lithotripsy. In this report, we present the technique employed to successfully perform an electrohydraulic lithotripsy for removal of a large gallstone impacted in the sigmoid colon. A cavity was excavated in an obstructing 4.1 cm lamellated stone in the sigmoid colon using electrohydraulic lithotripsy. A screw stent retractor and stent extractor bored a larger lumen which allowed for guidewire advancement and stone fracture via serial pneumatic balloon dilatation. The stone fragments were removed. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy is a safe and effective method to treat colonic obstruction in the setting of gallstone ileus. PMID:20333797

  15. Ureteroscopic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Grasso, M

    1999-07-01

    The indications for ureteroscopic lithotripsy have increased with endoscope miniaturization and powerful, precise endoscopic lithotrites like the holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. Successful ureteropyeloscopic treatment with the currently available instrumentation and techniques is independent of the size, composition, and location of stones in the upper urinary tract. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy maintains a major role in treating uncomplicated, moderately sized upper urinary tract calculi. Complex upper urinary tract calculi, however, are best treated endoscopically. In addition, the endoscopic treatment of ureteral calculi is efficacious and definitive, albeit more invasive than extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

  16. Fragmentation methods in laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Whitehurst, Colin; King, Terence A.

    1991-07-01

    Following a series of opto-acoustic-mechanical and spectroscopic studies into the basic mechanisms of laser lithotripsy, a plasma-mediated opto-mechanical energy transfer model is presented. Laser energy, first absorbed by the calculi material at the surface and couples into the initiated plasma following ionization of vaporized material, is finally transformed into destructive mechanical energy via a shock wave induced by the impulsive expansion of the resulting plasma. This leads to the fragmentation of the calculi. The laser-plasma energy coupling gives a new definition for the fluence threshold to laser induced breakdown, which agrees with shock wave detection and analysis. A laser pulse shape with initial low intensity and sufficient fluence to vaporize a required amount of target material (lasting a few microsecond(s) ) and terminating in a short, intense pulse of about 1microsecond(s) or less, to couple most of the laser energy into the dense young plasma and so create high pressures, is required to produce optimum effect for laser lithotripsy. An opto-mechanical coupler has been designed which transfers the maximum laser energy into mechanically destructive energy, and successfully fragments various types of urinary and biliary calculi even including those calculi with poor surface absorptance, like pure white cystine. A solid state laser, Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers wavelength and 150 microsecond(s) pulse width), has also been tested as an alternative to the flashlamp-excited dye laser. The underwater shock wave induced by this laser has been measured and has successfully fragmented calculi with poor absorptance in the visible region.

  17. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Ell, C; Wondrazek, F; Frank, F; Hochberger, J; Lux, G; Demling, L

    1986-05-01

    With the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy transmission via a flexible glass fiber, it proves possible under laboratory conditions, to destroy gallstones reliably and reproducibly. Lithotripsy is effected mechanically via a laser-induced local shockwave.

  18. Subcapsular hematoma after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Matheus Miranda; da Silva, Rodrigo Donalisio; Jaworski, Paulo; Kim, Fernando J; Molina, Wilson R

    2016-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is an uncommon complication after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. We report on a 38-year-old male with an 8 mm lower pole stone who underwent a left ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. The stone was successfully fragmented. Several hours after being discharged home, the patient returned complaining of back pain and hematuria. He was hemodynamically stable. Laboratory exams were normal. A CT study showed a crescent renal subcapsular hematoma surrounding the left kidney. The patient was admitted to the ward for conservative treatment. No additional intervention was necessary. Most subcapsular hematomas tend to resolve spontaneously. PMID:27544565

  19. Update on contact lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Michel, M S; Köhrmann, K U; Alken, P

    2000-11-01

    Despite the development of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, endoscopic stone removal, with or without intracorporeal lithotripsy, is still an effective minimally invasive alternative for special indications. There is no defined all-purpose lithotripsy procedure for contact lithotripsy. The choice of the lithotripsy procedure for endoscopic stone disintegration depends on a number of different factors, the main one being stone localization. Small calibre, flexible probes (electrohydraulic, pneumatic, laser) are especially appropriate for ureterorenoscopy, but the speed of stone disintegration is a limiting factor. In contrast, large calibre rigid probes (ultrasound) are clearly more effective, but are unsuitable in size for flexible ureterorenoscopy. This indicates that the type and size of the endoscope decisively influences the choice of devices for endoscopic stone disintegration. Additional inhibiting factors are the flexibility or the rigidity of the instrument and the diameter of the working channel. It must be noted that total costs are not only calculated on the purchase of the equipment, but must also cover disposable materials.

  20. Endoscopic excimer laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Pini, Roberto; Vannini, Matteo; Benaim, George; Mattioli, Stefano

    1994-02-01

    Long pulse excimer laser radiation can be efficiently coupled and transmitted through optical fibers allowing the achievement of both photoablative and photomechanical effects. In this work the investigation has been focussed on the urologic surgery field to demonstrate the effectiveness of an excimer laser system for very different therapeutic tasks: recanalization of urethral stenosis and lithotripsy. The choice of the suitable radiation dosimetry and the technical solutions employed provide to the surgeon a multipurpose laser system with a wide range of utility in comparison with other laser systems.

  1. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  2. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  3. [Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy--in vitro trial and animal experiment studies].

    PubMed

    Wenk, H; Benecke, W; Thomas, S; Barreton, G; Lange, V; Möller, K O; Schildberg, F W

    1988-01-01

    Laser induced shock wave lithotripsy is a new procedure to destroy gallstones. Stones of up to 500 mg are destroyed within 5 min. Severe reactions of the soft tissue cannot be observed in animal studies. No perforations, stenoses or thermic lesions after wound healing were observed. The development of an optomechanical transducer replacing the optical lens system at the end of the transmission guide allows its handling in flexible endoscopes. Clinical use is therefore possible from the technical aspect.

  4. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  5. How painful are shockwave lithotripsy and endoscopic procedures performed at outpatient urology clinics?

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byong Chang; Park, Hyoung Keun; Kwak, Cheol; Oh, Seong-June; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2005-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate the subjective pain felt by patients during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and endoscopic procedures such as cystoscopy, retrograde ureteral stenting, retrograde pyelography (RGP), and ureteroscopic lithotripsy performed in an outpatient clinic, and to identify how severe pain during such procedures is. We estimated subjective pain in 984 patients after SWL (186), cystoscopy (489), retrograde ureteral stenting (127), RGP (97), and ureteroscopic lithotripsy (85) performed by a single expert in an outpatient clinic using a prospective questionnaire with a ten point visual analog scale between January 2001 and December 2003. There was no premedication in any procedure except ureteroscopic lithotripsy for which an intramuscular injection of analgesics (pethidine HCl 50 mg) was used. The pain scale score in SWL was 6.62+/-2.27, the highest among the procedures (P<0.05). Pain scores for endoscopies were 4.48+/-2.07 in retrograde ureteral stenting, 3.81+/-2.06 in ureteroscopic lithotripsy, 3.72+/-1.75 in RGP, and 3.08+/-1.95 in cystoscopy. In this study, we observed that patients feel most pain in SWL without anesthesia, and that pain during ureteroscopic lithotripsy under local anesthesia is not high, compared with other endoscopic procedures.

  6. [Endoscopic removal of ureteral calculi in the age of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Heidler, H

    1990-03-15

    High success rates of the shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of ureteral stones are only achieved by repeated sessions and auxiliary measures. Therefore no general therapy of choice can be established. If differentiation is made according to certain criteria the endoscopic removal of ureteral calculi still plays an effective role as a significant complement to the shock wave lithotripsy. With a primary success rate of 93% for the distal ureteral stone and a rate of 1.5% for severe complications the endoscopic removal of large and small ureteral calculi indicated by a high risk situation of a vain attempt of a spontaneous stone loss is presenting a highly effective and successful matter of therapy with low risk. These indications are considered unfavourable assumptions for a primary shock wave lithotripsy. The therapeutical concept, results and complications due to ureteroscopy are presented and compared with the shock wave treatment.

  7. [Endoscopic lithotripsy with pneumatic shockwave (Swiss Lithoclast) using a mini-ureteroscope].

    PubMed

    Knispel, H H; Klän, R; Dieckmann, K P

    1993-09-01

    We performed endoscopic lithotripsy for 23 urinary stones (21 ureteral and 2 bladder stones) with a pneumatic shockwave unit (Swiss Lithoclast; EMS, Angiomed), for the first time applying the probe through the tangential working channel of a semirigid 6.9-Fr ureteroscope (Circon, ACMI). Disintegration was successful in all stones (5-24 mm). Immediately after treatment, the 2 patients with bladder calculi and 10 of the patients with ureteral stones (47.6%) were stone free, while another 5 had residual fragments < 3 mm. Migration of fragments in 4 patients (19%) led to subsequent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There were no ureteral perforations in this series. Routine application of double-J stents avoided any serious postoperative complications. Endoscopic lithotripsy with the pneumatic shockwave unit was shown to be highly effective regardless of stone composition. The ltihotripsy probe is easily applied through mini-ureteroscopes.

  8. Endoscopic gallbladder catheterisation and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the management of Mirizzi's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, D F; Tweedle, D E; Rao, P N

    1988-11-01

    A novel approach to the management of Mirizzi's syndrome due to a mucocele of the gallbladder is reported. Endoscopic retrograde catheterisation of the gallbladder permitted decompression, and was followed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallbladder calculi in an 80-year-old man considered unfit for operation.

  9. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  10. Laser and acoustic lens for lithotripsy

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Makarewicz, Anthony J.; London, Richard A.; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic focusing device whose acoustic waves are generated by laser radiation through an optical fiber. The acoustic energy is capable of efficient destruction of renal and biliary calculi and deliverable to the site of the calculi via an endoscopic procedure. The device includes a transducer tip attached to the distal end of an optical fiber through which laser energy is directed. The transducer tip encapsulates an exogenous absorbing dye. Under proper irradiation conditions (high absorbed energy density, short pulse duration) a stress wave is produced via thermoelastic expansion of the absorber for the destruction of the calculi. The transducer tip can be configured into an acoustic lens such that the transmitted acoustic wave is shaped or focused. Also, compressive stress waves can be reflected off a high density/low density interface to invert the compressive wave into a tensile stress wave, and tensile stresses may be more effective in some instances in disrupting material as most materials are weaker in tension than compression. Estimations indicate that stress amplitudes provided by this device can be magnified more than 100 times, greatly improving the efficiency of optical energy for targeted material destruction.

  11. Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for the management of urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halland, Spring K.; House, John K.; George, Lisle

    2001-05-01

    Obstructive urolithiasis is a common problem in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The most common site of urinary tract obstruction in these species is the urethra. Surgical procedures developed to relieve obstructions, in our experience have been effective in approximately 75% of cases. Urethral stricture is a common complication if the mucosa of the urethra is disrupted. The objective of this project was to evaluate endoscopy guided laser lithotripsy as a therapeutic modality to relieve urethral obstructions in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The study population consisted of patients presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis with obstructive urolithiasis. Lithotripsy was performed using a Holmium:YAG laser via a 200-micron low water quartz fiber passed through a flexible mini-endoscope. Two types of urinary calculi were managed with this technique, calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxyphosphate. Laser lithotripsy was effective at relieving obstructions caused by both types of calculi when conventional methods had failed. Laser lithotripsy performed via urethral endoscopy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs and reduces the risk of post procedural urethral stricture.

  12. Laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy of canine urocystoliths and nephroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Stair, Ernest L.; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease affecting dogs which can sometimes be treated with dietary and medical protocols. In many cases, however, medical management cannot be employed because the dietary restrictions are contraindicated, effective medical dissolution protocols for the calculi (uroliths) do not exist, or obstruction by the calculi may result in deterioration of renal function during the time required for medical dissolution. At present, the management of medically untreatable calculi has been surgical removal which may result in temporary but dramatic decrease in renal function, irreversible loss of damaged nephrons, and significant risk, particularly for bilateral or recurrent nephroliths. An innovative technique for the removal of these uroliths would involve laser lithotripsy which transforms light energy into acoustical energy generating a shock wave sufficient to fragment stones (photoacoustic ablation). The laser is transmitted via quartz fibers which are small and flexible and can be used under direct vision through endoscopes resulting in effective fragmentation with little surrounding tissue damage. Lasers are becoming increasingly more utilized in veterinary medicine, in contrast to the limited availability of other non-invasive methods of treatment of nephroliths (i.e. extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy).

  13. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  14. [Intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using the neodymium YAG laser].

    PubMed

    Schmeller, N T; Hofstetter, A; Kriegmair, M; Frank, F; Wondrazek, F

    1989-09-10

    The problem of suitable energy transfer and conversion for intraureteral lithotripsy has not yet been solved satisfactorily. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy (LISL) appears to be a very promising solution to this problem. We report on initial clinical experience using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generating a shockwave on the metallic surface of an optomechanic coupler. This leads to the fine fragmentation of a urinary calculus situated close to or in contact with the coupler. Only minimal side effects occur in biological tissue. Further development of the coupler resulted in considerable increase of its fragmentation capability with no increase in side-effects. As a result, application under fluoroscopic control alone became possible, which appears adequate in approximately half of the cases. In the other half visual inspection via ureteroscopy is required. Laser-induced lithotripsy is the only technique that uses a flexible transmission system, results in the fine fragmentation of calculi, and is free of serious side effects on tissue, i.e. does not lead to perforation of the wall of the ureter.

  15. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  16. Efficacy of retrograde ureteropyeloscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi >2 cm.

    PubMed

    Bader, M J; Gratzke, C; Walther, S; Weidlich, P; Staehler, M; Seitz, M; Sroka, R; Reich, O; Stief, C G; Schlenker, B

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the efficacy and safety of retrograde ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi greater than 2 cm in diameter. A total of 24 patients with a stone burden >2 cm were treated with retrograde ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy. Primary study endpoints were number of treatments until the patient was stone free and perioperative complications with a follow-up of at least 3 months after intervention. In 24 patients (11 women and 13 men, 20-78 years of age), a total of 40 intrarenal calculi were treated with retrograde endoscopic procedures. At the time of the initial procedure, calculi had an average total linear diameter of 29.75 ± 1.57 mm and an average stone volume of 739.52 ± 82.12 mm(3). The mean number of procedures per patient was 1.7 ± 0.8 (range 1-3 procedures). The overall stone-free rate was 92%. After 1, 2 and 3 procedures 54, 79 and 92% of patients were stone free, respectively. There were no major complications. Minor postoperative complications included pyelonephritis in three cases (7.5%), of whom all responded immediately to parenteral antibiotics. In one patient the development of steinstrasse in the distal ureter required ureteroscopic fragment disruption and basketing. Ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy represents an efficient treatment option and allows the treatment of large intrarenal calculi of all compositions and throughout the whole collecting system even for patients with a stone burden of more than 2 cm size. PMID:20204341

  17. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy. Images PMID:1413743

  18. Experience with endoscopic holmium laser in the pediatric population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Reddy, Pramod P.; Barrieras, Diego; Bagli, Darius J.; McLorie, Gordon A.; Khoury, Antoine E.

    1999-06-01

    Introduction: Due to the unavailability of suitable endoscopic instruments, pediatric patients have not benefited fully from the technological advances in the endoscopic management of the upper urinary tract. This limitation may be overcome with the Holmuim:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet(Ho:YAG) laser delivered via small instruments. To date, there is no published report on the use of this modality in children. Purpose: We evaluated the indications, efficacy, and complications of endourological Ho:YAG laser surgery in the treatment of pediatric urolithiasis, posterior urethral valves, ureterocele and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Methods: The patient population included 10 children with renal, ureteral and bladder calculi, 2 children with posterior urethral valves, 2 children with obstructing ureteroceles, 2 children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and 1 child with a urethral stricture. Access to the lesions was either antegrade via a percutaneous nephrostomy tract or retrograde via the urethra. A solid state Ho:YAG laser with maximum output of 30 watts (New Star lasers, Auburn, CA) was utilized as the energy source. Results: A total of 10 patients underwent laser lithotripsy. The means age of the patients was 9 yrs (5-13 yrs). The average surface area of the calculi as 425.2 mm2 (92-1645 mm2). 8 of the patients required one procedure to render them stone free, one patient had a staghorn calculus filling every calyx of a solitary kidney requiring multiple treatments and one other patient with a staghorn calculus required 2 treatments. There were no complications related to the laser lithotripsy. Two newborn underwent successful ablation of po sterious urethral valves. Two infants underwent incision of obstructing ureteroceles with decompression of the ureterocele on postoperative ultrasound. Two children underwent endypyelotomy for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. One was successful an done required an open procedure to correct the obstruction. One child

  19. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy in an in vitro ureter model.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Luke A; Wilson, Christopher R; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2014-12-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to the clinical gold standard holmium:YAG laser. The holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150 to 500 Hz, and a 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate/40% calcium phosphate) of uniform mass and diameter (4 to 5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 and 13.7 ml/ min for the TFL and holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from the tube's center and 1 mm above the mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded throughout each experiment for both lasers. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. The holmium laser time measured 167±41 s (n=12). TFL times measured 111±49, 39±11, and 23±4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively (n=12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24±1°C for holmium, and 33±3°C, 33±7°C, and 39±6°C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and observation of reduced stone retropulsion and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional holmium laser for lithotripsy. PMID:25518001

  20. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy in an in vitro ureter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-12-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to the clinical gold standard holmium:YAG laser. The holmium laser (λ=2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150 to 500 Hz, and a 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate/40% calcium phosphate) of uniform mass and diameter (4 to 5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from the tube's center and 1 mm above the mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded throughout each experiment for both lasers. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. The holmium laser time measured 167±41 s (n=12). TFL times measured 111±49, 39±11, and 23±4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively (n=12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24±1°C for holmium, and 33±3°C, 33±7°C, and 39±6°C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and observation of reduced stone retropulsion and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  1. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy in an in vitro ureter model.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Luke A; Wilson, Christopher R; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2014-12-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to the clinical gold standard holmium:YAG laser. The holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150 to 500 Hz, and a 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate/40% calcium phosphate) of uniform mass and diameter (4 to 5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 and 13.7 ml/ min for the TFL and holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from the tube's center and 1 mm above the mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded throughout each experiment for both lasers. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. The holmium laser time measured 167±41 s (n=12). TFL times measured 111±49, 39±11, and 23±4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively (n=12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24±1°C for holmium, and 33±3°C, 33±7°C, and 39±6°C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and observation of reduced stone retropulsion and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  2. Laser lithotripsy: a review of 20 years of research and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dretler, S P

    1988-01-01

    Four new technologies have transformed the treatment of urinary calculi: electrohydraulic lithotripsy, ultrasonic lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and laser lithotripsy. Initial attempts to ablate urinary calculi by continuous wave CO2, ruby, and Nd-YAG lasers failed because of excess thermal injury and inability to pass the laser energy via a flexible fiber. Basic laboratory studies then demonstrated that short pulsed laser energy absorbed by the calculus resulted in fragmentation. The parameters that produced optimal urinary calculus fragmentation were found using the flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser, with the following parameters: wavelength: 504 nm; pulse duration: 1 microsec; fiber: 250 micro silica-coated quartz; repetition: 5-20 Hz. Use of pulsed dye laser caused no tissue damage. The mechanism of fragmentation is light absorption, plasma development, and repetitive acoustic shock wave action with resultant fragmentation. The techniques for application of laser to calculi have been successful, and new, miniature instruments have been developed. Laser lithotripsy is a successful method for fragmenting ureteral calculi. The small caliber of the laser fiber makes this method useful for treating calculi in narrow, tortuous ureters; impacted calculi; distal calculi in ureters that cannot be dilated, via the percutaneous route for stones in calyces or impacted in the upper ureter. Investigations are continuing to optimize fragmentation of harder calculi and to use laser fragmentation within the kidney. Laser lithotripsy may also be used to fragment biliary calculi.

  3. Successful Removal of a Large Common Bile Duct Stone by Using Direct Peroral Cholangioscopy and Laser Lithotripsy in a Patient with Severe Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song I; Lim, Byung Hun; Heo, Won Gak; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Tae Hyeon

    2016-07-01

    A 75-year-old woman with hypertension presented with acute suppurative cholangitis. Chest radiography revealed severe kyphosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large stone impacted in the common bile duct (CBD). The patient underwent emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography revealed a large stone (7×3 cm) in the CBD that could not be captured using a large basket. We could not use the percutaneous approach for stone fragmentation by using a cholangioscope because of severe degenerative kyphosis. Finally, we performed holmium laser lithotripsy under peroral cholangioscopy by using an ultraslim endoscope, and the large stone in the CBD was successfully fragmented and removed without complications. PMID:27000425

  4. A special irrigation liquid to increase the reliability of laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Reichel, E; Paltauf, G; Schmidt-Kloiber, H; Groke, K

    1992-01-01

    For the laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy (LISL) the laser-pulses of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser produce an optical breakdown in the irrigation liquid surrounding the urinary stone. Subsequently high-pressure shockwaves are emitted causing stone fragmentation. Since the LISL is an endoscopic technique, problems arise from the transmission of the laser pulses through optical fibers. The intensity threshold for an optical breakdown in commonly used saline solution amounts to 21 GW/cm2, in optical silica fibers, to about 3 GW/cm2. Therefore bare fibers cannot be used without being destroyed by a breakdown. So we have developed an irrigation liquid by adding small quantities of metal ions to saline solution to lower the threshold intensity. The most suitable ion was Fe3+ in a concentration of 0.02 mmol/l, which shows a lowering to 5 GW/cm2. In combination with a spherically shaped fiber exit the intensities that have to be transmitted are below the threshold of the fiber material. Using this irrigation liquid the overall reliability of the method could be significantly increased and several stone fragmentations can be performed with a single optical fiber.

  5. Cavitation bubble dynamics during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored for lithotripsy. TFL parameters differ from standard Holmium:YAG laser in several ways, including smaller fiber delivery, more strongly absorbed wavelength, low pulse energy/high pulse rate operation, and more uniform temporal pulse structure. High speed imaging of cavitation bubbles was performed at 105,000 fps and 10 μm spatial resolution to determine influence of these laser parameters on bubble formation. TFL was operated at 1908 nm with pulse energies of 5-75 mJ, and pulse durations of 200-1000 μs, delivered through 100-μm-core fiber. Cavitation bubble dynamics using Holmium laser at 2100 nm with pulse energies of 200-1000 mJ and pulse duration of 350 μs was studied, for comparison. A single, 500 μs TFL pulse produced a bubble stream extending 1090 +/- 110 μm from fiber tip, and maximum bubble diameters averaged 590 +/- 20 μm (n=4). These observations are consistent with previous studies which reported TFL ablation stallout at working distances < 1.0 mm. TFL bubble dimensions were five times smaller than for Holmium laser due to lower pulse energy, higher water absorption coefficient, and smaller fiber diameter used.

  6. Safety and efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Cook, Anthony J.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Auge, Brian K.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in patients with known and uncorrected bleeding diatheses. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2 tertiary stone centers was performed to identify patients with known bleeding diatheses who were treated with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract calculi. Twenty-five patients with 29 upper urinary tract calculi were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Bleeding diatheses identified were coumadin administration for various conditions (17), liver dysfunction (3), thrombocytopenia (4), and von Willebrand's disease (1). Mean international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count and bleeding time were 2.3, 50 x 109/L, and > 16 minutes, for patients receiving coumadin or with liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, or von Willebrand's disease, respectively. Results: Overall, the stone-free rate was 96% (27/28) and 29 of 30 procedures were completed successfully without significant complication. One patient who was treated concomitantly with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) had a significant retroperitoneal hemorrhage that required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Treatment of upper tract urinary calculi in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses can be safely performed using contemporary small caliber ureteroscopes and holmium laser as the sole modality of lithotripsy. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy without preoperative correction of hemostatic parameters limits the risk of thromboembolic complications and costs associated with an extended hospital stay. Avoidance of the use of EHL is crucial in reducing bleeding complications in this cohort of patients.

  7. Endoscopic laser treatment for pediatric nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Suzuki, N; Sato, H; Yamaguchi, T; Fujita, H; Umezawa, Y; Suzuki, M

    2000-01-01

    We have used the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser and the gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser with flexible fiber delivery instruments for vaporization of the inferior nasal turbinate in pediatric patients since 1993. Under endoscopic control, the whole inferior turbinate was vaporized by 5-10 W laser output delivered via an optical fiber. Generally, the nasal mucosa changes into normal mucosa, and symptoms improve. The greatest symptomatic improvement was in nasal obstruction. The results obtained by the two laser devices were similar although they have had different characteristics. Endoscopic laser surgery is effective in the treatment of pediatric nasal allergy.

  8. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  9. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  10. Differentiation of tissue and kidney stones for laser lithotripsy using different spectroscopic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Birgit; Cordes, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Holmium lasers are nowadays the gold standard for endoscopic laser lithotripsy. However, there is a risk of damaging or perforating the ureter or kidney tissue when the vision is poor. An automatic tissue/stone differentiation would improve the handling and safety of the procedure. To achieve this objective, an easy and robust real-time discrimination method has to be found which can be used to realize a feedback loop to control the laser system. Two possible approaches have been evaluated: White light reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both cases, we use the treatment fiber for detection and evaluate the possibility to decide whether the fiber is placed in front of tissue or calculus by the signal that is delivered by the surface in front of it. White light reflectance spectroscopy uses the standard light source for endourologic surgeries: Radiation of a Xenon light source is coupled to the ureteroscope via a liquid light guide. The part of the white light that is reflected back into the fiber is spectroscopically analyzed. In a clinical proof of concept study reflection signals were measured in vivo in 8 patients. For differentiation of stone and tissue via autofluorescence, excitation as well as detection was done via the treatment fiber. A suitable excitation wavelength was chosen with in vitro measurements (UV / visible) on several human renal calculi and porcine tissues. For verification of the positive results with green excitation in a clinical proof of concept study, a measurement set-up was realized which allows the recording of fluorescence signals during an endourological intervention.

  11. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  12. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY AND ENDOSCOPIC URETERAL STENT PLACEMENT IN AN ASIAN SMALL-CLAWED OTTER (AONYX CINEREA) WITH NEPHROLITHIASIS.

    PubMed

    Wojick, Kimberlee B; Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick W; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2015-06-01

    Urolithiasis is a significant disease concern in Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea), with over 60% of captive animals affected. Bilateral ureteral stent placement, using endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) were performed as salvage procedures in a 13-yr-old intact female Asian small-clawed otter following a 7-yr history of nephrolithiasis and progressive renal insufficiency. Following the procedure, radiographs revealed a slight shifting of urolith position, although a decrease in urolith mass was not observed. As a result of declining quality of life related to severe osteoarthritis, the otter was euthanized 5 wk after the procedure. While this treatment approach was unsuccessful in this case, the technique was clinically feasible, so ESWL and ureteral stent placement may remain a consideration for other individuals of this species presented earlier in the course of this disease. PMID:26056891

  13. Ureteropyeloscopy and homium: YAG laser lithotripsy for treatment of ureteral calculi (report of 356 cases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhong; Din, Qiang; Jiang, Hao-wen; Zen, Jing-cun; Yu, Jiang; Zhang, Yuanfang

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium YAG laser lithotripsy for the treatment of ureteral calculi. Methods: A total of 356 patients underwent ureteropyeloscopic lithotripsy using holmium YAG laser with a semirigid uretesopyeloscope, 93 upper, 135 middle, and 128 lower ureteral stones were treated. Results: The overall successful fragmentation rate for all ureteral stones in a single session achieved 98% (349/356). The successful fragmentation rate stratified by stone location was 95% 88/93 in the upper ureter, 99% (134/135) in the mid ureter , and 99%(127/128) in the distal ureter. 12 cases with bilateral ureteral stones which caused acute renal failure and anuria were treated rapidly and effectively by the holmium YAG laser lithotripsy. No complications such as perforation and severe trauma were encountered during the operations. 2 weeks 17months (with an average of 6.8 month ) follow up postoperatively revealed that the overall stone-free rate was 98%(343/349) and no ureteral stenosis was found. Conclusions Holmium YAG laser lithotripsy is a highly effective, minimally invasive and safe therapy for ureteral calculi. It is indicated as a first choice of treatment for patients with ureteral calculi, especially for the ones with mid- lower levels of ureteral calculi.

  14. New tunable flashlamp-pumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Giannetas, V.; Charlton, Andrew; King, Terence A.

    1993-05-01

    Laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, solid state Ti:sapphire laser (Vuman, free running untuned wavelength 792 nm, 2 microseconds pulse width and up to 240 mJ pulse energy) have been successfully and efficiently coupled into thin optical fibers. The coupling efficiency can be up to 67% for 300 micron and 43% for 200 micron core diameter optical fibers. With these two optical fibers in vitro laser lithotripsy has been performed successfully on various human calculi including gall bladder, kidney, ureter and salivary duct stones. The bright white flash of the induced plasma emission, strong shock waves, fiber recoil and stone propulsion and the splattering of the stone chips have been observed during the calculi fragmentation.

  15. Transurethral holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy for large symptomatic prostatic calculi: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic prostatic calculi are a rare clinical entity with wide range of management options, however, there is no agreement about the preferred method for treating these symptomatic calculi. In this study we describe our experience of transurethral management of symptomatic prostatic calculi using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy. Patients with large, symptomatic prostatic stones managed by transurethral lithotripsy using holmium-YAG laser over 3-year duration were included in this retrospective study. Patients were evaluated for any underlying pathological condition and calculus load was determined by preoperative X-ray KUB film/CT scan. Urethrocystoscopy was performed using 30° cystoscope in lithotomy position under spinal anesthesia, followed by transurethral lithotripsy of prostatic calculi using a 550 μm laser fiber. Stone fragments were disintegrated using 100 W laser generators (VersaPulse PowerSuite 100 W, LUMENIS Surgical, CA). Larger stone fragments were retreived using Ellik's evacuator while smaller fragments got flushed under continuous irrigation. Five patients (median age 42 years) with large symptomatic prostatic calculi were operated using the described technique. Three patients had idiopathic stones while rest two had bulbar urethral stricture and neurogenic bladder, respectively. Median operative time was 62 min. All the patients were stone free at the end of procedure. Median duration of catheterization was 2 days. Significant improvement was observed in symptoms score and peak urinary flow and none of the patient had any complication. Transurethral management using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy is a safe and highly effective, minimally invasive technique for managing symptomatic prostatic calculi of all sizes with no associated morbidity.

  16. Effectiveness and Safety of Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Otsuki, Hideo; Uehara, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Murao, Wataru; Fujio, Koji; Fujio, Kei; Wada, Koichiro; Araki, Motoo; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-06-01

    Upper urinary tract calculi are common; however, there is no recommended treatment selection for elderly patients. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (URS lithotripsy) is minimally invasive, and it provides a high stone-free rate (SFR) treatment for upper urinary tract calculi. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of URS lithotripsy after dividing the 189 cases into 3 groups by patient age: the '<65 group' (<65 years old, n=108), the '65-74 group' (65-74 years old, n=42), and the ' 75 group' ( 75 years old, n=39). The patients' characteristics, stone status, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The 65-74 group and the 75 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to the<65 group. Compared to the<65 group, the 65-74 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, and the 75 group had significantly higher the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Despite these preoperative risk factors, SFR and postoperative pyelonephritis in the 65-74 group and the 75 group were similar to those of the<65 group. In conclusion, URS lithotripsy is the preferred treatment for upper urinary tract calculi, even for elderly patients who have multiple preoperative risk factors. PMID:27339204

  17. Interspersion of fragmented fiber's splinters into tissue during pulsed alexandrite laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Strunge, C; Brinkmann, R; Flemming, G; Engelhardt, R

    1991-01-01

    Laser induced shockwave lithotripsy (LISL) on artificially inserted human renal calculi was realized in explanted pig ureters. A pulse stretched Alexandrite solid state laser was used at 750nm. Pulses of 350ns and 1 microseconds duration were transmitted through a 250 microns all silica fiber onto a stone surface, keeping the fiber tip in contact with a stone close to the ureter wall. The high power density of the 350 ns pulses lead to an optical breakdown inside the distal fiber tip causing fiber fragmentation of about 28 mm/100 pulses. Deep penetration of the fiber fragments into the ureter wall was proven histologically. Fiber fragmentation was avoided by increasing the pulse duration up to 1 microseconds. Riks for patient treatment caused by short pulse lithotripsy are discussed.

  18. Endoscopic laser stereotaxis: management of brain lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, Lucia J.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Moure, Federico; Diaz, Fernando

    1994-05-01

    Image-guided stereotaxis is an accurate and safe method of directing therapy to target volumes defined in 2D multi-planes or 3D perspectives using computer reconstruction of image data. The major limitations of stereotactic techniques are the lack of intraoperative visualization and the ability to directly monitor the procedures, and changes of intracranial coordinates after decompression of cystic lesions or aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid in the management of intraventricular lesions. Stereotactic neuroendoscopy involves integration of rigid-flexible endoscopy and the Nd-YAG laser in 2D/3D multiplanar image-guided stereotactic procedures. The major advantages of endoscopic laser surgery include being minimally invasive (burrhole or small craniotomy surgery), direct intraoperative visualization, hemostasis, evacuation or resection assessment, and wide exploration of intracranial cavities or ventricles. We used endoscopic laser surgery in the management of 202 patients undergoing biopsy, aspiration, resection, and internal decompression of deep and subcortical intracranial lesions, and for different types of fenestration procedures. Image-guidance combined with endoscopic techniques may offer a safe, accurate alternative to conventional neurosurgical procedures in treating small solid, cystic, intraventricular lesions, and in fenestration procedures.

  19. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  20. Efficacy of Combined Endoscopic Lithotomy and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy, and Additional Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy Using the SpyGlass Direct Visualization System or X-Ray Guided EHL as Needed, for Pancreatic Lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ken; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Okano, Naoki; Mimura, Takahiko; Kishimoto, Yui; Hara, Seiichi; Takuma, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the efficacy of combined endoscopic lithotomy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and additional electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) as needed, for the treatment of pancreatic duct stones, we retrospectively evaluated 98 patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic lithiasis. Methods. For the management of main pancreatic duct (MPD) stones in 98 patients, we performed combined endoscopic treatment (ET)/ESWL therapy as the first treatment option. When combined ET/ESWL was unsuccessful, EHL with the SpyGlass Direct Visualization system or X-ray guided EHL was performed. Outpatient ESWL was reserved as one of the final treatment options. Results. Fragmentation was successful in 80 (81.6%) patients as follows: combined ET/ESWL: 67 cases; SpyGlass EHL: 4 cases; X-ray guided EHL: 3 cases; and outpatient ESWL: 6 cases. Successful outcome was obtained by combined ET/ESWL in 67 of the 98 patients (74.5%), by EHL in 7 of 14 patients (7.1%), and by outpatient ESWL in 6 of 6 patients (6.1%). Negotiating the guidewire through a severe MPD stricture was significantly associated with a higher rate of stone fragmentation (P = 0.0003). Conclusions. In cases where combined ET/ESWL was not successful for stone clearance, EHL using the SpyGlass system or X-ray guided EHL was effective in cases where the guidewire could be negotiated through the MPD stricture and it increased the fragmentation rate. PMID:24999474

  1. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  2. Compact laser illumination system for endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Blase, Bastian

    2015-08-01

    External cold light sources as well as LEDs are commonly used for abdominal illumination in minimally invasive surgery. Still, both feature certain disadvantages. A new illumination system for endoscopes based on laser diodes is placed in the handle. No external light cables are needed. High conversion and coupling efficiencies and small package size allow for several diodes to be integrated, enabling color mixing and the adjustment of color temperatures. An optical module to collimate and combine the light is described. The heat to be dissipated is stored in a passive latent heat storage based on phase change materials surrounding the optical module. Thereby, operation time is considerably extended, as the handle's temperature is stabilized. To reduce the negative effect of coherent light on optical rough surfaces leading to patterns of spots, several devices for speckle reduction are developed and tested. By combining these components, an assembly of a powerful RGB laser light module for the integration in standard sized endoscopes is formed. PMID:26737628

  3. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  4. Integrated Multipoint-Laser Endoscopic Airway Measurements by Transoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Neitsch, Marie; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Hofer, Mathias; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Optical and technical characteristics usually do not allow objective endoscopic distance measurements. So far no standardized method for endoscopic distance measurement is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of transoral airway measurements with a multipoint-laser endoscope. Methods. The semirigid endoscope includes a multipoint laser measurement system that projects 49 laser points (wavelength 639 nm, power < 5 mW) into the optical axis of the endoscopic view. Distances, areas, and depths can be measured in real-time. Transoral endoscopic airway measurements were performed on nine human cadavers, which were correlated with CT measurements. Results. The preliminary experiment showed an optimum distance between the endoscope tip and the object of 5 to 6 cm. There was a mean measurement error of 3.26% ± 2.53%. A Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.95 (p = 0.01) was calculated for the laryngeal measurements and of 0.93 (p < 0.01) for the tracheal measurements compared to the CT. Using the Bland-Altman-Plot, the 95% limits of agreement for the laryngeal measurements were satisfactory: −0.76 and 0.93. Conclusions. Integrated multipoint-laser endoscopic measurement is a promising technical supplement, with potential use in diagnostic endoscopy and transoral endoscopic surgery in daily practice. PMID:27022612

  5. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) of common bile duct calculi without previous endoscopic papillotomy].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L; Schumacher, R; Johanns, W; Janssen, J; Sulliga, M; Schnabel, R; Welp, L B; Pumplün, B

    1996-07-01

    In 17 patients (8 men, 9 women; mean age 61.5 years) with problematic bile-duct stones (papilla endoscopically inaccessible, residual bile-duct stones after recent laparoscopic cholecystectomy or age below 25 years) the chances of successful treatment by ESWL without sphincterotomy were examined. In 15 patients with solitary stones measuring up to 14 mm "pulverization-ESWL" produced complete freedom from stones after spontaneous migration of fragments through the intact papilla. Only two patients with two ductal stones measuring up to 15 mm still had residual fragments in the bile duct after treatment. The ideal stone for ESWL without sphincterotomy is thus the solitary bile-duct stone measuring up to 14 mm. Before performing a high-risk sphincterotomy, before re-operation and in young patients one should therefore always examine whether ESWL without sphincterotomy is indicated.

  6. Nonstented versus routine stented ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Zhuo, Jian; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Wen, Wei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2008-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized study to evaluate whether postoperative ureteral stenting is necessary after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. A total of 115 consecutive patients with distal or middle ureteral calculi amenable to ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy were prospectively randomized into stented group (n = 58) and nonstented group (n = 57). The stent was routinely placed in the treated ureter for 2 weeks. The outcomes were measured with postoperative patient symptoms, stone-free rates, early and late postoperative complications, and cost-effectiveness. The postoperative symptoms were measured with Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ). All patients completed a 12-week follow-up. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to the patient age, stone size, stone location and mean operative time. According to the USSQ, the symptoms of the stented group were significantly worse compared to the nonstented group (P = 0.0001). In the stented group, two patients had high fever for 1 week after the operation, stent migration was found in two patients, and the stents had to be removed earlier in five patients because of severe pain or hematuria. The cost of the stented group was significantly higher than the nonstented group. The stone-free rate was 100% in both groups. No hydronephrosis or ureteral stricture was detected by intravenous pyelogram in the 12th week postoperative follow-up. In conclusion, we believe that routine stenting after ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser is not necessary as long as the procedure is uncomplicated for distal or middle ureteral calculis less than 2 cm.

  7. Is flexible ureterorenoscopy and laser lithotripsy the new gold standard for lower pole renal stones when compared to shock wave lithotripsy: Comparative outcomes from a University hospital over similar time period

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Jacob; Ishii, Hiro; Simmonds, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal lower pole stones pose difficulty in management due to anatomical variation, stone size, hardness and patient demographics. Flexible ureterorenoscopy and laser lithotripsy (FURSL) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) are preferred for stones 1-2 cm in size. We wanted to compare the outcomes of FURSL and SWL for lower pole stones during the same time period. Material and methods All patients who were treated for lower pole stones with FURSL and SWL during a 19-month period were included. The stone free rate (SFR) was defined as ≤3 mm fragments on follow-up imaging or stone free endoscopically. Data was recorded in an excel spreadsheet with SPSS version 21 used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 161 lower pole procedures were done (93 SWL and 63 FURSL). The mean stone size for SWL (7.4 mm; range: 4-16 mm) was significantly smaller than for FURSL (13.4 mm; 4-53 mm). The mean operating time and hospital stay for FURSL was 65 minutes (range: 30-160 minutes) and 0.5 days (range: 0-7 days) respectively. The SFR was significantly better (p <0.001) for FURSL (n = 63, 93%) compared to SWL (n = 23, 25%). There were 4 (6%) complications (3 Clavien II and 1 Clavien I) in the FURSL group (2 urosepsis, 1 UTI and 1 stent pain). Three patients in the SWL group (Clavien I) were readmitted with renal colic but there were no other complications. Conclusions FURSL for lower pole stones seems to be a much better alternative than SWL with a high SFR even for larger stones and seems to be the new gold standard for lower pole stone management. PMID:26251738

  8. Gallbladder stone inspection and identification for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yacob; Kokaj, Jahja O.

    1999-03-01

    Using high speed imaging techniques, the gall bladder stone immersed in liquid is detected and identified. The detection of the shock waves induced by laser power is reached by using interferometry technique. Using gall bladder and tissue images obtained by ultra-fast photography and time resolved laser fluorescence the correlation of correlation is performed. The tissue image is used to perform the correlation filter. Hence lower correlation output is used for firing of the laser power.

  9. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  10. Percutaneous yttrium aluminum garnet-laser lithotripsy of intrahepatic stones and casts after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Nis Hallundbaek; Svenningsen, Peter; Frevert, Susanne; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Bile duct stones and casts (BDSs) contribute importantly to morbidity after liver transplantation (LT). The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical efficacy, safety, and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in transplant recipients and to discuss underlying factors affecting the outcome. A retrospective chart review revealed 18 recipients with BDSs treated by PTCSL laser lithotripsy with a holmium-yttrium aluminum garnet laser probe at 365 to 550 µm. They were analyzed in a median follow-up time of 55 months. In all but 1 patient (17/18 or 94%), it was technically feasible to clear all BDSs with a mean of 1.3 sessions. PTCSL was unsuccessful in 1 patient because of multiple stones impacting the bile ducts bilaterally; 17% had early complications (Clavien II). All biliary casts were successfully cleared; 39% had total remission; 61% needed additional interventions in the form of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and dilation (17%), re-PTCSL (11%), self-expandable metallic stents (22%), or hepaticojejunostomy (6%); and 22% eventually underwent retransplantation. The overall liver graft survival rate was 78%. Two patients died during follow-up for reasons not related to their BDS. Nonanastomotic strictures (NASs) were significantly associated with treatment failure. We conclude that PTCSL in LT patients is safe and feasible. NASs significantly increased the risk of relapse. Repeated minimally invasive treatments, however, prevented graft failure in 78% of the cases. PMID:25821134

  11. Detachable fiber optic tips for use in thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-03-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) has recently been proposed as an alternative to the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser for lithotripsy. The TFL's Gaussian spatial beam profile provides higher power transmission through smaller optical fibers with reduced proximal fiber tip damage, and improved saline irrigation and flexibility through the ureteroscope. However, distal fiber tip damage may still occur during stone fragmentation, resulting in disposal of the entire fiber after the procedure. A novel design for a short, detachable, distal fiber tip that can fit into an ureteroscope's working channel is proposed. A prototype, twist-lock, spring-loaded mechanism was constructed using micromachining methods, mating a 150-μm-core trunk fiber to 300-μm-core fiber tip. Optical transmission measuring 80% was observed using a 30-mJ pulse energy and 500-μs pulse duration. Ex vivo human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones were vaporized at an average rate of 187 μg/s using 20-Hz modulated, 50% duty cycle 5 pulse packets. The highest stone ablation rates corresponded to the highest fiber tip degradation, thus providing motivation for use of detachable and disposable distal fiber tips during lithotripsy. The 1-mm outer-diameter prototype also functioned comparable to previously tested tapered fiber tips.

  12. Detachable fiber optic tips for use in thulium fiber laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Thomas C; Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-03-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) has recently been proposed as an alternative to the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser for lithotripsy. The TFL's Gaussian spatial beam profile provides higher power transmission through smaller optical fibers with reduced proximal fiber tip damage, and improved saline irrigation and flexibility through the ureteroscope. However, distal fiber tip damage may still occur during stone fragmentation, resulting in disposal of the entire fiber after the procedure. A novel design for a short, detachable, distal fiber tip that can fit into an ureteroscope's working channel is proposed. A prototype, twist-lock, spring-loaded mechanism was constructed using micromachining methods, mating a 150-μm-core trunk fiber to 300-μm-core fiber tip. Optical transmission measuring 80% was observed using a 30-mJ pulse energy and 500-μs pulse duration. Ex vivo human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones were vaporized at an average rate of 187  μg/s using 20-Hz modulated, 50% duty cycle 5 pulse packets. The highest stone ablation rates corresponded to the highest fiber tip degradation, thus providing motivation for use of detachable and disposable distal fiber tips during lithotripsy. The 1-mm outer-diameter prototype also functioned comparable to previously tested tapered fiber tips.

  13. [The use of lasers in the treatment of urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    de Reijke, T M; Zeijlemaker, B Y; Sterenborg, H J; Kurth, K H

    1991-12-14

    The treatment of calculi in the urinary tract has been subject to major changes over the last few years. Since extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the first choice of treatment, there appears to be little need for endoscopic and surgical techniques. In case ESWL treatment is unsuccessful or inadequate, laser lithotripsy is a good alternative. In most cases, laser lithotripsy causes a good disintegration with use of very thin and flexible instrumentation. Hence, the risk of damage to the urinary tract is much less than with other endoscopic techniques such as ultrasonic and electrohydraulic lithotripsy. Our first results with 21 bladder and 18 ureter calculi in 25 patients were a successful disintegration of 84% of bladder calculi and a 70% success for ureter calculi. Only one complication of the ureteroscopic manipulation was observed. Disadvantages of laser lithotripsy are the high price of the equipment and the fact that not all calculi can be fragmented with one type of laser.

  14. Investigation on the impact of pulse duration for laser induced lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Kiris, Tugba; Fiedler, Sebastian; Scheib, Gabriel; Kuznetsova, Julia; Pongratz, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Objective: In-vitro investigation of Ho:YAG-laser induced stone fragmentation was performed to identify potential impacts of different pulse durations on stone fragmentation characteristics. Materials and Methods: An innovative Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long- or short pulse mode was tested with regard to its fragmentation properties. The pulse duration depends on the specific laser parameter used. Fragmentation tests (hand held, hands free, single pulse induced crater) on artificial BEGO-Stones and fiber burn back tests were performed under reproducible experimental conditions. Additionally, the repulsion of long versus short laser pulses was compared using the pendulum set-up. Results: Differences in fragmentation rates between the two pulse duration regimes were seen. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Using long pulse mode, the fiber burn back is nearly negligible while in short pulse mode an increased burn back was seen. The results of the pendulum test showed that the deviation induced by the momentum of shorter pulses is increased compared to longer pulses. Conclusion: Long pulse-mode showed reduced side effects like repulsion and fiber burn back in comparison to short pulse-mode while fragmentation rates remained at a comparable level. Lower push back and reduced burn back of longer laser pulses may results in better clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy and more convenient handling during clinical use.

  15. Application systems for intracorporeal laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy using the Nd:YAG Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Frank, F; Eichenlaub, M; Hessel, S; Wondrazek, F

    1990-10-01

    For laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy, the electromagnetic energy of a laser light pulse is converted intracorporeally into the acoustic energy of a shockwave. The lithotriptor is based on a specially developed, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser whose high power light pulses (70 mJ, 25 nsec) are coupled into a flexible quartz fiber with a core diameter of 600 mum. Using focusing elements, energy densities higher than 6 x 10 5 J m -2 can be achieved, resulting in an optical breakdown in water followed by a shockwave. As a result of different absorption mechanisms, the breakdown threshold can be decreased by placing a metallic target into the laser beam. The different shockwave formations of such optomechanical transducers have been measured. First clinical applications have been performed.

  16. Endoscopic Carbon Dioxide Laser Photocoagulation Of Bleeding Canine Gastric Ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Dov; Ron, Nimrod; Orgad, Uri; Katzir, Abraham

    1987-04-01

    This is the first report which describes carbon dioxide laser photocoagulation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding via a flexible endoscope, using an infrared transmitting siver nalide fiber. Various laser parameters were checked to determine the optimal conditions for hemostasis. Both the acute effects of laser irradiation on tissue and the chronic effects on healing process were examined. Preliminary results indicate that carbon dioxide laser beam can successfully photocoagulate moderately bleeding ulcers.

  17. Flexible ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract stone disease in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Sninsky, Brian C; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to present the outcomes of flexible ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy (URS) for upper urinary tract stone disease in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients performed by a single surgeon. A retrospective analysis was performed for SCI patients treated with flexible URS for proximal ureter and kidney stone disease by a single surgeon between 2003 and 2013. Patient characteristics, operative outcomes, metabolic evaluation, and stone analyses were assessed in detail. A total of 27 URS procedures were performed for urolithiasis in 21 renal units of 19 patients. The mean age was 52.1 ± 15.6 years (16-72) and mean BMI was 29.2 ± 7.3 kg/m(2) (20-45.7). Etiology of SCI was trauma (n: 10), multiple sclerosis (n: 6), cerebrovascular accident (n: 1), or undetermined (n: 2). The mean stone size was 15.9 ± 8.6 (6-40) mm. In the 27 URS procedures, stones were located in the ureter (n: 5), the kidney (n: 14), and both areas (n: 8). Mean hospitalization time was 2.0 ± 2.4 (0-10) days. Postoperative complications were observed in 6 cases (22.2%). Three major complications included urosepsis (n: 1) and respiratory failure (n: 2), that were observed postoperatively and required admission to the intensive care unit. The 2 minor complications were hypotension, fever and UTI, and required medical treatment. Fourteen (66.6%) of the 21 renal units were stone free. Calcium phosphate carbonate (n: 9) and struvite (n: 5) were the primary stone compositions detected. Hypocitraturia (n: 6), hypercalciuria (n: 5), hypernaturia (n: 5), hyperoxaluria (n: 4), and hyperuricosuria (n: 1) were common abnormalities in 24-h urine analysis. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy can be an effective treatment modality for SCI patients with upper urinary tract calculi.

  18. Gallstone disease: Symptoms, diagnosis and endoscopic management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Caddy, Grant R; Tham, Tony C K

    2006-01-01

    Bile duct stones (BDS) are often suspected on history and clinical examination alone but symptoms may be variable ranging from asymptomatic to complications such as biliary colic, pancreatitis, jaundice or cholangitis. The majority of BDS can be diagnosed by transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance cholangiography prior to endoscopic or laparoscopic removal. Approximately 90% of BDS can be removed following endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC)+sphincterotomy. Most of the remaining stones can be removed using mechanical lithotripsy. Patients with uncorrected coagulopathies may be treated with ERC+pneumatic dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi. Shockwave lithotripsy (intraductal and extracorporeal) and laser lithotripsy have also been used to fragment large bile duct stones prior to endoscopic removal. The role of medical therapy in treatment of BDS is currently uncertain. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, investigation and current management of BDS.

  19. In vitro investigations of repulsion during laser lithotripsy using a pendulum set-up.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Haseke, Nicolas; Pongratz, Thomas; Hecht, Volkmar; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Bader, Markus Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy is a commonly used technique to treat ureteral calculi.The type of energy source used is one of the main influences of retrograd calculi propulsion. Using a momentum pendulum under-water set-up the induced momentum and the initial velocity were investigated. Pulsed laser light from three different clinically available laser systems, including a Ho:YAG laser, a frequency-doubled double-pulse (second harmonic generation, SHG) Nd:YAG laser and a flash-lamp pumped dye (FLPD) laser, were transmitted via flexible fibres of different core diameter to the front of the pendulum sinker. Single pulses at variable pulse energy, according to the clinical laser parameter settings, were applied to the target sinker, thus causing a repulsion-induced deflection which was documented by video recording. The maximum deflection was determined. Solving the differential equation of a pendulum gives the initial velocity, the laser-induced momentum and the efficiency of momentum transfer. The induced deflection as well as the starting velocity of the two short-duration pulsed laser systems (SHG Nd:YAG, FLPD) were similar (s (max) = 2-3.6 cm and v (0) = 150-200 mm/s, respectively), whereas both values were lower using the Ho:YAG laser with a long pulse duration (s (max) = 0.9--1.6 cm and v (0) = 60-105 mm/s, respectively). The momentum I induced by the Ho:YAG laser was only 50% and its transfer efficacy η (Repuls) was reduced to less than 5% of the values of the two short-pulsed laser systems. This investigation clearly showed the variable parts and amounts of repulsion using different pulsed lasers in an objective and reproducible manner. The momentum transfer efficiency could be determined without any physical friction problems. Further investigations are needed to compare stone fragmentation techniques with respect to laser repulsion and its clinical impact.

  20. In vitro investigations of repulsion during laser lithotripsy using a pendulum set-up.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Haseke, Nicolas; Pongratz, Thomas; Hecht, Volkmar; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Bader, Markus Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy is a commonly used technique to treat ureteral calculi.The type of energy source used is one of the main influences of retrograd calculi propulsion. Using a momentum pendulum under-water set-up the induced momentum and the initial velocity were investigated. Pulsed laser light from three different clinically available laser systems, including a Ho:YAG laser, a frequency-doubled double-pulse (second harmonic generation, SHG) Nd:YAG laser and a flash-lamp pumped dye (FLPD) laser, were transmitted via flexible fibres of different core diameter to the front of the pendulum sinker. Single pulses at variable pulse energy, according to the clinical laser parameter settings, were applied to the target sinker, thus causing a repulsion-induced deflection which was documented by video recording. The maximum deflection was determined. Solving the differential equation of a pendulum gives the initial velocity, the laser-induced momentum and the efficiency of momentum transfer. The induced deflection as well as the starting velocity of the two short-duration pulsed laser systems (SHG Nd:YAG, FLPD) were similar (s (max) = 2-3.6 cm and v (0) = 150-200 mm/s, respectively), whereas both values were lower using the Ho:YAG laser with a long pulse duration (s (max) = 0.9--1.6 cm and v (0) = 60-105 mm/s, respectively). The momentum I induced by the Ho:YAG laser was only 50% and its transfer efficacy η (Repuls) was reduced to less than 5% of the values of the two short-pulsed laser systems. This investigation clearly showed the variable parts and amounts of repulsion using different pulsed lasers in an objective and reproducible manner. The momentum transfer efficiency could be determined without any physical friction problems. Further investigations are needed to compare stone fragmentation techniques with respect to laser repulsion and its clinical impact. PMID:22011742

  1. Endoscopic laser scalpel for head and neck cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Snehal; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Kirov, Stefan; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, such as laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy, provide reliable disease control with reduced impact on the function of the diseased organ. Surgical lasers can ablate, cut and excise tissue while sealing small blood vessels minimizing bleeding and risk of lymphatic metastases from tumors. Lasers with wavelengths in the IR are readily absorbed by water causing minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ideal for surgery near critical anatomical structures. MIS techniques have largely been unable to adopt the use of lasers partly due to the difficulty in bringing the laser into the endoscopic cavity. Hollow waveguide fibers have been adapted to bring surgical lasers to endoscopy. However, they deliver a beam that diverges rapidly and requires careful manipulation of the fiber tip relative to the target. Thus, the principal obstacle for surgical lasers in MIS procedures has been a lack of effective control instruments to manipulate the laser in the body cavity and accurately deliver it to the targeted tissue. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and built an endoscopic laser system that incorporates a miniature dual wedge beam steering device, a video camera, and the control system for remote and /or robotic operation. The dual wedge Risley device offers the smallest profile possible for endoscopic use. Clinical specifications and design considerations will be presented together with descriptions of the device and the development of its control system.

  2. Efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripsy for ureteroscopic removal of proximal and distal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laser lithotripsy is an established endourological modality. Ho:YAG laser have broadened the indications for ureteroscopic stone managements to include larger stone sizes throughout the whole upper urinary tract. Aim of current work is to assess efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy during retrograde ureteroscopic management of ureteral calculi in different locations. Methods 88 patients were treated with ureteroscopic Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy in our institute. Study endpoint was the number of treatments until the patient was stone-free. Patients were classified according to the location of their stones as Group I (distal ureteric stones, 51 patients) and group II (proximal ureteral stones, 37). Group I patients have larger stones as Group II (10.70 mm vs. 8.24 mm, respectively, P = 0.020). Results Overall stone free rate for both groups was 95.8%. The mean number of procedures for proximal calculi was 1.1 ± 0.1 (1–3) and for distal calculi was 1.0 ± 0.0. The initial treatment was more successful in patients with distal ureteral calculi (100% vs. 82.40%, respectively, P = 0.008). No significant difference in the stone free rate was noticed after the second laser procedure for stones smaller versus larger than 10 mm (100% versus 94.1%, P = 0.13). Overall complication rate was 7.9% (Clavien II und IIIb). Overall and grade-adjusted complication rates were not dependant on the stone location. No laser induced complications were noticed. Conclusions The use of the Ho:YAG laser appears to be an adequate tool to disintegrate ureteral calculi independent of primary location. Combination of the semirigid and flexible ureteroscopes as well as the appropriate endourologic tools could likely improve the stone clearance rates for proximal calculi regardless of stone-size. PMID:25107528

  3. Endoscopic laser treatment of subglottic and tracheal stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Alex J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1999-06-01

    The ideal laser produces discrete wounds in a reproducible manner. The CO2 laser with its 10.6 micron wavelength is highly absorbed by water, its energy concentrated at the point of impact and the longer wavelength creates less scatter in tissue. The development of binocular endoscopic delivery system for use with binocular microlaryngoscopes have aided in using CO2 laser to treat patients with subglottic and tracheal stenosis. Often, patients with these disease processes require multiple endoscopic or open reconstructive procedures and my ultimately become tracheotomy dependent. The canine model of subglottic stenosis that has been develop allows testing of new agents as adjuncts to laser treatment. Mitomycin-C is an antibiotic with antitumor activity used in chemotherapy and also in ophthalmologic surgery due to its known inhibition of fibroblast proliferation. Current studies indicate this drug to have significant potential for improving our current management of this disease process.

  4. Hollow steel tips for reducing distal fiber burn-back during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Thomas C; Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-07-01

    The use of thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the clinical holmium:YAG laser is being studied. The TFL's Gaussian spatial beam profile provides efficient coupling of higher laser power into smaller core fibers without proximal fiber tip degradation. Smaller fiber diameters are more desirable, because they free up space in the single working channel of the ureteroscope for increased saline irrigation rates and allow maximum ureteroscope deflection. However, distal fiber tip degradation and "burn-back" increase as fiber diameter decreases due to both excessive temperatures and mechanical stress experienced during stone ablation. To eliminate fiber tip burn-back, the distal tip of a 150-μm core silica fiber was glued inside 1-cm-long steel tubing with fiber tip recessed 100, 250, 500, 1000, or 2000 μm inside the steel tubing to create the hollow-tip fiber. TFL pulse energy of 34 mJ with 500-μs pulse duration and 150-Hz pulse rate was delivered through the hollow-tip fibers in contact with human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones during ex vivo studies. Significant fiber tip burn-back and degradation was observed for bare 150-μm core-diameter fibers. However, hollow steel tip fibers experienced minimal fiber burn-back without compromising stone ablation rates. A simple, robust, compact, and inexpensive hollow fiber tip design was characterized for minimizing distal fiber burn-back during the TFL lithotripsy. Although an increase in stone retropulsion was observed, potential integration of the hollow fiber tip into a stone basket may provide rapid stone vaporization, while minimizing retropulsion.

  5. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Samsudin, Azi; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Selmi, Fahed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case. Case report A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure). Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT) of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30% to 17%. Follow-up CT revealed reduction in the size of subcapsular hematoma, no hydronephrosis, and several residual calculi. Conclusion Risk of subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic lithotripsy can be reduced by avoiding prolonged endoscopy and performing ureteroscopy under low pressure. When a paraplegic patient develops features of infection after ureteroscopy, renal

  6. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Samsudin, Azi; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Selmi, Fahed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case. Case report A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure). Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT) of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30% to 17%. Follow-up CT revealed reduction in the size of subcapsular hematoma, no hydronephrosis, and several residual calculi. Conclusion Risk of subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic lithotripsy can be reduced by avoiding prolonged endoscopy and performing ureteroscopy under low pressure. When a paraplegic patient develops features of infection after ureteroscopy, renal

  7. Endoscopic goniotomy probe for holmium:YAG laser delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Ren, Qiushi

    1994-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope can be combined with a cutting laser to perform laser goniotomy in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. The anterior chambers of cadaver procine eyes were deepened with a viscoelastic material. A 300-micron-diameter silica fiber coupled to an Olympus 0.8-mm-diameter flexible fiber optic endoscope entered the anterior chambers through 4-mm corneal incisions. The anterior chamber angles were clearly observed on a videoscreen as the endoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel approached the pectinate ligaments. With the guidance of a He-Ne aiming beam, the anterior chamber angle pectinate ligaments were cut over a 160 degree arc with a pulsed Ho:YAG laser (2.1 micrometers wavelength, 50 mJ, 5 Hz repetition). The specimens were fixed in glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy, or fixed in formalin and processed for light microscopy. The treated area demonstrated incision of the pectinate ligaments with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork. The edoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel is capable of cutting the pectinate ligaments in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. Therefore, it may be a useful instrument for performing goniotomy when a cloudy cornea in primary infantile glaucoma prevents visualization of the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy lens.

  8. Intracorporeal lithotripsy. Update on technology.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Denstedt, J D

    2000-05-01

    The number and variety of devices currently available for endoscopic lithotripsy reflect the reality that no single device is ideal in all situations. Although the search for the universal lithotriptor continues, the urologist must consider several factors if faced with the decision of which device to purchase. Perhaps foremost among these factors is the clinical situation with which one commonly deals. For example, although the smaller, flexible probes such as EHL or laser demonstrate considerable utility if used ureteroscopically, the larger stone burden associated with today's percutaneous nephrolithotripsy population often is treated more efficiently with one of the mechanical devices employing a larger, rigid probe, such as ultrasound or the Lithoclast. Similarly, the type and size of endoscopic equipment at one's disposal have a significant impact on which device to purchase or use. There are physical constraints affecting which device may or may not be used, rigid versus flexible endoscope, working channel caliber, and offset versus end-on-port. The skill and experience of the surgeon is also a factor of obvious importance, particularly if one is using a modality with a relatively narrow margin of safety such as EHL. Likewise, the training and experience of nursing personnel is a factor, especially regarding the use of lasers, which require certified personnel who are well versed in laser safety. Finally, in today's environment one must carefully evaluate cost in terms of not only initial capital outlay but also ongoing charges for disposable and maintenance items. Thus, the decision of which device to purchase is complex and requires careful evaluation of all of the previously noted variables. Likewise, if one is fortunate enough to have more than one device available, the decision of which lithotriptor to employ requires a similar decision based on sound surgical judgment. PMID:10778472

  9. Pneumatic lithotripsy applied through deflected working channel of miniureteroscope: results in 143 patients.

    PubMed

    Knispel, H H; Klän, R; Heicappell, R; Miller, K

    1998-12-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is a successful treatment for ureteral calculi, introduction of miniureteroscopes has advanced endoscopic management. We combined the use of a semirigid ureteroscope with a pneumatic lithotripter (Swiss Lithoclast) for the treatment of ureteral calculi. From January 1992 to August 1994, 143 patients (87 male, 56 female; mean age 48.7 years; age range 22-74 years) with urolithiasis underwent endoscopic lithotripsy with the Swiss Lithoclast under general anesthesia. The 0.8 = mm probe was inserted through the deflected working channel (3.4F) of the Micro-6L ureteroscope (tip diameter 6.9F). The calculi were in the distal (N = 96; 67.1%), mid (N = 34; 23.8%), and proximal part (N = 13; 9.1%) of the ureter. The mean stone size was 6.8 mm (range 5-26 mm). Of the 137 patients whose stones we could access adequately, 70 (51.1%) were stone free immediately after the procedure, and another 31 (22.6%) had residual fragments <3 mm that passed spontaneously. The remaining 36 patients underwent another 50 procedures; 30 SWL sessions in 26 patients (19%), 17 further endoscopic lithotripsies in 14 (10.2%), and open surgery in 3. Application of the Swiss Lithoclast through semirigid miniureteroscopes is highly effective for endoscopic lithotripsy, regardless of stone composition. Deflection of the probe up to 30 degrees did not impair the disintegration rate. Because of the high migration rate of mid and proximal ureteral stones, the Swiss Lithoclast is not recommended in these cases as a primary procedure. Low capital cost and simple and safe handling are the device's major advantages over laser lithotripsy.

  10. Erbium:YAG laser lithotripsy by use of a flexible hollow waveguide with an end-scaling cap.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Nito, Koh; Matsuura, Yuji; Kasai, Takao; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Seichi; Arai, Youichi; Ioritani, Naomasa; Okagami, Yoshihide; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Zavoral, Miroslav; Kohler, Oto; Drlik, Pavel

    2003-05-01

    An Er:YAG laser light delivery system composed of a polymer-coated silver hollow waveguide and a quartz sealing cap has been developed for calculus fragmentation. Sealing caps with various distal-end geometries were fabricated, and the focusing effects of these caps for Er:YAG laser light were measured both in air and in water. Owing to the high power capability of the quartz a beam of sealing caps, Er:YAG laser light with an output energy of 200 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz was successfully transmitted in saline solution by use of the system. Calculus fragmentation experiments conducted in vitro showed that the delivery system is suitable for medical applications in lithotripsy. We also found that the cap with a focusing effect is more effective in cutting calculi. The deterioration of the sealing caps after calculus fragmentation is also discussed.

  11. [Percutaneous transhepatic laser lithotripsy of gallstones--results of animal experiments].

    PubMed

    Wenk, H; Thomas, S; Baretton, G; Schildberg, F W

    1989-01-01

    Since laserinduced shock wave lithotripsy of gallstones is possible for treatment of common bile duct stones, the percutaneous transhepatic laserlithotripsy of stones in the gallbladder is examined in an animal study. In 8 animal experiments it could be shown that puncture of the gallbladder, dilatation of the working channel, (laserinduced) shock wave lithotripsy, removal of the fragments and the instruments are possible in one session. Neither when performing simple closure of the wound by suture nor by fibrinsealing severe side-effects could be recognized. After laserlithotripsy ablation of epithelium and hematomas can be observed, which are restituted within one month. The experiments show that in organ-saving shockwave lithotripsy there is no need for waiting for the development of a fistula and the percutaneous approach can be simplified.

  12. Endoscopic laser treatment of uterine malformations.

    PubMed

    Donnez, J; Nisolle, M

    1997-07-01

    Hysteroscopic resection of an intrauterine septum may benefit patients suffering from infertility or recurrent pregnancy loss. A partial or complete uterine septum can be easily resected using a Nd-YAG laser. If present, the vaginal septum may also be removed during the same procedure. The reproductive outcome of women treated by operative hysteroscopy for an intrauterine septum is reviewed. To avoid pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn, the removal of the horn and the homolateral tube may be performed by either bipolar coagulation or a CO2 laser.

  13. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct calculi].

    PubMed

    Greiner, L; Jakobeit, C

    1993-08-01

    Shockwave therapy of bile duct stones is not dependent on difficult preconditions concerning stone-volume and -composition or subsequent lythic therapy. Its main indication is failure of endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct stones--which may even be carried out even instead of EST in specific cases--is with a success rate of 80 to 95% as effective as shockwave lithotripsy in urology.

  14. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi].

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T

    1990-05-01

    Using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) pancreatic stones may be disintegrated. Acute adverse effects directly attributably to shock wave lithotripsy are rare. More than half of the patients will exhibit complete clearance of the pancreatic duct system after ESWL, endoscopic sphincterotomy and extraction of fragments. Most of the patients in whom the ducts could be cleared from the stones also showed improvement of chronic pancreatic pain. These findings, however, have to be substantiated by larger clinical studies with longer follow-up periods.

  15. Lithotripsy: an update on urologic applications in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lane, India F

    2004-07-01

    Lithotripsy methods for fragmenting uroliths continue to evolve.Increasing access to and experience with newer generation lithotriptors and continued study of laser methodology are likely to increase the application of lithotripsy methods in small animal urology. For small animals in which intervention is recommended for progressive, symptomatic, infected, or obstructive uroliths, nonsurgical extracorporeal or intracorporeal lithotripsy methods maybe considered.

  16. [Significance of the CO2-laser angle, oral cavity endoscopes].

    PubMed

    Gáspár, L; Bakos, R; Kásler, M

    1991-10-01

    The CO2-laser ray guided at 90 degrees to the surface creates a crater of typical "v" shape. If the guide angle of the ray deviates therefrom and the smaller the angle of incidence than 90 degrees, destruction becomes the more astymmetric, the crater takes an ever more flattened eliptical shape. The lack of tissue becomes even more superficial, thus removal of a circumscribed pathological area requires the sacrifice of more ambient healthy tissue. Consterning the possible angle of incidence of the laser ray instrumental measurements were carried out. It has been ascertained that in the pharinx third of the mouth cavity behind the plain corresponding to the premolars, as a rule, only guide angles below 50 degrees, in the middle third of the mouth cavity corresponding to the area between the front teeth and the molars guide angles between 50-70 degrees, and in the front third mostly a ray guiding below 90 degrees are possible. In the middle and rear third of the mouth cavity the ideal rey-guiding at 90 degrees can be obtained but with reflection, certain areas even cannot be treated directly, are visible but in mirrors. By transforming the hand piece of the laser apparatus endoscopes with fixed mirror and rotating mirror have been constructed. By means of the endoscope with fixed mirror already all parts of the mouth cavity have been rendered accessible while the rotating mirror model became suitable even to admit the laser ray to the surfaces at the ideal angle of incidence of 90(2). PMID:1765203

  17. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  18. Studies On Endoscopic Local Hyperthermia Using Nd-YAG Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, H.; Kanemaki, N.; Furusawa, A.; Hotta, M.; Kuroiwa, A.; Nishida, M.; Mori, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Morise, K.; Iizuka, A.

    1987-03-01

    Attempting a new method of laser irradiation for depressed gastric carcinoma, using a newly developed interstitial probe and laser attenuator, we applied local hyperthermia with prolonged low watt contact irradiation. Experimental studies were performed with this probe, using BDF1 mice injected hypodermically with Lewis lung carcinoma. A laser power of 2.0 w at the tip of fiber produced the most desirable temperature curve, about 43 - 60°C at the irradiation site. Clinical applications were carried out on 15 patients with early gastric carcinoma (mainly depressed), 10 preoperative pilot cases and 5 inoperable cases. In follow-up operations and biopsies gastric carcinoma was found to have completely dis-appeared in 2 of the preoperative and 4 of the inoperable cases. In the remaining 8 preoperative cases residual traces of carcinoma were found at the margin of the laser ulcer, but not at the bottom of it. We propose that endoscopic local hyperthermia using interstitial probe and low power irradiation (2.0 W) is the safest and most suitable method of dealing with depressed carcinoma.

  19. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  20. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  1. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  2. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  3. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is currently being studied as a potential alternative to the conventional, solid-state Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is an ideal candidate to replace the Ho:YAG for laser lithotripsy due to a higher absorption coefficient in water of the emitted wavelength, an ability to operate at high pulse rates, and a near single mode, Gaussian spatial beam profile. The higher absorption of the TFL wavelength by water translates to a decrease in ablation threshold by a factor of four. High pulse rate operation allows higher ablation rates than the Ho:YAG, thus decreasing operation time necessary to ablate the urinary stone. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple higher laser power into smaller optical fibers than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. This decrease in fiber diameter translates into a potential decrease in the size of ureteroscope working channel, higher saline irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety, and may also extend to a decrease in overall ureteroscope diameter. Furthermore, the improved spatial beam profile reduces the risk of damage to the input end of the fiber. Therefore, the trunk fiber, minus the distal fiber tip, may be preserved and re-used, resulting in significant cost savings. This thesis details rapid TFL lithotripsy at high pulse rates up to 500 Hz, both with and without the aid of a stone retrieval basket, in order to demonstrate the TFL's superior ablation rates over the Ho:YAG. Collateral damage testing of the TFL effect on the ureter wall and Nitinol stone baskets were conducted to ensure patient safety for future clinical use. Proximal fiber end damage testing was conducted to demonstrate fiber preservation, critical for permanent fiber integration. Optical fibers were fitted with fabricated hollow steel tips and integrated with stone retrieval baskets for testing. Ball tipped optical fibers were tested to maintain ablation

  4. Endoscopic and KTP laser-assisted surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Produl; Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Balakrishnan, Ramaswamy; Raj, Girish; Pillai, Suresh

    2002-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a highly vascular tumor arising from the area around the sphenopalatine foramen. Various radical and extended radical surgeries have been advocated to surgically excise both extranasopharyngeal and nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibromas. However angiofibromas involving the nasopharynx, nose, and sphenoid with minimal lateral extension via the sphenopalatine foramen can also be adequately managed endoscopically either alone or with 1 of the traditional approaches. Nine cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma were successfully managed between January, 1999, and March, 2001, by preoperative selective embolization of the internal maxillary artery with or without external carotid artery clamping, followed by endoscopic excision. Two of the 9 cases underwent KTP/532 laser-assisted endoscopic excision, whereas the transpalatal approach was used along with the endoscope in another 2 cases. The patients remained free of disease after a median follow-up period of 17 months. We report our preliminary experience in endoscopic and KTP laser-assisted excision of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

  5. Endoscopic repair of unilateral choanal atresia with the KTP laser: a one stage procedure.

    PubMed

    Tzifa, K T; Skinner, D W

    2001-04-01

    This paper, describes the endoscopic repair of unilateral choanal atresia with the KTP laser, a one-stage procedure, with no requirement for stenting. Three patients are presented with unilateral choanal atresia, aged six, nine and 38-years-old. The procedure combines the excellent endoscopic visualization, with the good haemostatic and penetrating properties of the KTP laser. Follow up was between 12 months and four years with all choanae remaining patent, no dilatation was required. No surgical complications were noted.

  6. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  7. Primary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in management of large bladder calculi.

    PubMed

    Husain, I; el-Faqih, S R; Shamsuddin, A B; Atassi, R

    1994-06-01

    Large bladder calculi are often outside the range of treatment with conventional endoscopic lithotrites because of either anatomic factors or the mechanical limits of available instruments. Alternative methods of cystolithotripsy: ultrasonic, electrohydraulic, or laser, can prove time-consuming or even hazardous, so that open surgery is often the most expeditious option. We report our experience using Dornier HM3 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for initial bladder stone reduction preparatory to transurethral litholapaxy and definitive treatment of any underlying obstructive pathology. Primary cystolitholapaxy was judged impractical in these 24 patients (21 adults and 3 children) presenting 31 large bladder stones (mean size 35.6 mm). In all patients, primary transpelvic SWL was followed immediately by endoscopic evacuation of stone debris or cystolitholapaxy. In addition, 10 of the 24 patients (42%) underwent a definitive endoscopic operation for treatment of an underlying obstructive lesion at either the same or a follow-on session. Morbidity was minimal, and the mean hospital stay after the initial SWL treatment was 3.5 days. In our experience, Dornier SWL has proved invaluable in enabling cystolitholapaxy of very large bladder calculi that would otherwise require protracted and difficult endoscopic manipulation or open surgery.

  8. Single-session ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy for multiple stones.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Ryoji; Kitayama, Sachi; Tsujii, Toshihiko

    2012-12-01

    Multiple stones are found in 20-25% of patients with urolithiasis. The stone multiplicity is a powerful adverse factor influencing the treatment outcome after shockwave lithotripsy, although guidelines for the treatment of multiple stones have not been well established yet. Herein we report our most recent experience of a single-session ureteroscopy for multiple stones. Between September 2008 and December 2011, 51 patients with multiple stones (total 146 stones) in different locations (37unilateral, 14 bilateral) underwent a total of 65 ureteroscopic procedures. Operative time, stone-free rates and complications were evaluated. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments in the ureter and the absence of >2 mm fragments in the kidney. The mean stone number per patient was 2.9 ± 1.7 and the mean stone burden (cumulative stone length) was 21.5 ± 11.6 mm. The mean number of procedures was 1.3 ± 0.6. Overall, the stone-free rate after a single session was 80% (41/51). In patients with stone burden <20 mm and ≥20 mm, stone-free rates after a single session were 92% (23/25) and 69% (18/26), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the stone burden and the presence of impacted stones were the factors significantly influencing the treatment outcome. Stone location did not have a strong influence on the outcome. No major intraoperative complications were identified. Our findings suggest that ureteroscopy is an efficient treatment for multiple stones. For patients with stone burden <20 mm, either unilaterally or bilaterally, a single session of ureteroscopy is a favorable treatment option with a high stone-free rate.

  9. [Extracorporeal shockwave nephro-uretero-lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Lopatkin, N A; Martov, A G; Beshliev, L A

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been widely introduced in the treatment of nephro-uretero-lithiasis during the last decade as it provides a noninvasive removal of the stones from the upper urinary tracts. The paper covers the history, techniques, indications, contraindications, anesthesia, complications and results of the method. Positive and negative characteristics of ESWL equipment (lithotriptors) are considered. The experience with 5000 lithotripsies led the authors to the conclusion that ESWL does not solve all the problems in the treatment of nephro-uretero-lithiasis and should be introduced only in large clinics practicing actively x-ray endoscopy and equipped with modern endoscopic and ultrasonic urologic units.

  10. Endoscopic laser therapy in malignant tracheobronchial obstruction using sequential Nd YAG laser and photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moghissi, K.; Dixon, K.; Hudson, E.; Stringer, M.; Brown, S.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because the survival after treatment of advanced inoperable endo-tracheobronchial carcinoma is so poor, a pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the combined cumulative effect on survival of neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd YAG) laser followed by photodynamic treatment used endoscopically. METHODS: Seventeen patients who presented between January 1992 and March 1996 with inoperable tracheobronchial lesions causing more than 50% endoluminal obstruction were selected to enter the pilot study. Initially they had bronchoscopic Nd YAG laser treatment to debulk the tumour, and this was followed six weeks later by photodynamic therapy to treat the residual tumour. RESULTS: All patients had symptomatic relief and at least a partial response, and seven had a complete response for 3-6 months. Eight of the 17 (47%) survived for at least two years and 11 (65%) survived for a year or more. The median survival of the 10 patients who had died by the time of writing was 18.5 months (range 5-39), 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.9 to 29.5. CONCLUSIONS: Combined Nd YAG laser and endoscopic photodynamic therapy may be an effective palliative treatment for patients with inoperable endotracheobronchial cancer. 


 PMID:9093347

  11. Management of vesical calculi: comparison of lithotripsy devices.

    PubMed

    Razvi, H A; Song, T Y; Denstedt, J D

    1996-12-01

    Although endoscopic lithotripsy of bladder stones has been well described and is widely practiced, comparison of the main modalities of mechanical, electrohydraulic, and ultrasonic lithotripsy is lacking. The exact role of these and other modalities such as the Swiss Lithoclast and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is not clearly defined. The safety and efficacy of the various lithotripsy modalities available to treat bladder calculi were reviewed retrospectively over an 18-year period. A total of 106 patients were treated with some form of intracorporeal lithotripsy. In general, all devices proved to be effective with a low rate of complications. The addition of transurethral resection of the prostate to bladder stone management under the same anesthetic was also found to be a safe procedure for moderate benign prostatic hyperplasia. In summary, transurethral endoscopic lithotripsy is a safe and effective method of bladder stone management both alone and in combination with transurethral prostatectomy. All modalities of intracorporeal lithotripsy are effective; however, devices such as ultrasound lithotripters or the Swiss Lithoclast that utilize larger, rigid probes may be more efficient for patients with large or particularly hard vesical calculi.

  12. High-speed photography during laser-based gall bladder stone lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.

    2001-04-01

    Shadowgraphy of gall bladder stone, which is held by a basket and immersed in a civete is performed. The exposure time is determined by the time of a N-Dye laser pulse used as a lightening source for photography. The shadowgram is projected in the objective of a camera which is connected to a microscope. The light coming from the laser, illuminates the civete collecting optical information of the stone and physical phenomena appearing above the stone. On top of the stone a tip of optical fiber is fixed, which is used for transmitting Ho:Yag laser power to the stone. Using a computer and time delay the laser pulses used for destruction and illumination are synchronized. Since the N-Dye laser pulse is pico-second range and the Ho:Yag laser pulse is in the range of micro-second, many image frames are obtained within the time of one pulse applied during the destruction. It is known that in the process of stone destruction several phenomena like plume, plasma, shock wave and bubble formation take place. However, the physical mechanism of the stone destruction is not yet completely understood. From the obtained results the above phenomena are studied which gives new information and clue for understanding some of the mentioned phenomena. The laser power which is guided by an optical fiber into the gall bladder or kidney of the human body can damage the living tissue and cause some serious health problems. For this reason the fiber needs to be oriented properly during the action of the laser power.

  13. Effects of shielded or unshielded laser and electrohydraulic lithotripsy on rabbit bladder.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, K M; Rosen, D I; Flotte, T J; Dretler, S P; Nishioka, N S

    1990-04-01

    The pulsed dye laser and electrohydraulic lithotriptor (EHL) are both effective devices for fragmenting urinary and biliary calculi. Both fragment stones by producing a plasma-mediated shockwave. Recently, a plasma shield consisting of a hollow spring and a metal end cap has been described for use with the laser and EHL devices in an attempt to minimize tissue damage without adversely affecting stone fragmentation rates. The tissue effects produced by a pulsed dye laser and an EHL device with and without plasma shields were examined and compared using rabbit urinary bladders. If blood was present, the unshielded laser perforated the bladder wall in two pulses. However, in the absence of blood, over 100 pulses were needed for the laser to perforate the bladder. A mean of six pulses were required to perforate the bladder wall with a shielded laser. The unshielded EHL perforated the bladder wall in two pulses, whereas, the shielded EHL required a mean of 35 pulses. Microscopically, areas of exposure revealed hemorrhage and tissue ablation. We conclude that all devices examined can produce significant tissue damage when discharged directly onto bladder epithelium.

  14. Application Of Endoscopic Lasers For Operations In Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelkin, O. K.; Saphronov, A. M.; Shapovalov, A. M.; Zaharov, P. I.

    1988-06-01

    We have described our experience in the application of high energy argon and Nd:YAG lasers for endoscopic surgical manipulations. Laser was used for the removal of polyps with a wide base, villi tumours in colon, for the elimination of scar strictures in colon anastomosis, for the formation of primary-delayed colon anastomosis and for the removal of timoral stenosis in esophagus and in colon. Laser therapy has certain advantages over other endoscopic manipulations: long-term and immediate results are better. One can use this therapy in combination with others (radial therapy, surgical treatment). We have worked out a classification of polyps and stenosing tumours in the digestive system to determine indications for laser endoscopy and to choose the best parameters of laser irradiation.

  15. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W. J.; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-12-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391 mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct stones].

    PubMed

    Wenzel, H; Greiner, L; Jakobeit, C; Lazica, M; Thüroff, J

    1989-05-12

    Extracorporeal lithotripsy (EL) was undertaken in 50 patients (mean age 73.7 years; range 29-90 years) with extrahepatic and, in five, with intrahepatic gallstones, the usual endoscopic methods having been unsuccessful in removing the stones. Occasionally stone fragments were passed spontaneously, but in most they had to be removed endoscopically, in 48 (96%) with extrahepatic and in three (60%) with intrahepatic stones. Biliary tract or gallbladder infections occurred after the lithotripsy and associated local litholysis in seven of the 48 with extrahepatic (14%) and three of the five (60%) with intrahepatic stones. There was one hospital death. The results indicate that EL has definite advantages over surgical treatment in these patients, who are usually elderly and in whom surgical intervention is more risky.

  17. First experience with blind lithotripsy of ureteral calculi by ruby laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Sokolovsky, Alexander A.; Mursin, A. G.; Soms, Leonid N.; Berenberg, Vladimir A.; Polikarpov, Sergey S.; Parkhomchuk, N. A.; Voskresensky, M. A.

    1994-05-01

    For the last two years we have applied continuous dual-wavelength Nd:YAG 20 - 60 W power laser to various urologic operations. Transmission of laser irradiation via a flexible quartz fiber permitted operating at any depth of the wound. High-intensity irradiation of 1.06 mkm wavelength was effective in making thin incisions into a variety of tissues, including skin, subcutaneous fat, aponeurosis, muscles, urinary bladder wall, prostate gland, renal pelvis, renal capsule and parenchyma, and urethra. The incisions were especially effective if the contact method was used. Operational access was accomplished in 3 - 5 minutes. At the same time, hemostasis occurred in small diameter vessels. More reliable hemostasis could be achieved by means of 1.32 mkm wavelength. With the present laser device, we carried out 57 different urologic operations in our clinic. Examples of such operations include prostatectomy, pyelolithotomy, ureterolithotomy, nephrectomy, resection of renal cysts, condylomata acuminata of the urogenital organs, and papilloma of the urethra and bladder. The results suggest that a combination of these two wavelengths may prove most effective. Advantages of this approach include a decreased blood loss and decreased surgical time, asepsis, good short- and long-term results, and no complications.

  18. Changing paradigms in the treatment of uroliths by lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Lulich, Jody P; Adams, Larry G; Grant, David; Albasan', Hasan; Osborne, Carl A

    2009-01-01

    Surgery remains a common procedure for removal of uroliths from the lower urinary tract of dogs. Incorporation of intracorporeal laser lithotripsy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has provided impetus for a paradigm shift in the way veterinarians manage urinary stones, however. These minimally invasive techniques provide a successful alternative to surgical urolith extraction.

  19. Modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi: A single-surgeon experience of 382 cases

    PubMed Central

    YAN, ZEJUN; XIE, GUOHAI; YUAN, HESHENG; CHENG, YUE

    2015-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi, a retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's 3-year modular flexible ureteroscopy experience was performed. All of the patients were treated with modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments or a single fragment ≤4 mm in diameter at the 3-month follow-up. The procedure number, operative time, stone-free rates, repeat usage of the multilumen catheter, and perioperative complications were documented. The present study included 215 male patients and 167 female patients, with an average age of 48.5±13.7 years (range, 17–84 years). The mean stone size was 11.5±4.1 mm (range, 4–28 mm), and the mean total stone burden was 17.5±5.7 mm (range 15–46 mm). A total of 305 patients (79.8%) had a stone burden ≤20 mm, and 77 patients (20.2%) had a stone burden >20 mm. The mean number of primary procedures was 1.3±0.2 (range, 1–3). The stone-free rate following the first and the second procedure was 73.4 and 86.9%, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1±1.2 days (range, 2–6 days). The highest clearance rates were observed for proximal ureteral stones (100%) and renal pelvic stones (88.7%), whereas the lowest clearance rates were observed for lower calyx stones (76.7%) and multiple calyx stones (77.8%). The higher the initial stone burden, the lower the postoperative stone-free rate (≤20 vs. >20 mm; 89.8 vs. 75.3%). The overall complication rate was 8.1%. The results of the present study suggest that modular flexible ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy may be considered the primary method for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi in select patients, due to its acceptable efficacy, low morbidity, and relatively low maintenance costs. PMID:26622508

  20. Endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy for pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults.

    PubMed

    Xiuwen, Jiang; Jianguo, Tang

    2015-04-01

    Many methods have been used to treat venous malformations, including sclerotherapy, laser therapy, and surgery. Nowadays, endoscopic laser surgery has become a popular therapeutic modality for most of pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations. There are various kinds of lasers that have been applied, but Holmium:YAG laser (Ho laser) has not been reported yet. Ho laser is produced by a kind of iraser which is made of yttrium aluminum garnet mixed with holmium, chromium and thulium. Aim of the current work is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ho laser interstitial therapy in pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults. The clinical data of 42 patients with pharyngolaryngeal venous malformation treated with endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy over a 12-year period were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The wave length of Ho laser was 2.1 µm and the diameter of optical fiber was 550 µm. The pulse energy was 0.5 J and the time of duration was 600 µs. The highest output power was 100 W. Outcomes were graded as cure (complete resolution), considerable reduction (>60-80 % reduction), and no obvious change (<50 % reduction). The lesions were well controlled without severe complications. Complete resolution of the lesion was observed in 95.1 % of the patients, while 4.9 % patients showed considerable reduction of the swelling. Complications occurred in 4.8 % of patients. No respiratory troubles or other severe complications occurred. Endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy is an effective and safe treatment modality for pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults.

  1. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  2. Correction method of bending loss in the hollow optical fiber for endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakari, Daisuke; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment of early digestive cancer because it can avoid the risk of perforation. Although a hollow optical fiber transmitting mid-infrared light has been used, it was observed that the irradiation effect was influenced by bending a gastrointestinal gastrointestinal endoscope due to the change in transmittance by the bending loss. Therefore, we quantitatively evaluated the change in the irradiation effect by bending the hollow optical fiber in the gastrointestinal endoscope and proposed a correction method to stabilize the irradiation effect. First, the relationship between the irradiated laser energy density and the incision depth for porcine stomach was measured by bending the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Next, the relationship between the bending angle of the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope and the temperature rise of the hollow optical fiber in the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope was measured during the laser irradiation. As a result, the laser energy density and the incision depth decreased as the bending angle increased, and linear correlation between the laser energy density and the incision depth was observed. It was found that the bending angle can be estimated by the ratio of the setting laser power to time derivative of the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber. In conclusion, it is suggested that the correction of the laser energy density and stabilization of the incision capability is possible by measuring the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber.

  3. [Clinical relevance of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in choledocholithiasis].

    PubMed

    Weiss, W; Türk, C; Brownstone, E; Hruby, W; Klose, W; Kölbl, C; Marberger, M; Tuchmann, A

    1989-09-29

    Primary endoscopic removal of bile duct stones is an established method of treatment. However, the extraction of stones is impossible in about 10% of cases despite successful endoscopic papillotomy and manual lithotripsy. Over a period of two years extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was performed in 32 patients. Piezolith 2200, a second generation lithotripter was used, which requires neither analgesia nor anaesthesia for the patient. Localisation of the stones was carried out by means of a 3.5 MH 2 sector scanner. ESWL treatment was successful in 24 of 32 patients (75%). In 6 patients the bile duct stones were too large or too numerous and in 2 patients sonographic localisation was impossible. Out of a total of 131 patients with stones in the biliary tract only 9 (6.8%) needed surgery. Piezoelectric lithotripsy is a safe and effective adjunct procedure for the treatment of bile duct stones which were not extractable by endoscopy.

  4. Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy for treatment of bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Gorphe, Philippe; Hartl, Dana; Primov-Fever, Adi; Hans, Stephane; Crevier-Buchman, Lise; Brasnu, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy for bilateral vocal fold paralysis has the advantage of preserving the structure and the position of the vocal fold, contrary to a transverse cordotomy or total arytenoidectomy. Our objective was to evaluate the functional results of this procedure. This is a prospective non-randomized study. Twenty patients were included: five patients had a tracheotomy preoperatively and 15 patients had dyspnea on exertion. Acoustic voice measurements, spirometric parameters and the voice handicap index 120 (VHI), were evaluated 1 week before surgery and 3 months after. All the five patients with tracheotomy were successfully decannulated. Acoustic records and VHI were available for eight patients. Jitter and shimmer were worse (p = 0.0078), whereas the VHI was not significantly different after surgery. Spirometric records, available for six patients, were not modified. Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy allowed decannulation and subjective improvement of quality of life in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

  5. Voice evaluation following endoscopic laser CO2 cordectomy and conventional cordectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An analysis of long term voice quality outcomes of two different types of surgical intervention for Tis and T1 glottic carcinoma: laryngofissure conventional cordectomy and endoscopic laser CO2 cordectomy, with or without additional radiation therapy. Material and methods Total of 46 patients with Tis and T1 glottic carcinoma served as subjects. All have been treated surgically with laryngofissure conventional cordectomy (32.61%) or endoscopic laser CO2 cordectomy (67.39%). The surgeries were performed in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Medical University of Warsaw (1990-2004). The presented voice assessments were made at least 3 years following the surgery, in between January 2006 and February 2007. Results In patients after the endoscopic laser CO2 cordectomy the following findings are more often observed: the unrestrained voice production, wider range of Fo in a spoken sentence, longer maximum phonation time, better intensity of phonation for normal and loud speaking, lower degree of hoarseness based on the Yanagihara’s classification, and the lower VHI. No significant influence of the performed additional radiotherapy on voice parameters was found. Conclusions Patients after endoscopic laser CO2 cordectomy, compared to laryngofissure conventional cordectomy, present better voice quality. The amount of the excised vocal fold tissue, which in our study was slightly larger in case of the conventional cordectomy, could account for the results mentioned above. This may also be explained by the necessity of the anterior thyrotomy, which is required for conventional cordectomy via external approach, and often results in anterior synechia and level difference between the neocord and the contralateral vocal fold. PMID:22291748

  6. Treatment of nose, pharynx, larynx, and trachea disorders with Nd:YAG laser through fiber endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mengkui; Zhong, Denan; Yang, Shulan

    1993-03-01

    This article is about 203 examples and 14 types of pathological illnesses in the nose, pharynx, and trachea. All these are effectively treated under fiber endoscope with YAG laser, except one example of adenocarcinoma in the nose and pharynx which has relapsed after three times of treatment with rays. The other 202 examples needed only one time of treatment with the rays. The results of the experiment in one to three years is satisfactory.

  7. A comparative study to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy for residual calculi after percutaneous nephrolithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Wen, Jiaming; Li, Zhongyi; Zhang, Zhewei; Gong, Xiuqing; Chen, Jimin; Du, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    A certain proportion of patients with initial Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) management require ancillary procedures to increase the stone-free rate. In this study, we aim to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy (F-UL) for treatment of residual calculi after PCNL by comparison with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Total of 96 patients with residual renal calculi (4 mm to 20 mm) after PCNL was enrolled from May 2010 to March 2013. They were randomly divided into two groups: US Group: patients were treated with F-UL; SWL Group: patients were treated with SWL. Follow-up was made one month and three months after treatment. The mean residual stone size after PCNL was 12.4 ± 4.3 mm in US group compared with 11.9 ± 4.5 in SWL group. The stone-free rate was 84.7% one month after surgical procedure in US group, this rate increased to 91.3% in the third months, while the stone-free rate in SWL group is 64.6% one month after treatment and 72.9% in the third month. For residual stone in lower calyx, the stone-free rate three month after treatment was 90.4% in US group compared to 65.2% in SWL group (P < 0.05). The overall complication rate was low in both groups, no severe complication was found. Both F-UL and SWL are safe and effective methods for residual calculi after PCNL, without severe complications. F-UL provided significantly higher stone-free rate compared with SWL, especially for low-pole calculi.

  8. Experimental Studies Of Endoscopic Local Hyperthermia With Contact Nd-YAG Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Sohtaro; Aoki, Jun; Shiina, Yasubumi; Miwa, Takeshi; Daikuzono, Norio; Joffe, Stephen N.

    1987-03-01

    We have been studying experimentally and clinically to evaluate the histological effects and safety of the therapeutic Nd-YAG laser endoscopy by the contact method with new ceramic endoprobes comparing wit Li those by the non-contact method with single quartz fiber. In this paper, we would like to discuss possibilities of clinical application of endoscopic local hyperthermia using Nd-YAG laser (Laserthermia) with computer control system. Newly developed computer controlled Laserthermia may possible to apply for the treatment of the malignant tumor in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

  9. First experience in pulsed YAG-laser clinical applications in endoscopic surgery for gallstone destruction and operations on peripapillary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, S. V.; Manevich, V. D.; Meshkov, Vladimir M.; Kornilov, Yu. M.; Manenkov, Alexander A.; Upyrev, A. V.; Ryabykh, V. I.; Denisov, N. N.; Bagdasarov, V. H.; Starkovsky, A. N.

    1990-09-01

    1. Central Clinical Hospital No 1, the USSR Ministry of Communications, Moscow 2. II Surgery Department, Central Institute for Advanced Medical Training, Moscow 3. Central Clinical Hospital No 4, the USSR Ministry of Communications, Moscow 4. Central Clinical Hospital of the RSFSR Ministry of Health, Moscow 5. General Physics Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow Progress in biliferous system surgery is to a considerable extent associated with realization of endosurgery methods on gallbladder and main biliary tracts. Radical alterations in the treatment tactics and the up-date developments of this trend put forward new technical and methodical tasks. The problem of safe disintegration of gallstones.is one of them. Introduction into clinical practice of endoscopic draining operations on the distal section of hepaticocholedoch eliminating such complications as wedging into it of the stone remains and recurrent lithogenesis, inevitably puts forward the problem of lithotripsy which is often of top priority as determining the radical effect of endosurgical interference.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Soehendra, N; Grimm, H; Meyer, H W; Schreiber, H W

    1989-09-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy was performed on eight patients (six men, two women; mean age 46.3 years, range 36-58) with predominantly stone-induced obstructive pancreatitis. Stones in the pancreatic duct were smashed in one session to such an extent that the fragments were eliminated spontaneously via the ostium which had previously been split endoscopically. Repeat lithotripsy to achieve complete removal was necessary in only two patients. In one there were multiple concrements along the entire length of the main pancreatic duct; the other had a cherry-sized stone near the bifurcation of the accessory pancreatic duct. There were no serious complications. After successful removal of the stones all patients were free of pain which before had required strong analgesics to control. Six patients remained pain-free during a follow-up period of two eight months. Pain again occurred in the other two, but it was less frequent and milder.

  11. An endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry of a gastroduodenal mucosa at bleeding ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkin, U. G.; Kapralov, C. V.; Gogolev, A. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    One of the important problems of a bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer surgery is a prognosis of the recurrent hemorrhage and appraisal of endoscopic hemostasis quality. Endoscopic Laser Doppler Flowmetry of a mucous coat of stomach and a duodenum was made on 34 patients for the purpose of investigation of features of microcirculation. Analogous researches are made on 30 patients with a peptic ulcer and on 28 practically healthy people. Analysis of LDF-grams has shown certain differences in regional microcirculations in stomach and duodenal at normal and at a pathology. Increase of regional perfusion in periulcerose zone with its pathology disbalance can serve as a criterion for activities of an alteration processes in gastroduodenal ulcer defining the risk of possible hemorrhage.

  12. Endoscopic laser-induced steam generator: a new method of treatment for early gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takuya; Arai, Tsunenori; Tajiri, Hisao; Nogami, Yashiroh; Hino, Kunihiko; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    The minimum invasive endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer has been popular in Japan. The endoscopic mucosal resection and laser coagulation by Nd:YAG laser irradiation has been the popular treatment method in this field. However, the submucosal cancer has not been successfully treated by these methods. To treat the submucosal cancer endoscopically, we developed a new coagulation therapy using hot steam generated by Nd:YAG laser. The steam of which temperature was over 10 deg. in Celsius was generated by the laser power of 30 W with 5 ml/min. of saline. The steam was emitted to canine gastric wall under laparotomy or endoscopy for 50 s respectively. Follow up endoscopy was performed on 3, 7, 14, 28 days after the treatment. Histological examination was studied on 7, 28 days, and just after the emission. In the acute observation, the submucosal layer was totally coagulated. On the 7th day, ulceration with white coat was seen. The mucosal defect, submucosal coagulation, and marked edema without muscle degeneration were found by the histological study. On the 14th day, the ulcer advanced in the scar stage. On the 28th day, it completely healed into white scar with mucosal regeneration and mucosal muscle thickening. We could obtain reproducible coagulation up to deep submucosal layer with large area in a short operation time. Moreover there were no degeneration of proper muscle. This treatment effectiveness could be easily controlled by the steam temperature and emission duration. We think that this method can be applied to early gastric cancer including the submucosal cancer, in particular poor risk case for operation. Further study should be done to apply this method to clinical therapy.

  13. Endoscopic laser range scanner for minimally invasive, image guided kidney surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friets, Eric; Bieszczad, Jerry; Kynor, David; Norris, James; Davis, Brynmor; Allen, Lindsay; Chambers, Robert; Wolf, Jacob; Glisson, Courtenay; Herrell, S. Duke; Galloway, Robert L.

    2013-03-01

    Image guided surgery (IGS) has led to significant advances in surgical procedures and outcomes. Endoscopic IGS is hindered, however, by the lack of suitable intraoperative scanning technology for registration with preoperative tomographic image data. This paper describes implementation of an endoscopic laser range scanner (eLRS) system for accurate, intraoperative mapping of the kidney surface, registration of the measured kidney surface with preoperative tomographic images, and interactive image-based surgical guidance for subsurface lesion targeting. The eLRS comprises a standard stereo endoscope coupled to a steerable laser, which scans a laser fan beam across the kidney surface, and a high-speed color camera, which records the laser-illuminated pixel locations on the kidney. Through calibrated triangulation, a dense set of 3-D surface coordinates are determined. At maximum resolution, the eLRS acquires over 300,000 surface points in less than 15 seconds. Lower resolution scans of 27,500 points are acquired in one second. Measurement accuracy of the eLRS, determined through scanning of reference planar and spherical phantoms, is estimated to be 0.38 +/- 0.27 mm at a range of 2 to 6 cm. Registration of the scanned kidney surface with preoperative image data is achieved using a modified iterative closest point algorithm. Surgical guidance is provided through graphical overlay of the boundaries of subsurface lesions, vasculature, ducts, and other renal structures labeled in the CT or MR images, onto the eLRS camera image. Depth to these subsurface targets is also displayed. Proof of clinical feasibility has been established in an explanted perfused porcine kidney experiment.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of a pulsed 2.15-micron laser system for fiberoptic endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Reynolds, R D; DeFilippi, V J; Andrew, J; Liu, J Y; Cohen, M G

    1988-01-01

    There is a need for lasers that are compatible with fiberoptic endoscopes and that provide greater cutting precision than currently can be produced by the widely used Nd:YAG (1.06 micron) laser. Recently available lasers that operate in the 2-micron region fill this need. This laser light energy can be transmitted by low OH- silica fibers and has much less tissue penetration than radiation at 1.06 micron. We have been evaluating a prototype solid state laser system that produces pulses of 2.15 microns light that is delivered by a silica based fiberoptic delivery system with negligible transmission losses. This system is based on a thulium-holmium-chromium doped YAG (Tm-Ho-Cr: YAG) rod that lases at 2.15 micron. The laser does not require cryogenic cooling, toxic gases, or custom utilities and should be practical in a clinical environment. In vivo animal testing of this laser confirms that it provides greater ablating precision than does the Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 micron.

  15. [Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Preliminary communication].

    PubMed

    Garnica, E

    1989-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has been successfully used in the treatment of urinary stones. Since 1985, it has also been applied in the management of gallbladder and biliary duct stones. The preliminary experience in Venezuela with the shock wave technology for the treatment of biliary stone disease is presented. The facilities of the Unit for the Treatment of Lithiasis. UNILIT of Venezuela, in Caracas were used. This unit is equipped with a Siemens Lithostar, that operates with an electromagnetic shock wave generator guided by a very accurate computerized biplane fluoroscopic system. Symptomatic gallstones with functioning gallbladder and radiolucid stones smaller than 3 cm, were the most important inclusion criteria. For duct stones, all cases that could not be managed by endoscopy were included. Fifteen cases have been treated from April 1988. Ten with gallstones and 5 with biliary duct stones. Success rate for gallstones, clarifications of gallbladder within a 12 month follow-up, was achieved in 40%. In the cases of biliary duct lithiasis, the aim was to reduce the stone to smaller fragments that could pass spontaneously or be retrieved by endoscopic maneuvers. In all the five cases treated, the stones could be crushed into small fragments and in four, they were easily withdrawn by endoscopic ballooning. Preliminary results and published data suggest that shockwave lithotripsy is a valuable method of treatment for selected cases of gallbladder stones and it is specially useful in the management of biliary duct stones where the endoscopic maneuvers have failed.

  16. [Shockwave lithotripsy in gallbladder and bile duct calculi: indications and results].

    PubMed

    Paumgartner, G

    1990-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy combined with adjuvant litholytic therapy (ursodeoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) is a relatively safe and effective noninvasive therapy for selected patients with symptomatic radiolucent gallbladder stones. The best results (80% stone-free patients within 1 year) are obtained with radiolucent solitary stones with a diameter of less than 20 mm. Shock-wave lithotripsy achieves rapid clearance of stones in about 80% of patients with bile duct calculi in whom endoscopic procedures fail.

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in cholelithiasis].

    PubMed

    POtashov, L V; Gadzhiev, Sh M

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe their experiences with using stroke-wave lithotripsy in 102 patients with cholelithiasis. Positive results were obtained in 68% of the patients. Indications to lithotripsy are formulated. A description of specific features of the method is given.

  18. [Shockwave lithotripsy in sialolithiasis patients].

    PubMed

    Abdusalamov, M R; Afanas'ev, V V; Gamataev, I I

    2014-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy was performed by various appliances in sialolithiasis patients. The best results were obtained by means of miniature appliances. Lithotripsy proved to be useful safe alternative for sialolithiasis treatment.

  19. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of common bile duct calculi].

    PubMed

    Amstrup, J H; Eldrup, J; Wille-Jørgensen, P A

    1995-04-10

    Fifteen patients with stones in the common bile duct, in whom treatment with endoscopic papillotomy and stone-extraction had been unsuccessful were treated with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Nine patients were stone-free after one or two sessions, and two patients after further endoscopic treatment. One patient achieved partial clearance and palliation. One patient had a choledochoduodenostomy performed due to ineffectiveness of the shockwave lithotripsy. Two patients, who were thought to have a stone, turned out to have neoplasma in the common bile duct. Complications were frequent but temporary and needed no treatment. We conclude that extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a valuable and safe alternative in those cases where conventional endoscopic treatment has failed, and should be considered before operation, especially to old for high-risk patients.

  20. Low cost and compact nonlinear (SHG/TPE) laser scanning endoscope for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayun; Lim, Ken Choong; Li, Hao; Seck, Hon Luen; Yu, Xia; Kok, Shaw Wei; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPE) and second harmonic generation (SHG) can been used to extract biological information from tissues at the molecular level, which is blind to traditional microscopes. Through these two image contrast mechanisms, a nonlinear laser scanning endoscope (NLSE) is able to image tissue cells and the extra cellular matrix (ECM) through a special fiber and miniaturized scanner without the requirement of poisonous chemical staining. Therefore, NLSE reserves high potential for in-vivo pathological study and disease diagnosis. However, the high cost and bulky size of a NLSE system has become one of the major issues preventing this technology from practical clinical operation. In this paper, we report a fiber laser based multi-modality NLSE system with compact size and low cost, ideal for in-vivo applications in clinical environments. The demonstration of the developed NLSE nonlinear imaging capability on different bio-structures in liver, retina and skin are also presented.

  1. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  2. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  4. [Use of a flexible laser-beam (Yag) for endoscopic treatment of some tracheobronchial lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toty, L; Personne, C; Hertzog, P; Colchen, A; Lotteau, J; Romanelli, J; Audebaud, G; Vourc'h, G; Guillet, H; Miro, L

    1979-01-01

    After the use for several years of an endoscope which enables electro-coagulation in the treatment of some tracheo-bronchial lesions, the limitations and accidents of this method were compared with clinical results and experimental research. Results seem to indicate that the flexible laser beam can considerably improve therapeutic possibilities. This beam, conducted by a flexible fiber, could easily be used by medico-surgical teams who already possess the suitable endoscopic material, or material that could readily be adapted to this method.

  5. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  6. [Role of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of common bile duct and intrahepatic calculi].

    PubMed

    Dagenais, M; Lapointe, R; Déry, R; Gianfelice, D; Roy, A; Gagnon, J

    1995-01-01

    The management of intrahepatic and common bile duct stones has been modified by the advent of endoscopic sphincterotomy and percutaneous extraction through a T-tube tract or transhepatic access. Occasionally, nonoperative extraction is incomplete. The use of extracorporeal lithotripsy is reviewed in this setting. From May 1990 to February 1994, 18 patients (age 68.4 +/- 4.6 years) were treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic sphincterotomy and retrograde extraction or percutaneous approach. 72% of patients had previously undergone a cholecystectomy and 44% exploration of the common duct. Patients were submitted to 1.56 +/- 0.17 session of lithotripsy (5.546 +/- 701 shockwaves). Hospital stay was 19.5 +/- 3.3 days. After the lithotripsy, 1.17 +/- 0.19 endoscopic or percutaneous procedures per patient were necessary to clear the biliary tract. Seventy-eight percent of patients became stone-free. The five failures were treated by endobiliary prosthesis (n = 4) or cholecystectomy and bile duct exploration (n = 1). Lithotripsy in association with the usual therapeutic modalities contributes to clearing the bile duct from stones and avoids surgery in the majority of patients. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary in order to obtain those results.

  7. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculo-cysternostomy using a 2.0 micron fiber guided cw laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin M.; Teichmann, Heinrich O.; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. In occlusive hydrocephalus caused by aquaeductal stenosis 3rd ventriculostomy is the primary choice of the operative procedures. Although Nd:YAG and diode lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 micron (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until May 2005 22 endoscopic procedures in 20 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany) and a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 micron core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope's working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of

  8. Sonographically-guided extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, F; Gurakuqi, G C; Pristautz, H; Trauner, M; Schnedl, W

    1996-03-01

    Over a 2 year period, 10 patients with pancreatic stones due to alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis (proven by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography) underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Prior to shockwave therapy, all patients underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Targeting of shockwave lithotripsy was exclusively performed under sonographic control. All patients were treated with a second generation electrohydraulic spark gap lithotriptor and fragmentation of concrements could be achieved in all cases. Complete duct clearance was confirmed in seven patients by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography in one session, with endoscopic fragment extraction by basket and/or balloon catheter. In three patients, balloon dilation of concomitant strictures located in the head of the pancreas was performed prior to fragment extraction. All stone-free patients showed no further symptoms over the follow-up period of 12 months. Three patients in whom complete extraction of fragments was not successful experienced minor symptoms over the 12 month follow-up period.

  9. Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Burhenne, H J

    1990-01-01

    Biliary extracorporeal lithotripsy has been considered one of the alternatives to surgery for the treatment of gallstones in the bile ducts and in the gallbladder. Although this technique can fragment almost all gallstones, the clinical effectiveness of this new treatment modality must be measured by successful elimination of all fragments. Some physical principles, stone targeting, patient protocol, complications, and clinical results are presented.

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic management of intrahepatic stones in patients with altered biliary anatomy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bathini, Rajesh; Sharma, Atul; Maydeo, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Incidence of primary intrahepatic stones (IHS) in India is very less as compared to the Far East. However patients with altered biliary anatomy are prone for IHS formation secondary to anastomotic stricture formation. Indian data on percutaneous endoscopic management of IHS is scare. Five patients with IHS were managed percutaneously. All patients had undergone Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy and were not suitable for direct endoscopic intervention. All patients underwent percutaneous biliary drainage followed by cholangioscopy-guided laser lithotripsy. Crushed stones were pushed across the anastomotic site using basket/balloon and ductal clearance was achieved. Good stone pulverization could be achieved in five patients (100 %). Complete ductal clearance could be achieved in all patients (100 %). Cholangioscopy-guided treatment of IHS can be valuable alternative to surgery in select group of patients especially those having dilated biliary tree with absence of intrahepatic strictures. However long-term follow up studies are required to see for recurrence of stone formation.

  11. Combined endoscopic laser therapy and brachytherapy for palliation of oesophageal carcinoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, P; Whitton, V; Moghissi, K

    1992-01-01

    Palliative treatment for oesophageal malignancy aims to maximise symptom relief with minimal disturbance to the patient. Twenty one patients with oesophageal carcinoma were studied prospectively to assess the combined efficacy of laser and brachytherapy in the palliation of oesophageal carcinoma, 20 were unsuitable for resectional surgery because of tumour extent and one patient underwent the treatment protocol after myocardial infarction, for symptom relief before resection. Two patients died at hospital and the remaining 19 survived from 9 to 455 days (mean 140 days). All patients tolerated the procedure well and improvement in swallowing was noted in 19 who survived the procedure--an improvement that was maintained until their death. However, five patients required oesophageal dilatation after the initial treatment. Results were not affected by the histology of the tumour. In summary, combined endoscopic laser and brachytherapy is effective palliation for oesophageal carcinoma and may be particularly appropriate in those patients with cervical and upper thoracic tumours in whom intubation may be unsatisfactory. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374728

  12. Endoscopic therapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic therapy is recommended as the first-line therapy for painful chronic pancreatitis with an obstacle on the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The clinical response should be evaluated at 6 to 8 weeks. Calcified stones that obstruct the MPD are first treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy; dominant MPD strictures are optimally treated with a single, large, plastic stent that should be exchanged within 1 year even in asymptomatic patients. Pancreatic pseudocysts for which therapy is indicated and are within endoscopic reach should be treated by endoscopy.

  13. Clinical results of piezoelectric gallstone lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Deziel, D J; Jensen, D M; Faibisoff, J H; Silver, A; Silver, B; Sabesin, S M

    1992-04-01

    The safety and efficacy of piezoelectric extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of symptomatic gallbladder stones were evaluated in 53 consecutively treated patients. All treatments were performed as outpatients without anesthesia; over 95 per cent of 109 treatments were performed without analgesia or sedation. Ursodeoxycholic acid was administered post-treatment. Seventy per cent of patients had multiple sessions. Cumulative stone-free rates of 38 per cent at 6 months, 65 per cent at 12 months, and 75 per cent at 15 months were achieved. There was no difference in eventual stone clearance between patients with single stones less than 20 mm diameter, single stones greater than or equal to 20 mm diameter, or multiple (two or three) stones, although patients with single smaller stones required significantly fewer total shocks to become stone-free (P = .02). Stone clearance correlated with estimated stone volume. Biliary pain occurred in 62 per cent of patients after treatment but ceased in stone-free patients. Biliary complications of pancreatitis (7.5%) and choledocholithiasis (3.8%) were successfully treated by endoscopic papillotomy. Nonbiliary complications were virtually nonexistent. Three patients (5.7%) had elective cholecystectomy. Results indicate that piezoelectric lithotripsy is a safe, minimally painful treatment that, in conjunction with oral bile acids, can produce stone-free rates of 75 to 100 per cent in selected patients.

  14. Mobile extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, V; Bailey, M J

    1991-01-01

    During the last 18 months, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been provided at Epsom District Hospital using a mobile unit containing a Dornier HM4 lithotriptor. Patients with upper ureteric and renal stones were selected for treatment, which was performed without anaesthesia or sedation as a day-case procedure; 83 patients were treated, 5 of them with bilateral stones. Seventy patients required 1 treatment session, 17 required 2 and 1 patient required 3. There were no serious complications but 3 patients needed ureteroscopy to remove obstructing stones. The overall success rate was 86%. The cost to treat each NHS patient was 253 pounds. Mobile lithotripsy as a day-case procedure is a safe and cost-effective means of treating urolithiasis and can be performed in a District General Hospital.

  15. Safety and feasibility of day case ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy (URSL) in patients with a solitary kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anngona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of nephrolithiasis in patients with a solitary kidney poses a treatment challenge. The study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of ureteroscopy and laser stone fragmentation (URSL) for renal stones in these patients treated in our university teaching hospital. Material and methods Between July 2012 and December 2014, seventeen cases of URSL for stones in a solitary kidney were reviewed. Patient demographics, stone dimensions, perioperative and post-operative outcomes were recorded in a prospectively maintained database. Serum creatinine levels pre-procedure and at follow-up were also compared. Results Seventeen cases of URSL were conducted with a mean age of 52.9 ±19.9 years. 8 of the 17 (47%) patients had stones in multiple locations and 13 (76%) were in the lower pole. The mean ± SD stone size and BMI were 13.0 ±8.9 mm and 31.6 ±5.8 kg/m2, respectively. The stone free rate (SFR) was 82.5%. Fourteen (82.5%) patients were discharged the same day and 16 cases (94%) were discharged within 24 hours. For patients with deranged pre-operative serum creatinine, the mean serum creatinine level improved from 131.2 ±68.3 µmol/L pre-URSL to 106.5 ±36.7 µmol/L at follow-up. There was one Clavien grade II complication with a patient requiring additional antibiotics for post-operative urinary tract infection. There were no other major or minor complications. Conclusions Day case ureteroscopy for stone disease in a solitary kidney is safe and feasible with a low complication rate and an overall improvement in renal function. PMID:27123333

  16. Blue Laser Imaging-Bright Improves Endoscopic Recognition of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomie, Akira; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kitae, Hiroaki; Majima, Atsushi; Horii, Yusuke; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Onozawa, Yuriko; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kimura-Tsuchiya, Reiko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endoscopic recognition of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) using four different methods (Olympus white light imaging (O-WLI), Fujifilm white light imaging (F-WLI), narrow band imaging (NBI), and blue laser imaging- (BLI-) bright). Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 superficial ESCCs that had been examined using the four different methods. Subjective evaluation was provided by three endoscopists as a ranking score (RS) of each image based on the ease of detection of the cancerous area. For the objective evaluation we calculated the color difference scores (CDS) between the cancerous and noncancerous areas with each of the four methods. Results. There was no difference between the mean RS of O-WLI and F-WLI. The mean RS of NBI was significantly higher than that of O-WLI and that of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of F-WLI. Moreover, the mean RS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of NBI. Furthermore, in the objective evaluation, the mean CDS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of O-WLI, F-WLI, and NBI. Conclusion. The recognition of superficial ESCC using BLI-bright was more efficacious than the other methods tested both subjectively and objectively. PMID:27738428

  17. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculocysternostomy using a recently developed 2.0-micron fiber-guided high-power diode-pumped solid state laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. Although Nd:YAG- and diode-lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 μm (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until June 2004 fourteen endoscopic procedures in 12 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany; a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 μm core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope"s working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of a shunt device could be avoided. The authors conclude that the use of the new RevolixTM laser enables safe and effective procedures

  18. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy can target neoplasia not detected by conventional endoscopic measures in long segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Arvind J.; George, Benley J.; Berkowitz, Joshua; Sejpal, Divyesh V.; McKinley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Methods and study aims: The incidence of esophageal cancer is rising despite increased surveillance efforts. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) is a new endoscopic imaging tool that can allow for targeted biopsy of neoplasia in Barrett’s esophagus. We report a series of 6 patients with long-segment Barrett’s esophagus ( > 3 cm), who underwent a session of endoscopy with volumetric laser endomicroscopy, after a separate prior session of standard high-definition endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI) and random biopsies that did not reveal neoplasia. In all six patients, the first endoscopy was the index endoscopy diagnosing the Barrett’s esophagus. All VLE exams were performed within 6 months of the previous endoscopy. In five patients, VLE-targeted biopsy resulted in upstaged disease/diagnosed dysplasia that then qualified the patient for endoscopic ablation therapy. In one patient, VLE localized a focus of intramucosal cancer that allowed for curative endoscopic mucosal resection. This case series shows that endoscopy with VLE can target neoplasia that cannot be localized by high-definition endoscopy with NBI and random biopsies. PMID:27004250

  19. Compact, transmissive two-dimensional spatial disperser design with application in simultaneous endoscopic imaging and laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Adam, Jost; Gerken, Martina; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-20

    Minimally invasive surgery procedures benefit from a reduced size of endoscopic devices. A prospective path to implement miniaturized endoscopy is single optical-fiber-based spectrally encoded imaging. While simultaneous spectrally encoded inertial-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery have been successfully demonstrated in a large table setup, a highly miniaturized optical design would promote the development of multipurpose endoscope heads. This paper presents a highly scalable, entirely transmissive axial design for a spectral 2D spatial disperser. The proposed design employs a grating prism and a virtual imaged phased array (VIPA). Based on semi-analytical device modeling, we performed a systematic parameter analysis to assess the spectral disperser's manufacturability and to obtain an optimum application-specific design. We found that, in particular, a low grating period combined with a high optical input bandwidth and low VIPA tilt showed favorable results in terms of a high spatial resolution, a small device diameter, and a large field of view. Our calculations reveal that a reasonable imaging performance can be achieved with system diameters of below 5 mm, which renders the proposed 2D spatial disperser design highly suitable for use in future endoscope heads that combine mechanical-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery. PMID:24514122

  20. Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy of an Impacted Enterolith Causing Acute Afferent Loop Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Sin; Hwang, Soon Oh; Lee, Sunhyo; Jung, Yunho; Chung, Il-Kwun; Park, Sang-Heum; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Afferent loop syndrome caused by an impacted enterolith is very rare, and endoscopic removal of the enterolith may be difficult if a stricture is present or the normal anatomy has been altered. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy is commonly used for endoscopic fragmentation of biliary and pancreatic duct stones. A 64-year-old man who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy and gastrojejunostomy presented with acute, severe abdominal pain for a duration of 2 hours. Initially, he was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis because of an elevated amylase level and pain, but was finally diagnosed with acute afferent loop syndrome when an impacted enterolith was identified by computed tomography. We successfully removed the enterolith using direct electrohydraulic lithotripsy conducted using a transparent cap-fitted endoscope without complications. We found that this procedure was therapeutically beneficial. PMID:25133128

  1. Voice quality after endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: objective measurements emphasizing the Voice Handicap Index.

    PubMed

    Núñez Batalla, Faustino; Caminero Cueva, Maria Jesús; Señaris González, Blanca; Llorente Pendás, José Luis; Gorriz Gil, Carmen; López Llames, Aurora; Alonso Pantiga, Ramón; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome and self-evaluation of the voice of patients with T1 glottic carcinoma treated with endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy. We performed an objective voice evaluation, as well as a physical, emotional and functional well being assessment of 19 patients treated with laser surgery and 18 patients treated with radiotherapy. Voice quality is affected both by surgery and radiotherapy. Voice parameters only show differences in the maximum phonation time between both treatments. Results in the Voice Handicap Index show that radiotherapy has less effect on patient voice quality perception. There is a reduced impact on the patient's perception of voice quality after radiotherapy, despite there being no significant differences in vocal quality between radiotherapy and laser cordectomy.

  2. Voice quality after endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: objective measurements emphasizing the Voice Handicap Index

    PubMed Central

    Caminero Cueva, Maria Jesús; Señaris González, Blanca; Llorente Pendás, José Luis; Gorriz Gil, Carmen; López Llames, Aurora; Alonso Pantiga, Ramón; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome and self-evaluation of the voice of patients with T1 glottic carcinoma treated with endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy. We performed an objective voice evaluation, as well as a physical, emotional and functional well being assessment of 19 patients treated with laser surgery and 18 patients treated with radiotherapy. Voice quality is affected both by surgery and radiotherapy. Voice parameters only show differences in the maximum phonation time between both treatments. Results in the Voice Handicap Index show that radiotherapy has less effect on patient voice quality perception. There is a reduced impact on the patient’s perception of voice quality after radiotherapy, despite there being no significant differences in vocal quality between radiotherapy and laser cordectomy. PMID:17999074

  3. [Intraoperative assessment by laser-Doppler skin blood flowmetry of the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy].

    PubMed

    Sano, T; Fukushige, T; Miyagawa, Y; Yamada, S; Kano, T

    1999-05-01

    We have investigated whether laser-Doppler (L-D) skin blood flowmetry on the finger could be useful for an intraoperative assessment of the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) under general anesthesia. Subjects were 5 young adults receiving ETS for palmar hyperhidrosis. ETS was performed with the patients in the semi-sitting position under one lung ventilation. A pair of LDF probes were placed on the palmar side of the both second fingers. Palmar hyperhidrosis disappeared after ETS in all cases, but compensatory hyperhidrosis developed in the back of the body and the thigh. After completion of ETS on one side, the L-D skin blood flow increased to 267.6 +/- 211.1% on the side of ETS, and it increased in 2 other cases and decreased on the contrary in 3 cases on the other side. After ETS on both sides the L-D skin blood flow increased to 265.0 +/- 185.9% on the side of initial ETS and to 211.4 +/- 172.8% on the side of subsequent ETS. The initial EST induced reflex vasoconstriction on the finger of both sides and also on the toe. Spontaneous fluctuation and reflex vasoconstriction of the skin blood flow were still observed, although the periodicity of spontaneous fluctuation between the right and the left finger was lost in some of the cases. An increase in L-D skin blood flow on the side of ongoing ETS is useful for intraoperative assessment of ETS. PMID:10380502

  4. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in gallstone perforation].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C

    1992-04-01

    A 78-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis, arteriosclerosis and cardiac arrhythmias (Lown grade IVb) was admitted to hospital because of haematemesis. Gastroscopy revealed a narrow, deformed duodenal bulb with a bleeding ulcer crater on the posterior wall and a mucosal protrusion 1 cm in diameter. In the course of the illness the duodenal bulb obstruction increased further and there was recurrent vomiting. Repeat gastroscopy 7 days later showed a gallstone, about 4 cm in diameter, which had perforated into the duodenal bulb and could not be removed endoscopically. Because of the serious nature of the other diseases an operation was not undertaken, but an ultrasound-guided extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was performed. In three sessions this succeeded without complication to break up the stone, the larger fragments of which were then removed endoscopically while the small ones passed through the gut spontaneously. Subsequent ultrasonography demonstrated a shrunk, stone-free gallbladder with a cholecystoduodenal fistula. Afterwards the patient was again able to take food by mouth without any problems.

  5. Feasibility of endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality in the evaluation of auditory disorder: study in bone-tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Lee, Sangyeob; Park, Jihoon; Ha, Myungjin; Radfar, Edalat; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of an endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality (ELSIM) in the measurement of perfusion of flowing fluid in optical bone tissue phantom(OBTP). Many studies suggested that the change of cochlear blood flow was correlated with auditory disorder. Cochlear microcirculation occurs under the 200μm thickness bone which is the part of the internal structure of the temporal bone. Concern has been raised regarding of getting correct optical signal from hard tissue. In order to determine the possibility of the measurement of cochlear blood flow under bone tissue using the ELSIM, optical tissue phantom (OTP) mimicking optical properties of temporal bone was applied.

  6. [Use of a laser beam (YAG) with a flexible fiber for endoscopic treatment of some broncho-tracheal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toty, L; Personne, C L; Hertzog, P; Colchen, A; Lotteau, J; Romanelli, J; Guillet, R; Miro, L; Audebaud, G; Vourc'h, G

    1979-01-01

    For several years we employed an endoscope permitting electro-coagulation in the treatment of some broncho-tracheal lesions and were able to observe the limits and accidents involved in this method. When compared with clinical results (work of Freche in ORL, laser CO2) and after experimental research, the use of a flexible laser beam (YAG) seems to bring about a noteworthy increase in therapeutic possibilities. This flexible fiber beam could easily be used by some medico-surgical teams who already possess appropriate of easily adaptable endoscopic equipment. Clinical studies are in progress.

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic treatment of cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, D P; Rubio, P A; Gleeson, M J

    1990-01-01

    Surgical management of gallstones was first performed successfully in 1878. Over the past decade, several new treatment alternatives have evolved that challenge the supremacy of traditional surgical cholecystectomy. Two endoscopic alternatives, e.g., percutaneous cholecystolithotomy (PCCL) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) are the latest additions to the growing armamentarium. Our initial experience with PCCL and LC as compared with our traditional cholecystectomy experience shows a 57% reduction in hospital days, a 58% reduction in postoperative analgesic dose, and 50% or more reduction in disabling convalescence in favor of the endoscopic alternatives. A review of the efficacy and morbidity of traditional surgery, peroral drug chemolysis (PDC), shockwave lithotripsy plus PDC, and percutaneous transhepatic lavage with methyl terbutyl ether suggests that the endoscopic alternatives are less morbid than traditional surgery and more efficacious and perhaps less morbid than other non-invasive or minimally invasive alternatives. Both original data and a literature review are presented.

  8. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  9. Gallstone lithotripsy: the Rotterdam experience.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, P W; van der Hul, R L; den Toom, R; Nijs, H G; Terpstra, O T; Bruining, H A

    1994-06-01

    In the period between September 1988 and September 1992, 133 patients (34 males and 99 females; mean age 49 years [range 24-81]) underwent 299 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy sessions with adjuvant oral bile acid therapy. The mean number of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy sessions was 2.5 (1-7) and the mean number of shock waves 2,817 (75-4000), while the mean duration per session was 62 minutes (35-210). Ninety-eight patients (73.7%) required intravenous analog-sedation. At last follow-up (mean: 17.7 months [2-46]), 37 patients (27.8%) were free of stones and 30 (22.6%) had undergone cholecystectomy. At 1 year after the first session of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, 51.0% of the patients with a solitary stone and 8.3% of the patients with 2-10 stones were free of concrements (p < 0.0001). Fourteen per cent [6/43] of the patients developed recurrent stones. Major complications comprised pancreatitis (n = 4; 3.0%) and acute cholecystitis (n = 1; 0.8%). Our results reconfirm that extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is safe and moderately effective in selected patients. Because of the wide acceptance of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy should be restricted to patients at increased surgical risk and patients who refuse surgery. In view of the poor results in multiple stones, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy should be performed only on solitary stones.

  10. Use of endoscopic distal attachment cap to enhance image stabilization in probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in colorectal lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Ussui, Vivian; Xu, Can; Crook, Julia E.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Hardee, Joy; Staggs, Estela G.; Shahid, Muhammad W.; Wallace, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal cancer can be prevented through the use of colonoscopy with polypectomy. Most colon polyps are benign or low grade adenomas. However, currently all lesions need histopathologic analysis, which increases diagnostic costs and delays the final diagnosis. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a new technology that enables real-time endomicroscopy. However, there are challenges to maintaining a stable image with currently available systems. We conducted a small study to obtain a preliminary assessment of whether the use of an endoscopic distal attachment cap may enhance image quality of CLE in comparison with images obtained with free-hand acquisition. Patients and methods: Forty outpatients underwent colonoscopy for evaluation of colon polyps in a single academic medical center. Patients were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 study arms on the basis of whether an endoscopic distal attachment cap was used (n = 21, Cap Used) or not used (n = 19, No Cap) in the procedure. The quality of confocal images and probe stabilization was summarized. Results: A total of 81 polyps were identified. The proportion of polyps with images of high quality was 74 % (28/38) in the Cap Used group and 79 % (30/38) in the No Cap arm. Image stability was also similar with and without a cap. Diagnostic accuracy was estimated to be slightly higher in the Cap Used group for probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE; 78 % vs 70 %). This was also true for white-light and narrow-band imaging. Conclusions: This preliminary study did not yield any evidence to support that the use of an endoscopic distal attachment cap improves the quality of images obtained during CLE. PMID:26528511

  11. Introduction of an ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope for color imaging and integrated PDD and future PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Kenerson, Heidi L.; Lee, Cameron M.; Melville, C. David; Johnston, Richard S.; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2009-06-01

    The scanning fiber endoscope (SFE), an ultrathin laser scanning endoscope capable of producing 500-line color images at 30-Hz frame rate, has been developed at the University of Washington. The SFE probe is a 1-mm diameter by 9-mm long rigid scanner at the tip of a highly flexible and robust tether (minimum bend radius < 8- mm), comprised of helically wound optical fibers and electrical wires within a protective sheath. The unique physical characteristics of this system have allowed the camera to navigate narrow passages where other technologies have suffered from reduced image quality and fragility, such as imaging the peripheral airways and bile duct. The scanning engine of the SFE allows for laser-based imaging and potential applications of pixel-accurate therapy in remote regions of the body. In this study, the standard SFE operation has been tailored to create widefield fluorescence images for photodynamic detection. A kidney with renal cell carcinoma was excised from an Eker rat after post-mortem in situ perfusion with 0.4 mM hypericin. The 442-nm blue and 532-nm green laser illumination sources were used for both standard reflectance imaging and fluorescence excitation, while the red 635- nm illumination was disabled. Red detection signal gain was increased to amplify the red fluorescence signal from the photomultiplier tube and within the computer image display. Results show green and blue reflectance images overlaid with red fluorescence signal in tumor regions of the kidney. These imaging capabilities portend future adoption of laser-based SFE imaging for real-time PDD.

  12. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal.

  13. In vivo comparison of THC:YAG laser welding to sutured closure of biliary tissue.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Popp, H W; Treat, M R; Bass, L S; Popilskis, S

    1991-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic approaches to cholelithiasis are an alternative to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy which offer advantages of fewer restrictions on stone size and type as well as avoidance of fragmented stone passage complications. Endoscopic techniques would be facilitated by methods of welding gallbladder tissues. The technical constraints imposed by the endoscopic approach favor nonsuture methods of fusing gallbladder tissues. To evaluate a laser method for fusing biliary tissue, we have compared the healing response of laser-welded versus polyglycolic acid suture-closed incisions in canine gallbladder tissue in vivo. The laser used was a thulium-holmium-chromium:YAG laser producing 200-microsecond, 300-millijoule pulses at 2.15 microns. Serial sacrifice of dogs that underwent laser or suture closure of incisions made in the fundus of the gallbladder revealed that all repairs healed without evidence of leakage or infection. Laser-welded cholecystotomy sites had complete fibrous healing of the wound by two weeks postoperatively and reepithelialization by three weeks after operation. Suture-closed wounds were still without complete epithelization four weeks after the procedure. Laser welding may be a useful technique in endoscopic biliary surgery.

  14. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  15. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  16. Non-surgical management of bile duct stones refractory to routine endoscopic measures.

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T

    1992-11-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy and percutaneous approaches to the biliary tract have revolutionized the treatment of bile duct stones. Both the endoscopic and transhepatic approaches are less invasive than open surgery. This is an advantage for the mostly elderly and frail patients with common bile duct stones. Other patients with intrahepatic stones, e.g. young patients with oriental lithiasis, may also profit from the non-surgical approach. In this latter group it is often difficult for the surgeon to obtain access to the stone-bearing bile ducts. Due to the anatomical situation, size or impaction of stones the non-surgical approach, including mechanical disintegration, may primarily fail. Several techniques such as intracorporeal lithotripsy using electrohydraulic probes or laser light, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or direct contact dissolution are now available and often allow complete clearance of the bile ducts. If a kidney lithotripter with radiographic devices is available, it should be used after an attempt at mechanical lithotripsy has failed (Figure 1). According to the literature, experience with this method is greater than with any other 'third-step approach'. The procedure is simple, relatively safe and successful in approximately 80% of patients. However, in at least one third of patients, several sessions have to be performed and further endoscopy is frequently required for extraction of fragments. Intracorporeal techniques may become the procedure of choice in the future, at least in patients with common bile duct stones. At the moment, however, the different devices are still not fully developed and too susceptible to damage. A further major drawback, especially with high-energy electrohydraulic intracorporeal lithotripsy, is the danger of bile duct injury or even perforation, so that most procedures must be performed under optical control. The use of contact dissolution cannot generally be recommended. Treatment with mono-octanoin or modified

  17. Our experience with transcanalicular laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (TCLADCR) in patients of chronic dacryocystitis with deviated nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchi; Nagpal, Smriti; Kumar, Sushil; Kamal, Saurabh; Dangda, Sonal; Bodh, Sonam Angmo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to study the operative difficulties and success rate of transcanalicular laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy in patients of chronic dacryocystitis with deviated nasal septum (DNS). A prospective interventional clinical study of 36 consecutive patients suffering from chronic dacryocystitis with nasolacrimal duct obstruction with DNS undergoing primary TCLADCR from March to June 2011 was carried out. Diode laser was used to create a 16-mm(2) ostium which was enlarged to 64 mm(2) using Blakesley's forceps. Success was defined as anatomical patency and absence of symptoms at 12 months of follow-up. Out of the 36 patients, 25 were females with ages 20-72 years, and 19 were left sided. There were 12 high, 12 mid and 12 basal DNS towards the side of surgery, mild to moderate in severity. Intraoperatively there was difficulty in visualising the aiming beam in the nose, tedious manipulation of endoscope and excessive bleeding in 3 patients. Increased bleeding and failures were significantly higher in high DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 0.0045). The procedure was successful in 94.4 % cases with average ostium size of 21.94 mm(2) at 12 months and no statistically significant difference in success rates between mild and moderate DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 1.000). Also there was no difference in the complication rate between mild and moderate DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 0.0841). TCLADCR is an effective procedure in patients with mild to moderate mid and basal DNS and obviates the need for multiple procedures and a cutaneous scar.

  18. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy 5 years on].

    PubMed

    Lopatkin, N A; Dzeranov, N K; Golovanov, S A

    1994-01-01

    Investigations initiated in the Research Urological Institute headed by professor N. A. Lopatkin in 1984 on development of an original Russian lithotriptor URAT-II were successfully finished in 1987. Since that time the design has been advanced. The investigators plan to introduce a novel polyfunctional lithotriptor ARKO-LIT with double guidance system and several impulse heads. The unit is to have various forms of impulse generation and diverse physical parameters. When equipped with water cushion, the new lithotriptor will enable the physician to do endoscopic, x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic manipulations. It is emphasized that the main thing in prevention of lithotripsy complications is proper management of the apparatuses which implies sufficient knowledge of the impulse physics and impulse interaction with biologically active tissues. As for cell impairment, lipid peroxidation evaluation suggests that under adequate selection and performance of the procedure as well as proper preoperative preparation, changes in cell membranes are moderate and disappear within 7 posttreatment days. In case of underestimation of the patient's condition, renal function, in violation of the stone destruction technique the above changes may advance to serious and entail severe complications.

  19. [The value of shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Beglinger, C

    1994-03-26

    The standard treatment for symptomatic cholecystolithiasis remains surgery, the present method of choice being laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Noninvasive treatment options are available, but should be restricted to selected cases. Extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is an alternative to noninvasive treatment, provided the patients are carefully selected. The main disadvantages include prolonged administration of gall salts and the problem of stone recurrence.

  20. Variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemberg, Vladimir G.; Black, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Conventional side-firing fiber technology exhibits performance limitations and utilizes expensive single-use only devices which often require multiple fibers for laser prostatectomy. Another limitation of existing side-firing fiber technology is its inability to focus the beam to create incisions for urologic applications such as laser TURP (transurethral resectional prostatectomy), tumor necrosis, lithotripsy, genital warts, and photodynamic therapy. Newly introduced variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device utilizes either one or two lenses and a mirror, onto a single cylinder of molded glass. The laser beam exits the optical fiber, passes through the lens, strikes the cylindrical mirror, and traverses the cylindrical surface. Depending on the design, the laser beam is reflected at the angles ranging from 30 degrees to 120 degrees out of the cylindrical lens. A second lens can be formed onto the side of the cylindrical surface at the beam's exit point. Another advantage of the innovative side-firing device is its capability to provide versatile matching to multiple laser wavelengths from 360 nm to 2.5 microns, and achieve power densities great enough to perform vaporization, incision and coagulation of tissue. Precise focusing of the laser beam results in reduced tissue necrosis of surrounding the treatment area as well as in decreased laser radiation back-scattering. Surgeons can very the focus by adjusting the distance from the tip to the target area. The variable focus side-firing device provides a focused beam at the range of 1.0 to 1.5 mm, for incision. Outside this range, it produces a defocused beam for coagulation.

  1. Functional results of endoscopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadick, Haneen; Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Bergler, Wolfgang; Maurer, Joachim; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Functional results following lasersurgery of minor laryngeal carcinomas were very encouraging. The indication for lasersurgical intervention was then extended to larger carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx. The purpose of this study was to assess vocal function and swallowing ability after endoscopic lasersurgery and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. From January 1994 to December 1996, 72 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx were examined prospectively. The patients underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of laryngopharyngectomy. The voice quality was evaluated pre- and postoperatively by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The swallowing ability was judged according to individual scores. The necessity of tracheostomy and nasogastric tube were registered and the duration of hospitalization was documented. The results showed that laryngeal phonation and swallowing ability were significantly better 12 months after lasersurgery compared to the preoperative findings whereas the recurrence rate was similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy. Lasersurgery as an alternative surgical procedure to laryngectomy enables patients to retain a sufficient voice function and swallowing ability.

  2. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens.

  3. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Holsinger, F. Christopher; Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC. PMID:26351337

  4. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Ferris, Robert L

    2015-10-10

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC.

  5. Combined laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and endoscopic pyelolithotripsy for staghorn calculi: long-term follow-up results from a case series

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Palleschi, Giovanni; Silvestri, Luigi; Leto, Antonino; Ripoli, Andrea; Fuschi, Andrea; Al Salhi, Yazan; Autieri, Domenico; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Staghorn renal stones are a challenging field in urology. Due to their high recurrence rates, particularly those associated with an infective process, a complete removal is the ultimate goal in their management. We report our experience with a combined approach of laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and endoscopic pyelolithotripsy, the stone clearance rate, and long-term, follow-up outcomes. Methods: From June 2012 to October 2014, nine adult patients with large staghorn renal calculi (mean size, 7.2 cm; range, 6.2–9.0 cm) underwent a combined laparoscopic and endoscopic approach. The technique comprised laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and holmium-YAG laser stone fragmentation with the use of a flexible cystoscope introduced through a 12 mm trocar. Results: The average operative time was 140 min (range, 90–190 min). The mean estimated hemoglobin loss was 0.6 mmol/l (range 0.5–0.7 mmol/l). None of the patients required an open- surgery conversion. The mean hospital stay was 4 days (range, 2–6 days). A computed tomography urogram control at 6 months of follow up did not show any stone recurrence. Conclusions: Laparoscopic pyelolithotomy combined with endoscopic pyelolithotripsy could be a therapeutic option in cases where mini-invasive procedures, that is, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, ureteroscopic lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) have failed. This technique has a high stone-clearance rate (75–100%) comparable with open surgery and PCNL. However, it could be technically demanding and should be performed by skilled laparoscopy surgeons. PMID:26834835

  6. [Endoscopic-radiologic diagnosis and therapy of the bile ducts. Results of endoscopic papillotomy].

    PubMed

    Reisinger, W; Münster, B; Schulz, H J; Otto, R; Seifert, C

    1989-01-01

    Endoscopic-radiologic methods for demonstrating the hepatobiliary and pancreatic ducts are an integrated part of the diagnostic spectrum of gastroenterologic centers. At the Charité since 1975 we have made more than 5,500 endoscopic-retrograde cholangio-pancreaticographies (ERCP's). This method provides immediately or later an adequate therapy as an alternative to the otherwise necessary surgery. The most frequently used and basic method is endoscopic papillotomy (EPT). In most cases it precedes endoscopic removal of concrements, prosthetic drainage of biliary pathways or extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Since 1977 we have carried out 2,050 EPT's at the Charité, more than 60% of these for patients of higher age (above 60). With 98.3% successful interventions complications were seen in only 4.7% of the cases. The influence of close interdisciplinary cooperation of endoscopicists and radiologists on the results of the investigation and the rate of complications is discussed.

  7. Cleaning of endodontic root canal by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG laser beam with fiber optic delivery: scanning electron microscopy, endoscopic and microradiographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berna, Norberto; Melis, Marco; Benvenuti, Alessandro; Tosto, Sebastiano; Pierdominici, Fabrizio

    1997-05-01

    12 teeth have been extracted and treated 'in vitro' by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG pulsed laser with fiber optic delivery to compare the cleaning efficiency of the root canal. The optic fiber was equipped with a water-air coaxial cooling system. The ultrasonic device was equipped with a 3 percent NaCl solution douche system. The samples have been prepared according to the technical specifications of the suppliers of laser and ultrasonics and observed by an endodontic endoscope. Cross sections of the samples have been utilized for microradiographic investigations and scanning electron microscopy observations. Local melting has been observed after laser irradiation.Also, vitrification preferentially occurred in the apical zones. The occurrence of vitrification was found strongly dependent on the translation velocity of the laser beam inside the root canal. The laser beam has shown a cleaning efficiency greater than that obtained by ultrasonic procedure.

  8. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones. Possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Vergunst, H; Terpstra, O T; Brakel, K; Laméris, J S; van Blankenstein, M; Schröder, F H

    1989-11-01

    Recently extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been introduced as a nonoperative treatment for gallstone disease. Except for lung damage, no significant adverse effects of ESWL of gallbladder stones have been observed in animals. In clinical use ESWL of gallbladder stones is now confined to 15% to 30% of symptomatic patients. To achieve complete stone clearance, ESWL of gallbladder stones must be supplemented by an adjuvant therapy. ESWL of bile duct stones is highly effective and can be considered in patients in whom primary endoscopic or surgical stone removal fails. Second generation lithotriptors allow anesthesia-free (outpatient) treatments, but the clinical experience with most of these ESWL devices is still limited. The likelihood of gallbladder stone recurrence is a major disadvantage of ESWL treatment, which raises the issue of cost-effectiveness. ESWL for cholelithiasis is a promising treatment modality with good short-term and unknown long-term results.

  9. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (λ=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (λ=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  10. Endoscopic removal of PMMA in hip revision surgery with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazy, John; Kollmer, Charles; Uppal, Gurvinder S.; Lane, Gregory J.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1991-05-01

    Purpose: to compare CO2 laser to mechanical means of PMMA removal in total hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients requiring hip revision surgery were studied and compared to historical controls. Cement was removed from the femoral canal utilizing a 30 centimeter laparoscope. A CO2 laser waveguide was passed through the laparoscope into the femoral canal and a TV camera was placed over the eye piece to permit visualization of the depths of the femoral canal on a video monitor. The leg was placed in a horizontal position which avoided the pooling of blood or saline in the depths of the femur. Under direct vision the distal plug could be vaporized with a 40 centimeter CO2 laser waveguide. Power settings of 20 to 25 watts and a superpulsed mode were used. A 2 mm suction tube was welded to the outside of the laparoscope permitting aspiration of the products of vaporization. Results: Of 45 hip revisions there were no shaft perforation, fractures or undue loss of bone stock. There was no statistically different stay in hospital time, blood loss or operative time between the CO2 revision group compared to the non-laser revision group, in which cement was removed by mechanical methods. Conclusions: Mechanical methods used in removing bone cement using high speed burrs, reamers, gouges, and osteotomies is technically difficult and fraught with complications including shaft fracture, perforations, and unnecessary loss of bone stock. The authors' experience using the CO2 laser in hip revision surgery has permitted the removal of bone cement. Use of a modified laparoscope has allowed for precise, complete removal of bone cement deep within the femoral shaft without complication or additional operative time. The authors now advocate the use of a CO2 laser with modified laparoscope in hip revision surgery in which bone cement is to be removed from within the femoral shaft.

  11. Diode laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy: a comparison of three different combinations of adjunctive procedures.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Remzi; Meric, Aysenur; Ozsütcü, Mustafa; Yenigun, Alper

    2013-08-01

    Chronic dacryocystitis is a frequently encountered condition which can be corrected by dacryocystorhinostomy. Today, the diode laser is increasingly put to use in such corrective operations. This study aims to answer the questions of which adjunctive procedures and which combinations of such procedures are necessary and effective in securing more successful outcomes in diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy. This prospective randomized study included eighty patients (13 male, 67 female) who underwent dacryocystorhinostomy in our hospital during the 2 year period of January 2009-January 2011. The patients were selected consecutively and were randomly allocated to three groups. Group 1 (30): diode laser + mitomycin C + silicone intubation; Group 2 (27): diode laser + silicone intubation; Group 3 (23): diode laser + mitomycin C. All patients were evaluated postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and on the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th, 18th, and 24th months. The postoperative evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative ostium measurements, recording postoperative complications, and calculating and comparing success rates and operative times. The mean ages of the patients were 63.4 for Group 1, 60.7 for Group 2, and 61.8 for Group 3. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups regarding pre- and postoperative ostium measurements. The success rates were 84.3, 80, and 76.9 % for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Complications noted in Group 1 were restenosis (3), premature silicone tube loss (1), development of granulation tissue (3), synechia (2), infection (2), and hemorrhage (3). Those for Group 2 were restenosis (5), premature tube loss (2), granulation (8), synechia (6), infection (3), and hemorrhage (4). Group 3 had 6 cases with stenosis, 5 with granulation, 3 with infection, 6 with synechia, and 5 with hemorrhage. The operative times of the groups were 25.5, 15.3, and 18.1 min, respectively, for Group 1, 2, and 3. All three groups had statistically

  12. Retrospective measures on applying endoscopic YAG laser to treat alimentary canal diseases from 1983 to 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Zhong; Wu, Ning-Xiao; Gao, Su-ping; Rong, Zeng-Qin

    1996-05-01

    It was in 1983 when we started to apply YAG laser to do experiments on animal and fresh internal organs off the body to confirm its effectiveness. Then we started to use it in clinical practice. Up to October 1995, in the twelve years, we treated 1075 cases, 2574 person times. Seven-hundred-seventy-nine cases of various esophagostenosis. Four-hundred-fifty-six of them were malignant stenosis, 295 anastomostenosis, 15 stenosis after radiotherapeutics, 7 corrosive anastomostenosis, 6 inflammatory anastomostenosis, plus we cured 5 cardia losses of relax, and 241 polyps in the alimentary canal. Among the 2154 polyps cured, 6 were that of esophagus, 6 that of cardia, 25 that of stomach, 10 that of duodenum, 194 that of large intestine. In addition, we treated 15 alimentary canal bleeding and 35 malignant colon and tectum cancers. Our experience in laser operating on the coelom has become richer and richer. The methods we used are being widened. The range of our laser application is being enlarged. We have gained our own experience in preventing complications and keeping the endoscopy from being damaged. The cure rate of the non-malignant had raised up to 98.7%. Cure rate of the malignant had raised up to 91%. The alimentary canal polyps can be cured perfectly. It is hard to tell whether YAG laser or high frequency electroresection has the advantage over the other. Besides, this paper is going to put forward several questions to discuss.

  13. Treatment for intranasal synechiae by CO2 laser under endoscopic visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yunhai; Yin, Shankai

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  14. Comparison of the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Li, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Sun, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Zhong, Chen; Wood, Kristofer; Wei, Hai-Bin; Xia, Shu-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RPLU) and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (UHLL) as two minimally invasive procedures in managing obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The retrospective study included 189 patients who underwent unilateral obstructive upper ureteral stones with concurrent UTI from January 2007 to November 2014 at our institution. Patients received RPLU (81 cases) or UHLL (108 cases). All patients received preoperative anti-infection treatment (indwelling ureteral stent and/or preoperative antibiotics). Collected data, including sex, age, stone size, success rate, operation duration, post-operation hospitalization time, and post-operation complications, were compared. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months after surgeries, and no ureterostenosis occurred. The study included 189 patients, 41 (21.7 %) females and 148 (78.3 %) males with a medium age of 52 years (range 22-81 years). All surgeries were successfully performed without conversion to open surgery. Stone size in the RPLU group was larger than that of the UHLL group (16.1 ± 1.4 vs. 10.4 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.012). Operative duration (P = 0.009) and hospitalization time (P < 0.001) in the UHLL group were significantly shorter than those in the RPLU group, whereas stone clearance rate was significantly higher in the RPLU group (100 vs. 88.9 %, P = 0.002). Of note, postoperative fever was more common in patients treated with UHLL (15 cases) versus RPLU (4 cases) (13.9 vs. 4.9 %, P = 0.043). Moreover, in the UHLL group, three patients without a preoperative indwelling ureteral stent were complicated with sepsis, which was not seen in RPLU group. In our study, the safety and stone clearance rate of RPLU are better than those of UHLL in the treatment of unilateral upper ureteric calculi with concurrent UTI

  15. Comparison of the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Li, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Sun, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Zhong, Chen; Wood, Kristofer; Wei, Hai-Bin; Xia, Shu-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RPLU) and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (UHLL) as two minimally invasive procedures in managing obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The retrospective study included 189 patients who underwent unilateral obstructive upper ureteral stones with concurrent UTI from January 2007 to November 2014 at our institution. Patients received RPLU (81 cases) or UHLL (108 cases). All patients received preoperative anti-infection treatment (indwelling ureteral stent and/or preoperative antibiotics). Collected data, including sex, age, stone size, success rate, operation duration, post-operation hospitalization time, and post-operation complications, were compared. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months after surgeries, and no ureterostenosis occurred. The study included 189 patients, 41 (21.7 %) females and 148 (78.3 %) males with a medium age of 52 years (range 22-81 years). All surgeries were successfully performed without conversion to open surgery. Stone size in the RPLU group was larger than that of the UHLL group (16.1 ± 1.4 vs. 10.4 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.012). Operative duration (P = 0.009) and hospitalization time (P < 0.001) in the UHLL group were significantly shorter than those in the RPLU group, whereas stone clearance rate was significantly higher in the RPLU group (100 vs. 88.9 %, P = 0.002). Of note, postoperative fever was more common in patients treated with UHLL (15 cases) versus RPLU (4 cases) (13.9 vs. 4.9 %, P = 0.043). Moreover, in the UHLL group, three patients without a preoperative indwelling ureteral stent were complicated with sepsis, which was not seen in RPLU group. In our study, the safety and stone clearance rate of RPLU are better than those of UHLL in the treatment of unilateral upper ureteric calculi with concurrent UTI

  16. Percutaneous endoscopic management of intrahepatic stones in patients with altered biliary anatomy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bathini, Rajesh; Sharma, Atul; Maydeo, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Incidence of primary intrahepatic stones (IHS) in India is very less as compared to the Far East. However patients with altered biliary anatomy are prone for IHS formation secondary to anastomotic stricture formation. Indian data on percutaneous endoscopic management of IHS is scare. Five patients with IHS were managed percutaneously. All patients had undergone Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy and were not suitable for direct endoscopic intervention. All patients underwent percutaneous biliary drainage followed by cholangioscopy-guided laser lithotripsy. Crushed stones were pushed across the anastomotic site using basket/balloon and ductal clearance was achieved. Good stone pulverization could be achieved in five patients (100 %). Complete ductal clearance could be achieved in all patients (100 %). Cholangioscopy-guided treatment of IHS can be valuable alternative to surgery in select group of patients especially those having dilated biliary tree with absence of intrahepatic strictures. However long-term follow up studies are required to see for recurrence of stone formation. PMID:27041379

  17. Arguments for choosing extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for removal of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Tiselius, Hans-Göran; Chaussy, Christian G

    2015-10-01

    At a time when there is an almost unlimited enthusiasm and preference among urologists for endoscopic stone removal, we have found it essential to meet some of the frequently presented arguments on why extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) should not be used. We have based our considerations in this brief article on our 30-35 years' experience with the non-invasive or least invasive technique that SWL represents. Stone disintegration, requirement of repeated treatment sessions, the concern of residual fragments, complications and economic aspects are some points that are discussed.

  18. Preventing stone retropulsion during intracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Osama M; Tawfik, Ahmad M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies of ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral stones have reported that most stone clearance failures can be attributed to stone fragment retropulsion. Stone retropulsion can result in increased operative time and cost-resulting from the need to change from the semi-rigid ureteroscope to a flexible instrument to chase migrated calculi-and additional procedures to treat residual migrated fragments are often required. The degree of migration depends mainly on the energy source used for lithotripsy; pneumatic and electrohydraulic lithotripters are associated with a greater degree of retropulsion than lasers. Different stone-trapping strategies and devices have been developed to minimize stone migration. Novel devices include the Lithovac(®) suction device, the Passport(™) balloon, the Stone Cone(™), the PercSys Accordion(®), the NTrap(®), and stone baskets such as the LithoCatch(™), the Parachute(™), and the Escape(®). Some authors have also reported on the use of lubricating jelly and BackStop(®) gel (a reverse thermosensitive polymeric plug); these devices are instilled proximal to the stone prior to the application of kinetic energy in order to prevent retrograde stone migration.

  19. Endoscopic palliation of colorectal benign and malignant tumors: YAG laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, Riccardo; Marino, Saverio; Angriman, Imerio; Vella, Vincenzo; Donadi, Michele; D'Amico, D. F.

    1997-12-01

    From November 1, 1992 to January 31, 1997, we treated 189 pts: 113 males and 76 females, of mean age 67 yrs. 148 pts were affected with colo-rectal cancer and 41 pts with extensive carpet benign tumors. Tumor location was: rectum in 115 pts, recto-sigmoid joint in 31 pts, colo-rectal anastomosis in 25 pts, sigmoid colon in 15 pts, descending colon in 2 pts and cecum in 1 pt. 26 pts were treated with diathermo-therapy, 15 pts with dilatation, 12 pts with radiotherapy, 5 pts with chemotherapy, 1 pt with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Yag-laser palliation gave good results in 90% (170 - 189) with an average survival of 24 weeks; there were complications due to the treatment in due pts (1%) without hospital mortality.

  20. [Current status of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Wilbert, D M; Jocham, D; Eisenberger, F; Chaussy, C

    1994-11-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy has become an established standard procedure for the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Almost 100 lithotripters are installed in large and medium-sized urological departments in Germany. The number of treatments per year averages 660 ESWL sessions per hospital. Multifunctional use and non-urological ESWL therapy ensure maximum utilization of the lithotripter units. In additional hospitals mobile lithotripsy is provided. At present there is a trend toward ambulatory ESWL treatment.

  1. Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, J.

    1987-01-01

    Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has proved to be a revolutionary advance in the treatment of renal stone disease. It, itself, is non-invasive but may necessitate or be used as an adjunct to more invasive auxiliary procedures. The basic principles of lithotripsy, the clinical experience thus far and probable future applications are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3330235

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in childhood].

    PubMed

    Schultz-Lampel, D; Lampel, A; Lazica, M; Thüroff, J W

    1997-05-01

    In general, the criteria for treatment of urolithiasis in children are the same as those for adults. Today, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the method of choice for treatment of most pediatric urinary stones. Stone-free rates between 57% and 97% at short-term follow-up and 57%-92% at long-term follow-up have proven the efficacy of ESWL treatment in children. So far, there is no evidence of negative side effects of ESWL treatment in children in the long-term, confirming the safety of ESWL treatment seen in the short-term results. In particular, neither induction of hypertension nor deterioration of renal function have been detected in children when limitation of shock wave energy and shock wave numbers have been carefully observed.

  3. Shockwave lithotripsy: anecdotes and insights.

    PubMed

    Lingeman, James E; Kim, Samuel C; Kuo, Ramsay L; McAteer, James A; Evan, Andrew P

    2003-11-01

    Shockwave lithotripters have evolved considerably since the introduction of the Dornier HM3 machine 20 years ago. Although shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) remains the preferred treatment for the majority of symptomatic upper urinary-tract calculi, newer lithotripters are not as effective and may have a higher risk of side effects. Lack of progress in lithotripter evolution is attributable to inadequate understanding of how and why shockwaves produce effects on stone and tissue. Current knowledge suggests that stones fragment by the mechanisms of compression fracture, spallation, squeezing, and acoustic cavitation, while tissue damage from shockwaves is secondary to cavitation and non-cavitational forces such as sheer stress. It appears likely that most tissue damage from shockwaves is caused by cavitation. As the understanding of SWL matures, new lithotripter designs may emerge that truly represent an improvement on the original Dornier HM3 machine.

  4. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Payne, S R; Ford, T F; Wickham, J E

    1985-10-01

    Since 1981, 525 renal and ureteric calculi have been removed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCN) or transurethral ureteroscopy as the primary modalities of therapy. Successful extraction of the stone at the first attempt was achieved in 92 per cent of cases by PCN and 70 per cent of cases by ureteroscopy, whilst further endoscopic surgery improved the overall success rates to 98 per cent and to 80 per cent respectively. Complication rates from these procedures have both been low as has the morbidity, with most patients leaving hospital within 4 days and returning to work within 2 weeks. The successful development of endoscopic lithotomy and the use of in situ destruction techniques has meant that we now reserve open surgery for difficult multibranched staghorn calculi and ureteric stones embedded in the urothelium. With the advent of extracorporeally generated shockwave lithotripsy it is likely that even these types of stone will be amenable to minimally invasive procedures.

  5. [Complications of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, G J; David, R D; Fuchs, A M

    1989-01-01

    The authors reviewed treatments performed worldwide using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy since its introduction in West Germany in 1980 to determine the efficacy of this treatment modality and its potential risks. The prevention of complications related to patients or shock wave energy are discussed, as well as the cardiovascular complications related to immersion, prevention of lesions to nearby organs, treatment of ESWL-induced bleeding, treatment of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction, prevention and treatment of infection, and long-term biological effects. Currently, less than 5% of patients are excluded from treatment with ESWL due to technical reasons or increased risk of periprocedural complications. Patients with cardiac pacemakers have been treated safely. Calcifications of the ipsilateral renal artery or aorta are considered only relative contraindications. However, certain technical limitations exist; i.e., the Dornier HM-3 cannot support patients weighing more than 135 kg., and patient height is also a limiting factor. There is an impressively low incidence of complications related to the energy of the shock wave. The severity and extent of damage are dose- and pressure-dependent. The potential for induction of cardiac arrhythmias secondary to the shock wave exists; however, effective prevention is achieved by coupling the shock wave discharge to the electrocardiogram. Complications of immersion are also extremely rare and can be avoided by careful preoperative evaluation. Damage to nearby organs such as pulmonary, gastric, duodenal or colonic contusions, constitute a very infrequent complication. Elevations of liver enzymes have also been noted post-lithotripsy. However, all these changes were transient and had no significant clinical consequences. Management of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction is by endourological procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Ultrasound controlled extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi in patients with chronic recurrent pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, F; Gurakuqi, G C; Trauner, M; Krejs, G J

    1994-09-01

    A consecutive series of 10 patients with pancreatic stones due to chronic pancreatitis was treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy during an investigation period of 2 years. The first step of the therapeutic regime included an endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to shockwave treatment. The targeting procedure was performed strictly under sonographic control. All patients were treated with a second-generation electrohydraulic lithotriptor, fragmentation could be achieved in all 10 cases. In 7 patients stonefreeness could be reached by endoscopic stone extraction, all these patients were symptom-free over a follow-up period of 12 months. In 3 patients complete duct clearance could not be achieved, these patients presented with minor symptoms over the follow-up period.

  7. [Conservative treatment of severe renal trauma after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Bruschini, Homero; Torricelli, Fábio; Lopes, Roberto Nicomedes

    2011-01-01

    Subcapsular and perinephric hematomas are relatively common after shock-wave lithotripsy, but high-grade kidney injuries are extremely rare. We present the first case of a high-grade kidney injury after shock-wave lithotripsy managed conservatively. A 57-year-old white female patient with left 1.5cm superior ureteral calculi was submitted to shock-wave lithotripsy.

  8. Outcome after endoscopically assisted surgical retrieval of symptomatic parotid stones.

    PubMed

    Overton, A; Combes, J; McGurk, M

    2012-02-01

    10% of symptomatic parotid stones cannot be removed by minimally invasive radiological or endoscopic techniques alone. In these cases endoscopically assisted surgical parotid sialolithectomy can be performed via an extraoral approach, reconstituting the duct and preserving functioning glandular tissue. Between 2003 and 2010, 55 consecutive patients underwent endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones from 57 glands, two having bilateral procedures. Outcome was assessed using a structured questionnaire. 39/55 patients (71%) patients were successfully contacted (40 procedures; one bilateral case). At median follow-up of 3.1 years 28 glands (70%) were symptomless, whilst 11 (28%) were much improved but causing mild or occasional residual symptoms. One patient required postoperative lithotripsy and basket retrieval of a retained stone, but was subsequently symptom free. A further patient was initially symptom free then relapsed, did not respond to lithotripsy and is awaiting further assessment. In 10% of cases a short-lived sialocoele developed postoperatively. No individual reported facial weakness and one had a scar of concern. 37/39 (95%) patients were pleased to have had the operation and would have the procedure contralaterally in similar circumstances. Endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones is a successful technique with low morbidity that is well received by patients. PMID:22018956

  9. Retrospective analysis of a combined endoscopic and transcutaneous technique for the management of parotid salivary gland stones.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Jura; Sillanpää, Saara; Virtanen, Jussi; Sipilä, Markku; Rautiainen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Sialendoscopy is used in the diagnosis and treatment of various symptoms relating to the salivary gland, e.g. chronic swelling or obstruction and inflammation of the salivary duct. Small intraductal stones can be removed with various instruments during sialendoscopy, whereas larger ones can be fragmented with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or laser. However, 5-10% of the patients with parotid stones cannot be treated with these methods. In patients with large impacted stones or stones in a hilus area, a combined endoscopic and transcutaneous technique can be employed. The stone is approached endoscopically, a skin flap is raised over or a small incision is made through the illuminated area, and the stone is removed by an external route with minimal morbidity. This retrospective study analysed the cases of 8 patients treated using the combined technique, 6 of whom became symptom free. Superficial parotidectomy was performed in 1 patient. No complications were observed, and ductal stents were not used. The average diameter of the stones was 7.6 mm (range 7.0-10.2). The combined technique is recommended for the removal of large and impacted intraductal stones in the parotid gland. No major complications have been reported.

  10. Outcome of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A single-center prospective study in 45 patients

    PubMed Central

    Lönnebro, Ragnar; Stigliano, Serena; Haas, Stephan L; Swahn, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Noel, Rozh; Segersvärd, Ralf; Chiaro, Marco Del; Verbeke, Caroline S; Arnelo, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in the bile duct and the pancreas is sometimes cumbersome. This applies in particular to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) and bile duct strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Aims To evaluate in a prospective cohort study the sensitivity and specificity of probe-based confocal laser microscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods We performed pCLE together with mother-baby endoscopy (SpyGlass) during 50 ERCP sessions in 45 patients. The Miami and Paris criteria were applied. Clinical diagnosis via imaging was compared to pCLE and the final pathological diagnosis from surgically-resected, biopsy, or cytology specimens. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year. Results We were able to perform pCLE in all patients. Prior to endoscopy, the diagnosis was benign in 23 patients and undetermined (suspicious) in 16 patients, while six patients had an unequivocal diagnosis of malignancy. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity 52%. The positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 82% and 100%, respectively. Apart from mild post-ERCP pancreatitis in two patients, no complications occurred. Conclusions Our study showed that pCLE is a safe, expert endoscopic method with high technical feasibility, high sensitivity and high NPV. It provided diagnostic information that can be helpful for decisions on patient management, especially in the case of IPMN and unclear pancreatic lesions, in individuals whom are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26668748

  11. Use of image enhancement during lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, C; Corry, D A; Bowsher, W G; Nockler, I B; Whitfield, H N

    1996-08-01

    Renal excursion during breathing is inevitable and is a cause of poor localization during extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL), which in theory might lead to poor treatment results. Eighty-one patients underwent lithotripsy treatment with and without the use of an image enhancement system designed for use with the Dornier MPL9000 lithotripter. This device contains a memory incorporated into a separate differential grayscale monitor, which allows the stone image to be stored. Shockwave release is enabled only when this image corresponds to the real-time image on the lithotripter ultrasound monitor. No improvement in success rates was found using this system, although upper-pole stones appeared to be fragmented more successfully. Overall, the results were favorable in both groups after a single treatment. Further work is needed to establish whether image enhancement is capable of improving the success rates and reducing the side effects of lithotripsy by better targeting.

  12. Successful laserlithotripsy in Bouveret's syndrome using a new frequency doubled doublepulse Nd:YAG laser (FREDDY).

    PubMed

    Maiss, J; Hochberger, J; Hahn, E G; Lederer, R; Schneider, H T; Muehldorfer, S

    2004-08-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction as a result of gallstone (Bouveret syndrome) is a rare but serious complication of cholelithiasis. In many cases, surgery has been conducted for treatment. In recent years, minimal invasive treatment modalities (e.g. shockwave lithotripsy) have been shown to be effective in some of those patients. Laserlithotripsy has so far been described in two cases with a Rhodamine-6G dye laser. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with duodenal obstruction due to a huge gallstone. The patient was referred to our hospital because attempts at endoscopic extraction and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy had failed. The man was treated successfully in just one session with a new cost-efficient frequency doubled doublepulse Nd:YAG laser (FREDDY) using a total of 5726 laser pulses (120 mJ pulse energy, 10 Hz pulse repetition rate) and recovered rapidly. Laserlithotripsy can be considered an effective non-invasive therapeutic alternative to surgical treatment in Bouveret's syndrome, especially in old or high-risk patients.

  13. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in children].

    PubMed

    Charbit, L; Terdjman, S; Gendreau, M C; Guérin, D; Quental, P; Cukier, J

    1989-01-01

    Upper urinary tract lithiasis is a rare condition in children in comparison to its incidence in the adult population. The distribution of lithiasis in children has been reported to be 56% for idiopathic lithiasis, 20% for metabolic lithiasis, and 25% for lithiasis associated with uropathy. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has become the treatment of choice for upper urinary tract calculi in the adult patient as well as in children after minor changes and complementary material had permitted the utilization of the Dornier HM-3 lithotripter in these small patients. The reported 3-month success rates range from 47% to 83%, according to the number of patients or kidneys free from calculi. The series reported in the literature have a mean of about 60% completely stone-free kidneys evidenced on the X-ray of the abdomen without preparation at 3 months. Its indications and results are comparable with those of ESWL in the adult. However, the long-term results have as yet not been evaluated and, to date, its hypothetical effects on renal growth or arterial pressure have not yet been elucidated.

  14. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy today.

    PubMed

    Tailly, Geert G

    2013-07-01

    Even 32 years after its first introduction shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) remains a matter of discussion and controversy. Since the first SWL in 1980, millions of treatments have been performed worldwide. To this day SWL remains the least invasive of all stone treatments and is considered the treatment modality of first choice for the majority of urinary stones. Despite the massive scale on which SWL is performed in a wide range of indications, complication rate has always remained very low and usually limited to minor side effects and complications. The introduction of affordable multifunctional lithotripters has made SWL available to more and more departments of urology worldwide. Still many centers are disappointed with the treatment results and concerned about the adverse tissue effects. In this SWL proves to be the victim of its uninvasiveness and its apparent ease of practice. Urologists need proper skill and experience; however, to adequately administer shockwaves in order to improve outcome. This aspect is too often minimized and neglected. Apart from this the power of shockwaves often is underestimated by operators of shockwave machines. Basic knowledge of the physics of shockwaves could further reduce the already minimal adverse tissue effects. Good training and coaching in the administration of shockwaves would no doubt lead to a renaissance of SWL with better treatment results and minimal adverse tissue effects.

  15. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in sedation-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Berger, M; Brandstetter, A; Chowanetz, E; Gasser, G; Mossig, H; Schmidt, P

    1988-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of combined sedation and analgesia during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using the Dornier lithotriptor HM III. We used a combination of a benzodiazepin derivatives with an opioid. We tested the dosage of drugs needed in relation to the length of treatment, the size of the stone and the overall energy output of the lithotriptor. In addition, continuous records were made of the patient's blood pressure and the oxygen saturation in the blood, with and without oxygen insufflation. Our results show that sedation combined with analgesia is a reasonable and useable alternative to general or regional anaesthesia for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in endoscopic therapy-refractory gallstones].

    PubMed

    Tudyka, J; Wechsler, J G; Kratzer, W; Janowitz, P; Stange, E F; Adler, G

    1992-12-22

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was undertaken in 36 patients (12 men, 24 women; mean age 70.9 +/- 2.4 years) with extra- or intrahepatic bile duct stones which could not be removed endoscopically. Stone fragmentation was successful in 32 patients with stones in the choledochal duct and in one with stones in the left hepatic duct. Fragmentation failed in two patients with stones in the left hepatic duct and one with stones in the cystic duct. 26 of the 36 patients were free of stone after spontaneous passage (n = 3) or after endoscopic removal of the residual concrements (n = 23). Complications occurred in only five patients during or after ESWL (cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, pancreatitis, cholangitis).--These data point to ESWL being clearly preferable to surgical intervention in bile duct stones refractory to endoscopic treatment, especially in the elderly with an increased perioperative risk.

  18. Endoscopically Based Endonasal and Transnasal Lasersurgery

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Hans; Hopf, Juergen U. G.; Hopf, Marietta

    2001-01-01

    The endoscopically based endonasal and transnasal laser surgery is a surgical procedure, which offers the ENT-specialist a safe and effective method to cure or to improve a number of diseases of the upper and middle airways. Coagulative lasers are used in contact and noncontact mode. Their light is mainly absorbed by hemoglobin but rarely by water. The laser–tissue interaction is performed via flexible glass fibers. For the delivery of the laser beam we use specially designed applicator sheaths, which incorporate the endoscope, the laser fiber and the suction channel. The procedure is controlled online via the endoscopic image on the monitor (“video-endoscopy”). The patient suffers less trauma using this treatment compared to the standard endoscopic surgery and the procedure is much quicker. Pre- and post-operative rhinomanometric and rhinoresistometric measurements reveal that the air flow rate of the nose can be improved effectively. PMID:18493555

  19. Shockwave lithotripsy and endourological stone treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Lahme, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Urolithiasis in children is a rare disease in developed countries. Due to the particular anatomical conditions of the infant body, indications and results of the well-known treatment modalities, such as shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy and PCNL, have to be determined. Experience in active stone treatment in children is very rare and only a limited number of papers are available. SWL can be performed only if focus size and treatment facilities are adapted to the size of the child. Miniaturization of ureteroscopes allows primary access to the infant upper urinary tract. Results, complications and morbidity of the treatment are similar to the results in adults. The main prerequisite for the primary endoscopic approach is the experience of the surgeon. PCNL should be performed as Mini-Perc. Percutaneous procedures show equal results and morbidity compared to the treatment of adults, in experienced hands. As two-thirds of infant stone patients have an underlying metabolic disorder, close cooperation of adult and pediatric urologists, nephrologists and radiologists is necessary in order to achieve good results in the treatment of infant stones.

  20. [Electromagnetic shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones. Preliminary clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, H; Brandstetter, K; Hagenmüller, F; Gerhardt, P; Classen, M

    1990-01-26

    75 applications of extracorporeal electromagnetically produced shock-waves were performed on 40 patients with symptomatic gallbladder stones (27 women and 13 men; mean age 43.5 [25-69] years). The patients had up to three stones each, with a maximal diameter of 35 mm. Computed tomography revealed partial calcification of the stones in nine patients. Stone fragmentation succeeded in all patients. Two weeks after lithotripsy two patients were free of stone. Maximal fragment diameter, as measured by ultrasound, was less than 6 mm in 19 patients, 6-10 mm in 14, and 11-15 mm in five. At reexamination of 24 patients three months later, three additional patients were free of stone by ultrasound. No significant side effects were noted during the first 30 days after the procedure. But during further observation mild pancreatitis developed in two, while in one choledochal concrements caused obstructive jaundice which necessitated endoscopic papillotomy. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method of fragmenting gall-bladder stones.

  1. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated. PMID:25726490

  2. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Burhenne, H J

    1992-01-01

    Encouraging results with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic duct stones have been reported from Europe. We present our experience with the first two North American patients, treated with excellent results in one and limited clinical improvement in the other patient at 1 year follow-up. Targeting of pancreatic duct stones was achieved with either fluoroscopy or ultrasound.

  3. Severe perinephric hemorrhage after shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, N K; Karanastasis, D; Stenos, J L

    1995-06-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who, after a second session of shockwave lithotripsy for multiple stones in the right kidney, showed symptoms of severe hemorrhage and flank pain unresponsive to analgesics, with the gradual development of extensive and serious perinephric hematoma. The bleeding necessitated nephrectomy. Unrecognized chronic pyelonephritis may have been a predisposing factor.

  4. [Sonography and biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L; Rebensburg, S; Spelter, M; Schumacher, R; Frenzel, F; Pumplün, B

    1992-12-01

    Ultrasound is an indispensable tool for preliminary diagnosis ("filter function"), during treatment ("monitoring function") and in the follow-up examinations ("follow-up function") after shock-wave lithotripsy of gallstones. It permits rapid and reliable assessment of the therapeutic outcome and early identification of complications, which present-day experience has shown to be rare.

  5. [Sonography and biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L

    1992-12-01

    Ultrasound is an indispensable tool for preliminary diagnosis ('filter function'), during treatment ('monitoring function') and in the followup examinations ('follow-up function') after shock wave lithotripsy of gallstones. It permits rapid and reliable assessment of the therapeutic outcome and early identification of complications, which experience to date has shown to be rare.

  6. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This paper proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm. PMID:26640425

  7. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-07-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3-D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This article proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3-D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3-D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm.

  8. Lipid peroxidation induced by shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, T D; Durrani, A F; Brown, S A; Ferraro, R; Preminger, G M

    1998-06-01

    To determine the relation between high-energy shockwaves (HESW) and the presence of lipid peroxidation produces, juvenile pigs were subjected to shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). After lithotripsy, both treated and control kidneys were analyzed, along with urine samples collected before, during, and after SWL. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and lipid-conjugated diene (CD) concentrations, used as markers for membrane lipid peroxidation, were determined in the kidney and urine samples. Significantly increased mean TBARS concentrations (146%) were associated with homogenates of lithotripsy-treated kidneys, 77.8 +/- 14.4 (SD) mmol/g v the controls, 31.4 +/- 14.9 mmol/g. Lithotripsy induction of lipid peroxidation products in the cortex, the gross damage site, and the respective medulla were also examined. In HESW-treated cortex samples, increased TBARS concentrations were seen--75.0 +/- 21.3 mmol/g--compared with untreated controls-- 45.2+/- 5.6 mmol/g--while increased CD concentrations (168%) were observed in the medulla of HESW-treated samples. No significant differences were observed in TBARS or CD concentrations in urine samples from control or treated kidneys, yet specific lipid hydroperperoxides were detected in the urine of HESW-treated kidneys. We conclude that HESW lithotripsy of swine kidneys is associated with increased lipid peroxidation products that may cause further cellular damage. Lipid peroxidation induced by SWL may be one of several mechanisms that lead to other potential bioeffects. Finally, analysis of specific lipid hydroperoxides in the urine of HESW-treated kidneys may serve as a noninvasive marker of renal injury after clinical SWL.

  9. Comparison of urinary calculus fragmentation during Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Teichman, Joel H.; Welch, A. J.

    2005-04-01

    We compared urinary calculus fragmentation with long pulsed Ho:YAG (λ= 2.12 μm) versus Er:YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) lasers. We measured the ablation width, depth, volume and efficiency as a function of pulse energy from calculus threshold energy to clinical energy typically used for Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. Ablation effects were evaluated for three types of urinary calculi (calcium oxalate monohydrate, cystine, and uric acid), for single and multiple pulses applied at various optical energy levels. By means of comparing laser-induced crater topography and ablation volume for each stone type, the feasibility of Er:YAG laser lithotripsy was appraised. The Er:YAG laser pulse energy generated deeper and narrower crater shapes with relatively smooth contours whereas the Ho:YAG laser produced shallower and wider craters with irregular shapes. In terms of multiple pulses ablation, the Er:YAG produced larger ablation volume than Ho:YAG. The deeper crater induced by the Er:YAG was attributed to the higher absorption coefficient of stones at the 2.94 μm wavelength, and widening of crater by Ho:YAG was perhaps caused by lateral expansion of ablated material. Comparing the ablation efficiency, Er:YAG was superior to Ho:YAG for both single and five-pulses.

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    D'Addessi, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Luca; Sasso, Francesco; Gulino, Gaetano; Falabella, Roberto; Bassi, Pierfrancesco

    2008-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1980, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become the first therapeutic option in most cases of upper-tract urolithiasis, and the technique has been used for pediatric renal stones since the first report of success in 1986. Lithotripter effectiveness depends on the power expressed at the focal point. Closely correlated with the power is the pain produced by the shockwaves. By reducing the dimensions of the focus, it becomes possible to treat the patient without anesthesia or analgesia but at the cost of a higher re-treatment rate. Older children often tolerate SWL under intravenous sedation, and minimal anesthesia is applicable for most patients treated with second- and third-generation lithotripters. Ureteral stenting before SWL has been controversial. Current data suggest that preoperative stent placement should be reserved for a few specific cases. Stone-free rates in pediatric SWL exceed 70% at 3 months, with the rate reaching 100% in many series. Even the low-birth-weight infant can be treated with a stone-free as high as 100%. How can one explain the good results? Possible explanations include the lesser length of the child's ureter, which partially compensates for the narrower lumen. Moreover, the pediatric ureter is more elastic and distensible, which facilitates passage of stone fragments and prevents impaction. Another factor is shockwave reproduction in the body: there is a 10% to 20% damping of shockwave energy as it travels through 6 cm of body tissue, so the small body volume of the child allows the shockwaves to be transmitted with little loss of energy. There are several concerns regarding the possible detrimental effect of shockwaves on growing kidneys. Various renal injures have been documented with all type of lithotripters. On the other hand, several studies have not shown adverse effects. In general, SWL is considered to be the method of choice for managing the majority of urinary stones in children of all

  11. Detection of tissue injury after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Brody, J M; Siebert, W F; Cattau, E L; al-Kawas, F; Goldberg, J A; Zeman, R K

    1991-06-01

    We evaluated seven patients undergoing gallstone lithotripsy for evidence of hepatic or renal trauma after each of 10 lithotripsy treatments. Postlithotripsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sonography showed no evidence of hepatic or renal injury as compared with baseline studies. Four treatments resulted in sonographic evidence of gaseous hepatic microbubbles (analogous to "the bends") due to cavitation effects of the shockwaves. Three of these four treatments produced serum glutamicoxaloacetic transaminase and -pyruvic transaminase elevation. One patient had microscopic hematuria. Minimal tissue damage results from gallstone lithotripsy. MRI and ultrasound, performed after lithotripsy, appear to be less sensitive than transaminasemia in detecting this low-grade injury.

  12. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  13. [Using safocid for antibiotic prophylaxis in minimally-invasive endoscopic operations and manipulations].

    PubMed

    Proskurin, A A; Asfandiiarov, F R; Kalashnikov, E S; Miroshnikov, V M

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of safocid (1 g of seknidasol, 1 g of azitromycin, 150 mg of fluconasol) was studied in antibiotic prophylaxis before conduction of urological endoscopic operations: diagnostic cystoscopy, renal stenting, ureteroscopy with contact lithotripsy. A total of 128 patients of the urological department received a single safocid dose 90 min before surgical intervention. Safocid efficacy in prevention of infectious complications reached 96.2%. PMID:21427992

  14. [Shockwave lithotripsy in the pancreas; the first 16 patients treated in Rotterdam-Dijkzigt].

    PubMed

    van der Hul, R L; Plaisier, P W; den Toom, R; van Blankenstein, M; Terpstra, O T; Jeekel, J

    1993-04-10

    Sixteen patients, 7 women and 9 men, with a mean age of 42 years and with recurrent attacks of abdominal pain as a result of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, were treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), after endoscopical removal of one or more stones from the main pancreatic duct had proved impossible. In all patients fragmentation by ESWL of the stone situated farthest distally was attempted, after which the remaining calculi and fragments could be voided spontaneously or could be flushed via a drain placed endoscopically in the main pancreatic duct. In 12 patients (75%) fragmentation of stones was achieved, 11 of them had a dramatic relief of pain immediately after ESWL. In 7 patients (44%) stone clearance was achieved; at follow-up (1-38 months after ESWL) none of these had complaints. Of the 5 patients with stone fragmentation without stone clearance, 2 were operated on because of recurrent symptoms. The only complication seen after ESWL, was an exacerbation of pancreatitis in 1 patient, which could be treated conservatively. If pancreatic stones cannot be removed endoscopically, ESWL appears to be an attractive alternative to an operation. It is important to achieve stone clearance.

  15. Management of pancreaticobiliary disease using a new intra-ductal endoscope: The Texas experience

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Douglas S; Tarnasky, Paul R; Patel, Sandeep N; Raijman, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a new single-operator mini-endoscope, Spyglass®, for its performance, feasibility and safety in the management of pancreaticobiliary disease. METHODS: In a multicenter retrospective analysis of patients undergoing intraductal endoscopy, we evaluated 128 patients (71 men, mean age 57.6 years). Indications were therapeutic (TX) in 72 (56%) and diagnostic (DX) in 56 (44%). RESULTS: Peroral endoscopy was performed in 121 and percutaneous in seven. TX indications included CBD stones in 41, PD stones in six, and biliary strictures in 25. DX indications included abnormal LFT’s in 15, abnormal imaging in 38 and cholangiocarcinoma staging in three. Visualization of the stone(s) was considered good in 31, fair in six, and poor in four. Advancement of the electrohydraulic lithotripsy probe was not possible in three patients and proper targeting of the lesion was partial in four patients. A holmium laser was used successfully in three patients. Ductal clearance was achieved in 37 patients after one procedure and in four patients after two procedures. Diagnosis of biliary strictures was modified in 20/29 and confirmed to be malignant in 10/23. Of the modified patients, no diagnosis was available in 17. Spyglass® demonstrated malignancy in 8/17 and non-malignancy in nine. Suspected pathology by imaging studies and abnormal LFT’s was modified in 43/63 (66%). Staging of cholangiocarcinoma demonstrated multicentric cholangiocarcinoma in 2/3. There was no morbidity associated with the use of Spyglass®. CONCLUSION: Spyglass Spyscope® is a first generation, single operator miniature endoscope that can evaluate and treat various biliary and pancreatic tract diseases. PMID:19294765

  16. Anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy at the Victorian Lithotripsy Service--the first 300 patients.

    PubMed

    Silbert, B S; Kluger, R; Dixon, G C; Berg, J

    1988-08-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken of the anaesthesia for the first 300 patients at the Victorian Lithotripsy Service. The majority (71.7%) were not hospitalised on site, including four quadriplegics and two ASA grade IV patients. Two hundred and eighty-three (94.3%) patients received continuous lumbar epidural anaesthesia, sixteen (5.3%) received general anaesthesia and one received a spinal anaesthetic. Eighty-two patients (27.3%) underwent ancillary procedures at the time of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The most common intraoperative complications were hypotension (72 patients, 25.4%) and shivering (39 patients, 13.8%). Arrhythmias occurred in nine (3%) patients. There was a 90% patient follow-up rate and the most common postoperative complication was backache (101 patients, 37.4%). The problems of anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are discussed. Epidural anaesthesia offers a number of advantages for this procedure and proved very suitable for the majority of patients.

  17. [Treatment of renoureteral lithiasis using extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Experience in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Larrea Masvidal, E; García Serrano, C; Hernández Silverio, D; Castillo Rodríguez, M; Casals Armada, J; Valdés Gómez, C; Báez Hernández, D

    1989-01-01

    Herein we present our experience in 5,000 cases of reno-ureteral lithiasis submitted to treatment at the Extracorporeal Lithotripsy Unit of Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital in Havana, Cuba, from April 1986 and during a period spanning 30 months. Treatment was exclusively by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in 85.5% of the patients and in combination with other procedures in 14.5% (endoscopic maneuvers in 5.9%, percutaneous nephrostomy 4.4%, open surgery 3.6%, and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy 0.6%). Complications were observed in 7% of the cases: ureteric obstruction (6.4%) with or without infection, perirenal hematoma (0.4%), and obstructive anuria (0.2%); acute urinary infection of different clinical types, some of which were very severe, were observed concomitantly in 2.6% of these patients. Two months following treatment, 86% of the cases were completely stone-free. At 6 months 96.2% were completely stone-free; the remaining 3.8% were classed as residual lithiasis. The pathologic conditions that put patients at high therapeutic risk and the possible complications that could arise were identified. The efficacy of the Dornier HM-3 lithotripter and the health care system that permits its extensive use are highlighted.

  18. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of distal ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Bubeck, J R; Hautmann, R

    1986-01-01

    To date, the use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been limited to renal calculi and ureteral calculi above the pelvic brim. Modifying the position of the patient on the support of the Dornier lithotripter HM3, we were able to localize and treat distal ureteral calculi. Until April 1986, 43 patients with stones in the lower ureter underwent contact-free lithotripsy. Treatment was successful in 39 patients (90%), 2 of these requiring 2 sessions. In 4 patients treatment failed and stone removal was accomplished using ureteroscopy or open surgery. No complications or adverse side effects were encountered in the whole series. ESWL is now the method of choice for the treatment of distal ureteral calculi in our department.

  19. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in anomalous kidneys.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, S; Sarica, K; Ozdiler, E; Dinçel, C; Küpeli, S; Gögüş, O

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, stones in anomalous kidneys have been removed by open or percutaneous surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) with the Dornier MPL 9000 lithotripter was performed in seven patients with horseshoe kidneys, four with pelvic ectopic kidneys, and six with malrotated kidneys. Twelve patients (71%) needed repeated treatments. A total of 11 patients (65%) in all the groups were stone free, and four patients had asymptomatic residual fragments no more than 5 mm in diameter. In the remaining two patients, no sign of stone disintegration was observed, and they underwent open surgery. Extracorporeal lithotripsy is the treatment of choice for stones in horseshoe or malrotated kidneys but is not useful for stones in most pelvic kidneys.

  20. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and lymph node calcification].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, E; Fujime, M; Niijima, T

    1987-05-01

    A female patient with calculi in the left kidney and calcified lymph nodes in the vicinity of the left renal pelvis was treated successfully with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. The simultaneous action of the shock waves on the calcified lymph nodes did not cause any alteration of the lymph node structure. Thus a shock-wave treatment can be carried out even in the presence of a calcified lymph node without complications.

  1. Case report: scrotal ecchymosis after shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Aydur, Emin; Göktas, Serdar; Kibar, Yusuf; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Ors, Fatih; Peker, A Fuat

    2006-12-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is the treatment of choice for most renal calculi because it is highly effective and relatively noninvasive. Although complications of SWL are relatively few, one that occurs more frequently is perirenal hematoma, usually diagnosed by radiologic procedures. We present an interesting case of scrotal ecchymosis as an unusual presentation of perirenal hematoma causing ipsilateral spermatic-vein thrombosis after SWL for a left renal stone. To our knowledge, this condition has not been reported previously.

  2. [Ureterorenoscopy combined with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    González Cabrera, L A; Oro Ortiz, J

    1989-01-01

    In May 1986, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and endourologic procedures became available in the treatment of lithiasis at the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital. The present study describes our experience and the results achieved during a 12-month period using endourologic procedures. During this period 65 URS procedures were performed to treat post-ESWL ureteral obstruction, and 22 to push the stone up to the kidney for subsequent ESWL treatment.

  3. Supracostal approach for percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, E F; Forsyth, M J

    1990-02-01

    The supracostal approach to renal access for ultrasonic lithotripsy continues to be used with good results at The Oregon Health Sciences University when indicated, because it provides better access to much of the kidney collecting system and proximal ureter. The complication rate is acceptably low if the precautions outlined above are followed. Access above the 11th rib is discouraged unless there is no other choice. PMID:2305530

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for treatment of intrahepatic stones: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ker, C G; Hwang, C H; Chen, J S; Lee, K T; Sheen, P C

    1993-04-01

    In vitro, bile duct stones, mostly comprising calcium bilirubinate, are readily fragmented by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). In the case of intrahepatic stones, ESWL is effective if the stones float freely in the bile, but if the stones completely fill, or are impacted within, the hepatic duct or bile duct, attempts at fragmentation will end in failure. Three patients with intrahepatic stones were treated with ESWL, and effectively fragmented. The stone fragments passed out spontaneously through T-tube sinus tract, PTDC sinus tract and the sphincter of Oddi as shown in the second cholangiogram. No specific complication was noted in our experimental and clinical experience. We believe that ESWL for fragmentation of biliary stones is technically reliable. The problem of the passage of these fragmented stones is considered; if necessary, it can be overcome by endoscopic means.

  5. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones: how many patients are suitable for it?].

    PubMed

    Rambow, A; Staritz, M; Klose, P; Thelen, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1989-06-01

    The proportion of patients with gallbladder stones suitable for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was analysed prospectively in 200 patients aged 17-76 years (62 males, 138 females) with symptomatic cholecystolithiasis. Criteria for inclusion were clinical symptoms, solitary stones (diameter 10-30 mm) or up to three stones with comparable total volume, contractile gallbladder, no calcification of stones, normal biliary tract anatomy. To check these criteria a step-by-step diagnostic procedure was instituted which consisted of history, ultrasonography with contractility test, abdominal X-ray film, computed tomography measurement of stone density, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Only 19 patients fulfilled the criteria. The others had to be excluded because of history (35), stone size or number (73), impaired gallbladder contractility (27), calcified stone (30), pigment content (12), and/or biliary tract anatomy. Thus only a surprisingly small percentage (about 10%) of patients with symptomatic gallbladder stones is suitable for ESWL.

  6. Endoscopic management of bile duct stones at Riyadh Military Hospital: An eight-year experience.

    PubMed

    Al-Karawi, M A; Mohamed, A R

    1991-01-01

    Over a period of eight years, 161 Saudi patients with biliary stones underwent 200 endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic studies at the Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Endoscopic sphincterotomy was performed in 93.2% of these patients and not attempted in the remainder who were referred for surgery because of biliary stones in both the common bile duct and gallbladder. All patients were symptomatic and the most common presenting symptom was biliary colic, seen in 42.2% of these patients. Either acute gallstone pancreatitis or cholangitis was seen in 14.2%, and this resolved completely following gallstone extraction. Endoscopic extraction of common bile duct stones was successful in 138 (85.7%) patients. Failure of stone extraction occurred in nine patients, three of whom received extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which was successful in only one. Complications from endoscopic sphicterotomy and stone extractions occurred in 12 patients, of which bleeding was the most common.

  7. Endoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) for oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, Keyvan

    2006-06-01

    Endoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) is undertaken only when tumour is visible endoscopically with malignancy biopsy confirmed. Patients will be either Group A: inoperable cases with locally advanced cancer when the aim is palliation of dysphagia, or Group E: patients with early stage I-II disease who are unsuitable for surgery or decline operation, when the intent is curative. Following assessment for suitability for PDT and counselling, Photofrin 2mg/(kgbw) is administered 24-72h before endoscopic illumination using a Diode 630nm laser. Illumination may be either interstitial or intraluminal at a dose of 100-200J/cm. PMID:25049097

  8. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  9. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  10. Preliminary results using a flexible endoscope for orbital surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Braunstein, Richard E.; Schubert, Herman D.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Odel, Jeffery G.; Behrens, Myles M.

    1992-08-01

    A technique for visualizing the optic nerve, the short and long posterior ciliary arteries and nerves, the ophthalmic vein, and the rectus muscles using a flexible endoscope was developed in human cadavers. Previous reports of orbital endoscopy were limited to the use of a rigid endoscope. Potential applications for this new flexible endoscopic technique include the biopsy of orbital tumors, fenestration of the optic nerve sheath with mid-infrared lasers, photocoagulation of orbital tumors, and retrieval of foreign bodies or slipped muscles.

  11. Delivery of Erbium:YAG laser radiation through side-firing germanium oxide optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Anthony K.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2006-02-01

    The Erbium:YAG laser is currently being tested experimentally for endoscopic applications in urology, including more efficient laser lithotripsy and more precise incision of urethral strictures than the Holmium:YAG laser. While side-firing silica fibers are available for use with the Ho:YAG laser in urology, no such fibers exist for use with the Er:YAG laser. These applications may benefit from the availability of a side-firing, mid-infrared optical fiber capable of delivering the laser radiation at a 90-degree angle to the tissue. The objective of this study is to describe the simple construction and characterization of a side-firing germanium oxide fiber for potential use in endoscopic laser surgery. Side-firing fibers were constructed from 450-micron-core germanium oxide fibers of 1.45-m-length by polishing the distal tip at a 45-degree angle and placing a 1-cm-long protective quartz cap over the fiber tip. Er:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 2.94 microns, pulse duration of 300 microseconds, pulse repetition rate of 3 Hz, and pulse energies of from 5 to 550 mJ was coupled into the fibers. The fiber transmission rate and damage threshold measured 48 +/- 4 % and 149 +/- 37 mJ, respectively (n = 6 fibers). By comparison, fiber transmission through normal germanium oxide trunk fibers measured 66 +/- 3 %, with no observed damage (n = 5 fibers). Sufficient pulse energies were transmitted through the side-firing fibers for contact tissue ablation. Although these initial tests are promising, further studies will need to be conducted, focusing on assembly of more flexible, smaller diameter fibers, fiber bending transmission tests, long-term fiber reliability tests, and improvement of the fiber output spatial beam profile.

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: role of the radiologist.

    PubMed

    Barth, K H; Pahira, J J; Elliott, L P

    1985-06-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a new noninvasive treatment modality for urinary calculi. ESWL may be applied to the majority of patients requiring stone removal and is expected to replace, to a large degree, percutaneous stone removal (PSR), now practiced jointly by interventional radiologists and endourologists in most institutions. In a number of cases, ESWL and PSR will be complementary procedures. Technically, ESWL can be considered a radiologic procedure; thus far, radiologists are not participating in its use. In the authors' opinion, ESWL should be a combined urologic radiologic procedure analogous to PSR; this will allow the most rational and effective treatment.

  13. Renal function following extracorporeal lithotripsy in children.

    PubMed

    Corbally, M T; Ryan, J; FitzPatrick, J; Fitzgerald, R J

    1991-05-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has revolutionised the management of urinary calculous disease, the long-term effects of ESWL on renal function are not known. This study of 18 children demonstrated a mild, statistically insignificant decrease of 15% in DTPA measured glomerular filtration rate following ESWL. In view of this, we recommend that pretherapy and posttherapy estimates of renal function be obtained in all patients undergoing ESWL. Long-term follow-up is necessary to further quantify the effects of ESWL on the developing kidney.

  14. The steinstrasse: a legacy of extracorporeal lithotripsy?

    PubMed

    Coptcoat, M J; Webb, D R; Kellet, M J; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1988-01-01

    32 steinstrasse formations in the first 600 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy treatments required intervention. Their radiological appearance has been classified into 3 types and the aetiology of each type is discussed. 24 cases received a primary needle nephrostomy to relieve obstruction and of these 18 passed spontaneously, 5 required ureteroscopic manipulation and 1 underwent open surgery. Primary ureteroscopic removal was successful in 3 out of 5 cases. 3 upper ureteric steinstrassen were removed by a percutaneous intrarenal approach. A suggested plan of management for complicated steinstrassen is outlined.

  15. Perinephric abscess following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Stephen E.; Vallely, John F.; Denstedt, John D.

    1998-10-01

    Since the introduction and widespread use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), various complications have been noted. Perinephric hematoma and ureteral obstruction may be anticipated by urologists as potential problems. We report the first case of perinephric abscess encountered after 17 895 SWL treatments at our institution. A 65 year old woman presented 4 months following a second SWL procedure with a perinephric abscess and was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage. A review of the English literature revealed only 3 other cases of perinephric abscess following SWL. This diagnosis should be considered in early and late presentations of flank pain following SWL.

  16. [Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy for children].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, A; Matsuda, H; Uemura, T; Kohri, K; Kurita, T; Kanbara, N; Tamura, M

    1988-06-01

    We performed extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on a 5-year-old and 8-year-old. Ureteral calculi in both patients were disintegrated, and all fragments were passable spontaneously. The 5-year-old girl was the youngest of the cases of ESWL reported in Japan. As this patient was 107 cm in height, we put a styrofoam layer on the back of this patient. This protected her lung from the shock wave, and the height limit was released from the ESWL treatment. These cases and the peculiarities and devices for ESWL in the pediatric field are discussed. PMID:3223460

  17. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Amanda B.; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  19. Superior mesenteric artery dissection after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bakoyiannis, Christos; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Fragiadis, Evangelos; Felesaki, Eleni; Kafeza, Marina; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Tsigris, Christos

    2012-01-01

    The use of shockwave lithotripsy is currently the mainstay of treatment in renal calculosis. Several complications including vessel injuries have been implied to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. We report an isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery in a 60-year-old male presenting with abdominal pain which occurred three days after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The patient was treated conservatively and the abdominal pain subsided 24 hours later. The patient's history, the course of his disease, and the timing may suggest a correlation between the dissection and the ESWL.

  20. Management of surgical margins after endoscopic laser surgery for early glottic cancers: a multicentric evaluation in French-speaking European countries.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Nicolas; Vergez, Sébastien; Babin, Emmanuel; Baumstarck, Karine; Santini, Laure; Dessi, Patrick; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the practices of ENT surgeons for the management of surgical margins after endoscopic laser surgery for early glottic cancers. A questionnaire was sent to different surgeons managing cancers of the larynx in France, Belgium and Switzerland. A descriptive and comparative analysis of practices across centers was performed. Sixty-nine surgeons completed the questionnaire (58 in France, 10 in Belgium and 1 in Switzerland). In case of very close or equivocal resection margins after definitive histological examination, 67 % of surgeons perform close follow-up, 28 % further treatment and 5 % had no opinion. Factors resulting in a significant change in the management of equivocal or very close margins were: the country of origin (p = 0.011), the specialty of the multidisciplinary team leader (p = 0.001), the fact that radiation equipment is located in the same center (p = 0.027) and the access to IMRT technique (p = 0.027). In case of positive resection margins, 80 % of surgeons perform further treatment, 15 % surveillance, and 5 % had no opinion. The only factor resulting in a significant change in the management of positive margins was the number of cancers of the larynx treated per year (p = 0.011). It is important to spare, on one hand equivocal or very close margins and on the other hand, positive margins. Postoperative management should be discussed depending on intraoperative findings, patient, practices of multidisciplinary team, and surgeon experience. This management remains non-consensual and writing a good practice guideline could be useful.

  1. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones and the importance of operative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Berci, G

    1990-01-01

    Our institute participated in a national study. We had 68 patients (two-thirds had solitary and one-third multiple gallstone calculi). Our extracorporeal lithotripsy results at 9-18 months' follow-up showed 25% to be free of stone (fragment). Forty-four percent required a second session. This technique has limitations and needs further improvement in the aiming devices available and the size of fragments in order to be useful to a larger group of patients. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a new modality for endoscopic removal of the stone-filled gallbladder. It can be performed safely in a well-selected group of elective cases. It represents a final cure because the diseased stone-containing gallbladder is removed. Patients have distinct advantages: less postoperative pain, a short hospital stay, and early return to work. Intraoperative cholangiography is of help to define the anatomy. Surgeons need to be competent in laparoscopy before using this technique to perform endoscopic cholecystectomy. It will play a dominant role in the future treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis.

  2. Patient and personnel exposure during extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Glaze, S; LeBlanc, A D; Bushong, S C; Griffith, D P

    1987-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has provided a nonsurgical approach to treatment of renal stones. The Dornier lithotripter uses dual image intensified x-ray systems to center the stone before treatment. Three imaging modes are offered: a fluoroscopic mode and two video spot filming modes. The average entrance exposure to the stone side of the typical patient at our facility is 2.6 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (10 R) [range: 0.5-7.7 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (2-30 R)] which is comparable and often much less than that reported for percutaneous lithotripsy. Recommendations are made for minimizing patient exposure. Scattered radiation levels in the lithotripter room are presented. We have determined that Pb protective apparel is not required during this procedure provided x-ray operation is temporarily halted should personnel be required to lean directly over the tub to attend to the patient. If the walls of the ESWL room are greater than 1.83 m (6 feet) from the tub, shielding in addition to conventional construction is not required.

  3. Patient and personnel exposure during extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Glaze, S; LeBlanc, A D; Bushong, S C; Griffith, D P

    1987-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has provided a nonsurgical approach to treatment of renal stones. The Dornier lithotripter uses dual image intensified x-ray systems to center the stone before treatment. Three imaging modes are offered: a fluoroscopic mode and two video spot filming modes. The average entrance exposure to the stone side of the typical patient at our facility is 2.6 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (10 R) [range: 0.5-7.7 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (2-30 R)] which is comparable and often much less than that reported for percutaneous lithotripsy. Recommendations are made for minimizing patient exposure. Scattered radiation levels in the lithotripter room are presented. We have determined that Pb protective apparel is not required during this procedure provided x-ray operation is temporarily halted should personnel be required to lean directly over the tub to attend to the patient. If the walls of the ESWL room are greater than 1.83 m (6 feet) from the tub, shielding in addition to conventional construction is not required. PMID:3679826

  4. Advances in endoscopic imaging in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Pastorelli, Luca; Ishaq, Sauid; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies for the treatment of ulcerative colitis require more accurate tools for gastrointestinal imaging to better assess mucosal disease activity and long-term prognostic clinical outcomes. Recent advances in gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy are radically changing the role of endoscopy in every-day clinical practice and research trials. Advanced endoscopic imaging techniques including high-definition endoscopes, optical magnification endoscopy, and various chromoendoscopy techniques have remarkably improved endoscopic assessment of ulcerative colitis. More recently, optical biopsy techniques with either endocytoscopy or confocal laser endomicroscopy have shown great potential in predicting several histological changes in real time during ongoing endoscopy. Here, we review current applications of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques in ulcerative colitis and present the most promising upcoming headways in this field. PMID:26365308

  5. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and hemophilia: apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Brunet, P; Rigot, J M; Coupez, B; Mazeman, E

    1995-02-01

    We report pelvis calculi fragmentation through the use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in a patient with mild hemophilia B. The EDAP LT 01 lithotriptor was used without incident. We review other reported cases in the literature.

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for kidney stone on surgical clip.

    PubMed

    Clark, J Y; Kearse, W S

    1997-04-01

    We report the successful use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for the destruction of a renal stone that had formed around a surgical clip. The SWL led to passage of both the stone and the clip.

  7. [A year experience with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones].

    PubMed

    Rothenbühler, J M; Beglinger, C; Meyer, B; Marx, A; Ackermann, C; Stalder, G A; Harder, F

    1990-04-21

    43 patients with symptomatic gallbladder stones were treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and oral bile acids. In all patients the stones were successfully fragmented during the first lithotripsy session. 33 patients underwent 2-4 treatment sessions. In 16 out of 43 patients the stones disappeared within 7.9 months. The rate of stone dissolution was dependent on the number and size of stones. 3 patients required surgery because of frequent colic in one case, cholecystitis in one case and lack of cooperation in one case. No important side effects were noted except mild pancreatitis 3 weeks after lithotripsy in one patient. Results at this center of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with oral bile acids indicate that this treatment may become an alternative to cholecystectomy in patients with a small number (less than 3) of stones not exceeding 30 mm in diameter.

  8. Mobile lithotripsy services: best bet for most hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, E; Hagin, D

    1989-03-01

    During its short history, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has revolutionized the treatment of kidney stones and may well have a substantial impact on gallstone treatment. The two technologies are potential money makers for hospitals if properly planned for and conceived. For the majority of hospitals, shared arrangements, whether they involve leases or joint ventures, are the key to a successful lithotripsy program. Rural and midsized communities have the greatest need for renal lithotripsy, and hospitals in these areas should explore mobile programs. Urban hospitals located in areas where there is already adequate access to lithotripters are well advised to work with established programs unless the price of lithotripters drops significantly. The demand for biliary lithotripsy remains uncertain, but one thing is clear: hospitals that don't prepare for it now will be left behind once the technology finds it niche.

  9. [The history of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in Spain].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Marcellán, Francisco Javier; Ibarz Servio, Luis

    2007-10-01

    We give a historical outline of urinary lithiasis with emphasis in the alternative therapeutic options to surgery. We expose the previous steps that led to the birth of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and its implementation in our country.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: treatment of choice in ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Rigatti, P; Montorsi, F; Guazzoni, G; Maffezzini, M

    1989-05-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy represents the therapy of choice for reno-ureteral stone disease being resolutive in more than 85% of cases. This procedure can be successfully applied to ureteral stones providing appropriate preoperative cystoscopic manipulations and a correct positioning of the patient on the stretcher of the lithotripter. We hereby report our experience in 119 patients with ureteral lithiasis submitted to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with a 98% success rate.

  11. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for lower pole calculi smaller than one centimeter.

    PubMed

    Chaussy, Christian; Bergsdorf, Thorsten

    2008-10-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has revolutionized the treatment of urinary calculi and became the accepted standard therapy for the majority of stone patients. Only for stones located in the lower calix, ESWL displayed a limited efficacy. Since the stone-free rate seemed to be preferential, endoscopic maneuvers like percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) have been proposed as the primary approach for this stone localization.Stone size seems to be the most important parameter in regard to the stone-free rate, whereas anatomical characteristics of the lower pole collecting system are discussed controversial. Various studies show a good stone clearance between 70-84% for stones up to 1 cm in diameter. Additional physical and medical measures are suitable to improve treatment results. Stone remnants after ESWL, defined as clinical insignificant residual fragments (CIRF) will not cause problems in every case and will pass until up to 24 months after treatment; in total 80-90% of all patients will become stone-free or at least symptom-free.When complete stone-free status is the primary goal, follow-up examinations with new radiological technologies like spiral CT show that the stone-free rate of ESWL and endoscopically treated patients (RIRS) does not differ significantly. However, in comparison to endoscopic stone removal, shockwave therapy is noninvasive, anesthesia-free and can be performed in an outpatient setup. Therefore, ESWL remains the first choice option for the treatment of lower caliceal stones up to 1 cm. The patient will definitely favour this procedure.

  12. [Shockwave lithotripsy: energy needed for fragmenting calculi].

    PubMed

    Drach, G W

    1989-01-01

    Based on the experience with the Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, the author analyzes herein the adverse effects caused by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Although admittedly empirical, an attempt is made to establish the number of shock waves and pressure required to achieve stone fragmentation without causing injury to the kidney. The effects of lung, stomach, colon, and skin or muscle contusions, hematoma, renal scarification, decreases in renal function, elevations in liver enzymes, and pancreatitis are reported, as well as systemic effects such as hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria, hearing change, and potential excessive radiation exposure, etc. The estimate of shock wave energy is discussed, highlighting the importance of the number of shock waves over the energy of the shock wave, and attention is focussed on the concept of stone fragility. Although we can nearly define the upper limits of energy related to safety, the author concludes that currently many questions remain unanswered.

  13. [New trends in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Folberth, W

    1992-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has become an established and successful treatment modality for urinary and biliary calculi. However, shock wave technology and corresponding device designs are still at an innovative stage. Three trends are discussed in this paper. In shock wave technology the electromagnetic principle seems to win the race. The demands for successful and tissue-protective stone disintegration require shockwave sources with high dynamic range and optimised focal geometry. Electromagnetic shock wave generators meet all these requirements. For stone localisation an isocentric X-ray targeting system combined with integrated shock wave application is accepted as the "gold standard". In ultrasound localisation in-line targeting is superior to out-of-line targeting.

  14. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of primary intrahepatic stones.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Lee, S K; Min, Y I; Lee, M G; Sung, K B; Cho, K S; Lee, S G; Min, P C

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy (ESWL) was performed in intrahepatic stone patients (n = 18) by Dornier MPL 9,000 with ultrasound guidance. The patients had T-tube (n = 9) or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tube (n = 9). Average treatment session was four and shock-wave numbers were in the range of 3,064 to 12,000 (average 6,288 shocks). Intrahepatic stones were removed completely in 16 patients over a 3 month period by ESWL and combined stone extraction maneuver such as cholangioscopic or interventional radiologic method. Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy was very helpful in facilitating extraction of stones in unfavorable locations or located above the severe stricture. In summary, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, followed by percutaneous stone extraction, will provide an improvement in the success rate and duration of treatment required for complete removal of primary hepatolithiasis.

  15. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: experience with 1000 treatments].

    PubMed

    Zehntner, C; Ackermann, D; Zingg, E J

    1987-03-14

    6 1/2 years after the first clinical trials in Munich, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a well established method for the treatment of urinary tract calculi. The number of open surgical interventions in urolithiasis has therefore markedly diminished. In hospitals with lithotriptors open surgical procedures are less than 1% today. In the first 16 months the Department of Urology at the University of Berne performed 1000 treatments with a kidney stone lithotriptor. The treatment was successful in 93.8%, a result comparable with those of other stone centres. During the last few months the indication for the treatment has been considerably enlarged. The new lithotriptors differ in several respects from the standard model by Dornier, though basically the principle of shockwaves remains unchanged.

  16. Does extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy cause hypertension?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, B S; Cole, R S; Palfrey, E L; Shuttleworth, K E

    1989-12-01

    Several series have suggested that the incidence of hypertension following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) may be as high as 8%. In this study, changes in blood pressure and the incidence of hypertension have been observed in 733 patients 12 to 44 months after renal ESWL on the Dornier HM3. The incidence of hypertension following ESWL was 8.1%. In patients with a pre-ESWL diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg, the incidence of those with a diastolic greater than or equal to 100 mm Hg post-operatively was significantly greater than that predicted by historical data. There was no overall change in the mean blood pressure of the group. The hypertensive risk of ESWL remains unclear. However, blood pressure surveillance should be performed following ESWL and a prospective study is required.

  17. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Management of Residual Stones after Ureterolithotripsy versus Mini-Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhichao; Zhao, Xiaokun; Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Zhaohui; Xu, Ran; Zhang, Lianping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in managing residual stones after ureterolithotripsy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was carried out of 71 patients with proximal urinary tract stones (greater than 10 mm) who underwent ureterolithotripsy or mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy at a single institution from 2009 to 2011. The 71 patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 37) comprised patients who underwent ureterolithotripsy, and group II (n = 34) comprised patients who underwent mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Clinical characteristics, stone-free rates, stone demographics, and complications were evaluated. Results The overall stone-free rate was 90.1%. The stone-free rates in groups I and II were 97.3% and 82.4%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the stone-free rates between groups I and II (P = 0.035). Neither serious intraoperative nor postoperative complications were observed. No significant difference in complications was observed between the two groups (P = 0.472). Conclusions The results of our study suggest that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is an effective and safe auxiliary procedure for managing residual stones after primary endoscopic surgery. This procedure is associated with a satisfactory stone-free rate and a low complication rate, particularly for residual stones after ureteroscopic procedures. PMID:23785516

  18. Management of lower pole renal calculi: shock wave lithotripsy versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy versus flexible ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Preminger, Glenn M

    2006-04-01

    Current ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy devices and stone retrieval technology allow for the treatment of calculi located throughout the intra-renal collecting system. Difficulty accessing lower pole calculi, especially when the holmium laser fiber is utilized, is often encountered. Herein we review our experience where lower pole renal calculi were ureteroscopically managed by holmium laser fragmentation, either in situ, or by first displacing the stone into a less dependent position with the aid of a nitinol stone retrieval device. Lower pole stones less than 20 mm can be primarily treated by ureteroscopic means in patients: that are obese; have a bleeding diathesis; with stones resistant to shockwave lithotripsy (SWL); with complicated intra-renal anatomy; or as a salvage procedure after failed SWL. Lower pole calculi are fragmented with a 200 microm holmium laser fiber via a 7.5 F flexible ureteroscope. For those patients where the laser fiber reduced ureteroscopic deflection, precluding re-entry into the lower pole calyx, a 1.9 F nitinol basket is used to displace the lower pole calculus into a more favorable position, thus allowing for easier fragmentation. A nitinol device passed into the lower pole, through the ureteroscope, for stone displacement cause only a minimal loss of deflection and no significant impact on irrigation. Eighty-five percent of patients were stone free by IVP or CT scan performed at 3 months. Ureteroscopic management of lower pole calculi is a reasonable alternative to SWL or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in patients with low volume stone disease. If the stone cannot be fragmented in situ, nitinol basket or grasper retrieval, through a fully deflected ureteroscope, allows for repositioning of the stone into a less dependant position, thus facilitating stone fragmentation.

  19. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  20. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  1. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  2. Development of 3D holographic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç; Önal Tayyar, Duygu

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the development of a 3D holographic endoscope with an interferometer built around a commercial rigid endoscope. We consider recording the holograms with coherent and incoherent light separately without compromising the white light imaging capacity of the endoscope. In coherent light based recording, reference wave required for the hologram is obtained in two different ways. First, as in the classical holography, splitting the laser beam before the object illumination, and secondly creating the reference beam from the object beam itself. This second method does not require path-length matching between the object wave and the reference wave, and it allows the usage of short coherence length light sources. For incoherent light based holographic recordings various interferometric configurations are considered. Experimental results on both illumination conditions are presented.

  3. [Clinical experiences with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D; Merz, V; Marth, D; Zehntner, C

    1989-07-01

    Clinical experience with 2738 patients treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy between March 1985 and December 1988 is reported. All treatments were performed with the Dornier HM-3 lithotriptor. 34% of the patients needed auxiliary measures, consisting primarily of urological manipulation to improve urinary drainage or for better localization and/or focussing of the stones. Severe complications were rare; urosepticemia occurred in 0.3%, 2 patients had to undergo nephrectomy because of abscessing pyelonephritis, and there was one death due to recurrent pulmonary embolism in a patient with polycythemia vera. ESWL was used for stones in the entire upper urinary tract. The stone free rate for pelvic calculi smaller than 2 cm was 79% three months after treatment; a further 16% showed desintegrated material smaller than 5 mm, augmenting the success rate to 95%. The success rate dropped to 74% for very large renal stones of more than 4 cm. A stone free rate of 84-96% was ascertained for ureteral calculi 3 months after ESWL. Absolute contraindications for ESWL are acute pyelonephritis, coagulation disorders and pregnancy. The patients must tolerate anesthesia, as most treatments with this lithotriptor must be carried out under peridural or general anesthesia and only in a few exceptional cases is treatment in sedoanalgesia possible. ESWL is now generally accepted in view of its negligible invasiveness, low morbidity and the high success rate. Modern treatment of urinary calculi is inconceivable without considering ESWL.

  4. Renal rupture following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Sam S; Niku, Michelle; Vos, Elaine; Hogan, Shomari

    2014-09-01

    A 41-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of hematuria three days status post extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The patient described a three-day history of worsening left-sided abdominal pain immediately following the procedure. She denied any fever, chills, changes in bowel habits, hematochezia, increased urinary frequency, urinary urgency, or dysuria. Physical exam revealed tenderness to palpation in the left upper quadrant, left flank and periumbilical region with mild guarding. Laboratory studies revealed an anemic patient with downward trending hematocrit (red blood cell count of 3.41 10(6)/μL, hemoglobin of 10.6 g/dL, and a hematocrit of 31.3% down from 43% a week and a half prior). Urinalysis revealed red and cloudy urine with 3+ leukocytes. A chest radiograph was unremarkable. A computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a laceration to the lateral aspect of the mid left kidney with a hematoma measuring 3.2 cm in thickness (Figure). The patient was subsequently admitted to the hospital for monitoring and discharged on day nine.

  5. [Gallstone treatment by electrohydraulic extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Janowitz, P; Kratzer, W; Wechsler, J G; Kuhn, K; Janowitz, A; Swobodnik, W; Ditschuneit, H

    1991-08-30

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) with an electrohydraulic system was performed in 124 patients (33 men, 91 women; mean age 50.1 +/- 12.7 years). Sufficient stone fragmentation was achieved in 122 patients (98.3%). ESWL was repeated in 29 patients (23.3%), twice in 7 patients (5.6%). Average shockwave application per patient was 1,441 +/- 414 impulses, at a mean energy of 20.0 +/- 1.6 kV. Mean stone diameter before ESWL was 16.2 +/- 4.2 (7-30) mm, 7.1 +/- 4.1 (0-19) mm after ESWL. Computed tomography, performed immediately after ESWL in 88 patients demonstrated hypodense thickening (3-10 mm) of the gallbladder wall in 28.4% of patients. This was interpreted as wall oedema, reversible in all. One patient had a covered gallbladder rupture and two had biliary pancreatitis. None of the patients required emergency surgery. 93 patients (74.9%) had no stones 12 months later. A high success rate can be achieved if certain criteria are adhered to and suitable patients are selected.

  6. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  7. Impact of shockwave lithotripsy on upper urinary tract calculi.

    PubMed

    Riehle, R A; Näslund, E B; Fair, W; Vaughan, E D

    1986-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) currently is performed in selected urologic centers to treat over 80 per cent of patients with symptomatic upper urinary tract calculi. This noninvasive technique utilizing shockwaves to disintegrate stones into sand-sized particles allows the patient to pass the particles with spontaneous urination and replaces most surgery or percutaneous endoscopy for stone removal. However, stone-free success rates must be individualized depending on stone position, stone size, and composition. Lithotripsy of renal stones prior to migration and proximal ureteral stones early in their symptomatic course may alter significantly the incidence of distal ureteral calculi requiring hospitalization, cystoscopy, or ureteroscopy.

  8. Hyponatraemia and mental symptoms following vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Batra, Y K; Kapoor, R; Hemal, A K; Vaidyanathan, S

    1988-08-01

    A patient became confused and restless after vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy performed with distilled water as the irrigant. Serum sodium decreased to 120 mmol/litre from the pre-operative value of 138 mmol/litre. A cystogram revealed intraperitoneal extravasation of contrast. She recovered promptly after intravenous infusion of normal saline and emergency surgery for repair of the damaged bladder wall. This case illustrates that hyponatraemia and mental symptoms similar to those following transurethral resection syndrome also occur with ultrasonic lithotripsy when distilled water is used as the irrigant. PMID:3421461

  9. [Stone Cone® in ureteroscopic ballistic lithotripsy of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Arancio, M; Guglielmetti, S; Delsignore, A; Landi, A; Marchetti, C; Mina, A; Marcato, M; Martinengo, C

    2008-01-01

    Stone Cone® (Microvasive-Boston Scientific Corp, USA) is a device which prevents retrograde calculus migration during endoscopic ureterolithotripsy. We have studied the safety and efficacy of this device in endoscopic ureterolithotripsy with ballistic energy in proximal ureteral stones. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From 01/02/2006 to 01/02/2008 we carried out 36 ureterorenoscopies (URS) for proximal ureteral stones (average age: 46, range: 15-73). A ballistic energy was used for stones fragmentation. In 18 patients (Group A) we carried out URS with the aid of Stone Cone®, which was not used in the other 18 patients (Group B). Semirigid 8 Ch or 10 Ch Storz ureteroscope and ballistic lithotriptor Swiss Lithoclast Master EMS® were used. In cases of migration, edema, and ureteral damage, a ureteral stent was used. RESULTS. In Group B patients (URS performed without Stone Cone®) the migration of the whole stone, or of clinically significant fragments, occurred 8 times (45%). All of these patients underwent external shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) at a center equipped with a lithotriptor. A ureteral stent was placed in 14 cases (78%). In Group A, the migration of a stone requiring ESWL treatment occurred only once (5%). The ureteral stent was placed 8 times (45%). We had no significant complications during the procedure. CONCLUSIONS. The Stone Cone® is a safe and easy-to-use device. The cost of this device can be balanced by the reduction of postoperative ESWL treatments for lithiasic fragments pushing up into the kidneys (p<0.01), and of ureteral stent applications at the end of the procedure (p<0.05).

  10. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Macos; Koski, Amanda; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of gastrointestinal cancer is essential for the patient treatment and medical care. Endoscopically guided biopsy is currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of early esophageal cancer, but can suffer from high false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10 - 15 m for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 m), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at high resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal cancers are demonstrated with distinct features. The ability of high resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo would facilitate the development of OCT as a potential imaging modality for early detection of neoplastic changes.

  11. [Endoscopy, shockwave lithotripsy and local lysis in complicated pigmentary calculi of extra- and intrahepatic bile ducts].

    PubMed

    Güldütuna, S; Hellstern, A; Leuschner, M; Kurtz, W; Lembcke, B; Heller, K; Leuschner, U

    1991-02-22

    Endoscopy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and local lysis with alkaline solution of EDTA and bile salts in water were applied in combination in four patients with extra- and intrahepatic pigment stones as well as calcium bilirubinate covered concrements of the biliary tract. In the first patient (a man aged 80 years) a giant concrement of the bile duct was broken up after ESWL by three weeks of local chemical lysis and the fragments were removed by endoscopy. In the second case (man, aged 72), a nonextractable pigment stone was at first reduced in size by four-day local lysis and then removed endoscopically. Intrahepatic pigment stones were completely removed in the other two patients (boy of 12, man of 62) by local lysis only in 3 and 15 weeks, respectively. Even long-term use of the alkaline solution may not cause any serious side effects. Breaking up of stones after size reduction with ESWL of giant stones, size reduction of intact stones and contact lysis of intrahepatic stones are three important indications for chemical dissolution of biliary tract stones, respectively.

  12. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  13. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis. PMID:22147960

  14. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis.

  15. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  16. Shockwave lithotripsy of salivary duct stones.

    PubMed

    Iro, H; Schneider, H T; Födra, C; Waitz, G; Nitsche, N; Heinritz, H H; Benninger, J; Ell, C

    1992-05-30

    Surgical extirpation of the affected gland has been necessary for cases of sialolithiasis in which the stone cannot be removed by dilatation or dissection of the salivary duct. The ability of the piezoelectric lithotripter to deliver shockwaves to a small focus makes extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of salivary gland stones potentially safe. Its safety and efficacy have been assessed in 51 patients with symptomatic solitary salivary stones that could not be removed by conservative measures. The stones had a median diameter of 8 (range 4-18) mm and were located in the submandibular gland in 69% of patients and in the parotid gland in 31%. A total of 72 shockwave treatment sessions (maximum 3 per patient) were given under continuous sonographic monitoring. In 45 patients (88%) complete fragmentation (fragments less than or equal to 3 mm) of the concrements was achieved. No patient needed anaesthesia, sedatives, or analgesics. The only untoward effects were localised petechial haemorrhages after 10 (13%) out of 72 treatments and transient swelling of the gland immediately after delivery of shockwave in 2/72 (3%) sessions. 20 weeks after the first session 90% (46/51) of patients were free of discomfort, and 53% (27/51) were stone free. Stone-clearance rate was higher among patients with stones in the parotid gland (81%) than among those with stones of the submandibular gland (40%). Auxiliary measures such as dilatation or dissection of the salivary duct were required only in patients with stones in the submandibular gland (20%). No long-term damage to the treated salivary gland or to adjacent tissue structures was noted during the median follow-up of 9 (1-24) months. Extracorporeal piezoelectric shockwave therapy seems likely to be safe, comfortable, and effective minimally-invasive, non-surgical treatment for salivary stones.

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of gallstone patients].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, B D; Chubenko, S S; Romankova, V A

    1993-04-01

    Stroke-wave lithotripsy (SWL) was used for the treatment of patients with cholelithiasis. Indications and contraindications were strictly observed. This method provides destruction calculi down to a size of 2-3 mm which enables them to enter the intestine without local injury. Subsequent choleritics, exercises, duodenal to reduce time of gallbladder emptying and intake of litholytics.

  18. Shock wave lithotripsy in patients requiring anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Alsaikhan, Bader; Andonian, Sero

    2011-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) remains the only truly minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of upper tract nephrolithiasis. Recently, there has been a recent rise in the patients on antiplatelet agents. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to review the literature available regarding SWL in these high-risk patients requiring anti-coagulation therapy. Alternative therapies to SWL are also presented.

  19. The complications of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Coptcoat, M J; Webb, D R; Kellett, M J; Fletcher, M S; McNicholas, T A; Dickinson, I K; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1986-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy has been shown to be a safe and effective method of treating most upper urinary tract stones. Major complications, although few, include haemorrhage, septicaemia, "Steinstrasse" formation and cardiac arrhythmias. The experience from 600 consecutive cases is reviewed and methods of prevention are discussed.

  20. [Methods optimizing the efficiency of the extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)].

    PubMed

    Bonev, K; Panchev, P; Simeonov, P

    2007-01-01

    The medicine science is in a progressive mode. One of the ever discussed problems is the stone kidney disease and the optimizing methods of its treatment. In this article the authors announced a new method of applying jelly, thus improving the efficiency of the Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy (ESWL).

  1. Root cause analysis following nephrectomy after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katie; Cruz, Eneida; Guilbert, Mary Beth; Oser, Meg O'Toole

    2008-12-01

    An adverse event after a routine extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy procedure set into motion a root cause analysis methodology to decipher why and how the event occurred and offer a solution to prevent it from happening again. The process of performing a root cause analysis is discussed in detail.

  2. Hepatic haematoma after shockwave lithotripsy for renal stones.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chi-Fai; Law, Vincent T T; Chiu, Peter K F; Tan, Chong-Boon; Man, Chi-Wai; Chu, Peggy S K

    2012-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a non-invasive procedure for urolithiasis. Only a very small portion of patients suffer from post-SWL haematoma and most of them have perinephric haematoma formation. We present two patients who developed subcapsular hepatic haematomas after SWL, followed by a review of the literature on the condition.

  3. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral stones. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Xue, Z Y

    1991-04-01

    From June 1987 to December 1988, 212 cases of ureteral calculi were treated with ESWL and ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) respectively. The lithotriptic success rates of ESWL for upper, mid and distal ureteric stones were 100.0%, 100.0% and 93.4% respectively as compared with 62.5%, 85.7% and 93.7% of URSL. ESWL for upper and mid ureteral stones was obviously superior to URSL (P less than 0.001). The incidence rate of complications of ESWL was lower than that of URSL (P less than 0.05). In the 212 cases, urinary extravasation caused by ureteral injury occurred in 4 cases treated by URSL. We suggest that ESWL should be the first treatment of choice for ureteral calculi and URSL is not recommended for the treatment of upper ureteral calculi, but it may be used as an adjunctive method.

  4. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of the ureteral calculus--clinical results with local shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Wilbert, D M; Voges, G E; Müller, S C; Alken, P

    1987-11-01

    Second generation local shockwave lithotripsy appliances (Lithostar) were used for the treatment of upper and lower ureteral stones in 199 patients, 145 of whom had upper ureteral stones. In 78 patients the calculi were pushed back and all but one disintegrated. In 33 patients a catheter was inserted past the stone, which resulted of primary disintegration in 66%. In 19 of 34 patients (56%) in whom the stones could not be moved, primary disintegration was achieved. Distal ureteral stones were present in 54 patients and these were treated successfully by ESWL alone in 83.3%. Auxiliary measures (total 10%) included ureteroscopy, percutaneous extraction and ureterolithotomy. The results are discussed under the aspects of 'in situ' versus 'push-and-smash' procedures.

  5. [Use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for kidney calculi].

    PubMed

    Trapeznikova, M F; Dutov, V V

    2004-01-01

    278 patients with coral nephrolithiasis were examined in 1990-2003. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy was made in 46 (16.5%) patients with 48 coral stones (mean age 48.2 +/- 18.3 years) as a basic treatment. The length of the concrement was 4.9 +/- 1.8 cm, width 3.8 +/- 1.4 cm, a relative area 19.72 +/- 13.01 cm2. All the patients have initially undergone internal drain of the kidney by a catheter (n = 13) or stent (n = 33). Each lithotripsy session included, on the average, 2882 +/- 318 impulses (17-19 kV). The number of high-energy impulses per a session comprised 342 +/- 23. A total number of the sessions reached 3.4 +/- 1.55. Initial destruction of the concrement requires 1.6 +/- 0.6 sessions in 10144 +/- 1081.2 impulses per one patient including 1436 +/- 96.6 high-energy impulses. One procedure comprises 2-3 sessions of lithotripsy with a 5-7 day interval. The results were assessed at discharge after the first session and 6 months later, the degree of stones elimination from the kidney, complications, manipulations to manage the complications. At discharge after 3 lithotripsy sessions recovery was achieved only in 3 out of 46 (6.52%) patients. Six months later the fragments eliminated in 26.1% (12 of 46 patients). Monolithotripsy caused complications in 13 patients. Additional manipulations made up 65.2%. Inefficacy of explorative treatment necessitated conversion to open intervention in 6 (13.1% 0 patients. The use of extracorporeal lithotripsy as a monotherapy in coral nephrolithiasis is now limited.

  6. Endoscopic stapling diverticulotomy of pharyngeal pouch.

    PubMed

    Bates, G J; Koay, C B

    1996-03-01

    Endoscopic diverticulotomy (Dohlman's procedure) is a well-established and effective alternative to external diverticulectomy in the treatment of pharyngeal pouch. The division of the common septum between the pouch and the oesophagus is usually performed either with electrocautery or with a laser. We describe a new technique of endoscopic diverticulotomy using a linear cutter stapling gun. This technique has the advantages of being quick and bloodless, avoiding the need for a nasogastric tube, permitting oral intake as early as the first postoperative day and allowing early discharge from hospital. It also has the theoretical advantage over the electrocautery or the laser technique of reducing the risk of fistula formation, mediastinitis and thermal injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. PMID:8678451

  7. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  8. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  9. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-06-14

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis.

  10. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  11. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  12. Repeated piezoelectric lithotripsy for gallstones with and without ursodeoxycholic acid dissolution: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y; Ishihara, F; Kajiyama, G; Nakazawa, S; Otho, M; Tanimura, H; Akura, Y; Harada, M; Hihara, M; Kawai, Y

    1995-12-01

    The use of bile acid dissolution therapy in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones, remains controversial. Our study examined whether chemolitholysis after sufficient disintegration enhanced stone clearance within 6 months of the first lithotripsy. A total of 143 patients who developed one to three radiolucent stones measuring < or = 30 mm in diameter were randomly separated into two treatment groups: 47% were given lithotripsy alone, and 53% lithotripsy plus ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Repeated piezoelectric lithotripsy was given, with no limit on the total number of treatment sessions, to pulverize or disintegrate stones into fragments < 3 mm. Stones were disintegrated in 97% of all patients, and the fragments were < or = 2 mm in 50% of these patients. According to an intention-to-treat analysis, 52% in the lithotripsy alone group and 58% in the UDCA group were free of stones 6 months after the first lithotripsy (P = 0.61). Of the patients with fragments < or = 2 mm, 71% in the former and 86% in the latter group were free of stones 6 months after the first lithotripsy, with no significant difference between the groups. Biliary pain occurred in 25% of all patients, including 3 with acute cholecystitis. We concluded that the sufficient disintegration of gallstones achieved with repeated lithotripsy enhanced the early clearance of fragments, regardless of whether chemolitholysis was employed.

  13. [The prognosis of the efficacy of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of the kidneys and ureters].

    PubMed

    Dzhavad-Zade, S M

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the data on 300 patients revealed a relationship between basic clinical and history evidence, location of the concrement and efficacy of a single lithotripsy. The author presents factors influencing concrement disintegration. Basing on the relations between efficacy of lithotripsy and clinical signs three-score system for estimation of each sign is proposed. The highest effect of the concrement fragmentation occurred within 10 scores (in 97.1% of the patients). The score above 16 is indicative of lowering efficacy of lithotripsy. This system of calculation is efficient in prognostication of efficacy of extracorporeal impulse lithotripsy of the kidneys and ureters.

  14. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  15. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  16. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  17. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser.

  18. Dual-channel spectrally encoded endoscopic probe

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Guy; Genish, Hadar; Rosenbluh, Michael; Yelin, Dvir

    2012-01-01

    High quality imaging through sub-millimeter endoscopic probes provides clinicians with valuable diagnostics capabilities in hard to reach locations within the body. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) has been shown promising for such task; however, challenging probe fabrication and high speckle noise had prevented its testing in in vivo studies. Here we demonstrate a novel miniature SEE probe which incorporates some of the recent progress in spectrally encoded technology into a compact and robust endoscopic system. A high-quality miniature diffraction grating was fabricated using automated femtosecond laser cutting from a large bulk grating. Using one spectrally encoded channel for imaging and a separate channel for incoherent illumination, the new system has large depth of field, negligible back reflections and well controlled speckle noise which depends on the core diameter of the illumination fiber. Moreover, by using a larger imaging channel, higher groove density grating, shorter wavelength and broader spectrum, the new endoscopic system now allow significant improvements in almost all imaging parameter compared to previous systems, through an ultra-miniature endoscopic probe. PMID:22876349

  19. Management of urinary tract calculi by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, S N; Seth, A; Sood, R; Gupta, N P; Dogra, P N; Hemal, A K

    1994-02-01

    From July 1989 to April 1993, Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy (ESWL) was performed on 642 patients, of which 21 were from the pediatric age group. All treatments were done on a second generation lithotriptor-Siemens Lithostar, which does not require any modification for positioning of children. Fragmentation was achieved in all the patients (100%). A complete stone free rate was achieved in 17/21 patients (80.9%). Three (14.3%) patients had insignificant residual fragments whereas 1 (4.8%) had a residual fragment approximately 4 mm in size. 5640 shocks were required on an average. We have used low energy shockwaves with good results. General anesthesia was required for lithotripsy in only one child. The average fluoro exposure time was 1.6 minutes. We conclude that ESWL is a safe and effective method for treating urinary tract calculi in children.

  20. Shockwave lithotripsy and pacemakers: experience with 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Albers, D D; Lybrand, F E; Axton, J C; Wendelken, J R

    1995-08-01

    Lithotripsy treatment of urinary tract calculi initially excluded patients with cardiac pacemakers. Continued research and clinical study of patient outcomes has promoted a change in that initial concept. The Oklahoma Lithotripsy Center has successfully treated 20 patients with various types of pacemakers. No significant cardiovascular events occurred during treatment. Patients should be evaluated before the procedure by a cardiologist, and dual-chamber pacemakers should be reprogrammed to the single-chamber mode. Patients who cannot tolerate this should not undergo SWL. Rate-responsive pacemakers should be programmed to the non-rate-responsive (VVI) mode. The pacemaker should be at least 5 cm from the blast path. With these precautions and careful monitoring, SWL can be performed safely in most patients with pacemakers.

  1. [Extracorporeal piezogenerated shockwave lithotripsy. Our experience in 500 cases].

    PubMed

    Vargas Blasco, C; Alcover García, J; Gil-Vernet Sedo, J M; Bianchi Cardona, L

    1990-01-01

    Between April 1987 and August 1988, 498 patients suffering renal or ureteral lithiasis, all of them with a 6 months or more follow-up period, have been treated in our Unit. Patients were treated in an ambulatory regime without need for anesthesia or analgesia. Up to 27% of the cases has surgical background for lithiasis. One hundred and twenty-six patients had a double J ureteral catheter placed prior to lithotripsy treatment. Fourty-four percent cases needed only one session, 25% two, 12% three and 18% more than three sessions. At the time of discharge 86% patients had no lithiasis or fragments less than 3 mm. Only 9% had fragments larger that 3 mm. It is our opinion than piezoelectric extracorporeal lithotripsy has been proven as a safe, effective and painless procedure in most renal lithiasis.

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy on the Sonolith-3000 apparatus].

    PubMed

    Tkachuk, V N; Veroman, V Iu; Komiakov, B K; Bannikov, V V; Sapelkin, A V; Ivanov, A O; Iudkevich, B A; Kalashian, R K

    1991-01-01

    The authors observed 812 patients with nephrolithiasis who underwent 876 sessions of shock-wave lithotripsy on Sonolith-3000 lithotriptor supplied with an ultrasonic system of the stone localization. The size of nephroliths ranged from 0.7 to 4.2 cm. Large-size nephroliths required repeated sessions and pretreatment establishment of the stent. The procedure proceeded without anesthesia. Subsequent renal colic was reported in 126 (15.5%), an exacerbation of pyelonephritis in 45 (5.5%), subcapsular hematoma in 4 (0.5%) of the patients. 790 patients showed clinical response (97.3%), with a complete destruction of the stone in 446 (54.9%) and partial one in 344 (42.4%) cases. 27 subjects were treated in outpatient setting. According to the authors, lithotripsy is contraindicated in urinary tract obstruction below the stone, renal failure, chronic pyelonephritis in the active phase of inflammation, marked impairment of cardiac rhythm.

  3. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  4. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  5. Two-wavelength method for endoscopic shape measurement by spatial phase-shifting speckle-interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kandulla, Jochen; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; von Bally, Gert

    2004-10-10

    A two-wavelength method for endoscopic topography reconstruction is introduced that can be applied to out-of-plane sensitive electronic-speckle-pattern interferometry systems based on rigid endoscope imaging systems. The surface measurement is performed by detection of the phase-difference distribution affected by a change in the applied laser wavelength. Furthermore, the off-axis endoscopic illumination geometry is taken into account by an approximation. Experimental results of the characterization of the endoscopic surface reconstruction technique and the measurement accuracy obtained are described and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the method is demonstrated with results from the topographic reconstruction of a free-form surface. PMID:15508598

  6. Do not treat staghorn calculi by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy alone!

    PubMed

    Delaney, C P; Creagh, T A; Smith, J M; Fitzpatrick, J M

    1993-01-01

    A review of 84 patients with triple phosphate (staghorn) calculi treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) revealed a 67% stone clearance at 6 months. Classification of calculi according to morphology showed a variation in stone clearance from 47 to 82%. A significant number of patients developed complications (25%) or required additional procedures (27%). ESWL monotherapy is not a suitable treatment option for most patients with staghorn calculi.

  7. Flexible cystoscopy as an adjunct to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Mark, S D; Gray, J M; Wright, W L

    1990-09-01

    Ancillary procedures associated with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) include placement and subsequent removal of double pigtail ureteric stents. A simple new technique has been developed for the insertion of these stents. Using the flexible cystoscope, the procedure is performed on an out-patient basis under local anaesthesia. Placement of the stents was successful in 30/34 patients and removal was successful in 14/14 patients.

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy today--an assessment of current status].

    PubMed

    Chaussy, C; Wilbert, D M

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is standard therapy for urolithiasis. With comparable technical principles, various lithotripters have been developed and are in routine use. Renal pelvic stones, calyceal stones, ureteral stones, and other special forms can be treated with varying results. Currently, the so-called clinically insignificant residual fragments and the recurrence of calculi are under discussion. Whereas the side effects of ESWL are well known, studies comparing ESWL with other endourological procedures are still lacking.

  9. Lasers in the management of calcified urinary tract stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime O.; Tunuguntla, Hari S. G. R.; Crone, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Indwelling double J ureteral stents are used for internal urinary diversion for ureteral obstruction and post-surgical drainage of the upper urinary tract. Stent calcification is a serious complication especially in those with forgotten stents. In a retrospective review of 16 patients (10 male and 6 female) we found holmium laser to be highly effective in the management of calcified stents. Encrustations/calcifications were noted on the distal end of the sent in 6 patiens (37.5%), middle and distal portions in 2 patients (12.5%), along the entire length of the stent in 3 patients (18.75%), lower portion of the stent in 4 patients (25%) and at the upper and lower ends of the stent in one patient (6.25%). Cystolitholapaxy, retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) with holmium: YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PNL) and antegrade URS with holmium: YAG laser intracorporeal lithotripsy were effectively performed without intraoperative complications. Lithotripsy became necessary before stent removal in 11 patients (68.75%). Holmium laser lithotripsy was useful in managing 7 patients (43.75%), and shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) in 6 patients (37.5%). In two patients (12.5%) both holmium and SWL were used before the stent can be removed.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave biliary lithotripsy. Physical basis and clinical application].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Sánchez, N; Uribe-Esquivel, M; Bosques, F; de la Mora, G; Sánchez, J M; Ponciano, G

    1990-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves lithotripsy is a new procedure discovered and applied in the present decade to treat urinary and biliary stones. Shock waves are acoustic waves similar to sonic waves which follow the acoustic laws and therefore the shock waves can be refracted or reflected depending on the medium interface. Due to the high water content, the human body can be crossed by shock waves which eventually may be focused on the target stone. There are several commercially available shock waves generators, i.e. the spark gap emisors which were the first ones, and the piezoceramic and electromagnetic emisors. To focus the shock waves on a biliary stone the machines are provided with fluoroscopic or ultrasound devices or with both in the most advanced machines. Using an electromagnetic emisor (Lithostar plus) our group has treated 78 patients with biliary stones without analgesia or anesthesia. Total stone fragmentation was achieved in 85% of the cases. In patients with cholesterol gallstones who undergo lithotripsy, an adjuvant treatment with oral cholesterol solvent is mandatory. Extracorporeal biliary lithotripsy is free of mortality, and the morbidity is less than 5%.

  11. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  12. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  13. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  14. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: first 1000 cases at the London Stone Clinic.

    PubMed

    Das, G; Dick, J; Bailey, M J; Fletcher, M S; Webb, D R; Kellett, M J; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1987-10-10

    One thousand patients underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for renal and ureteric calculi at this clinic. An overall success rate of 91.8% was achieved (stone free or less than 2 mm fragments at three months) and for stones measuring 1 cm 96.3%. Lithotripsy produced extremely low morbidity, and no deaths have occurred at the clinic. Patients who had lithotripsy alone had a mean hospital stay of three days and in most instances were able to perform their full range of activities on discharge. Planned combination of lithotripsy with minimally invasive endourological procedures such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureterorenoscopy has allowed us to extend the range of treatable cases to include large stones. Prophylactic use of Double-J ureteric stents in selected cases has reduced the incidence of obstruction by stone fragments after lithotripsy, thereby decreasing morbidity and hospital stay.

  15. [Biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the surgical treatment concept of cholelithiasis].

    PubMed

    Meiser, G; Heinerman, M; Boeckl, O

    1990-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (BESWL) using the "Obertisch" module Lithostar Plus (Siemens AG) was carried out in 100 patients, comprising a total of 189 gallbladder stones with a size range from 8 to 35 mm. Chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acid was given as adjuvant litholytic therapy, beginning 14 days before treatment. 53% of the patients suffered from radiolucent solitary stones with an average size of 21 +/- 6 mm. 14% had more than 3 stones, another 12% had solitary stones with a small rim calcification. In 99 patients all stones could be disintegrated. In 90% we achieved a fragment size smaller than 5 mm, in 10% smaller than 8 mm. 68 patients were treated in a single session, in 32% a 2nd or 3rd treatment was necessary. In the average 4100 +/- 2200 shock-waves with energy level 9 (650 bar) were applied. During treatment 15 patients suffered from slight right kidney pain. In the following 48 hours after BESWL we observed a transitory significant elevation of transaminases (32%), urinary amylases without clinical symptoms (31%), bilirubin (31%) and white blood cells (71%). A microhematuria was seen in 33%, a macrohematuria in 2%. Post-BESWL sonographically we found a transitory edema of the gallbladder wall in 18%, in 15% a hydrops, in 10% a dilatation of the common bile duct and in 4% free fluid surrounding the gallbladder. After dismission 31% of the patients suffered from slight colicky pain. In 3 patients acute biliary pancreatitis was observed 4 and 8 weeks after BESWL which could be treated by EPT and endoscopic stone removal.

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic and large common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-10-21

    Extraction of large pancreatic and common bile duct (CBD) calculi has always challenged the therapeutic endoscopist. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is an excellent tool for patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi that are not amenable to routine endotherapy. Pancreatic calculi in the head and body are targeted by ESWL, with an aim to fragment them to < 3 mm diameter so that they can be extracted by subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In our experience, complete clearance of the pancreatic duct was achieved in 76% and partial clearance in 17% of 1006 patients. Short-term pain relief with reduction in the number of analgesics ingested was seen in 84% of these patients. For large CBD calculi, a nasobiliary tube is placed to help target the calculi, as well as bathe the calculi in saline - a simple maneuver which helps to facilitate fragmentation. The aim is to fragment calculi to < 5 mm size and clear the same during ERCP. Complete clearance of the CBD was achieved in 84.4% of and partial clearance in 12.3% of 283 patients. More than 90% of the patients with pancreatic and biliary calculi needed three or fewer sessions of ESWL with 5000 shocks being delivered at each session. The use of epidural anesthesia helped in reducing patient movement. This, together with the better focus achieved with newer third-generation lithotripters, prevents collateral tissue damage and minimizes the complications. Complications in our experience with nearly 1300 patients were minimal, and no extension of hospital stay was required. Similar rates of clearance of pancreatic and biliary calculi with minimal adverse effects have been reported from the centers where ESWL is performed regularly. In view of its high efficiency, non-invasive nature and low complication rates, ESWL can be offered as the first-line therapy for selected patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi.

  17. Olecranon extrabursal endoscopic bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chen G; McGuire, Duncan T; Morse, Levi P; Bain, Gregory I

    2013-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis is a common clinical problem. It is often managed conservatively because of the high rates of wound complications with the conventional open surgical technique. Conventional olecranon bursoscopy utilizes an arthroscope and an arthroscopic shaver, removing the bursa from inside-out. We describe an extrabursal endoscopic technique where the bursa is not entered but excised in its entirety under endoscopic vision. A satisfactory view is obtained with less morbidity than the open method, while still avoiding a wound over the sensitive point of the olecranon. PMID:23970201

  18. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  19. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques.

  20. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  1. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  2. Gastric band migration following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB): two cases of endoscopic management using a gastric band cutter.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Pawel; Hady, Hady Razak; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kaminski, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is one of the most frequently used minimally invasive and reversible procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity. Migration of the gastric band into the gastric lumen is a rare late complication of LAGB. Previous attempts at endoscopic removal of migrated bands have included the use of endoscopic scissors, laser ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). We report two cases of successful endoscopic management of gastric band migration using a gastric band cutter. PMID:23256012

  3. Advances in the Endoscopic Assessment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Cooperation between Endoscopic and Pathologic Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic assessment has a crucial role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is particularly useful for the assessment of IBD disease extension, severity, and neoplasia surveillance. Recent advances in endoscopic imaging techniques have been revolutionized over the past decades, progressing from conventional white light endoscopy to novel endoscopic techniques using molecular probes or electronic filter technologies. These new technologies allow for visualization of the mucosa in detail and monitor for inflammation/dysplasia at the cellular or sub-cellular level. These techniques may enable us to alter the IBD surveillance paradigm from four quadrant random biopsy to targeted biopsy and diagnosis. High definition endoscopy and dye-based chromoendoscopy can improve the detection rate of dysplasia and evaluate inflammatory changes with better visualization. Dye-less chromoendoscopy, including narrow band imaging, iScan, and autofluorescence imaging can also enhance surveillance in comparison to white light endoscopy with optical or electronic filter technologies. Moreover, confocal laser endomicroscopy or endocytoscopy have can achieve real-time histology evaluation in vivo and have greater accuracy in comparison with histology. These new technologies could be combined with standard endoscopy or further histologic confirmation in patients with IBD. This review offers an evidence-based overview of new endoscopic techniques in patients with IBD. PMID:26018512

  4. [Cost comparison of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of gallstones].

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Benninger, J; Ell, C

    1994-11-11

    To aid in the choice between laparoscopic cholecystectomy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of gallstones the costs of the two methods were investigated. A decision tree was constructed so as to set out the initial procedure costs of both techniques and possible subsequent costs due to treatment failure or complications. The computations were based on figures from the University Clinic, Erlangen, in 1993. The direct (medical) costs of laparoscopic cholecystectomy amounted to DM 3556, to which must be added further indirect costs of DM 3152 arising from loss of working capacity and premature death. The direct expenses for lithotripsy including outpatient aftercare were DM 6708 and the indirect expenses DM 1858. The overall costs per patient for lithotripsy are hence DM 1858 higher than those of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This cost difference remained substantially unaltered even when the success rates of the two techniques were varied over a wide range. When lithotripsy is performed entirely as an outpatient procedure and inpatient costs hence disappear, the expected overall cost drops from DM 8567 to DM 6381. Omission of the lump sum charge for lithotripsy effects a similar drop in overall costs to DM 6379. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is hence cheaper than lithotripsy. Only if lithotripsy can be performed at very low cost can it compete with laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  5. Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Won-Ju; Park, Chang-Hwan; Chung, Kyoung-Myeun; Park, Seon-Young; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Ki, Ho-seok; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.

  6. [Opioid analgesia during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones].

    PubMed

    Schelling, G; Weber, W; Mendl, G; Negri, L; Jänicke, U; Sackmann, M; Peter, K

    1989-11-01

    Gallstone lithotripsy is a new and noninvasive therapeutic option for approximately 20% of patients who harbor cholesterol gallstones. Technologically advanced second-generation lithotripters such as the Dornier MPL 9000 device have greatly simplified biliary lithotripsy with a consecutive reduction in anesthetic requirements. Despite these technical improvements, patients still can experience considerable pain and discomfort during biliary ESWL. Due to its relatively predictable pharmacokinetic profile and its short duration of action, alfentanil appeared to be a suitable drug for pain relief during stone fragmentation. In order to analyze the degree and distribution of pain during gallstone lithotripsy and to evaluate pain control by alfentanil, 44 consecutive patients (ASA I-II) with no previous ESWL therapy were studied. Pain intensity and degree of opioid-induced sedation during shock wave application were evaluated according to 5-point verbal scales that ranged from 0 = no pain to 4 = unbearable pain and 0 = patient awake to 4 = patient asleep. All patients were treated while in the prone position and received oxygen at 6 l/min. After stone focusing, an alfentanil infusion at an initial rate of 2.5 micrograms/kg min was started. Single shock waves were released as test shocks after approximately 2 min. If they were well tolerated, stone fragmentation was begun. If not, more alfentanil was allowed to accumulate until continuous treatment was tolerated. Further in- or decreases of the infusion rate were titrated according to patient response. Registered variables included the required alfentanil loading dose, maintenance and total doses, and the applied shock wave energy approximated by multiplication of shock wave number and voltage squared.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Color processing of ultrasonographic images in extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Lardennois, B; Ziade, A; Walter, K

    1991-02-01

    A number of technical difficulties are encountered in the ultrasonographic detection of renal stones which unfortunately limit its performance. The margin of error of firing in extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) must be reduced to a minimum. The role of the ultrasonographic monitoring during lithotripsy is also essential: continuous control of the focussing of the short-wave beamand assessment if the quality of fragmentation. The authors propose to improve ultrasonographic imaging in ESWL by means of intraoperative colour processing of the stone. Each shot must be directed to its target with an economy of vision avoiding excessive fatigue. The principle of the technique consists of digitalization of the ultrasound video images using a Macintosh Mac 2 computer. The Graphis Paint II program is interfaced directly with the Quick Capture card and recovers the images on its work surface in real time. The program is then able to attribute to each of these 256 shades of grey any one of the 16.6 million colours of the Macintosh universe with specific intensity and saturation. During fragmentation, using the principle of a palette, the stone changes colour from green to red indicating complete fragmentation. A Color Space card converts the digital image obtained into a video analogue source which is visualized on the monitor. It can be superimposed and/or juxtaposed with the source image by means of a multi-standard mixing table. Colour processing of ultrasonographic images in extracoporeal shockwave lithotripsy allows better visualization of the stones and better follow-up of fragmentation and allows the shockwave treatment to be stopped earlier. It increases the stone-free performance at 6 months. This configuration will eventually be able to integrate into the ultrasound apparatus itself.

  8. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for salivary calculi in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, F; Marchisio, P; Arisi, E; Capaccio, P

    2001-10-01

    Salivary gland lithiasis is uncommon in pediatric patients. Color Doppler ultrasonography (US) enables an accurate diagnosis of lithiasis to be made without exposure to the radiation of traditional imaging techniques. The development of minimally invasive techniques in the ENT field has made salivary lithotripsy a feasible alternative to traditional invasive surgery. The safety and efficacy of shock wave lithotripsy for salivary calculi were evaluated in pediatric patients. Seven children (5 males; age 4-15 years) with single calculi (mean diameter 4.4 mm) of the submandibular (n = 4) and parotid glands (n = 3) underwent extracorporeal electromagnetic shock wave lithotripsy (EESWL). In four cases the stone was intraductal (two submandibular and two parotideal) and in the remaining three cases it was intraparenchymal (two submandibular and one parotideal). In one case sedative anesthesia was performed. The mean number of therapeutic sessions was five. Patients were followed up clinically and with US for 6-72 months (mean 32 months). Complete disintegration of the calculi was achieved in five cases while in two cases a residual fragment < 2 mm in diameter was observed. None of the patients had recurrence of calculi in the treated gland. Mild self-limited adverse effects (pain, swelling of the gland, self-limiting bleeding from the duct, cutaneous petechiae) were observed in four cases. Our data suggest that EESWL is effective, safe and well tolerated; the minimal invasiveness of the technique suggests that EESWL should be used as the primary approach to salivary calculi in pediatric patients. The continuous US monitoring enables the efficacy of EESWL to be evaluated during both treatment and follow-up, with only slight discomfort for the pediatric patient.

  9. Tracking kidney stones with sound during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Jonathan M.

    The prevalence of kidney stones has increased significantly over the past decades. One of the primary treatments for kidney stones is shock wave lithotripsy which focuses acoustic shock waves onto the stone in order to fragment it into pieces that are small enough to pass naturally. This typically requires a few thousand shock waves delivered at a rate of about 2 Hz. Although lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment option for kidney stories, both acute and chronic complications have been identified which could be reduced if fewer shock waves were used. One factor that could be used to reduce the number of shock waves is accounting for the motion of the stone which causes a portion of the delivered shock waves to miss the stone, yielding no therapeutic benefit. Therefore identifying when the stone is not in focus would allow tissue to be spared without affecting fragmentation. The goal of this thesis is to investigate acoustic methods to track the stone in real-time during lithotripsy in order to minimize poorly-targeted shock waves. A relatively small number of low frequency ultrasound transducers were used in pulse-echo mode and a novel optimization routine based on time-of-flight triangulation is used to determine stone location. It was shown that the accuracy of the localization may be estimated without knowing the true stone location. This method performed well in preliminary experiments but the inclusion of tissue-like aberrating layers reduced the accuracy of the localization. Therefore a hybrid imaging technique employing DORT (Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator) and the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm was developed. This method was able to localize kidney stories to within a few millimeters even in the presence of an aberrating layer. This would be sufficient accuracy for targeting lithotripter shock waves. The conclusion of this work is that tracking kidney stones with low frequency ultrasound should be effective clinically.

  10. Clinical factors associated with postoperative hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Woo; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Yim, Sang Un; Cho, Yang Hyun; Shin, Bo Sung; Chung, Ho Seok; Yu, Ho Song; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Jung, Seung Il; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine the predictors of ipsilateral hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods From January 2010 to December 2014, a total of 204 patients with ureteral calculi who underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy were reviewed. Patients with lack of clinical data, presence of ureteral rupture, and who underwent simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) were excluded. Postoperative hydronephrosis was determined via computed tomographic scan or renal ultrasonography, at 6 months after ureteroscopic lithotripsy. Multivariable analysis was performed to determine clinical factors associated with ipsilateral hydronephrosis. Results A total of 137 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the patients was 58.8±14.2 years and the mean stone size was 10.0±4.6 mm. The stone-free rate was 85.4%. Overall, 44 of the 137 patients (32.1%) had postoperative hydronephrosis. Significant differences between the hydronephrosis and nonhydronephrosis groups were noted in terms of stone location, preoperative hydronephrosis, impacted stone, operation time, and ureteral stent duration (all, p<0.05). On multivariable analysis, increasing preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.31; p=0.001) and impacted stone (adjusted OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.15–7.61; p=0.031) independently predicted the occurrence of postoperative hydronpehrosis. Conclusions Large preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney and presence of impacted stones were associated with hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic stone removal. Therefore, patients with these predictive factors undergo more intensive imaging follow-up in order to prevent renal deterioration due to postoperative hydronephrosis. PMID:27617316

  11. Clinical factors associated with postoperative hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Woo; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Yim, Sang Un; Cho, Yang Hyun; Shin, Bo Sung; Chung, Ho Seok; Yu, Ho Song; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Jung, Seung Il; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine the predictors of ipsilateral hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods From January 2010 to December 2014, a total of 204 patients with ureteral calculi who underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy were reviewed. Patients with lack of clinical data, presence of ureteral rupture, and who underwent simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) were excluded. Postoperative hydronephrosis was determined via computed tomographic scan or renal ultrasonography, at 6 months after ureteroscopic lithotripsy. Multivariable analysis was performed to determine clinical factors associated with ipsilateral hydronephrosis. Results A total of 137 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the patients was 58.8±14.2 years and the mean stone size was 10.0±4.6 mm. The stone-free rate was 85.4%. Overall, 44 of the 137 patients (32.1%) had postoperative hydronephrosis. Significant differences between the hydronephrosis and nonhydronephrosis groups were noted in terms of stone location, preoperative hydronephrosis, impacted stone, operation time, and ureteral stent duration (all, p<0.05). On multivariable analysis, increasing preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.31; p=0.001) and impacted stone (adjusted OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.15–7.61; p=0.031) independently predicted the occurrence of postoperative hydronpehrosis. Conclusions Large preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney and presence of impacted stones were associated with hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic stone removal. Therefore, patients with these predictive factors undergo more intensive imaging follow-up in order to prevent renal deterioration due to postoperative hydronephrosis.

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, endourology and open surgery: the management and follow-up of 200 patients with urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Webb, D R; McNicholas, T A; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1985-11-01

    The management and follow up of 200 consecutive patients with renal and ureteric calculi are presented. The primary treatment of 185 (92.5%) was by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), of whom three (1.6)%) with large calculi underwent percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) prior to ESWL as a planned combined procedure. Twelve (6%) were treated by PCNL or ureterorenoscopy (URS) as their definitive treatment and three (1.5%) by conventional open renal and ureteric surgery. The average in-patient stay was 3.8 days and most returned to normal activity within one day of discharge. Of the 185 patients 102 (55%) required no analgesia after treatment by ESWL, 29 (15.6%) required parenteral analgesia and the rest were comfortable with oral non-narcotic medication. Thirty (16%) required auxillary treatment by percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN), PCNL and URS following ESWL for obstructive complications from stone particles. Two required further ESWL and one PCNL at three months for large fragments. Overall, open surgery was required for only 1% of renal calculi and 13% of ureteric stones. These results are consistant with the extensive West German experience confirming that most urinary calculi are now best managed by ESWL and endoscopic techniques. Where these facilities are available open surgery should only be necessary for less than 5% of upper urinary tract stones.

  13. Second-generation lithotripsy: a safe, noninvasive, ambulatory procedure.

    PubMed

    Baert, L; Claes, H; Billiet, I; D'Hallewin, M; Vandeursen, H; Van Poppel, H

    1989-01-01

    A total of 600 patients underwent 696 treatments of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) during the period between June and November 1987. Our progressively increasing experience with the second-generation device shows that this new unit is as effective as the conventional one, and reveals several advantages. The focusing of the stone is easier; therapy time is shorter; general or regional anesthesia is no longer necessary; distal ureteral stones can be disintegrated, and adjuvant procedures are easily performed during the ESWL session. Of the last 400 patients of our series, 76% were treated on an outpatient basis without any major complications.

  14. A death due to perirenal hematoma complicating extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Koichi; Takahashi, Sayuri; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Nakajima, Makoto; Saka, Kanju; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2008-03-01

    Perirenal hematoma is an occasional complication of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) which does not usually require treatment. A 79-year-old woman died 23 h after ESWL. Forensic autopsy was performed to determine whether medical treatment contributed to her death. The cause of death was hemorrhagic shock due to massive hematoma from a ruptured small vein in the perirenal adipose capsule. No injury to other organs was found and the patient had neither coagulation abnormality nor venous disease. Perirenal hematoma can easily be diagnosed with abdominal sonography, if pain or symptoms of anemia develop. Doctors must be aware of the possibilities of severe renal hematomas after ESWL.

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy monotherapy for paediatric urinary tract calculi.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, J A; Moran, K; Mooney, E E; Sheehan, S; Smith, J M; Fitzpatrick, J M

    1990-06-01

    The role of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the management of paediatric urinary tract calculi was evaluated. The study group included 22 children (13 male, 9 female) with an age range of 2 to 13 years. The renal calculi, including staghorn and ureteric calculi, varied in size from 0.3 to 5 cm. Overall stone clearance at 3 months was 79% with a low incidence of complications (2 children required nephrostomy drainage for sepsis). ESWL is a non-invasive method of managing even complex stones in children of all ages, irrespective of size or position.

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of urolithiasis in children].

    PubMed

    Dzeranov, H K; Pavlov, A Iu; Cherepanova, E V

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was performed in 1451 children with urolithiasis aged from 7 months to 16 years. A total of 2464 sessions were made. Low-energy impulses in ESWL were effective in 98.8% children with concrements up to 2.0 cm in size and in 98.8% of those with stones larger than 2.0 cm. We believe that main factors of high efficiency of ESWL in children are: more friable structure of stones, small depth of stone location, faster evacuation of the stone fragments. ESWL with low energy impulses is highly effective and is not accompanied with traumatic complications. Renal parenchyma is not affected.

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of pediatric urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Zöller, G; Ludewig, M; Kallerhoff, M; Zappel, H

    1991-11-01

    The 2nd generation lithotripter LITHOSTAR plus was used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of 9 kidney stones, 2 ureteral calculi and 2 bladder stones in 10 children 15 months to 17 years old. Ultrasonic stone localization was used in 2 children, x-ray guided stone localization in 8 children. General anesthesia was necessary in 6 children. A stone free rate of 60% was achieved after 1 treatment. Except for one 14-year old boy no adjuvant procedures like percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteral stents were applied. No major complications were encountered.

  18. Shockwave lithotripsy-new concepts and optimizing treatment parameters.

    PubMed

    Bhojani, Naeem; Lingeman, James E

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of kidney stone disease has changed dramatically over the past 30 years. This change is due in large part to the arrival of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). ESWL along with the advances in ureteroscopic and percutaneous techniques has led to the virtual extinction of open surgical treatments for kidney stone disease. Much research has gone into understanding how ESWL can be made more efficient and safe. This article discusses the parameters that can be used to optimize ESWL outcomes as well as the new concepts that are affecting the efficacy and efficiency of ESWL.

  19. [Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of a salivary stone].

    PubMed

    Iro, H; Schneider, T; Nitsche, N; Waitz, G; Marienhagen, J; Ell, C

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonography revealed a 12 mm concrement in the left parotid duct of a 67-year-old man with an acute exacerbation of a left-sided purulent parotitis. After the acute phase had subsided under antibiotic therapy it was not possible to remove the stone either by bougie or cutting into the duct close to the papilla. Piezoelectric shockwave lithotripsy with a total of 1000 shock-waves fragmented the stone, and sonography 48 hours and four weeks later demonstrated that the parotid gland was free of stone.

  20. Renal milk of calcium: contraindication to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, A; Vorreuther, R; Krug, B; Moul, J W; Engelmann, U H

    1996-01-01

    Renal milk-of-calcium (MOC) cysts are rare findings, with only approximately 60 cases reported in the literature. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of the typical "half-moon" configuration on horizontal beam radiography; classical ultrasound finding is a gravity-dependent, echogenic shadowy material in a renal cyst. The importance of the MOC syndrome lies in its recognition and differentiation from a renal stone in order to avoid unwarranted surgery or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). We have encountered five patients with renal MOC and present the typical clinical and radiological features in order to facilitate differential diagnosis.

  1. Short-term bioeffects of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Akdaş, A; Türkeri, L N; Ilker, Y; Simşek, F; Emerk, K

    1994-06-01

    Safety guidelines for shockwave delivery during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) are not yet clear. Renal functions were assessed by using urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT; EC.2.6.1.2), aspartate aminotransferase (AST; EC. 2.6.1.1), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) as well as sodium, potassium, and calcium concentrations in respect to tubular functions after SWL with the Dornier MFL 5000 unit in 32 patients. In order to monitor glomerular function, we determined microalbuminuria. Transient glomerular and tubular damage occurs in SWL-treated kidneys. The minimum interval between two shockwave treatments should be at least 7 days.

  2. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy monotherapy for large renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M J; Griffith, D P

    1989-10-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) monotherapy with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter was used to treat 199 large (greater than or equal to 3 cm) renal calculi. Calculi were classified as solitary (29), multiple (152) or staghorn (18) with stone-free rates of 55.2, 39.5 and 55.6% respectively. The stone-free rate was not statistically related to stone size, site or multiplicity. Complications occurred in 24 patients (12.8%) and were more common with solitary and staghorn calculi. ESWL is not recommended as primary treatment for most patients with large renal calculi.

  3. [Antibiotic prophylaxis with enoxacin in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Knipper, A; Böhle, A; Pensel, J; Hofstetter, A G

    1989-01-01

    According to literature, 16 to 35% of operatively removed renal stones harbour bacteria. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis with enoxacin in reducing the rate of bacteriuria after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was investigated in a prospective randomized study. Twenty-five patients received a single 400 mg dose of enoxacin one hour before ESWL, 25 patients did not receive an antibiotic. It was found that a single 400 mg dose of enoxacin one hour before ESWL can reduce the rate of bacteriuria significantly.

  4. Does respiratory gating improve extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy results?

    PubMed

    Sade, M; Guler, C; Esen, A A; Kirkali, Z

    1994-10-01

    The reliability and efficacy of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has been established in urinary stone disease. Its combination with respiratory gating might be a useful method to increase the effectiveness of treatment and reduce the number of shocks required. For this purpose, the results of SWL combined with respiratory gating were compared with those of SWL without gating. There was no difference in the stone-free rates of the two groups or in the complication rate. It is concluded that this method neither decreases the number of shockwaves needed nor increases the effectiveness of SWL.

  5. [Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy in horseshoe kidney].

    PubMed

    Blasco Casares, F J; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M; Ruiz Marcellán, F J

    1994-05-01

    Presentation of our experience in the use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for the treatment of lithiasis that occurred in 34 renal units from 28 patients with horseshoe kidneys. All patients but one were placed in supine decubitus with the calculus positioned in F2. A total of 47 sessions were performed for 34 treatments apart from 3 ureteroscopies for ureteral voiding. The results of the follow-up is absence of lithiasis in 13 renal units, debris of less than 3 mm in six, non-removable debris in 13 cases and relapse in two.

  6. Choledocholithiasis diagnostics - endoscopic ultrasound or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography?

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław

    2014-06-01

    It is estimated that 3.4% of patients qualified for cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis have a coexisting choledocholithiasis. For decades, endoscopic ascending retrograde cholangiopancreatography has been the golden diagnostic standard in cases of suspected choledocholithiasis. The method is associated with a relatively high rate of complications, including acute pancreatitis, the incidence of which is estimated to range between 0.74% and 1.86%. The mechanism of this ERCP-induced complication is not fully understood, although factors increasing the risk of acute pancreatitis, such as sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, previous acute pancreatitis, narrow bile ducts or difficult catheterization of Vater's ampulla are known. It has been suggested to discontinue the diagnostic endoscopic retrograde ascending cholangiopancreatography and replace it with endoscopic ultrasonography due to possible and potentially dangerous complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography has sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 95% regardless of gallstone diameter, as opposed to magnetic resonance cholangiography. However, both of these parameters depend on the experience of the performing physician. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography allows to limit the number of performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures by more than 2/3. Ascending endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography combined with an endoscopic incision into the Vater's ampulla followed by a mechanical evacuation of stone deposits from the ducts still remains a golden standard in the treatment of choledocholithiasis. Despite some limitations such as potentially increased treatment costs as well as the necessity of the procedure to be performed by a surgeon experienced in both endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography as well as endoscopic ultrasonography, the diagnostic endoscopic ultrasonography followed by a simultaneous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography aimed at gallstone removal is

  7. Intraductal shock-wave lithotripsy in complicated common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Riemann, J F; Kohler, B; Weber, J; Schlauch, D

    1992-02-01

    Intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was performed in 36 patients with problematic common bile duct stones. All of the patients had undergone unsuccessful mechanical lithotripsy prior to this procedure. In 29 patients (80.6%), the stones were fragmented under cholangioscopic control and subsequently extracted with a Dormia basket. In seven patients, the procedure failed due to stone impaction or failure to intubate the common bile duct with a nasobiliary tube. No complications were observed. Cholangioscopically guided intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a highly effective and safe procedure for the conservative treatment of complicated common bile duct stones.

  8. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  9. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  10. Comparison of percutaneous and endoscopic retrograde removal of postoperatively retained bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Becker, C D; Eigenmann, F; Scheurer, U; Halter, F

    1993-01-01

    Forty-one patients underwent nonsurgical removal of postoperatively retained bile duct stones in two nonrandomized groups. The endoscopic-retrograde technique was used in 21 patients, and succeeded in 19. The percutaneous approach through the T-tube tract was used in 22 patients, including the two in whom endoscopic stone removal had failed, and was successful in 21 patients. Individual preferences and prior history introduced a selection bias against the percutaneous technique. Auxiliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was used in 2 patients whose stones could not be fragmented mechanically by the percutaneous basket technique. ESWL was successful in one patient but failed in the second. Because endoscopy had also failed in this case, the patient subsequently underwent repeat surgery. Procedure-related complications were minor with both techniques and were readily treated by conservative measures. We conclude that both the retrograde and the percutaneous approaches are effective and safe. The endoscopic approach appears convenient because there is no need to await maturation of the percutaneous tract, but sphincterotomy carries a small but distinctive risk. Because the percutaneous approach uses an existing tract, is only minimally invasive and leaves the sphincter of Oddi intact, it is preferable in those patients who have T-tubes of appropriate size and position in place.

  11. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Saclarides, Theodore John

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer. PMID:26491409

  12. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure.

  13. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  14. Laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) is a newly developed concept for tumor dissection of the gastrointestinal tract that was first investigated for local resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The first reported version of LECS for GIST has been named 'classical LECS' to distinguish it from other modified LECS procedures, such as inverted LECS, a combination of laparoscopic and endoscopic approaches to neoplasia with a non-exposure technique (CLEAN-NET), and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). These modified LECS procedures were developed for dissection of malignant tumors which may seed tumor cells into the abdominal cavity. While these LECS-related procedures might prevent tumor seeding, their application is limited by several factors, such as tumor size, location and technical difficulty. Currently, classical LECS is a safe and useful procedure for gastric submucosal tumors without mucosal defects, independent of tumor location, such as proximity to the esophagogastric junction or pyloric ring. For future applications of LECS-related procedures for other malignant diseases with mucosal lesions such as GIST with mucosal defects and gastric cancer, some improvements in the techniques are needed.

  15. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: our experience in 5,000 cases].

    PubMed

    Krayannis, A; Kostakopoulos, A; Deliveliotis, C; Delakas, D; Goulandris, N; Dimopoulos, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors report their experience on 7,500 patients who underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL1). The first 6,800 were treated with the standard Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, while the remaining 700 were treated with the modified HM-3 machine equipped with the new ellipsoid (and the double-shot generator). The authors present the results and conclusions from their experience with 5,000 ESWL treatments which were performed at their Urology Department. An analysis is made on patient age, sex, stone site, duration of sessions, average number of shock waves used, exposure time, number of electrodes per session, retreatments, and results achieved relative to stone size. Furthermore, the authors report on the complications and treatment in special cases; i. e., patients with horseshoe kidneys, solitary kidneys, spinal cord lesions, radiolucent calculi, hemophilia, and staghorn stones. The mean duration of treatment was 37 minutes. The average number of shock waves used was 1,703. The mean radiation exposure time was 1.9 minutes. Two electrodes per session were required in 48% of the patients. Three months following lithotripsy, 72% of the patients were stone-free, 19% had small remaining stone fragments, and 9% had unimportant stone particles.

  16. Risk factors predisposing to repeated extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D M; Lenaghan, D

    1994-01-01

    The Victorian Lithotripsy Service is geographically unique, representing the only Australian lithotripter for a 900-km radius and serving a patient population of over 3 million, and 26 accredited operator urologists. Because of distance and health service constraints few patients treated for renal calculi on this machine have the opportunity to seek additional treatment by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) elsewhere. The treatment histories of all patients who underwent ESWL at this center over a 4-year period were examined, with those patients who required ESWL on more than one occasion being identified and their treatment details reviewed. The retreatment rate was approximately 6%. In patients who required three or more ESWL treatments multiple calculi were present significantly more often than in the overall cohort (p < 0.05), and ESWL alone was ultimately successful in obtaining satisfactory stone fragmentation in only 62% of this group. In view of the high cost of repeated treatments by ESWL the applicability of this treatment method in cases of multiple calculi should be questioned. Initial undertreatment of calculi may also represent a significant factor in the retreatment of some radiopaque calculi.

  17. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy of upper ureteral calculi with semirigid ureteroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Hong, J S

    1996-02-01

    Forty-three patients with single ureteral calculi located above the pelvic brim were treated by electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) using a semirigid mini-ureteroscope. Of the 43 calculi, 36 (84%) were fragmented in one procedure. Six calculi (14%) were pushed back to the renal pelvis and treated successfully by complementary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). The total success rate of ureteroscopic manipulation thus was 98%. The operation time (mean 26.4 minutes) and postoperative hospital stay (mean 2.53 days) were relatively short. Complications were limited to four (9%) minor perforations of the ureter managed by internal stenting. Among these patients with complications, there were no significant ureteral strictures noted on excretory urography or ureteroscopic examination 1 to 3 months after ureterolithotripsy. The costs of ureteroscopy with EHL are lower than that of SWL or ureteroscopic lasertripsy. The total fees for ureteroscopy with EHL are about two thirds those for SWL in Taiwan. Despite the longer learning curve required for ureteroscopy, ureteroscopy associated with EHL is a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of upper ureteral calculi, especially when SWL is not readily available.

  18. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy--what type of anesthesia?].

    PubMed

    Dimai, W; Grebski, J

    1987-03-21

    Since lithotripsy of renal calculi by shock waves is painful, it requires anesthesia. General or regional anesthesia technics may be used. Of more than 1000 treatments at the University Hospital of Zurich, over 90% were done under epidural anesthesia. It is necessary to extend the anesthesia up to the level of Th 4/5 to block all painful sensations. 1-2% carbonated lidocaine was found to be the most suitable anesthetic, providing fast onset and reasonable duration of anesthesia and thus allowing early mobilisation of the patient after treatment. Approximately 3% of the patients were primarily scheduled for general anesthesia for several reasons. These patients were intubated and ventilated by a conventional anesthesia machine at 40-60 breaths per minute. With the small tidal volumes of 200-300 ml there was only minimal displacement of the concretions by respiratory movements. Monitoring of the endtidal CO2 turned out to be problematic in some cases. Epidural anesthesia with carbonated lidocaine is a highly suitable method for anesthesia in over 90% of lithotripsy treatments.

  19. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using ultrasonic imaging: urologists' experience.

    PubMed

    Kiely, E A; Ryan, P C; McDermott, T E; Butler, M R

    1989-07-01

    The EDAP LT.01 is a second generation shockwave lithotripter which employs ultrasound imaging and piezoelectric shockwave generation. We describe the first 12 months of its use in the treatment of urinary calculi by urologists with no previous practical experience of ultrasonography. A total of 406 calculi (359 renal and 47 ureteric) in 317 patients were treated. Analgesia or sedation was not routinely used and 59% of all treatments were performed as outpatient procedures. The clearance rate of renal calculi smaller than 1 cm was 81%, while that of calculi larger than 3 cm was 80% (mean clearance 77.5%). Lithotripsy of ureteric calculi following retrograde manipulation to a renal site resulted in 94.4% clearance compared with 39% for those treated at a ureteric site; 93% of 684 lithotripsy treatments were either painless or caused only mild pain. Our experience with imaging and treating urinary calculi with the EDAP LT.01 lithotripter has been excellent. Patients are treated effectively and inexpensively as out-patients without analgesia or sedation.

  20. [Imaging procedures prior to the extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones].

    PubMed

    Schneider, H T; Ell, C; Benninger, J; Theobaldy, S; Friedel, N; Rödl, W; Heyder, N; Hahn, E G

    1991-01-25

    In order to determine whether cholecystography and computed tomography (CT) are capable of better gallstone characterization than conventional radiography alone, 91 patients (76 females, 15 males; mean age 47 +/- 12 years) with symptomatic single gallstones were studied prospectively prior to extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy with concomitant oral stone dissolution therapy. In addition, the value of oral cholecystography in demonstrating patency of the cystic duct was compared with ultrasound assessment of gallbladder function. Despite "negative" plain gallbladder radiographs in all patients, oral cholecystography showed significant stone calcification in 8 of the 91 patients and CT showed stone calcifications in 52 of the 91 patients. In 12 patients the maximum stone density was between 50 and 90 Hounsfield units, and in 40 patients it was more than 90 Hounsfield units. CT revealed ring-like calcification in the majority (79%) of these stones. Oral cholecystography showed satisfactory concentration of contrast medium in all patients, while ultrasonography of the gallbladder following a chemically defined test meal demonstrated contractility of more than 50% of initial volume in 69 patients and of less than 30% in 9 patients. Although oral cholecystography is a simple, readily available complication-free method, ultrasound assessment of gallbladder contraction is better for selecting patients for extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy. CT allows significantly better characterization of gallstones than oral cholecystography and conventional plain gallbladder radiography.

  1. [Lithotripsy in the conservative treatment of salivary stones].

    PubMed

    Vavrina, J; Müller, W; Schlegel, C

    1997-03-25

    Otolaryngologists and generalists as well are commonly involved in the evaluation and management of salivary gland stones. Most patients present with a history of recurrent swelling and pain in the gland, associated with eating. Up to date conservative therapy was limited to the treatment of the acute sialadenitis, which may develop as a consequence of the obstruction and often recurs until the function of the salivary gland ceases. Surgical treatment depends on the location of the calculus. Distal stones can be removed trans-orally by dilatation or incision of the duct, whereas those near the hilus and intraglandular stones required excision of the gland, including the disadvantage of a scar and the risk of injury to cranial nerves. Extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy is a new noninvasive method, which allows to destroy intra- and extraglandular salivary stones, mostly without the need of local or general anesthesia. Reported disintegration rates vary from 14% to 85%, depending on site and size of the calculus. About 80% of the patients remain symptomless Lithotripsy of salivary stones is a cost-effective, additional treatment modality to surgery and may be employed on an outpatient basis.

  2. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, F.; Thomas, K.; Leighton, T. G.; Ryves, S.; Phillips, D.; Coleman, A. J.

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  3. Numerical simulation of shock and bubble dynamics in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2002-11-01

    Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of stone comminution (and potential for tissue damage) during shockwave lithotripsy requires knowledge of the complex stress fields associated with both the incident focussing shock and the dynamics of cavitation bubbles that it induces. While simple models from geometrical acoustics and subsequent modeling of spherical bubbles in isolation (Gilmore equation) can provide estimates, high-speed photography in vitro reveals a far more complex flow with bubble number densities that are sufficiently high such that collective effects associated with a cloud of bubbles are important. This talk will describe a modeling effort aimed at estimating stresses from these complex lithotripter generated flow fields. We compute the time-dependent, compressible, ensemble-averaged two-phase flow equations with a finite-difference scheme. Detailed modeling of the dynamics of bubbles (on the microscale) and high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing schemes are employed. The model is compared to hydrophone and passive cavitation detection measurements, as well as qualitative comparison with high-speed photography. Finally, we explore collective bubble mechanisms ranging from defocusing and shielding of the stone (for high bubble densities in the focal region) to enhanced stresses due to concerted cloud collapse in a dual-pulse lithotripsy configuration. [Work supported by NIH P01 DK-43881 and NSF under grant CTS-9979258.

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using Storz Modulith SL20--the Singapore General Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, M Y; Li, M K; Foo, K T

    1993-11-01

    The Storz Modulith SL20 is a third-generation lithotripter which was installed in our hospital in March 1991. The aim of this paper is to evaluate our results in the management of renal calculi using this machine. We report our experience in the treatment of the first 215 renal units (118 renal and 83 ureteric) in 190 patients with a minimum follow-up period of three months. Success for renal stones was defined as stone-free or with insignificant residual fragments of less than 4 mm in size post therapy. Success for ureteric stones was defined as stone-free after therapy. The success rate for renal calculi was 88% and for ureteric calculi 71%. The mean number of sessions to achieve these results for renal calculi was 1.6 and for ureteric calculi 1.4. Of the failures, only 1.9% required open surgery whilst the remainder were dealt with using minimally invasive procedures like intracorporeal laser lithotripsy. There was no mortality in our series. Complications occurred in four patients, who required hospitalisation for renal colic (n = 1), urinary tract infection (n = 1) and obstructive uropathy (n = 2).

  5. Endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Evins, Alexander I; Banu, Matei A; Njoku, Innocent; Elowitz, Eric H; Härtl, Roger; Bernado, Antonio; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2015-04-01

    Foraminal stenosis frequently causes radiculopathy in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. Endoscopic transforaminal techniques allow for foraminal access with minimal tissue disruption. However, the effectiveness of foraminal decompression by endoscopic techniques has yet to be studied. We evaluate radiographic outcome of endoscopic transforaminal foraminotomies performed at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 on cadaveric specimens. Before and after the procedures, three dimensional CT scans were obtained to measure foraminal height and area. Following the foraminotomies, complete laminectomies and facetectomies were performed to assess for dural tears or nerve root damage. L3-L4 preoperative foraminal height increased by 8.9%, from 2.12±0.13cm to 2.27±0.14cm (p<0.01), and foraminal area increased by 24.8% from 2.21±0.18cm(2) to 2.72±0.19cm(2) (p<0.01). At L4-L5, preoperative foraminal height was 1.87±0.17cm and area was 1.78±0.18cm(2). Endoscopic foraminotomies resulted in a 15.3% increase of foraminal height (2.11±0.15cm, p<0.05) and 44.8% increase in area of (2.51±0.21cm(2), p<0.01). At L5-S1, spondylitic changes caused diminished foraminal height (1.26±0.14cm) and foraminal area (1.17±0.18cm(2)). Postoperatively, foraminal height increased by 41.6% (1.74±0.09cm, p<0.05) and area increased by 98.7% (2.08±0.17cm(2), p<0.01). Subsequent inspection via a standard midline approach revealed one dural tear of an S1 nerve root. Endoscopic foraminotomies allow for effective foraminal decompression, though clinical studies are necessary to further evaluate complications and efficacy.

  6. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  7. The current status and possible future for lithotripsy of salivary calculi.

    PubMed

    Escudier, M P

    1998-03-01

    Extracorporeal and intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are effective in at least 30% of cases, particularly when combined with adjuvant techniques. Factors that appear to affect outcome adversely are stone size, partial fragmentation with reduced clearance, duct stenosis, and poor gland function.

  8. Applicability of Iceland spar as a stone model standard for lithotripsy devices.

    PubMed

    Blitz, B F; Lyon, E S; Gerber, G S

    1995-12-01

    The identification of a universal stone model standard would enable reproducible fragmentation data useful for the design, evaluation, and comparison of various lithotripsy devices. The clinical benefits of such a stone model include the elucidation of setting parameters that would optimize fragmentation strategies. Iceland spar is a pure form of calcite (CaCO3) that was subjected to experimental disintegration by electrohydraulic lithotripsy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Iceland spar was fragmented with both lithotripsy methods in a reproducible fashion. The degree of fragmentation was directly related to alterations in either power or shock frequency. Iceland spar is radiopaque, inexpensive, easily obtained, homogenous in composition, and sizable. Iceland spar meets a variety of stone model criteria, warranting its continued investigation as a potential stone model standard.

  9. MINOP: development of a miniaturized endoscopic operation system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andreas E.; Wieneke, Paul

    1996-04-01

    Within the framework of R&D activities in the field of microsystems technology, the Institute for Microstructure Technology of Karlsruhe Research Center among others has started to improve the functionality of existing medicotechnical instruments by increased integration of microtechnical components. On the basis of microsystems fabrication techniques, completely novel medical endoscope systems have become feasible. In cooperation with clinical, technical and industrial partners, a novel endoscopic operation system based on microsystems technology is being developed by the Institute for Microstructure Technology and the Aesculap AG company, Tuttlingen within the framework of the MINOP joint project. This new system shall be applied above all in the field of neurosurgery. This newly conceived endosystem is characterized by a multitude of novelties. It can perform a number of both sensor and actor functions. Due to its extremely small outer diameter, it can be applied through minute openings. As a result of the integrated microfluidic control system, the flexible endoscope can be moved to the actual site of operation on a previously specified path. This will allow future bi- and triportal neuro-endoscopic interventions for critical operations in the brain area. The different lumina of the flexible endoscope fulfill various functions. Via the optical fibers, laser radiation may be led to the distal end of the endoscope. Using microtechnical fabrication methods, special plastic microlenses have been produced. The working channel can be applied for rinsing and removal. Furthermore, the cleaning of the optics or the taking of tissue samples are possible. If required, another laser fiber can be driven forward through the working channel for selective therapy. For the first time, high-performance microinstruments have been developed on the basis of novel materials. These instruments can be applied either through the working channel or through an additional trocar.

  10. Small bowel perforation after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of an ureter stone.

    PubMed

    Klug, R; Kurz, F; Dunzinger, M; Aufschnaiter, M

    2001-01-01

    A 60-year-old man was treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for an impacted ureter stone. Two days after the procedure he developed an acute abdomen. On laparotomy, a small bowel perforation in the area of an adhesion to the abdominal wall was found. The adherent intestinal segment was located exactly in the range of the ESWL field, so that excluding further reasons the shockwave lithotripsy must be assumed to be causative.

  11. [Computed tomographic and sonographic detection of renal and perirenal changes following shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Grote, R; Döhring, W; Aeikens, B

    1986-04-01

    The finding of a major haemorrhage after lithotripsy induced us to look at 42 patients undergoing extracorporeal lithotripsy by CT and by sonography, both before and after the procedure, in order to determine the frequency of bleeding. In 37 patients, significant bleeding was found in the perirenal tract and in Gerota's capsule. There were six small sub-capsular haematomas which were not found by sonography and two extensive renal haematomas.

  12. Goodpasture's disease following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a case report & literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cranfield, Alistair; Mathavakkannan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Shock wave lithotripsy may unmask epitopes within the glomerular basement membrane, leading to the formation of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and clinical disease in susceptible individuals. Although rare, our case highlights the need for vigilant monitoring of renal function following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This may allow for early recognition, treatment and improved outcome of anti-GBM disease. PMID:25838905

  13. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  14. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  15. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  16. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  17. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  18. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations.

  19. Endoscopic Management of Dieulafoy's Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hye Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a vascular abnormality consisting of a large caliber-persistent tortuous submucosal artery. A small mucosal defect with the eruption of this protruding vessel can cause bleeding. In fact, a Dieulafoy's lesion is a relatively rare but potentially life-threatening condition. It accounts for 1% to 2% of cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Although there is no consensus on the treatment of Dieulafoy's lesions; treatment options depend on the mode of presentation, site of the lesion, and available expertise. Endoscopic therapy is usually successful in achieving primary hemostasis, with hemostasis success rates reaching 75% to 100%. Although various therapeutic endoscopic methods are used to control bleeding in Dieulafoy's lesions, the best method for endoscopic intervention is not clear. Combination endoscopic therapy is known to be superior to monotherapy because of a lower rate of recurrent bleeding. In addition, mechanical therapies including hemostatic clipping and endoscopic band ligation are more effective and successful in controlling bleeding than other endoscopic methods. Advances in endoscopic techniques have reduced mortality in patients with Dieulafoy's lesion-from 80% to 8%-and consequently, the need for surgical intervention has been reduced. Currently, surgical intervention is used for cases that fail therapeutic endoscopic or angiographic interventions. PMID:25844338

  20. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  1. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  2. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  3. Endoscopic extraperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hourlay, P; Vangertruyden, G; Verduyckt, F; Trimpeneers, F; Hendrickx, J

    1995-05-01

    From June 24, 1993, until November 9, 1993, eight sympathectomies were performed by extraperitoneal endoscopy for treatment of Sudeck atrophy. Seventy-five percent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the intervention. A follow-up after 4 months shows that four patients are free of pain. Two are satisfied, but some pain remains. In two cases, the intensity of the pain remains unchanged but the character of the pain has changed. This new technique is safe and offers the well-known advantages of minimal invasive surgery. Moreover, this endoscopic approach opens perspectives for the exploration of the entire retroperitoneum. PMID:7545831

  4. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  5. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  6. Ultrasound guided lithotripsy of salivary calculi using an electromagnetic lithotriptor.

    PubMed

    Eggers, G; Chilla, R

    2005-12-01

    Sialolithiasis is a common disease of the major salivary glands. A supplement to the traditional therapies is extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of the calculus. This method has been adopted from the therapy of renal or bladder calculi. Patients with a solitary calculus of parotid or submandibular gland were treated with a specially designed lithotriptor. In a retrospective study the results of this therapy were analysed. The success rate was far better for parotid gland calculi than for submandibular calculi. We could not find better results than those published in literature with other devices. In our therapeutic concept, sialolithotripsy is the therapy of first choice for single parotid gland calculi. For submandibular gland calculus this method is advisable in selected cases only.

  7. Patient information leaflets for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Askari, A; Shergill, I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the level of information provided in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) patient information leaflets in the London and East of England Deaneries Design All trusts in the London and East of England Deanery who offer an ESWL service were contacted and leaflets were compared Setting London and East of England Deanery Participants Alan Askari, Iqbal Shergill Main outcome measures Examination of key information that was communicated to ESWL patients via leaflets Results 12 trusts responded across the two deaneries. There was significant variation in the amount of information provided in the leaflets with some leaflets not containing an adequate level of instruction or information to patients Conclusions The authors propose that a national standardised information leaflet should be incorporated with the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) procedure specific information leaflet for ESWL procedures PMID:22666532

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for upper urinary tract stone].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of stone by means of acoustic shockwaves created by an extracorporeal source. ESWL brakes the stone by spallation and squeezing. The optimal frequency for fragmentation is 1Hz. The initial power must be low, then progressively increased during the session. The contra-indications for ESWL are pregnancy, major deformities, severe obesity, aortic aneurism, uncontrolled coagulation disorders, untreated urinary infection, cardiac pacemaker. A stone density of 1000UH is a risk factor for fragmentation failure. The success rate for the kidney and the ureter is 60-80% and 80%, respectively. Stone clearance may be facilitated by alpha blockers. Asymptomatic and non-infected residual fragments less than 4mm must be followed-up annually.

  9. [Lipids in the urine after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Levillain, P; Thomas, E; Tobelem, G; Economou, C; Thibault, M; Lemonnier, A; Arvis, G

    1986-01-01

    Lipid corpuscles have been found in the urine in about 40 per cent of women (4/10) after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, however this lipuria is very rare in men (1 or 2 per cent of cases) and less pronounced. During three days after treatment, this post-therapeutic lipuria was found to be independent of the age of patients, of the site of the calculi, of their chemical composition or of the number of shock waves administered. This lipuria probably results from the liquefaction of peri-pelvic fat tissue by exothermic reaction. These lipid corpuscles consist mostly of triglycerides and to a lesser extent phospholipids with a very small proportion of cholesterol and fatty acids.

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and litholytic therapy in cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Erdamar, I; Avci, G; Füzün, M; Harmancioğlu, O

    1992-03-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and litholytic therapy were used in 100 patients over a period of 16 months. ESWL was carried out with a Lithostar Plus and chenodeoxycholic acid was used as the lytic agent, given until 3 months after complete disappearance of stones. Within a period of 8-12 months, stones disappeared completely in 82 per cent of the patients who had a single stone less than or equal to 20 mm in diameter and in 50 per cent of those with a single stone greater than 20 mm in size or with multiple stones. Complications requiring surgery developed in five patients: three had acute cholecystitis and two developed acute pancreatitis. Of the patients in whom complete stone clearance was achieved, two of 11 followed up developed recurrence of stones 4 months after cessation of lytic therapy.

  11. [Extracorporeal lithotripsy of stones in the single kidney].

    PubMed

    Dzeranov, N K; Moskalenko, S A; Obukhova, T V

    1997-01-01

    The authors used shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) in 130 patients with solitary kidney to crush renal calculi. Valid policy in preoperative drainage may result in a significant reduction of the occurrence of postoperative obstructive complications. It was only 11.5%. A valid choice of sparing regimen of crushing kidney and prepelvic ureter calculi help prevent hematomas, a severe complication of early postoperative period. No cases of this complication were seen in the study. A significant renal function failure in early postoperative period was not recorded. A 2.5--5-year follow-up in 21 patients has found that in 61.9% of patients renal function recovered or remained stable, in 38.1% of patients renal function declined. This was due to deterioration of the underlying disease (chronic pyelonephritis, frequent recurrences of lithogenesis).

  12. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones. Retrospective view and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Adamek, H E; Riemann, J F

    1992-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a non-invasive technique in gallstone management, which has been in clinical use since many years now. Exact patient selection provides considerable stone-free rates within a year. Side effects and complications are rare. The stone-recurrence rate is about 15% after two years, and thus lower compared to that after oral dissolution therapy alone. Until now, there is no reasonable medical therapy to prevent stone recurrence. Furthermore, ESWL is a suitable therapy for retained common bile duct stones. Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become established as a new, minimally invasive surgical method, ESWL will continue to be a successful technique for the treatment of thoroughly selected gallstone patients, who are looking for a non-invasive way to get rid of their biliary pain, but not of their gall bladder.

  13. [The prediction of the results of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, V N; Perel'man, V M; Kadyrov, Z A

    1997-01-01

    The disease history, objective, x-ray and aggregatometry evidence has been analyzed for 188 nephroureterolithiasis patients to make the prognosis of extracorporeal impulse lithotripsy (EIL). If the concrements presented at x-ray picture as structurally homogeneous, medium-contrast, with even margins, fragmentation occurred after 3-4 sessions in 81% of the cases. Low or high contrast calculi with heterogeneous margins disintegrated after 1-2 EIL sessions. Flat calculi were easier to crush than round ones. A decline or absence of changes on the aggregatometry curves prompted the decision on efficacy of further EIL. The calculi which existed for 6 months maximum were the easiest to crush. The outcome of the previous EIL is also essential for prognosis. Inflammation and obesity worsen EIL results. Variant of EIL regimen and the number of impulses are also prognostically significant.

  14. Is extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy suitable treatment for lower ureteric stones?

    PubMed

    Cole, R S; Shuttleworth, K E

    1988-12-01

    Forty patients with lower ureteric calculi for which intervention was considered desirable have been treated by in situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) on the Dornier HM3 Lithotripter using a modified technique. Stone localisation was satisfactory in all patients. Adequate disintegration was achieved in 90% of patients following one treatment; 34 patients have been followed up for at least 3 months and 27 of these are stone-free (79%). Treatment failed in 4 patients and 2 of these had dense lower ureteric stone streets as a result of previous ESWL. The retreatment rate, post-treatment auxiliary procedure rate and complication rate were minimal. It was concluded that in situ ESWL is an effective and safe method for treating certain selected lower ureteric stones and should be considered as a feasible alternative to the more conventional methods of treatment.

  15. [Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: the evolution of a revolution].

    PubMed

    Chaussy, C; Fuchs, G

    1989-05-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy has now been in clinical use for 8 years, and it has replaced other treatment techniques for the majority of surgical calculi in the upper urinary tract. For the first time it provides a completely noninvasive method for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. The current range of indications means that approximately 70% of nonselected urinary stone patients can be treated by this method, while 25% of the patients with more complex stones in the upper urinary tract can receive treatment with the lithotripter combined with endourological procedures. The clinical role of this method is determined by a high success rate and minimal complications. This has led to a rapid worldwide acceptance in the urological community, and up to now more than 1.5 million patients with urinary stone disease have been treated.

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with coagulation disorders].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Marcellán, F J; Mauri Cunill, A; Cabré Fabré, P; Argentino Gancedo Rodríguez, V; Güell Oliva, J A; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M

    1992-03-01

    During treatment of renal lithiasis with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) hemorrhagic events, especially renal hematoma, may present. A coagulation study is warranted in order to institute hemotherapy for blood factor deficiencies. We reviewed the records of 4,000 patients that had undergone ESWL. Of these, 17 (12 males, 5 females) presented coagulation disorders. The bleeding diatheses were due to platelet deficiency in 6 cases, plasma defects in 5, platelet and plasma disorders in 2, and capillary wall defects in 5 cases. The underlying cause was hepatosplenic disease in 12 cases, iatrogenic in 1, connectivopathy and corticoids in 2, and capillary purpura of unknown cause in 2 cases. Due to this protocol, no patient presented hemorrhage or hematoma from shock wave-induced lesions. These results show that a complete coagulation study must be performed in order to institute the necessary measures in patients with disorders of hemostasis due to the high risk of hematoma repeatedly reported in the literature.

  17. Can aspirin prevent gallstone recurrence after successful extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy?

    PubMed

    Adamek, H E; Buttmann, A; Weber, J; Riemann, J F

    1994-04-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a feasible procedure for the treatment of gallbladder stones in humans. Well-selected patients can achieve stone-free rates in a high percentage. With the gallbladder in situ, these patients are at risk of stone recurrence. There is considerable evidence that aspirin prevents cholesterol gallstone formation in animal models and may prevent gallstone recurrence in man. We attempted to clarify the risk of gallstone recurrence after successful piezoelectric lithotripsy in patients taking either low-dose aspirin or no medication. The first 45 patients shown to be completely free from stones after ESWL were randomized into two groups. One group received 100 mg aspirin daily; the other group did not receive any further medical therapy. Patients were further examined on an average of 19.6 months and 21.9 months, respectively. In the aspirin group the recurrence rate was 18.2%, whereas 21.7% of the patients in the control group developed recurrent stones. Seventy-eight per cent of these patients also had a recurrence of biliary pain. By life-table analysis we had, after a follow-up period of 24 months, a stone recurrence rate of 25% (+/- 11) in the aspirin group and 34% (+/- 14) in the control group. Our results indicate that recurrence prophylaxis remains one of the central questions in ESWL. In this preliminary study, 100 mg of aspirin daily was not able to reduce the recurrence rate after successful ESWL. Further studies will have to show whether higher doses of aspirin or other ways of preventing gallstone after ESWL are possible.

  18. Pre-Emptive Tramadol Could Reduce Pain after Ureteroscopic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Denčić, Nataša; Jovičić, Jelena; Mirković, Jelena; Durutović, Otaš; Milenković-Petronić, Dragica; Lađević, Nebojša

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimal analgesia in ambulatory urology patients still remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to examine if the pre-emptive use of intravenous tramadol can reduce pain after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in patients diagnosed with unilateral ureteral stones. Materials and Methods This prospective pilot cohort study included 74 patients diagnosed with unilateral ureteral stones who underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy under general anesthesia in the Urology Clinic at the Clinical Center of Serbia from March to June 2012. All patients were randomly allocated to two groups: one group (38 patients) received intravenous infusion of tramadol 100 mg in 500 mL 0.9%NaCl one hour before the procedure, while the other group (36 patients) received 500 mL 0.9%NaCl at the same time. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were recorded once prior to surgery and two times after the surgery (1 h and 6 h, respectively). The patients were prescribed additional postoperative analgesia (diclofenac 75 mg i.m.) when required. Pre-emptive effects of tramadol were assessed measuring pain scores, VAS1 and VAS2, intraoperative fentanyl consumption, and postoperative analgesic requirement. Results The average VAS1 score in the tramadol group was significantly lower than that in the non-tramadol group. The difference in average VAS2 score values between the two groups was not statistically significant; however, there were more patients who experienced severe pain in the non-tramadol group (p<0.01). The number of patients that required postoperative analgesia was not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion Pre-emptive tramadol did reduce early postoperative pain. The patients who received pre-emptive tramadol were less likely to experience severe post-operative pain. PMID:25048508

  19. Problems in Endoscopic Sphincteropapillotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeong Cheol; Myeong, Jae II; Yeo, Hyang Soon; Park, Hong Bae

    1987-01-01

    Since 1976, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography(ERCP) has been done in 2,185 cases at Kwangju Christian Hospital in Kwangju, Korea, Between November 1981 and September 1986, endoscopic sphincteropapillotomy(EST) was performed on 194 patients. The results are as follows: 1) Common bile duct stones were found in 171 patients, ascaris in the common bile ducts of 12 patients, ascaris and stones in the common bile duct of 1 patient, clonorchis in the bile ducts of 4 patients, fibrotic stenosis of the periampullary choledochoduodenal fistula in 1 patient, stenosis of the common bile duct in 1 patient and stones in the pancreatic ducts of 4 patients.2) In five cases the stones were extracted under direct vision, in 61 cases the stones were passed in the stool, while in 66 cases stone elimination was confirmed by repeated ERCP or T-tube cholangiography. In 46 cases the stones were not removed, but symptoms and laboratory findings showed marked improvement.3) Complications following EST included 5 cases of bleeding, 1 case of acute pancreatitis with a pancreatic pseudocyst, one death due to sepsis following cholangitis, 5 cases of recurrent cholangitis and 2 cases of recurrent pancreatitis.4) The conditions under which EST became difficult or did not succeed included periampullary diverticula, fibrotic stenosis of ampulla of Vater and stones in the intrahepatic ducts or a gallbladder.5) With improved EST technical maneuverability, we could prevent bleeding and acute pancreatitis with a pancreatic pseudocyst and perform EST successfully in cases with periampullary diverticula. PMID:3154824

  20. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of problem bile duct calculi].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L

    1993-02-01

    ESWL is a new gentle, very effective, poor-risk technique in treatment of extrahepatic problematic bile-duct stones. This method might substitute surgical choledochotomy to a great extent. ESWL is a new therapeutic alternative to achieve nonoperative freedom of stones or, at least, to treat biliary obstruction in intrahepatic bile-duct stones, which are not treatable by endoscopic operative methods.

  1. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  2. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  3. Anterior endoscopic correction of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Picetti, George D; Ertl, Janos P; Bueff, H Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Our technique of anterior endoscopic scoliosis correction demonstrates the ability to perform an anterior approach through a minimally invasive technique with minimal disruption of the local biology. The initial results appear to equal curve correction and fusion rates to those of a formal open anterior approach. Additional benefits are: 1) shortened operative time, 2) lower blood loss, 3) shortened rehabilitation time, 4) less pain, and 5) shortened hospital stays. Endoscopic technique shows great promise in the management of scoliosis curves; however, this is a technically demanding procedure that requires cross-training in endoscopic discectomy and scoliosis management as well as familiarity with the anterior approach anatomy. PMID:12389288

  4. Powered functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Krouse, H J; Parker, C M; Purcell, R; Krouse, J H; Christmas, D A

    1997-09-01

    The use of powered instrumentation in functional endoscopic sinus surgery has been a revolutionary development in the surgical treatment of chronic sinusitis. Several studies have demonstrated the safety, efficacy, and ease of use of this new technique. To provide support and coordinate the surgical process in powered functional endoscopic sinus surgery procedures, perioperative nurses must have an appreciation for its specific equipment handling and for appropriate patient care. This article describes a specific protocol that perioperative nurses can use to facilitate efficient and safe surgical environments for patients who undergo powered endoscopic sinus surgery procedures.

  5. Physical mechanisms of importance to laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1998-12-31

    Bubble dynamics plays a key role in many medical procedures including Laser Thrombolysis (L-T), acoustic and laser lithotripsy, interocular laser surgery, photoacoustic drug delivery, and perhaps ultrasonic imaging. The authors are investigating the effect that interfaces of different materials, especially biological and biomedical materials, have on the dynamics of nearby bubbles. Collapsing bubbles often become nonspherical, resulting in spectacular directed motion with potentially both beneficial and undesirable consequences. This directed motion may explain L-T mass removal and some types of laser-induced tissue damage.

  6. Mechanisms of biliary stone fragmentation using the Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Schafer, S A; Durville, F M; Jassemnejad, B; Bartels, K E; Powell, R C

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated the fragmentation of gallstones using the pulsed Ho:YAG laser, comparing it to lithotripsy using the visible pulsed-dye laser. We find that the physical mechanisms of stone fragmentation appear to be quite different in the two cases. Using high-speed photography, measurement of acoustic transients, time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and direct microscopic observation, we have analyzed the interaction of the Ho:YAG laser with both water and gallstones. We propose a new model in which fragmentation begins with absorption of the laser light by the stone surface. This is followed by melting and ejection of stone material, which is then swept away by the vapor bubble formed by the absorption of the Ho:YAG laser light by water. This model is in excellent agreement with our experimental observations, and differs substantially from the model developed by Teng et al. for laser lithotripsy using the visible pulsed-dye laser.

  7. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  8. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Kelly A.; Lee, Sang W.

    2015-01-01

    Benign colon polyps are best treated endoscopically. Colon polyps that are not amenable for endoscopic removals either because they are too large or situated in anatomically difficult locations can pose a clinical dilemma. Traditionally the most common recommendation for these patients has been to offer a colon resection. Although the laparoscopic approach has improved short-term outcomes, morbidities associated with bowel resection are still significant. We may be over treating majority of these patients because of the remote possibility that these polyps may be harboring a cancer. A combined approach using both laparoscopy and colonoscopy (combined endoscopic and laparoscopic surgery) has been described as an alternative to bowel resection in select patients with polyps that cannot be removed endoscopically. Polyp removal using this combined approach may be an effective alternative in select patients. PMID:26491405

  9. Endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Liu, Hongguang; Liao, Joseph C.; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate feasibility of endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov light originated when charged nuclear particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a biological tissue of living subjects at superluminal velocity. The endoscopy imaging system consists of conventional optical fiber bundle/ clinical endoscopes, an optical imaging lens system, and a sensitive low-noise charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Our systematic studies using phantom samples show that Cerenkov light from as low as 1 µCi of radioactivity emitted from 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be coupled and transmitted through conventional optical fibers and endoscopes. In vivo imaging experiments with tumor bearing mice, intravenously administered with 18F-FDG, further demonstrated that Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy is a promising new tool in the field of endoscopic molecular imaging. PMID:22741069

  10. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  11. Endoscopic approach to achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J; Wehrmann, Till

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The etiology is still unknown and therefore all treatment options are strictly palliative with the intention to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Current established endoscopic therapeutic options include pneumatic dilation (PD) or botulinum toxin injection. Both treatment approaches have an excellent symptomatic short term effect, and lead to a reduction of LES pressure. However, the long term success of botulinum toxin (BT) injection is poor with symptom recurrence in more than 50% of the patients after 12 mo and in nearly 100% of the patients after 24 mo, which commonly requires repeat injections. In contrast, after a single PD 40%-60% of the patients remain asymptomatic for ≥ 10 years. Repeated on demand PD might become necessary and long term remission can be achieved with this approach in up to 90% of these patients. The main positive predictors for a symptomatic response to PD are an age > 40 years, a LES-pressure reduction to < 15 mmHg and/or an improved radiological esophageal clearance post-PD. However PD has a significant risk for esophageal perforation, which occurs in about 2%-3% of cases. In randomized, controlled studies BT injection was inferior to PD and surgical cardiomyotomy, whereas the efficacy of PD, in patients > 40 years, was nearly equivalent to surgery. A new promising technique might be peroral endoscopic myotomy, although long term results are needed and practicability as well as safety issues must be considered. Treatment with a temporary self expanding stent has been reported with favorable outcomes, but the data are all from one study group and must be confirmed by others before definite recommendations can be made. In addition to its use as a therapeutic tool, endoscopy also plays an important role in the diagnosis and surveillance of patients with achalasia. PMID:23951393

  12. [Endoscopic surgery of vocal cord cancers].

    PubMed

    Kleinsasser, O; Glanz, H; Kimmich, T

    1988-10-01

    Controversy began in the last century as to whether endoscopic surgery for vocal cord carcinoma carries an unnecessary risk for the patient. This controversy has been renewed since microlaryngoscopy offered the possibility of precise endoscopic resection of a vocal cord carcinoma. The most decisive prerequisites are careful assessment and adherence to strict indications. We only remove small carcinomas arising on freely mobile vocal cords by endoscopy, if the tumour is fully visible through a larger calibre operating laryngoscope. We prefer to use conventional microsurgical instruments rather than the laser. The specimen should be taken in one piece and be subjected to histological examination. Every patient must be closely followed up. A total of 76 patients with carcinomata in situ (Tis a, Tis b) and microinvasive carcinomas (T 1a, T 1b) have been followed for up to 8 years. So far not a single patient has lost his life, his larynx or his voice, or needed an additional external operation or irradiation. The results of endolaryngeal microsurgery for smaller vocal cord tumours are achieved with a minimum cost in time and money, and the least possible burden for the patient. They are scarcely inferior to primary irradiation with respect to the voice and are definitely better with respect to cure. However such results are only achieved in very carefully selected cases.

  13. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  14. Matched pair analysis of ureteroscopy vs. shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of upper ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Bariol, S V; Moussa, S A; Smith, G; Tolley, D A

    2007-05-01

    There is controversy over whether shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) or ureteroscopy (URS) is the best management of ureteric calculi, especially for stones located in the upper ureter. This study compares URS and SWL management of upper ureteric stones directly for the first time using a different analysis tool, the matched pair analysis study design. This method enables meaningful comparisons to be made on a small number of matched patients, using precise like-for-like matching. Adult patients undergoing primary treatment of solitary radiopaque proximal ureteric stones were identified. Patients with stents, nephrostomies or stones at the pelvi-ureteric junction were excluded. Patients had a minimum of 3 months follow-up. Patients treated by primary URS were matched using four parameters (sex, laterality, stone size and location) to patients treated on a Dornier Compact Delta Lithotriptor. A total of 1479 patients had URS or SWL from which 27 upper ureteric stone matched pairs were identified. Three-month stone free rates were 82% for URS and 89% for SWL (McNemar's test, p=0.625). Re-treatment was required in 11% and 26% following URS and SWL respectively (p=0.219). Forty-one per cent of URS patients required an ancillary treatment, such as stent removal, compared with only 22% of SWL patients (p=0.227). Introduction of a holmium:YAG laser for use with URS improved the stone free rate for URS to 100%. Using a robust like-for-like comparison of similar patients with very similar upper ureteric stones the outcomes following SWL and URS were comparable. Choice of treatment should therefore be based on parameters such as availability of equipment, waiting times and patient preference.

  15. [Value of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of urinary lithiasis in children].

    PubMed

    Charbit, L; Terdjman, S; Gendreau, M C; Guérin, D; Quentel, P; Cukier, J

    1989-01-01

    We report our experience with extracorporeal lithotripsy (Dornier HM3) in a series of 26 children with a mean age of 11.6 years, treated for 3 1/2 years. 12 children (46%) had a previous history of calculi and 7 (27%) had already undergone surgery on the same side. Treatment requires two transducer investigations before lithotripsy. With the exception of minor modifications the technique is the same as in the adult. Three (9.7%) postlithotripsy complications were noted, requiring 2 drainage procedures to be carried out on the urinary tract. At 3 months, the success rate (no residual calculi on the plain abdominal film) was 60.7%. This study confirms the efficacy of lithotripsy in the treatment of urinary lithiasis in children.

  16. Controlled, forced collapse of cavitation bubbles for improved stone fragmentation during shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cocks, F H; Cioanta, I; Preminger, G M

    1997-12-01

    The feasibility of using controlled, forced collapse of cavitation bubbles for improved stone fragmentation during shock wave lithotripsy was demonstrated using microsecond tandem shockwave pulses. High-speed photography revealed that a secondary shock wave, released in less than 500 microseconds (microsec.) following a lithotripter-generated shock wave, can be used to control and force the collapse of cavitation bubbles toward target concretions. This timely enforced shockwave-bubble interaction was found to greatly enhance the cavitational activity near the stone surface, with a resultant up to 43% increment in stone fragmentation. Since most of the cavitation energy is directed and concentrated toward the target stones and fewer shock waves are needed for successful stone comminution, tissue injury associated with this new lithotripsy procedure may also be reduced. This novel concept of shock wave lithotripsy may be used to improve the treatment efficiency and safety of existing clinical lithotripters, as well as in the design of new shock wave lithotripters.

  17. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic pyelolithotomy versus extra corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy for management of renal stones

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Jagdish; Gupta, Nikhil; Lal, Pawanindra; Lal, Pawan; Ramteke, Vinod K

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of retroperitoneal laparoscopic pyelolithotomy (RPPL) and its comparison with extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the management of renal calculi. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was carried out in the Department of surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India. The study included 86 cases of solitary renal calculi in the retroperitoneoscopic (RPPL) group and 82 cases in the shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) group. The parameters compared were stone clearance, hospital stay, number of postoperative visits, mean time to resume normal activities, number of man days lost, and analgesic requirement. RESULTS: The RPPL group showed better stone clearance, fewer hospital visits, low analgesic requirement, fewer number of man days lost, and early resumption of normal activities, as compared to the SWL group. CONCLUSIONS: Shock wave lithotripsy, being a noninvasive modality, is an established procedure all over the world. However RPPL achieves comparable or better results in high volume centers. PMID:21120067

  18. [Shock wave lithotripsy, retrograde intrarenal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole renal stones?].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alejandro; Gallegos, Héctor; Salvadó, José A

    2015-09-09

    Among the therapeutic alternatives available for the treatment of lower pole renal calculi are extracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and retrograde intrarenal surgery. There is controversy about which of these techniques is more effective, especially for stones smaller than 20 mm. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded percutaneous nephrolithotomy probably increases success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In comparison to retrograde intrarenal surgery, it may increase success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment. Retrograde intrarenal surgery may increase success rate, and probably decreases need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

  19. Intracorporeal retrograde choledocholithotripsy or ESWL as a therapy for choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ell, C

    1993-06-01

    More than 90% of all common bile duct stones can be removed endoscopically following endoscopic sphincterotomy aided by the use of baskets, balloon catheters and mechanical lithotripsy. Oversized, very hard or impacted stones, however, often resist conventional endoscopic therapy. Promising new or improved approaches to the treatment of these stones are intracorporeal or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Shockwave lithotriptors for ESWL are currently available worldwide. However, to treat with the water-bath first generation devices general anaesthesia is required, since shockwaves are painful. Furthermore, an X-ray localization system is essential to visualize the stones after opacification of the bile duct via a nasobiliary catheter. On average, two shockwave treatments with a further one to four endoscopic sessions are required. Intracorporeal lithotripsy promises more comfort and less effort for the patient. Shockwaves are generated either by means of the spark gap principle (electrohydraulic probes) or by laser-induced plasma generation. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy appears to be the safer procedure, since with solid state lasers (Q-switched Nd: YAG, alexandrite) athermal, well controlled shockwaves can be generated without the risks of duct perforation (as described for the electrohydraulic system). Furthermore, a recently developed stone-tissue detection system integrated in a new dye laser system (Lithognost) enhances the safety of laser-induced lithotripsy. In consequence, laser lithotripsy without direct endoscopic control appears possible in selected cases.

  20. Endoscopic stapedotomy: our view point.

    PubMed

    Naik, Chetana; Nemade, Sanjana

    2016-01-01

    Use of endoscope in middle ear surgery is not new, yet there is resistance to its use in stapedotomy. This is due to perceived long learning curve in shifting from conventional microscope to the endoscope and fear of one-handed work. (1) to present a case series of endoscopic stapedotomies and analyze the operative findings. (2) Discuss the merits and demerits of same. 20 patients with otosclerosis underwent stapedotomy over 5 years using 0°, 4 mm nasal endoscope of 18 cm length. Visualization of middle ear structures, surgical steps, operative time, hearing results and complications were analyzed. In all 20 cases, (13 males, 7 females, age: 32.7 years) manipulation of endoscope within the canal was easy facilitating endomeatal incision and elevation of tympanomeatal flap. An optimum exposure of incudo-stapedial joint was obtained in 88.24 % cases. Adequate exposure of crura was obtained in 82.35 % and the footplate in 95 %. The removal of postero-superior bony wall was required in 30 % and chorda tympani mobilization in 25 % of cases. The average operative time was 31 min. Audiometry done at 6 weeks showed, complete air-bone gap closure in 55 %, mild conductive hearing loss (up to 20 dB) in 30 % and mixed hearing loss in 2 cases (BC up to 30 dB and air-bone gap up to 20 dB). In one patient who initially had hearing improvement post operatively, developed moderate conductive hearing loss at 10 weeks. Performing fully endoscopic stapedotomy using a 4 mm nasal endoscope is a feasible option giving excellent visualization with good results.

  1. Drugs for Pain Management in Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Zaman, Faruquz; Kachrilas, Stefanos; Kumar, Priyadarshi; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2011-01-01

    Objective. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the main aspects and currently used drugs for analgesia in shockwave lithotripsy. Evidence Acquisition. We reviewed current literature, concentrating on newer articles and high-quality reviews in international journals. Results. No standardized protocols for pain control in SWL exist, although it is crucial for treatment outcome. General and spinal anaesthesia show excellent pain control but are only recommended for selected cases. The newer opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are able to deliver good analgesia. Interest in inhalation anaesthesia with nitrous oxide, local anaesthesia with deep infiltration of the tissue, and dermal anaesthesia with EMLA or DMSO has recently rekindled, showing good results in terms of pain control and a favourable side effect profile. Tamsulosin and paracetamol are further well-known drugs being currently investigated. Conclusion. Apart from classically used drugs like opioids and NSARs, medicaments like nitrous oxide, paracetamol, DMSA, or refined administration techniques for infiltration anaesthesia show a good effectiveness in pain control for SWL. PMID:22135735

  2. Shock wave lithotripsy: advances in technology and technique

    PubMed Central

    Lingeman, James E.; McAteer, James A.; Gnessin, Ehud; Evan, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is the only noninvasive method for stone removal. Once considered as a primary option for the treatment of virtually all stones, SWL is now recognized to have important limitations that restrict its use. In particular, the effectiveness of SWL is severely limited by stone burden, and treatment with shock waves carries the risk of acute injury with the potential for long-term adverse effects. Research aiming to characterize the renal response to shock waves and to determine the mechanisms of shock wave action in stone breakage and renal injury has begun to suggest new treatment strategies to improve success rates and safety. Urologists can achieve better outcomes by treating at slower shock wave rate using a step-wise protocol. The aim is to achieve stone comminution using as few shock waves and at as low a power level as possible. Important challenges remain, including the need to improve acoustic coupling, enhance stone targeting, better determine when stone breakage is complete, and minimize the occurrence of residual stone fragments. New technologies have begun to address many of these issues, and hold considerable promise for the future. PMID:19956196

  3. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  4. Review on Lithotripsy and Cavitation in Urinary Stone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Oral, Ozlem; Ekici, Sinan; Gozuacik, Devrim; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation is the sudden formation of vapor bubbles or voids in liquid media and occurs after rapid changes in pressure as a consequence of mechanical forces. It is mostly an undesirable phenomenon. Although the elimination of cavitation is a major topic in the study of fluid dynamics, its destructive nature could be exploited for therapeutic applications. Ultrasonic and hydrodynamic sources are two main origins for generating cavitation. The purpose of this review is to give the reader a general idea about the formation of cavitation phenomenon and existing biomedical applications of ultrasonic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Because of the high number of the studies on ultrasound cavitation in the literature, the main focus of this review is placed on the lithotripsy techniques, which have been widely used for the treatment of urinary stones. Accordingly, cavitation phenomenon and its basic concepts are presented in Section II. The significance of the ultrasound cavitation in the urinary stone treatment is discussed in Section III in detail and hydrodynamic cavitation as an important alternative for the ultrasound cavitation is included in Section IV. Finally, side effects of using both ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in biomedical applications are presented in Section V. PMID:27249837

  5. [Use of high frequency jet ventilation in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Schulte am Esch, J; Kochs, E; Meyer, W H

    1985-06-01

    High frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) was used in 68 patients which were treated with extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) because of stone diseases in the upper urinary tract. The question was whether HFJV in combination with a semiclosed conventional circle system offered a practicable and safe technique to minimize the oscillations which are proportional to the applied tidal volume and to the diaphragmatic movements. With IPPV the mean distance of the stone movement was 32 mm, whereas with the application of HFJV the stones oscillated around their resting position within limits of 2 to 3 mm (ventilation frequency: 200-300/min, driving pressure: 0.6-1.1 bar, tidal volume: 3-8 1/min). The effectiveness of HFJV was monitored by the end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PeCO2) during intermittently conventional ventilation with "adequate" tidal volumes (TV 15 ml/kg bw). The correlation between PeCO2 and simultaneous measured PaCO2 was r = 0,91. The application of HFJV enhances the efficiency of ESWL. So the treatment of stones of the upper urinary tract can be varied by more subtle dosage of the incoming shock wave energy and by stabilisation of the stones in the underlying ellipsoid of the energy focus.

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones: clinical experience with 170 patients.

    PubMed

    Dion, Y M; Morin, J; Fraser, W

    1992-04-01

    Between Jan. 19, 1989 and Nov. 23, 1990, 170 patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis were evaluated for possible treatment by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Thirty-one patients were not eligible for treatment, 28 (16%) because of nonvisualization of gallstones by ultrasonography and 3 (2%) because polyps were erroneously diagnosed on ultrasonography. Thirteen (8%) patients failed to comply with the protocol, leaving 126 patients for assessment. At the time of writing, the treatment success rate is 57% at 6 months and 69% at 9 months. Treatment failed in 21 (17%) patients because of unsatisfactory fragmentation in 16 (13%) patients, frequent biliary colic in 3 (2%) patients, acute pancreatitis in 1 (0.8%) patient and severe bile-salt-induced diarrhea in 1 (0.8%) patient. Complications included biliary colic (40 patients), mild diarrhea on bile salts (24 patients), severe diarrhea (1 patient), macroscopic hematuria (4 patients), acute pancreatitis (2 patients) and vagal shock (1 patient). This study demonstrates the effectiveness (87%) of the lithotripter in reducing gallstones to fragments 5 mm in diameter or smaller. However, complete disappearance of these fragments with adjuvant bile-salt therapy may take many months.

  7. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole nephrolithiasis?

    PubMed

    Cass, A S

    1996-02-01

    A controversy has arisen as to whether the initial form of therapy for lower pole nephrolithiasis should be extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We reviewed our results with 968 single lower pole stones treated by SWL and reviewed publications comparing SWL and PCNL for lower pole nephrolithiasis. In our cases, the stone-free rate was 71.2%, the rate of repeat treatment and post-treatment secondary procedures was 6.4%, the complication rate was 0.5%, and the hospital stay was less than 24 hours in 99.3% of patients. In published series of PCNL for lower pole nephrolithiasis, the stone free rate was 70.5% to 100%, repeat treatment rates were 4% to 62.5%, the complication rates were 13% to 38%, and the hospital stay was 3.1 to 6.1 days. The rates of recurrent stone disease with PCNL were 11% to 22%, similar to the rates after SWL. The percentage of renal urolithiasis patients with lower pole calculi since we started our unit in late 1986 has remained essentially constant at 38%. Although the stone-free rate with PCNL is higher than with SWL, the lower complication rate, lower repeat treatment/secondary procedure rate, the shorter hospital stay, and the similar recurrent stone rate with SWL make SWL more clinically effective as the primary therapy for lower pole calculi less than 2 cm in diameter.

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of the gallbladder: importance of selection criteria].

    PubMed

    Thorens, J; Schnegg, J F; Fasel, J; Deslarzes, C; Duvoisin, B; Schnyder, P; Gonvers, J J; Blum, A L

    1993-04-10

    In recent years, a number of alternatives to surgery for gallstones have been developed. Among them, extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was promising, being non-invasive and risk-free. Nevertheless, its results vary according to the size, number and composition of the stones and according to the bile acids treatment used for fragment dissolution. To better evaluate the importance of these factors, we have widened the selection criteria currently used (1 to 3 non-calcified stones with a diameter below 30 mm) by including patients with large stones (up to 40 mm in diameter), multiple stones (up to 10 stones) and calcified stones. We also compared, for efficacy of fragment dissolution after ESWL, treatment by ursodeoxycholic acid alone as opposed to a mixture with chenodeoxycholic acid. Our results were (1) significant lessening of the fragmentation rate and of the number of gallbladders free of stones 1 year after ESWL when selection criteria are widened; (2) a mixture of ursodeoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids may favour fragment dissolution after ESWL compared to treatment by ursodeoxycholic acid alone.

  9. Different modes of fragmenting gallstones in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, R; Schweinsberg, V; Klengel, H; Niedmann, P D; Fölsch, U R

    1993-03-01

    Forty radiolucent gallbladder stones from eight patients were fragmented in vitro by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, using the electromagnetic lithotripter Lithostar Plus (Siemens) at five different energy levels. The stones were characterized by size, computed tomography (CT) density, and cholesterol content. The largest residual fragment was measured after every 20 to 100 shock waves. As expected, fewer shock waves were required to achieve fragmentation at higher energy levels. When stones of the same size were compared, there were remarkable differences in the number of shock waves required for fragmentation. These differences must originate in other properties of the stones than size and number. Two different modes of fragmentation were observed: in one group of stones small, flat fragments were chipped off at the beginning of fragmentation ('chipping mode'). These stones initially lost about 25% of their weight as small fragments (< 1 mm) before breaking centrally into some large fragments. In the other group stones initially lost only about 10% of their weight as small fragments (< 1 mm) at the beginning of fragmentation and early broke centrally into some large fragments ('breaking mode'). Stones showing the chipping mode were almost pure cholesterol stones (> 97%) and required significantly less shock waves than stones of the same size showing the breaking mode (cholesterol content, 64-94%). This mode of fragmentation could not be predicted by CT density.

  10. Mechanisms of differing stone fragility in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Preminger, G M

    1994-08-01

    Clinical experience with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has demonstrated significant variations in stone fragility. To understand the physical mechanisms of the differences, we quantitatively determined shockwave-stone interaction under clinically relevant SWL conditions for six stone compositions: calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), struvite (MAPH), calcium apatite (CA), uric acid (UA), brushite, and cystine. We also characterized the acoustic and mechanical properties of the stones using ultrasound and microindentation techniques. Our results show that renal calculi have distinctly different acoustic and mechanical properties. Higher wave speed, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were measured from COM and cystine stones, whereas lower values of the corresponding properties were found in CA and MAPH, and the values for brushite and UA stones were in between. Computer modeling of shockwave propagation revealed that under the same shockwave intensity, larger deformation was induced in CA and MAPH stones than in COM and cystine stones. In addition, multiple reflected tensile waves were predicted for stones with concentric layer structure, indicating their susceptibility to shockwave fragmentation. These findings elucidate the mechanisms of the differences in stone fragility observed clinically. Their implications to SWL are discussed.

  11. Complementary approaches to decreasing discomfort during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL).

    PubMed

    Ngee-Ming, Goh; Tamsin, Drake; Rai, B P; Somani, B K

    2014-06-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an established treatment for renal stones. Although non-invasive, it can cause significant pain and anxiety during the procedure. Our purpose was to review the literature to look at the effect of complimentary therapy in patients undergoing SWL and whether it led to a reduction in the requirement of analgesics and anxiolytics. A systematic review was performed on the use of acupuncture, auricular acupressure, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and music during SWL. Only prospective randomized controlled trials were selected. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study. Outcomes relating to analgesia requirement, anxiety and stone-free rates (SFR) were compared. Seven papers were identified reporting on 591 patients (acupuncture-3, TENS-1 and music-3). Pain control/analgesia requirement was significantly better in four studies (music-2, acupuncture-1, TENS-1). Significantly lower anxiety was noted in one study with music and two using acupuncture. No difference in SFR was noted with the use of complementary therapy. No major or minor side effects were noted. Complementary therapy for SWL can help lower analgesia requirement and the anxiety associated with it. However, it does not have any effect on the SFR.

  12. Drugs for pain management in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bach, Christian; Zaman, Faruquz; Kachrilas, Stefanos; Kumar, Priyadarshi; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2011-01-01

    Objective. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the main aspects and currently used drugs for analgesia in shockwave lithotripsy. Evidence Acquisition. We reviewed current literature, concentrating on newer articles and high-quality reviews in international journals. Results. No standardized protocols for pain control in SWL exist, although it is crucial for treatment outcome. General and spinal anaesthesia show excellent pain control but are only recommended for selected cases. The newer opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are able to deliver good analgesia. Interest in inhalation anaesthesia with nitrous oxide, local anaesthesia with deep infiltration of the tissue, and dermal anaesthesia with EMLA or DMSO has recently rekindled, showing good results in terms of pain control and a favourable side effect profile. Tamsulosin and paracetamol are further well-known drugs being currently investigated. Conclusion. Apart from classically used drugs like opioids and NSARs, medicaments like nitrous oxide, paracetamol, DMSA, or refined administration techniques for infiltration anaesthesia show a good effectiveness in pain control for SWL.

  13. [Subcapsular hematoma of the liver after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Ishizuka, E; Iwasaki, A; Saito, R

    1998-03-01

    We experienced a case of a hepatic subcapsular hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for a right renal stone. To our knowledge this presentation is the second case in the Japanese literature. A 63-year-old female with a right renal stone received 2,800 shots of 14.0 kilo-volts shockwave with Sonolith 3,000. Preoperative examination of the blood disclosed no abnormalities in the coagulating system except slight reduction of platelet count and slight impairment of liver function. Postoperative routine ultrasound echograms revealed a hepatic subcapsular hematoma although she had no symptom. The size of the hematoma measured 11.0 x 5.0 cm in computed tomograms (CT). She was carefully observed without any treatments because the hematoma did not increase in size. CT scans 6 months after the ESWL treatment demonstrated neither hematoma nor masses in the liver. As a complication of ESWL for urolithiasis a hepatic subcapsular hematoma is very rare. We herein presented the case and discussed the complications of ESWL briefly in the literature.

  14. The problem of coupling in dry-head lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Neucks, Joshua S.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.

    2007-04-01

    Recent in vitro studies have shown that air pockets can get trapped at the coupling interface of the treatment head in dry-head lithotripsy, and this can pose a significant barrier to transmission of shock wave energy to the focal zone. Breakage of model stones is very sensitive to the presence of air pockets at the coupling interface. The quality of routine coupling is highly variable, and it seems quite feasible that the way in which the coupling gel is applied may have a significant effect on the quality of coupling. Therefore, attempts to find the best coupling regime may be valuable to perform, and preliminary results of in vitro tests are presented in this report. Experiments were conducted using gel or castor oil as coupling agents. The test tank was coupled through a transparent Mylar membrane to the water-filled cushion of the treatment head, so that pockets of air trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be observed and photographed. It is shown that the quality of coupling can be improved by applying an excessive amount of gel to just the water cushion of the lithotripter, while applying gel to both the water cushion and the Mylar membrane typically gives poor coupling. Repeat decoupling and re-coupling substantially degraded the quality of coupling, reducing shock wave energy density at the target by ˜80%. It was also observed that using castor oil as a coupling medium does not guarantee air-free coupling.

  15. Pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Predicting successful outcomes.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Sean; Shukla, Aseem R

    2010-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently a first-line procedure of most upper urinary tract stones <2 cm of size because of established success rates, its minimal invasiveness and long-term safety with minimal complications. Given that alternative surgical and endourological options exist for the management of stone disease and that ESWL failure often results in the need for repeat ESWL or secondary procedures, it is highly desirable to identify variables predicting successful outcomes of ESWL in the pediatric population. Despite numerous reports and growing experience, few prospective studies and guidelines for pediatric ESWL have been completed. Variation in the methods by which study parameters are measured and reported can make it difficult to compare individual studies or make definitive recommendations. There is ongoing work and a need for continuing improvement of imaging protocols in children with renal colic, with a current focus on minimizing exposure to ionizing radiation, perhaps utilizing advancements in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. This report provides a review of the current literature evaluating the patient attributes and stone factors that may be predictive of successful ESWL outcomes along with reviewing the role of pre-operative imaging and considerations for patient safety.

  16. A mechanistic analysis of stone comminution in lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Macconaghy, Brian; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2005-04-01

    In vitro experiments and an elastic wave model were employed to isolate and assess the importance of individual mechanisms in stone comminution in lithotripsy. Cylindrical U-30 cement stones were treated in an HM-3-style research lithotripter. Baffles were used to block specific waves responsible for spallation, squeezing, or shear. Surface cracks were added to stones to simulate the effect of cavitation, then tested in water and glycerol (a cavitation suppressive medium). Each case was simulated using the elasticity equations for an isotropic medium. The calculated location of maximum stress compared well with the experimental observations of where cracks naturally formed. Shear waves from the shock wave in the fluid traveling along the stone surface (a kind of dynamic squeezing) led to the largest stresses in the cylindrical stones and the fewest SWs to fracture. Reflection of the longitudinal wave from the back of the stone-spallation-and bubble-jet impact on the proximal and distal faces of the stone produced lower stresses and required more SWs to break stones. Surface cracks accelerated fragmentation when created near the location where the maximum stress was predicted. [Work supported by NIH DK43881, NIH-Fogarty, NSBRI SMS00203, RFBR, and ONRIFO.

  17. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  18. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  19. [Electrohydraulic shockwave lithotripsy with ventral shockwave exposure--technic, indications and initial clinical results].

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Bachor, R; Hautmann, R

    1988-05-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy of ureteral or calyceal calculi covered by the bony pelvis and of anteriorly located stones, such as calculi in horseshoe kidneys or the common bile duct, requires ventral introduction of the shockwave into the body. Eleven patients underwent ESWL in the prone position for the aforementioned indications. All treatments were performed with the Dornier HM3 lithotripter, which allows prone positioning of the patient without technical modification of the stretcher. ESWL was successful in all patients, one requiring a second session for complete stone disintegration. Thus, the possibility of shockwave lithotripsy with the patient in the prone position allows further extension of the indications for noninvasive treatment of calculi.

  20. [Pain-free piezoelectric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in gallbladder stones. Initial experiences].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, C; Meyer, B; Rothenbühler, J M; Beglinger, C; Stalder, G A; Harder, F

    1989-05-27

    Efficacy and side effects of lithotripsy of gallbladder stones with a piezoelectric lithotriptor are assessed. 16 treatments were performed in 8 patients (1-3 per patient). Patients required no premedication, analgesia, infusion or monitoring. Gallstone fragmentation was achieved with all treatments. Laboratory findings remained unchanged after treatment, with the exception of one patient with mild pancreatitis. With adjuvant oral bile acid treatment, 6 of the 8 patients were stone-free within 3 days to 3 months. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with piezoelectric shock waves provides painless and efficient gallstone fragmentation. Repeated treatments may speed complete fragment dissolution.

  1. [Experience of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy for the urolithiasis in horseshoe kidney].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, A; Asai, Y; Ameno, Y; Sakakura, T; Sugita, O; Kamizuru, M; Sakamoto, W; Nakatani, T; Kishimoto, T; Maekawa, M

    1991-12-01

    At Osaka City University, 1,987 patients with urolithiasis have been treated by extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) during a four-year period. We treated 5 patients with horseshoe kidney and the obtained results were analyzed retrospectively. Three of these patients, who had a solitary stone could successfully be treated by ESWL as monotherapy. One who had multiple stones required transurethral lithotripsy after ESWL due to stone-street. The remaining 1 patient who had undergone heminephrectomy developed perirenal hematoma after ESWL, which spontaneously disappeared without any specific treatment. We discuss the special care related to the use of ESWL in the horseshoe kidney.

  2. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... an endoscope are as follows: Mechanical cleaning The operating channels and external portions of the endoscope are ... that there are no leaks in its internal operating channels. This not only ensures peak performance of ...

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Maple, John T; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Konda, Vani; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    ESD is an established effective treatment modality for premalignant and early-stage malignant lesions of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum. Compared with EMR, ESD is generally associated with higher rates of en bloc, R0, and curative resections and a lower rate of local recurrence. Oncologic outcomes with ESD compare favorably with competing surgical interventions, and ESD also serves as an excellent T-staging tool to identify noncurative resections that will require further treatment. ESD is technically demanding and has a higher rate of adverse events than most endoscopic procedures including EMR. As such,sufficient training is critical to ensure safe conduct and high-quality resections. A standardized training model for Western endoscopists has not been clearly established,but will be self-directed and include courses, animal model training, and optimally an observership at an expert center.Numerous dedicated ESD devices are now available in the United States from different manufacturers. Although the use of ESD in the United States is increasing, issues related to technical difficulty, limited training opportunities and mentors, risk of adverse events, long procedure duration,and suboptimal reimbursement may limit ESD adoption in the United States to a modest number of academic referral centers for the foreseeable future.

  4. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  5. Clinical study using novel endoscopic system for measuring size of gastrointestinal lesion

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Seki, Takeshi; Akatsu, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Takao; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To verify the performance of a lesion size measurement system through a clinical study. METHODS: Our proposed system, which consists of a conventional endoscope, an optical device, an optical probe, and a personal computer, generates a grid scale to measure the lesion size from an endoscopic image. The width of the grid scale is constantly adjusted according to the distance between the tip of the endoscope and lesion because the lesion size on an endoscopic image changes according to the distance. The shape of the grid scale was corrected to match the distortion of the endoscopic image. The distance was calculated using the amount of laser light reflected from the lesion through an optical probe inserted into the instrument channel of the endoscope. The endoscopist can thus measure the lesion size without contact by comparing the lesion with the size of the grid scale on the endoscopic image. (1) A basic test was performed to verify the relationship between the measurement error eM and the tilt angle of the endoscope; and (2) The sizes of three colon polyps were measured using our system during endoscopy. These sizes were immediately measured by scale after their removal. RESULTS: There was no error at α = 0°. In addition, the values of eM (mean ± SD) were 0.24 ± 0.11 mm (α = 10°), 0.90 ± 0.58 mm (α = 20°) and 2.31 ± 1.41 mm (α = 30°). According to these results, our system has been confirmed to measure accurately when the tilt angle is less than 20°. The measurement error was approximately 1 mm in the clinical study. Therefore, it was concluded that our proposed measurement system was also effective in clinical examinations. CONCLUSION: By combining simple optical equipment with a conventional endoscope, a quick and accurate system for measuring lesion size was established. PMID:24744595

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  7. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  8. Recent development in multifunctional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-01

    We have developed the novel video endoscope imaging techniques; Narrow band imaging (NBI), Auto-Fluorescence Imaging (AFI), Infra-Red Imaging (IRI) and Endo-Cytoscopy System (ECS). The purpose of these imaging techniques is to emphasize the important tissue features associated with early stage of lesions. We have already launched the new medical endoscope system including NBI, AFI and IRI (EVIS LUCERA SPECTRUM, OLYMPUS MEDICAL SYSTEMS Co., Ltd., Fig.1). Moreover ECS, which has enough magnification to observe cell nuclei on a superficial mucosa under methylene blue dye staining, is the endoscopic instrument with ultra-high optical zoom. In this paper we demonstrate the concepts and the medical efficacy of each technology.

  9. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding. PMID:25548554

  11. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  12. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  13. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  14. Semen quality after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for the management of lower ureteric stones: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gulur, Dev Mohan; Philip, Joe

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy has long been an important tool in the urologists' armamentarium for the treatment of distal ureteric stones. Several studies have been conducted on the morbidity and adverse effects of ESWL on human tissues but the effect of lithotripsy on semen and testes remains inconclusive. Impact on semen analysis and testes is important because the seminal vesicles and testes are exposed to the shock waves due to their anatomical proximity to the distal ureter. This article has reviewed all the published literature in English language on semen analysis after lithotripsy.

  15. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  16. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  17. Hemostasis in Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pant, Harshita

    2016-06-01

    Intraoperative bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery poses an additional dimension to an already technically challenging surgical approach because of the narrow sinonasal surgical field, single working hand, and the use of endoscopic instruments. Poor visualization is one of the most important factors that increase the risk of intraoperative complications such as inadvertent injury to major vessels and nerves, and incomplete surgery. This article provide a logical approach to improving the surgical field, minimizing risk of inadvertent vascular injury, and managing intraoperative bleeding. PMID:27267017

  18. Is endoscopic ultrasonography useful for endoscopic submucosal dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Sun, Siyu; Guo, Jintao; Ge, Nan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Guoxin; Hu, Jinlong; Wang, Shupeng

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an innovative advance in the treatment of early gastrointestinal (GI) cancer without lymph node metastases and precancerous lesions as it is an effective and safe therapeutic method. ESD has also been a promising therapeutic option for removal of submucosal tumors (SMTs) for improving the completeness of resection of a large lesion. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) can be used to detect the depth of invasion during the preoperative evaluation because of its close proximity to the lesion. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration can be used to increase the diagnostic accuracy of EUS in determining the malignant lymph node. EUS is considered to be a useful imaging procedure to characterize early GI cancer, which is suspicious for submucosal invasion, and the most accurate procedure for detecting and diagnosing SMTs for further treatment. In the process of ESD, EUS can also be used to detect surrounding blood vessels and the degree of fibrosis; this may be helpful for predicting procedure time and decreasing the risk of bleeding and perforation. EUS-guided injection before ESD renders the endoscopic resection safe and accurate. Therefore, EUS plays an important role in the use of ESD. However, compared to conventional endoscopic staging, EUS sometimes can under or overstage the lesion, and the diagnostic accuracy is controversial. In this review, we summarize the latest research findings regarding the role of EUS in ESD. PMID:27803900

  19. Experience with the pulsed dye laser in management of ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D M; Peters, J S; Costello, A J

    1992-10-01

    Pulsed dye laser lithotripsy is a recently developed technique for the management of urinary calculi. This article reports the results of treatment of a cohort of patients managed with this technology. Post-treatment bed stay was generally less than 48 h, narcotic analgesia was not regularly required, and no significant post-treatment complications were encountered. This treatment appeared to complement an existing extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) service at St Vincent's Hospital and may offer a financial advantage in the treatment of patients with urinary calculi.

  20. When should one perform shockwave lithotripsy for lower caliceal stones?

    PubMed

    Ilker, Y; Tarcan, T; Akdas, A

    1995-12-01

    Extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy of lower caliceal stones is often unrewarding because of the difficulty of passing stone fragments. We report our results in SWL of lower pole stones in 219 patients and compare them with the results of SWL of middle (82 patients) and upper pole (85 patients) stones. The stone-free rate of SWL monotherapy was found to be 59%, 77%, and 64% in lower, middle, and upper caliceal stones, respectively. In lower pole stones, SWL was unsuccessful in 41% of the patients, of whom 9% had minimal residual asymptomatic stones (less than 4 mm in greatest diameter). In comparison with the results of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCN) of lower pole urolithiasis in the literature, SWL was unsuccessful in large stones, with stone-free rates of 13% and 0 when the stone size was 3 to 4.9 cm2 and > 5 cm2, respectively. A stone-free rate of 82% when the stone burden was < 1 cm2 is similar to the PCN results of other centers, suggesting that SWL may be the first choice of treatment in lower pole stones of this size. We achieved a stone-free rate of 59% when the stone size was between 1 and 3 cm2, which is lower than the stone-free rates of PCN in the literature. In spite of its lower stone-free rates, SWL, with its lower morbidity, may still be considered an acceptable treatment modality in this range of moderate stone burden, especially when there is a patient desire for conservative treatment.

  1. [The application of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy in the treatment of choledocholithiasis].

    PubMed

    Nichitaĭlo, M E; Ogorodnik, P V; Goĭda, S M; Diachenko, V V; Goĭda, M S; Sobchinskiĭ, S A; Voĭtseshin, V V; Gul'ko, O N

    2001-10-01

    The method of extracorporal shockwave biliary lithotripsy was introduced in the clinic since 1993 yr in patients with residual choledocholithiasis. The method was applied in 25 patients. Cholecystectomy with external drainage of common biliary duct was performed in all patients beforehand. Positive result was noted in 16 observations. All patients are alive.

  2. Hypercalciuria and renal stones in a sarcoidosis patient treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, O P; Alfaro, C

    1986-03-01

    A case of chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis and hypercalciuria complicated by bilateral renal stones is reported. Urinary stones were pulverized by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) as the patient had declined any surgical procedure. The use of ESWL in conjunction with corticosteroids appears to be the treatment of choice in the management of renal stones secondary to abnormalities of calcium metabolism in sarcoidosis.

  3. Vertebral fracture associated with shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with granulomatous spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kazimoğlu, H; Mungan, M U; Kirkali, Z

    2001-09-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is an accepted treatment modality in the treatment of urinary stone disease. Many complications have been reported secondary to high-energy shockwaves, but the effects of SWL on the skeletal system have rarely been investigated. We represent the first case of a burst-type vertebral fracture after SWL in an elderly osteoporotic patient with granulomatous spondylitis.

  4. Treatment of Renal Calculi with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy: How applications of this method have expanded.

    PubMed

    Eberwein, P M; Denstedt, J D

    1992-07-01

    In 12 years, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has replaced other treatment techniques for most surgical calculi in the upper urinary tract. Worldwide clinical series have documented its efficacy. Technological advances and modifications have significantly expanded the clinical applications of this technique.

  5. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  6. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  7. Stereo Imaging Miniature Endoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam; Manohara, Harish; White, Victor; Shcheglov, Kirill V.; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2011-01-01

    Stereo imaging requires two different perspectives of the same object and, traditionally, a pair of side-by-side cameras would be used but are not feasible for something as tiny as a less than 4-mm-diameter endoscope that could be used for minimally invasive surgeries or geoexploration through tiny fissures or bores. The proposed solution here is to employ a single lens, and a pair of conjugated, multiple-bandpass filters (CMBFs) to separate stereo images. When a CMBF is placed in front of each of the stereo channels, only one wavelength of the visible spectrum that falls within the passbands of the CMBF is transmitted through at a time when illuminated. Because the passbands are conjugated, only one of the two channels will see a particular wavelength. These time-multiplexed images are then mixed and reconstructed to display as stereo images. The basic principle of stereo imaging involves an object that is illuminated at specific wavelengths, and a range of illumination wavelengths is time multiplexed. The light reflected from the object selectively passes through one of the two CMBFs integrated with two pupils separated by a baseline distance, and is focused onto the imaging plane through an objective lens. The passband range of CMBFs and the illumination wavelengths are synchronized such that each of the CMBFs allows transmission of only the alternate illumination wavelength bands. And the transmission bandwidths of CMBFs are complementary to each other, so that when one transmits, the other one blocks. This can be clearly understood if the wavelength bands are divided broadly into red, green, and blue, then the illumination wavelengths contain two bands in red (R1, R2), two bands in green (G1, G2), and two bands in blue (B1, B2). Therefore, when the objective is illuminated by R1, the reflected light enters through only the left-CMBF as the R1 band corresponds to the transmission window of the left CMBF at the left pupil. This is blocked by the right CMBF. The

  8. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  9. [Five-years' experience in the use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy at the Central Kiev Clinic Hospital].

    PubMed

    Bidnyĭ, V H; Popov, V O; Bidnyĭ, V V; Revunets', R H

    2001-01-01

    The article focuses on the main aspects of treatment of urolithiasis with the aid of extracorporeal lithotripsy at the Central Kiev City Clinical Hospital with particular regard to the therapeutic policy of in-patient managing of patients. An analysis has been performed together with substantiation of connection between physical parameters of the focal zone and efficiency of lithotripsy, which attempts will, we believe, promote the accuracy of prognostication of the course of treatment.

  10. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  11. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-02-27

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  12. Lasers in digestive endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Lasers were introduced in digestive endoscopy to stop active gastroduodenal hemorrhages. Their use spread progressively to the treatment of chronic hemorrhages from vascular malformations and sessile tumors. Laser face competition from other endoscopic techniques such as electrocoagulation, injection techniques, dilation, stents, and brachytherapy. Many series have reported the efficacy of lasers in digestive endoscopy used for their thermal or photochemical effects. However, they were gradually abandoned for the treatment of hemorrhages because of competition from nonlaser techniques. Lasers are still used for ablation of sessile tumors, but their true impact is difficult to evaluate. Modern methods of technology assessment did not allow gastroenterologists to clearly define the place of lasers among surgery, radio-chemotherapy, and other endoscopic techniques, and data on the daily use of lasers are not available. Therefore, the conclusion can only be subjective. The best current application of thermal lasers appears to be in the treatment of rectosigmoid villous adenomas in elderly patients. Small superficial rectal cancers may also become a good subject due to the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography. Early lesions with multifocal or diffuse disease such as early esophageal cancers could be the most promising subject of application for photodynamic therapy in the future.

  13. Randomised controlled trial of cost-effectiveness of lithotripsy and open cholecystectomy as treatments for gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, J P; Brazier, J E; Milner, P C; Westlake, L; Kohler, B; Williams, B T; Ross, B; Frost, E; Johnson, A G

    1992-10-01

    Inpatient extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for treatment of gallbladder stones has not previously been compared with open cholecystectomy in terms of cost-effectiveness. In a randomised controlled trial, 163 patients, stratified by gallstone bulk (over 4 cm3 or not), were randomised to lithotripsy or cholecystectomy (38 large-bulk and 27 small-bulk cholecystectomy; 37 large-bulk and 61 small-bulk lithotripsy) and followed up for 1 year. Both treatments gave significant health gains in terms of a reduction in episodes of biliary pain, improved perceived health status, and symptom relief, but few differences between treatments were found. There was some evidence that biliary-pain episodes were less severe after cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy patients also had greater improvements in mean health gain for three related symptoms: vomiting, feeling sick, and fatty-food upset. However, there were no differences between groups in perceived health status. Among lithotripsy patients, health gain was not related to stone clearance. Lithotripsy was more expensive than cholecystectomy, principally because of the costs of the inpatient stay and adjuvant bile-salt therapy. Conventional lithotripsy appears at least as cost-effective as cholecystectomy for patients with small-bulk stones but less cost-effective for those with large-bulk stones. To some extent treatment choice can be guided by patient preference.

  14. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy.

  15. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:26445394

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of stones in lower calices of kidney].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Peniukova, I V; Moskalenko, S A; Peniukov, V G; Peniukov, D V; Balykov, I S

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study aimed to evaluation of possible relationship between anatomical structure of the renal pelvis of the kidney, the size of the stone and the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) of stones in lower calices of kidney, defined as "stone-free state". ESWL was performed in 285 patients. Sizes of stones varied from 5 to 25 mm. With interval distribution of stone sizes, the greatest number of cases was detected with size of 5 to 12 mm. The destruction of stone required one ESWL session in 196 cases, and three sessions only in 12 cases. The total number of pulses per one stone did not exceed 9500, and more than 70% of the stones have been effectively destroyed with less than 3000 pulses. The result of treatment was assessed 3-4 months after the last ESWL session on the basis of ultrasound and X-ray examination using nominal (dichotomous) scale. In addition, for verification of significant (expected and unexpected) correlations, exploratory analysis of the correlation matrices of factors possibly affecting the discharge of stone fragments was performed. Positive treatment outcome was recorded in 212 (74.4%) patients. Residual stone fragments (> or = 5 mm) were identified in 73 (25.6%) patients; in 69 patients fragments corresponded to the initial localization and 4 fragments were located in the pelvis and calices of middle and lower segments of the kidney. Statistical processing found no association between the size of the stone and the number of ESWL sessions required for its destruction (P = 0,4056). The analysis of relationship between the nature of the complications and size of stone revealed differences, but there were no significant differences in median test (p = 0.1067). Based on exploratory analysis and correlations identified, in-depth evaluation was carried out on three factors: the size of the stone, length of lower calices neck, and pyelocaliceal corner. Width of lower calices neck as a

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with a single kidney].

    PubMed

    Mompó Sanchís, J A; Fernández Rodríguez, A; Tormos Pérez, E

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-eight patients with calculi in solitary kidney were submitted to treatment with shock waves. The epidemiologic data presented herein include stone volume, localization, and type (29 caliceal, 10 pyelic, and 5 multiple calculi; 13 pseudostaghorn, 11 staghorn, and 10 ureteral calculi). Patient evaluation 3 months after treatment revealed overall good results were achieved: 46 renal units were stone-free and 20 had small stone fragments that could be spontaneously passed. Thirteen patients had persistent residual lithiasis. Different types of complementary endoscopic treatments had been utilized in 65% of the cases. With regard to complications, there were 5 cases with obstructive anuria and 4 with fever. The foregoing results show that ESWL is a safe and effective method of treatment of lithiasis in patients with solitary kidney. It is currently the procedure of choice for this patient group.

  18. A new endoscopic hand drill for management of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Batzella, Sandro; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Iacono, Raffaele Dello; Battistoni, Paolo; Caterino, Umberto; Santini, Mario; Galluccio, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Tracheal resection and primary anastomosis is the treatment of choice for the management of benign tracheal stenoses. Rigid endoscopy with laser-assisted mechanical dilatation is an alternative to surgery and helps to improve symptoms and quality of life in patients unfit for surgery. Here, we describe the treatment of a simple web-like stenosis, using a new endoscopic hand drill that was assembled by sharpening the blunt tip of a standard endoscopic cotton applicator. The bronchoscopy was positioned proximally to the stenotic lesion and radial holes were made at 12, 3 and 9 o'clock. The tip of instrument touched the target area of the stenotic scar. The proximal end was handily rotated and the force, applied on the instrument's tip, and the hole was drilled. Next, endoscopic scissors was placed in the drill holes and the stenotic scar was cut. Mechanical dilatation with rigid bronchoscopes of increasing diameters completed the procedure. This procedure was successfully applied in 5 patients with simple benign tracheal stenosis and unfit for surgery. No intraoperative and/or postoperative complications occurred. No recurrence of stenosis was detected after a mean follow-up of 26 ± 2 months.

  19. Endoscopic treatment of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Newlands, S D; Weymuller, E A

    1999-01-01

    Traditional treatment of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) has included open surgical approaches for the majority of tumors. At the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC), endoscopic techniques have been used for the removal of some small JNAs. This report describes the institutional experience in treating these tumors. The medical records of 15 patients at UWMC treated over a 15-year period for JNA were reviewed. Three patients were treated only by an endoscopic approach, and one patient had a combined endoscopic and open procedure. All three of the patients treated only by the endoscopic approach were disease free with a minimum of 24 months follow up. The one patient treated with a combined endoscopic and open approach had recurrence of disease. Endoscopic removal after embolization effectively treated three patients with early stage JNAs. Indications for this procedure are discussed.

  20. 2.15 Micron Laser Welding Of Gallbladder Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treat, Michael R.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Popp, Howard W.

    1989-09-01

    Laser welding of biliary tissues would be a valuable technique in conventional and endoscopic surgery. Laser welding would allow the avoidance of potentially lithogenic suture material as a sequela to biliary tract surgery. Laser welding would be compatable from the surgical technical standpoint with fiberoptic endoscopic intrumentation. The 2.15 micron thulium-holmium-chromium laser offers tissue penetration on the order of a few hundred microns. We have hypothesized that this laser might be well suited to performing biliary tissue welding. We evaluated this laser in vitro using canine gallbladder tissue and we were able to achieve histologically satisfactory tissue fusion and immediate bursting strengths above physiologically encountered biliary pressures.