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Sample records for endoscopic surgical skill

  1. Reliability of laparoscopic skills assessment on video: 8-year results of the endoscopic surgical skill qualification system in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Ono, Yoshinari; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Ken; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Shigeta, Masanobu; Habuchi, Tomonori; Terachi, Toshiro

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Urological Association and Japanese Society of Endourology established a urologic laparoscopic skills qualification system called the Endoscopic Surgical Skill Qualification (ESSQ) System in Urological Laparoscopy in 2004. The reliability of video assessments by referees was evaluated. Videos of nephrectomies or adrenalectomies performed by the applicants were assessed by two referees selected among a pool of 42 referees. From 2004 to 2011, 1308 urologists applied and 60.2% were qualified after video assessments. The results of skills assessments on 1220 videos that had fixed points by two referees were analyzed statistically. The average number of videos that each referee assessed was 58.1, with a range of 16 to 87. The accordance rate of the results of the video assessment, pass or fail, by the two referees was 68.9%. The scores of the video assessment by each referee averaged 62.7±2.4 (standard deviation) (full score was set at 75 points and ≥60 points was needed to pass). There was a statistically significant difference in the average video assessment score among the referees (P<0.001), and five referees showed significantly higher or lower average scores than the other referees. The percentage qualification of the final decision made by the Referee Committee on the videos originally assessed by each referee showed no significant differences among the 42 referees. The accordance rate of the results from the video assessment by each referee with the final decision by the committee showed a statistically significant positive correlation with the number of videos assessed by each referee (r=0.404, P=0.0080). The ESSQ system showed moderate reliability for the video assessments by the referees. It was concluded that the video assessments by the referees were fair for all applicants, because the final qualification rates showed no significant differences among the referees.

  2. Effectiveness of short-term endoscopic surgical skill training for young pediatric surgeons: a validation study using the laparoscopic fundoplication simulator.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Takahiro; Ieiri, Satoshi; Obata, Satoshi; Uemura, Munenori; Souzaki, Ryota; Matsuoka, Noriyuki; Katayama, Tamotsu; Masumoto, Kouji; Hashizume, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric surgeons require highly advanced skills when performing endoscopic surgery; however, their experience is often limited in comparison to general surgeons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic surgery training for less-experienced pediatric surgeons and then compare their skills before and after training. Young pediatric surgeons (n = 7) who participated in this study underwent a 2-day endoscopic skill training program, consisting of lectures, box training and live tissue training. The trainees performed the Nissen construction tasks before and after training using our objective evaluation system. A statistical analysis was conducted using the two-tailed paired Student's t tests. The time for task was 984 ± 220 s before training and 645 ± 92.8 s after training (p < 0.05). The total path length of both forceps was 37855 ± 10586 mm before training and 22582 ± 3045 mm after training (p < 0.05). The average velocity of both forceps was 26.1 ± 3.68 mm/s before training and 22.9 ± 2.47 mm/sec after training (p < 0.1). The right and left balance of suturing was improved after training (p < 0.05). Pediatric surgery trainees improved their surgical skills after receiving short-term training. We demonstrated the effectiveness of our training program, which utilized a new laparoscopic fundoplication simulator.

  3. Technology for Psychomotor Skills Testing in Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hanna; Drew; Cuschieri

    1997-06-01

    Psychomotor research is essential for aptitude-based selection of surgical trainees and sound surgical practice. Two microprocessor-controlled psychomotor testers were developed to evaluate psychomotor skills related to endoscopic surgery. Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Tester (DEPT) measures single-handed performance in an endoscopic environment and therefore it can be used to evaluate differing abilities between the right and left hand. Advanced Dundee endoscopic Psychomotor Tester (ADEPT) measures two-handed performance, and consequently it can be used to assess coordinated bimanual endoscopic manipulations. Psychomotor testers provide real-time objective scoring systems that have several aspects of face validity to real endoscopic environment. Studies on medical students have confirmed that objective evaluation of task performance in an endoscopic field is feasible and have documented differences in psychomotor abilities between subjects.

  4. Gynaecological endoscopic surgical education and assessment. A diploma programme in gynaecological endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Campo, Rudi; Wattiez, Arnaud; Tanos, Vasilis; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Grimbizis, Grigoris; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Puga, Marco; Molinas, Roger; O'Donovan, Peter; Deprest, Jan; Van Belle, Yves; Lissens, Ann; Herrmann, Anja; Tahir, Mahmood; Benedetto, Chiara; Siebert, Igno; Rabischong, Benoit; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    In recent years, training and education in endoscopic surgery has been critically reviewed. Clinicians, both surgeons as gynaecologist who perform endoscopic surgery without proper training of the specific psychomotor skills, are at higher risk to increased patient morbidity and mortality. Although the apprentice-tutor model has long been a successful approach for training of surgeons, recently, clinicians have recognised that endoscopic surgery requires an important training phase outside the operating theatre. The Gynaecological Endoscopic Surgical Education and Assessment programme (GESEA) recognises the necessity of this structured approach and implements two separated stages in its learning strategy. In the first stage, a skill certificate on theoretical knowledge and specific practical psychomotor skills is acquired through a high-stake exam; in the second stage, a clinical programme is completed to achieve surgical competence and receive the corresponding diploma. Three diplomas can be awarded: (a) the Bachelor in Endoscopy, (b) the Minimally Invasive Gynaecological Surgeon (MIGS) and (c) the Master level. The Master level is sub-divided into two separate diplomas: the Master in Laparoscopic Pelvic Surgery and the Master in Hysteroscopy. The complexity of modern surgery has increased the demands and challenges to surgical education and the quality control. This programme is based on the best available scientific evidence, and it counteracts the problem of the traditional surgical apprentice-tutor model. It is seen as a major step toward standardisation of endoscopic surgical training in general.

  5. Gynaecological Endoscopic Surgical Education and Assessment. A diploma programme in gynaecological endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Campo, Rudi; Wattiez, Arnaud; Tanos, Vasilis; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Grimbizis, Grigoris; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Puga, Marco; Molinas, Roger; O'Donovan, Peter; Deprest, Jan; Van Belle, Yves; Lissens, Ann; Herrmann, Anja; Tahir, Mahmood; Benedetto, Chiara; Siebert, Igno; Rabischong, Benoit; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, training and education in endoscopic surgery has been critically reviewed. Clinicians, both surgeons as gynaecologist who perform endoscopic surgery without proper training of the specific psychomotor skills are at higher risk to increased patient morbidity and mortality. Although the apprentice-tutor model has long been a successful approach for training of surgeons, recently, clinicians have recognised that endoscopic surgery requires an important training phase outside the operating theatre. The Gynaecological Endoscopic Surgical Education and Assessment programme (GESEA), recognises the necessity of this structured approach and implements two separated stages in its learning strategy. In the first stage, a skill certificate on theoretical knowledge and specific practical psychomotor skills is acquired through a high stake exam; in the second stage, a clinical programme is completed to achieve surgical competence and receive the corresponding diploma. Three diplomas can be awarded: (a) the Bachelor in Endoscopy; (b) the Minimally Invasive Gynaecological Surgeon (MIGS); and (c) the Master level. The Master level is sub-divided into two separate diplomas: the Master in Laparoscopic Pelvic Surgery and the Master in Hysteroscopy. The complexity of modern surgery has increased the demands and challenges to surgical education and the quality control. This programme is based on the best available scientific evidence and it counteracts the problem of the traditional surgical apprentice tutor model. It is seen as a major step toward standardization of endoscopic surgical training in general.

  6. Surgical Endoscopy Versus Endoscopic Surgery for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Bogdan Silviu; Pătraşcu, Ştefan; Şurlin, Valeriu; Săftoiu, Adrian

    Obesity treatment options are of great interest worldwide with major developments in the past 20 years. From general surgery to natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery intervention nowadays, obesity surgical therapies have surely developed and are now offering a variety of possibilities. Although surgery is the only proven approach for weight loss, a joint decision between the physician and patient is required before proceeding to such a procedure. With a lot of options available, the treatment should be individualized because the benefits of surgical intervention must be weighed against the surgical risks. Medline search to locate full-text articles and abstracts with obvious conclusions by using the keywords: obesity, surgical endoscopy, gastric bypass, bariatric surgery, and endoscopic surgery, alone and in various combinations. Additional relevant publications were also searched using the reference lists of the identified articles as a starting point. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass still is the most effective, less invasive, bariatric surgical intervention, although there are various complications encountered, such as postoperative hemorrhage (1.9%-4.4%), internal hernias, anastomotic strictures (2.9%-23%), marginal ulcerations (1%-16%), fistulas (1.5%-6%), weight gain, and nutritional deficiencies. However, the absence of parietal incisions, less pain, decreased risk of infection, and short hospital stay make room for endoscopic surgery as a possible valid option for obesity for both the doctors' and the patients' perspective. The current tendency is to promote surgical treatment of obesity to a status of less invasive scars therefore promoting minimally invasive surgical techniques.

  7. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Haptic feedback and control of a flexible surgical endoscopic robot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Sun, Zhenglong; Phee, Soo Jay

    2013-11-01

    A flexible endoscope could reach the potential surgical site via a single small incision on the patient or even through natural orifices, making it a very promising platform for surgical procedures. However, endoscopic surgery has strict spatial constraints on both tool-channel size and surgical site volume. It is therefore very challenging to deploy and control dexterous robotic instruments to conduct surgical procedures endoscopically. Pioneering endoscopic surgical robots have already been introduced, but the performance is limited by the flexible neck of the robot that passes through the endoscope tool channel. In this article we present a series of new developments to improve the performance of the robot: a force transmission model to address flexibility, elongation study for precise position control, and tissue property modeling for haptic feedback. Validation experiment results are presented for each sector. An integrated control architecture of the robot system is given in the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel’s attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel–Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice. PMID:26090737

  10. Endoscopic quadricepsplasty: A new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C E; Leon, H O; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present a new surgical subperiosteal endoscopic technique for the release of fibrosis of the quadriceps to the femur caused by gunshot injuries, postsurgical scarring, and fractures, that was developed at the Arthroscopy Group at Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The technique used is a proximal endoscopic subperiosteal extension of the usual arthroscopic intra-articular release of adhesions, using periosteal elevators and arthroscopic scissors placed through medial and lateral superior knee portals to release adhesions and bands of scar tissue beneath the quadriceps mechanism. The technique was used in a prospective case series of 26 male patients aged 19 to 22 years between February 1997 and March 1998 who presented with clinically and ultrasonically documented extra-articular fibrosis resulting in ankylosis of the knee in extension. Only patients who had reached a plateau in their aggressive physiotherapy program with no further progression in knee flexion for 3 months were selected. Those with joint instability, motion-limiting articular surface pathology, and muscle or neurologic injury were excluded. All patients had obtained satisfactory results at 2-year follow-up. The extra-articular release gained at final follow-up was between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion in addition to that obtained at the completion of the standard intra-articular release. Complications included 1 case of deep vein thrombosis, 2 cases of scrotal edema, 5 cases of hemarthrosis, and 2 cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. We have found this technique useful in obtaining additional flexion and improved function in a difficult class of patients with ankylosis caused by extra-articular fibrosis of the quadriceps to the femur, allowing immediate aggressive rehabilitation and presenting a useful outpatient alternative with fewer and less severe complications than described with the classic open Thompson's quadricepsplasty.

  11. Corpus callosotomy-Open and endoscopic surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Matthew D; Vellimana, Ananth K; Asano, Eishi; Sood, Sandeep

    2017-04-01

    Corpus callosotomy is a palliative surgical procedure for patients with refractory epilepsy. It can be performed through an open approach via a standard craniotomy and the aid of an operating microscope, or alternatively via a mini-craniotomy with endoscope assistance. The extent of callosal disconnection performed varies according to indications and surgeon preference. In this article, we describe both open and endoscopic surgical techniques for anterior and complete corpus callosotomy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Surgical fidelity: comparing the microscope and the endoscope.

    PubMed

    Cote, Martin; Kalra, Ricky; Wilson, Taylor; Orlandi, Richard R; Couldwell, William T

    2013-12-01

    Both the microscope and the endoscope are widely used as visualization tools in neurosurgery; however, surgical dexterity when operating with each may differ. The aim of this study was to compare the surgical fidelity when using each of these visualization tools. Junior residents and expert surgeons performed standardized motor tasks under microscopic and endoscopic visualization. Demerits for inaccuracy and time needed to complete the tasks were used to compare the surgeons' performance with the microscope and the endoscope. The participants also performed a motor task under direct vision using different instruments to evaluate whether the shape of the instrument had any impact on the surgical fidelity. For the junior residents, the number of demerits accrued was lower with the microscope than with the endoscope, and the time needed to complete the tasks was also lower with the microscope. There was no difference in the number of demerits between the microscopic and the endoscopic experts, but the microscopic expert completed the task in a shorter time. There was no difference in demerits or performance time when comparing a short, straight instrument and a longer, bayoneted one. For junior residents, surgical fidelity is higher with the microscope than with the endoscope. This difference vanishes with experience, but a slower speed of execution is observed with endoscopic visualization, both in junior and expert surgeons.

  13. Evolution of surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kurt-E; Bell, Robert-L; Duffy, Andrew-J

    2006-05-28

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated "tissue" in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients.

  14. Evolution of surgical skills training

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kurt E; Bell, Robert L; Duffy, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education’s (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients. PMID:16718842

  15. Optimal management of Barrett's esophagus: pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Konda, Vani Ja; Dalal, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus, are rapidly rising in incidence. This review serves to highlight the role of pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical intervention in the management of Barrett's esophagus, which requires acid suppression and endoscopic assessment. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor may decrease acid exposure and delay the progression to dysplasia. Patients who require aspirin for cardioprotection or other indications may also benefit in terms of a protective effect against the development of esophageal cancer. However, without other indications, aspirin is not indicated solely to prevent cancer. A careful endoscopic examination should include assessment of any visible lesions in a Barrett's segment. An expert gastrointestinal pathologist should confirm neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. For those patients with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma, careful consideration of endoscopic therapy or surgical therapy must be given. All visible lesions in the setting of dysplasia should be targeted with focal endoscopic mucosal resection for both accurate histopathologic diagnosis and treatment. The remainder of the Barrett's epithelium should be eradicated to address all synchronous and metachronous lesions. This may be done by tissue acquiring or nontissue acquiring means. Radiofrequency ablation has a positive benefit-risk profile for flat Barrett's esophagus. At this time, endoscopic therapy is not indicated for nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Esophagectomy is still reserved for selected cases with evidence of lymph node metastasis, unsuccessful endoscopic therapy, or with high-risk features of high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

  16. Recognition of surgical skills using hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Stefanie; Zentek, Tom; Sudra, Gunther; Gehrig, Tobias; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline and can be regarded as a major breakthrough in surgical technique. A minimally invasive intervention requires enhanced motor skills to deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination and restricted mobility. To alleviate these constraints we propose to enhance the surgeon's capabilities by providing a context-aware assistance using augmented reality techniques. To recognize and analyze the current situation for context-aware assistance, we need intraoperative sensor data and a model of the intervention. Characteristics of a situation are the performed activity, the used instruments, the surgical objects and the anatomical structures. Important information about the surgical activity can be acquired by recognizing the surgical gesture performed. Surgical gestures in minimally invasive surgery like cutting, knot-tying or suturing are here referred to as surgical skills. We use the motion data from the endoscopic instruments to classify and analyze the performed skill and even use it for skill evaluation in a training scenario. The system uses Hidden Markov Models (HMM) to model and recognize a specific surgical skill like knot-tying or suturing with an average recognition rate of 92%.

  17. Surgical skill facilitation in videoscopic open surgery.

    PubMed

    Panait, Lucian; Rafiq, Azhar; Mohamed, Ahmed; Doarn, Charles; Merrell, Ronald C

    2003-12-01

    The operating room (OR) was traditionally characterized as a closed environment, in which the view of the operative field was available to the surgeon and assistant only. In laparoscopy, integration of technology into the surgical theatre has transformed surgical procedures into minimally invasive events, with viewing of the surgical field using endoscopic cameras. Similar technical advances to the open surgical environment will allow visualization and coordination of finer surgical maneuvers on standard video monitors. The objective of this study was to develop optimal protocols for performing basic open surgical maneuvers without direct viewing of the operating field, instead watching a monitor that displays the image of the surgical field captured by an endoscopic camera. The AESOP robotic arm and Alpha Virtual Port (Computer Motion, Goleta, California) were used to hold the endoscopic camera in different positions relative to the surgeon and the operative table. The surgeons conducting the study evaluated six such different setups. Based on the average time to complete the task in each of these setups and the ease of adaptation to the new working conditions, we concluded that at least one of these setups could be translated into the OR. The advantages of integrating video image enhancement over classical open surgery (OS) are that the surgical field can be magnified to perform finer maneuvers, and to share views of the surgical field with additional clinicians and trainees.

  18. Scientific Skill Assessment of Basic Surgical Dissection and Overall Laparoscopic Performance.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Yoshida, Kenji; Habuchi, Tomonori; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Terachi, Toshiro

    2017-04-01

    To improve surgical education, objective and scientific skill assessments are required. There are two types of skill evaluations: assessments of basic surgical skills and assessments of overall surgical performance. To establish a reliable assessment method for surgical dissection, we measured the force applied on the tip of a surgical instrument during dissection of the renal vessels of pigs. The experiments revealed that, during surgical dissection, expert laparoscopic surgeons applied vertical force at the beginning of the stroke and then horizontal force, with minimum vertical force, at the end of the stroke. As an assessment of overall surgical performance, the Endoscopic Surgical Qualification system was developed and has been used for 12 years in Japan. More than 3700 surgeons, including urologists, were determined to have appropriate laparoscopic surgical skills after assessments of unedited videos by referees.

  19. Specificity of motor learning in simulator training of endoscopic-surgery skills.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Herbert; Klimmer, Felix; Luttmann, Alwin; Bolbach, Ullrich

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of simulators for the practice of endoscopic-surgery sensori-motor skills opens a wide range of design options. An obvious one is augmented visual information early in practice, in particular a direct view of the site instead of the endoscopic view. We studied the effects of such augmented visual information on the simulated ablation of tissue with straight, horizontal and parallel cuts. Direct view had an immediate beneficial effect on performance as compared with endoscopic-view practice. However, in subsequent tests with endoscopic view the benefits disappeared and turned into costs for some aspects of performance, e.g., duration. This finding highlights for a simulated surgical task that optimisation of practice by a performance criterion may not result in optimisation by a transfer criterion. Endoscopic surgery represents a challenge for human sensori-motor skills, but new simulator-based training methods give leeway for optimisation. A candidate is augmented visual feedback, in particular a direct rather than endoscopic view of the site. However, performance becomes dependent on the augmented feedback so that the costs outweigh the benefits.

  20. Flexible endoscopic and surgical management of Zenker's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Dzeletovic, Ivana; Ekbom, Dale C; Baron, Todd H

    2012-08-01

    Zenker's diverticulum is an outpouching of the mucosa through the Killian's triangle. The etiology of Zenker's diverticulum is not well understood. It is thought to be due to the incoordination or incomplete relaxation of the cricopharyngeal muscle. Most patients are men who present with symptoms of dysphagia between the seventh and eighth decades of life. The diagnosis is made with a dynamic contrast swallowing study. Treatment options include open surgical diverticulectomy and diverticulopexy with myotomy or myotomy alone using flexible or rigid endoscopes. Rigid endoscopic treatment is currently the preferred initial choice for Zenker's diverticulum of any size. The flexible endoscopic technique is used when there is a high risk of general anesthesia, or neck extension is contraindicated. Some centers use flexible endoscopy as the initial treatment option. Due to a lack of prospective studies, the treatment choice should be tailored to the individual patient and local expertise.

  1. Perceptions of surgical specialists in general surgery, orthopaedic surgery, urology and gynaecology on teaching endoscopic surgery in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Schijven, M P; Schout, B M A; Dolmans, V E M G; Hendrikx, A J M; Broeders, I A M J; Borel Rinkes, I H M

    2008-02-01

    Specific training in endoscopic skills and procedures has become a necessity for profession with embedded endoscopic techniques in their surgical palette. Previous research indicates endoscopic skills training to be inadequate, both from subjective (resident interviews) and objective (skills measurement) viewpoint. Surprisingly, possible shortcomings in endoscopic resident education have never been measured from the perspective of those individuals responsible for resident training, e.g. the program directors. Therefore, a nation-wide survey was conducted to inventory current endoscopic training initiatives and its possible shortcomings among all program directors of the surgical specialties in the Netherlands. Program directors for general surgery, orthopaedic surgery, gynaecology and urology were surveyed using a validated 25-item questionnaire. A total of 113 program directors responded (79%). The respective response percentages were 73.6% for general surgeons, 75% for orthopaedic surgeon, 90.9% for urologists and 68.2% for gynaecologists. According to the findings, 35% of general surgeons were concerned about whether residents are properly skilled endoscopically upon completion of training. Among the respondents, 34.6% were unaware of endoscopic training initiatives. The general and orthopaedic surgeons who were aware of these initiatives estimated the number of training hours to be satisfactory, whereas the urologists and gynaecologists estimated training time to be unsatisfactory. Type and duration of endoscopic skill training appears to be heterogeneous, both within and between the specialties. Program directors all perceive virtual reality simulation to be a highly effective training method, and a multimodality training approach to be key. Respondents agree that endoscopic skills education should ideally be coordinated according to national consensus and guidelines. A delicate balance exists between training hours and clinical working hours during residency

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Pancreatobiliary Endoscopy in Surgically Altered Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Lee, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the mainstay of therapy for pancreatobiliary diseases. While ERCP is safe and highly effective in the general population, the procedure remains challenging or impossible in patients with surgically altered anatomy (SAA). Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows transmural access to the bile or pancreatic duct (PD) prior to ductal drainage using ERCP-based techniques. Also known as endosonography-guided cholangiopancreatography (ESCP), the procedure provides multiple advantages over overtube-assisted enteroscopy ERCP or percutaneous or surgical approaches. However, the procedure should only be performed by endoscopists experienced in both EUS and ERCP and with the proper tools. In this review, various EUS-guided diagnostic and therapeutic drainage techniques in patients with SAA are examined. Detailed step-by-step procedural descriptions, technical tips, feasibility, and safety data are also discussed. PMID:27894187

  3. Systematic review comparing endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Dhir, Vinay; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Seo, Dong Wan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review comparing the outcomes of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage. METHODS: Comparative studies published between January 1980 and May 2014 were identified on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane controlled trials register and assessed for suitability of inclusion. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate. Secondary outcomes included were the recurrence rates, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, adverse events and mortalities. RESULTS: Ten comparative studies were identified and 3 were randomized controlled trials. Four studies reported on the outcomes of percutaneous and surgical drainage. Based on a large-scale national study, surgical drainage appeared to reduce mortality and adverse events rate as compared to the percutaneous approach. Three studies reported on the outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and surgical drainage. Clinical success and adverse events rates appeared to be comparable but the EUS approach reduced hospital stay, cost and improved quality of life. Three other studies compared EUS and esophagogastroduodenoscopy-guided drainage. Both approaches were feasible for pseudocyst drainage but the success rate of the EUS approach was better for non-bulging cyst and the approach conferred additional safety benefits. CONCLUSION: In patients with unfavorable anatomy, surgical cystojejunostomy or percutaneous drainage could be considered. Large randomized studies with current definitions of pseudocysts and longer-term follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of the various modalities. PMID:27014427

  4. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Boming; Li, Quanpeng; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jiang, Guobing; Ge, Xianxiu; Nie, Junjie; Zhang, Xiuyun; Wu, Ping; Ji, Jie; Miao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered anatomy is challenging. Results of ERCP in those patients varied. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of various endoscopes-assisted ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy. Fifty-two patients with Billroth II reconstruction (group A), 20 patients with subtotal or total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis (group B), 25 patients with pancreatoduodenectomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy reconstruction (group C) were included. Gastroscope, duodenoscope, colonoscope, and double-balloon enteroscope were used. The endoscope insertion success rate of groups A, B, C was 96.2% (50/52), 85.0% (17/20), 80% (20/25), respectively. χ2 test showed that there was no significant difference between the 3 groups (P = 0.068). The mean insertion time was 36.7, 68.4, and 84.0 minutes, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the insertion time of group C was significantly longer than that of groups B and C (both P <0.001). The endoscopic cannulation success rates of groups A, B, C were 90%, 82.4%, and 100%, respectively. χ2 test showed that there was no significant difference between the 3 groups (P = 0.144). The mean cannulation time was 19.4, 28.1, and 20.4 minutes, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the cannulation time of group B was longer than that of groups A and C (P <0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). In total, 74 patients with successful biliary cannulation achieved the therapeutic goal; thus, the clinical success rate was 76.3% (74/97). Our study showed that ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy was safe and feasible. PMID:28033284

  5. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Amer, Syed; Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Menias, Christine O; Pannala, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), can be more challenging compared to those with a normal anatomy. Detailed assessment of cross-sectional imaging features by the radiologist, especially the pancreaticobiliary anatomy, strictures, and stones, is very helpful to the endoscopist in planning the procedure. In addition, any information on enteral anastomoses (for e.g., gastrojejunal strictures and afferent limb obstruction) is also very useful. The endoscopist should review the operative note to understand the exact anatomy prior to procedure. RYGB, which is performed for medically complicated obesity, is the most commonly encountered altered anatomy ERCP procedure. Other situations include patients who have had a pancreaticoduodenectomy or a hepaticojejunostomy. Balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy (single and double-balloon enteroscopy) or rotational endoscopy is often used to traverse the length of the intestine to reach the papilla. In addition, ERCP in these patients is further challenging due to the oblique orientation of the papilla relative to the forward viewing endoscope and the limited enteroscopy-length therapeutic accessories that are currently available. Overall, reported therapeutic success is approximately 70-75% with a complication rate of 3-4%. Alternative approaches include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, or surgery. Given the complexity, ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy should be performed in close collaboration with body imagers, interventional radiology, and surgical services.

  6. [Strategies for endoscopic and surgical treatment of biliary tract calculi].

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Dragos; Stojanović, Mirjana; Milojević, Predrag; Caparević, Zorica; Lalosević, Dorde; Radovanović, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    Common bile duct calculi represent a pathologic entity involving obstructive icterus, cholangitis, hepatic cirrhosis or pancreatitits. Common bile duct calculi mostly have a secondary origin (from gallbladder) in 95% of cases, while primary choledocholithiasis is rare. From surgical aspect, common bile duct calculi can be: 1. Asymptomatic, without manifested symptoms or signs, 2. Mobile, with intermittent biliar obstruction and disobstruction, 3. Fixed, with obstruction and signs of hepato-biliary and/or bilio-pancreatic duct, 4. Transitory, microcalculi which pass through Vater's Papilla by propulsion into duodenum with symptoms. Modern biliary surgery includes diagnosis of common bile duct calculi, and if possible preoperative endoscopic (endoluminal) surgery, which is less invasive for patients. If such approach is not possible, it is necessary to perform stone extraction and cholecystectomy. Common bile duct calculi represent a common disease of the digestive system. Endoscopic diagnostic procedure is very important in management of choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic treatment of common bile duct calculi prior to cholecystectomy is a method of choice and a strategy for associated cholecysto-choledocholithiasis.

  7. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  8. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  9. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) as a surgical treatment of Haglund's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Schunck, J; Sokkar, S H

    2007-07-01

    Posterior calcaneal exostosis treatment modalities showed many controversial opinions. After failure of the conservative treatment, surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal exostosis are indicated by many authors. But clinical studies also show a high rate of unsatisfactory results with a relative high incidence of complications. The minimal surgical invasive technique by an endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) could be an option to overcome some of these problems. We operated on 81 patients with an age range between 25 and 55 years, 40 males and 41 females. The radiologic examination prior to surgery documented in all cases a posterior superior calcaneal exostosis that showed friction to the Achilles tendon. All patients included in the study had neither clinical varus of the hind foot nor cavus deformities. All patients had undergone a trial of conservative treatment for at least 6 months and did not show a positive response. The average follow-up was 35.3 months (12-72). According to the Ogilvie-Harris-Score, 34 patients presented good and 41 patients excellent results, while three patients showed fair results, and three patients only poor results. All the post-operative radiographs showed sufficient resection of the calcaneal spur. Only minor postoperative complications were observed. ECP is an effective and of minimal-invasive procedure for the treatment of patients with calcaneal exostosis. After a short learning curve, the endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique has less morbidity, less operating time, and nearly no complications; moreover, the pathology can better be differentiated.

  10. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated.

  11. An integrated approach to endoscopic instrument tracking for augmented reality applications in surgical simulation training.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Constantinos; Lahanas, Vasileios; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2013-12-01

    Despite the popular use of virtual and physical reality simulators in laparoscopic training, the educational potential of augmented reality (AR) has not received much attention. A major challenge is the robust tracking and three-dimensional (3D) pose estimation of the endoscopic instrument, which are essential for achieving interaction with the virtual world and for realistic rendering when the virtual scene is occluded by the instrument. In this paper we propose a method that addresses these issues, based solely on visual information obtained from the endoscopic camera. Two different tracking algorithms are combined for estimating the 3D pose of the surgical instrument with respect to the camera. The first tracker creates an adaptive model of a colour strip attached to the distal part of the tool (close to the tip). The second algorithm tracks the endoscopic shaft, using a combined Hough-Kalman approach. The 3D pose is estimated with perspective geometry, using appropriate measurements extracted by the two trackers. The method has been validated on several complex image sequences for its tracking efficiency, pose estimation accuracy and applicability in AR-based training. Using a standard endoscopic camera, the absolute average error of the tip position was 2.5 mm for working distances commonly found in laparoscopic training. The average error of the instrument's angle with respect to the camera plane was approximately 2°. The results are also supplemented by video segments of laparoscopic training tasks performed in a physical and an AR environment. The experiments yielded promising results regarding the potential of applying AR technologies for laparoscopic skills training, based on a computer vision framework. The issue of occlusion handling was adequately addressed. The estimated trajectory of the instruments may also be used for surgical gesture interpretation and assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Endoscopic Surgical Removal of Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando; Piuzzi, Nicolás S.; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martín; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris (CTRF) is an under-recognized condition and, because of its self-limiting nature, is usually managed conservatively. Nevertheless, when nonsurgical therapy fails, further invasive alternatives are required. At this point, arthroscopic resection provides a minimally invasive and interesting alternative to open surgery. The aim of this work is to report the surgical technique of endoscopic surgical removal in patients with CTRF at the periarticular region of the hip joint. Endoscopic surgical removal of CTRF was performed without traction following anatomic landmarks for hip arthroscopy portal placement. We used the anterolateral portal and the proximal accessory portal to obtain access to the lesion. A shaver and radiofrequency device are useful tools to depict the calcific lesion while the whole resection is performed with a 5-mm round burr. Intraoperative fluoroscopy control during the entire procedure is essential. Endoscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis of the hip is a valuable technique in the treatment of patients who do not respond to conservative treatment. PMID:26759778

  13. Endoscopic Surgical Removal of Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Comba, Fernando; Piuzzi, Nicolás S; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martín; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris (CTRF) is an under-recognized condition and, because of its self-limiting nature, is usually managed conservatively. Nevertheless, when nonsurgical therapy fails, further invasive alternatives are required. At this point, arthroscopic resection provides a minimally invasive and interesting alternative to open surgery. The aim of this work is to report the surgical technique of endoscopic surgical removal in patients with CTRF at the periarticular region of the hip joint. Endoscopic surgical removal of CTRF was performed without traction following anatomic landmarks for hip arthroscopy portal placement. We used the anterolateral portal and the proximal accessory portal to obtain access to the lesion. A shaver and radiofrequency device are useful tools to depict the calcific lesion while the whole resection is performed with a 5-mm round burr. Intraoperative fluoroscopy control during the entire procedure is essential. Endoscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis of the hip is a valuable technique in the treatment of patients who do not respond to conservative treatment.

  14. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Dedmon, Matthew; Lin, Brian M; Lee, Kyuwon; Sinha, Sumi; Black, Nicole; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator. The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple colored infiltrants via a commercial inkjet 3D-printing service. All components of a left-sided ear were printed to scale. Six right-handed trainees completed three trials each. Mean trial time (n = 3) ranged from 23.03 to 62.77 s using the dominant hand for all dissection. Statistically significant differences between first and last completion time with the dominant hand (p < 0.05) and average completion time for junior and senior residents (p < 0.05) suggest construct validity. A 3D-printed simulator is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Percutaneous Radiologic, Surgical Endoscopic, and Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy/Gastrojejunostomy: Comparative Study and Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkmeier, Jeffrey M.; Trerotola, Scott O.; Wiebke, Eric A.; Sherman, Stuart; Harris, Veronica J.; Snidow, John J.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Rogers, Wendy J.; Zhou Xiaohua

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the results and costs of three different means of achieving direct percutaneous gastroenteric access. Methods: Three groups of patients received the following procedures: fluoroscopically guided percutaneous gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (FPG, n= 42); percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (PEG, n= 45); and surgical endoscopic gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (SEG, n= 34). Retrospective review of the medical records was performed to evaluate indications for the procedure, procedure technical success, and outcome. Estimated costs were compared for each of the three procedures, using a combination of charges and materials costs. Results: Technical success was greater for FPG and SEG (100% each) than for PEG (84%, p= 0.008 vs FPG and p= 0.02 vs SEG). All patients (n= 7) who failed PEG subsequently underwent successful FPG. Success in placing a gastrojejunostomy was 91% for FPG, and estimated at 43% for PEG and 0 for SEG. Complications did not differ in frequency among groups. For gastrostomy, the average cost per successful tube was lowest in the PEG group ($1862, p= 0.02); FPG averaged $1985, and SEG $3694. SEG costs significantly more than FPG or PEG (p= 0.0001). For gastrojejunostomy, FPG averaged $2201, PEG $3158, and SEG $3045. Conclusion: Technical success for gastrostomy is higher for FPG and SEG than PEG. Though PEG is the least costly procedure, the difference is modest compared with FPG. For gastrojejunostomy, FPG offers the highest technical success rate and lowest cost. Due to high costs associated with the operating room, SEG should be reserved for those patients undergoing a concurrent surgical procedure.

  16. Surgical Crisis Management Skills Training and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Forrest, Damien; Pandey, Vikas; Undre, Shabnam; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative surgical crisis management is learned in an unstructured manner. In aviation, simulation training allows aircrews to coordinate and standardize recovery strategies. Our aim was to develop a surgical crisis simulation and evaluate its feasibility, realism, and validity of the measures used to assess performance. Methods: Surgical trainees were exposed to a bleeding crisis in a simulated operating theater. Assessment of performance consisted of a trainee’s technical ability to control the bleeding and of their team/human factors skills. This assessment was performed in a blinded manner by 2 surgeons and one human factors expert. Other measures consisted of time measures such as time to diagnose the bleeding (TD), inform team members (TT), achieve control (TC), and close the laceration (TL). Blood loss was used as a surrogate outcome measures. Results: There were considerable variations within both senior (n = 10) and junior (n = 10) trainees for technical and team skills. However, while the senior trainees scored higher than the juniors for technical skills (P = 0.001), there were no differences in human factors skills. There were also significant differences between the 2 groups for TD (P = 0.01), TC (P = 0.001), and TL (0.001). The blood loss was higher in the junior group. Conclusions: We have described the development of a novel simulated setting for the training of crisis management skills and the variability in performance both in between and within the 2 groups. PMID:16794399

  17. Abdominal Colpopexy: Comparison of Endoscopic Surgical Strategies (ACCESS)☆

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, E.R.; Kenton, K.; Tarney, C.; Brubaker, L.; Rosenman, A.; Smith, B.; Stroupe, K.; Bresee, C.; Pantuck, A.; Schulam, P.; Anger, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Robotic assistance during laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse rapidly disseminated across the United States without level I data to support its benefit over traditional open and laparoscopic approaches. This manuscript describes design and methodology of the Abdominal Colpopexy: Comparison of Endoscopic Surgical Strategies (ACCESS) Trial [1]. Methods ACCESS is a randomized comparative effectiveness trial enrolling patients at two academic teaching facilities, UCLA (Los Angeles, CA) and Loyola University (Chicago, IL). The primary aim is to compare costs of robotic assisted versus pure laparoscopic abdominal sacrocolpopexy (RASC vs LASC). Following a clinical decision for minimally-invasive abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC) and research consent, participants with symptomatic stage≥II pelvic organ prolapse are randomized to LASC or RASC on the day of surgery. Costs of care are based on each patient’s billing record and equipment costs at each hospital. All costs associated with surgical procedure including costs for robot and initial hospitalization and any re-hospitalization in the first 6 weeks are compared between groups. Secondary outcomes include post-operative pain, anatomic outcomes, symptom severity and quality of life, and adverse events. Power calculation determined that 32 women in each arm would provide 95% power to detect a $2500 difference in total charges, using a two-sided two sample t-test with a significance level of 0.05. Results Enrollment was completed in May 2011. The 12-month follow-up will end in May 2012. Conclusions This is a multi-center study to assess cost as a primary outcome in a comparative effectiveness trial of LASC versus RASC. PMID:22643040

  18. Endoscopic Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy: Best Surgical Management for DCR.

    PubMed

    Bharangar, Sandeep; Singh, Nirupama; Lal, Vikram

    2012-12-01

    EEDCR is a highly rewarding Endoscopic procedure for management of dacryocystitis when epiphora does not respond to medications or repeated syringing of nasolacrimal duct. It is a simple, less time consuming, safe but skilful, highly satisfying surgery both for the patients as well as the surgeons. There is very big advantage of EEDCR, it is close 100% successful procedure, even if there is recurrence of epiphora it is again correctable fully with no residual affects. EEDCR is far more superior to External DCR/Laser DCR and there are definite reasons for it. A total number of 578 cases have been operated by me from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2011, only very few reoccurrences were there and they were corrected easily so much so that it can be said that it is a close 100% successful procedure and best surgical management of DACRYOCYSTITIS up to date. The successful outcome was defined as symptomatic relief from epiphora and dacryocystitis and a patent nasolacrimal duct upon syringing at the end of procedure and on follow up of patient.

  19. In vivo experiments of a surgical robot with vision field control for Single Port Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuta; Kobayashi, Yo; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tomono, Yu; Noguchi, Takehiko; Takahashi, Yu; Toyoda, Kazutaka; Uemura, Munenori; Ieiri, Satoshi; Ohdaira, Takeshi; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Recently, robotics systems are focused to assist in Single Port Endoscopic Surgery (SPS). However, the existing system required a manual operation of vision and viewpoint, hindering the surgical task. We proposed a surgical endoscopic robot for SPS with dynamic vision control, the endoscopic view being manipulated by a master controller. The prototype robot consists of a manipulator for vision control, and dual tool tissue manipulators (gripping: 5DOFs, cautery: 3DOFs) can be attached at the tip of sheath manipulator. In particular, this paper focuses on an in vivo experiment. We showed that vision control in the stomach and a cautery task by a cautery tool could be effectively achieved.

  20. The development of a haptic interface for the Virtual Translumenal Endoscopic Surgical Trainer (VTEST.

    PubMed

    Dargar, Saurabh; Solley, Thomas; Nemani, Arun; Brino, Cecilia; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is an experimental surgical technique with benefits including reduced pain, post operative recovery period and better cosmesis compared to traditional laparoscopic procedures. In a pure NOTES procedure, a flexible endoscope is used for performing the surgery and visualization. The Virtual Translumenal Endoscopic Surgical Trainer (VTEST(TM)) is being developed as a platform to train for NOTES procedures and innovate NOTES tools and techniques. In this work we report the design specification for the hardware interface to be used for VTEST(TM).

  1. Surgical anatomy of endoscope-assisted approaches to common aneurysm sites.

    PubMed

    Peris-Celda, Maria; Da Roz, Leila; Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Morishita, Takashi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2014-03-01

    The endoscope is being introduced as an adjuvant to improve visualization of certain areas in open cranial surgery. To describe the endoscopic anatomy of common aneurysm sites and to compare it with the microsurgical anatomy. Pterional, anterior interhemispheric, and subtemporal approaches to the most common aneurysm sites were examined in cadaveric heads under the surgical microscope and with the endoscope. The endoscopic view, particularly with the angled endoscopes, provides a significant improvement compared with the microscopic view, especially for poorly visualized sites such as the medial aspect of the supraclinoid carotid artery and its branches, the area below the anterior perforated substance and optic tract, and the carotid and basilar bifurcations. The endoscope aided in the early visualization of perforating branches at each aneurysm site except the middle cerebral artery. Small-diameter optics (2.7 mm) provided greater space for dissection and less potential for tissue damage in narrow places, whereas the larger 4-mm diameter optics provided better visualization and less panoramic distortion. The positioning of the endoscope for each aneurysm site is reviewed. The endoscope provides views that complement or improve the microscopic view at each aneurysm site except the middle cerebral artery. Endoscopy training and a thorough knowledge of endoscopic vascular anatomy are essential to safely introduce endoscopic assistance in vascular surgery.

  2. Endoscopic surgical management of sinonasal inverted papilloma extending to frontal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukiko; Shoji, Fumi; Katori, Yukio; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Naoya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kakuta, Risako Kakuta; Suzuki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ohta, Nobuo; Kakehata, Seiji; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-10

    Sinonasal inverted papilloma has been traditionally managed with external surgical approaches. Advances in imaging guidance systems, surgical instrumentation, and intraoperative multi-visualization have led to a gradual shift from external approaches to endoscopic surgery. However, for anatomical and technical reasons, endoscopic surgery of sinonasal inverted papilloma extending to the frontal sinuses is still challenging. Here, we present our experience in endoscopic surgical management of sinonasal inverted papilloma extending to one or both frontal sinuses. We present 10 cases of sinonasal inverted papilloma extending to the frontal sinuses and successfully removed by endoscopic median drainage (Draf III procedure) under endoscopic guidance without any additional external approach. The whole cavity of the frontal sinuses was easily inspected at the end of the surgical procedure. No early or late complications were observed. No recurrence was identified after an average follow-up period of 39.5 months. Use of an endoscopic median drainage approach to manage sinonasal inverted papilloma extending to one or both frontal sinuses is feasible and seems effective.

  3. Robotic surgical skills: acquisition, maintenance, and degradation.

    PubMed

    Jenison, Eric L; Gil, Karen M; Lendvay, Thomas S; Guy, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The degradation in robotic skills that occurs during periods of robotic surgical inactivity in newly trained surgeons was measured. The role of animate training in robotic skill was also assessed. Robotically naive resident and attending surgeons underwent training with the da Vinci robot on needle passage (DN), rocking ring transfer peg board (RPB), and running suture pod tasks (SP). Errors were established to convert actual time to adjusted time. Participants were deemed "proficient" once their adjusted times were within 80% of those set by experienced surgeons through repeated trials. Participants did not use the robot except for repeating the tasks once at 4, 8, and 12 weeks (tests). Participants then underwent animate training and completed a final test within 7 days. Twenty-five attending and 29 resident surgeons enrolled; 3 withdrew. There were significant increases in time to complete each of the tasks, and in errors, by 4 weeks (Adjusted times: DN: 122.9 +/- 2.2 to 204.2 +/- 11.7, t = 6.9, P < .001; RPB: 262.4 +/- 2.5 to 364.7 +/- 8.0, t = 12.4, P < .001; SP: 91.4 +/- 1.4 to 169.9 +/- 6.8, t = 11.3, P < .001). Times decreased following animate training, but not to levels observed after proficiency training for the RPB and SP modules. Robotic surgical skills degrade significantly within 4 weeks of inactivity in newly trained surgeons. Animate training may provide different skills than those acquired in the dry lab.

  4. Robotic Surgical Skills: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Karen M.; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Guy, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The degradation in robotic skills that occurs during periods of robotic surgical inactivity in newly trained surgeons was measured. The role of animate training in robotic skill was also assessed. Methods: Robotically naïve resident and attending surgeons underwent training with the da Vinci® robot on needle passage (DN), rocking ring transfer peg board (RPB), and running suture pod tasks (SP). Errors were established to convert actual time to adjusted time. Participants were deemed “proficient” once their adjusted times were within 80% of those set by experienced surgeons through repeated trials. Participants did not use the robot except for repeating the tasks once at 4, 8, and 12 weeks (tests). Participants then underwent animate training and completed a final test within 7 days. Results: Twenty-five attending and 29 resident surgeons enrolled; 3 withdrew. There were significant increases in time to complete each of the tasks, and in errors, by 4 weeks (Adjusted times: DN: 122.9 ± 2.2 to 204.2 ± 11.7, t=6.9, P<.001; RPB: 262.4 ± 2.5 to 364.7 ± 8.0, t=12.4, P<.001; SP: 91.4 ± 1.4 to 169.9 ± 6.8, t=11.3, P<.001). Times decreased following animate training, but not to levels observed after proficiency training for the RPB and SP modules. Conclusions: Robotic surgical skills degrade significantly within 4 weeks of inactivity in newly trained surgeons. Animate training may provide different skills than those acquired in the dry lab. PMID:23477169

  5. Evaluation of surgical freedom for microscopic and endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches to the sella.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Hardesty, Douglas A; Zaidi, Hasan A; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; White, William L; Preul, Mark C; Little, Andrew S

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic and endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches to the sellar are well established. Surgical freedom is an important skull base principle that can be measured objectively and used to compare approaches. To compare the surgical freedom of 4 transsphenoidal approaches to the sella turcica to aid in surgical approach selection. Four transsphenoidal approaches to the sella were performed on 8 silicon-injected cadaveric heads. Surgical freedom was determined with stereotactic image guidance using previously established techniques. The results are presented as the area of surgical freedom and angular surgical freedom (angle of attack) in the axial and sagittal planes. Mean total exposed area surgical freedom for the microscopic sublabial, endoscopic binostril, endoscopic uninostril, and microscopic endonasal approaches were 102 ± 13, 89 ± 6, 81 ± 4, and 69 ± 10 cm2, respectively. The endoscopic binostril approach had the greatest surgical freedom at the pituitary gland and ipsilateral and contralateral internal carotid arteries (25.7 ± 5.4, 28.0 ± 4.0, and 23.0 ± 3.0 cm2) compared with the microscopic sublabial (21.8 ± 3.5, 21.3 ± 2.4, and 19.5 ± 6.3 cm2), microscopic endonasal (14.2 ± 2.7, 14.1 ± 3.2, and 16.3 ± 4.0 cm2), and endoscopic uninostril (19.7 ± 4.8, 22.4 ± 2.3, and 19.5 ± 2.9 cm2) approaches. Axial angle of attack was greatest for the microscopic sublabial approach to the same targets (14.7 ± 1.3°, 11.0 ± 1.5°, and 11.8 ± 1.1°). For the sagittal angle of attack, the endoscopic binostril approach was superior for all 3 targets (16.6 ± 1.7°, 17.2 ± 0.70°, and 15.5 ± 1.2°). Microscopic sublabial and endoscopic binostril approaches provided superior surgical freedom compared with the endonasal microscopic and uninostril endoscopic approaches. This work provides objective baseline values for the quantification and evaluation of future refinements in surgical technique or instrumentation.

  6. Assessment of technical and nontechnical skills in surgical residents.

    PubMed

    Ponton-Carss, Alicia; Kortbeek, John B; Ma, Irene W Y

    2016-11-01

    Surgical competence encompasses both technical and nontechnical skills. This study seeks to evaluate the validity evidence for a comprehensive surgical skills examination and to examine the relationship between technical and nontechnical skills. Six examination stations assessing both technical and nontechnical skills, conducted yearly for surgical trainees (n = 120) between 2010 and 2014 are included. The assessment tools demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Interstation reliability for technical skills was low (alpha = .39). Interstation reliability for the nontechnical skills was lower (alpha range -.05 to .31). Nontechnical skills domains were strongly correlated, ranging from r = .65, P < .001 to .86, P < .001. The associations between nontechnical and technical skills were inconsistent, ranging from poor (r = -.06; P = .54) to moderate (r = .45; P < .001). Multiple samplings of integrated technical and nontechnical skills are necessary to assess overall surgical competency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  8. Endoscopic pancreatic and biliary manometry in pancreatic, biliary, and papillary disease, and after endoscopic sphincterotomy and surgical sphincteroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, J A; Carr-Locke, D L

    1984-01-01

    Endoscopic manometry was used to measure pancreatic duct, common bile duct, pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter pressures in 43 healthy volunteers and 162 patients with a variety of papillary, pancreatic and biliary disorders. Common bile duct pressure was significantly raised after cholecystectomy, with common bile duct stones and papillary stenosis but pancreatic duct pressure only in papillary stenosis. After endoscopic sphincterotomy mean common bile duct pressure fell from 11.2 to 1.1 mmHg and pancreatic duct pressure from 18.0 to 11.2 mmHg. Distinct pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter zones were identified as phasic pressures of 3-12 waves/minute on pull-through from pancreatic duct and common bile duct to duodenum. Pancreatic duct sphincter pressures were higher with common bile duct stones and stenosis whereas bile duct sphincter pressures were higher in pancreatitis and stenosis. Bile duct sphincter activity was present in 60% of patients after surgical sphincteroplasty but 21% of patients after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic manometry facilitated the diagnosis of papillary stenosis, has allowed study of papillary pathophysiology and has shown a functional inter-relationship between the two sphincteric zones. PMID:6500363

  9. "TuNa-saving" endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a surgical technique for maxillary inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Fabio; Pusateri, Alessandro; Matti, Elina; Avato, Irene; Zaccari, Dario; Emanuelli, Enzo; Volo, Tiziana; Cazzador, Diego; Citraro, Leonardo; Ricci, Giampiero; Tomacelli, Giovanni Leo

    2017-04-03

    The maxillary sinus is the most common site of sinonasal inverted papilloma. Endoscopic sinus surgery, in particular endoscopic medial maxillectomy, is currently the gold standard for treatment of maxillary sinus papilloma. Although a common technique, complications such as stenosis of the lacrimal pathway and consequent development of epiphora are still possible. To avoid these problems, we propose a modification of this surgical technique that preserves the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated for maxillary inverted papilloma in three tertiary medical centres between 2006 and 2014. Pedicle-oriented endoscopic surgery principles were applied and, in select cases where the tumour pedicle was located on the anterior wall, a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy was carried out as described in this paper. From 2006 to 2014 a total of 84 patients were treated. A standard endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed in 55 patients (65.4%), while the remaining 29 (34.6%) had a modified technique performed. Three recurrences (3/84; 3.6%) were observed after a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A new surgical approach for select cases of maxillary sinus inverted papilloma is proposed in this paper. In this technique, the endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed while preserving the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct ("TuNa-saving"). This technique allowed for good visualization of the maxillary sinus, good oncological control and a reduction in the rate of complications.

  10. Objective performance measures using motion sensors on an endoscopic tool for evaluating skills in natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

    PubMed

    Chin, Lauren I; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Dargar, Saurabh; Matthes, Kai; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery is an emerging procedure. High fidelity virtual reality-based simulators allow development of new surgical procedures and tools and train medical personnel without risk to human patients. As part of a project funded by the National Institutes of Health, we are developing a Virtual Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Trainer (VTEST TM) for this purpose. In this work, objective performance measures derived from motion tracking sensors attached to an endoscope was tested for the transgastric NOTES appendectomy procedure performed with ex-vivo pig organs using the EASIE-R(TM) trainer box. Results from our study shows that both completion time and economy of motion parameters were able to differentiate between expert and novice NOTES surgeons with p value of 0.039 and 0.02 respectively. Jerk computed on sensor 2 data also showed significant results (p = 0.02). We plan to incorporate these objective performance measures in VTEST(TM).

  11. Surgical Skills and Lessons from Other Vocations

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, RM

    2006-01-01

    Formerly, a few lucky trainees, attached to talented masters* keen to teach, derived excellent, well-rounded training – but many others struggled alone. Now, formal courses allow experts to teach simple, safe methods, often using simulations. Courses are usually delivered as modules – each unit designed to provide an assessable competence. Simulations are, however, imperfect substitutes for living tissues. Such courses are aids, not substitutes, for operative experience – but this, for many irreversible reasons, is restricted. Successful operators in all specialties and all countries, have in common the combination of good judgement, commitment, intimate knowledge of anatomy and pathology, together with technical skills that are more easily recognised than described. We need to identify good trainers and relieve them of commitments that reduce their ability to pass on their skills. As a trainee, try to identify and copy their characteristics. This advice comes not from a gifted surgeon but from one fortunate to have worked with, and watched, surgical masters – and who is still privileged to teach. PMID:16551392

  12. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Through the Sinus Tract of a Surgical Gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, George

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a woman on whom a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) was performed through the sinus tract of a previous surgical gastrostomy for supraglottic obstructing malignancy. Five years after the induction of the surgical gastrostomy, she experienced a peristomal leakage, leading to severe necrotizing fasciitis, with skin irritation and inflammation. Despite extensive treatment to heal the abdominal wall close to the feeding tube, it recurred 3 months later, without any obvious cause. It was thus decided to perform a new gastrostomy in a nearby normal skin area, but, since it was totally impossible for the endoscope to be passed by mouth, due to obstruction, the sinus tract of the gastrostomy was used to facilitate endoscope insertion into the stomach for a new PEG. PMID:25674532

  13. Mobile surgical skills education unit: a new concept in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Faisal M; Hseino, Hazem; Hill, Arnold D K; Kavanagh, Eamon; Traynor, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Basic surgical skills are an integral part of surgical training. Simulation-based surgical training offers an opportunity both to trainees and trainers to learn and teach surgical skills outside the operating room in a nonpatient, nonstressed environment. However, widespread adoption of simulation technology especially in medical education is prohibited by its inherent higher cost, limited space, and interruptions to clinical duties. Mobile skills laboratory has been proposed as a means to address some of these limitations. A new program is designed by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), in an approach to teach its postgraduate basic surgical trainees the necessary surgical skills, by making the use of mobile innovative simulation technology in their own hospital settings. In this article, authors describe the program and students response to the mobile surgical skills being delivered in the region of their training hospitals and by their own regional consultant trainers.

  14. Development of stereo endoscope system with its innovative master interface for continuous surgical operation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungjoon; Lee, Chiwon; Hong, Nhayoung; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Sungwan

    2017-06-24

    Although robotic laparoscopic surgery has various benefits when compared with conventional open surgery and minimally invasive surgery, it also has issues to overcome and one of the issues is the discontinuous surgical flow that occurs whenever control is swapped between the endoscope system and the operating robot arm system. This can lead to problems such as collision between surgical instruments, injury to patients, and increased operation time. To achieve continuous surgical operation, a wireless controllable stereo endoscope system is proposed which enables the simultaneous control of the operating robot arm system and the endoscope system. The proposed system consists of two improved novel master interfaces (iNMIs), a four-degrees of freedom (4-DOFs) endoscope control system (ECS), and a simple three-dimensional (3D) endoscope. In order to simultaneously control the proposed system and patient side manipulators of da Vinci research kit (dVRK), the iNMIs are installed to the master tool manipulators of dVRK system. The 4-DOFs ECS consists of four servo motors and employs a two-parallel link structure to provide translational and fulcrum point motion to the simple 3D endoscope. The images acquired by the endoscope undergo stereo calibration and rectification to provide a clear 3D vision to the surgeon as available in clinically used da Vinci surgical robot systems. Tests designed to verify the accuracy, data transfer time, and power consumption of the iNMIs were performed. The workspace was calculated to estimate clinical applicability and a modified peg transfer task was conducted with three novice volunteers. The iNMIs operated for 317 min and moved in accordance with the surgeon's desire with a mean latency of 5 ms. The workspace was calculated to be 20378.3 cm(3), which exceeds the reference workspace of 549.5 cm(3). The novice volunteers were able to successfully execute the modified peg transfer task designed to evaluate the proposed system's overall

  15. Decontamination of minimally invasive surgical endoscopes and accessories.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, G

    2000-08-01

    (1) Infections following invasive endoscopy are rare and are usually of endogenous origin. Nevertheless, infections do occur due to inadequate cleaning and disinfection and the use of contaminated rinse water and processing equipment. (2) Rigid and flexible operative endoscopes and accessories should be thoroughly cleaned and preferably sterilized using properly validated processes. (3) Heat tolerant operative endoscopes and accessories should be sterilized using a vacuum assisted steam sterilizer. Use autoclavable instrument trays or containers to protect equipment during transit and processing. Small bench top sterilizers without vacuum assisted air removal are unsuitable for packaged and lumened devices. (4) Heat sensitive rigid and flexible endoscopes and accessories should preferably be sterilized using ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde (rigid only) or gas plasma (if appropriate). (5) If there are insufficient instruments or time to sterilize invasive endoscopes, or if no suitable method is available locally, they may be disinfected by immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde or a suitable alternative. An immersion time of at least 10 min should be adopted for glutaraldehyde. This is sufficient to inactivate most vegetative bacteria and viruses including HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Longer contact times of 20 min or more may be necessary if a mycobacterial infection is known or suspected. At least 3 h immersion in glutaraldehyde is required to kill spores. (6) Glutaraldehyde is irritant and sensitizing to the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Measures must be taken to ensure glutaraldehyde is used in a safe manner, i.e., total containment and/or extraction of harmful vapour and the provision of suitable personal protective equipment, i.e., gloves, apron and eye protection if splashing could occur. Health surveillance of staff is recommended and should include a pre-employment enquiry regarding asthma, skin and mucosal sensitivity problems and

  16. Surgical training in your hands: organising a skills course.

    PubMed

    Burnand, Henry; Mutimer, Jon

    2012-12-01

    The advent of simulated surgical skills courses has brought dynamic changes to the traditional approach to acquiring practical skills in surgery. Teaching is a core part of the surgical profession, and any trainee can be involved in the organisation of skills training courses. This paper outlines the importance of organising surgical skills courses for trainees, and provides a practical guide on how to do so within busy clinical environments. The paper examines how to plan a course, how to design the programme, and provides tips on faculty staff requirements, venue, finance and participants, with additional suggestions for assessment and evaluation. We recommend the organisation of skills courses to any trainee. By following key ground rules, the surgical trainee can enable the acquisition of advanced learning opportunities and the ability to demonstrate valuable organisational skills. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  17. Surgical skills training restructured for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael; Caskey, Robert; Mitchell, Marc; Sawaya, David

    2012-09-01

    Few if any medical schools have a comprehensive surgical skills program taking medical students from learning basic knot tying and surgical skills to performing these skills at a level adequate for function during a primary care, surgical, or subspecialty residency. We have designed and continue to refine a program, which consists of five workshops focused on basic surgical skills, which are applicable to all medical and surgical disciplines. During the first workshop students learn how to tie both one- and two-handed surgical knots. The second workshop involves teaching students differences in suture type and use, instrument handling, and suturing techniques. The third workshop is used to address problems and refine techniques previously learned in the first two sessions. The fourth workshop comprises a final examination to evaluate suture and knot tying skills. The fifth session is a voluntary knot tying and suturing competition with awards for speed, finesse, aesthetics, and the watertightness of a vascular surgical repair. Surgical faculty and house staff are present at each workshop to provide direction and constructive criticism. Fifty-seven third-year medical students have completed the surgical skills curriculum. Statistical analysis demonstrates significant improvement in both knot tying and suturing (P < 0.05) for these students. Forty-four percent of students have successfully sewn a watertight anastomosis. We hypothesize that this curriculum will produce medical students with basic surgical skills, appreciation of surgical technique, and the confidence to perform basic surgical skills at completion of the curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscope

    MedlinePlus

    An endoscope is a medical device with a light attached. It is used to look inside a body cavity ... sigmoidoscopy . A medical procedure using any type of endoscope is called an endoscopy . See also: Colonoscopy Cystourethroscopy ...

  19. Systematic video game training in surgical novices improves performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Schlickum, Marcus Kolga; Hedman, Leif; Enochsson, Lars; Kjellin, Ann; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between previous video game experience and performance in minimally invasive surgical simulators. The hypothesis is that systematic video game training with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarity to endoscopy would show a transfer effect on performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulation. A prospective randomized study was performed. Thirty surgical novices were matched and randomized to five weeks of systematic video game training in either a first-person shooter game (Half Life) with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarities to endoscopy or a video game with mainly cognitive demands (Chessmaster). A matched control group (n = 10) performed no video game training during five weeks. Performance in two virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators (MIST-VR and GI Mentor II) was measured pre- and post-training. Before simulator training we also controlled for students' visual-spatial ability, visual working memory, age, and previous video game experience. The group training with Half Life showed significant improvement in two GI Mentor II variables and the MIST-VR task MD level medium. The group training with Chessmaster only showed an improvement in the MIST-VR task. No effect was observed in the control group. As recently shown in other studies, current and previous video game experience was important for simulator performance. Systematic video game training improved surgical performance in advanced virtual reality endoscopic simulators. The transfer effect increased when increasing visual similarity. The performance in intense, visual-spatially challenging video games might be a predictive factor for the outcome in surgical simulation.

  20. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes.

  1. Challenges of Endoscopic Management of Pancreaticobiliary Complications in Surgically Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Tin Moe; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticobiliary complications following various surgical procedures, including liver transplantation, are not uncommon and are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic endoscopy plays a substantial role in these patients and can help to avoid the need for reoperation. However, the endoscopic approach in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy is technically challenging because of the difficulty in entering the enteral limb to reach the target orifice to manage pancreaticobiliary complications. Additional procedural complexity is due to the need of special devices and accessories to obtain successful cannulation and absence of an elevator in forward-viewing endoscopes, which is frequently used in this situation. Once bilioenteric anastomosis is reached, the technical success rates achieved in expert hands approach those of patients with intact GI anatomy. The success of endoscopic therapy in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy depends on multiple factors, including the expertise of the endoscopist, understanding of postoperative anatomic changes, and the availability of suitable scopes and accessories for endoscopic management. In this issue of Clinical Endoscopy, the focused review series deals with pancreatobiliary endoscopy in altered GI anatomy such as bilioenteric anastomosis and post-gastrectomy. PMID:27894188

  2. Endoscopic goniotomy: a potential surgical procedure for primary infantile glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Alward, Wallace L. M.; Folberg, Robert

    1993-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Unlike trabeculotomy, goniotomy facilitates the visualization of the trabecular meshwork and does not disturb the conjunctiva. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope would improve visualization during goniotomy in pig cadaver eyes. We deepened the anterior chamber of each pig eye with viscoelastic material. A modified 23-gauge needle attached to an Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible fiberoptic endoscope entered the anterior chamber through a 3 mm limbal incision. The angle was clearly seen on a videoscreen as the needle approached and incised the trabecular pillars for 120 degree(s); the iris immediately fell back. Following the procedure, the eyes were fixed in formalin and sectioned for light microscopy, or fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde for scanning electron microscopy. Trabecular pillars were present from the iris root to Schwalbe's line in the untreated region of the anterior chamber angle. The treated area demonstrated incision of the trabecular pillars with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork.

  3. Extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for retrochiasmatic craniopharyngioma: Surgical technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, Suresh K.; Jayashankar, Narayan; Khan, Ghulam M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Surgical treatment of retrochiasmatic craniopharyngioma still remains a challenge. While complete removal of the tumor with preservation of the vital neurovascular structures is often the goal of the treatment, there is no optimal surgical approach available to achieve this goal. Transcranial and transsphenoidal microsurgical approaches, commonly used in the past, have considerable technical limitations. The extended endonasal endoscopic surgical route, obtained by removal of tuberculum sellae and planum sphenoidale, offers direct midline access to the retrochiasmatic space and provides excellent visualization of the undersurface of the optic chiasm. In this report, we describe the technical details of the extended endoscopic approach, and review our results using this approach in the surgical management of retrochiasmatic craniopharyngiomas. Methods: Fifteen children, including 9 girls and 6 boys, aged 8 to 15 years underwent surgery using extended endoscopic transsphenoidal approach between 2008 and 2014. Nine patients had a surgical procedure done previously and presented with recurrence of symptoms and regrowth of their residual tumors. Results: A gross total or near total excision was achieved in 10 (66.7%) patients, subtotal resection in 4 (26.7%), and partial removal in 1 (6.7%) patient. Postoperatively, headache improved in 93.3%, vision recovered in 77.3%, and the hormonal levels stabilised in 66.6%. Three patients (20%) developed postoperative CSF leaks which were managed conservatively. Three (20%) patients with diabetes insipidus and 2 (13.3%) with panhypopituitarism required long-term hormonal replacement therapy. Conclusions: Our early experience suggests that the extended endonasal endoscopic approach is a reasonable option for removal of the retrochiasmal craniopharyngiomas. Compared to other surgical approaches, it provides better opportunities for greater tumor removal and visual improvement without any increase in risks. PMID:26962333

  4. Assessment of a manipulator device for NOTES with basic surgical skill tests: a bench study.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Advanced complex surgery performed with the natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery technique requires use of a multitasking platform. The aim of this study is to evaluate the basic functionality of a prototype multitasking platform "EndoSAMURAI" with the use of a biosimulation model and ex vivo porcine stomach. We compared the performance of basic surgical skill tasks between the EndoSAMURAI and standard laparoscopic instrumentation. Basic surgical tasks include cutting, dissection, and suturing and knot tying. Main outcome measurements were the time to complete each task and leak pressure to evaluate the quality of the suturing and knot tying. Although it took longer to perform all basic surgical tasks with the EndoSAMURAI than with laparoscopic instrumentation, all tasks could be performed precisely and with an accuracy comparable to that of the laparoscopic technique. Leak pressures of the gastric closure site between both techniques were also comparable.

  5. Treatment of Barrett's esophagus: update on new endoscopic surgical modalities.

    PubMed

    Kristo, I; Asari, R; Rieder, E; Riegler, V; Schoppmann, S F

    2015-04-01

    Barrett's esophagus represents a premalignant condition, which is strongly associated with the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Currently, there are no validated markers to extract exactly that certain patient that will proceed to neoplastic progression. Therefore, therapeutic options have to include a larger population to provide prophylaxis for affected patients. Recently developed endoscopic therapeutic approaches offer treatment options for prevention or even treatment of limited esophageal adenocarcinoma. At present, high eradication rates of intestinal metaplasia as well as dysplasia are observed, whereas low complication rates offer a convenient safety profile. These striking new methods symbolize a changing paradigm in a field, where minimal-invasive tissue ablating methods and tissue preserving techniques have led to modified regimens. This review will focus on current standards and newly emerging methods to treat Barrett's esophagus and its progression to cancer and will highlight their evolution, potential benefits and their limitations.

  6. Communication as a core skill of palliative surgical care.

    PubMed

    Miner, Thomas J

    2012-03-01

    Excellence as a surgeon requires not only the technical and intellectual ability to effectively take care of surgical disease but also an ability to respond to the needs and questions of patients. This article provides an overview of the importance of communication skills in optimal surgical palliation and offers suggestions for a multidisciplinary team approach, using the palliative triangle as the ideal model of communication and interpersonal skills. This article also discusses guidelines for advanced surgical decision making and outlines methods to improve communication skills.

  7. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J.; Cho, B. C. John; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dickie, Colleen I.; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Jaffray, David A.; Weersink, Robert A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ˜2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  8. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J; Cho, B C John; Sharpe, Michael B; Dickie, Colleen I; DaCosta, Ralph S; Jaffray, David A; Weersink, Robert A

    2012-10-21

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ∼2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  9. Surgical instruments and endoscopes of Susruta, the sage surgeon of ancient India.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, K

    2008-10-01

    Susruta, the great sage surgeon, philosopher and teacher of ancient India, practiced around 600 bc. He is renowned all over the world for his contribution to surgery in general and plastic surgery in particular especially rhinoplasty. But his contribution to endoscopes is not well known to the medical world. His contribution to surgical instruments including endoscopes is reviewed here. Literature survery was the basis of this study. Susruta samhita [1], the treatise compiled by Susruta, various commentaries on it by different authors [2, 3] and other related literature are used as primary sources. Susruta belonged to a period between 600 and 800 bc. His conception of surgical instruments, the description of their quality, methods of manufacture and their usage are very unique, as there were no earlier comprehensive descriptions of similar surgical instruments by any surgeon, not only in India but also the whole world. Susruta was perhaps the first surgeon in the world to describe different types of surgical instruments including endoscopes. This is far beyond the imagination of any other surgeon at that period of time and obviously he was far ahead of his time in this field.

  10. Effect of Incremental Endoscopic Maxillectomy on Surgical Exposure of the Pterygopalatine and Infratemporal Fossae

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Smita; Dolci, Ricardo L. L.; Buohliqah, Lamia; Fiore, Mariano E.; Filho, Leo F.S. Ditzel; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Otto, Bradley A.; Carrau, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Access to the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae presents a significant surgical challenge, owing to their deep-seated location and complex neurovascular anatomy. This study elucidates the benefits of incremental medial maxillectomies to access this region. We compared access to the medial aspect of the infratemporal fossa provided by medial maxillectomy, anteriorly extended medial maxillectomy, endoscopic Denker approach (i.e., Sturmann-Canfield approach), contralateral transseptal approach, and the sublabial anterior maxillotomy (SAM). Methods We studied 10 cadaveric specimens (20 sides) dissecting the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae bilaterally. Radius of access was calculated using a navigation probe aligned with the endoscopic line of sight. Area of exposure was calculated as the area removed from the posterior wall of maxillary sinus. Surgical freedom was calculated by computing the working area at the proximal end of the instrument with the distal end fixed at a target. Results The endoscopic Denker approach offered a superior area of exposure (8.46 ± 1.56 cm2) and superior surgical freedom. Degree of lateral access with the SAM approach was similar to that of the Denker. Conclusion Our study suggests that an anterior extension of the medial maxillectomy or a cross-court approach increases both the area of exposure and surgical freedom. Further increases can be seen upon progression to a Denker approach. PMID:26949591

  11. Acute Hemorrhagic Apoplectic Pituitary Adenoma: Endoscopic Management, Surgical Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Zhao, Yanxin; Wiebe, Timothy M; Li, Xingang

    2015-09-01

    To assess safety and effectiveness of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for acute hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Eighty nine patients with hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary tumor undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery were included into a retrospective chart of this study. Charts were reviewed for patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications. Seventy eight (87.7%) patients achieved total resection, 9 (10.1%) had subtotal resection, and 2 (2.2%) patients had partial resection; no patient experienced insufficient resection. After surgery, 65 (90.3%) of 72 patients who had visual acuity deterioration preoperatively normalized and improved significantly; the rate for remission of visual field was 87.7%. All other acute symptoms, such as severe headache, nausea, vomiting, alteration of mental status, and loss of consciousness, vanished postoperatively. Twenty eight (90.4%) of 31 patients with active secreting adenoma had hormonal remission based on endocrinological evaluation. Three (3.4%) patients incurred CSF leakage which was managed with lumbar drainage. Nine (10.1%) patients incurred transient DI postoperatively, and 2 (2.2%) of them developed permanent DI. Seven (7.9%) patients developed hypopituitarism which was treated with replacement therapy of hormone. One (1.1%) experienced craniotomy for intracranial hemorrhage and died from severe surgical complications postoperatively. There were no patients of meningitis or carotid artery injury. Early detection and emergent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery provided a safe and effective surgical option for hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary tumor with a low morbidity and mortality.

  12. [Utility of the surgical treatment for severe epistaxis by endoscopic approach of sphenopalatine and ethmoidal arteries].

    PubMed

    Rejas Ugena, E; Trinidad Ruiz, G; Alvarez Domínguez, J; Carrasco Claver, F; Pino Rivero, V; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the treatments used for controlling epistaxis, particularly compared with the surgical endoscopic ligation or cauterization of sphenopalatine (SP) and anterior ethmoid (AE) arteries, a intervention prospective-retrospective study is presented with the aim of assessing the feasibility of these surgical techniques as an alternative to conventional treatments. 184 consecutive patients admitted in the ENT ward between the years 1997 and 2005 were included in the study, and distributed into three groups depending on the last treatment applied to control their bleeding: AP group.- anterior packing (n=98); PP group.- posterior packing (n=66), and ES group.- endoscopic ligation and/or cauterization of SP or AE (n=20). Highly significant differences were found between the groups, not only regarding the efficacy (90% for surgical treatment compared with 41.3% for AP and 63.1% for PP), but also the length of postreatment hospital stay (AP.- 4.92 days; PP.- 6.3 days; ES.- 2.15 days). The lack of efficacy of conventional treatment and the increasing risk factors that condition nasal bleeding, together with the advance of endoscopic and anesthesic procedures have brought along the possibility of a surgical solution for these patients. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of these techniques as alternative for nasal packing in the treatment of posterior epistaxis, and even its ethical and economical convenience as a substitutive to posterior packing.

  13. Review of Techniques to Achieve Optical Surface Cleanliness and Their Potential Application to Surgical Endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Kreeft, Davey; Arkenbout, Ewout Aart; Henselmans, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes; van Furth, Wouter R.; Breedveld, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A clear visualization of the operative field is of critical importance in endoscopic surgery. During surgery the endoscope lens can get fouled by body fluids (eg, blood), ground substance, rinsing fluid, bone dust, or smoke plumes, resulting in visual impairment. As a result, surgeons spend part of the procedure on intermittent cleaning of the endoscope lens. Current cleaning methods that rely on manual wiping or a lens irrigation system are still far from ideal, leading to longer procedure times, dirtying of the surgical site, and reduced visual acuity, potentially reducing patient safety. With the goal of finding a solution to these issues, a literature review was conducted to identify and categorize existing techniques capable of achieving optically clean surfaces, and to show which techniques can potentially be implemented in surgical practice. The review found that the most promising method for achieving surface cleanliness consists of a hybrid solution, namely, that of a hydrophilic or hydrophobic coating on the endoscope lens and the use of the existing lens irrigation system. PMID:28511635

  14. From external to internal auditory canal: surgical anatomy by an exclusive endoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Mattioli, Francesco; Nogeira, Joao Flavio; Tarabichi, Muuaz; Villari, Domenico; Presutti, Livio

    2013-03-01

    Surgical approaches to the inner ear and internal auditory canal (IAC) are well known and well documented. The objective of this study is to analyze the morphology, and surgical and anatomic findings of an exclusive endoscopic transcanal approach (EETA) to the IAC. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 11 temporal bones, approaching the internal auditory meatus directly through the external ear canal and avoiding mastoidectomy. In all cases, it was possible to dissect the internal carotid artery and jugular bulb with a 0° endoscope, and with good control of these two structures. The medial wall of the bony labyrinth guaranteed good landmarks for IAC dissection, such as the spherical recess, and the labyrinthine tract of the facial nerve. The IAC can be thoroughly visualized in the cadaver using EETA, avoiding mastoidectomy, extensive temporal bone tissue removal and external incisions. Clinically based reports will be required in future to strengthen our preliminary results.

  15. Design of a surgical robot with dynamic vision field control for Single Port Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yo; Sekiguchi, Yuta; Tomono, Yu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Toyoda, Kazutaka; Konishi, Kozo; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Ieiri, Satoshi; Tanoue, Kazuo; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masaktsu G

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a robotic system was developed to assist Single Port Endoscopic Surgery (SPS). However, the existing system required a manual change of vision field, hindering the surgical task and increasing the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the manipulator. We proposed a surgical robot for SPS with dynamic vision field control, the endoscope view being manipulated by a master controller. The prototype robot consisted of a positioning and sheath manipulator (6 DOF) for vision field control, and dual tool tissue manipulators (gripping: 5DOF, cautery: 3DOF). Feasibility of the robot was demonstrated in vitro. The "cut and vision field control" (using tool manipulators) is suitable for precise cutting tasks in risky areas while a "cut by vision field control" (using a vision field control manipulator) is effective for rapid macro cutting of tissues. A resection task was accomplished using a combination of both methods.

  16. Instructive Video Retrieval for Surgical Skill Coaching Using Attribute Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-28

    for surgical skill coaching using attribute learning Video-based coaching systems have seen increasing adoption in various applications including...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Video retrieval, attribute learning , REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10...for surgical skill coaching using attribute learning Report Title Video-based coaching systems have seen increasing adoption in various applications

  17. The surgical skills laboratory residency interview: an enjoyable alternative.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Travis M; Horgan, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The authors aimed to trial an alternative interviewing strategy by inviting residency candidates to our surgical anatomy laboratory. Interviews were coincident with surgical dissection. The authors hypothesized that residency candidates hoping to match into a surgical subspecialty might enjoy this unconventional interviewing strategy, which would mimic an operating room experience. On scheduled residency interview dates, formal, unstructured interviews were held with half of the neurosurgical faculty, and unstructured surgical skills laboratory-based interviews were held with the other half of the neurosurgical faculty. Interviews in the skills laboratory featured cases and corresponding surgical dissection guided by faculty. After the interview, the residency candidates were encouraged to complete an optional survey about their interview process. The survey results were pooled for analysis. Of 28 interviewed, 19 individuals responded to the survey. The survey respondents had favorable reviews of the all aspects of the interview process. When asked to report the most enjoyable part of the interview, all respondents listed the surgical skills laboratory. The average respondent scores for importance of the surgical skills laboratory interview (9.5 ± 1.1) compared with conventional interview with faculty (9.2 ± 1.0) or residents (9.1 ± 1.0) was not significantly different (p = 0.50, analysis of variance). The surgical skills laboratory interviews were reviewed favorably by the survey respondents. Nearly all respondents listed the surgical skills interview as the most enjoyable part of the interview experience. The authors advocate this residency interview strategy for surgical subspecialty residencies. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost-effective framework for basic surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deng-Jin; Wen, Chan; Yang, Ai-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Lei, Yan; Lan, Yang-Jun; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The importance of basic surgical skills is entirely agreed among surgical educators. However, restricted by ethical issues, finance etc, the basic surgical skills training is increasingly challenged. Increasing cost gives an impetus to the development of cost-effective training models to meet the trainees' acquisition of basic surgical skills. In this situation, a cost-effective training framework was formed in our department and introduced here. Each five students were assigned to a 'training unit'. The training was implemented weekly for 18 weeks. The framework consisted of an early, a transitional, an integrative stage and a surgical skills competition. Corresponding training modules were selected and assembled scientifically at each stage. The modules comprised campus intranet databases, sponge benchtop, nonliving animal tissue, local dissection specimens and simulating reality operations. The training outcomes used direct observation of procedural skills as an assessment tool. The training data of 50 trainees who were randomly selected in each year from 2006 to 2011 year, were retrospectively analysed. An excellent and good rate of the surgical skills is from 82 to 88%, but there is no significant difference among 6 years (P > 0.05). The skills scores of the contestants are markedly higher than those of non-contestants (P < 0.05). The average training cost per trainee is about $21.85-34.08. The present training framework is reliable, feasible, repeatable and cost-effective. The skills competition can promote to improve the surgical skills level of trainees. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  19. Measuring Surgical Skills in Simulation-based Training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Satava, Richard M; Marsh, J Lawrence; Hurwitz, Shepard R

    2017-10-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training addresses several concerns associated with the traditional apprenticeship model, including patient safety, efficient acquisition of complex skills, and cost. The surgical specialties already recognize the advantages of surgical training using simulation, and simulation-based methods are appearing in surgical education and assessment for board certification. The necessity of simulation-based methods in surgical education along with valid, objective, standardized techniques for measuring learned skills using simulators has become apparent. The most commonly used surgical skill measurement techniques in simulation-based training include questionnaires and post-training surveys, objective structured assessment of technical skills and global rating scale of performance scoring systems, structured assessments using video recording, and motion tracking software. The literature shows that the application of many of these techniques varies based on investigator preference and the convenience of the technique. As simulators become more accepted as a teaching tool, techniques to measure skill proficiencies will need to be standardized nationally and internationally.

  20. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Diego; Mardighian, Andrea; D'Amora, Marilina; Roberto, Luca; Lassandro, Francesco; Rossi, Claudia; Gatta, Gianluca; Scaglione, Mariano; Giuseppe, Guglielmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before and after endoscopic or surgical treatment. Results. The mean variation of oesophageal diameter before and after treatment is −2.1 mm for surgery and 1.74 mm for pneumatic dilation (OR 0.167, CI 95% 0.02–1.419, and P: 0.10). The variations of all variables, with the exception of the oesophageal diameter variation, are strongly related to the treatment performed. Conclusions. The barium X-ray study of the digestive tract, performed before and after different treatment approaches, demonstrates that the surgical treatment has to be considered as the treatment of choice of achalasia, reserving endoscopic treatment to patients with high operative risk and refusing surgery. PMID:26819603

  1. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Diego; Mardighian, Andrea; D'Amora, Marilina; Roberto, Luca; Lassandro, Francesco; Rossi, Claudia; Gatta, Gianluca; Scaglione, Mariano; Giuseppe, Guglielmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before and after endoscopic or surgical treatment. Results. The mean variation of oesophageal diameter before and after treatment is -2.1 mm for surgery and 1.74 mm for pneumatic dilation (OR 0.167, CI 95% 0.02-1.419, and P: 0.10). The variations of all variables, with the exception of the oesophageal diameter variation, are strongly related to the treatment performed. Conclusions. The barium X-ray study of the digestive tract, performed before and after different treatment approaches, demonstrates that the surgical treatment has to be considered as the treatment of choice of achalasia, reserving endoscopic treatment to patients with high operative risk and refusing surgery.

  2. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the pharyngeal region using anchored hemoclip with surgical thread: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Tabuchi, Maiko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the pharyngeal region has not been well accepted, although ESD of the gastrointestinal tract is a standard procedure for treating early cancers. However, early detection and treatment of pharyngeal cancers is highly beneficial because surgical resection can be highly invasive and cause serious cosmetic deformities, swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, and speech defects. On the other hand, application of an anchored clip with surgical thread during ESD of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported to be beneficial. This pilot case series reveals the usefulness and clinical feasibility of applying a clip with thread in ESD of the pharyngeal region. PMID:27540568

  3. Transoral endoscopic nasopharyngectomy with a flexible next-generation robotic surgical system.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond K; Holsinger, F Christopher

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility of transoral endoscopic nasopharyngectomy without division of the soft plate using a flexible, next-generation robotic surgical system. Preclinical anatomic study using four human cadavers. Transoral resection of the nasopharyngeal wall with en-bloc resection of the cartilaginous Eustachian tube and dissection of the parapharyngeal fat space. The first flexible robotic surgical system has recently been described. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to determine whether this flexible system could be used to perform transoral robotic nasopharyngectomy. This novel system allowed docking of the patient-side cart at the side of the operating table. The cannula tip was placed approximately 12 cm from the edge of the retractor pointing superiorly toward the nasopharynx (NP). Retraction of the soft palate anteriorly and tonsillar pillars laterally with stay sutures expanded the velopharyngeal inlet, providing adequate space to deploy all four instruments (three surgical instruments and a camera) into the NP for dissection. All instruments could be deployed into the NP, without collision or restriction of joint movement in this cadaver model. Using this position and docking location, the new flexible surgical robot provided sufficient access, reach, and visualization to complete robotic nasopharyngectomy with en-bloc resection of the cartilaginous Eustachian tube. This feasibility study showed that transoral endoscopic nasopharyngectomy could be performed without compromising the integrity of the soft palate using a novel flexible robotic surgical system. N/A. Laryngoscope, 126:2257-2262, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Surgical mistake causing an high recto-vaginal fistula. A case report with combined surgical and endoscopic approach: therapeutic considerations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectovaginal fistulas (RVFs) have multiple causes, size and location on which the surgical treatment depends. Description The Authors consider different approaches to RVFs and describe a clinical case of recurrent high RVF. Conclusions Most RVFs can be successfully repaired, although many interventions may be necessary. A colostomy with delayed repair may improve RVFs outcome. Moreover, several authors indicate Mucosal Advancement Flap and Babcock-Bacon technique as the treatments of choice respectively for low and high RVFs (complex and recurrent) and emphasize the placement of endoscopic prothesis in cases of difficult healing of the anastomosis. PMID:24266908

  5. Efficacy of intraoperative dexmedetomidine infusion on visualization of the surgical field in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunzu; Ha, Sang-Hee; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background In endoscopic sinus surgery, visualization of the surgical field is a major concern, as surgical bleeding is the cause of many complications. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on the visualization of the surgical field in endoscopic sinus surgery. Methods Forty-three patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly allocated to the dexmedetomidine or remifentanil group and general anesthesia was induced and maintained using a propofol target-controlled infusion. In the dexmedetomidine group, dexmedetomidine was loaded for 5 min and a continuous infusion was administered. In the remifentanil group, a remifentanil target-controlled infusion was used. After completion of the operation, the satisfaction with the visualization of the surgical field was assessed on a numeric rating scale, from 0 (= worst) to 10 (= best). The mean blood pressure, heart rate, recovery profiles, and postoperative pain score were recorded. Results Satisfaction score for visualization by numeric rating scale was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.95). There were no differences in the mean blood pressure and heart rate. The extubation time was significantly shorter in the dexmedetomidine group (8.4 ± 1.8 min) than in the remifentanil group (11.9 ± 5.4 min) (P = 0.04). Except for the extubation time, the recovery profiles of the two groups were comparable. Conclusions Continuous infusions of dexmedetomidine provide a similar visualization of the surgical field and hemodynamic stability as remifentanil target-controlled infusions in patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:26495054

  6. Spectrum of Use and Effectiveness of Endoscopic and Surgical Therapies for Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Kennard, Elizabeth; Slivka, Adam A.; Brand, Randal E.; Anderson, Michelle; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; O’Connell, Michael; Gelrud, Andres; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to describe the frequency of use and reported effectiveness of endoscopic and surgical therapies in patients with CP treated at US referral centers. METHODS Five hundred fifteen patients were enrolled prospectively in the North American Pancreatitis II Study 2, where patients and treating physicians reported previous therapeutic interventions and their perceived effectiveness. We evaluated the frequency and effectiveness of endoscopic (biliary or pancreatic sphincterotomy, biliary or pancreatic stent placement) and surgical (pancreatic cyst removal, pancreatic drainage procedure, pancreatic resection, surgical sphincterotomy) therapies. RESULTS Biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy (42%) were the most commonly attempted endoscopic procedure (biliary stent, 14%; pancreatic stent, 36%; P<0.001). Endoscopic procedures were equally effective (biliary sphincterotomy, 40.0%; biliary stent, 40.8%; pancreatic stent, 47.0%; P=0.34). On multivariable analysis, the presence of abdominal pain (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% 95% confidence interval, 1.15–2.88) predicted endoscopy, whereas exocrine insufficiency (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.94) deterred endoscopy. Surgical therapies were attempted equally (cyst removal, 7%; drainage procedure, 10%; resection procedure, 12%) except for surgical sphincteroplasty (4%; P<0.001). Surgical sphincteroplasty was the least effective therapy (46%; P<0.001) versus cyst removal (76% drainage [71%] and resection [73%]). CONCLUSIONS Although surgical therapies were performed less frequently than endoscopic therapies, they were more often reported to be effective. PMID:24717802

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound evaluation in the surgical treatment of duodenal and peri-ampullary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Azih, Lilian C; Broussard, Brett L; Phadnis, Milind A; Heslin, Martin J; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Varadarajulu, Shayam; Arnoletti, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for predicting depth of mucosal invasion and to analyze outcomes following endoscopic and transduodenal resection. METHODS: Records of 111 patients seen at our institution from November 1999 to July 2011 with the post-operative pathological diagnosis of benign ampullary and duodenal adenomas were reviewed. Records of patients who underwent preoperative EUS for diagnostic purposes were identified. The accuracy of EUS in predicting the absence of muscular invasion was assessed by comparing EUS reports to the final surgical pathological results. In addition, the incidence of the post-operative complications over a period of 30 d and the subsequent long-term outcome (recurrence) over a period of 30 mo associated with endoscopic and transduodenal surgical resection was recorded, compared and analyzed. RESULTS: Among 111 patients with benign ampullary and duodenal adenomas, 47 underwent preoperative EUS for 29 peri-ampullary lesions and 18 duodenal lesions. In addition, computed tomography was performed in 18 patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography in 10 patients and esophagogastroduodenoscopy in 22 patients. There were 43 patients with sporadic adenomas and 4 patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)/other polyposis syndromes. In 38 (81%, P < 0.05) patients, EUS reliably identified absence of submucosal and muscularis invasion. In 4 cases, EUS underestimated submucosal invasion that was proven by pathology. In the other 5 patients, EUS predicted muscularis invasion which could not be demonstrated in the resected specimen. EUS predicted tumor muscularis invasion with a specificity of 88% and negative predictive value of 90% (P < 0.05). Types of resection performed included endoscopic resection in 22 cases, partial duodenectomy in 9 cases, transduodenal ampullectomy with sphincteroplasty in 10 cases and pancreaticoduodenectomy in 6 cases. The main post-operative final pathological results included

  8. A new endoscopic surgical classification and invasion criteria for pituitary adenomas involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Savas; Anik, Ihsan; Koc, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    There are two major problems for the pituitary adenomas invading the Cavernous Sinus (CS); differentiation of extension and invasion and inability to demonstrate the medial wall via preoperative imaging methods. Two important corridors are defined in endoscopic cavernous sinus approaches; the lateral and medial corridor. A retrospective analysis was performed in 400 endoscopic transphenoidal approaches and 360 pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transphenoidal surgery in our department between September 1997 and December 2010. 48 patients affected by the tumours involving the cavernous sinus were included in this study. We performed an intraoperative evaluation of cavernous sinus invasion considering visualization of the medial wall defect, intracavernous ICA segments, minor tumour extensions through small focal pit holes of the medial wall of CS or confirming carotid segments of CS by micro-doppler. Cavernous sinus involvement was classified into three types according to the medial and lateral corridor extension of the tumor as 25 isolated medial corridor involvement (Type I), 5 isolated lateral corridor involvement (Type II) and 18 total involvement (Type III). Our classification depends on fully surgical endoscopic approach supported by neuroimaging techniques and anatomical studies and shows a good predictive value for all cavernous sinus involvement.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES) skills examination.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Matthew; Matthew Ritter, E

    2017-05-10

    The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES) manual skills examination is a simulation-based assessment of five foundational skills in endoscopic surgery. With the FES skills exam becoming part of the board certification process in general surgery, continual investigation is needed to determine the validity with which the exam is supporting inferences and decision-making about examinees, as well as how it might be improved. The present study retrospectively analyzed performance and demographic details for the initial 344 examinees completing the FES skills exam. The five tasks showed distinct degrees of difficulty, with Loop Reduction being especially difficult for examinees. Tasks related to one another positively but moderately, suggesting that the exam assesses both general and task-specific skills. The number of lower-endoscopic cases completed by an examinee strongly predicted performance, while upper endoscopy experience and career level (e.g., resident vs. fellow vs. practicing) did not. Hand dominance and the type of simulator used were not found to be related to scores. However, three demographic variables that related to one another-gender, glove size, and height-were also related to performance and pass/fail status. This study's results generally support the validity argument for the FES skills exam while pointing to additional investigations to be undertaken as the exam is applied more broadly.

  10. Endoscopic septoplasty in primary cases using electromechanical instruments: surgical technique, efficacy and results.

    PubMed

    De Sousa Fontes, Aderito; Sandrea Jiménez, Minaret; Chacaltana Ayerve, Rosa R

    2013-01-01

    The microdebrider is a surgical tool which has been used successfully in many endoscopic surgical procedures in otolaryngology. In this study, we analysed our experience using this powered instrument in the resection of obstructive nasal septum deviations. This was a longitudinal, prospective, descriptive study conducted between January and June 2007 on 141 patients who consulted for chronic nasal obstruction caused by a septal deviation or deformity and underwent powered endoscopic septoplasty (PES). The mean age was 39.9 years (15-63 years); 60.28% were male (n=85) The change in nasal symptom severity decreased after surgery from 6.12 (preoperative) to 2.01 (postoperative). Patients undergoing PES had a significant reduction of nasal symptoms in the pre- and postoperative period, which was statistically significant (P<.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the results at the 2 nd week, 6th week and 5th year after surgery. The 100% of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and no patient answered "No" to the question added to compare patient satisfaction after surgery. Minor complications in the postoperative period were present in 4.96% of the cases. Powered endoscopic septoplasty allows accurate, conservative repair of obstructive nasal septum deviations, with fewer complications and better functional results. In our experience, this technique offered significant perioperative advantages with high postoperative patient satisfaction in terms of reducing the severity of nasal symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Endoscopic surgical treatment for pituitary apoplexy in three elderly patients over the age of 80.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Yano, Shigetoshi; Sakurama, Tomotaka; Ohmori, Yuki; Kawano, Takayuki; Morioka, Motohiro; Chen, Hank; Zhang, John H; Kuratsu, Jun-Ichi

    2011-01-01

    As the population continues to live longer, the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma-induced apoplexy becomes more common in the elderly. The standard treatment options for pituitary apoplexy are debatable. Although there is little information regarding the treatment of pituitary apoplexy in elderly patients, the optimal treatment needs to be determined for this age group. The current study examined the surgical treatment of pituitary apoplexy in three patients over the age of 80. Three patients over the age of 80 with pituitary apoplexy were admitted to our hospital. Some symptoms caused by pituitary apoplexy, including decreased visual acuity, double vision and oculomotor paresis, had persisted for more than 14 days. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed suprasellar mass lesions extending into the cavernous sinus. The general condition of the patients was good, and we performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery in each of these cases. The masses were removed, and the histological findings were diagnosed as non-functioning pituitary adenoma with presence of hemorrhagic or ischemic necrosis. Perioperative courses and general conditions were good, and the neurological deficits of each patient improved immediately. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery has the advantage of visualization of the structures surrounding the pituitary gland. Moreover, the complication rate is relatively low because stress on the pituitary gland can be reduced by using this procedure. Even in patients over 80 years of age during the subacute phase, endoscopic surgical management is a good treatment candidate for pituitary apoplexy with mass lesion extension into the cavernous sinus.

  12. Endoscopic versus surgical treatment of ampullary adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Kondo, André; Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the outcomes of endoscopic resection compared with surgery in the treatment of ampullary adenomas. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. For this purpose, the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were scanned. Studies included patients with ampullary adenomas and data considering endoscopic treatment compared with surgery. The entire analysis was based on a fixed-effects model. Five retrospective cohort studies were selected (466 patients). All five studies (466 patients) had complete primary resection data available and showed a difference that favored surgical treatment (risk difference [RD] = -0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.44 to -0.04). Primary success data were identified in all five studies as well. Analysis showed that the surgical approach outperformed endoscopic treatment for this outcome (RD = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.50 to -0.24). Recurrence data were found in all studies (466 patients), with a benefit indicated for surgical treatment (RD = 0.10, 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.19). Three studies (252 patients) presented complication data, but analysis showed no difference between the approaches for this parameter (RD = -0.15, 95% CI = -0.53 to 0.23). Considering complete primary resection, primary success and recurrence outcomes, the surgical approach achieves significantly better results. Regarding complication data, this systematic review concludes that rates are not significantly different.

  13. Endoscopic versus surgical treatment of ampullary adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Kondo, André; Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the outcomes of endoscopic resection compared with surgery in the treatment of ampullary adenomas. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. For this purpose, the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were scanned. Studies included patients with ampullary adenomas and data considering endoscopic treatment compared with surgery. The entire analysis was based on a fixed-effects model. Five retrospective cohort studies were selected (466 patients). All five studies (466 patients) had complete primary resection data available and showed a difference that favored surgical treatment (risk difference [RD] = -0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.44 to -0.04). Primary success data were identified in all five studies as well. Analysis showed that the surgical approach outperformed endoscopic treatment for this outcome (RD = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.50 to -0.24). Recurrence data were found in all studies (466 patients), with a benefit indicated for surgical treatment (RD = 0.10, 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.19). Three studies (252 patients) presented complication data, but analysis showed no difference between the approaches for this parameter (RD = -0.15, 95% CI = -0.53 to 0.23). Considering complete primary resection, primary success and recurrence outcomes, the surgical approach achieves significantly better results. Regarding complication data, this systematic review concludes that rates are not significantly different. PMID:26872081

  14. Acute Hemorrhagic Apoplectic Pituitary Adenoma: Endoscopic Management, Surgical Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Zhao, Yanxin; Wiebe, Timothy M.; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess safety and effectiveness of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for acute hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Methods: Eighty nine patients with hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary tumor undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery were included into a retrospective chart of this study. Charts were reviewed for patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications. Results: Seventy eight (87.7%) patients achieved total resection, 9 (10.1%) had subtotal resection, and 2 (2.2%) patients had partial resection; no patient experienced insufficient resection. After surgery, 65 (90.3%) of 72 patients who had visual acuity deterioration preoperatively normalized and improved significantly; the rate for remission of visual field was 87.7%. All other acute symptoms, such as severe headache, nausea, vomiting, alteration of mental status, and loss of consciousness, vanished postoperatively. Twenty eight (90.4%) of 31 patients with active secreting adenoma had hormonal remission based on endocrinological evaluation. Three (3.4%) patients incurred CSF leakage which was managed with lumbar drainage. Nine (10.1%) patients incurred transient DI postoperatively, and 2 (2.2%) of them developed permanent DI. Seven (7.9%) patients developed hypopituitarism which was treated with replacement therapy of hormone. One (1.1%) experienced craniotomy for intracranial hemorrhage and died from severe surgical complications postoperatively. There were no patients of meningitis or carotid artery injury. Conclusion: Early detection and emergent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery provided a safe and effective surgical option for hemorrhagic apoplectic pituitary tumor with a low morbidity and mortality. PMID:26335327

  15. Peer-assisted teaching of basic surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Preece, Ryan; Dickinson, Emily Clare; Sherif, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Yousef; Ninan, Ann Susan; Aildasani, Laxmi; Ahmed, Sartaj; Smith, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic surgical skills training is rarely emphasised in undergraduate medical curricula. However, the provision of skills tutorials requires significant commitment from time-constrained surgical faculty. Purpose We aimed to determine how a peer-assisted suturing workshop could enhance surgical skills competency among medical students and enthuse them towards a career in surgery. Methods Senior student tutors delivered two suturing workshops to second- and third- year medical students. Suturing performance was assessed before and after teaching in a 10-min suturing exercise (variables measured included number of sutures completed, suture tension, and inter-suture distance). Following the workshop, students completed a questionnaire assessing the effect of the workshop on their suturing technique and their intention to pursue a surgical career. Results Thirty-five students attended. Eighty-one percent believed their medical school course provided insufficient basic surgical skills training. The mean number of sutures completed post-teaching increased significantly (p<0.001), and the standard deviation of mean inter-suture distance halved from ±4.7 mm pre-teaching, to ±2.6 mm post-teaching. All students found the teaching environment to be relaxed, and all felt the workshop helped to improve their suturing technique and confidence; 87% found the peer-taught workshop had increased their desire to undertake a career in surgery. Discussion Peer-assisted learning suturing workshops can enhance medical students’ competence with surgical skills and inspire them towards a career in surgery. With very little staff faculty contribution, it is a cheap and sustainable way to ensure ongoing undergraduate surgical skills exposure. PMID:26044400

  16. Peer-assisted teaching of basic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Preece, Ryan; Dickinson, Emily Clare; Sherif, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Yousef; Ninan, Ann Susan; Aildasani, Laxmi; Ahmed, Sartaj; Smith, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic surgical skills training is rarely emphasised in undergraduate medical curricula. However, the provision of skills tutorials requires significant commitment from time-constrained surgical faculty. Purpose We aimed to determine how a peer-assisted suturing workshop could enhance surgical skills competency among medical students and enthuse them towards a career in surgery. Methods Senior student tutors delivered two suturing workshops to second- and third- year medical students. Suturing performance was assessed before and after teaching in a 10-min suturing exercise (variables measured included number of sutures completed, suture tension, and inter-suture distance). Following the workshop, students completed a questionnaire assessing the effect of the workshop on their suturing technique and their intention to pursue a surgical career. Results Thirty-five students attended. Eighty-one percent believed their medical school course provided insufficient basic surgical skills training. The mean number of sutures completed post-teaching increased significantly (p<0.001), and the standard deviation of mean inter-suture distance halved from ±4.7 mm pre-teaching, to ±2.6 mm post-teaching. All students found the teaching environment to be relaxed, and all felt the workshop helped to improve their suturing technique and confidence; 87% found the peer-taught workshop had increased their desire to undertake a career in surgery. Discussion Peer-assisted learning suturing workshops can enhance medical students' competence with surgical skills and inspire them towards a career in surgery. With very little staff faculty contribution, it is a cheap and sustainable way to ensure ongoing undergraduate surgical skills exposure.

  17. Expanding Surgical Opportunities: Endoscopic Harvesting of the Vena Saphena Parva in Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Rustenbach, Christian Jörg; Wachter, Kristina; Franke, Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm; Baumbach, Hardy

    2017-06-01

    The small saphenous vein (SSV) has proved to be a valid graft option for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), if other grafts are absent or unsuitable. Beside the described open technique we herein present our approach to endoscopic harvesting in supine position in seven patients. Harvesting was successful in six patients. Mean skin-to-skin time was 29.8 minutes. There were no infections or neurological deficits and the intraoperatively measured graft flow was excellent according to mean flow and low pulsatility index. Therefore, endoscopic harvesting of the SSV extends surgical opportunities not only in CABG, but also in surgery of peripheral artery disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    PubMed

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  19. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  20. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  1. Augmented reality for endoscopic sinus surgery with surgical navigation: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Citardi, Martin J; Agbetoba, Abib; Bigcas, Jo-Lawrence; Luong, Amber

    2016-05-01

    Augmented reality (AR) fuses computer-generated images of preoperative imaging data with real-time views of the surgical field. Scopis Hybrid Navigation (Scopis GmbH, Berlin, Germany) is a surgical navigation system with AR capabilities for endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Predissection planning was performed with Scopis Hybrid Navigation software followed by ESS dissection on 2 human specimens using conventional ESS instruments. Predissection planning included creating models of relevant frontal recess structures and the frontal sinus outflow pathway on orthogonal computed tomography (CT) images. Positions of the optic nerve and internal carotid artery were marked on the CT images. Models and annotations were displayed as an overlay on the endoscopic images during the dissection, which was performed with electromagnetic surgical navigation. The accuracy of the AR images relative to underlying anatomy was better than 1.5 mm. The software's trajectory targeting tool was used to guide instrument placement along the frontal sinus outflow pathway. AR imaging of the optic nerve and internal carotid artery served to mark the positions of these structures during the dissection. Surgical navigation with AR was easily deployed in this cadaveric model of ESS. This technology builds upon the positive impact of surgical navigation during ESS, particularly during frontal recess surgery. Instrument tracking with this technology facilitates identifying and cannulation of the frontal sinus outflow pathway without dissection of the frontal recess anatomy. AR can also highlight "anti-targets" (ie, structures to be avoided), such as the optic nerve and internal carotid artery, and thus reduce surgical complications and morbidity. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. The Role of Crowdsourcing in Assessing Surgical Skills.

    PubMed

    Katz, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Assessing surgical skill is critical in improving patient care while reducing medical errors, length of stay, and readmission rates. Crowdsourcing provides 1 potential method for accurately assessing this; only recently has crowdsourcing been studied as a valid way to provide feedback to surgeons. The results of such studies are explored. A systematic literature search was performed on PubMed to identify studies that have attempted to validate crowdsourcing as a method for assessing surgical skill. Through a combination of abstract screening and full-length review, 9 studies that met the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Crowdsourcing has been validated as an important way to provide feedback for surgical skill. It has been demonstrated to be effective in both dry-lab and live surgery, for a variety of tasks and methods. However, more studies must be performed to ensure that crowdsourcing can provide quality feedback in a wider variety of scenarios.

  3. Proficiency training on a virtual reality robotic surgical skills curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bric, Justin; Connolly, Michael; Kastenmeier, Andrew; Goldblatt, Matthew; Gould, Jon C

    2014-12-01

    The clinical application of robotic surgery is increasing. The skills necessary to perform robotic surgery are unique from those required in open and laparoscopic surgery. A validated laparoscopic surgical skills curriculum (Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery or FLS™) has transformed the way surgeons acquire laparoscopic skills. There is a need for a similar skills training and assessment tool for robotic surgery. Our research group previously developed and validated a robotic training curriculum in a virtual reality (VR) simulator. We hypothesized that novice robotic surgeons could achieve proficiency levels defined by more experienced robotic surgeons on the VR robotic curriculum, and that this would result in improved performance on the actual daVinci Surgical System™. 25 medical students with no prior robotic surgery experience were recruited. Prior to VR training, subjects performed 2 FLS tasks 3 times each (Peg Transfer, Intracorporeal Knot Tying) using the daVinci Surgical System™ docked to a video trainer box. Task performance for the FLS tasks was scored objectively. Subjects then practiced on the VR simulator (daVinci Skills Simulator) until proficiency levels on all 5 tasks were achieved before completing a post-training assessment of the 2 FLS tasks on the daVinci Surgical System™ in the video trainer box. All subjects to complete the study (1 dropped out) reached proficiency levels on all VR tasks in an average of 71 (± 21.7) attempts, accumulating 164.3 (± 55.7) minutes of console training time. There was a significant improvement in performance on the robotic FLS tasks following completion of the VR training curriculum. Novice robotic surgeons are able to attain proficiency levels on a VR simulator. This leads to improved performance in the daVinci surgical platform on simulated tasks. Training to proficiency on a VR robotic surgery simulator is an efficient and viable method for acquiring robotic surgical skills.

  4. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered anatomy using balloon-assisted enteroscope.

    PubMed

    Katanuma, Akio; Yane, Kei; Osanai, Manabu; Maguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered anatomy involves challenging procedures for ERCP endoscopists. In these patients, the anatomical structure of the intestine is substantially altered, and an endoscope needs to be inserted into the long afferent limb. Moreover, the papilla is observed in the opposite view from the normal anatomy. Recently, a balloon-assisted enteroscope (BAE) has been developed and made available for use in daily practice. The two types of BAE are single-balloon enteroscope (SBE), which is inserted with one balloon attached to the overtube using a balloon-assisted method, and double-balloon enteroscope (DBE), which is inserted with two balloons, one attached to the overtube and the other attached to the tip of the enteroscope. In addition, short-type DBE (short-DBE) and short-type SBE (short-SBE) with a working length of approximately 150 cm, which could be used with various ERCP accessories, are commercially available or under development. Notably, the success rate of ERCP through coordinated manipulation with a balloon was remarkably improved with the use of BAE, even in patients with surgically altered anatomy. Here, we report the current status and procedures of ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy.

  5. Double esophageal perforation by ingested foreign body: Endoscopic and surgical approach. A case report.

    PubMed Central

    Ugenti, I.; Digennaro, R.; Martines, G.; Caputi Iambrenghi, O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal perforation in adults is most frequently caused by ingested foreign bodies. They can migrate through the esophageal wall, damaging the nearby organs such as the aorta or the trachea, with fatal outcome. After the diagnosis, the viable treatments for extracting the foreign body and repairing the perforation are several. The appropriate treatment, may be endoscopic, surgical or combined, depending on the level of the perforation, on the co-morbidities of the patient and on the available resources. Presentation of case This paper describes a case of a 68 years old patient with a double EP caused by a meat-bone that perforated the thoracic esophageal wall, approaching the aorta on the left side and the azygos vein on the right side. Discussion Because of the double transfixion and the position near the aorta and the azygos, it was not possible to remove safely the bone during the endoscopy. The management required a combined endoscopic and surgical approach. This way it was possible to detect easily the location of the perforation, to remove safely the foreign body, to repair the perforation both from the outside and from the inside, and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. Conclusion Even when the type of esophageal perforation requires surgical treatment, the simultaneous use of endoscopy proved to be an advantage in order to extract the foreign body safely, to perform a double repair of the perforation and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. PMID:26551553

  6. Cross-platform digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

    2015-01-01

    A variety of structured assessment tools for use in surgical training have been reported, but extant assessment tools often employ paper-based rating forms. Digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills could potentially offer advantages over paper-based forms, especially in complex assessment situations. In this paper, we report on the development of cross-platform digital assessment forms for use with multiple raters in order to facilitate the automatic processing of surgical skills assessments that include structured ratings. The FileMaker 13 platform was used to create a database containing the digital assessment forms, because this software has cross-platform functionality on both desktop computers and handheld devices. The database is hosted online, and the rating forms can therefore also be accessed through most modern web browsers. Cross-platform digital assessment forms were developed for the rating of surgical skills. The database platform used in this study was reasonably priced, intuitive for the user, and flexible. The forms have been provided online as free downloads that may serve as the basis for further development or as inspiration for future efforts. In conclusion, digital assessment forms can be used for the structured rating of surgical skills and have the potential to be especially useful in complex assessment situations with multiple raters, repeated assessments in various times and locations, and situations requiring substantial subsequent data processing or complex score calculations.

  7. Surgical Practical Skills Learning Curriculum: Implementation and Interns' Confidence Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Danilo; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Garces-Descovich, Alejandro; Watkins, Ammara A; Gupta, Alok; Critchlow, Jonathan F; Kent, Tara S

    2017-08-18

    To provide an overview of the practical skills learning curriculum and assess its effects over time on the surgical interns' perceptions of their technical skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge. An 84-hour practical skills curriculum composed of didactic, simulation, and practical sessions was implemented during the 2015 to 2016 academic year for general surgery interns. Totally, 40% of the sessions were held during orientation, whereas the remainder sessions were held throughout the academic year. Interns' perceptions of their technical skills, administrative tasks, patient management, and knowledge were assessed by the practical skills curriculum residents' perception survey at various time points during their intern year (baseline, midpoint, and final). Interns were also asked to fill out an evaluation survey at the completion of each session to obtain feedback on the curriculum. General Surgery Residency program at a tertiary care academic institution. 20 General Surgery categorical and preliminary interns. Significant differences were found over time in interns' perceptions on their technical skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge (p < 0.001 for all). The results were also statistically significant when accounting for a prior boot camp course in medical school, intern status (categorical or preliminary), and gender (p < 0.05 for all). Differences in interns' perceptions occurred both from baseline to midpoint, and from midpoint to final time point evaluations (p < 0.001 for all). Prior surgical boot camp in medical school status, intern status (categorical vs. preliminary), and gender did not differ in the interns' baseline perceptions of their technical skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge (p > 0.05 for all). Implementation of a Practical Skills Curriculum in surgical internships can improve interns' confidence perception on their technical skills, patient management skills

  8. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  9. Current assessment and future directions of surgical skills laboratories.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Muneera R; DaRosa, Debra A; MacRae, Helen M; Dunnington, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    Educational, medicolegal, and financial constraints have pushed surgical residency programs to find alternative methods to operating room teaching for surgical skills training. Several studies have demonstrated that the use of skills laboratories is effective and enhances performance; however, little is known about the facilities available to residents. A survey was distributed to 40 general surgery program directors who, in an earlier questionnaire, indicated that they had skills laboratory facilities at their institutions. The survey included the following sections: demographics, facilities, administrative infrastructure, curriculum, learners, and opinions/thoughts of program directors. Of the 34 program directors that completed the survey, 76% are from a university program. The average facility is 1400 square feet, and most skills laboratories are located in the hospital. Nearly all skills facilities have dry laboratories (90%), and the most common equipment is box trainers (90%). Average start-up costs were $450,000. Sixty-two percent of programs have a skills curriculum for residents. Responders agreed that skills laboratories have a high value and should be part of residency curricula. The results of this survey provide a preliminary view of skills laboratories. There is variation in the size, location, and availability of simulators in skills laboratory facilities. Variations also exist in types of curricula formats, subspecialties who make use of the laboratory, and some administrative approaches. There is strong agreement among respondents that skills laboratories are a necessary and valuable component of residency education. Results also indicated concerns for recruiting faculty to teach in the skills laboratory, securing ongoing funding, and implementing a skills laboratory curriculum.

  10. Facial nerve hemangioma of the geniculate ganglion: an endoscopic surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Genovese, Elisabetta; Rubini, Alessia; Presutti, Livio

    2014-12-01

    Facial nerve hemangiomas are rare benign tumors arising from the venous plexus surrounding the facial nerve. Surgical management of these tumors is controversial. The goal of surgery is complete tumor removal with restoration of facial nerve function and preservation of hearing, wherever possible. The approaches most used are the translabyrinthine and middle cranial fossa approaches. In this report, we describe the first facial hemangioma treated with an endoscopic transcanal approach, combined with a retroauricular transmastoid minicraniotomy for closure of the dural defect. A great auricular nerve graft was used to reconnect interrupted nerve segments. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a hemangioma of the first genu of the facial nerve. With magnification of the structures, the transcanal endoscopic approach allowed a radical excision of the neoplasm permitting hearing function preservation, with the possibility to work with a minimally invasive approach with respect to the labyrinthine block and cochlea. Compared to a middle cranial fossa approach, the transcanal endoscopic approach avoided labyrinthine block removal and brain retraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical endoscopic vacuum therapy for anastomotic leakage and perforation of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, F; Schiffmann, L; Rau, B M; Klar, E

    2012-11-01

    Emergency operations for perforations and anastomotic leakage of the upper gastrointestinal tract are associated with a high overall morbidity and mortality rate. An endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) has been established successfully for anastomotic leakage after rectal resection but only limited data exist for EVT of the upper GI tract. We report on a series of nine patients treated with EVT for defects of the upper intestinal tract between March 2011 and May 2012. In four patients, initial endoscopic sponge placement was performed in combination with open surgical revision. Median follow-up was 189 (range, 51-366) days. In total, 52 vacuum sponges were placed in upper GI defects of nine patients. Indication for EVT were anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection or gastrectomy (n = 5) and iatrogenic or spontaneous esophageal perforations (n = 4). The mean number of sponge insertions was six (range, 1-13) with a mean changing interval of 3.5 days (range, 2-5). A successful vacuum therapy for upper intestinal defects was achieved in eight of nine patients (89 %). EVT is a promising approach for postoperative, iatrogenic, or spontaneous lesions of the upper GI tract. If necessary the endoscopic procedure can be combined with operative revision for better control of the local septic focus.

  12. Surgical results of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy and lacrimal trephination in distal or common canalicular obstruction.

    PubMed

    Baek, Byoung-Joon; Hwang, Gyu-Rin; Jung, Dong-Ho; Kim, I-Seok; Sin, Jae-Min; Lee, Heung-Man

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone stenting in patients with distal or common canalicular obstructions. The medical records of 29 patients (31 eyes) from January 2001 to December 2009 who underwent endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone tube insertion for the treatment of distal or common canalicular obstructions were retrospectively reviewed. The level of obstruction was confirmed by intraoperative probing. The outcome of the surgery was categorized as a complete success, partial success, or failure according to the functional and anatomic patency. The average age of the patients was 52 years. The duration of silicone intubation ranged from 4 to 11 months with an average of 5.7±1.6 months. The follow-up period after stent removal ranged from 4 to 15 months with an average of 8.2±3.3 months. Complete success was achieved in 25 out of 31 eyes (80.6%), partial success in 4 out of 31 eyes (12.9%), and failure in 2 out of 31 eyes (6.5%). Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone stent intubation may be safe and considered as an initial treatment of patients with distal or common canalicular obstructions.

  13. Surgical Results of Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy and Lacrimal Trephination in Distal or Common Canalicular Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Gyu-Rin; Jung, Dong-Ho; Kim, I-Seok; Sin, Jae-Min; Lee, Heung-Man

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the surgical outcomes of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone stenting in patients with distal or common canalicular obstructions. Methods The medical records of 29 patients (31 eyes) from January 2001 to December 2009 who underwent endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone tube insertion for the treatment of distal or common canalicular obstructions were retrospectively reviewed. The level of obstruction was confirmed by intraoperative probing. The outcome of the surgery was categorized as a complete success, partial success, or failure according to the functional and anatomic patency. Results The average age of the patients was 52 years. The duration of silicone intubation ranged from 4 to 11 months with an average of 5.7±1.6 months. The follow-up period after stent removal ranged from 4 to 15 months with an average of 8.2±3.3 months. Complete success was achieved in 25 out of 31 eyes (80.6%), partial success in 4 out of 31 eyes (12.9%), and failure in 2 out of 31 eyes (6.5%). Conclusion Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy followed by canalicular trephination and silicone stent intubation may be safe and considered as an initial treatment of patients with distal or common canalicular obstructions. PMID:22737291

  14. Advanced surgical skills for exposure in trauma: a new surgical skills cadaver course for surgery residents and fellows.

    PubMed

    Kuhls, Deborah A; Risucci, Donald A; Bowyer, Mark W; Luchette, Fred A

    2013-02-01

    Surgical education is changing owing to workforce and economic demands. Simulation and other technical teaching methods are used to acquire skills transferable to the operating room. Operative management of traumatic injuries has declined, making it difficult to acquire and maintain competence. The ASSET course was developed by the Committee on Trauma's Surgical Skills Committee to fill a surgical skills need in resident and fellow education. Using a human cadaver, standardized rapid exposure of vital structures in the extremities, neck, thorax, abdomen, retroperitoneum, and pelvis is taught. A retrospective analysis of 79 participants in four ASSET courses was performed. Operative experience data were collected, and self-efficacy questionnaires (SEQs) were administered before and after the course. Course evaluations and instructor evaluation data were analyzed. Student's and paired samples t tests as well as analysis of variance and Spearman ρ correlation coefficient analysis were performed using α at p < 0.05. We hypothesized that the ASSET course would teach new surgical techniques and that learner self-assessed ability would improve. Participants included 27 PGY-4, 20 PGY-5, 24 PGY-6 or PGY-7 and PGY-8 at other levels of training. Self-assessed confidence improved in all body regions (p < 0.001), with the greatest increase in upper extremity and chest. Pre- and post-SEQ scores correlated with trauma operative experience. Precourse SEQ scores differed by level of training. Instructor evaluations correlated with previous experience on a trauma service. Program evaluations averaged 4.73 on a 5-point scale, with gaining new knowledge rated at 4.8 and learning new techniques at 4.72. A standardized cadaver-based surgical exposures course offered to senior surgical residents adds new surgical skills and improves participant self-assessed ability to perform emergent surgical exposure of vital structures.

  15. Baseline urologic surgical skills among medical students: Differentiating trainees.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishaal; Lantz, Andrea G; Alzharani, Tarek; Foell, Kirsten; Lee, Jason Y

    2014-07-01

    Urology training programs seek to identify ideal candidates with the potential to become competent urologic surgeons. It is unclear whether innate technical ability has a role in this selection process. We aimed to determine whether there are any innate differences in baseline urologic technical skills among medical students. Second-year medical students from the University of Toronto were recruited for this study and stratified into surgical and non-surgical cohorts based on their reported career aspirations. After a pre-test questionnaire, subjects were tested on several urologic surgical skills: laparoscopy, cystoscopy and robotic surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, student t-tests and Spearman's correlation where appropriate. A total of 29 students participated in the study and no significant baseline differences were found between cohorts with respect to demographics and prior surgical experience. For laparoscopic skills, the surgical cohort outperformed the non-surgical cohort on several exercises: Lap Beans Missed (4.9 vs. 9.3, p < 0.01), Lap Bean Rating (3.8 vs. 3.1, p = 0.01), Lap Rings Error (0.2 vs. 1.22, p < 0.01), Lap Rings Rating (3.9 vs. 2.9, p < 0.01) and LapSim Grasping Score (64.3 vs. 46.4, p = 0.01). For cystoscopic skills, there were no significant differences between cohorts on any of the performance metrics. The surgical cohort also outperformed the non-surgical cohort on all measured robotic surgery performance metrics: Task Time (50.6 vs. 76.3, p < 0.01), Task Errors (0.2 vs. 3.1, p < 0.01), and Task Score (89.5 vs. 72.6, p < 0.01). Objective innate technical ability in urological skills, particularly laparoscopy and robotics, may differ between early trainees interested in a surgical career compared to those interested in a non-surgical career. Further studies are required to illicit what impact such differences have on future performance and competence.

  16. Baseline urologic surgical skills among medical students: Differentiating trainees

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishaal; Lantz, Andrea G.; Alzharani, Tarek; Foell, Kirsten; Lee, Jason Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urology training programs seek to identify ideal candidates with the potential to become competent urologic surgeons. It is unclear whether innate technical ability has a role in this selection process. We aimed to determine whether there are any innate differences in baseline urologic technical skills among medical students. Methods: Second-year medical students from the University of Toronto were recruited for this study and stratified into surgical and non-surgical cohorts based on their reported career aspirations. After a pre-test questionnaire, subjects were tested on several urologic surgical skills: laparoscopy, cystoscopy and robotic surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, student t-tests and Spearman’s correlation where appropriate. Results: A total of 29 students participated in the study and no significant baseline differences were found between cohorts with respect to demographics and prior surgical experience. For laparoscopic skills, the surgical cohort outperformed the non-surgical cohort on several exercises: Lap Beans Missed (4.9 vs. 9.3, p < 0.01), Lap Bean Rating (3.8 vs. 3.1, p = 0.01), Lap Rings Error (0.2 vs. 1.22, p < 0.01), Lap Rings Rating (3.9 vs. 2.9, p < 0.01) and LapSim Grasping Score (64.3 vs. 46.4, p = 0.01). For cystoscopic skills, there were no significant differences between cohorts on any of the performance metrics. The surgical cohort also outperformed the non-surgical cohort on all measured robotic surgery performance metrics: Task Time (50.6 vs. 76.3, p < 0.01), Task Errors (0.2 vs. 3.1, p < 0.01), and Task Score (89.5 vs. 72.6, p < 0.01). Discussion: Objective innate technical ability in urological skills, particularly laparoscopy and robotics, may differ between early trainees interested in a surgical career compared to those interested in a non-surgical career. Further studies are required to illicit what impact such differences have on future performance and competence. PMID

  17. Endoscopic management of patients with post-surgical leaks involving the gastrointestinal tract: A large case series

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Angelo; Cellini, Carlo; Sica, Mariano; Zullo, Angelo; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Galloro, Giuseppe; Conigliaro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical anastomotic leaks often require a re-intervention, are associated with a definite morbidity and mortality, and with relevant costs. We described a large series of patients with different post-surgical leaks involving the gastrointestinal tract managed with endoscopy as initial approach. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cases with anastomotic leaks managed with different endoscopic approaches (with surgical or radiological drainage when needed) in two endoscopic centres during 5 years. Interventions included: (1) over-the-scope clip (OTSC) positioning; (2) placement of a covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS); (3) fibrin glue injection (Tissucol); and (4) endo-sponge application, according to both the endoscopic feature and patient’s status. Results A total of 76 patients underwent endoscopic treatment for a leak either in the upper (47 cases) or lower (29 cases) gastrointestinal tract, and the approach was successful in 39 (83%) and 22 (75.9%) patients, respectively, accounting for an overall 80.3% success rate. Leak closure was achieved in 84.9% and 78.3% of patients managed by using a single or a combination of endoscopic devices. Overall, leak closure failed in 15 (19.7%) patients, and the surgical approach was successful in all 14 patients who underwent re-intervention, whilst one patient died due to sepsis at 7 days. Conclusions Our data suggest that an endoscopic approach, with surgical or radiological drainage when needed, is successful and safe in the majority of patients with anastomotic gastrointestinal leaks. Therefore, an endoscopic treatment could be attempted before resorting to more invasive, costly and risky re-intervention. PMID:28408994

  18. Indication, surgical technique and results of endoscopic fascial release in plantar fasciitis (E FRPF).

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Jörg; Schunck, Jochem; Liebsch, Dietrich; Filler, Tim

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the surgical technique for, and review our indications and results after, endoscopic fascial release in patients with plantar fasciitis. In five thiel-embalmed human specimens, a biportal technique for endoscopic release of the plantar fascia was established. The aim was here to evaluate the relation between the plantar fascia and the heel spur and to perform a release that would not exceed 50-70% of the diameter of the calcaneoplantar fascia. The endoscopic technique was performed within the last 5 years in ten male and seven female patients. All patients with the clinical entity of plantar fasciitis underwent conservative treatment for at least 6 months. The average age at surgery was 35 years (24-56 years). In the first five patients, surgery was performed under c-arm control. In all patients the operation could be finished endoscopically. The endoscopic portals healed without complications. The time for surgery during the learning curve ranged between 21 and 74 min (average 41 min) and was still longer compared to the open technique. The clinical follow-up ranged between 4 and 48 months (average 18.5 months). Out of 17 patients, 13 improved clinically, and they would choose the treatment option again. In the Ogilvie-Harris score, seven patients showed good and six excellent results. In two patients, the initial results were not satisfactory, because of a bony stress reaction of the calcaneus. This complication was treated by 6 weeks of partial weight bearing, without any further problems. Two other patients developed secondary pain in the lateral column. In spite of the minimal invasive approach it seems to be important to be careful in increasing the weight bearing in early rehabilitation. The technique of the endoscopic plantar fascia release (E FRPF) can be performed in a standardised and reproducible procedure. The follow-up examination showed good midterm results, but a loss of stability of the plantar arch

  19. Endoscopic vs. Surgical Interventions for Painful Chronic Pancreatitis: What is Needed for Future Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, John A; Reddy, Nageshwar D

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of painful chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. The available evidence from two randomized controlled trials favor surgical intervention, whereas an endotherapy-first approach is widely practiced. Chronic pancreatitis is complex disease with different genetic and environmental factors, different pain mechanisms and different treatment modalities including medical, endoscopic, and surgical. The widely practiced step-up approach remains unproven. In designing future clinical trials there are some important pre-requisites including a more comprehensive pain assessment tool, the optimization of conservative medical treatment and interventional techniques. Consideration should be given to the need of a control arm and the optimal timing of intervention. Pending better designed studies, the practical way forward is to identify subgroups of patients who clearly warrant endotherapy or surgery first, and to design the future clinical trials for the remainder. PMID:28079861

  20. GPs with enhanced surgical skills: a questionable solution for remote surgical services

    PubMed Central

    Vinden, Christopher; Ott, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Canadian College of Family Physicians recently decided to recognize family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) and has proposed a 1-year curriculum of surgical training. The purpose of this initiative is to bring or enhance surgical services to remote and underserviced areas. We feel that this proposed curriculum is overly ambitious and unrealistic and that it is unlikely to produce surgeons, or a system, capable of delivering high-quality surgical services. The convergence of a new training curriculum for general surgeons, coupled with the current oversupply of surgeons, provide an alternate pathway to meet the needs of these communities. A long-term solution will also require alternate funding models, a sophisticated and coordinated national locum service and a national review of the population and infrastructure requirements necessary for both sustainable resident surgical services and surgical outreach services. PMID:26574827

  1. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    PubMed

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Assessment of simulated surgical skills in parabolic microgravity.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Azhar; Broderick, Timothy J; Williams, David R; Doarn, Charles R; Jones, Jeffrey A; Merrell, Ronald C

    2005-04-01

    During spaceflight crew health is paramount in the success of flight missions. The delivery of healthcare during flight requires crew readiness for medical and surgical response. There were 20 participants who were evaluated for accurate performance of 4 basic laparoscopic surgical skills (clip applying, cutting, grasping, and suturing) during parabolic weightlessness using an inanimate workstation aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft. Data indicate that motor skill performance decreased within the parabolic microgravity flight environment. Performance in parabolic microgravity flight included futile effort with an increase in number of tasks attempted and a decrease in tasks completed successfully. There is a decreased frequency of accurate task completion in parabolic microgravity flight, but it is not an obstacle to implementation of effective training for providing in-flight medical care. The data reveal that individuals perform basic laparoscopic surgical simulation with greater effort in microgravity following simulation training.

  3. Surgical skill and complication rates after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Birkmeyer, John D; Finks, Jonathan F; O'Reilly, Amanda; Oerline, Mary; Carlin, Arthur M; Nunn, Andre R; Dimick, Justin; Banerjee, Mousumi; Birkmeyer, Nancy J O

    2013-10-10

    Clinical outcomes after many complex surgical procedures vary widely across hospitals and surgeons. Although it has been assumed that the proficiency of the operating surgeon is an important factor underlying such variation, empirical data are lacking on the relationships between technical skill and postoperative outcomes. We conducted a study involving 20 bariatric surgeons in Michigan who participated in a statewide collaborative improvement program. Each surgeon submitted a single representative videotape of himself or herself performing a laparoscopic gastric bypass. Each videotape was rated in various domains of technical skill on a scale of 1 to 5 (with higher scores indicating more advanced skill) by at least 10 peer surgeons who were unaware of the identity of the operating surgeon. We then assessed relationships between these skill ratings and risk-adjusted complication rates, using data from a prospective, externally audited, clinical-outcomes registry involving 10,343 patients. Mean summary ratings of technical skill ranged from 2.6 to 4.8 across the 20 surgeons. The bottom quartile of surgical skill, as compared with the top quartile, was associated with higher complication rates (14.5% vs. 5.2%, P<0.001) and higher mortality (0.26% vs. 0.05%, P=0.01). The lowest quartile of skill was also associated with longer operations (137 minutes vs. 98 minutes, P<0.001) and higher rates of reoperation (3.4% vs. 1.6%, P=0.01) and readmission (6.3% vs. 2.7%) (P<0.001). The technical skill of practicing bariatric surgeons varied widely, and greater skill was associated with fewer postoperative complications and lower rates of reoperation, readmission, and visits to the emergency department. Although these findings are preliminary, they suggest that peer rating of operative skill may be an effective strategy for assessing a surgeon's proficiency.

  4. [Endoscopic lateral parathyroidectomy as surgical treatment for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Vidal-Pérez, Óscar; Valentini, Mauro; Baanante-Cerdeña, Juan Carlos; Ginestà-Martí, César; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Most surgeons have rapidly accepted the use of minimally invasive surgical approaches for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. The role of the endoscope in neck surgery is still being discussed due to its technical difficulty and complex patient selection criteria. A prospective study was conducted between April 2010 and April 2013. It included patients diagnosed with sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism (sPHPT) by locating a single adenoma using ultrasound and sestamibi scintigraphy imaging. All patients agreed to be included in the study. Experienced endocrine surgeons that had been trained in endocrine minimally invasive surgery performed the procedure. The same surgical technique was used in all of the cases. The demographic and clinical variables were evaluated. A descriptive analysis was performed on the data measuring mean, standard deviation, and range. A total of 28 endoscopic lateral parathyroidectomies were performed. All patients were diagnosed with sporadic hyperparathyroidism sPHPT. The mean age was 68 years (59-89). No intraoperative complications were registered. Postoperative morbidity was comparable to that reported in the classical approach. A favourable outcome was observed in 27 of the 28 patients (96%) after a mean follow-up time of 22 (9 - 53) months. An endoscopic approach for hyperparathyroidism sPHPT is feasible and reproducible, and it obtains comparable results to the classical open surgery. Several factors make this technique suitable for highly specialised hospitals with a high patient volume and specialised endocrine surgery units. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinect based real-time position calibration for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jingfan; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Ma, Shaodong; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-03-01

    Unanticipated, reactive motion of the patient during skull based tumor resective surgery is the source of the consequence that the nasal endoscopic tracking system is compelled to be recalibrated. To accommodate the calibration process with patient's movement, this paper developed a Kinect based Real-time positional calibration method for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system. In this method, a Kinect scanner was employed as the acquisition part of the point cloud volumetric reconstruction of the patient's head during surgery. Then, a convex hull based registration algorithm aligned the real-time image of the patient head with a model built upon the CT scans performed in the preoperative preparation to dynamically calibrate the tracking system if a movement was detected. Experimental results confirmed the robustness of the proposed method, presenting a total tracking error within 1 mm under the circumstance of relatively violent motions. These results point out the tracking accuracy can be retained stably and the potential to expedite the calibration of the tracking system against strong interfering conditions, demonstrating high suitability for a wide range of surgical applications.

  6. Effect of Mirrored Views on Endoscopic and Arthroscopic Skill Performance

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Emanuel; Meier, Christoph; Wirth, Stefan; Koch, Peter Philipp; Meyer, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic procedures may be technically challenging because of impaired vision, limited space, and the 2-dimensional vision of a 3-dimensional structure. Spatial orientation may get more complicated when the camera is pointing toward the surgeon. Hypothesis: Spatial orientation and arthroscopic performance may be improved by simply mirroring the image on the monitor in different configurations regarding the position and orientation of camera and instrument. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirty volunteers from an orthopaedic department were divided into 3 equal groups according to their arthroscopic experience (beginners, intermediates, seniors). All subjects were asked to perform a standardized task in a closed box mimicking an endoscopic space. The same task had to be performed in 4 different configurations regarding camera and instrument position and orientation (pointing toward or away from the subject) with either the original or mirrored image on the monitor. Efficiency (time per stick; TPS), precision (successful completion of the task), and difficulty rating using a visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Results: Mirroring the image demonstrated no advantage over the original images in any configuration regarding TPS. Successful completion of the task was significantly better when the image was mirrored in the configuration with the camera pointing toward and the instrument away from the surgeon. There was a positive correlation between TPS and subjective VAS difficulty rating (r = 0.762, P = .000) and a negative correlation between the successful completion of the task and VAS (r = −0.515, P = .000). Conclusion: Mirroring the image may have a positive effect on arthroscopic performance of surgeons in certain configurations. A significantly improved performance was seen when the arthroscope was pointing toward and the grasping instrument pointing away from the subject. Mirroring the image may facilitate surgery in

  7. Teaching Surgical Skills: What Kind of Practice Makes Perfect?

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Carol-Anne E.; Dubrowski, Adam; MacRae, Helen; Graham, Brent; Grober, Ethan; Reznick, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Surgical skills laboratories have become an important venue for early skill acquisition. The principles that govern training in this novel educational environment remain largely unknown; the commonest method of training, especially for continuing medical education (CME), is a single multihour event. This study addresses the impact of an alternative method, where learning is distributed over a number of training sessions. The acquisition and transfer of a new skill to a life-like model is assessed. Methods: Thirty-eight junior surgical residents, randomly assigned to either massed (1 day) or distributed (weekly) practice regimens, were taught a new skill (microvascular anastomosis). Each group spent the same amount of time in practice. Performance was assessed pretraining, immediately post-training, and 1 month post-training. The ultimate test of anastomotic skill was assessed with a transfer test to a live, anesthetized rat. Previously validated computer-based and expert-based outcome measures were used. In addition, clinically relevant outcomes were assessed. Results: Both groups showed immediate improvement in performance, but the distributed group performed significantly better on the retention test in most outcome measures (time, number of hand movements, and expert global ratings; all P values <0.05). The distributed group also outperformed the massed group on the live rat anastomosis in all expert-based measures (global ratings, checklist score, final product analysis, competency for OR; all P values <0.05). Conclusions: Our current model of training surgical skills using short courses (for both CME and structured residency curricula) may be suboptimal. Residents retain and transfer skills better if taught in a distributed manner. Despite the greater logistical challenge, we need to restructure training schedules to allow for distributed practice. PMID:16926566

  8. Effect of Spatial Cognitive Ability on Gain in Robot-Assisted Surgical Skills of Urological Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Teishima, Jun; Hattori, Minoru; Inoue, Shogo; Hieda, Keisuke; Kobatake, Kohei; Shinmei, Shunsuke; Egi, Hiroyuki; Ohdan, Hideki; Matsubara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated the needs for a spatial cognitive ability that can give an accurate understanding of the position, orientation, and size and form of the objects in endoscopic surgery, there has been no study on the relationship between the skills of robot-assisted surgery and spatial cognitive ability. To assess the effect of spatial cognitive ability on gain in robot-assisted surgical skills of urological surgeons. The robot-assisted surgery skills of 24 urological surgeons who had no previous experience with the Mimic dV-Trainer (MdVT) and had not been the main surgeon in robot-assisted surgery and 20 volunteer medical students who had no previous experience of the MdVT were assessed by using a program consisting of 4 kinds of tasks. Their performances were recorded using a built-in scoring algorithm. Their spatial cognitive abilities were also assessed using a mental rotation test. Although there was a significant correlation between the spatial cognitive ability and a score of 2 for the more difficult tasks for student groups using the MdVT, there was no significant correlation between them for all tasks for groups of urological surgeons. The results of the present study indicate that differences in spatial cognitive ability in urological surgeons have no effect on the gain in fundamental robot-assisted surgery skills whereas there was a significant correlation between the spatial cognitive ability and fundamental robot-assisted surgical skills in the volunteers. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Digital Environment for Movement Control in Surgical Skill Training.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Gómez, Juan J; Peguero, Pedro D; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Intelligent environments are increasingly becoming useful scenarios for handling computers. Technological devices are practical tools for learning and acquiring clinical skills as part of the medical training process. Within the framework of the advanced user interface, we present a technological application using Leap Motion, to enhance interaction with the user in the process of a laparoscopic surgical intervention and integrate the navigation through augmented reality images using manual gestures. Thus, we intend to achieve a more natural interaction with the objects that participate in a surgical intervention, which are augmented and related to the user's hand movements.

  10. Changing the surgical dogma in frontal sinus trauma: transnasal endoscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica W; Jeyarajan, Hari; Illing, Elisa A; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-05-01

    Management of frontal sinus trauma includes coronal or direct open approaches through skin incisions to either ablate or obliterate the frontal sinus for posterior table fractures and openly reduce/internally fixate fractured anterior tables. The objective of this prospective case-series study was to evaluate outcomes of frontal sinus anterior and posterior table trauma using endoscopic techniques. Prospective evaluation of patients undergoing surgery for frontal sinus fractures was performed. Data were collected regarding demographics, etiology, technique, operative site, length involving the posterior table, size of skull base defects, complications, and clinical follow-up. Forty-six patients (average age, 42 years) with frontal sinus fractures were treated using endoscopic techniques from 2008 to 2016. Mean follow-up was 26 (range, 0.5 to 79) months. Patients were treated primarily with a Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies. Draf III was used in 8 patients. Average fracture defect (length vs width) was 17.1 × 9.1 mm, and the average length involving the posterior table was 13.1 mm. Skull base defects were covered with either nasoseptal flaps or free tissue grafts. One individual required Draf IIb revision, but all sinuses were patent on final examination and all closed reductions of anterior table defects resulted in cosmetically acceptable outcomes. Frontal sinus trauma has traditionally been treated using open approaches. Our findings show that endoscopic management should become part of the management algorithm for frontal sinus trauma, which challenges current surgical dogma regarding mandatory open approaches. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. ICO-OSCAR for pediatric cataract surgical skill assessment.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Meenakshi; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Pilling, Rachel; Li, Junhong; Golnik, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric cataract surgical skill assessment is important to ensure the competency of the trainees, especially pediatric ophthalmology fellows. Using a rubric would ensure objectivity in this process. The ICO-OSCAR pediatric cataract surgery rubric has been developed with global variations in techniques of pediatric cataract surgery in mind. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The ureterovesical junction in children: sonographic findings after surgical or endoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rypens, F; Avni, E F; Bank, W O; Schulman, C C; Struyven, J

    1992-04-01

    We retrospectively analyzed pre- and postoperative sonographic and medical records of 335 children who had surgical or endoscopic treatment at the ureterovesical junction, in order to determine normal and atypical sonographic appearances. Normal sonographic findings after ureteral reimplantation include thickening of the posterior bladder wall, pseudodiverticular sacculations, bladder asymmetry, and transitory hydroureteronephrosis. Short-term or persistent (lasting more than 1 month) hydroureteronephrosis, urinoma, hematoma, bladder lithiasis, and diverticula were abnormal findings, occurring in 17% of the patients. After partial ureteronephrectomies, visualization of the residual ureter on sonograms was not possible in cases without complications; in one patient, reflux of fluid dilated the residual ureter and made the ureter visible on sonograms. After endoscopic incisions, the masslike appearance of a collapsed ureterocele was observed. Submucosally injected Teflon always appeared as a curvilinear hyperechoic area with an acoustic shadow. Marked acute or persistent hydroureteronephrosis or ectopic intracavitary Teflon particles were observed in 2% of patients. Granuloma formation was considered likely in 5% of the patients when the area of injected Teflon material was longer than 12 mm on sonograms. Submucosally injected collagen appeared less echogenic than Teflon and showed no acoustic shadowing. The various normal sonographic appearances after treatment must be known in order to distinguish them from significant abnormalities. In patients with anatomic anomalies, such as short-term or persistent hydroureteronephrosis, urinoma, hematoma, and lithiasis, complementary uroradiologic examinations may be necessary to clarify the diagnosis.

  13. Multi-section continuum robot for endoscopic surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahisa; Okumura, Ichiro; Song, Sang-Eun; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose the development and assessment of a multi-section continuum robot for endoscopic surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms. The robot has two sections for bending actuated by tendon wires. By actuating the two sections independently, the robot can generate a variety of posture combinations by these sections while maintaining the tip angle. This feature offers more flexibility in positioning of the tip than a conventional endoscope for large viewing angles of up to 180 degrees. To estimate the flexible positioning of the tip, we developed kinematic mapping with friction in tendon wires. In a kinematic-mapping simulation, the two-section robot at the target scale (i.e., an outer diameter of 1.7 mm and a length of 60 mm) had a variety of tip positions within 50-mm ranges at the 180 degree-angled view. In the experimental validation, the 1:10 scale prototype performed the three salient postures with different tip positions at the 1800-angled view.

  14. A virtual reality environment for patient data visualization and endoscopic surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jung-Leng; Lobe, Thom; Winer, Eliot

    2009-04-01

    Visualizing patient data in a three-dimensional (3D) representation can be an effective surgical planning tool.As medical imaging technologies improve with faster and higher resolution scans, the use of virtual reality for interacting with medical images adds another level of realism to a 3D representation. The software framework presented in this paper is designed to load and display any DICOM/PACS-compatible 3D image data for visualization and interaction in an immersive virtual environment. In "examiner" mode, the surgeon can interact with a 3D virtual model of the patient by using an intuitive set of controls designed to allow slicing, coloring,and windowing of the image to show different tissue densities and enhance important structures. In the simulated"endoscopic camera" mode, the surgeon can see through the point of view of a virtual endoscopic camera to navigate inside the patient. These tools allow the surgeon to perform virtual endoscopy on any suitable structure.The software is highly scalable, as it can be used on a single desktop computer to a cluster of computers in an immersive multiprojection virtual environment. By wearing a pair of stereo glasses, a surgeon becomes immersed within the model itself, thus providing a sense of realism, as if the surgeon is "inside" the patient.

  15. Endoscopic transconjunctival surgical approach to intraconal space of the orbit: first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lyson, Tomasz; Sieskiewicz, Andrzej; Rogowski, Marek; Proniewska-Skretek, Ewa; Mariak, Zofia; Turek, Grzegorz; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a transconjunctival, endoscope-assisted (TEA) approach to the medial intra-orbital space was developed based on cadaver preparations, with an ultimate goal of minimizing disturbances of the anatomic structures of the orbit. However, no report on clinical validation of this promising technique was published thus far. We present our experiences with the TEA approach in two patients. In emergency conditions, we approached the lateral retrobulbar space of a 42-year-old male through a 180° incision close to the corneal limbus; a scrap of metal, which had perforated the globe and resided at its posterior wall, was removed endoscopically. Moreover, we used the TEA approach to remove a tumor from the upper intraconal space in a 63-year-old woman. In both patients the surgical goal was achieved with no muscle transection and without additional morbidity and complications. Our experiences with TEA approach suggest that the procedure is clinically feasible, produces no co-morbidity and yields good functional and cosmetic results. As a result, the whole circumference of the retrobulbar space can be conveniently explored. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. The Helminths Causing Surgical or Endoscopic Abdominal Intervention: A Review Article.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Erdal; Dokur, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Helminths sometimes require surgical or endoscopic intervention. Helminths may cause acute abdomen, mechanical intestinal obstruction, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforation, hepatitis, pancreatitis, and appendicitis. This study aimed to determine the surgical diseases that helminths cause and to gather, analyze the case reports, case series and original articles about this topic in literature. This study was designed as a retrospective observational study. In order to determine the studies published in literature, the search limits in Pub-Med database were set to 1 Jan 1957 and 31 Mar 2016 (59 yr), and the articles regarding Helminth-Surgery-Endoscopy were taken into examination. Among 521 articles scanned, 337 specific ones were involved in this study. The most common surgical pathology was found to be in Ascaris lumbricoides group. Enterobius vermicularis was found to be the parasite that caused highest amount of acute appendicitis. Anisakiasis was observed to seem mainly because of abdominal pain and mechanical intestinal obstruction. Strongyloides stercoraries causes duodenal pathologies such as duodenal obstruction and duodenitis. Taenia saginata comes into prominence with appendicitis and gastrointestinal perforations. Fasciola hepatica exhibits biliary tract involvement and causes common bile duct obstruction. Hookworms were observed to arise along with gastrointestinal hemorrhage and anemia. Trichuris trichiuria draws attention with gastrointestinal hemorrhage, mechanical intestinal obstruction. Helminths may lead to life-threatening clinic conditions such as acute abdomen, gastrointestinal perforation, intestinal obstruction, and hemorrhages. There is a relationship between surgery and helminths. It is very important for surgeons to consider and remember helminths in differential diagnoses during their daily routines.

  17. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach for Apoplectic Pituitary Tumor: Surgical Outcomes and Complications in 45 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Li, Xueen; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) for apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Design A retrospective study. Setting Qilu Hospital of Shandong University; Brain Science Research Institute, Shandong University. Participants Patients admitted to Qilu Hospital of Shandong University who were diagnosed with an apoplectic pituitary tumor and underwent EETA for resection of the tumor. Main Outcome Measures In total 45 patients were included in a retrospective chart review. Data regarding patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications were obtained from the chart review. Results In total, 38 (92.7%) of 41 patients with loss of vision obtained visual remission postoperatively. In addition, 16 patients reported a secreting adenoma, and postsurgical hormonal levels were normal or decreased in 14 patients. All other symptoms, such as headache and alteration of mental status, recovered rapidly after surgery. Two patients (4.4%) incurred cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six patients (13.3%) experienced transient diabetes insipidus (DI) postoperatively, but none of these patients developed permanent DI. Five patients (11.1%) developed hypopituitarism and were treated with replacement of hormonal medicine. No cases of meningitis, carotid artery injury, or death related to surgery were reported. Conclusion EETA offers a safe and effective surgical option for apoplectic pituitary tumors and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:26949589

  18. Can Multiple Object Tracking Predict Laparoscopic Surgical Skills?

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Sebastian; McCaffrey, Rob; Butz, Matthew; Post, Dustin; Howlett, Joel; Dorsch, Kim D; Lyster, Kish

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between multiple object tracking (MOT) and simulated laparoscopic surgery skills. A total of 29 second-year medical students were recruited for this study. The participants completed 3 rounds of a three-dimensional MOT and a simulated laparoscopic surgery task. Averages of the performance on the tasks were calculated. Descriptive variables (i.e., age, hours of sleep, caffeine, and video game use) were measured via questionnaires. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression models with surgical performance as the outcome variable. Predictor variable was the multiple objects tracking score and the descriptive variables. The regression models revealed a significant prediction of simulated laparoscopic surgical skills by the multiple objects tracking score. In particular, 29% of the variance of time to completion and 28% of the average surgical arm movement were explained. In both regressions, the MOT score was the only significant predictor. This study demonstrates the potential implications of perceptual-cognitive training for future surgeons. Along with motor skill practice, MOT may aid to better prepare health care professionals for the complex cognitive demands of surgery. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoscopes and robots for tight surgical spaces: use of precurved elastic elements to enhance curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remirez, Andria A.; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Many applications in medicine require flexible surgical manipulators and endoscopes capable of reaching tight curvatures. The maximum curvature these devices can achieve is often restricted either by a strain limit, or by a maximum actuation force that the device's components can tolerate without risking mechanical failure. In this paper we propose the use of precurvature to "bias" the workspace of the device in one direction. Combined with axial shaft rotation, biasing increases the size of the device's workspace, enabling it to reach tighter curvatures than a comparable device without biasing can achieve, while still being able to fully straighten. To illustrate this effect, we describe several example prototype devices which use flexible nitinol strips that can be pushed and pulled to generate bending. We provide a statics model that relates the manipulator curvature to actuation force, and validate it experimentally.

  20. Assessment of surgical skills of trainees in the UK.

    PubMed

    Beard, Jonathan D

    2008-05-01

    Surgical training and assessment in the UK has been criticised in the past for lacking transparency, reliability and validity. The new Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) has a well-defined, competence-based syllabus and a system of workplace-based assessments and examinations that map to the syllabus. The main aims of workplace-based assessment are to aid learning through objective feedback and to provide evidence that the competencies required to progress to the next level of training have been achieved. Reduction in surgical experience means that more training will need to be undertaken on simulations, although experience and assessment in the operating room must remains the 'gold-standard'. Simulation training will require the provision of properly resourced surgical skills facilities in every hospital. The key to reliable assessment and constructive feedback is well-trained trainers. Training is a skill that must be learned, and assessment and feedback techniques form part of this. In surgery, it has been assumed that all consultants are trainers but this is clearly not the case. Surgeons will need to follow the example of primary care, where trainers are selected from experienced general practitioners who demonstrate enthusiasm and ability. The reward for the trainer should be protected time for training. The reward for the National Health Service will be better trained surgeons.

  1. Assessment of Surgical Skills of Trainees in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Jonathan D

    2008-01-01

    Surgical training and assessment in the UK has been criticised in the past for lacking transparency, reliability and validity. The new Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) has a well-defined, competence-based syllabus and a system of workplace-based assessments and examinations that map to the syllabus. The main aims of workplace-based assessment are to aid learning through objective feedback and to provide evidence that the competencies required to progress to the next level of training have been achieved. Reduction in surgical experience means that more training will need to be undertaken on simulations, although experience and assessment in the operating room must remains the ‘gold-standard’. Simulation training will require the provision of properly resourced surgical skills facilities in every hospital. The key to reliable assessment and constructive feedback is well-trained trainers. Training is a skill that must be learned, and assessment and feedback techniques form part of this. In surgery, it has been assumed that all consultants are trainers but this is clearly not the case. Surgeons will need to follow the example of primary care, where trainers are selected from experienced general practitioners who demonstrate enthusiasm and ability. The reward for the trainer should be protected time for training. The reward for the National Health Service will be better trained surgeons. PMID:18492389

  2. Ingested gastrointestinal foreign bodies: predisposing factors for complications in children having surgical or endoscopic removal.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Baran; Cevik, Alper A; Ilhan, Huseyin

    2007-02-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine the predisposing factors associated with the complications of ingested gastrointestinal (GI) tract foreign bodies (FBs) in children who had surgical or endoscopic removal. The study was performed in 161 children who had endoscopic or surgical removal. The clinical data were evaluated in two groups. In groups I and II, respectively, 135 patients with no complications and 26 patients with complications were analyzed. The relative risk analysis was performed for the risk factors. The number of the patients with an accurate history and the radiopaque FBs was significantly higher in group I. Metal, especially sharp objects, and food plugs obstructing a diseased esophagus were the most common FBs found in group II. The majority of the FBs of both groups were entrapped in esophagus, the number of the FBs distal to esophagus was significantly higher and duration of lodgment was significantly longer in group II. Esophageal abrasion, laceration and bleeding, complete esophageal obstruction, caustic injury, severe esophageal stricture, laryngeal edema, recurrent aspiration pneumonia, loss of weight, intestinal perforation, constipation and intestinal obstruction were determined as complications. The relative risk was >1 for duration of lodgment more than 24 h, for sharp or pointed objects, button batteries, nonopaque objects, diseased esophagus and for the objects located below the upper third of esophagus. Type, radiopacity, location and duration of the ingested GI tract FB determine the outcome. A delayed diagnosis is the most significant factor increasing the risk of complications. Physician must maintain a high index of suspicion and a more extensive history; physical examination and radiodiagnostic investigation should be obtained in suspected cases.

  3. ‘Minimum-incision’ endoscopically assisted transvesical prostatectomy: Surgical technique and early outcomes

    PubMed Central

    El-Karamany, Tarek M.; Al-Adl, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Baky, Shabieb A.; Abdel-Azeem, Abdallah F.; Zaazaa, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the surgical technique and report the early outcomes of a ‘minimum-incision’ endoscopically assisted transvesical prostatectomy (MEATP) for managing benign prostatic obstruction secondary to a large (>80 g) prostate. Patients and methods In a prospective feasibility trial, 60 men with large benign prostates underwent MEATP. The baseline and postoperative evaluation included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a measurement of maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), and the postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume. The adenoma was enucleated digitally through a 3-cm suprapubic skin incision, and haemostasis was completed with endoscopic coagulation of the prostatic fossa. Perioperative complications were recorded and stratified according to the modified Clavien–Dindo score. Results The mean (SD, range) prostate weight estimated by ultrasonography was 102.9 (15.4, 80–160) g, the operative duration was 52 (8, 40–65) min, the haemoglobin loss was 2.1 (1, 0.4–5) g/dL, the catheterisation time was 5.2 (1.3, 4–9) days, and the hospital stay was 6.2 (1.4, 5–10) days. There were 21 complications recorded in 16 (27%) patients, and most (86%) were of grades 1 and 2. The most frequent complications were bleeding requiring a blood transfusion (8%), and prolonged drainage (5%). There was a significant improvement at 3 months after surgery in the IPSS (8.6 vs. 21.6, P < 0.001), Qmax (19.5 vs. 7.7, P < 0.001), and PVR (15.8 vs. 83.9 mL, P < 0.001). Conclusion MEATP is feasible, safe and effective. Comparative studies and long-term data are required to determine its role in the surgical treatment of large-volume BPH. PMID:26019954

  4. Toward real-time endoscopically-guided robotic navigation based on a 3D virtual surgical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-03-01

    The challenge is to accurately guide the surgical tool within the three-dimensional (3D) surgical field for roboticallyassisted operations such as tumor margin removal from a debulked brain tumor cavity. The proposed technique is 3D image-guided surgical navigation based on matching intraoperative video frames to a 3D virtual model of the surgical field. A small laser-scanning endoscopic camera was attached to a mock minimally-invasive surgical tool that was manipulated toward a region of interest (residual tumor) within a phantom of a debulked brain tumor. Video frames from the endoscope provided features that were matched to the 3D virtual model, which were reconstructed earlier by raster scanning over the surgical field. Camera pose (position and orientation) is recovered by implementing a constrained bundle adjustment algorithm. Navigational error during the approach to fluorescence target (residual tumor) is determined by comparing the calculated camera pose to the measured camera pose using a micro-positioning stage. From these preliminary results, computation efficiency of the algorithm in MATLAB code is near real-time (2.5 sec for each estimation of pose), which can be improved by implementation in C++. Error analysis produced 3-mm distance error and 2.5 degree of orientation error on average. The sources of these errors come from 1) inaccuracy of the 3D virtual model, generated on a calibrated RAVEN robotic platform with stereo tracking; 2) inaccuracy of endoscope intrinsic parameters, such as focal length; and 3) any endoscopic image distortion from scanning irregularities. This work demonstrates feasibility of micro-camera 3D guidance of a robotic surgical tool.

  5. Use of Performance Measures to Evaluate, Document Competence and Deterioration of Advanced Surgical Skills Exposure for Trauma (ASSET) Surgical Skills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    training. Simulation training options include virtual reality trainers,7-10 models or manikins,11-13 human cadaver training,14-16 and animal laboratories...Jensen P, Darzi A. An evidence-based virtual reality training program for novice laparoscopic surgeons. Ann Surg. 2006 Aug;244(2):310-4. 15 8...offering a potential mechanism to supplement surgical skills training. Simulation training options include virtual reality trainers,7-10 models or

  6. Endoscopic versus surgical approach in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Débora V.; Kondo, André; Bernardo, Wanderley M.; Sakai, Paulo; Moura, Renata Nobre; Silva, Gustavo Luis Rodela; Ide, Edson; Tomishige, Toshiro; de Moura, Eduardo G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zenker’s diverticulum is a rare disease in the general population. Its treatment can be carried out by either an endoscopic or surgical approach. The objective of this study was to systematically identify all reports that compare both treatment modalities and to assess the outcomes in terms of length of procedure, length of hospitalization, time until diet introduction, complication rates, and recurrence rates. Methods: A search of Medline and Embase selected all studies that compared different methods of surgical and endoscopic treatment for Zenker’s diverticulum published in the English, Portuguese, and Spanish languages between 1975 and 2014. The meta-analysis was developed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Data were extracted and analyzed for five different outcomes. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria, describing outcomes of endoscopic versus surgical treatment for 596 patients with Zenker’s diverticulum. A meta-analysis of the studies suggested a statistically significant reduction in operating time and length of hospitalization, favoring endoscopic treatment (standardized mean difference (SMD) – 78.06, 95 %CI – 90.63, – 65.48 and SMD – 3.72, 95 %CI – 4.49, – 2.95, respectively), just as with the reduction in the fasting period (SMD – 4.30, 95 %CI – 5.18, – 3.42) and risk of complications (SMD – 0.09, 95 %CI 0.03, 0.43) for patients who had undergone the endoscopic approach in comparison with the surgical group. Also, a statistically significant reduction in the risk of symptom recurrence was seen when the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum was carried out by a surgical approach compared with endoscopic treatment (SMD 0.08, 95 %CI 0.03, 0.13). Conclusion: Compared with a surgical approach, endoscopic treatment appeared to result in a shorter length of procedure and

  7. Endoscopic Assisted Supraorbital Keyhole Approach or Endoscopic Endonasal Approach in Cases of Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma: Which Surgical Route Should Be Favored?

    PubMed

    Linsler, Stefan; Fischer, Gerrit; Skliarenko, Volodymyr; Stadie, Axel; Oertel, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Keyhole approaches are under investigation for skull base tumor surgery. They are expected to have a low complication rate with the same successful resection rate compared with endoscopic endonasal procedures. In this study, we compare our current series of tuberculum sellae meningiomas resected via an endoscopic endonasal or microsurgical supraorbital keyhole approach. Between 2011 and 2016, 16 patients were treated using the supraorbital keyhole procedure and 6 patients received an endoscopic endonasal procedure. Both surgical techniques were analyzed and compared concerning complications, surgical radicality, endocrinologic, and ophthalmologic outcome and recurrences in patients' follow-up. The 2 different approaches yielded similar rates of gross total resection (endonasal 83% [5 of 6] vs. supraorbital 87% [14 of 16]), near total resection (17% [1 of 6] vs. 13% [2 of 16]), and visual recovery (endonasal 66% [2 of 3] vs. supraorbital 60% [3 of 5]). An extension lateral to the internal carotid artery was noted in 81% (13 of 16) of the supraorbital cases and in none of the endonasal cases. Tumor volume was 14.9 cm(3) (±8.2 cm(3)) for supraorbital tumors versus 2.1 cm(3) (±0.8 cm(3)) for the endonasal approach. Both approaches provide minimally invasive surgical routes accessing meningiomas of the sellar region. The ideal approach should be tailored to the individual patient considering the tumor anatomy, lateral extension, and the experience of the surgeon with both surgical approaches. We suggest using the supraorbital approach for larger meningiomas of sellar region with far lateral extension or broad vascular encasement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical Outcomes of Canalicular Trephination Combined with Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy in Patients with Distal or Common Canalicular Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yoon Jin; Choi, Hye Sun; Jang, Jae Woo; Kim, Sung Joo; Jang, Sun Young

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the surgical outcomes of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction. It also identified the factors affecting surgical success rates associated with this technique. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 57 patients (59 eyes) in whom a canalicular obstruction was encountered during endoscopic DCR. All patients were treated with endoscopic DCR, followed by canalicular trephination and silicone tube placement. The surgical outcome was categorized as a functional success according to the patient's subjective assessment of symptoms, including epiphora, and as an anatomical success according to a postoperative nasolacrimal duct irrigation test. Surgical success rates were compared based on age, sex, location of the obstruction, number of silicone tubes, and experience of the surgeon. Functional success was achieved in 55 of 59 eyes (93%) at one month, 50 eyes (84%) at three months, and 46 eyes (78%) at six months. Anatomical success was achieved in 58 of 59 eyes (98%) at one month, 52 eyes (88%) at three months, and 50 eyes (84%) at six months. There was a statistically significant difference in surgical outcome according to the experience of the surgeon. The anatomical success rate at the six-month follow-up exam was 95.4% in the >5 years of experience group, and 53.3% in the <5 years of experience group (p = 0.008, Pearson chi-square test). The success rate of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic DCR in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction decreased gradually during the six-month follow-up period. In particular, patients undergoing procedures with experienced surgeons tended to show excellent surgical outcomes at the six-month follow-up exam.

  9. Surgical Outcomes of Canalicular Trephination Combined with Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy in Patients with Distal or Common Canalicular Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yoon Jin; Choi, Hye Sun; Jang, Jae Woo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the surgical outcomes of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction. It also identified the factors affecting surgical success rates associated with this technique. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 57 patients (59 eyes) in whom a canalicular obstruction was encountered during endoscopic DCR. All patients were treated with endoscopic DCR, followed by canalicular trephination and silicone tube placement. The surgical outcome was categorized as a functional success according to the patient's subjective assessment of symptoms, including epiphora, and as an anatomical success according to a postoperative nasolacrimal duct irrigation test. Surgical success rates were compared based on age, sex, location of the obstruction, number of silicone tubes, and experience of the surgeon. Results Functional success was achieved in 55 of 59 eyes (93%) at one month, 50 eyes (84%) at three months, and 46 eyes (78%) at six months. Anatomical success was achieved in 58 of 59 eyes (98%) at one month, 52 eyes (88%) at three months, and 50 eyes (84%) at six months. There was a statistically significant difference in surgical outcome according to the experience of the surgeon. The anatomical success rate at the six-month follow-up exam was 95.4% in the >5 years of experience group, and 53.3% in the <5 years of experience group (p = 0.008, Pearson chi-square test). Conclusions The success rate of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic DCR in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction decreased gradually during the six-month follow-up period. In particular, patients undergoing procedures with experienced surgeons tended to show excellent surgical outcomes at the six-month follow-up exam. PMID:26635452

  10. Numerical fidelity of endoscopic biopsy fragments in the processing sequence of a university surgical pathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Owens, Scott R; Wiehagen, Luke; Simmons, Christopher; Sikorova, Alena; Stewart, William; Kelly, Susan; Nestler, Richard; Yousem, Samuel A

    2011-12-01

    Diagnostic specimens in surgical pathology are, in general, becoming smaller and smaller, as minimally invasive surgical procedures are used to obtain representative tissue. Conservation and effective utilization of small biopsy tissue is therefore crucial in the pathology laboratory. To identify potential areas where biopsy tissue may be lost in the course of processing in our university-based laboratory. We followed 2934 endoscopic biopsy samples as they moved through our grossing area and histology laboratory by documenting the number of fragments inked and placed within tissue paper at the time of gross assessment, the number of fragments found in each cassette after processing and subsequently embedded in paraffin, and the number of pieces of tissue present on glass slides after staining. In 805 (27.4%) cases, the number of fragments of tissue noted on glass slides containing 2 levels of the paraffin block differed from the number submitted in the tissue cassette. Of these, most (137, 17%) differed between the number of fragments embedded in paraffin and those identified on glass slides. Loss of tissue fragments occurred in only 7.2% of cases, while 26.3% had gains in tissue fragments. Recognition of type(s) and source(s) of variation in biopsy fragment numbers is important in quality control and in the overall practical management of a histology laboratory.

  11. Effect of premedication with systemic steroids on surgical field bleeding and visibility during nasosinusal endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fraire, María E; Sanchez-Vallecillo, María V; Zernotti, Mario E; Paoletti, Oscar A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is the inflammation of the nasal and paranasal sinus mucosa persisting for at least 12 weeks. The success of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) depends on minimising oedema and intraoperative bleeding. For this purpose, some surgeons advocate the use of preoperative systemic steroids (SS). Our aim was to assess if the administration of preoperative SS in patients with CRS with or without nasal polyps (NP) facilitates the surgical procedure. Non-randomized clinical trial in CRS patients with or without NP. Patients in the ESS group received oral meprednisone preoperatively, whereas the control group did not. The visibility of the surgical field, intraoperative bleeding and surgery duration were recorded. Each group (SS group and control group) included 27 patients. The administration of SS reduced the values of all the parameters in patients without NP, with no significant differences. In patients with NP, only operative bleeding was reduced significantly. Even though all the parameters decreased with the preoperative administration of SS, only operative bleeding was significantly reduced in patients with CRS with NP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25806847

  13. Mastering Surgical Skills Through Simulation-Based Learning: Practice Makes One Perfect

    PubMed Central

    Khunger, Niti; Kathuria, Sushruta

    2016-01-01

    Simulation-based learning in surgery is a learning model where an environment similar to real life surgical situation is created for the trainee to learn various surgical skills. It can be used to train a new operator as well to assess his skills. This methodology helps in repetitive practice of surgical skills on nonliving things so that the operator can be near-perfect when operating on a live patient. Various models are available for learning different dermatosurgery skills. PMID:27081246

  14. Rotational assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with reconstructive gastrointestinal surgical anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Zouhairi, Majed El; Watson, James B; Desai, Svetang V; Swartz, David K; Castillo-Roth, Alejandra; Haque, Mahfuzul; Jowell, Paul S; Branch, Malcolm S; Burbridge, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the success rates of performing therapy utilizing a rotational assisted enteroscopy device in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in surgically altered anatomy patients. METHODS: Between June 1, 2009 and November 8, 2012, we performed 42 ERCPs with the use of rotational enteroscopy for patients with altered anatomy (39 with gastric bypass Roux-en-Y, 2 with Billroth II gastrectomy, and 1 with hepaticojejunostomy associated with liver transplant). The indications for ERCP were: choledocholithiasis: 13 of 42 (30.9%), biliary obstruction suggested on imaging: 20 of 42 (47.6%), suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: 4 of 42 (9.5%), abnormal liver enzymes: 1 of 42 (2.4%), ascending cholangitis: 2 of 42 (4.8%), and bile leak: 2 of 42 (4.8%). All procedures were completed with the Olympus SIF-Q180 enteroscope and the Endo-Ease Discovery SB overtube produced by Spirus Medical. RESULTS: Successful visualization of the major ampulla was accomplished in 32 of 42 procedures (76.2%). Cannulation of the bile duct was successful in 26 of 32 procedures reaching the major ampulla (81.3%). Successful therapeutic intervention was completed in 24 of 26 procedures in which the bile duct was cannulated (92.3%). The overall intention to treat success rate was 64.3%. In terms of cannulation success, the intention to treat success rate was 61.5%. Ten out of forty two patients (23.8%) required admission to the hospital after procedure for abdominal pain and nausea, and 3 of those 10 patients (7.1%) had a diagnosis of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The average hospital stay was 3 d. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to consider an attempt at rotational assisted ERCP prior to a surgical intervention to alleviate biliary complications in patients with altered surgical anatomy. PMID:25789100

  15. Performance of endoscopic ultrasound in staging rectal adenocarcinoma appropriate for primary surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitin K; Sauer, Bryan G; Wang, Andrew Y; White, Grace E; Zabolotsky, Andrew; Koons, Ann; Leung, Wesley; Sarkaria, Savreet; Kahaleh, Michel; Waxman, Irving; Siddiqui, Ali A; Shami, Vanessa M

    2015-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) often is used to stage rectal cancer and thereby guide treatment. Prior assessments of its accuracy have been limited by small sets of data collected from tumors of varying stages. We aimed to characterize the diagnostic performance of EUS analysis of rectal cancer, paying particular attention to determining whether patients should undergo primary surgical resection. We performed a retrospective observational study using procedural databases and electronic medical records from 4 academic tertiary-care hospitals, collecting data on EUS analyses from 2000 through 2012. Data were analyzed from 86 patients with rectal cancer initially staged as T2N0 by EUS. The negative predictive value (NPV) was calculated by comparing initial stages determined by EUS with those determined by pathology analysis of surgical samples. Logistic regression models were used to assess variation in diagnostic performance with case attributes. EUS excluded advanced tumor depth with an NPV of 0.837 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.742-0.908), nodal metastasis with an NPV of 0.872 (95% CI, 0.783-0.934), and both together with an NPV of 0.767 (95% CI, 0.664-0.852) compared with pathology analysis. Incorrect staging by EUS affected treatment decision making for 20 of 86 patients (23.3%). Patient age at time of the procedure correlated with the NPV for metastasis to lymph node, but no other patient features were associated significantly with diagnostic performance. Based on a multicenter retrospective study, EUS staging of rectal cancer as T2N0 excludes advanced tumor depth and nodal metastasis, respectively, with an approximate NPV of 85%, similar to that of other modalities. EUS has an error rate of approximately 23% in identifying disease appropriate for surgical resection, which is lower than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Helminths Causing Surgical or Endoscopic Abdominal Intervention: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    UYSAL, Erdal; DOKUR, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Helminths sometimes require surgical or endoscopic intervention. Helminths may cause acute abdomen, mechanical intestinal obstruction, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforation, hepatitis, pancreatitis, and appendicitis. This study aimed to determine the surgical diseases that helminths cause and to gather, analyze the case reports, case series and original articles about this topic in literature. Methods: This study was designed as a retrospective observational study. In order to determine the studies published in literature, the search limits in Pub-Med database were set to 1 Jan 1957 and 31 Mar 2016 (59 yr), and the articles regarding Helminth-Surgery-Endoscopy were taken into examination. Among 521 articles scanned, 337 specific ones were involved in this study. Results: The most common surgical pathology was found to be in Ascaris lumbricoides group. Enterobius vermicularis was found to be the parasite that caused highest amount of acute appendicitis. Anisakiasis was observed to seem mainly because of abdominal pain and mechanical intestinal obstruction. Strongyloides stercoraries causes duodenal pathologies such as duodenal obstruction and duodenitis. Taenia saginata comes into prominence with appendicitis and gastrointestinal perforations. Fasciola hepatica exhibits biliary tract involvement and causes common bile duct obstruction. Hookworms were observed to arise along with gastrointestinal hemorrhage and anemia. Trichuris trichiuria draws attention with gastrointestinal hemorrhage, mechanical intestinal obstruction. Conclusion: Helminths may lead to life-threatening clinic conditions such as acute abdomen, gastrointestinal perforation, intestinal obstruction, and hemorrhages. There is a relationship between surgery and helminths. It is very important for surgeons to consider and remember helminths in differential diagnoses during their daily routines. PMID:28761475

  17. Endoscopic and surgical treatment of malignant colorectal polyps: a population-based comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mounzer, Rawad; Das, Ananya; Yen, Roy D; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Hosford, Lindsay; Wani, Sachin

    2015-03-01

    Long-term population-based data comparing endoscopic therapy (ET) and surgery for management of malignant colorectal polyps (MCPs) are limited. To compare colorectal cancer (CRC)-specific survival with ET and surgery. Population-based study. Patients with stage 0 and stage 1 MCPs were identified from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database (1998-2009). Demographic characteristics, tumor size, location, treatment modality, and survival were compared. Propensity-score matching and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association between treatment and CRC-specific survival. ET and surgery. Mid-term (2.5 years) and long-term (5 years) CRC-free survival rates and independent predictors of CRC-specific mortality. Of 10,403 patients with MCPs, 2688 (26%) underwent ET and 7715 (74%) underwent surgery. Patients undergoing ET were more likely to be older white men with stage 0 disease. Surgical patients had more right-sided lesions, larger MCPs, and stage 1 disease. There was no difference in the 2.5-year and 5-year CRC-free survival rates between the 2 groups in stage 0 disease. Surgical resection led to higher 2.5-year (97.8% vs 93.2%; P < .001) and 5-year (96.6% vs 89.8%; P < .001) CRC-free survival in stage 1 disease. These results were confirmed by propensity-score matching. ET was a significant predictor for CRC-specific mortality in stage 1 disease (hazard ratio 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.75-3.29; P < .001). Comorbidity index not available, selection bias. ET and surgery had comparable mid- and long-term CRC-free survival rates in stage 0 disease. Surgical resection is the recommended treatment modality for MCPs with submucosal invasion. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative evaluation of structural and functional changes in pancreas after endoscopic and surgical management of pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Rao, Chalapathi; Sharma, Ravi; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis may develop pancreatic insufficiency and this is commonly seen in patients who have undergone surgery for pancreatic necrosis. Owing to the paucity of relative data, we retrospectively evaluated the structural and functional changes in the pancreas after endoscopic and surgical management of pancreatic necrosis. The records of patients who underwent endoscopic transmural drainage of walled off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) over the last 3 years and who completed at least 6 months of follow up were analyzed. Structural and functional changes in these patients were compared with 25 historical surgical controls (operated in 2005-2006). Twenty six patients (21 M; mean age 35.4±8.1 years) who underwent endoscopic drainage for WOPN were followed up for 22.3±8.6 months. During the follow up, five (19.2%) patients developed diabetes with 3 patients requiring insulin and 1 patient with steatorrhea requiring pancreatic enzyme supplementation. The pancreatic fluid collection (PFC) recurred in 1 patient whose stents spontaneously migrated out. On follow up, in the surgery group, 2 (8%) patients developed steatorrhea and 11 (44%) developed diabetes. Five (20%) of these patients had recurrence of PFC. On comparison of follow up results of endoscopic drainage with surgery, recurrence rates as well as frequency of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency was lower in the endoscopic group but difference was not significant. Structural and functional impairment of pancreas is seen less frequently in patients with pancreatic necrosis treated endoscopically compared to patients undergoing surgery, although the difference was insignificant. Further studies with large sample size are needed to confirm these initial results.

  19. Learning the surgical craft: a review of skills training options.

    PubMed

    Cosman, Peter; Hemli, Jonathan M; Ellis, Andrew M; Hugh, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Surgical practice is undergoing fundamental changes, and this is having a significant effect on the training of surgeons. Learning the craft of surgery is threatened by reduced elective operative exposure and general service cuts within public teaching hospitals, safer working hour legislation and pressures to accelerate the training of young surgeons. Rapid technological changes mean that 'old dogs' have to teach 'young dogs' many new tricks in a relatively adverse environment. This review outlines the great variety of resources available for skills-based training outside the operating room. These resources are ready to be used as a necessary adjunct to the training of competent surgeons in Australasia.

  20. What surgical skills rural surgeons need to master.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Amy L; Hughes, Tyler G; Borgstrom, David C; Sachdeva, Ajit K; DaRosa, Debra A; Hoyt, David B

    2013-11-01

    As new technology is developed and scientific evidence demonstrates strategies to improve the quality of care, it is essential that surgeons keep current with their skills. Rural surgeons need efficient and targeted continuing medical education that matches their broader scope of practice. Developing such a program begins with an assessment of the learning needs of the rural surgeon. The aim of this study was to assess the learning needs considered most important to surgeons practicing in rural areas. A needs assessment questionnaire was administered to surgeons practicing in rural areas. An additional gap analysis questionnaire was administered to registrants of a skills course for rural surgeons. Seventy-one needs assessment questionnaires were completed. The self-reported procedures most commonly performed included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 44), hernia repair (n = 42), endoscopy (n = 43), breast surgery (n = 23), appendectomy (n = 20), and colon resection (n = 18). Respondents indicated that they would most like to learn more skills related to laparoscopic colon resection (n = 16), laparoscopic antireflux procedures (n = 6), laparoscopic common bile duct exploration/ERCP (n = 5), colonoscopy/advanced techniques and esophagogastroscopy (n = 4), and breast surgery (n = 4). Ultrasound, hand surgery, and leadership and communication were additional topics rated as useful by the respondents. Skills course participants indicated varying levels of experience and confidence with breast ultrasound, ultrasound for central line insertion, hand injury, and facial soft tissue injury. Our results demonstrated that surgeons practicing in rural areas have a strong interest in acquiring additional skills in a variety of general and subspecialty surgical procedures. The information obtained in this study may be used to guide curriculum development of further postgraduate skills courses targeted to rural surgeons. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published

  1. A new innovative laparoscopic fundoplication training simulator with a surgical skill validation system.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Takahiro; Ieiri, Satoshi; Obata, Satoshi; Uemura, Munenori; Souzaki, Ryota; Matsuoka, Noriyuki; Katayama, Tamotsu; Masumoto, Kouji; Hashizume, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2017-04-01

    We developed and validated a specific laparoscopic fundoplication simulator for use with the objective endoscopic surgical skills evaluation system. The aim of this study was to verify the quality of skills of surgeons. We developed a 1-year-old infant body model based on computed tomography data and reproduced pneumoperitoneum model based on the clinical situation. The examinees were divided into three groups: fifteen pediatric surgery experts (PSE), twenty-four pediatric surgery trainees (PSN), and ten general surgeons (GS). They each had to perform three sutures ligatures for construction of Nissen wrap. Evaluate points are time for task, the symmetry of the placement of the sutures, and the uniformity of the interval of suture ligatures in making wrap. And the total path length and velocity of forceps were measured to assess bi-hand coordination. PSE were significantly superior to PSN regarding total time spent (p < 0.01) and total path length (p < 0.01). GS used both forceps faster than the other groups, and PSN used the right forceps faster than the left forceps (p < 0.05). PSE were shorter with regard to the total path length than GS (p < 0.01). PSE showed most excellent results in the symmetry of the wrap among three groups. Our new model was used useful to validate the characteristics between GS and pediatric surgeon. Both PSE and GS have excellent bi-hand coordination and can manipulate both forceps equally and had superior skills compared to PSN. In addition, PSE performed most compact and accurate skills in the conflicted operative space.

  2. Resubmission of Gap Analysis Workshop for Training for Reintegration of Surgical Skills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    provide an open forum for surgeons and health professionals interested in laparoscopic, endoscopic and minimally invasive surgery . SLS endeavors to...after extended periods of time without use of that skill. This scenario is encountered frequently in surgery when surgeons may have to perform a... Surgery (FLS) sponsored by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES).8 SCORE

  3. Idle time: an underdeveloped performance metric for assessing surgical skill.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Rutherford, Drew N; Ray, Rebecca D; Laufer, Shlomi; Kwan, Calvin; Cohen, Elaine R; Mason, Andrea; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate validity evidence using idle time as a performance measure in open surgical skills assessment. This pilot study tested psychomotor planning skills of surgical attendings (n = 6), residents (n = 4) and medical students (n = 5) during suturing tasks of varying difficulty. Performance data were collected with a motion tracking system. Participants' hand movements were analyzed for idle time, total operative time, and path length. We hypothesized that there will be shorter idle times for more experienced individuals and on the easier tasks. A total of 365 idle periods were identified across all participants. Attendings had fewer idle periods during 3 specific procedure steps (P < .001). All participants had longer idle time on friable tissue (P < .005). Using an experimental model, idle time was found to correlate with experience and motor planning when operating on increasingly difficult tissue types. Further work exploring idle time as a valid psychomotor measure is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  5. Current and future use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Karam, Matthew D; Pedowitz, Robert A; Natividad, Hazel; Murray, Jayson; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2013-01-02

    Acquisition of surgical skills through laboratory-based training and simulation is appealing to surgical training programs. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline information on the current use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education and to determine the interest in expansion of these facilities and training techniques. The creation of the survey was a collaborative effort between the authors and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Two online versions of the Surgical Skills Simulation survey were created, one (with twenty-three items) specifically for program directors and one (with fourteen items) for orthopaedic residents. The survey was sent via e-mail to 185 program directors and 4549 residents. Data were retrieved and analyzed by the AAOS Department of Research and Scientific Affairs. Eighty-six (46%) of the 185 surveys distributed to orthopaedic surgery residency directors and 687 (15%) of the 4549 distributed to orthopaedic surgery residents were completed. Seventy-six percent of the program directors reported having a surgical skills laboratory, and 46% of these reported having a structured surgical skills laboratory curriculum. Fifty-eight percent of program directors and 83% of residents believed that surgical skill improvement by orthopaedic residents was not being objectively measured. Both 80% of program directors and 86% of residents agreed that surgical skills simulations should become a required part of training, and 82% and 76% were interested in a standardized surgical skills curriculum. Eighty-seven percent of program directors identified a lack of available funding as the most substantial barrier to development of a formal surgical skills program at their institution. There was strong agreement among both program directors and residents that surgical skills laboratories and simulation technology should be a required component of orthopaedic resident training. At the present time, the

  6. A Comprehensive, High-Quality Orthopedic Intern Surgical Skills Program.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel E; Patt, Joshua C; Scannell, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    To design and implement a month-long, low-cost, comprehensive surgical skills curriculum built to address the needs of orthopedic surgery interns with high satisfaction among both interns and faculty. The study design was retrospective and descriptive. The study was conducted at tertiary care referral center with a medium sized orthopedic residency surgery program (5 residents/year). Totally 5 orthopedic surgery residents and 16 orthopedic surgery faculty participated. A general mission was established-to orient the resident to the postgraduate year 1 and prepare them for success in residency. The basic tenets of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons surgical skills program framework were built. Curricular additions included anatomic study, surgical approaches, joint-specific physical examination, radiographic interpretation, preoperative planning, reduction techniques, basic emergency and operating room procedures, cadaveric procedure practice, and introduction to arthroplasty. The program was held in August during protected time for intern participants. In total, 16 orthopedic surgeons instructed 85% of the educational sessions. One faculty member did most of the preparation and organization to facilitate the program. The program ran for a cumulative 89 hours, including 14.5 hours working with cadaveric specimens. The program cost a total of $8100. The average module received a 4.15 rating on a 5-point scale, with 4 representing "good" and 5 representing "excellent." The program was appropriately timed and addressed topics relevant to the intern without sacrificing clinical experience or burdening inpatient services with interns' absence. The program received high satisfaction ratings from both the interns as well as the faculty. Additionally, the program fostered early relationships between interns and faculty-an unforeseen benefit. In the future, our program plans to better integrate validated learning metrics and improve instruction pertaining to both

  7. Tether-free endoscopic biopsy with self-assembled micro-surgical tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, Evin; Shin, Eun Ji; Selaru, Florin; Kalloo, Anthony; Gracias, David

    2013-03-01

    Feynman's futuristic vision of ``swallowing the surgeon'' or a truly non-invasive surgery relies on the invention and utilization of tetherless, stimuli-responsive and miniaturized surgical tools. We propose a step in this direction by the use of sub-millimeter scale, untethered, self-assembled endoscopic tools by designing and deploying microgrippers (μ-grippers) for effective mucosal sampling from large surface-area organs and for tissue retrieval from hard to reach places in the body. Due to their small size, tether-free actuation, parallel fabrication and deployment, μ-grippers can be dispersed in large numbers (hundreds or thousands) to collect tissue samples and allow statistical sampling of large mucosal areas. Monte Carlo simulations showed that using large number of biopsy tools increases the sampling coverage for screening procedures and hence the chance of detecting the malignant lesions. To establish the feasibility of using μ-grippers for sampling large organs we used with ex-vivo colon and in-vivo esophagus models. Our results showed that it is possible to retrieve high quality tissue samples which are suitable for either conventional cytologic or genetic analyses by using μ-grippers. This work was funded in part by the NSF grant NSF CBET-1066898 and the NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program through grant DP2-OD004346-01; in part by FAMRI grant 072119 YCSA and by a K08 Award (DK09015) from the NIH.

  8. The endoscopic endonasal approach to the Meckel's cave tumors: surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Simon, Emile; Jacquesson, Timothée; Sindou, Marc; Tringali, Stéphane; Messerer, Mahmoud; Berhouma, Moncef

    2014-12-01

    Many benign and malignant tumors as well as other inflammatory or vascular diseases may be located in the areas of Meckel's cave or the cavernous sinus. Except for typical features such as for meningiomas, imaging may not by itself be sufficient to choose the best therapeutic option. Thus, even though modern therapy (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or radiosurgery) dramatically reduces the field of surgery in this challenging location, there is still some place for surgical biopsy or tumor removal in selected cases. Until recently, the microscopic subtemporal extradural approach with or without orbitozygomatic removal was classically used to approach Meckel's cave but with a non-negligible morbidity. Percutaneous biopsy using the Hartel technique has been developed for biopsy of such tumors but may fail in the case of firm tumors, and additionally it is not appropriate for anterior parasellar tumors. With the development of endoscopy, the endonasal route now represents an interesting alternative approach to Meckel's cave as well as the cavernous sinus. Through our experience, we describe the modus operandi and discuss what should be the appropriate indication of the use of the endonasal endoscopic approach for Meckel's cave disease in the armamentarium of the skull base surgeon.

  9. [Endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy. A non-surgical method of enteral alimentation in ORL patients unable to feed orally].

    PubMed

    Girodet, J; Vedrenne, J B; Salmon, R J; Rodriguez, J; Esteve, M; Guillaume, A; Brugere, J

    1988-01-01

    Since surgical gastrostomy is not a risk-free operation in debilitated patients, a method of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy (EPG) is proposed. A thread is passed percutaneously into the gastric cavity and brought to the exterior through the mouth during fibroscopy. This thread allows removal of a gastrostomy tube by simple traction. Used in 18 patients with ENT cancer the EPG was simple to perform, postoperative complications being minor in 3 cases and serious in one patient. In the absence of any obstacle in the pharyngeal channel preventing the passage of a fibroscope, EPG is a simple procedure and is therefore an alternative to surgical gastrostomy.

  10. EVA: laparoscopic instrument tracking based on Endoscopic Video Analysis for psychomotor skills assessment.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, Ignacio; Sánchez-González, Patricia; Chmarra, Magdalena K; Lamata, Pablo; Fernández, Alvaro; Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Jansen, Frank Willem; Dankelman, Jenny; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2013-03-01

    The EVA (Endoscopic Video Analysis) tracking system is a new system for extracting motions of laparoscopic instruments based on nonobtrusive video tracking. The feasibility of using EVA in laparoscopic settings has been tested in a box trainer setup. EVA makes use of an algorithm that employs information of the laparoscopic instrument's shaft edges in the image, the instrument's insertion point, and the camera's optical center to track the three-dimensional position of the instrument tip. A validation study of EVA comprised a comparison of the measurements achieved with EVA and the TrEndo tracking system. To this end, 42 participants (16 novices, 22 residents, and 4 experts) were asked to perform a peg transfer task in a box trainer. Ten motion-based metrics were used to assess their performance. Construct validation of the EVA has been obtained for seven motion-based metrics. Concurrent validation revealed that there is a strong correlation between the results obtained by EVA and the TrEndo for metrics, such as path length (ρ = 0.97), average speed (ρ = 0.94), or economy of volume (ρ = 0.85), proving the viability of EVA. EVA has been successfully validated in a box trainer setup, showing the potential of endoscopic video analysis to assess laparoscopic psychomotor skills. The results encourage further implementation of video tracking in training setups and image-guided surgery.

  11. Para-axillary subcutaneous endoscopic approach in torticollis: tips and tricks in the surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Baran; Karacay, Safak; Arda, Surhan; Alici, Umut

    2015-04-01

    An obvious scar on the neck may appear following the open surgery for congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). The cosmetic result may displease the patient and the family. In this study, we describe a minimally invasive technique, para-axillary subcutaneous endoscopic approach (PASEA) in CMT. A total of 11 children (seven girls and four boys with the age range between 1 and 15 years) were operated for torticollis by PASEA. All patients had facial asymmetry and head and neck postural abnormality. Following an incision at the ipsilateral para-axillary region, a subcutaneous cavernous working space is formed toward sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. The muscle and fascia are cut by cautery under endoscopic vision. The patients had postoperative 2nd-week and 3rd-month visits. The incision scar, inspection, and palpation findings of the region, head posture, and shoulder position of the affected side were considered in evaluation of the cosmetic outcome. Preoperative and postoperative range of motion of the head and neck were compared for functional outcome. We preferred single incision surgery in our last two patients; the rest had double para-axillary incision for port insertion. Incomplete transection of the muscle was not observed. There was no serious complication. Postoperatively, head posture and shoulder elevation were corrected significantly. Range of motion of the head was improved. Postoperatively, all the patients had rotation capacity with more than 30 degrees. The range of postoperative flexion and extension movements was between 45 and 60 degrees. The open surgery techniques of CMT causes visible lifelong incision scar on the neck. PASEA leaves a cosmetically hidden scar in the axillary region. A single incision surgery is also possible. A well-formed cavernous working space is needed. External manual palpation, delicate dissection, and cutting of SCM muscle with cautery are the important components of the procedure. Surgeons having experience in pediatric

  12. Surgical Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy for Defects of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Florian; Schiffmann, Leif; Janisch, Florian; Schwandner, Frank; Alsfasser, Guido; Gock, Michael; Klar, Ernst

    2016-02-01

    Intraluminal therapy used in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was first shown for anastomotic leaks after rectal resection. Since a few years vacuum sponge therapy is increasingly being recognized as a new promising method for repairing upper GI defects of different etiology. The principles of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy remain the same no matter of localization: Continuous or intermittent suction and drainage decrease bacterial contamination, secretion, and local edema. At the same time, perfusion and granulation is promoted. However, data for endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) of the upper intestinal tract are still scarce and consist of only a few case reports and small series with low number of patients. Here, we present a single center experience of EVT for substantial wall defects in the upper GI tract. Retrospective single-center analysis of EVT for various defects of the upper GI tract over a time period of 4 years (2011-2015) with a mean follow-up of 17 (2-45) months was used. If necessary, initial endoscopic sponge placement was performed in combination with open surgical revision. In total, 126 polyurethane sponges were placed in upper gastrointestinal defects of 21 patients with a median age of 72 years (range, 49-80). Most frequent indication for EVT was anastomotic leakage after esophageal or gastric resection (n = 11) and iatrogenic esophageal perforation (n = 8). The median number of sponge insertions was five (range, 1-14) with a mean changing interval of 3 days (range, 2-4). Median time of therapy was 15 days (range, 3-46). EVT in combination with surgery took place in nine of 21 patients (43 %). A successful vacuum therapy for upper intestinal defects with local control of the septic focus was achieved in 19 of 21 patients (90.5 %). EVT is a promising approach for postoperative, iatrogenic, or spontaneous lesions of the upper GI tract. In this series, EVT was combined with operative revision in a relevant proportion of

  13. Palliation With Endoscopic Metal Stents May Be Preferable to Surgical Intervention for Patients With Obstructive Pancreatic Head Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kofokotsios, Alexandros; Papazisis, Konstantinos; Andronikidis, Ioannis; Ntinas, Achilleas; Kardassis, Dimitrios; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopically placed metal stents in comparison with operative procedures, in patients with obstructive pancreatic head cancer. Endoscopic stenting techniques and materials for gastrointestinal malignancies are constantly improving. Despite this evolution, many still consider operative procedures to be the gold standard for palliation in patients with unresectable obstructive pancreatic head cancer. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients who were diagnosed with obstructive (biliary, duodenal, or both) adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head. Twenty-nine patients (endoscopy group) underwent endoscopic stenting. Eleven patients (bypass group) underwent biliodigestive bypass. Twelve patients (Whipple group) underwent Whipple operation with curative intent; however, histopathology revealed R1 resection (palliative Whipple). T4 disease was identified in 13 (44.8%), 7 (63.6%), and 3 (25%) patients in the endoscopy, bypass, and Whipple groups, respectively. Metastatic disease was present only in the endoscopy group (n = 12; 41.3%). There was no intervention-related mortality. Median survival was 280 days [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 103, 456 days], 157 days (95% CI, 0, 411 days), and 647 days (95% CI, 300, 993 days) for the endoscopy, bypass, and Whipple groups, respectively (P = 0.111). In patients with obstructive pancreatic head cancer, endoscopic stenting may offer equally good palliation compared with surgical double bypass. The numerically (not statistically) better survival after palliative Whipple might be explained by the smaller tumor burden in this subgroup of patients and not by the superior efficacy of this operation. PMID:26414833

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic versus surgical gastrostomy in patients with benign and malignant diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, José Gonçalves Pereira; Ide, Edson; Kondo, Andre; de Moura, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux; de Moura, Eduardo Turiani Hourneaux; Sakai, Paulo; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    To compare the complications and mortality related to gastrostomy procedures performed using surgical and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy techniques, this review covered seven studies. Five of these were retrospective and two were randomized prospective studies. In total, 406 patients were involved, 232 of whom had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and 174 of whom had undergone surgical gastrostomy. The analysis was performed using Review Manager. Risk differences were computed using a fixed-effects model and forest and funnel plots. Data on risk differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained using the Mantel-Haenszel test. There was no difference in major complications in retrospective (95% CI (-0.11 to 0.10)) or randomized (95% CI (-0.07 to 0.05)) studies. Regarding minor complications, no difference was found in retrospective studies (95% CI (-00.17 to 0.09)), whereas a difference was observed in randomized studies (95% CI (-0.25 to -0.02)). Separate analyses of retrospective and randomized studies revealed no differences between the methods in relation to mortality and major complications. Moreover, low levels of minor complications were observed among endoscopic procedures in randomized studies, with no difference observed compared with retrospective studies. PMID:27074179

  15. Direct Observation versus Endoscopic Video Recording-Based Rating with the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills for Training of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Felix; Hendrie, Jonathan D; Stock, Christian; Salama, Mohamed; Preukschas, Anas A; Senft, Jonas D; Kowalewski, Karl F; Wagner, Martin; Kenngott, Hannes G; Linke, Georg R; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat P

    2016-01-01

    The validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) score is used for evaluating laparoscopic surgical performance. It consists of two subscores, a Global Rating Scale (GRS) and a Specific Technical Skills (STS) scale. The OSATS has accepted construct validity for direct observation ratings by experts to discriminate between trainees' levels of experience. Expert time is scarce. Endoscopic video recordings would facilitate assessment with the OSATS. We aimed to compare video OSATS with direct OSATS. We included 79 participants with different levels of experience [58 medical students, 15 junior residents (novices), and 6 experts]. Performance of a cadaveric porcine laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) was evaluated with OSATS by blinded expert raters by direct observation and then as an endoscopic video recording. Operative time was recorded. Direct OSATS rating and video OSATS rating correlated significantly (x03C1; = 0.33, p = 0.005). Significant construct validity was found for direct OSATS in distinguishing between students or novices and experts. Students and novices were not different in direct OSATS or video OSATS. Mean operative times varied for students (73.4 ± 9.0 min), novices (65.2 ± 22.3 min), and experts (46.8 ± 19.9 min). Internal consistency was high between the GRS and STS subscores for both direct and video OSATS with Cronbach's α of 0.76 and 0.86, respectively. Video OSATS and operative time in combination was a better predictor of direct OSATS than each single parameter. Direct OSATS rating was better than endoscopic video rating for differentiating between students or novices and experts for LC and should remain the standard approach for the discrimination of experience levels. However, in the absence of experts for direct rating, video OSATS supplemented with operative time should be used instead of single parameters for predicting direct OSATS scores. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Mental practice enhances surgical technical skills: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonal; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Sirimanna, Pramudith; Moran, Aidan; Grantcharov, Teodor; Kneebone, Roger; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2011-02-01

    To assess the effects of mental practice on surgical performance. Increasing concerns for patient safety have highlighted a need for alternative training strategies outside the operating room. Mental practice (MP), "the cognitive rehearsal of a task before performance," has been successful in sport and music to enhance skill. This study investigates whether MP enhances performance in laparoscopic surgery. After baseline skills testing, 20 novice surgeons underwent training on an evidence-based virtual reality curriculum. After randomization using the closed envelope technique, all participants performed 5 Virtual Reality (VR) laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC). Mental practice participants performed 30 minutes of MP before each LC; control participants viewed an online lecture. Technical performance was assessed using video Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills-based global ratings scale (scored from 7 to 35). Mental imagery was assessed using a previously validated Mental Imagery Questionnaire. Eighteen participants completed the study. There were no intergroup differences in baseline technical ability. Learning curves were demonstrated for both MP and control groups. Mental practice was superior to control (global ratings) for the first LC (median 20 vs 15, P = 0.005), second LC (20.5 vs 13.5, P = 0.001), third LC (24 vs 15.5, P < 0.001), fourth LC (25.5 vs 15.5, P < 0.001) and the fifth LC (27.5 vs 19.5, P = 0.00). The imagery for the MP group was also significantly superior to the control group across all sessions (P < 0.05). Improved imagery significantly correlated with better quality of performance (ρ 0.51–0.62, Ps < 0.05). This is the first randomized controlled study to show that MP enhances the quality of performance based on VR laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This may be a time- and cost-effective strategy to augment traditional training in the OR thus potentially improving patient care.

  17. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy and Surgical Gastrostomy in Severely Handicapped Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June; Lee, Min; Joo, Chan Uhng; Kim, Sun Jun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Gastrostomy is commonly used procedures to provide enteral nutrition support for severely handicapped patients. This study aimed to identify and compare outcomes and complications associated with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and surgical gastrostomy (SG). Methods A retrospective chart review of 51 patients who received gastrostomy in a single tertiary hospital from January 2000 to May 2016 was performed. We analyzed the patients and the complications caused by the procedures. Results Among the 51 patients, 26 had PEG and 25 had SG. Four cases in the SG group had fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PEG and SG groups were followed up for an average of 29 months and 44 months. Major complications occurred in 19.2% of patients in the PEG group and 20.0% in the SG group, but significant differences between the groups were not observed. Minor complications occurred in 15.4% of patients in the PEG group and 52.0% in the SG group. Minor complications were significantly lower in the PEG group than in the SG group (p=0.006). The average use of antibiotics in the PEG and SG groups was 6.2 days and 15.7 days (p=0.002). Thirteen patients died of underlying disease but not related to gastrostomy, and only one patient died due to complications associated with general anesthesia. Conclusion The duration of antibiotics use and incidence of minor complications were significantly lower in the PEG group than those in the SG group. Early PEG could be recommended for nutritional supports. PMID:28401053

  18. Technical innovation, standardization, and skill qualification for pediatric minimally invasive surgery in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    This is a presentation of sharing endeavors at modifying and standardizing surgical procedures as well as establishing endoscopic surgical skill qualification in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan.

  19. Can a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills encourage medical students to consider a surgical career?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Florian; Rommel, Niklas; Koerdt, Steffen; Fichter, Andreas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2016-05-01

    Interest in a surgical career is declining among medical students, and many more need to commit themselves to becoming surgeons to cope with this. We have therefore developed a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills to find out whether a short course such as this can make students more enthusiastic about surgery, and about subsequently pursuing a career in one of its subspecialties. Fifty-four randomly-selected medical students did a one-day practical course in the skills required for maxillofacial surgical specialties. The 4 subdivisions involved - traumatology, resection of a tumour (cancer surgery), plastic surgery (microsurgery), and cleft lip and palate surgery. All students took written tests and completed an evaluation form about their interest in a surgical career before and after training. There was a significant increase in test scores in almost all categories at the end of the course, and significantly more students were prepared to consider a surgical career or a career in maxillofacial surgery after the training. This study shows that a one-day training course in surgical skills can significantly improve medical students' surgical knowledge, and might encourage them to enter a surgical career. We recommend the integration of a short training course such as this into the medical school curriculum. Only time and further evaluation will tell whether this increased exposure to surgical techniques can be transformed into additional surgeons.

  20. The Surgical Skills and Technology Elective Program (SSTEP): A comprehensive simulation-based surgical skills initiative for preclerkship medical students.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Riaz J; Siu, Jennifer M; You, Daniel Z; Spano, Stefania; Winthrop, Andrea L; Rudan, John F; Reznick, Richard K; Sanfilippo, Anthony T; Belliveau, Paul

    2017-09-20

    The Surgical Skills and Technology Elective Program (SSTEP) is a voluntary preclerkship surgical bootcamp that uses simulation learning to build procedural knowledge and technical skills before clerkship. Eighteen second year students (n = 18) participated in simulation workshops over the course of 7 days to learn clerkship-level procedural skills. A manual was supplied with the program outline. Assessment of the participants involved: 1) a written exam 2) a single videotaped Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) station 3) an exit survey to document changes in career choices. Compared to the mean written pre-test score students scored significantly higher on the written post-test (35.83 ± 6.56 vs. 52.11 ± 5.95 out of 73) (p = 0.01). Technical skill on the OSATS station demonstrated improved performance and confidence following the program (10.10 vs. 17.94 out of 25) (p = 0.05). Most participants (72%) re-considered their choices of surgical electives. A preclerkship surgical skills program not only stimulates interest in surgery but can also improve surgical knowledge and technical skills prior to clerkship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer-assessed performance of psychomotor skills in endoscopic otolaryngology surgery: construct validity of the Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Otolaryngology Surgery Trainer (DEPOST).

    PubMed

    Ross, Peter D; Steven, Richard; Zhang, Dong; Li, Heng; Abel, Eric W

    2015-11-01

    This study was undertaken to introduce and establish the value of the Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Otolaryngology Surgery Trainer (DEPOST) as a customisable, objective real-time scoring system for trainee assessment. The construct validity of the system was assessed by comparing the performance of experienced otolaryngologists with that of otolaryngology trainees, junior doctors and medical students. Forty two subjects (13 Consultants, 8 senior trainees, 13 junior trainees and 8 junior doctors/medical students) completed a single test on DEPOST. The test involved using a 30° rigid endoscope and a probe with position sensor, to identify a series of lights in a complex 3-dimensional model. The system scored subjects for time, success rate, and economy of movement (distance travelled). An analysis of variance and correlation analysis were used for the data analysis, with statistical significance set at 0.05. Increasing experience led to significantly improved performance with the DEPOST (p < 0.01). Senior trainees' results were significantly better than those of consultant otolaryngologists in success rate and time (p < 0.05 & p < 0.05). Consultants were the most efficient in their movement (p = 0.051) CONCLUSIONS: The system provides an accurate and customisable assessment of endoscopic skill in otolaryngologists. The DEPOST system has construct validity, with master surgeons and senior trainees completing the tasks more accurately without sacrificing execution time, success rate or efficiency of movement.

  2. [Simulation training in surgical education - application of virtual reality laparoscopic simulators in a surgical skills course].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K S; Gröne, J; Lauscher, J C; Ritz, J-P; Holmer, C; Pohlen, U; Buhr, H-J

    2012-04-01

    Training and simulation are gaining importance in surgical education. Today, virtual reality surgery simulators provide sophisticated laparoscopic training scenarios and offer detailed assessment methods. This also makes simulators interesting for the application in surgical skills courses. The aim of the current study was to assess the suitability of a virtual surgery simulator for training and assessment in an established surgical training course. The study was conducted during the annual "Practical Course for Visceral Surgery" (Warnemuende, Germany). 36 of 108 course participants were assigned at random for the study. Training was conducted in 15 sessions over 5 days with 4 identical virtual surgery simulators (LapSim) and 2 standardised training tasks. The simulator measured 16 individual parameters and calculated 2 scores. Questionnaires were used to assess the test persons' laparoscopic experience, their training situation and the acceptance of the simulator training. Data were analysed with non-parametric tests. A subgroup analysis for laparoscopic experience was conducted in order to assess the simulator's construct validity and assessment capabilities. Median age was 32 (27 - 41) years; median professional experience was 3 (1 - 11) years. Typical laparoscopic learning curves with initial significant improvements and a subsequent plateau phase were measured over 5 days. The individual training sessions exhibited a rhythmic variability in the training results. A shorter night's sleep led to a marked drop in performance. The participants' different experience levels could clearly be discriminated ( ≤ 20 vs. > 20 laparoscopic operations; p ≤ 0.001). The questionnaire showed that the majority of the participants had limited training opportunities in their hospitals. The simulator training was very well accepted. However, the participants severely misjudged the real costs of the simulators that were used. The learning curve on the

  3. Endoscope-Assisted Resection of Elongated Styloid Process Through a Retroauricular Incision: A Novel Surgical Approach to Eagle Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renhui; Liang, Faya; Han, Ping; Cai, Qian; Yu, Shitong; Huang, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Conventional resection of the elongated styloid process is associated with large-scale tissue dissection and poor surgical exposure. The purpose of this study was to show the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a novel surgical approach using an endoscopic technique to treat Eagle syndrome. The authors implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of 133 patients undergoing endoscope-assisted styloidectomy (EAS) from June 2010 to August 2015 at a university teaching hospital. Outcome measurements included the length of the styloid process, blood loss, and duration of surgery. The simple verbal response scale for symptom relief, cosmetic appearance of the incision, and postoperative incision pain was used for the assessment of patients' subjective satisfaction. All patients underwent EAS without conversion to conventional surgery. One hundred seven patients (80.5%) achieved complete relief of symptoms, with 20 (15%) achieving partial relief. The residual length of the styloid process was 10.1 ± 4.4 mm. One hundred seventy-two incision sides (75.8%) had no pain during the postoperative evaluation. One side (0.4%) showed slight transient facial paresis and 4 sides (1.8%) presented transient ear numbness. The vast majority of patients (122 of 133; 91.7%) considered the cosmetic appearance of the incision to be excellent. The results of this study suggest that EAS provides a viable surgical approach for Eagle syndrome in efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Endoscopic trachea stenting for scar strictures as a preparation for the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Starkov, Iu G; Solodinina, E N; Slepenkova, K V; Esakov, Iu S

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the results of the endoscopic tracheal stenting of 33 patients with cicatrical stenosis. The patients aged 19-72 years. All patients had the acquired stenosis after intubation and tracheostomy. In 12 cases the procedure was successful, no complications were observed. In 3 cases the endoscopic stentin was the final stage of the treatment. The temporary stenting was effective in 8 cases. Stent migration was observed in 2 patients. The stent exposition ranged 8-90 days.

  5. Transfrontal Transaqueductal, Transtrigonal, and Suboccipital Infratentorial Supracerebellar Endoscopic Fenestration of Posterior Fossa Arachnoid Cysts: Three Surgical Cases.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Tan, Yew Chin; Kandasamy, Regunath; Ghani, Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic intracranial arachnoid cysts are commonly treated using neuroendoscopy. Cysts located within the posterior fossa may present a greater surgical challenge to the neurosurgeon due to the numerous vital neurovascular structures located within this confined space. Adding neuronavigation during endoscopy helps a neurosurgeon to visualize and utilize both anterior and posterior corridors safely to access and manage these lesions. We present three symptomatic posterior fossa arachnoid cysts that were treated successfully using minimally invasive neuronavigation-guided endoscopic neurosurgery utilizing the anterior transfrontal transaqueductal, anterior transfrontal transtrigonal, and posterior suboccipital infratentorial supracerebellar approaches.

  6. Comparative analysis of the transcranial "far lateral" and endoscopic endonasal "far medial" approaches: surgical anatomy and clinical illustration.

    PubMed

    Benet, Arnau; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Kassam, Amin B

    2014-02-01

    The main aim of our study was to analyze and compare the surgical anatomy pertinent to the dorsal transcranial transcondylar (far lateral approach) with that of the ventral endoscopic endonasal transcondylar (far medial approach) route. Eight cadaveric specimens were dissected and analyzed bilaterally. Brainstem exposure and surgical corridor areas were measured. In addition, we present three clinical scenarios to illustrate the clinical feasibility of the proposed surgical strategies. The hypoglossal nerve, vertebral artery, and hypoglossal canal divide the lower third of the clivus into ventromedial and dorsolateral compartments. The far medial approach provides significantly larger exposure of the brainstem in the ventromedial compartment (464.6 ± 68.34 mm(2)) compared with the far lateral approach (126.35 ± 32.25 mm(2)), P < 0.01. The far lateral approach provides a wide exposure of the brainstem in the dorsolateral compartment (295.24 ± 58.03 mm(2), 74% of the dorsolateral compartment). The exposure of the brainstem in the dorsolateral compartment is not possible using the endonasal route. The surgical corridor from one compartment to the other, through the lower cranial nerves, was significantly larger on the far lateral approach (78.19 ± 14.54 mm(2)) than on the far medial (23.77 ± 15.17 mm(2)), P = 0.03. The far medial approach offers a safe, wide exposure of the lower third of the clivus for lesions that expand ventromedial to the hypoglossal nerve. The far lateral approach is most suitable for lesions located dorsolateral to the lower cranial nerves. The vertebral artery and hypoglossal canal are the most important landmarks to guide surgical planning. A combined endonasal-transcranial approach should be considered for resection of extensive lesions involving both ventromedial and dorsolateral compartments. We strive to encourage skull base surgeons to integrate endoscopic and microscopic approaches to the posterior fossa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  7. Is Three-Dimensional Videography the Cutting Edge of Surgical Skill Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Victoria A.; Brandt, Michael G.; Moore, Corey C.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The process of learning new surgical technical skills is vital to the career of a surgeon. The acquisition of these new skills is influenced greatly by visual-spatial ability (VSA) and may be difficult for some learners to rapidly assimilate. In many cases, the role of VSA on the acquisition of a novel technical skill has been explored; however,…

  8. Is Three-Dimensional Videography the Cutting Edge of Surgical Skill Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Victoria A.; Brandt, Michael G.; Moore, Corey C.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The process of learning new surgical technical skills is vital to the career of a surgeon. The acquisition of these new skills is influenced greatly by visual-spatial ability (VSA) and may be difficult for some learners to rapidly assimilate. In many cases, the role of VSA on the acquisition of a novel technical skill has been explored; however,…

  9. Early promising results for the endoscopic surgical treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Berker, Mustafa; Işikay, Ilkay; Berker, Dilek; Bayraktar, Miyase; Gürlek, Alper

    2013-11-15

    High levels of endogenous cortisol due to Cushing's disease cause significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of Cushing's disease is challenging. For many years, transsphenoidal microsurgical resection of the adenoma has been the treatment of choice. However, recently, neuroendoscope has taken its place in the neurosurgeon's armamentarium, and the endoscopic transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumors has become a familiar approach. Our aim was to present the results of pure endoscopic surgery in the treatment of corticotropinomas for comparison with the results of previous endoscopic and microsurgical series. We present a retrospective analysis of 90 patients with diagnosis of Cushing's disease who were operated between 2006 and 2012. Among 90 patients, a total of 81 (90.0 %) had a remission (28 out of 29 macroadenomas (96.6 %) and 53 out of 61 microadenoma patients (86.9 %)). Of note is that 66 out of 69 (95.7 %) primary patients (i.e., those who were operated in our center) and 15 out of 21 (71.4 %) patients previously operated in other centers reached a hypo/eucortisolemic state. A remission rate comparable with previous endoscopic series was achieved. In nine patients, it was not possible to achieve remission at all. On the other hand, only four of our cases (5.6 %) had a recurrence, and with reoperation, all of these patients entered a re-remission. To our knowledge, our series is the largest series studying endoscopically operated adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting adenomas. Our results suggest that the endoscopic approach has opened a new avenue in the treatment of Cushing's disease, previously a therapeutic challenge for both the clinician and the neurosurgeon. Endoscopic approach in the treatment of Cushing's disease is clearly better for patients because of its low morbidity rates and short duration of hospital stay. On the other hand, long-term follow-up of our patients will show whether these favorable observations will persist.

  10. Development and validation of trauma surgical skills metrics: Preliminary assessment of performance after training.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Stacy; Garofalo, Evan; Shalin, Valerie; Pugh, Kristy; Chen, Hegang; Pasley, Jason; Sarani, Babak; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark; Mackenzie, Colin F

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining trauma-specific surgical skills is an ongoing challenge for surgical training programs. An objective assessment of surgical skills is needed. We hypothesized that a validated surgical performance assessment tool could detect differences following a training intervention. We developed surgical performance assessment metrics based on discussion with expert trauma surgeons, video review of 10 experts and 10 novice surgeons performing three vascular exposure procedures and lower extremity fasciotomy on cadavers, and validated the metrics with interrater reliability testing by five reviewers blinded to level of expertise and a consensus conference. We tested these performance metrics in 12 surgical residents (Year 3-7) before and 2 weeks after vascular exposure skills training in the Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma (ASSET) course. Performance was assessed in three areas as follows: knowledge (anatomic, management), procedure steps, and technical skills. Time to completion of procedures was recorded, and these metrics were combined into a single performance score, the Trauma Readiness Index (TRI). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test compared pretraining/posttraining effects. Mean time to complete procedures decreased by 4.3 minutes (from 13.4 minutes to 9.1 minutes). The performance component most improved by the 1-day skills training was procedure steps, completion of which increased by 21%. Technical skill scores improved by 12%. Overall knowledge improved by 3%, with 18% improvement in anatomic knowledge. TRI increased significantly from 50% to 64% with ASSET training. Interrater reliability of the surgical performance assessment metrics was validated with single intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.7 to 0.98. A trauma-relevant surgical performance assessment detected improvements in specific procedure steps and anatomic knowledge taught during a 1-day course, quantified by the TRI. ASSET training reduced time to complete vascular

  11. Porcine wet lab improves surgical skills in third year medical students.

    PubMed

    Drosdeck, Joseph; Carraro, Ellen; Arnold, Mark; Perry, Kyle; Harzman, Alan; Nagel, Rollin; Sinclair, Lynnsay; Muscarella, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Medical students desire to become proficient in surgical techniques and believe their acquisition is important. However, the operating room is a challenging learning environment. Small group procedural workshops can improve confidence, participation, and performance. The use of fresh animal tissues has been rated highly among students and improves their surgical technique. Greater exposure to surgical procedures and staff could positively influence students' interest in surgical careers. We hypothesized that a porcine "wet lab" course for third year medical students would improve their surgical skills. Two skills labs were conducted for third year medical students during surgery clerkships in the fall of 2011. The students' surgical skills were first evaluated in the operating room across nine dimensions. Next, the students performed the following procedures during the skills lab: (1) laparotomy; (2) small bowel resection; (3) splenectomy; (4) partial hepatectomy; (5) cholecystectomy; (6) interrupted abdominal wall closure; (7) running abdominal wall closure; and (8) skin closure. After the skills lab, the students were re-evaluated in the operating room across the same nine dimensions. Student feedback was also recorded. Fifty-one participants provided pre- and post-lab data for use in the final analysis. The mean scores for all nine surgical skills improved significantly after participation in the skills lab (P ≤ 0.002). Cumulative post-test scores also showed significant improvement (P = 0.002). Finally, the student feedback was largely positive. The surgical skills of third year medical students improved significantly after participation in a porcine wet lab, and the students rated the experience as highly educational. Integration into the surgery clerkship curriculum would promote surgical skill proficiency and could elicit interest in surgical careers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Bypass with Endoscopically Harvested Internal Saphenous Vein versus Bypass with Surgically Harvested Internal Saphenous Vein for Lower Limb Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Peinado Cebrián, Javier; Flores Herrero, Ángel; Salgado Lopetegui, Christian Leonel; Lamarca Mendoza, María Pilar; Montoya Ching, Ricardo; Seco, Santiago Estébanez; Leal Lorenzo, José Ignacio; Gil Sales, José; Pérez-Grueso, Antonio Orgaz

    2015-10-01

    Patients with lower limb arterial disease have a high risk for complications related with surgical wounds. The endoscopic extraction of the great saphenous vein (GSV) is a less invasive alternative to the conventional surgical extraction. A clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up was carried out on the lower limb bypass with GSV performed in our institution between years 2007 and 2012. Patients were selected for open or endoscopic harvesting depending on the surgeon assigned (endoscopic or open surgeon). Follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and annually thereafter. All the GSV endoscopic harvestings (GSVEH) were performed by the same surgeon. Data for primary, assisted, and secondary patency and amputation-free survival were analyzed. Anatomopathalogic analysis were performed on pares of samples of the same vein dissected surgically and endoscopically from the same patient. Sixty bypass surgery has been performed on 60 patients (54 men and 6 women), 30 with GSVEH (50%), and 30 with GSV open harvesting (GSVOH). All patients were intervened for critical limb ischemia (Rutherford cathegory 4, 5, and 6). Significant differences were found between both groups for suture dehiscence (GSVEH 0%, GSVOH 20%, P = 0.01) and infection (GSVEH 3%, GSVOH 30% P, 0.006). No significant differences were found between both groups regarding to primary patency, assisted primary patency, or amputation-free survival. An anatomopathologic comparison of segments of veins extracted surgically and endoscopically of the same patients did not show any significant differences. Although no statistically significant differences were found between GSVOH and GSVEH bypass for lower limb revascularization, there is a trend toward poorer patency rates for the endoscopic technique. GSVEH lowers the risks for infection and dehiscence of surgical wounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors for Surgical Referral in Patients With Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound: Results From a Large Multicenter Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Gaddam, Srinivas; Keach, Joseph W; Mullady, Daniel; Fukami, Norio; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R; Shah, Raj J; Murad, Faris M; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Ghassemi, Kourosh F; Sedarat, Alireza; Watson, Rabindra R; Amateau, Stuart K; Brauer, Brian C; Yen, Roy D; Hosford, Lindsay; Hollander, Thomas; Donahue, Timothy R; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; McCarter, Martin D; Gajdos, Csaba; Attwell, Augustin R; Muthusamy, V Raman; Early, Dayna S; Wani, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an integral role in the evaluation of pancreatic cysts lesions (PCLs). The aim of the study was to determine predictors of surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. We performed a multicenter retrospective study of patients undergoing EUS for evaluation of PCLs. Demographics, EUS characteristics, and fine-needle aspiration results were recorded. Patients were categorized into surgery or surveillance groups on the basis of post-EUS recommendations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of surgical referral. 1804 patients were included. 1301 patients were recommended to undergo surveillance and 503 patients were referred for surgical evaluation, of which 360 patients underwent surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed the following 5 independent predictors of surgical referral: symptoms of weight loss on presentation (odds ratio [OR], 2.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-5.03), EUS findings of associated solid mass (OR, 7.34; 95% CI, 3.81-14.16), main duct communication (OR, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.71-9.98), multilocular macrocystic morphology (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.78-4.38), and fine-needle aspiration findings of mucin on cytology (OR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.94-4.82). This study identifies factors associated with surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. Future studies should focus on creation of risk stratification models to determine the need for surgery or enrollment in surveillance programs.

  14. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  15. [Ideas of standardization evaluation on acupuncture skills: enlightened by quantitative appraisal of surgical skills in Europe and North America].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Mary X

    2011-12-01

    Acupuncture manipulation skills are the core of acupuncture therapy. Traditional acupuncture skills evaluation is based on experts' subjective assessment which is deficient in reliability and validity. Certain progresses on the quantitative research on acupuncture skills have been made in China, while there is still a long way to go before the formation of the consummate standardization evaluation system on acupuncture skills. Actually, quantitative appraisal on surgical skills has been developed for a long time in Europe and North America. Since acupuncture could be considered as a kind of skills of minimally invasive surgery because small wounds would be generated by needles, the theories and methods in surgical quantitative appraisal could be utilized. For instance, scales could be designed to evaluate the operation modes in acupuncture skills and precise instruments could be used in the measurement of acupuncture skills. Then standard databases on common acupuncture manipulations would be built. Moreover, in terms of the characteristics of acupuncture skills, high-fidelity simulators should be designed or standardized patients should be trained for the assessment of "Deqi" (arrival of qi)feelings. Thereby, an appropriate standardization evaluation system for acupuncture skills would be created gradually.

  16. Salient haptic skills trainer: initial validation of a novel simulator for training force-based laparoscopic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Singapogu, Ravikiran B; DuBose, Sarah; Long, Lindsay O; Smith, Dane E; Burg, Timothy C; Pagano, Christopher C; Burg, Karen J L

    2013-05-01

    There is an increasing need for efficient training simulators to teach advanced laparoscopic skills beyond those imparted by a box trainer. In particular, force-based or haptic skills must be addressed in simulators, especially because a large percentage of surgical errors are caused by the over-application of force. In this work, the efficacy of a novel, salient haptic skills simulator is tested as a training tool for force-based laparoscopic skills. Thirty novices with no previous laparoscopic experience trained on the simulator using a pre-test-feedback-post-test experiment model. Ten participants were randomly assigned to each of the three salient haptic skills-grasping, probing, and sweeping-on the simulator. Performance was assessed by comparing force performance metrics before and after training on the simulator. Data analysis indicated that absolute error decreased significantly for all three salient skills after training. Participants also generally decreased applied forces after training, especially at lower force levels. Overall, standard deviations also decreased after training, suggesting that participants improved their variability of applied forces. The novel, salient haptic skills simulator improved the precision and accuracy of participants when applying forces with the simulator. These results suggest that the simulator may be a viable tool for laparoscopic force skill training. However, further work must be undertaken to establish full validity. Nevertheless, this work presents important results toward addressing simulator-based force-skills training specifically and surgical skills training in general.

  17. The Sex Difference in Basic Surgical Skills Learning: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zheng; Yan, Fei-Hu; Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Wei; Shui, Xian-Qi; Liu, Jia; Zhuo, Dong-Lan; Li, Li; Yu, En-da

    2016-01-01

    Very little is known of sex-related differences among medical students in the acquisition of basic surgical skills at an undergraduate level. The aim of this study was to investigate the sex differences in basic surgical skills learning and the possible explanations for sex disparities within basic surgical skills education. A didactic description of 10 surgical skills was performed, including knot tying, basic suture I, basic suture II, sterile technique, preoperative preparation, phlebotomy, debridement, laparotomy, cecectomy, and small bowel resection with hand-sewn anastomosis. The students were rated on a 100-point scale for each basic surgical skill. Later during the same semester all the students took the final theoretical examination. A total of 342 (male = 317 and female = 25) medical students participated in a single skills laboratory as part of their third-year medical student clerkship. The mean scores for each of the 10 surgical skills were higher in female group. The difference in sterile technique, preoperative preparation, cecectomy, and small bowel resection with hand-sewn anastomosis reached the significant level. Compared with male medical students, the mean theory examination score was significantly higher in female medical students. Approximately 76% of the (19 of 25) female students expressed their interest in pursuing a surgical career, whereas only 65.5% (207 of 317) male students wanted to be surgical professionals (p = 0.381). Female medical students completed basic surgical skills training more efficiently and passed the theoretical examination with significantly higher scores than male medical students. In the future, studies should be done in other classes in our institution and perhaps other schools to see if these findings are reliable or valid or just a reflection of this 1 sample. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender differences in the acquisition of surgical skills: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amir; Subhi, Yousif; Ringsted, Charlotte; Konge, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Females are less attracted than males to surgical specialties, which may be due to differences in the acquisition of skills. The aim of this study was to systematically review studies that investigate gender differences in the acquisition of surgical skills. We performed a comprehensive database search using relevant search phrases and MeSH terms. We included studies that investigated the role of gender in the acquisition of surgical skills. Our search yielded 247 studies, 18 of which were found to be eligible and were therefore included. These studies included a total of 2,106 study participants. The studies were qualitatively synthesized in five categories (studies on medical students, studies on both medical students and residents, studies on residents, studies on gender differences in needed physical strength, and studies on other gender-related training conditions). Male medical students tended to outperform females, while no gender differences were found among residents. Gaming experience and interest in surgery correlated with better acquisition of surgical skills, regardless of gender. Although initial levels of surgical abilities seemed lower among females, one-on-one training and instructor feedback worked better on females and were able to help the acquisition of surgical skills at a level that negated measurable gender differences. Female physicians possess the required physical strength for surgical procedures, but may face gender-related challenges in daily clinical practice. Medical students are a heterogeneous group with a range of interests and experiences, while surgical residents are more homogeneous perhaps due to selection bias. Gender-related differences are more pronounced among medical students. Future surgical curricula should consider tailoring personalized programs that accommodate more mentoring and one-on-one training for female physicians while giving male physicians more practice opportunities in order to increase the output of

  19. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated.

  20. A randomized comparison of laparoscopic, flexible endoscopic, and wired and wireless magnetic cameras on ex vivo and in vivo NOTES surgical performance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victoria C; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Swain, C Paul; Bergs, Richard; Paramo, Juan; Hogg, Deborah C; Fernandez, Raul; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Scott, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    The influence of endoscopic video camera (VC) image quality on surgical performance has not been studied. Flexible endoscopes are used as substitutes for laparoscopes in natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), but their optics are originally designed for intralumenal use. Manipulable wired or wireless independent VCs might offer advantages for NOTES but are still under development. To measure the optical characteristics of 4 VC systems and to compare their impact on the performance of surgical suturing tasks. VC systems included a laparoscope (Storz 10 mm), a flexible endoscope (Olympus GIF 160), and 2 prototype deployable cameras (magnetic anchoring and guidance system [MAGS] Camera and PillCam). In a randomized fashion, the 4 systems were evaluated regarding standardized optical characteristics and surgical manipulations of previously validated ex vivo (fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery model) and in vivo (live porcine Nissen model) tasks; objective metrics (time and errors/precision) and combined surgeon (n = 2) performance were recorded. Subtle differences were detected for color tests, and field of view was variable (65°-115°). Suitable resolution was detected up to 10 cm for the laparoscope and MAGS camera but only at closer distances for the endoscope and PillCam. Compared with the laparoscope, surgical suturing performances were modestly lower for the MAGS camera and significantly lower for the endoscope (ex vivo) and PillCam (ex vivo and in vivo). This study documented distinct differences in VC systems that may be used for NOTES in terms of both optical characteristics and surgical performance. Additional work is warranted to optimize cameras for NOTES. Deployable systems may be especially well suited for this purpose.

  1. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education.

  2. Design and Validation of an Open-Source, Partial Task Trainer for Endonasal Neuro-Endoscopic Skills Development: Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Baby, Britty; Damodaran, Natesan; Srivastav, Vinkle; Suri, Ashish; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kumar, Subodh; Kalra, Prem; Prasad, Sanjiva; Paul, Kolin; Anand, Sneh; Kumar, Sanjeev; Dhiman, Varun; Ben-Israel, David; Kapoor, Kulwant Singh

    2016-02-01

    Box trainers are ideal simulators, given they are inexpensive, accessible, and use appropriate fidelity. The development and validation of an open-source, partial task simulator that teaches the fundamental skills necessary for endonasal skull-base neuro-endoscopic surgery. We defined the Neuro-Endo-Trainer (NET) SkullBase-Task-GraspPickPlace with an activity area by analyzing the computed tomography scans of 15 adult patients with sellar suprasellar parasellar tumors. Four groups of participants (Group E, n = 4: expert neuroendoscopists; Group N, n =19: novice neurosurgeons; Group R, n = 11: neurosurgery residents with multiple iterations; and Group T, n = 27: neurosurgery residents with single iteration) performed grasp, pick, and place tasks using NET and were graded on task completion time and skills assessment scale score. Group E had lower task completion times and greater skills assessment scale scores than both Group N and R (P ≤ 0.03, 0.001). The performance of Groups N and R was found to be equivalent; in self-assessing neuro-endoscopic skill, the participants in these groups were found to have equally low pretraining scores (4/10) with significant improvement shown after NET simulation (6, 7 respectively). Angled scopes resulted in decreased scores with tilted plates compared with straight plates (30° P ≤ 0.04, 45° P ≤ 0.001). With tilted plates, decreased scores were observed when we compared the 0° with 45° endoscope (right, P ≤ 0.008; left, P ≤ 0.002). The NET, a face and construct valid open-source partial task neuroendoscopic trainer, was designed. Presimulation novice neurosurgeons and neurosurgical residents were described as having insufficient skills and preparation to practice neuro-endoscopy. Plate tilt and endoscope angle were shown to be important factors in participant performance. The NET was found to be a useful partial-task trainer for skill building in neuro-endoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for neurosurgical residency training.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K C; Kshettry, Varun R; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Schlenk, Richard P; Benzel, Edward C

    2015-11-01

    Surgical education has been forced to evolve from the principles of its initial inception, in part due to external pressures brought about through changes in modern health care. Despite these pressures that can limit the surgical training experience, training programs are being held to higher standards of education to demonstrate and document trainee competency through core competencies and milestones. One of the methods used to augment the surgical training experience and to demonstrate trainee proficiency in technical skills is through a surgical skills laboratory. The authors have established a surgical skills laboratory by acquiring equipment and funding from nondepartmental resources, through institutional and private educational grants, along with product donations from industry. A separate educational curriculum for junior- and senior-level residents was devised and incorporated into the neurosurgical residency curriculum. The initial dissection curriculum focused on cranial approaches, with spine and peripheral nerve approaches added in subsequent years. The dissections were scheduled to maximize the use of cadaveric specimens, experimenting with techniques to best preserve the tissue for repeated uses. A survey of residents who participated in at least 1 year of the curriculum indicated that participation in the surgical skills laboratory translated into improved understanding of anatomical relationships and the development of technical skills that can be applied in the operating room. In addition to supplementing the technical training of surgical residents, a surgical skills laboratory with a dissection curriculum may be able to help provide uniformity of education across different neurosurgical training programs, as well as provide a tool to assess the progression of skills in surgical trainees.

  4. Endoscopic versus surgical resection of GI stromal tumors in the upper GI tract.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Ho; Koh, Jin Sung; Lee, Beom Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Jang, You-Jin; Mok, Young-Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic resection has been performed for treatment of GI stromal tumors (GISTs) in the upper GI tract. However, the therapeutic roles of the endoscopic procedure remain debatable. We aimed in this retrospective study to evaluate the feasibility and long-term follow-up results of endoscopic resection of GISTs in the upper GI tract, compared with surgery. Between March 2005 and August 2014, 130 cases of GIST in the upper GI tract were resected. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including R0 resection rate and recurrence rate between the endoscopy group (n = 90) and surgery group (n = 40). The most common location of GIST was the stomach body in the endoscopy group, whereas it was the duodenum in the surgery group (P = .001). Tumor size was significantly smaller (2.3 vs 5.1 cm; P < .001), and procedure time (51.8 ± 36.2 vs 124.6 ± 74.7 minutes; P < .001) and hospital stay (3.3 ± 2.4 vs 8.3 ± 5.4 days; P < .001) were significantly shorter in the endoscopy group than in the surgery group. The R0 resection rate was 25.6% in the endoscopy group, whereas it was 85.0% in the surgery group (P = .001), and 50.0% of resected tumors belonged to a very low-risk group in the endoscopy group, whereas 35.0% and 30.0% belonged to low-risk and high-risk in the surgery group (P = .001). However, during 45.5 months of follow-up, the recurrence rate was not significantly different between the 2 groups (2.2% vs 5.0%; P = .586). Endoscopic resection might be an alternative therapeutic modality for GISTs in the upper GI tract in selective cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. [Recurrence of nasosinusal polyposis after ethmoidectomy by endonasal approach. Functional, endoscopic, x-ray tomographic aspects and surgical implications].

    PubMed

    Batteur, B; Strunski, V; Caprio, D; Berthet, V; Goin, M

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent polyposis after 116 endonasal ethmoidectomies performed in 61 patients were investigated on the basis of functional, endoscopic and tomodensitometric data. The results of the endoscopic examinations revealed that the anterior ethmoid was involved most often (41%) with either a single localization or in combination with other sites in the sinuses. Functional rhinosinus symptomatology was satisfactory in most cases after a mean follow-up of 22 months, especially for nasal obstruction which was initially predominant (91%). Headaches, especially fronto-orbial localizations, clearly decreased after the operation but there was no correlation between the presence of headache after the operation and the recurrence of the polyposis. Computed tomography gave results similar to those obtained by endoscopy. However, a distinction could not be made between radio-opaque images of polyposis and certain cicatricial or inflammatory reactions. Unlike the functional outcome, ethmoidectomy had little effect on these images. Recurrent polyps appeared most often on the anterior ethmoid and the role of the initial infundibulotomy can be debated. It would appear that the prognosis of polyposis is not modified by extended anterior ethmoidectomy, suggesting that a more conservative surgical approach may be appropriate for frontal ethomoidal polyps.

  6. Electromagnetic guided bedside or endoscopic placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes in surgical patients (CORE trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Arja; de Rooij, Thijs; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Busch, Olivier R; Bergman, Jacques J; Ubbink, Dirk T; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Erkelens, G Willemien; Molenaar, I Quintus; Monkelbaan, Jan F; Rosman, Camiel; Tan, Adriaan C; Kruyt, Philip M; Bac, Dirk Jan; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M; Besselink, Marc G

    2015-03-26

    Gastroparesis is common in surgical patients and frequently leads to the need for enteral tube feeding. Nasoenteral feeding tubes are usually placed endoscopically by gastroenterologists, but this procedure is relatively cumbersome for patients and labor-intensive for hospital staff. Electromagnetic (EM) guided bedside placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes by nurses may reduce patient discomfort, workload and costs, but randomized studies are lacking, especially in surgical patients. We hypothesize that EM guided bedside placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes is at least as effective as endoscopic placement in surgical patients, at lower costs. The CORE trial is an investigator-initiated, parallel-group, pragmatic, multicenter randomized controlled non-inferiority trial. A total of 154 patients admitted to gastrointestinal surgical wards in five hospitals, requiring nasoenteral feeding, will be randomly allocated to undergo EM guided or endoscopic nasoenteral feeding tube placement. Primary outcome is reinsertion of the feeding tube, defined as the insertion of an endoscope or tube in the nose/mouth and esophagus for (re)placement of the feeding tube (e.g. after failed initial placement or dislodgement or blockage of the tube). Secondary outcomes include patient-reported outcomes, costs and tube (placement) related complications. The CORE trial is designed to generate evidence on the effectiveness of EM guided placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes in surgical patients and the impact on costs as compared to endoscopic placement. The trial potentially offers a strong argument for wider implementation of this technique as method of choice for placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes. Dutch Trial Register: NTR4420 , date registered 5-feb-2014.

  7. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  8. Mental distress and effort to engage an image-guided navigation system in the surgical training of endoscopic sinus surgery: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, M N; Ledderose, G J; Becker, S; Leunig, A; Arpe, S; Luz, M; Stelter, K

    2015-04-01

    The use of image-guided navigation systems in the training of FESS is discussed controversy. Many experienced sinus surgeons report a better spatial orientation and an improved situational awareness intraoperatively. But many fear that the navigation system could be a disadvantage in the surgical training because of a higher mental demand and a possible loss of surgical skills. This clinical field study investigates mental and physical demands during transnasal surgery with and without the aid of a navigation system at an early stage in FESS training. Thirty-two endonasal sinus surgeries done by eight different trainee surgeons were included. After randomization, one side of each patient was operated by use of a navigation system, the other side without. During the whole surgery, the surgeons were connected to a biofeedback device measuring the heart rate, the heart rate variability, the respiratory frequency and the masticator EMG. Stress situations could be identified by an increase of the heart rate frequency and a decrease of the heart rate variability. The mental workload during a FESS procedure is high compared to the baseline before and after surgery. The mental workload level when using the navigation did not significantly differ from the side without using the navigation. Residents with more than 30 FESS procedures already done, showed a slightly decreased mental workload when using the navigation. An additional workload shift toward the navigation system could not be observed in any surgeon. Remarkable other stressors could be identified during this study: the behavior of the supervisor or the use of the 45° endoscope, other colleagues or students entering the theatre, poor vision due to bleeding and the preoperative waiting when measuring the baseline. The mental load of young surgeons in FESS surgery is tremendous. The application of a navigation system did not cause a higher mental workload or distress. The device showed a positive effort to engage

  9. Validation of an endoscopic part-task training box as a skill assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Kumar, Nitin; Thompson, Christopher C

    2015-04-01

    There is no objective methodology to assess trainee progress in endoscopy. Our prior work has detailed the development of the endoscopic part-task training box. To assess validity evidence regarding relationship to other variables by evaluating a correlation between level of endoscopic experience and training box score. Prospective validation study. Three academic institutions. A total of 42 participants: 7 novices, 7 first-year GI fellows, 7 second-year GI fellows, 7 third-year GI fellows, 7 attending physicians, and 7 interventional attending physicians. The training box consists of 5 modules: retroflexion, knob control, torque, polypectomy, and navigation/loop reduction. Performance is scored for precision and speed. Each participant was required to complete the training box once. Additionally, 5 participants at different endoscopic levels completed the training box 3 times at 1-week intervals. A correlation between level of endoscopic experience and training box score. All 42 participants completed the 5 modules during a single session. Aggregate training box scores differed significantly between each training level (P values < .05). Individual modules significantly differentiated between experience-level groups (novices, fellows, and attending physicians; P values < .01). Participants who repeated the training box demonstrated score improvement over time, with persistence of separation between training levels. The training box focuses only on the technical aspects of endoscopy and does not address the cognitive elements of endoscopic training. The endoscopic part-task training box is able to objectively assess endoscopic ability by differentiating scores based on clinical experience. Further multicenter efforts are now needed to establish learning curves and to correlate use of the simulator with improved clinical aptitude. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical nuances for nasoseptal flap reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Schmidt, Richard F; Choudhry, Osamah J; Shukla, Pratik A; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Extended endoscopic endonasal approaches have allowed for a minimally invasive solution for removal of a variety of ventral skull base lesions, including intradural tumors. Depending on the location of the pathological entity, various types of surgical corridors are used, such as transcribriform, transplanum transtuberculum, transsellar, transclival, and transodontoid approaches. Often, a large skull base dural defect with a high-flow CSF leak is created after endoscopic skull base surgery. Successful reconstruction of the cranial base defect is paramount to separate the intracranial contents from the paranasal sinus contents and to prevent postoperative CSF leakage. The vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF) has become the workhorse for cranial base reconstruction after endoscopic skull base surgery, dramatically reducing the rate of postoperative CSF leakage since its implementation. In this report, the authors review the surgical technique and describe the operative nuances and lessons learned for successful multilayered PNSF reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow CSF leaks created after endoscopic skull base surgery. The authors specifically highlight important surgical pearls that are critical for successful PNSF reconstruction, including target-specific flap design and harvesting, pedicle preservation, preparation of bony defect and graft site to optimize flap adherence, multilayered closure technique, maximization of the reach of the flap, final flap positioning, and proper bolstering and buttressing of the PNSF to prevent flap dehiscence. Using this technique in 93 patients, the authors' overall postoperative CSF leak rate was 3.2%. An illustrative intraoperative video demonstrating the reconstruction technique is also presented.

  11. Endoscopic Fascia Release for Forearm Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: Case Report and Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Cobb, Anna L; Cobb, Tyson K

    2017-09-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of the forearm is traditionally treated with open compartment release requiring large incisions that can result in less than optimal esthetic results. The purpose of this study is to describe a case report of 2 professional motocross patients with forearm CECS treated endoscopically using a minimally invasive technique. Two professional motocross racers presented with a history of chronic proximal volar forearm pain when motocross riding. Other symptoms included paresthesia and weakness, which, at times, led to an inability to continue riding. Both failed conservative management. Compartment pressure measurements were performed before and after provocative exercises to confirm diagnosis of CECS. Release of both the volar and dorsal compartments was performed endoscopically through a single incision. Symptoms resolved after surgery. The first patient resumed riding at 1 week, competing at 3 weeks, and continues to ride competitively without symptoms at 3 years postoperative. The second patient began riding at 1 week and won second place in the National Supercross finals 5 weeks after simultaneous bilateral release. This technique is simple and effective. The cannula used protects the superficial nerves while allowing release through a small, cosmetically pleasing incision.

  12. Surgical intern survival skills curriculum as an intern: does it help?

    PubMed

    Todd, S Rob; Fahy, Bridget N; Paukert, Judy; Johnson, Melanie L; Bass, Barbara L

    2011-12-01

    The transition from medical student to surgical intern is fraught with anxiety. We implemented a surgical intern survival skills curriculum to alleviate this through a series of lectures and interactive sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate its effectiveness. This was a prospective observational pilot study of our surgical intern survival skills curriculum, the components of which included professionalism, medical documentation, pharmacy highlights, radiographic interpretations, nutrition, and mock clinical pages. The participants completed pre-course and post-course surveys to assess their confidence levels in the elements addressed using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = unsatisfactory, 5 = excellent). A P value of less than .05 was considered significant. In 2009, 8 interns participated in the surgical intern survival skills curriculum. Fifty percent were female and their mean age was 27.5 ± 1.5 years. Of 33 elements assessed, interns rated themselves as more confident in 27 upon completion of the course. The implementation of a surgical intern survival skills curriculum significantly improved the confidence levels of general surgery interns and seemed to ease the transition from medical student to surgical intern. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploratory Evaluation of Surgical Skills Mentorship Program Design and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Anna R.; Wright, Frances C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: There are few opportunities for mentorship of practicing surgeons and no evidence to guide the design of such programs. This study explored outcomes and barriers associated with the design of surgical mentorship programs. Methods: Interviews were held with organizers, mentors, and proteges of 2 programs. Data from 23 participant…

  14. Is three-dimensional videography the cutting edge of surgical skill acquisition?

    PubMed

    Roach, Victoria A; Brandt, Michael G; Moore, Corey C; Wilson, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The process of learning new surgical technical skills is vital to the career of a surgeon. The acquisition of these new skills is influenced greatly by visual-spatial ability (VSA) and may be difficult for some learners to rapidly assimilate. In many cases, the role of VSA on the acquisition of a novel technical skill has been explored; however, none have probed the impact of a three-dimensional (3D) video learning module on the acquisition of new surgical skills. The first aim of this study is to capture spatially complex surgical translational flaps using 3D videography and incorporate the footage into a self-contained e-learning module designed in line with the principles of cognitive load theory. The second aim is to assess the efficacy of 3D video as a medium to support the acquisition of complex surgical skills in novice surgeons as evaluated using a global ratings scale. It is hypothesized that the addition of depth in 3D viewing will augment the learner's innate visual spatial abilities, thereby enhancing skill acquisition compared to two-dimensional viewing of the same procedure. Despite growing literature suggesting that 3D correlates directly to enhanced skill acquisition, this study did not differentiate significant results contributing to increased surgical performance. This topic will continue to be explored using more sensitive scales of measurement and more complex "open procedures" capitalizing on the importance of depth perception in surgical manipulation. Anat Sci Educ. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Endoscopic supraorbital eyebrow approach for the surgical treatment of extraaxialand intraaxial tumors.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Nishiyama, Yuya; Teo, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The supraorbital eyebrow approach is a minimally invasive technique that offers wide access to the anterior skull base region and parasellar area through asubfrontal corridor. The use of neuroendoscopy allows one to extend the approach further to the pituitary fossa, the anterior third ventricle, the interpeduncular cistern, the anterior and medial temporal lobe, and the middle fossa. The supraorbital approach involves a limited skin incision, with minimal soft-tissue dissection and a small craniotomy, thus carrying relatively low approach-related morbidity. All consecutive patients who underwent the endoscopic supraorbital eyebrow approach were retrospectively analyzed for lesion location, pathology, length of stay, complications, and cosmetic results. During a 56-month period, 97 patients (mean age 58.5 years) underwent an endoscopic eyebrow approach to resect extra- and intraaxial brain lesions. The most common pathologies treated were meningiomas (n = 41); craniopharyngiomas (n = 22); dermoid tumors (n = 7); metastases (n = 4); gliomas (n = 3); and other miscellaneous frontal, parasellar, and midbrain (n = 23) lesions. The median length of postoperative hospital stay was 2.7 days (range 1-8 days). In 82 patients a total removal of the lesion was performed, while in 15 patients a near-total or subtotal removal was achieved. There were no postoperative hematomas, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, or severe neurological deficits, with the exception of 2 cases of visual deterioration and 1 case each of meningitis, stroke, and third cranial nerve paresis. Other complications directly related to the approach included 2 cases of skin burn as a direct result of heat transmission from the microscope light, 1 case of right frontal palsy, 2 cases of frontal numbness, and 1 case of bone remodeling 1 year after surgery. The endoscopic supraorbital eyebrow approach is a safe and effective minimally invasive approach to remove extra- and intraaxial anterior skull base, parasellar

  16. Relationships among video gaming proficiency and spatial orientation, laparoscopic, and traditional surgical skills of third-year veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Millard, Heather A Towle; Millard, Ralph P; Constable, Peter D; Freeman, Lyn J

    2014-02-01

    To determine the relationships among traditional and laparoscopic surgical skills, spatial analysis skills, and video gaming proficiency of third-year veterinary students. Prospective, randomized, controlled study. A convenience sample of 29 third-year veterinary students. The students had completed basic surgical skills training with inanimate objects but had no experience with soft tissue, orthopedic, or laparoscopic surgery; the spatial analysis test; or the video games that were used in the study. Scores for traditional surgical, laparoscopic, spatial analysis, and video gaming skills were determined, and associations among these were analyzed by means of Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient (rs). A significant positive association (rs = 0.40) was detected between summary scores for video game performance and laparoscopic skills, but not between video game performance and traditional surgical skills scores. Spatial analysis scores were positively (rs = 0.30) associated with video game performance scores; however, that result was not significant. Spatial analysis scores were not significantly associated with laparoscopic surgical skills scores. Traditional surgical skills scores were not significantly associated with laparoscopic skills or spatial analysis scores. Results of this study indicated video game performance of third-year veterinary students was predictive of laparoscopic but not traditional surgical skills, suggesting that laparoscopic performance may be improved with video gaming experience. Additional studies would be required to identify methods for improvement of traditional surgical skills.

  17. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat Pai, Rohini V; Badiger, Santhoshi; Sachidananda, Roopa; Basappaji, Santhosh Mysore Chandramouli; Shanbhag, Raghunath; Rao, Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30) or group C (n = 30). The patients' vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field) than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS. PMID:27275059

  18. [Surgical treatment of achalasia - endoscopic or laparoscopic? : Proposal for a tailored approach].

    PubMed

    Rahden, B H A von; Filser, J; Al-Nasser, M; Germer, C-T

    2017-03-01

    Primary idiopathic achalasia is the most common form of the rare esophageal motility disorders. A curative therapy which restores the normal motility does not exist; however, the therapeutic principle of cardiomyotomy according to Ernst Heller leads to excellent symptom control in the majority of cases. The established standard approach is Heller myotomy through the laparoscopic route (LHM), combined with Dor anterior fundoplication for reflux prophylaxis/therapy. At least four meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated superiority of LHM over pneumatic dilation (PD); therefore, LHM should be used as first line therapy (without prior PD) in all operable patients. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new alternative approach, which enables Heller myotomy to be performed though the endoscopic submucosal route. The POEM procedure has a low complication rate and also leads to good control of dysphagia but reflux rates can possibly be slightly higher (20-30%). Long-term results of POEM are still scarce and the results of the prospective randomized multicenter trial POEM vs. LHM are not yet available; however, POEM seems to be the preferred treatment option for certain indications. Within the framework of the tailored approach for achalasia management of POEM vs. LHM established in Würzburg, we recommend long-segment POEM for patients with type III achalasia (spasmodic) and other hypercontractile motility disorders and potentially type II achalasia (panesophageal compression) with chest pain as the lead symptom, whereas LHM can also be selected for type I. For sigmoid achalasia, especially with siphon-like transformation of the esophagogastric junction, simultaneous hiatal hernia and epiphrenic diverticula, LHM is still the preferred approach. The choice of the procedure for revisional surgery in case of recurrent dysphagia depends on the suspected mechanism (morphological vs. functional/neuromotor).

  19. Endoscope-assisted retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach for surgical treatment of trigeminal schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Samii, Madjid; Alimohamadi, Maysam; Gerganov, Venelin

    2014-12-01

    Trigeminal schwannomas are the most common intracranial nonvestibular schwannomas, and the dumbbell-shaped subtype is the most challenging. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of the endoscope-assisted retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach (EA-RISA) for dumbbell trigeminal schwannomas and to compare EA-RISA with classic RISA. A retrospective study of all patients with trigeminal schwannomas was performed with a focus on dumbbell tumors. Tumors were classified according to a modified Samii classification. Extent of tumor removal, outcome, and morbidity rates in the 2 subgroups were compared. Twenty patients were enrolled: 8 had dumbbell-shaped tumors (type C1), 8 had middle fossa tumors (A1-3), 3 had extracranial extension (D2), and 1 had posterior fossa tumor. Gross total resection was achieved in 15 and near-total resection in 5 patients. In 4 patients with dumbbell tumors, the classic RISA (Samii approach) was used; EA-RISA was used in the other 4 patients. The extent of petrous apex drilling was determined individually on the basis of the anatomic variability of suprameatal tubercle and degree of tumor-induced petrous apex erosion; in 2 patients, only minimal drilling was needed. The endoscope was applied after microsurgical tumor removal and in 3 of 4 patients revealed a significant unrecognized tumor remnant in the anterolateral and superolateral aspects of the Meckel cave. Thus, the EA-RISA technique allowed gross total resection of the tumor. The EA-RISA enlarges the exposure obtained with the classic RISA. Its judicious use can help achieve safe and radical removal of dumbbell-shaped trigeminal schwannomas (C1 type).

  20. American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Glass, Charity C; Acton, Robert D; Blair, Patrice G; Campbell, Andre R; Deutsch, Ellen S; Jones, Daniel B; Liscum, Kathleen R; Sachdeva, Ajit K; Scott, Daniel J; Yang, Stephen C

    2014-02-01

    Simulation can enhance learning effectiveness, efficiency, and patient safety and is engaging for learners. A survey was conducted of surgical clerkship directors nationally and medical students at 5 medical schools to rank and stratify simulation-based educational topics. Students applying to surgery were compared with others using Wilcoxon's rank-sum tests. Seventy-three of 163 clerkship directors (45%) and 231 of 872 students (26.5%) completed the survey. Of students, 28.6% were applying for surgical residency training. Clerkship directors and students generally agreed on the importance and timing of specific educational topics. Clerkship directors tended to rank basic skills, such as examination skills, higher than medical students. Students ranked procedural skills, such as lumbar puncture, more highly than clerkship directors. Surgery clerkship directors and 4th-year medical students agree substantially about the content of a simulation-based curriculum, although 4th-year medical students recommended that some topics be taught earlier than the clerkship directors recommended. Students planning to apply to surgical residencies did not differ significantly in their scoring from students pursuing nonsurgical specialties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Teaching and evaluation of surgical skills in dermatology: results of a survey.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Jennifer L; Peirson, Ryan P; Berg, Daniel

    2004-11-01

    To assess how the surgical skills of residents are taught and evaluated within dermatology residency programs in the United States; to assess which surgical techniques training directors and residents consider important for residents to perform or at least understand by the end of residency training. A 126-question survey was sent to all 106 of the US dermatology residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Contact was initially made via e-mail. Surveys were addressed to the program director, surgical training director, and chief resident of each program. A follow-up survey was mailed to nonresponders. Ninety-five surveys were returned representing 71 (67%) of 106 programs. Eighty-nine percent of programs (n=63) reported having a formal curriculum in dermatologic surgery. Among programs represented, 97% (n=69) taught surgical skills in the procedure room, 84% (n=57) used pigs' feet, and fewer than 10% (n=6) used human cadavers. Ninety-four percent of programs (n=61) scheduled surgical lectures; two thirds (n=41) formally assigned surgical reading, and over half (n=36) used Web-based lectures to teach skills. To assess training, most programs (86%; n=50) used subjective global evaluation at the end of a surgery rotation. Fewer than 30% (n=15) discussed specific objectives prior to the rotation. Only about 25% of programs (n=17) reported the use of written or oral examinations to assess resident surgery skills. Traditional biopsy and simple surgical procedures were reported as most important to know and perform. Interest by both faculty members and residents in more advanced surgical techniques was more limited and variable. Cosmetic surgery techniques were most likely to be viewed as unimportant. Most dermatology programs teach surgical skills by traditional apprenticeship methods supplemented by work in pigs' feet laboratory classes and regularly scheduled lectures. Skill assessment is mainly done through subjective

  2. A cable-driven soft robot surgical system for cardiothoracic endoscopic surgery: preclinical tests in animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hesheng; Zhang, Runxi; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Xiaozhou; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgery attracts more and more attention because of the advantages of minimal trauma, less bleeding and pain and low complication rate. However, minimally invasive surgery for beating hearts is still a challenge. Our goal is to develop a soft robot surgical system for single-port minimally invasive surgery on a beating heart. The soft robot described in this paper is inspired by the octopus arm. Although the octopus arm is soft and has more degrees of freedom (DOFs), it can be controlled flexibly. The soft robot is driven by cables that are embedded into the soft robot manipulator and can control the direction of the end and middle of the soft robot manipulator. The forward, backward and rotation movement of the soft robot is driven by a propulsion plant. The soft robot can move freely by properly controlling the cables and the propulsion plant. The soft surgical robot system can perform different thoracic operations by changing surgical instruments. To evaluate the flexibility, controllability and reachability of the designed soft robot surgical system, some testing experiments have been conducted in vivo on a swine. Through the subxiphoid, the soft robot manipulator could enter into the thoracic cavity and pericardial cavity smoothly and perform some operations such as biopsy, ligation and ablation. The operations were performed successfully and did not cause any damage to the surrounding soft tissues. From the experiments, the flexibility, controllability and reachability of the soft robot surgical system have been verified. Also, it has been shown that this system can be used in the thoracic and pericardial cavity for different operations. Compared with other endoscopy robots, the soft robot surgical system is safer, has more DOFs and is more flexible for control. When performing operations in a beating heart, this system maybe more suitable than traditional endoscopy robots.

  3. A Review of THE ROLE OF SIMULATION IN DEVELOPING AND ASSESSING ORTHOPAEDIC SURGICAL SKILLS

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W; Johns, Brian D; Marsh, J Lawrence; Anderson, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgical skill is traditionally acquired during training in an apprenticeship model that has been largely unchanged for nearly 100 years. However, increased pressure for operating room efficiency, a focus on patient safety, work hour restrictions, and a movement towards competency-based education are changing the traditional paradigm. Surgical simulation has the potential to help address these changes. This manuscript reviews the scientific background on skill acquisition and surgical simulation as it applies to orthopaedic surgery. It argues that simulation in orthopaedics lags behind other disciplines and focuses too little on simulator validation. The case is made that orthopaedic training is more efficient with simulators that facilitate deliberate practice throughout resident training and more research should be focused on simulator validation and the refinement of skill definition. PMID:25328480

  4. [Effect of nano carbon tattooing on the lesion localization in the early colon cancer for additional surgical procedure after endoscopic resection].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Zhang, Zaizhong; Wang, Lie; Lin, Nan; Yang, Weijin; Wu, Weihang; Wang, Wen; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yu

    2017-08-25

    To explore the effect of nano carbon tattooing on the lesion localization in the early colon cancer for additional surgical procedure after endoscopic resection. Thirty-five patients with early colon cancer accepted additional surgical procedures after endoscopic resection in Fuzhou General Hospital of PLA from May 2014 to November 2016. All the patients underwent nano carbon tattooing before the end of endoscopic resection: 0.1 ml carbon nanoparticles suspension was respectively injected into the normal intestinal submucosa from 1 cm outside the 4 sites (upper, lower, left and right) of the lesion border by colonoscopy, marking the original lesion location and guiding the subsequent additional surgery. Data of these 35 cases were summarized. All the 35 cases, including 22 males and 13 females, with a mean age of 46.5 years(range 35-70), completed the endoscopic disposable carbon nano marking, and the mean operative time was 7.5 minutes(range 5-10). No bleeding, no perforation and no adverse reaction occurred. Four to 21(10±3.5) days after endoscopic resection, the patients received the additional surgery as a result of pathological specimens of endoscopic resection in 10 cases of vascular invasion, 7 cases of severe submucosal infiltration, 7 cases of more than grade G2 in tumor budding, 6 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, and 5 cases of positive margin. All the patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. The mean time of intraoperative detection and lesion location was 3.0 minutes(range 1-5). All tattooings were clearly visible under the naked eye. The colon wedge resection were performed in 5 cases, colon segment resection in 14 cases, and radical resection of colon cancer in 16 cases. The operative time was 45 to 180(120±30) min, and the blood loss was 50 ~ 200(50±15) ml. There was no intraoperative complications. The first gas passage time was 12 to 48(24±8) h. The postoperative hospital stay was 10 to 3(6.5±2.5) d

  5. The assessment of surgical skills as a complement to the training method. Revision.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, J; Bachiller-Burgos, J; Serrano-Pascual, Á; Cózar-Olmo, J M; Díaz-Güemes Martín-Portugués, I; Pérez-Duarte, F J; Hernández-Hurtado, L; Álvarez-Ossorio, J L; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition and improvement of surgical skills constitute a fundamental element in the training of any practitioner. At present, however, the assessment of these skills is a scarcely developed area of research. The aim of this study was to analyse the peculiarities of the various assessment systems and establish the minimum criteria that a skills and knowledge assessment system should meet as a method for assessing surgical skills in urological surgery. Scientific literature review aimed at the various currently available assessment systems for skills and competencies (technical and nontechnical), with a special focus on the systematic reviews and prospective studies. After conducting the review, we found that the various assessment systems for surgical competence have, in our opinion, a number of shortcomings. There is a certain degree of subjectivity in the assessment of surgeons by the evaluators. The assessment of nontechnical competencies is not formally recorded. There is no description of a follow-up assessment or any basic parameters associated with healthcare quality. There is no registration of associated competencies associated with the various surgical techniques. There is also no ranking of these competencies and the specific peculiarities for their application. We believe that the development of a new assessment system for surgical competencies (technical and nontechnical) aimed at assessing urologists in the various surgical techniques is necessary. To this end, our team has worked on developing the Evaluation System for Surgical Competencies on Laparoscopy, which is based on the definition, ranking and assessment of competencies demonstrated by surgeons. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Robotic surgical skill acquisition: What one needs to know?

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Akshay; Jeong, Wooju; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Campbell, Logan; Aggarwal, Shruti; Menon, Mani; Bhandari, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been eagerly adopted by patients and surgeons alike in the field of urology, over the last decade. However, there is a lack of standardization in training curricula and accreditation guidelines to ensure surgeon competence and patient safety. Accordingly, in this review, we aim to highlight ‘who’ needs to learn ‘what’ and ‘how’, to become competent in robotic surgery. We demonstrate that both novice and experienced open surgeons require supervision and mentoring during the initial phases of robotic surgery skill acquisition. The experienced open surgeons possess domain knowledge, however, need to acquire technical knowledge under supervision (either in simulated or clinical environment) to successfully transition to robotic surgery, whereas, novice surgeons need to acquire both domain as well as technical knowledge to become competent in robotic surgery. With regard to training curricula, a variety of training programs such as academic fellowships, mini-fellowships, and mentored skill courses exist, and cater to the needs and expectations of postgraduate surgeons adequately. Fellowships provide the most comprehensive training, however, may not be suitable to all surgeon-learners secondary to the long-term time commitment. For these surgeon-learners short-term courses such as the mini-fellowships or mentored skill courses might be more apt. Lastly, with regards to credentialing uniformity in criteria regarding accreditation is lacking but earnest efforts are underway. Currently, accreditation for competence in robotic surgery is institutional specific. PMID:25598593

  7. Robotic surgical skill acquisition: What one needs to know?

    PubMed

    Sood, Akshay; Jeong, Wooju; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Campbell, Logan; Aggarwal, Shruti; Menon, Mani; Bhandari, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been eagerly adopted by patients and surgeons alike in the field of urology, over the last decade. However, there is a lack of standardization in training curricula and accreditation guidelines to ensure surgeon competence and patient safety. Accordingly, in this review, we aim to highlight 'who' needs to learn 'what' and 'how', to become competent in robotic surgery. We demonstrate that both novice and experienced open surgeons require supervision and mentoring during the initial phases of robotic surgery skill acquisition. The experienced open surgeons possess domain knowledge, however, need to acquire technical knowledge under supervision (either in simulated or clinical environment) to successfully transition to robotic surgery, whereas, novice surgeons need to acquire both domain as well as technical knowledge to become competent in robotic surgery. With regard to training curricula, a variety of training programs such as academic fellowships, mini-fellowships, and mentored skill courses exist, and cater to the needs and expectations of postgraduate surgeons adequately. Fellowships provide the most comprehensive training, however, may not be suitable to all surgeon-learners secondary to the long-term time commitment. For these surgeon-learners short-term courses such as the mini-fellowships or mentored skill courses might be more apt. Lastly, with regards to credentialing uniformity in criteria regarding accreditation is lacking but earnest efforts are underway. Currently, accreditation for competence in robotic surgery is institutional specific.

  8. Numerical modeling of nasal obstruction and endoscopic surgical intervention: outcome to airflow and olfaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Cowart, Beverly J; Rosen, David; Scherer, Peter W; Dalton, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical obstruction of odorant flow to the olfactory neuroepithelium may be a primary cause of olfactory loss in nasal-sinus disease patients. Surgical removal of nasal obstruction may facilitate the recovery of olfactory ability. Unfortunately, quantifying the functional impact of nasal obstruction and subsequent surgical outcomes using acoustic rhinometry, rhinomanometry, or CT scans is inadequate. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques, we can convert patient CT scans into anatomically accurate 3D numerical nasal models that can be used to predict nasal airflow and odorant delivery rates. These models also can be rapidly modified to reflect anatomic changes, e.g., surgical removal of polyps. CFD modeling of one patient's nose pre- and postsurgery showed significant improvement in postsurgical ortho- and retronasal airflow and odorant delivery rate to olfactory neuroepithelium (> 1000 times), which correlated well with olfactory recovery. This study has introduced a novel technique (CFD) to calculate nasal airflow dynamics and its effects on olfaction, nasal obstruction, and sinus disease. In the future, such techniques may provide a quantitative evaluation of surgical outcome and an important preoperative guide to optimize nasal airflow and odorant delivery.

  9. Simulation based education - models for teaching surgical skills in general practice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sankar; Cooling, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    Simulation based education is an accepted method of teaching procedural skills in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. There is an increasing need for developing authentic simulation models for use in general practice training. This article describes the preparation of three simulation models to teach general practice registrars basic surgical skills, including excision of a sebaceous cyst and debridement and escharectomy of chronic wounds. The role of deliberate practise in improving performance of procedural skills with simulation based education is well established. The simulation models described are inexpensive, authentic and can be easily prepared. They have been used in general practice education programs with positive feedback from participants and could potentially be used as in-practice teaching tools by general practitioner supervisors. Importantly, no simulation can exactly replicate the actual clinical situation, especially when complications arise. It is important that registrars are provided with adequate supervision when initially applying these surgical skills to patients.

  10. Surgical ergonomics. Analysis of technical skills, simulation models and assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Papaspyros, Sotiris C; Kar, Ashok; O'Regan, David

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two centuries the surgical profession has undergone a profound evolution in terms of efficiency and outcomes. Societal concerns in relation to quality assurance, patient safety and cost reduction have highlighted the issue of training expert surgeons. The core elements of a training model build on the basic foundations of gross and fine motor skills. In this paper we provide an analysis of the ergonomic principles involved and propose relevant training techniques. We have endeavored to provide both the trainer and trainee perspectives. This paper is structured into four sections: 1) Pre-operative preparation issues, 2) technical skills and instrument handling, 3) low fidelity simulation models and 4) discussion of current concepts in crew resource management, deliberate practice and assessment. Rehearsal, warm-up and motivation-enhancing techniques aid concentration and focus. Appropriate posture, comprehension of ergonomic principles in relation to surgical instruments and utilisation of the non-dominant hand are essential skills to master. Low fidelity models can be used to achieve significant progress through the early stages of the learning curve. Deliberate practice and innate ability are complementary to each other and may be considered useful adjuncts to surgical skills development. Safe medical care requires that complex patient interventions be performed by highly skilled operators supported by reliable teams. Surgical ergonomics lie at the heart of any training model that aims to produce professionals able to function as leaders of a patient safety oriented culture. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medium term endoscopic assessment of the surgical outcome following laryngeal saccule resection in brachycephalic dogs.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, M; Gobbetti, M; Romussi, S; Brambilla, G; Giudice, C; Grieco, V; Stefanello, D

    2012-05-19

    Laryngeal saccule eversion has been widely reported as an important component of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). The authors hypothesised that saccules affected by acute histological changes in patients showing marked improvement following palate and nares surgery might spontaneously return to normal; moreover, spontaneous resolution of the eversion in patients with fibrotic saccules and/or without clinical improvement following BAOS surgery might be impossible and, on the contrary, the persistence of turbulent airflow and associated ongoing inflammation might lead to aberrant tissue proliferation after resection. In order to demonstrate our hypotheses, the authors decided to perform a unilateral sacculectomy and to postpone and assess the need for the execution of the contralateral saccule resection according to the findings of a second-look laryngoscopy. Ten dogs were enrolled. None of the saccules left in situ underwent spontaneous resolution of the eversion. In one dog, after sacculectomy, proliferation of a soft tissue lesion endoscopically similar to a newly formed saccule occurred. The results of the present study suggest that spontaneous resolution of saccule eversion is uncommon, even after the correction of the primary abnormalities (palate, nares). Resection of the saccules can relieve ventral rima glottidis obstruction; however, secondary intention healing might occasionally result in the recurrence of the obstruction.

  12. Single surgical step for endoscopic surgery and orbital reconstruction of a silent sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardesín, Alda; Escamilla, Yolanda; Romera, Manuel; Molina, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) is an uncommon disease characterised by enophthalmos, caused by ipsilateral maxillary sinus atelectasis. The diagnosis is clinical with radiological confirmation. The treatment has two objectives: to regulate the aeration of the maxillary sinus through achieving normal nasal cavity drainage and to restore the orbital architecture. A case of SSS treated in our hospital in a single surgical intervention is reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Acquiring surgical skills: the history of surgical teaching at the University of Sydney 1883-2014.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kilian G M; Storey, Catherine E

    2016-06-01

    There have been at least 10 major revisions of the medical curriculum since the inauguration of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sydney in 1883. This study traced the evolution of the teaching of surgery at our institution by examination of the set curriculum of each period; the expectations of student knowledge in the final examination as well as examining some of the insights provided by past students of their surgical experience through their writings. In the early years, medical graduates were qualified to perform operative surgery without any further training, whereas the modern postgraduate medical curriculum provides students with the basis for further surgical training.

  14. Cognitive learning and its future in urology: surgical skills teaching and assessment.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Somayeh B; Hussein, Ahmed A; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current status of novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education. Kinematics of end-effector trajectories, as well as cognitive state features of surgeon trainees and mentors have recently been studied as modalities to objectively evaluate the expertise level of trainees and to shorten the learning process. Virtual reality and haptics also have shown promising in research results in improving the surgical learning process by providing feedback to the trainee. 'Cognitive training' is a novel approach to enhance training and surgical performance. The utility of cognitive training in improving motor skills in other fields, including sports and rehabilitation, is promising enough to justify its utilization to improve surgical performance. However, some surgical procedures, especially ones performed during human-robot interaction in robot-assisted surgery, are much more complicated than sport and rehabilitation. Cognitive training has shown promising results in surgical skills-acquisition in complicated environments such as surgery. However, these methods are mostly developed in research groups using limited individuals. Transferring this research into the clinical applications is a demanding challenge. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of these novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education.

  15. Diagnosis of asymptomatic common bile duct stones: preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography versus intraoperative cholangiography--a multicenter, prospective controlled study. French Associations for Surgical Research.

    PubMed

    Montariol, T; Msika, S; Charlier, A; Rey, C; Bataille, N; Hay, J M; Lacaine, F; Fingerhut, A

    1998-07-01

    In patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis, preoperative diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stones can modify the therapeutic strategy. The aims of this prospective, controlled multicenter study were to assess the feasibility, concordance, discordance, and indexes such as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography compared with those of intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) in the diagnosis of asymptomatic CBD stones (i.e., patients undergoing cholecystectomy with no clinical or biologic evidence of CBD stones). From October 1993 to October 1995, 240 consecutive patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis, scheduled for cholecystectomy in 14 surgical centers, were enrolled in this study. All patients were selected for this study according to a preoperative high-risk CBD stone predictive score. Each patient underwent both endoscopic ultrasonography and IOC, as well as surgical exploration of the CBD when stones were detected during one or both preoperative investigations. All patients were seen 1 months and 1 year after operation to check for residual stones. The feasibility of endoscopic ultrasonography was significantly higher overall than that of IOC (99% vs 90%; p < 0.001), except when IOC was through a laparotomy (97% vs 93%; p = 0.16). The number of patients available for study was 215. In 198 cases (92%), results of both investigations were in concordance (161 negative and 37 positive values). Seventeen cases (8%) were discordant. There was overall concordance between the two investigations (kappa coefficient 0.764; 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 0.87), but the percentage of discordance was in favor of IOC. Sensitivity and specificity of IOC were significantly higher than those of endoscopic ultrasonography (1.00 and 0.98 vs 0.85 and 0.93, respectively). With a prevalence of CBD stones of 19%, positive and negative predictive values of IOC were significantly higher than those of

  16. Exploring hand coordination as a measure of surgical skill.

    PubMed

    Law, Katherine E; Jenewein, Caitlin G; Gannon, Samantha J; DiMarco, Shannon M; Maulson, Lakita J; Laufer, Shlomi; Pugh, Carla M

    2016-09-01

    The study aim was to identify residents' coordination between dominant and nondominant hands while grasping for sutures in a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair procedure simulation. We hypothesize residents will rely on their dominant and nondominant hands unequally while grasping for suture. Surgical residents had 15 min to complete the mesh securing and mesh tacking steps of a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair procedure. Procedure videos were coded for manual coordination events during the active suture grasping phase. Manual coordination events were defined as: active motion of dominant, nondominant, or both hands; and bimanual or unimanual manipulation of hands. A chi-square test was used to discriminate between coordination choices. Thirty-six residents (postgraduate year, 1-5) participated in the study. Residents changed manual coordination types during active suture grasping 500 times, ranging between 5 and 24 events (M = 13.9 events, standard deviation [SD] = 4.4). Bimanual coordination was used most (40%) and required the most time on average (M = 20.6 s, SD = 27.2), while unimanual nondominant coordination was used least (2.2%; M = 7.9 s, SD = 6.9). Residents relied on their dominant and nondominant hands unequally (P < 0.001). During 24% of events, residents depended on their nondominant hand (n = 120), which was predominantly used to operate the suture passer device. Residents appeared to actively coordinate both dominant and nondominant hands almost half of the time to complete suture grasping. Bimanual task durations took longer than other tasks on average suggesting these tasks were characteristically longer or switching hands required a greater degree of coordination. Future work is necessary to understand how task completion time and overall performance are affected by residents' hand utilization and switching between dominant and nondominant hands in surgical tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laparo-endoscopic single site surgery in pediatrics: Feasibility and surgical outcomes from a preliminary prospective Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Khambati, Aziz; Wehbi, Elias; Farhat, Walid A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) is becoming an alternative to standard laparoscopic surgery. Proposed advantages include enhanced cosmesis and faster recovery. We assessed the early post-operative surgical outcomes of LESS surgery utilizing different instruments in the pediatric urological population in Canada. Methods: We prospectively captured data on all patients undergoing LESS at our institution between February 2011 and August 2012. This included patient age, operative time, length of stay, complications and short-term surgical outcomes. Different instruments/devices were used to perform the procedures. Access was achieved through a transumbilical incision. Results: A total of 16 LESS procedures were performed, including seven pyeloplasties, four unilateral and one bilateral varicocelectomies, two simple nephrectomies, one renal cyst decortication and one pyelolithotomy. There was no statistical difference in the operative times, hospital length of stay and cost (pyeloplasty only) in patients undergoing pyeloplasty and varicocelectomy using the LESS technique when compared to an age matched cohort of patients managed with the traditional laparoscopic approach. One pyeloplasty in the LESS group required conversion to open due to a small intra-renal pelvis. There were no immediate or short term post-operative complications; however, one patient experienced a decrease in renal function status post LESS pyeloplasty. Since all procedures were performed by a vastly experienced surgeon at a tertiary center, the generalizability of the results cannot be assessed. Conclusions: There are only a few series that have assessed the role of LESS in pediatric urological surgery. Although our experience is limited by a heterogeneous group of patients with a short follow-up period, the present cohort demonstrates the safety and feasibility of LESS. Further evaluation with randomized studies is required to better assess the role of LESS in pediatric

  18. Basic airway skills acquisition using the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum: Initial results.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Sydne; Kim, Michael; Olasky, Jaisa; Campbell, Andre; Acton, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Skills Curriculum was developed to standardize medical student training. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and validity of implementing the basic airway curriculum. This single-center, prospective study of medical students participating in the basic airway module from 12/2014-3/2016 consisted of didactics, small-group practice, and testing in a simulated clinical scenario. Proficiency was determined by a checklist of skills (1-15), global score (1-5), and letter grade (NR-needs review, PS-proficient in simulation scenario, CP-proficient in clinical scenario). A proportion of students completed pre/post-test surveys regarding experience, satisfaction, comfort, and self-perceived proficiency. Over 16 months, 240 students were enrolled with 98% deemed proficient in a simulated or clinical scenario. Pre/post-test surveys (n = 126) indicated improvement in self-perceived proficiency by 99% of learners. All students felt moderately to very comfortable performing basic airway skills and 94% had moderate to considerable satisfaction after completing the module. The ACS/ASE Surgical Skills Curriculum is a feasible and effective way to teach medical students basic airway skills using simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Avoiding Surgical Skill Decay: A Systematic Review on the Spacing of Training Sessions.

    PubMed

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Cnossen, Fokie; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Tio, René A

    2017-08-23

    Spreading training sessions over time instead of training in just 1 session leads to an improvement of long-term retention for factual knowledge. However, it is not clear whether this would also apply to surgical skills. Thus, we performed a systematic review to find out whether spacing training sessions would also improve long-term retention of surgical skills. We searched the Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, Eric, and Web of Science online databases. We only included articles that were randomized trials with a sample of medical trainees acquiring surgical motor skills in which the spacing effect was reported. The quality and bias of the articles were assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. With respect to the spacing effect, 1955 articles were retrieved. After removing duplicates and articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria, 11 articles remained. The overall quality of the experiments was "moderate." Trainees in the spaced condition scored higher in a retention test than students in the massed condition. Our systematic review showed evidence that spacing training sessions improves long-term surgical skills retention when compared to massed practice. However, the optimal gap between the re-study sessions is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pilot study for an orthopedic surgical training laboratory for basic motor skills.

    PubMed

    Christy, Jonathan M; Kolovich, Gregory P; Beal, Matthew D; Mayerson, Joel L

    2014-11-01

    The most effective way to teach and assess a resident's knowledge of musculoskeletal medicine, including orthopedic-specific surgical skills, remains unclear. We designed a surgical skills training session to educate junior-level orthopedic residents in 4 core areas: comfort with basic power equipment, casting/splinting, suturing, and surgical instrument identification. As part of the study reported here, 11 orthopedic residents (postgraduate year 1-3) completed a skills session and were evaluated with written examinations and an ankle fracture model before and after the session. Four other junior residents were unable to attend the session because of clinical responsibilities. For the group of 11 residents who completed the written examination, mean (SD) presession percentile was 87.3 (10.4), mean (SD) postsession percentile was 92 (8.4), median was 96, and mode was 96. There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P < .05). In the ankle fracture model, for the entire group, mean (SD) overall presession percentile was 68.6 (13.9), and mean (SD) overall postsession percentile was 95.2 (5.2). There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P = .03). An intensive laboratory has the potential to improve junior-level residents' basic surgical skills and knowledge.

  1. Obstructive jaundice. Nonsurgical options for 'surgical' jaundice.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Burton, F R

    1991-12-01

    The development of nonoperative methods of biliary drainage has altered traditional concepts regarding management of medical and surgical jaundice. Patients with newly diagnosed obstructive jaundice typically are elderly and have an unresectable neoplasm. Because surgical cure is often impossible and operation is usually risky in such patients, decompression of the biliary tree by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopically inserted biliary stents has become an increasingly popular means of palliation. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and surgical bilidigestive bypass remain important alternatives. Selection of optimal management for the individual patient requires an in-depth evaluation by a skilled team consisting of the primary care physician, endoscopist, interventional radiologist, and surgeon.

  2. Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery: A Surgical Skills Assessment Tool in Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Arden, Deborah; Dodge, Laura E.; Zheng, Bin; Ricciotti, Hope A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe our experience with the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) program as a teaching and assessment tool for basic laparoscopic competency among gynecology residents. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at a single academic institution. Before the FLS program was introduced, baseline FLS testing was offered to residents and gynecology division directors. Test scores were analyzed by training level and self-reported surgical experience. After implementing a minimally invasive gynecologic surgical curriculum, third-year residents were retested. Results: The pass rates for baseline FLS skills testing were 0% for first-year residents, 50% for second-year residents, and 75% for third- and fourth-year residents. The pass rates for baseline cognitive testing were 60% for first- and second-year residents, 67% for third-year residents, and 40% for fourth-year residents. When comparing junior and senior residents, there was a significant difference in pass rates for the skills test (P=.007) but not the cognitive test (P=.068). Self-reported surgical experience strongly correlated with skills scores (r-value=0.97, P=.0048), but not cognitive scores (r-value=0.20, P=.6265). After implementing a curriculum, 100% of the third-year residents passed the skills test, and 92% passed the cognitive examination. Conclusions: The FLS skills test may be a valuable assessment tool for gynecology residents. The cognitive test may need further adaptation for applicability to gynecologists. PMID:21902937

  3. Double Endoscopic Intraluminal Operation (DEILO) for Early Gastric Cancer: Outcome of Novel Procedure for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kyoichi; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Kuriyama, Kengo; Suzuki, Masaki; Yanoma, Toru; Kimura, Akiharu; Kogure, Norimichi; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tetsuro; Mochiki, Erito; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been used to treat patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). Although several endoscopic devices have been developed to ensure easy and safe ESD, this technique still requires an experienced, highly skilled endoscopist, as it is performed through a single gastroscope, thus requiring one-handed surgical techniques. To overcome these limitations, many ESD procedures with counter-traction have been developed, such as the double scope, double channel scope, clip with line, magnetic anchor, percutaneous traction and external grasping forceps methods. We devised a double endoscopic intraluminal operation (DEILO). Two endoscopes were simultaneously inserted into the stomach. One endoscope was used to lift the lesion, and the other was used to excise the lesion. The DEILO procedure was performed on 122 cases of EGC. In this article, we report the efficacy and safety of DEILO in patients with EGC.

  4. Association of a Surgical Task During Training With Team Skill Acquisition Among Surgical Residents: The Missing Piece in Multidisciplinary Team Training.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jessica L; Crouch, Dustin L; Sobba, Kathryn; Evans, Douglas; Zhang, Jing; Johnson, James E; Saunders, Ian; Thomas, John; Bodin, Sarah; Tonidandel, Ashley; Carter, Jeff; Westcott, Carl; Martin, R Shayn; Hildreth, Amy

    2017-09-01

    The human patient simulators that are currently used in multidisciplinary operating room team training scenarios cannot simulate surgical tasks because they lack a realistic surgical anatomy. Thus, they eliminate the surgeon's primary task in the operating room. The surgical trainee is presented with a significant barrier when he or she attempts to suspend disbelief and engage in the scenario. To develop and test a simulation-based operating room team training strategy that challenges the communication abilities and teamwork competencies of surgeons while they are engaged in realistic operative maneuvers. This pre-post educational intervention pilot study compared the gains in teamwork skills for midlevel surgical residents at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center after they participated in a standardized multidisciplinary team training scenario with 3 possible levels of surgical realism: (1) SimMan (Laerdal) (control group, no surgical anatomy); (2) "synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks" mannequin (medium-fidelity anatomy), and (3) a patient simulated by a deceased donor (high-fidelity anatomy). Participation in the simulation scenario and the subsequent debriefing. Teamwork competency was assessed using several instruments with extensive validity evidence, including the Nontechnical Skills assessment, the Trauma Management Skills scoring system, the Crisis Resource Management checklist, and a self-efficacy survey instrument. Participant satisfaction was assessed with a Likert-scale questionnaire. Scenario participants included midlevel surgical residents, anesthesia providers, scrub nurses, and circulating nurses. Statistical models showed that surgical residents exposed to medium-fidelity simulation (synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks) team training scenarios demonstrated greater gains in teamwork skills compared with control groups (SimMan) (Nontechnical Skills video score: 95% CI, 1.06-16.41; Trauma Management Skills video score: 95% CI, 0.61-2.90) and

  5. Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Denadai, Rafael; Souto, Luís Ricardo Martinhão

    2012-01-01

    To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables) to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.

  6. Learning style and laparoscopic experience in psychomotor skill performance using a virtual reality surgical simulator.

    PubMed

    Windsor, John A; Diener, Scott; Zoha, Farah

    2008-06-01

    People learn in different ways, and training techniques and technologies should accommodate individual learning needs. This pilot study looks at the relationship between learning style, as measured with the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS), laparoscopic surgery experience and psychomotor skill performance using the MIST VR surgical simulator. Five groups of volunteer subjects were selected from undergraduate tertiary students, medical students, novice surgical trainees, advanced surgical trainees and experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Each group was administered the MIDAS followed by two simulated surgical tasks on the MIST VR simulator. There was a striking homogeny of learning styles amongst experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Significant differences in the distribution of primary learning styles were found (P < .01) between subjects with minimal surgical training and those with considerable experience. A bodily-kinesthetic learning style, irrespective of experience, was associated with the best performance of the laparoscopic tasks. This is the first study to highlight the relationship between learning style, psychomotor skill and laparoscopic surgical experience with implications for surgeon selection, training and credentialling.

  7. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) for Graves’ disease: a comparison of surgical results with open thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jitpratoom, Pornpeera; Ketwong, Khwannara; Sasanakietkul, Thanyawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) provides excellent cosmetic results from its potential for scar-free operation. The procedure has been applied successfully for Graves’ disease by the authors of this work and compared with the standard open cervical approach to evaluate its safety and outcomes. Methods From January 2014 to November 2016, a total of 97 patients with Graves’ disease were reviewed retrospectively. Open thyroidectomy (OT) and TOETVA were performed in 49 patients and 46 patients, respectively. For TOETVA, a three-port technique through the oral vestibule was utilized. The thyroidectomy was done endoscopically using conventional laparoscopic instruments and an ultrasonic device. Patient demographics and surgical variables, including operative time, blood loss, and complications, were investigated and compared. Results TOETVA was performed successfully in all 45 patients, although conversion to open surgery was deemed necessary in one patient. All patient characteristics for both groups were similar. Operative time was shorter for the OT group compared to the TOETVA group, which totaled 101.97±24.618 and 134.11±31.48 minutes, respectively (P<<0.5). Blood loss was comparable for both groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) pain score for the TOETVA group was significantly lower than for the OT group on day 1 (2.08±1.53 vs. 4.57±1.35), day 2 (0.84±1.12 vs. 2.57±1.08) and day 3 (0.33±0.71 vs. 1.08±1.01) (P<<0.05). Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy was found in four and two cases of TOETVA and OT group, respectively. Transient hypocalcemia was found in ten and seven cases of TOETVA and OT group, respectively. No other complications were observed. Conclusions TOETVA is a feasible and safe treatment for Graves’ disease in comparison to the standard open cervical approach. It is considered a viable alternative for patients who have been indicated for surgery with excellent cosmetic results. PMID

  8. A role for error training in surgical technical skill instruction and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David A; Regehr, Glenn; MacDonald, Jeannie

    2002-03-01

    During the evaluation of many instances of the same basic surgical skill, we observed that there were several errors that occurred frequently. Two studies were undertaken to examine the use of these errors for improving the instruction and evaluation of the skill. For both studies, two types of rater training videotapes were developed. One involved the use of examples of common errors (error) and the other demonstrated the skill being performed correctly (correct). A testing videotape was created consisting of 24 performances of the skill that ranged in quality of the performance. The first study was designed to assess the impact of error instruction on skill acquisition. In this study, a group of 30 senior medical students were randomly assigned to one of four different training groups: none, error only, correct only, and error+correct. Subjects were videotaped performing the skill before and after the training and three experts evaluated these performances independently using a 7-point rating scale. The second study was designed to assess the impact of error training on skill evaluation and was done using both novice and expert raters. The same group of 30 senior medical students used in the first study was used as novice raters. Following training in one of the four training groups, each subject rated the 24 performances on the testing videotape and interrater reliability was assessed for each group. Surgical faculty served as expert raters in this study and were randomly assigned to receive either error training or no training. Each subject viewed the testing videotape, rating the performances and giving "feedback" commentary. Interrater reliability was calculated for the two groups and the precision of the feedback was assessed. Significant improvement in posttest performance scores was seen only in the "error+correct" training group. Interrater reliability was somewhat lower for the "correct only" and "error only" training groups in both the student and

  9. [Natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery (notes)--a new era in general surgery].

    PubMed

    Elazary, Ram; Horgan, Santiago; Talamini, Mark A; Rivkind, Avraham I; Mintz, Yoav

    2008-10-01

    Four years ago, a new surgical technique was presented, the natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). This technique provides an incisionless operation. The surgical devices are inserted into the peritoneal cavity through the gastrointestinal or the urogenital tracts. Today, a cholecystectomy can be performed using an advanced endoscope inserted through the stomach or the vagina. The advantages of NOTES are: reduced post operative pain, no hernias, no surgical wounds infections and better cosmetic results. The disadvantages are: difficulties in achieving safe enterotomy closure or a leak proof anastomosis, it necessitates performing more operations compared to open or laparoscopic operations in order to obtain the skills for performing these operations, and difficulties of acquiring satisfactory endoscopic vision due to lack of advanced technology. Several NOTES operations have already been performed in humans. However, many other surgical procedures were tested in laboratory animals. Development and improvement of surgical devices may promote this surgical modality in the future.

  10. Developing Cognitive Task Analysis-based Educational Videos for Basic Surgical Skills in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Celine; McMillan, Catherine; Saun, Tomas J; Sun, Kimberly; D'hondt, Veerle; von Schroeder, Herbert P; Martou, Glykeria; Lee, Matthew; Liao, Elizabeth; Binhammer, Paul

    2017-03-22

    To describe the development of cognitive task analysis (CTA)-based multimedia educational videos for surgical trainees in plastic surgery. A needs assessment survey was used to identify 5 plastic surgery skills on which to focus the educational videos. Three plastic surgeons were video-recorded performing each skill while describing the procedure, and were interviewed with probing questions. Three medical student reviewers coded transcripts and categorized each step into "action," "decision," or "assessment," and created a cognitive demands table (CDT) for each skill. The CDTs were combined into 1 table that was reviewed by the surgeons performing each skill to ensure accuracy. The final CDTs were compared against each surgeon's original transcripts. The total number of steps identified, percentage of steps shared, and the average percentage of steps omitted were calculated. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, an urban tertiary care teaching center. Canadian junior plastic surgery residents (n = 78) were sent a needs assessment survey. Four plastic surgeons and 1 orthopedic surgeon performed the skills. Twenty-eight residents responded to the survey (36%). Subcuticular suturing, horizontal and vertical mattress suturing, hand splinting, digital nerve block, and excisional biopsy had the most number of residents (>80%) rank the skills as being skills that students should be able to perform before entering residency. The number of steps identified through CTA ranged from 12 to 29. Percentage of steps shared by all 3 surgeons for each skill ranged from 30% to 48%, while the average percentage of steps that were omitted by each surgeon ranged from 27% to 40%. Instructional videos for basic surgical skills may be generated using CTA to help experts provide comprehensive descriptions of a procedure. A CTA-based educational tool may give trainees access to a broader, objective body of knowledge, allowing them to learn decision-making processes

  11. Coaching Non-technical Skills Improves Surgical Residents' Performance in a Simulated Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Yule, Steven; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Wilkinson, Jill; McKinley, Aileen; MacDonald, Jamie; Neill, Adrian; McAdam, Tim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of coaching on non-technical skills and performance during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated operating room (OR). Non-technical skills (situation awareness, decision making, teamwork, and leadership) underpin technical ability and are critical to the success of operations and the safety of patients in the OR. The rate of developing assessment tools in this area has outpaced development of workable interventions to improve non-technical skills in surgical training and beyond. A randomized trial was conducted with senior surgical residents (n = 16). Participants were randomized to receive either non-technical skills coaching (intervention) or to self-reflect (control) after each of 5 simulated operations. Coaching was based on the Non-Technical Skills For Surgeons (NOTSS) behavior observation system. Surgeon-coaches trained in this method coached participants in the intervention group for 10 minutes after each simulation. Primary outcome measure was non-technical skills, assessed from video by a surgeon using the NOTSS system. Secondary outcomes were time to call for help during bleeding, operative time, and path length of laparoscopic instruments. Non-technical skills improved in the intervention group from scenario 1 to scenario 5 compared with those in the control group (p = 0.04). The intervention group was faster to call for help when faced with unstoppable bleeding in the final scenario (no. 5; p = 0.03). Coaching improved residents' non-technical skills in the simulated OR compared with those in the control group. Important next steps are to implement non-technical skills coaching in the real OR and assess effect on clinically important process measures and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Battle of the bots: a comparison of the standard da Vinci and the da Vinci Surgical Skills Simulator in surgical skills acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin; Mosley, Natalie; Tierney, James

    2016-08-29

    Virtual reality simulators are increasingly used to gain robotic surgical skills. This study compared use of the da Vinci Surgical Skills Simulator (dVSSS) to the standard da Vinci (SdV) robot for skills acquisition in a prospective randomized study. Residents from urology, gynecology, and general surgery programs performed three virtual reality tasks (thread the ring, ring rail, and tubes) on the dvSSS. Participants were then randomized to one of the two study groups (dVSSS and SdV). Each participant then practiced on either the dVSSS or the SdV (depending on randomization) for 30 min per week over a 4-week time period. The dVSSS arm was not permitted to practice ring rail (due to no similar practice scenario available for the SdV group). Following 4 weeks of practice, participants performed the same three virtual reality tasks and the results were recorded and compared to baseline. Overall and percent improvement were recorded for all participants from pre-test to post-test. Two-way ANOVA analyses were used to compare the dVSSS and SdV groups and three tasks. Initially, 30 participants were identified and enrolled in the study. Randomization resulted in 15 participants in each arm. During the course of the study, four participants were unable to complete all tasks and practice sessions and were, therefore, excluded. This resulted in a total of 26 participants (15 in the dVSSS group and 11 in the SdV group) who completed the study. Overall total improvement score was found to be 23.23 and 23.48 for the SdV and dVSSS groups, respectively (p = 0.9245). The percent improvement was 60 and 47 % for the SdV and dVSSS groups respectively, which was a statistically significant difference between the two groups and three tasks. Practicing on the standard da Vinci is comparable to practicing on the da Vinci simulator for acquiring robotic surgical skills. In spite of several potential advantages, the dVSSS arm performed no better than the SdV arm in the final

  13. Surgical outreach in rural South Africa: are we managing to impart surgical skills?

    PubMed

    Clarke, Damian Luiz; Aldous, Colleen

    2013-07-29

    The Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) has run a surgical outreach programme for over a decade.Objective. To quantify the impact of the outreach programme by analysing its effect on the operative capacity of a single rural health district. During 2012, investigators visited each district hospital in Sisonke Health District (SHD), KZN to quantify surgery undertaken by resident staff between 1998 and 2013. Investigators also reviewed the operative registers of the four district hospitals in SHD for a 6-month period (March - August 2012) to document the surgery performed at each hospital. The number of staff who attended specialist-based teaching was recorded in an attempt to measure the impact of each visit. From 1998 to 2013, 35 385 patients were seen at 1 453 clinics, 5 199 operations were performed and 1 357 patients were referred to regional hospitals. A total of 3 027 staff attended teaching ward rounds and teaching sessions. In the four district hospitals, 2 160 operations were performed in the 6-month period. There were 653 non-obstetrical operations and the obstetric cases comprised 1 094 caesarean sections, 55 sterilisations and 370 evacuations of the uterus. The infrastructure is well established and the outreach programme is well run and reliable. The clinical outputs of the programme are significant. However, the impact of this programme on specific outcomes is less certain. This raises the question of the future strategic choices that need to be made in our attempts to improve access to surgical care.

  14. Development of laparoscopic skills in Medical students naive to surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Cavalini, Worens Luiz Pereira; Claus, Christiano Marlo Paggi; Dimbarre, Daniellson; Cury, Antonio Moris; Bonin, Eduardo Aimoré; Loureiro, Marcelo de Paula; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills of Medical students trained on a surgical simulator. Methods First- and second-year Medical students participated on a laparoscopic training program on simulators. None of the students had previous classes of surgical technique, exposure to surgical practice nor training prior to the enrollment in to the study. Students´ time were collected before and after the 150-minute training. Skill acquisition was measured comparing time and scores of students and senior instructors of laparoscopic surgery Results Sixty-eight students participated of the study, with a mean age of 20.4 years, with a predominance of first-year students (62%). All students improved performance in score and time, after training (p<0,001). Score improvement in the exercises ranged from 294.1 to 823%. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that second-year Medical students have achieved higher performance after training. Conclusions Medical students who had never been exposed to surgical techniques can acquire basic laparoscopic skills after training in simulators. Second-year undergraduates had better performance than first-year students. PMID:25628198

  15. Training for endoscopic surgical procedures should be performed in the dissection room: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Klitsie, Pieter J; Ten Brinke, Bart; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J V; Theeuwes, Hilco P; Lange, Johan F; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is associated with a shallow learning curve. AnubiFiX embalming technique enables laparoscopic surgical training on supple embalmed and hence insufflatable human specimens in the dissection room. Aim of the present trial is to test whether dissection-based anatomy education is superior to classical frontal classroom education on the short and long term. A total of 112 medical students were randomized in three groups. Group I attended classroom education, group II laparoscopic dissection-based education and group III received both. All groups completed an anatomy test on human specimens before, immediately after and 3 weeks after the anatomy training. Group II and III scored significantly better compared to group I immediately after the anatomy training (p I-II < 0.001, p I-III < 0.001). This difference was still significant after 3 weeks (p I-II < 0.001, p I-III < 0.001). No significant difference was found between group II and group III immediately after the course (p = 0.86), nor at the follow-up (p = 0.054). The AnubiFiX™ embalming technique enables laparoscopic anatomy education in human specimens, with superior outcomes on the short and long term, as compared to classical frontal classroom education.

  16. Acquisition of diagnostic and surgical skills in otorhinolaryngology: a comparison of France and Germany.

    PubMed

    Oker, Natalie; Escabasse, Virginie; Al-Otaibi, Naif; Coste, Andre; Albers, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    With the coalescing of the European countries, among many others, official initiatives have been launched to propose minimum requirements for Otolaryngology, Head and Neck surgery (ORL) specialty training by creating an European log book. This study was initiated to assess and compare the acquisition of basic medical key diagnostic and surgical skills by residents and recent ORL specialists in France (FRA) and Germany (GER) and to determine whether gender-specific differences exist. For this, an anonymous questionnaire with questions to basic medical, diagnostic and surgical procedures specific to ORL was developed. 120 FRA and 125 GER questionnaires were returned from participants with a median training experience of 4 years. The female to male ratio was 1.3:1 and 78% of respondents were residents and 22% recent specialists. Concerning diagnostic procedures, there was no significant overall difference. Germans performed better in basic medical skills, while study participants from FRA had performed surgical procedures significantly more often in a more independent manner than German respondents in the areas of otology, rhinology and head and neck. Only in septoplasty, as part of rhinology, the Germans had a light advantage compared to the French. No difference was found for trauma surgery. No gender-specific difference became apparent. Taken together, in FRA, ORL training is far more surgically orientated than in GER. It remains unclear at what time, the Germans may catch up with their skills. Initiatives should be taken in GER to secure an adequate acquisition of surgical skill and experience to maintain a high level of ORL-specific competence.

  17. Development of a surgical skills curriculum for the training and assessment of manual skills in orthopedic surgical residents.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Eric A; Brooks, Adam G; Leasure, Jeremi; Camisa, William; van Warmerdam, Jennifer; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Montgomery, William; McGann, William

    2015-01-01

    To develop and conduct a pilot study of a curriculum of 4 surrogate bone training modules to assess and track progress in basic orthopedic manual skills outside the operating room. Four training modules were developed with faculty and resident input. The modules include (1) cortical drilling, (2) drill trajectory, (3) oscillating saw, and (4) pedicle probing. Orthopedic resident's performance was evaluated. Validity and reliability results were calculated using standard analysis of variance and multivariate regression analysis accounting for postgraduate year (PGY) level, number of attempts, and specific outcome target results specific to the simulation module. St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco, CA. These modules were tested on 15 orthopedic surgery residents ranging from PGY 1 to PGY 5 experience. The cortical drilling module had a mean success rate of 56% ± 5%. There was a statistically significant difference in performance according to the diameter of the drill used from 33% ± 7% with large diameter to 70% ± 6% with small diameter. The drill trajectory module had a success rate of 85% ± 3% with a trend toward improvement across PGY level. The oscillating saw module had a mean success rate of 25% ± 5% (trajectory) and 84% ± 6% (depth). We observed a significant improvement in trajectory performance during the second attempt. The pedicle probing module had a success rate of 46% ± 10%. The results of this pilot study on a small number of residents are promising. The modules were inexpensive and easy to administer. Conclusions of statistical significance include (1) residents who could easily detect changes in surrogate bone thickness with a smaller diameter drill than with a larger diameter drill and (2) residents who significantly improved saw trajectory with an additional attempt at the module. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 .

  19. Missed opportunities: a descriptive assessment of teaching and attitudes regarding communication skills in a surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Hutul, Olivia A; Carpenter, Robert O; Tarpley, John L; Lomis, Kimberly D

    2006-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that "residents must be able to demonstrate interpersonal and communication skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their patients' families, and professional associates." The authors sought to assess current methods of teaching and attitudes regarding communication skills in their surgical residency. After obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) exemption, voluntary anonymous surveys were completed by a sample of convenience at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center: surgical residents at Grand Rounds and attending surgeons in a faculty meeting. Data were evaluated from 49 respondents (33 of 75 total surgical residents, 16 representative attending surgeons). One hundred percent of respondents rated the importance of communication to the successful care of patients as "4" or "5" of 5. Direct attending observation of residents communicating with patients/families was confirmed by residents and faculty. Residents reported varying levels of comfort with different types of conversations. Residents were "comfortable" or "very comfortable" as follows: obtaining informed consent, 91%; reporting operative findings, 64%; delivering bad news, 61%; conducting a family conference, 40%; discussing do not resuscitate (DNR) orders, 36%; and discussing transition to comfort care, 24%. Resident receptiveness to communication skills education varied with proposed venues: 84% favored teaching in the course of routine clinical care, 52% via online resources, and 46% in workshops. Residents were asked how frequently they received feedback specific to their communication skills during the past 6 months: Most residents reported 0 (39%) or 1 (21%) feedback episode. Only 30% of resident respondents reported receiving feedback that they perceived helpful. Attending surgeons reported that they did provide residents feedback specific to their communication skills. When asked

  20. Development and verification of a taxonomy of assessment metrics for surgical technical skills.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Connie C; DaRosa, Debra; Sullivan, Maura E; Meyerson, Shari; Yoshida, Ken; Korndorffer, James R

    2014-01-01

    To create and empirically verify a taxonomy of metrics for assessing surgical technical skills, and to determine which types of metrics, skills, settings, learners, models, and instruments were most commonly reported in the technical skills assessment literature. In 2011-2012, the authors used a rational analysis of existing and emerging metrics to create the taxonomy, and used PubMed to conduct a systematic literature review (2001-2011) to test the taxonomy's comprehensiveness and verifiability. Using 202 articles identified from the review, the authors classified metrics according to the taxonomy and coded data concerning their context and use. Frequencies (counts, percentages) were calculated for all variables. The taxonomy contained 12 objective and 4 subjective categories. Of 567 metrics identified in the literature, 520 (92%) were classified using the new taxonomy. Process metrics outnumbered outcome metrics by 8:1. The most frequent metrics were "time," "manual techniques" (objective and subjective), "errors," and "procedural steps." Only one new metric, "learning curve," emerged. Assessments of basic motor skills and skills germane to laparoscopic surgery dominated the literature. Novices, beginners, and intermediate learners were the most frequent subjects, and box trainers and virtual reality simulators were the most frequent models used for assessing performance. Metrics convey what is valued in human performance. This taxonomy provides a common nomenclature. It may help educators and researchers in procedurally oriented disciplines to use metrics more precisely and consistently. Future assessments should focus more on bedside tasks and open surgical procedures and should include more outcome metrics.

  1. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  2. Black macular patches on parietal peritoneum and other extraintestinal sites from intraperitoneal spillage and spread of India ink from preoperative endoscopic tattooing: an endoscopic, surgical, gross pathologic, and microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Mitchell S; Courtney, James T; Amin, Mitual

    2010-09-01

    Three cases, including one case report and two clinical images, have been reported of extraintestinal or peritoneal black maculae detected at laparoscopy after colonoscopic tattooing, presumably from intraperitoneal spillage of India ink during tattooing. Report three cases of inadvertent extraintestinal tattooing from endoscopic tattooing of intestinal lesions, provide histologic evidence for the presumed pathophysiology, and promulgate recommendations to prevent this complication. Three patients underwent endoscopic tattooing of intestinal lesions using India ink, surgery for lesion removal, and pathologic analysis. Three patients had black macular patches or streaks identified intraoperatively at extraintestinal sites after endoscopic tattooing of intestinal lesions with India ink: (1) black patches on peritoneum 7 days after colonoscopic tattooing of cecal cancer, (2) black streaks on band connecting cecum to peritoneum 13 days after colonoscopic tattooing of cecal cancer, and (3) blackish band on jejunal mesentery 28 days after tattooing presumptive bleeding jejunal lesion. Pigmentation was detected at both injection and extraintestinal sites in all patients by (1) surgery, (2) gross pathology, and (3) microscopic examination demonstrating intracellular black pigmentation within mesothelial cells and macrophages. Special histologic stains were consistent with a carbon-based pigment, and inconsistent with iron or melanin as the pigment. The proposed mechanism is intraperitoneal India ink spillage from deep intestinal injection, as supported by histologic findings of subserosal pigment accumulation. An alternative histologic mechanism is migration of pigment-laden macrophages via lymphovascular channels. Endoscopic injection of India ink using standard sclerotherapy needles can inadvertently tattoo extraintestinal sites in addition to tattooing the primary lesion. Despite its striking appearance, this intraoperative, gross, and microscopic finding is likely not

  3. Workplace-based assessment: assessing technical skill throughout the continuum of surgical training.

    PubMed

    Beard, Jonathan; Rowley, David; Bussey, Maria; Pitts, David

    2009-03-01

    The Royal Colleges of Surgeons and Surgical Specialty Associations in the UK have introduced competence-based syllabi and curricula for surgical training. The syllabi of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) and Orthopaedic Curriculum and Assessment Programme (OCAP) define the core competencies, that is, the observable and measureable behaviours required of a surgical trainee. The curricula define when, where and how these will be assessed. Procedure-based assessment (PBA) has been adopted as the principal method of assessing surgical skills. It combines competencies specific to the procedure with generic competencies such as safe handling of instruments. It covers the entire procedure, including preoperative and postoperative planning. A global summary of the level at which the trainee performed the assessed elements of the procedure is also included. The form has been designed to be completed quickly by the assessor (clinical supervisor) and fed-back to the trainee between operations. PBA forms have been developed for all index procedures in all surgical specialties. The forms are intended to be used as frequently as possible when performing index procedures, as their primary aim is to aid learning. At the end of a training placement the aggregated PBA forms, together with the logbook, enable the Educational Supervisor and/or Programme Director to make a summary judgement about the competence of a trainee to perform index procedures to a given standard.

  4. Orbital endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Selva, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive "keyhole" surgery performed using endoscopic visualization is increasing in popularity and is being used by almost all surgical subspecialties. Within ophthalmology, however, endoscopic surgery is not commonly performed and there is little literature on the use of the endoscope in orbital surgery. Transorbital use of the endoscope can greatly aid in visualizing orbital roof lesions and minimizing the need for bone removal. The endoscope is also useful during decompression procedures and as a teaching aid to train orbital surgeons. In this article, we review the history of endoscopic orbital surgery and provide an overview of the technique and describe situations where the endoscope can act as a useful adjunct to orbital surgery.

  5. Training models in laparoscopy: a systematic review comparing their effectiveness in learning surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W; Van De Putte, D; Van Renterghem, K; Van Nieuwenhove, Y; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients in the operating room, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. We searched Pubmed, CENTRAL, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials and randomised cross-over studies comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. The reference list of identified trials was searched for further relevant studies. Fifty-eight trials evaluating several training forms and involving 1591 participants were included (four studies with a low risk of bias). Training (virtual reality (VR) or video trainer (VT)) versus no training improves surgical skills in the majority of trials. Both VR and VT are as effective in most studies. VR training is superior to traditional laparoscopic training in the operating room. Outcome results for VR robotic simulations versus robot training show no clear difference in effectiveness for either model. Only one trial included human cadavers and observed better results versus VR for one out of four scores. Contrasting results are observed when robotic technology is compared with manual laparoscopy. VR training and VT training are valid teaching models. Practicing on these models similarly improves surgical skills. A combination of both methods is recommended in a surgical curriculum. VR training is superior to unstructured traditional training in the operating room. The reciprocal effectiveness of the other models to learn surgical skills has not yet been established.

  6. Transluminal endoscopic step-up approach versus minimally invasive surgical step-up approach in patients with infected necrotising pancreatitis (TENSION trial): design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial [ISRCTN09186711

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infected necrotising pancreatitis is a potentially lethal disease that nearly always requires intervention. Traditionally, primary open necrosectomy has been the treatment of choice. In recent years, the surgical step-up approach, consisting of percutaneous catheter drainage followed, if necessary, by (minimally invasive) surgical necrosectomy has become the standard of care. A promising minimally invasive alternative is the endoscopic transluminal step-up approach. This approach consists of endoscopic transluminal drainage followed, if necessary, by endoscopic transluminal necrosectomy. We hypothesise that the less invasive endoscopic step-up approach is superior to the surgical step-up approach in terms of clinical and economic outcomes. Methods/Design The TENSION trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group superiority multicenter trial. Patients with (suspected) infected necrotising pancreatitis with an indication for intervention and in whom both treatment modalities are deemed possible, will be randomised to either an endoscopic transluminal or a surgical step-up approach. During a 4 year study period, 98 patients will be enrolled from 24 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite of death and major complications within 6 months following randomisation. Secondary endpoints include complications such as pancreaticocutaneous fistula, exocrine or endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, need for additional radiological, endoscopic or surgical intervention, the need for necrosectomy after drainage, the number of (re-)interventions, quality of life, and total direct and indirect costs. Discussion The TENSION trial will answer the question whether an endoscopic step-up approach reduces the combined primary endpoint of death and major complications, as well as hospital stay and related costs compared with a surgical step-up approach in patients with infected necrotising pancreatitis. PMID:24274589

  7. Features that contribute to the usefulness of low-fidelity models for surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Langebæk, R; Berendt, M; Pedersen, L T; Jensen, A L; Eika, B

    2012-04-07

    For practical, ethical and economic reasons, veterinary surgical education is becoming increasingly dependent on models for training. The limited availability and high cost of commercially produced surgical models has increased the need for useful, low-cost alternatives. For this reason, a number of models were developed to be used in a basic surgical skills course for veterinary students. The models were low fidelity, having limited resemblance to real animals. The aim of the present study was to describe the students' learning experience with the models and to report their perception of the usefulness of the models in applying the trained skills to live animal surgery. One hundred and forty-six veterinary fourth-year students evaluated the models on a four-point Likert scale. Of these, 26 additionally participated in individual semistructured interviews. The survey results showed that 75 per cent of the students rated the models 'useful'/'very useful'. Interviews revealed that tactile, dimensional, visual, situational and emotional features are important to students' perception of a successful translation of skills from models to live animal. In conclusion, low-fidelity models are useful educational tools in preparation for live animal surgery. However, there are specific features to take into account when developing models in order for students to perceive them as useful.

  8. Virtual reality simulators: current status in acquisition and assessment of surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Cosman, Peter H; Cregan, Patrick C; Martin, Christopher J; Cartmill, John A

    2002-01-01

    Medical technology is currently evolving so rapidly that its impact cannot be analysed. Robotics and telesurgery loom on the horizon, and the technology used to drive these advances has serendipitous side-effects for the education and training arena. The graphical and haptic interfaces used to provide remote feedback to the operator--by passing control to a computer--may be used to generate simulations of the operative environment that are useful for training candidates in surgical procedures. One additional advantage is that the metrics calculated inherently in the controlling software in order to run the simulation may be used to provide performance feedback to individual trainees and mentors. New interfaces will be required to undergo evaluation of the simulation fidelity before being deemed acceptable. The potential benefits fall into one of two general categories: those benefits related to skill acquisition, and those related to skill assessment. The educational value of the simulation will require assessment, and comparison to currently available methods of training in any given procedure. It is also necessary to determine--by repeated trials--whether a given simulation actually measures the performance parameters it purports to measure. This trains the spotlight on what constitutes good surgical skill, and how it is to be objectively measured. Early results suggest that virtual reality simulators have an important role to play in this aspect of surgical training.

  9. Computer-Enhanced Visual Learning Method: A Paradigm to Teach and Document Surgical Skills

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Max; Mickelson, Jennie; Yerkes, Elizabeth; Maizels, Evelyn; Stork, Rachel; Young, Christine; Corcoran, Julia; Holl, Jane; Kaplan, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Innovation Changes in health care are stimulating residency training programs to develop new methods for teaching surgical skills. We developed Computer-Enhanced Visual Learning (CEVL) as an innovative Internet-based learning and assessment tool. The CEVL method uses the educational procedures of deliberate practice and performance to teach and learn surgery in a stylized manner. Aim of Innovation CEVL is a learning and assessment tool that can provide students and educators with quantitative feedback on learning a specific surgical procedure. Methods involved examine quantitative data of improvement in surgical skills. Herein, we qualitatively describe the method and show how program directors (PDs) may implement this technique in their residencies. Results CEVL allows an operation to be broken down into teachable components. The process relies on feedback and remediation to improve performance, with a focus on learning that is applicable to the next case being performed. CEVL has been shown to be effective for teaching pediatric orchiopexy and is being adapted to additional adult and pediatric procedures and to office examination skills. The CEVL method is available to other residency training programs. PMID:21975716

  10. Assessing the Nontechnical Skills of Surgical Trainees: Views of the Theater Team.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Wild, Jonathan; Ritchie, Judith; Daniels, Sarah; Robertson, Eleanor; Beard, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the views of members of theater teams regarding the proposed introduction of a workplace-based assessment of nontechnical skills of surgeons (NOTSS) into the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme in the United Kingdom. In addition, the previous training and familiarity of the members of the surgical theater team with the concept and assessment of NOTSS would be evaluated. A regional survey of members of theater teams (consultant surgeons, anesthetists, scrub nurses, and trainees) was performed at 1 teaching and 2 district general hospitals in South Yorkshire. There were 160 respondents corresponding to a response rate of 81%. The majority (77%) were not aware of the NOTSS assessment tool with only 9% of respondents reporting to have previously used the NOTSS tool and just 3% having received training in NOTSS assessment. Overall, 81% stated that assessing NOTSS was as important as assessing technical skills. Trainees attributed less importance to nontechnical skills than the other groups (p ≤ 0.016). Although opinion appears divided as to whether the presence of a consultant surgeon in theater could potentially make it difficult to assess a trainee's leadership skills and decision-making capabilities, overall 60% agree that the routine use of NOTSS assessment would enhance safety in the operating theater and 80% agree that the NOTSS tool should be introduced to assess the nontechnical skills of trainees in theater. However, a significantly lower proportion of trainees (45%) agreed on the latter compared with the other groups (p = 0.001). Our survey demonstrates acceptability among the theater team for the introduction of the NOTSS tool into the surgical curriculum. However, lack of familiarity highlights the importance of faculty training for assessors before such an introduction. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. "I got it on Ebay!": cost-effective approach to surgical skills laboratories.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ethan; Schenarts, Paul J; Shostrom, Valerie; Schenarts, Kimberly D; Evans, Charity H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical education is witnessing a surge in the use of simulation. However, implementation of simulation is often cost-prohibitive. Online shopping offers a low budget alternative. The aim of this study was to implement cost-effective skills laboratories and analyze online versus manufacturers' prices to evaluate for savings. Four skills laboratories were designed for the surgery clerkship from July 2014 to June 2015. Skills laboratories were implemented using hand-built simulation and instruments purchased online. Trademarked simulation was priced online and instruments priced from a manufacturer. Costs were compiled, and a descriptive cost analysis of online and manufacturers' prices was performed. Learners rated their level of satisfaction for all educational activities, and levels of satisfaction were compared. A total of 119 third-year medical students participated. Supply lists and costs were compiled for each laboratory. A descriptive cost analysis of online and manufacturers' prices showed online prices were substantially lower than manufacturers, with a per laboratory savings of: $1779.26 (suturing), $1752.52 (chest tube), $2448.52 (anastomosis), and $1891.64 (laparoscopic), resulting in a year 1 savings of $47,285. Mean student satisfaction scores for the skills laboratories were 4.32, with statistical significance compared to live lectures at 2.96 (P < 0.05) and small group activities at 3.67 (P < 0.05). A cost-effective approach for implementation of skills laboratories showed substantial savings. By using hand-built simulation boxes and online resources to purchase surgical equipment, surgical educators overcome financial obstacles limiting the use of simulation and provide learning opportunities that medical students perceive as beneficial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Virtual laparoscopic surgical skills practice using a multi-degree of freedom joystick.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Kai; Head, Michael J; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare three different surgical skills practice environments while performing a virtual laparoscopic surgical training task using a multi-degree of freedom joystick, a commercial manipulator or a training box. Nine subjects performed a virtual peg transfer task and their upper extremity muscle effort and fatigue were measured. The results demonstrated a similar muscle effort and fatigue of the upper extremity among the three training environments. Subjects with medical backgrounds used significantly higher muscle effort when they performed the training task using the joystick than the manipulator, but used similar muscle effort between the joystick and the training box. This study suggests that the multi-degree of freedom joystick could provide more options to practice virtual laparoscopic surgical training tasks with muscle effort and fatigue similar to other traditional training boxes.

  13. [Evaluation of surgical skills of French ophthalmology, orthopedic and gastrointestinal surgery residents: Current status and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tranchart, H; Aurégan, J C; Gaillard, M; Giocanti-Aurégan, A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for nationwide assessment of surgical skills during residency, and to define ideal methods for assessment in three surgical disciplines: ophthalmology, orthopedics and gastrointestinal surgery. Three online questionnaires were sent by e-mail to 784 residents, fellows and hospital practitioners, and 119 university hospital physican-professors. Questionnaires focused on current assessment methods at the regional level, the roles of the surveyed population in these evaluations, potential obstacles to their development and the most relevant methods for practical evaluations. Nine hundred and three questionnaires were sent; 355 participants replied (response rate: 39%). The establishment of systematic assessment seemed necessary to over 90% of the survey population, and this opinion was equitably distributed among all three specialties. Over 60% of respondents felt that current assessment procedures were not satisfactory. In all three specialties, the ideal evaluation method proposed was a real patient procedure. This "in vivo" evaluation was considered applicable in 80% of cases, potential barriers to its development being the resident's anxiety, medical-legal reasons and the lack of objective criteria. The ideal timing of these assessments was bi-annual. Implementation of surgical skills assessment during residency seems necessary. The survey population appears dissatisfied with current arrangements. A step-by-step evaluation combining surgical simulations, animal training and live patient procedures may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Ready for the OR? - Clinical anatomy and basic surgical skills for students in their preclinical education.

    PubMed

    Böckers, Anja; Lippold, Dominique; Fassnacht, Ulrich; Schelzig, Hubert; Böckers, Tobias M

    2011-01-01

    Medical students' first experience in the operating theatre often takes place during their electives and is therefore separated from the university's medical curriculum. In the winter term 2009/10, the Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Ulm implemented an elective called "Ready for the OR" for 2nd year medical students participating in the dissection course. We attempted to improve learning motivation and examination results by transferring anatomical knowledge into a surgical setting and teaching basic surgical skills in preparation of the students' first participation in the OR. Out of 69 online applicants, 50 students were randomly assigned to the Intervention Group (FOP) or the Control Group. In 5 teaching session students learned skills like scrubbing, stitching or the identification of frequently used surgical instruments. Furthermore, students visited five surgical interventions which were demonstrated by surgical colleagues on donated bodies that have been embalmed using the Thiel technique. The teaching sessions took place in the institute's newly built "Theatrum Anatomicum" for an ideal simulation of a surgical setting. The learning outcomes were verified by OSPE. In a pilot study, an intervention group and a control group were compared concerning their examination results in the dissection course and their learning motivation through standardized SELLMO-test for students. Participants gained OSPE results between 60.5 and 92% of the maximum score. "Ready for the OR" was successfully implemented and judged an excellent add-on to anatomy teaching by the participants. However, we could not prove a significant difference in learning motivation or examination results. Future studies should focus on the learning orientation, the course's long-term learning effects and the participants' behavior in a real surgery setting.

  15. Live transference of surgical subspecialty skills using telerobotic proctoring to remote general surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ereso, Alexander Q; Garcia, Pablo; Tseng, Elaine; Gauger, Grant; Kim, Hubert; Dua, Monica M; Victorino, Gregory P; Guy, T Sloane

    2010-09-01

    Certain clinical environments, including military field hospitals or rural medical centers, lack readily available surgical subspecialists. We hypothesized that telementoring by a surgical subspecialist using a robotic platform is feasible and can convey subspecialty knowledge and skill to a remotely located general surgeon. Eight general surgery residents evaluated the effect of remote surgical telementoring by performing 3 operative procedures, first unproctored and then again when teleproctored by a surgical subspecialist. The clinical scenarios consisted of a penetrating right ventricular injury requiring suture repair, an open tibial fracture requiring external fixation, and a traumatic subdural hematoma requiring craniectomy. A robotic platform consisting of a pan-and-tilt camera with laser pointer attached to an overhead surgical light with integrated audio allowed surgical subspecialists the ability to remotely teleproctor residents. Performance was evaluated using an Operative Performance Scale. Satisfaction surveys were given after performing the scenario unproctored and again after proctoring. Overall mean performance scores were superior in all scenarios when residents were proctored than when they were not (4.30 +/- 0.25 versus 2.43 +/- 0.20; p < 0.001). Mean performance scores for individual metrics, including tissue handling, instrument handling, speed of completion, and knowledge of anatomy, were all superior when residents were proctored (p < 0.001). Satisfaction surveys showed greater satisfaction and comfort among residents when proctored. Proctored residents believed the robotic platform facilitated learning and would be feasible if used clinically. This study supports the use of surgical teleproctoring in guiding remote general surgeons by a surgical subspecialist in the care of a wounded patient in need of an emergency subspecialty operation. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Utilization and Surgical Skill Transferability of the Simulator Robot to the Clinical Robot for Urology Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjie; Mancuso, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality is an increasingly popular surgical training tool in Australia, following the introduction of Australia's first virtual reality simulation machine at Liverpool Hospital, Sydney. This literature review aims at identifying gaps in previous studies, and in providing a comprehensive review of future studies to be further developed in Australia. A multi-field research was performed combining the key terms 'uro*' and 'virtua*' and 'simula*' and 'robo*'. Academic search engines used in this literature review included 'Medline', 'Scopus', and 'Sciencedirect'. Studies with laparoscopic skills as a focused investigation but not robotic skills were excluded. Critical appraisal of each of the article was conducted with a discussion of key topic involving urologists with expert skills on robotic surgery. A thorough literature review discovered 3 main types of studies in this area. These are: (1) validity studies; (2) studies specific for urology procedures; (3) studies on skill transfer, in general. Cohort study and randomized control trial are the 2 dominant forms of research designs. Future studies need to focus more around the investigation of operation-specific training, in conjunction with skills-based teaching. Also, it is important that these studies incorporate teamwork, decision-making, and communication skills. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop: A Cadaver-Based Workshop to Prepare Residents for Surgery in Austere Settings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yihan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Meguid, Robert A; Kuwayama, David P

    2017-08-29

    Interest in humanitarian surgery is high among surgical and obstetric residents. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop is an annual 2-day course exposing senior residents to surgical techniques essential in low- and middle-income countries but not traditionally taught in US residencies. We evaluated the course's ability to foster resident comfort, knowledge, and competence in these skills. The cohort of course participants was studied prospectively. Participants attended didactic sessions followed by skills sessions using cadavers. Sample areas of focus included general surgery (mesh-free hernia repair), orthopedics (powerless external fixation), and neurosurgery (powerless craniotomy). Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire assessing confidence with taught skills; took a knowledge-based test composed of multiple choice and open-ended questions; and participated in a manual skills test of tibial external fixation. The Center for Surgical Innovation, University of Colorado School of Medicine. A total of 12 residents (11 general surgical and 1 obstetric) from ten US institutions. After the course, participants perceived increased confidence in performing all 27 taught procedures and ability to practice in low- and middle-income countries. In knowledge-based testing, 10 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on multiple choice questioning and 9 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on open-ended questioning with structured scoring. In manual skills testing, all external fixator constructs demonstrated objective improvement on structured scoring and subjective improvement on stability assessment. For senior residents interested in humanitarian surgery, a combination of skills-focused teaching and manual practice led to self-perceived and objective improvement in relevant surgical knowledge and skills. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop represents an effective model for transmitting essential surgical

  18. A computerized bioskills system for surgical skills training in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Conditt, M A; Noble, P C; Thompson, M T; Ismaily, S K; Moy, G J; Mathis, K B

    2007-01-01

    Although all agree that the results of total knee replacement (TKR) are primarily determined by surgical skill, there are few satisfactory alternatives to the 'apprenticeship' model of surgical training. A system capable of evaluating errors of instrument alignment in TKR has been developed and demonstrated. This system also makes it possible quantitatively to assess the source of errors in final component position and limb alignment. This study demonstrates the use of a computer-based system to analyse the surgical skills in TKR through detailed quantitative analysis of the technical accuracy of each step of the procedure. Twelve surgeons implanted a posterior-stabilized TKR in 12 fresh cadavers using the same set of surgical instruments. During each procedure, the position and orientation of the femur, tibia, each surgical instrument, and the trial components were measured with an infrared coordinate measurement system. Through analysis of these data, the sources and relative magnitudes of errors in position and alignment of each instrument were determined, as well as its contribution to the final limb alignment, component positioning and ligament balance. Perfect balancing of the flexion and extension gaps was uncommon (0/15). Under standardized loading, the opening of the joint laterally exceeded the opening medially by an average of approximately 4 mm in both extension (4.1 +/- 2.1 mm) and flexion (3.8 +/- 3.4 mm). In addition, the overall separation of the femur and the tibia was greater in flexion than extension by an average of 4.6 mm. The most significant errors occurred in locating the anterior/posterior position of the entry point in the distal femur (SD = 8.4 mm) and the correct rotational alignment of the tibial tray (SD = 13.2 degrees). On a case-by-case basis, the relative contributions of errors in individual instrument alignments to the final limb alignment and soft tissue balancing were identified. The results indicate that discrete steps in the

  19. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  20. Surgical skills for laparoscopic resection of the bursa omentalis and lymph node scavenging with radical gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, LIAO-NAN; HE, YAO-BIN; LI, HONG-MING; DIAO, DE-CHANG; MO, DE-LONG; WANG, WEI; WAN, JIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to inquire into the feasibility, surgical skills required and short-term effect of a laparoscopic resection of the bursa omentalis and lymph node scavenging with radical gastrectomy. In this study, the clinical data of 18 patients who received a laparoscopic resection of the bursa omentalis with radical gastrectomy in the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Guangdong Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) during the period between January 2012 and January 2014. A retrospective analysis was performed and the surgical duration, bursa omentalis resection time, amount of bleeding during the surgery, post-operative complications associated with the surgery, length of hospital stay, number of lymph nodes scavenged and short-term follow-up results were assessed. The results indicated that all of these 18 patients successfully received a resection of the bursa omentalis and no one required conversion to open surgery. The mean surgical duration was 289.3±30.3 min, the bursa omentalis resection time was 46.1±18.6 min and the amount of bleeding was recorded as 35.5±6.5 ml in these patients. No patients suffered from post-operative complications, such as pancreatic fistulae, anastomotic fistulae, intestinal obstructions or succumbing to the surgery, and no patients succumbed within a 6-month follow-up period. In conclusion, for advanced gastric carcinoma, laparoscopic resection of the bursa omentalis and lymph node scavenging with radical gastrectomy is feasible. In addition to meeting the requirement that the operator should be skilled and experienced in open bursa omentalis resection, and have well-knit basic skills in using a laparoscope, attention must also be paid to the construction of the surgical team. PMID:26170983

  1. Selective automation and skill transfer in medical robotics: a demonstration on surgical knot-tying.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alois; Mayer, Hermann; Staub, Christoph; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Transferring non-trivial human manipulation skills to robot systems is a challenging task. There have been a number of attempts to design research systems for skill transfer, but the level of the complexity of the actual skills transferable to the robot was rather limited, and delicate operations requiring a high dexterity and long action sequences with many sub-operations were impossible to transfer. A novel approach to human-machine skill transfer for multi-arm robot systems is presented. The methodology capitalizes on the metaphor of 'scaffolded learning', which has gained widespread acceptance in psychology. The main idea is to formalize the superior knowledge of a teacher in a certain way to generate support for a trainee. In our case, the scaffolding is constituted by abstract patterns, which facilitate the structuring and segmentation of information during 'learning by demonstration'. The actual skill generalization is then based on simulating fluid dynamics. The approach has been successfully evaluated in the medical domain for the delicate task of automated knot-tying for suturing with standard surgical instruments and a realistic minimally invasive robotic surgery system. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Simulation-based mastery learning for endoscopy using the endoscopy training system: a strategy to improve endoscopic skills and prepare for the fundamentals of endoscopic surgery (FES) manual skills exam.

    PubMed

    Ritter, E Matthew; Taylor, Zachary A; Wolf, Kathryn R; Franklin, Brenton R; Placek, Sarah B; Korndorffer, James R; Gardner, Aimee K

    2017-07-11

    The fundamentals of endoscopic surgery (FES) program has considerable validity evidence for its use in measuring the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for competency in endoscopy. Beginning in 2018, the American Board of Surgery will require all candidates to have taken and passed the written and performance exams in the FES program. Recent work has shown that the current ACGME/ABS required case volume may not be enough to ensure trainees pass the FES skills exam. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a simulation-based mastery-learning curriculum delivered on a novel physical simulation platform to prepare trainees to pass the FES manual skills exam. The newly developed endoscopy training system (ETS) was used as the training platform. Seventeen PGY 1 (10) and PGY 2 (7) general surgery residents completed a pre-training assessment consisting of all 5 FES tasks on the GI Mentor II. Subjects then trained to previously determined expert performance benchmarks on each of 5 ETS tasks. Once training benchmarks were reached for all tasks, a post-training assessment was performed with all 5 FES tasks. Two subjects were lost to follow-up and never returned for training or post-training assessment. One additional subject failed to complete any portion of the curriculum, but did return for post-training assessment. The group had minimal endoscopy experience (median 0, range 0-67) and minimal prior simulation experience. Three trainees (17.6%) achieved a passing score on the pre-training FES assessment. Training consisted of an average of 48 ± 26 repetitions on the ETS platform distributed over 5.1 ± 2 training sessions. Seventy-one percent achieved proficiency on all 5 ETS tasks. There was dramatic improvement demonstrated on the mean post-training FES assessment when compared to pre-training (74.0 ± 8 vs. 50.4 ± 16, p < 0.0001, effect size = 2.4). The number of ETS tasks trained to proficiency correlated moderately with the

  3. Integrated flexible endoscopy training during surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mario P; Mancini, Gregory J; Miedema, Brent W; Rangnekar, Nitin J; Koivunen, Debra G; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Eubanks, W Stephen; Stephenson, Hugh E

    2008-09-01

    New advances in endoscopic surgery make it imperative that future gastrointestinal surgeons obtain adequate endoscopy skills. An evaluation of the 2001-02 general surgery residency endoscopy experience at the University of Missouri revealed that chief residents were graduating with an average of 43 endoscopic cases. This met American Board of Surgery (ABS) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements but is inadequate preparation for carrying out advanced endoscopic surgery. Our aim was to determine if endoscopy volume could be improved by dedicating specific staff surgeon time to a gastrointestinal diagnostic center at an affiliated Veterans Administration Hospital. During the academic years 2002-05, two general surgeons who routinely perform endoscopy staffed the gastrointestinal endoscopy center at the Harry S. Truman Hospital two days per week. A minimum of one categorical surgical resident participated during these endoscopy training days while on the Veterans Hospital surgical service. A retrospective observational review of ACGME surgery resident case logs from 2001 to 2005 was conducted to document the changes in resident endoscopy experience. The cases were compiled by postgraduate year (PGY). Resident endoscopy case volume increased 850% from 2001 to 2005. Graduating residents completed an average of 161 endoscopies. Endoscopic experience was attained at all levels of training: 26, 21, 34, 23, and 26 mean endoscopies/year for PGY-1 to PGY-5, respectively. Having specific endoscopy training days at a VA Hospital under the guidance of a dedicated staff surgeon is a successful method to improve surgical resident endoscopy case volume. An integrated endoscopy training curriculum results in early skills acquisition, continued proficiency throughout residency, and is an efficient way to obtain endoscopic skills. In addition, the foundation of flexible endoscopic skill and experience has allowed early integration of surgery

  4. The use of head-mounted display eyeglasses for teaching surgical skills: A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Peden, Robert G; Mercer, Rachel; Tatham, Andrew J

    2016-10-01

    To investigate whether 'surgeon's eye view' videos provided via head-mounted displays can improve skill acquisition and satisfaction in basic surgical training compared with conventional wet-lab teaching. A prospective randomised study of 14 medical students with no prior suturing experience, randomised to 3 groups: 1) conventional teaching; 2) head-mounted display-assisted teaching and 3) head-mounted display self-learning. All were instructed in interrupted suturing followed by 15 minutes' practice. Head-mounted displays provided a 'surgeon's eye view' video demonstrating the technique, available during practice. Subsequently students undertook a practical assessment, where suturing was videoed and graded by masked assessors using a 10-point surgical skill score (1 = very poor technique, 10 = very good technique). Students completed a questionnaire assessing confidence and satisfaction. Suturing ability after teaching was similar between groups (P = 0.229, Kruskal-Wallis test). Median surgical skill scores were 7.5 (range 6-10), 6 (range 3-8) and 7 (range 1-7) following head-mounted display-assisted teaching, conventional teaching, and head-mounted display self-learning respectively. There was good agreement between graders regarding surgical skill scores (rho.c = 0.599, r = 0.603), and no difference in number of sutures placed between groups (P = 0.120). The head-mounted display-assisted teaching group reported greater enjoyment than those attending conventional teaching (P = 0.033). Head-mounted display self-learning was regarded as least useful (7.4 vs 9.0 for conventional teaching, P = 0.021), but more enjoyable than conventional teaching (9.6 vs 8.0, P = 0.050). Teaching augmented with head-mounted displays was significantly more enjoyable than conventional teaching. Students undertaking self-directed learning using head-mounted displays with pre-recorded videos had comparable skill acquisition to those attending traditional wet

  5. Residency training program paradigms for teaching robotic surgical skills to urology residents.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sonal; Tan, Gerald Y; Srivastava, Abhishek; Leung, Robert A; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2010-03-01

    The advent of laparoscopic and robotic techniques for management of urologic malignancies marked the beginning of an ever-expanding array of minimally invasive options available to cancer patients. With the popularity of these treatment modalities, there is a growing need for trained surgical oncologists who not only have a deep understanding of the disease process and adept surgical skills, but also show technical mastery in operating the equipment used to perform these techniques. Establishing a robotic prostatectomy program is a tremendous undertaking for any institution, as it involves a huge cost, especially in the purchasing and maintenance of the robot. Residency programs often face many challenges when trying to establish a balance between costs associated with robotic surgery and training of the urology residents, while maintaining an acceptable operative time. Herein we describe residency training program paradigms for teaching robotic surgical skills to urology residents. Our proposed paradigm outlines the approach to compensate for the cost involved in robotic training establishment without compromising the quality of education provided. With the potential advantages for both patients and surgeons, we contemplate that robotic-assisted surgery may become an integral component of residency training programs in the future.

  6. Addressing gaps in surgical skills training by means of low-cost simulation at Muhimbili University in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Stephanie; Mbembati, Naboth; Marshall, Nell; Tendick, Frank; Mkony, Charles; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Background Providing basic surgical and emergency care in rural settings is essential, particularly in Tanzania, where the mortality burden addressable by emergency and surgical interventions has been estimated at 40%. However, the shortages of teaching faculty and insufficient learning resources have hampered the traditionally intensive surgical training apprenticeships. The Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences consequently has experienced suboptimal preparation for graduates practising surgery in the field and a drop in medical graduates willing to become surgeons. To address the decline in circumstances, the first step was to enhance technical skills in general surgery and emergency procedures for senior medical students by designing and implementing a surgical skills practicum using locally developed simulation models. Methods A two-day training course in nine different emergency procedures and surgical skills based on the Canadian Network for International Surgery curriculum was developed. Simulation models for the surgical skills were created with locally available materials. The curriculum was pilot-tested with a cohort of 60 senior medical students who had completed their surgery rotation at Muhimbili University. Two measures were used to evaluate surgical skill performance: Objective Structured Clinical Examinations and surveys of self-perceived performance administered pre- and post-training. Results Thirty-six students participated in the study. Prior to the training, no student was able to correctly perform a surgical hand tie, only one student was able to correctly perform adult intubation and three students were able to correctly scrub, gown and glove. Performance improved after training, demonstrated by Objective Structured Clinical Examination scores that rose from 6/30 to 15/30. Students perceived great benefit from practical skills training. The cost of the training using low-tech simulation was four United States dollars per student

  7. [Transaxillary concealing single incision endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis: a novel surgical approach].

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Tu, Yuan-rong; Lai, Fan-cai; Li, Xu; Chen, Jian-feng; Luo, Rong-gang; Lin, Jian-bo

    2013-11-05

    To evaluate the cosmetic effect and safety of transaxillary concealing single incision endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis (PH). Retrospective study was conducted for 326 PH cases undergoing transaxillary concealing single incision endoscopic thoracic bilateral sympathectomy during January 2009 and March 2011. All operations were successfully performed without severe complication and mortality. No conversion into open technique was necessary. The mean unilateral operative duration was 5.8 (5-8) min. It was calculated from the time of skin incision to the application of dressing over wound. The mean follow-up period was 25 (8-38) months. All patients achieved excellent cosmetic effects with undetectable incision. Transaxillary concealing single incision endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a safe and effective procedure for treating primary PH. Incision is undetectable with excellent cosmetic effect. It is worthy of wider popularization.

  8. Can skills assessment on a virtual reality trainer predict a surgical trainee's talent in laparoscopic surgery?

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R; Gantert, W A; Scheidegger, D; Oertli, D

    2006-08-01

    A number of studies have investigated several aspects of feasibility and validity of performance assessments with virtual reality surgical simulators. However, the validity of performance assessments is limited by the reliability of such measurements, and some issues of reliability still need to be addressed. This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that test subjects show logarithmic performance curves on repetitive trials for a component task of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on a virtual reality simulator, and that interindividual differences in performance after considerable training are significant. According to kinesiologic theory, logarithmic performance curves are expected and an individual's learning capacity for a specific task can be extrapolated, allowing quantification of a person's innate ability to develop task-specific skills. In this study, 20 medical students at the University of Basel Medical School performed five trials of a standardized task on the LS 500 virtual reality simulator for laparoscopic surgery. Task completion time, number of errors, economy of instrument movements, and maximum speed of instrument movements were measured. The hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that the performance curves for some of the simulator measurements were very close to logarithmic curves, and there were significant interindividual differences in performance at the end of the repetitive trials. Assessment of perceptual motor skills and the innate ability of an individual with no prior experience in laparoscopic surgery to develop such skills using the LS 500 VR surgical simulator is feasible and reliable.

  9. Robotic technology results in faster and more robust surgical skill acquisition than traditional laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee J; Wilson, Mark R; Waine, Elizabeth; Masters, Rich S W; McGrath, John S; Vine, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Technical surgical skills are said to be acquired quicker on a robotic rather than laparoscopic platform. However, research examining this proposition is scarce. Thus, this study aimed to compare the performance and learning curves of novices acquiring skills using a robotic or laparoscopic system, and to examine if any learning advantages were maintained over time and transferred to more difficult and stressful tasks. Forty novice participants were randomly assigned to either a robotic- or laparoscopic-trained group. Following one baseline trial on a ball pick-and-drop task, participants performed 50 learning trials. Participants then completed an immediate retention trial and a transfer trial on a two-instrument rope-threading task. One month later, participants performed a delayed retention trial and a stressful multi-tasking trial. The results revealed that the robotic-trained group completed the ball pick-and-drop task more quickly and accurately than the laparoscopic-trained group across baseline, immediate retention, and delayed retention trials. Furthermore, the robotic-trained group displayed a shorter learning curve for accuracy. The robotic-trained group also performed the more complex rope-threading and stressful multi-tasking transfer trials better. Finally, in the multi-tasking trial, the robotic-trained group made fewer tone counting errors. The results highlight the benefits of using robotic technology for the acquisition of technical surgical skills.

  10. A comparison of surgical morbidity and scar appearance between gasless, transaxillary endoscopic thyroidectomy (GTET) and minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (VAT).

    PubMed

    Lang, Brian Hung-Hin; Wong, Kai-Pun

    2013-02-01

    The gasless, transaxillary endoscopic thyroidectomy (GTET) and minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (VAT) are both well-recognized endoscopic thyroid procedures, but how their postoperative outcomes are compared remains unclear. The present study was designed to compare surgical morbidities/complications and scar appearance between GTET and VAT at our institution. Of the 141 patients eligible for endoscopic thyroidectomy, 96 (68.1 %) underwent GTET and 45 (31.9 %) underwent VAT. Patient demographics, indications, operative findings, pain scores on days 0 and 1, and surgical morbidities were compared between the two groups. At 6 months after surgery, all patients were asked about their satisfaction on the cosmetic result by giving a score (Patient Satisfaction Score or PSS) and their scar appearance was assessed by the 11 domains in the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). GTET was associated with a significantly longer operating time (84 vs. 148 min, p = 0.005), higher pain scores on days 0 and 1 (2.9 vs. 2.3, p = 0.042 and 2.2 vs. 1.7, p = 0.033, respectively), overall recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury (6.3 vs. 0 %, p = 0.043), and overall morbidity rates (12.5 vs. 2.2 %, p = 0.049) than VAT. The actual individual score for the 11 domains in POSAS and for PSS remained similar between the two groups. They remained similar even when patients with morbidity were excluded. GTET was a technically more challenging procedure and was associated with longer hospital stay, longer operating time, more immediate pain, and increased overall RLN injury and morbidity than VAT. The 6-month POSAS and PSS were similar between the two procedures.

  11. An electronic portfolio for quantitative assessment of surgical skills in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Gómez, Serafín; Ostos, Elisa María Cabot; Solano, Juan Manuel Maza; Salado, Tomás Francisco Herrero

    2013-05-06

    We evaluated a newly designed electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) that provided quantitative evaluation of surgical skills. Medical students at the University of Seville used the e-Portfolio on a voluntary basis for evaluation of their performance in undergraduate surgical subjects. Our new web-based e-Portfolio was designed to evaluate surgical practical knowledge and skills targets. Students recorded each activity on a form, attached evidence, and added their reflections. Students self-assessed their practical knowledge using qualitative criteria (yes/no), and graded their skills according to complexity (basic/advanced) and participation (observer/assistant/independent). A numerical value was assigned to each activity, and the values of all activities were summated to obtain the total score. The application automatically displayed quantitative feedback. We performed qualitative evaluation of the perceived usefulness of the e-Portfolio and quantitative evaluation of the targets achieved. Thirty-seven of 112 students (33%) used the e-Portfolio, of which 87% reported that they understood the methodology of the portfolio. All students reported an improved understanding of their learning objectives resulting from the numerical visualization of progress, all students reported that the quantitative feedback encouraged their learning, and 79% of students felt that their teachers were more available because they were using the e-Portfolio. Only 51.3% of students reported that the reflective aspects of learning were useful. Individual students achieved a maximum of 65% of the total targets and 87% of the skills targets. The mean total score was 345 ± 38 points. For basic skills, 92% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and all achieved the maximum scores for participation as an observer and assistant. For complex skills, 62% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and 98% achieved

  12. An electronic portfolio for quantitative assessment of surgical skills in undergraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated a newly designed electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) that provided quantitative evaluation of surgical skills. Medical students at the University of Seville used the e-Portfolio on a voluntary basis for evaluation of their performance in undergraduate surgical subjects. Methods Our new web-based e-Portfolio was designed to evaluate surgical practical knowledge and skills targets. Students recorded each activity on a form, attached evidence, and added their reflections. Students self-assessed their practical knowledge using qualitative criteria (yes/no), and graded their skills according to complexity (basic/advanced) and participation (observer/assistant/independent). A numerical value was assigned to each activity, and the values of all activities were summated to obtain the total score. The application automatically displayed quantitative feedback. We performed qualitative evaluation of the perceived usefulness of the e-Portfolio and quantitative evaluation of the targets achieved. Results Thirty-seven of 112 students (33%) used the e-Portfolio, of which 87% reported that they understood the methodology of the portfolio. All students reported an improved understanding of their learning objectives resulting from the numerical visualization of progress, all students reported that the quantitative feedback encouraged their learning, and 79% of students felt that their teachers were more available because they were using the e-Portfolio. Only 51.3% of students reported that the reflective aspects of learning were useful. Individual students achieved a maximum of 65% of the total targets and 87% of the skills targets. The mean total score was 345 ± 38 points. For basic skills, 92% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and all achieved the maximum scores for participation as an observer and assistant. For complex skills, 62% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an

  13. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  14. The Effect of a Surgical Skills Course on Confidence Levels of Rural General Practitioners: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Pippa; Ward, Olga; Hamdorf, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Objective  To investigate the effect of a short surgical skills course on general practitioners' confidence levels to perform procedural skills. Design  Prospective observational study. Setting  The Clinical Evaluation and Training Centre, a practical skills-based educational facility, at The University of Western Australia. Participants  Medical practitioners who participated in these courses. Nurses, physiotherapists, and medical students were excluded. The response rate was 61% with 61 participants providing 788 responses for pre- and postcourse confidence levels regarding various surgical skills. Intervention  One- to two-day surgical skills courses consisting of presentations, demonstrations, and practical stations, facilitated by specialists. Main Outcome Measures  A two-page precourse and postcourse questionnaire was administered to medical practitioners on the day. Participants rated their confidence levels to perform skills addressed during the course on a 4-point Likert scale. Results  Of the 788 responses regarding confidence levels, 621 were rated as improved postcourse, 163 were rated as no change, and 4 were rated as lower postcourse. Seven of the courses showed a 25% median increase in confidence levels, and one course demonstrated a 50% median increase. All courses showed statistically significant results ( p  < 0.001). Conclusion  A short surgical skills course resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the confidence levels of rural general practitioners to perform these skills.

  15. Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alkhayal, Abdullah; Aldhukair, Shahla; Alselaim, Nahar; Aldekhayel, Salah; Alhabdan, Sultan; Altaweel, Waleed; Magzoub, Mohi Elden; Zamakhshary, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Background After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors’ perspective, and program directors’ attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills. Methods This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs’ perspective and the PDs’ attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated. Results Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents’ technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65). Conclusion The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents

  16. Human-robot skills transfer interfaces for a flexible surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Calinon, Sylvain; Bruno, Danilo; Malekzadeh, Milad S; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-09-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, tools go through narrow openings and manipulate soft organs to perform surgical tasks. There are limitations in current robot-assisted surgical systems due to the rigidity of robot tools. The aim of the STIFF-FLOP European project is to develop a soft robotic arm to perform surgical tasks. The flexibility of the robot allows the surgeon to move within organs to reach remote areas inside the body and perform challenging procedures in laparoscopy. This article addresses the problem of designing learning interfaces enabling the transfer of skills from human demonstration. Robot programming by demonstration encompasses a wide range of learning strategies, from simple mimicking of the demonstrator's actions to the higher level imitation of the underlying intent extracted from the demonstrations. By focusing on this last form, we study the problem of extracting an objective function explaining the demonstrations from an over-specified set of candidate reward functions, and using this information for self-refinement of the skill. In contrast to inverse reinforcement learning strategies that attempt to explain the observations with reward functions defined for the entire task (or a set of pre-defined reward profiles active for different parts of the task), the proposed approach is based on context-dependent reward-weighted learning, where the robot can learn the relevance of candidate objective functions with respect to the current phase of the task or encountered situation. The robot then exploits this information for skills refinement in the policy parameters space. The proposed approach is tested in simulation with a cutting task performed by the STIFF-FLOP flexible robot, using kinesthetic demonstrations from a Barrett WAM manipulator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic review of serious games for medical education and surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Graafland, M; Schraagen, J M; Schijven, M P

    2012-10-01

    The application of digital games for training medical professionals is on the rise. So-called 'serious' games form training tools that provide a challenging simulated environment, ideal for future surgical training. Ultimately, serious games are directed at reducing medical error and subsequent healthcare costs. The aim was to review current serious games for training medical professionals and to evaluate the validity testing of such games. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsychInfo and CINAHL were searched using predefined inclusion criteria for available studies up to April 2012. The primary endpoint was validation according to current criteria. A total of 25 articles were identified, describing a total of 30 serious games. The games were divided into two categories: those developed for specific educational purposes (17) and commercial games also useful for developing skills relevant to medical personnel (13). Pooling of data was not performed owing to the heterogeneity of study designs and serious games. Six serious games were identified that had a process of validation. Of these six, three games were developed for team training in critical care and triage, and three were commercially available games applied to train laparoscopic psychomotor skills. None of the serious games had completed a full validation process for the purpose of use. Blended and interactive learning by means of serious games may be applied to train both technical and non-technical skills relevant to the surgical field. Games developed or used for this purpose need validation before integration into surgical teaching curricula. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Successful implementation of the american college of surgeons/association of program directors in surgery surgical skills curriculum via a 4-week consecutive simulation rotation.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mayank Kumar; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Edelson, Paula Kaitlyn; Acero, Natalia Martinez; Hashimoto, Daniel; Danzer, Enrico; Selvan, Ben; Resnick, Andrew S; Morris, Jon B; Williams, Noel N

    2012-06-01

    Increased patient awareness, duty hour restrictions, escalating costs, and time constraints in the operating room have revolutionized surgery education. Although simulation and skills laboratories are emerging as promising alternatives for skills training, their integration into graduate surgical education is inconsistent, erratic, and often on a voluntary basis. We hypothesize that, by implementing the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery Surgical Skills Curriculum in a structured, inanimate setting, we can address some of these concerns. Sixty junior surgery residents were assigned to the Penn Surgical Simulation and Skills Rotation. The National Surgical Skills Curriculum was implemented using multiple educational tools under faculty supervision. Pretraining and posttraining assessments of technical skills were conducted using validated instruments. Trainee and faculty feedbacks were collected using a structured feedback form. Significant global performance improvement was demonstrated using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills score for basic surgical skills (knot tying, wound closure, enterotomy closure, and vascular anastomosis) and Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery skills, P < 0.001. Six trainees were retested on an average of 13.5 months later (range, 8-16 months) and retained more than 75% of their basic surgical skills. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Surgical Skills Curriculum can be implemented in its totality as a 4-week consecutive surgical simulation rotation in an inanimate setting, leading to global enhancement of junior surgical residents' technical skills and contributing to attainment of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competency.

  19. Psychomotor skills of surgical trainees compared with those of different medical specialists.

    PubMed

    Harris, C J; Herbert, M; Steele, R J

    1994-03-01

    Forty-eight trainees in surgery, psychiatry, anaesthetics and medicine underwent objective testing of manual dexterity (Mandex test), hand-eye coordination (Gibson spiral maze test) and visuospatial ability (embedded figures task). Surgical trainees performed significantly more quickly on the spiral maze test than psychiatrists (P = 0.03) but made more errors (P = 0.02). Combining male and female subjects across all groups, women were significantly more accurate than men. When men only were compared no psychomotor differences between specialty groups could be demonstrated. There were no differences in visuospatial ability by either sex or specialty. Self-selection on the basis of such skill is therefore unlikely.

  20. Endoscopic non-technical skills team training: The next step in quality assurance of endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether novel, non-technical skills training for Bowel Cancer Screening (BCS) endoscopy teams enhanced patient safety knowledge and attitudes. METHODS: A novel endoscopy team training intervention for BCS teams was developed and evaluated as a pre-post intervention study. Four multi-disciplinary BCS teams constituting BCS endoscopist(s), specialist screening practitioners, endoscopy nurses and administrative staff (A) from English BCS training centres participated. No patients were involved in this study. Expert multidisciplinary faculty delivered a single day’s training utilising real clinical examples. Pre and post-course evaluation comprised participants’ patient safety awareness, attitudes, and knowledge. Global course evaluations were also collected. RESULTS: Twenty-three participants attended and their patient safety knowledge improved significantly from 43%-55% (P ≤ 0.001) following the training intervention. 12/41 (29%) of the safety attitudes items significantly improved in the areas of perceived patient safety knowledge and awareness. The remaining safety attitude items: perceived influence on patient safety, attitudes towards error management, error management actions and personal views following an error were unchanged following training. Both qualitative and quantitative global course evaluations were positive: 21/23 (91%) participants strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with the course. Qualitative evaluation included mandating such training for endoscopy teams outside BCS and incorporating team training within wider endoscopy training. Limitations of the study include no measure of increased patient safety in clinical practice following training. CONCLUSION: A novel comprehensive training package addressing patient safety, non-technical skills and adverse event analysis was successful in improving multi-disciplinary teams’ knowledge and safety attitudes. PMID:25516665

  1. Endoscopic non-technical skills team training: the next step in quality assurance of endoscopy training.

    PubMed

    Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

    2014-12-14

    To investigate whether novel, non-technical skills training for Bowel Cancer Screening (BCS) endoscopy teams enhanced patient safety knowledge and attitudes. A novel endoscopy team training intervention for BCS teams was developed and evaluated as a pre-post intervention study. Four multi-disciplinary BCS teams constituting BCS endoscopist(s), specialist screening practitioners, endoscopy nurses and administrative staff (A) from English BCS training centres participated. No patients were involved in this study. Expert multidisciplinary faculty delivered a single day's training utilising real clinical examples. Pre and post-course evaluation comprised participants' patient safety awareness, attitudes, and knowledge. Global course evaluations were also collected. Twenty-three participants attended and their patient safety knowledge improved significantly from 43%-55% (P ≤ 0.001) following the training intervention. 12/41 (29%) of the safety attitudes items significantly improved in the areas of perceived patient safety knowledge and awareness. The remaining safety attitude items: perceived influence on patient safety, attitudes towards error management, error management actions and personal views following an error were unchanged following training. Both qualitative and quantitative global course evaluations were positive: 21/23 (91%) participants strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with the course. Qualitative evaluation included mandating such training for endoscopy teams outside BCS and incorporating team training within wider endoscopy training. Limitations of the study include no measure of increased patient safety in clinical practice following training. A novel comprehensive training package addressing patient safety, non-technical skills and adverse event analysis was successful in improving multi-disciplinary teams' knowledge and safety attitudes.

  2. [Trans-areola single port endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis: a new surgical approach].

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuan-rong; Lai, Fan-cai; Li, Xu; Lin, Min; Duan, Hong-bing; Fu, Cheng-guo; Zhan, Hua-hui; Zheng, Yi-wen

    2011-11-29

    To evaluate the cosmetic effects and safety profiles of trans-areola single port endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. A retrospective study was conducted for 45 males and 7 females with palmar hyperhidrosis undergoing trans-areola single port endoscopic thoracic bilateral sympathectomy during April and June 2011. All operations were successfully performed without severe morbidity and mortality. No conversion to open technique was necessary. The mean unilateral operative duration was 6 minutes (range: 5 - 8). The time was calculated from the time of skin incision to that of dressing application over wound. The mean hospitalization duration was 2.2 days (range: 2 - 3). The mean follow-up period was 2.8 months (range: 1 - 7). All patients achieved excellent cosmetic effects. No incision scar was found. Trans-areola single port endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a safe and effective therapeutic procedure for primary palmar hyperhidrosis. The incision is undetectable with excellent cosmetic effects. The trans-areola route is a new ideal and promising approach for endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

  3. Endoscopic curettage and bone grafting of huge talar bone cyst with preservation of cartilaginous surfaces: surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-12-01

    Open curettage and bone grafting of the huge talar cysts may need extensive soft tissue dissection or even different types of malleolar osteotomy to access the lesion. Arthroscopic approach can minimize soft tissue dissection or the need for malleolar osteotomy. Careful pre-operative planning of the portal sites allows endoscopic curettage and bone grafting of the lesions with preservation of the articular surfaces.

  4. The Effect of Visual-Spatial Ability on the Learning of Robot-Assisted Surgical Skills.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashige; Raison, Nicholas; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shamim Khan, M; Ahmed, Kamran; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2017-09-13

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation of visual-spatial ability with progression along the learning curve for robotic surgical skills training. A total of 21 novice participants were recruited. All participants completed a training program consisting of 5 training sessions of 30 minutes of virtual reality (VR) simulation and 30 minutes of dry laboratory training. The VR simulation part was the subject of the present study. During VR simulation training, participants performed the basic skill exercises of Camera Targeting 1, Pick and Place, and Peg Board 1 followed by advanced skill exercises of Suture Sponge 1 and Thread the Rings. The visual-spatial ability was assessed using a mental rotation test (MRT). Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between the MRT score and simulator score for the aforementioned 5 tasks. Student t test was used to compare the simulator score between high- and low-MRT score groups. A median MRT score of 26/40 (range: 13-38) was observed. Approximately 19 participants completed the full curriculum but 2 did not complete "Thread the Rings" during the study period. A significant correlation was observed between the MRT score and simulator score only in "Suture Sponge 1" over the first 3 attempts (first: r = 0.584, p = 0.0054; second: r = 0.443, p = 0.0443; third: r = 0.4458, p = 0.0428). After the third attempt, this significant correlation was lost. Comparison of the score for "Suture Sponge 1" between the high-MRT and low-MRT scoring participants divided by a median MRT score of 26 also showed a significant difference in the score until the third trial. Our observations suggest that the spatial cognitive ability influences the initial learning of robotic suturing skills. Further studies are necessary to verify the usefulness of an individual's spatial ability to tailor the surgical training program. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A human factors analysis of technical and team skills among surgical trainees during procedural simulations in a simulated operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Adams, Sally; Pandey, Vikas; Darzi, Ara

    2005-11-01

    High-risk organizations such as aviation rely on simulations for the training and assessment of technical and team performance. The aim of this study was to develop a simulated environment for surgical trainees using similar principles. A total of 27 surgical trainees carried out a simulated procedure in a Simulated Operating Theatre with a standardized OR team. Observation of OR events was carried out by an unobtrusive data collection system: clinical data recorder. Assessment of performance consisted of blinded rating of technical skills, a checklist of technical events, an assessment of communication, and a global rating of team skills by a human factors expert and trained surgical research fellows. The participants underwent a debriefing session, and the face validity of the simulated environment was evaluated. While technical skills rating discriminated between surgeons according to experience (P = 0.002), there were no differences in terms of the checklist and team skills (P = 0.70). While all trainees were observed to gown/glove and handle sharps correctly, low scores were observed for some key features of communication with other team members. Low scores were obtained by the entire cohort for vigilance. Interobserver reliability was 0.90 and 0.89 for technical and team skills ratings. The simulated operating theatre could serve as an environment for the development of surgical competence among surgical trainees. Objective, structured, and multimodal assessment of performance during simulated procedures could serve as a basis for focused feedback during training of technical and team skills.

  6. The effect of video review of resident laparoscopic surgical skills measured by self- and external assessment

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Almario, Gabriel E.; Kirk, Katherine; Guerrero, Veronica T.; Jeong, Kwonho; Kim, Sara; Hamad, Giselle G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Video review of surgical skills is an educational modality that allows trainees to reflect on self-performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether resident and attending assessments of a resident’s laparoscopic performance differ and whether video review changes assessments. Methods Third-year surgery residents were invited to participate. Elective laparoscopic procedures were video-recorded. The Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills evaluation was completed immediately after the procedure and again 7–10 days later by both resident and attending. Scores were compared using t- tests. Results Nine residents participated and 76 video reviews were completed. Residents scored themselves significantly lower than the faculty scores both prior to and after video review. Resident scores did not change significantly after video review. Conclusions Attending and resident self-assessment of laparoscopic skills differ and subsequent video review doesn’t significantly affect GOALS scores. Further studies should evaluate the impact of video review combined with verbal feedback on skill acquisition and assessment. PMID:26590043

  7. A preliminary review of a pilot curriculum to teach open surgical skills during general surgery residency with initial feedback.

    PubMed

    Are, Chandrakanth; Lomneth, Carol; Stoddard, Hugh; Azarow, Kenneth; Thompson, Jon S

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a preliminary review of a pilot curriculum to teach open surgical skills during general surgery residency and obtain initial feedback. The general surgery residency program introduced an open surgical skills training curriculum in 2009. The skills sessions are undertaken under the guidance of the faculty. An annual survey was distributed to the residents and faculty to obtain their feedback. A total of 50 sessions were conducted over the last 2 years. Ninety-five percent of the residents perceived this educational activity to be above average to exceptional with nearly 70% rating it as exceptional. Sixty-three percent of the faculty perceived it as above average to exceptional, with nearly 40% rating it as exceptional. The open surgical skills training curriculum was rated as the most educational activity in the program by residents and faculty alike. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlating virtual reality and box trainer tasks in the assessment of laparoscopic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jordan; Dandolu, Vani; Milner, Richard; Grewal, Harsh; Harbison, Sean; Hernandez, Enrique

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation in the assessment of laparoscopic surgical skills in medical students with the use of a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer and a low-fidelity video box trainer with comparative tasks. Third-year medical students were asked to perform 3 basic skills set modules on LapSim (Surgical Science, Gothenburg, Sweden): coordination, grasping and lifting, and handling the intestines. Each task was set at the easiest level, and each student was allowed a maximum of 10 attempts to complete each task. Similar-appearing tasks were chosen for comparison with the use of a standard video box trainer: pegboard, cup drop and rope pass, respectively. Laparoscopic skills were evaluated with the use of both trainers during 1 session. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to compare paired data on each student using statistical software. Forty-seven of 65 medical students were assigned to clinical clerkships on-campus at Temple University School of Medicine participated in the study. All 47 students participated in the video box trainer tasks; 34 students completed both the video box trainer and LapSim skills set. Observations that were obtained on the LapSim virtual reality system and video box trainer simulator demonstrated several correlations. The time to completion for the LapSim coordination task and the pegboard task were correlated (r = 0.507; P = .006), as were the grasping and lifting task completion time on LapSim and the comparative box trainer cup drop task completion time (r = 0.404; P = .022). When accounting for errors, the LapSim coordination task tissue damage score was correlated with the sum of all box trainer errors (r = 0.353; P = .040); the average grasping and lifting tissue damage was correlated with the total number of errors during all box trainer tasks (r = 0.374; P = .035). Overall, in evaluating laparoscopic skills, the LapSim and video box trainer were correlated positively with one another

  9. Objective Evaluation of Motor Skills for Orthopedic Residents Using a Motion Tracking Drill System: Outcomes of an ABOS Approved Surgical Skills Training Program.

    PubMed

    Pourkand, Ashkan; Salas, Christina; Regalado, Jasmin; Bhakta, Krishan; Tufaro, Rachel; Mercer, Deana; Grow, David

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedics is a motor skills-demanding surgical specialty requiring surgical skills training outside of the operating room. Unfortunately, limited quantitative techniques exist to determine the effectiveness of these surgical skills training programs. Using a variety of drill, surgeon, and specimen mounted sensors, we evaluated orthopedic surgery residents during a surgical skills training course approved by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons (ABOS). This evaluation consisted of quantitative measures of various kinematic and kinetic parameters with the goal of relating these to clinically-significant outcomes. Seven experienced surgeons and 22 surgical residents participated in this study, each performing 5 surgical drilling trials, pre- and post-training. Utilizing arm and tool kinematics, applied force, tool and bone vibration, and drill RPM were measured using a combination of force, acceleration, and optical tracking sensors. Post hoc screw pullout testing and resident survey data were also evaluated. Overall, 25 measured parameters were expressed as scalars and their covariance calculated. Non-trivial direct correlations whose magnitude exceeded 0.5 were: maximum penetration distance with applied force, drill toggle with drill roll angle, and drill RPM with force. Surgeons applying a high drill RPM also yielded a large force which in turn gave an increase in tendency for over-penetration. As a whole, the differences between experienced and novice surgeons measured in these trials were not statistically significant. However, when looking at specific performance criterion individually (maintaining steady force, minimizing over-penetration, minimizing both the major and minor axis diameters, minimizing toggle and drill vibration), experienced surgeons tended to outperform their novice counterparts. Objective assessment of surgical skills using sensor based technologies may help elucidate differences between novice and experienced surgeons for improved

  10. Can a Teaching Assistant Experience in a Surgical Anatomy Course Influence the Learning Curve for Nontechnical Skill Development for Surgical Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidenreich, Mark J.; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown…

  11. Can a Teaching Assistant Experience in a Surgical Anatomy Course Influence the Learning Curve for Nontechnical Skill Development for Surgical Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidenreich, Mark J.; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown…

  12. Simulator-based assessment of haptic surgical skill: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Singapogu, Ravikiran B; Long, Lindsay O; Smith, Dane E; Burg, Timothy C; Pagano, Christopher C; Prabhu, Varun V; Burg, Karen J L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if the forces applied by users of a haptic simulator could be used to distinguish expert surgeons from novices. Seven surgeons with significant operating room expertise and 9 novices with no surgical experience participated in this study. The experimental task comprised exploring 4 virtual materials with the haptic device and learning the precise forces required to compress the materials to various depths. The virtual materials differed in their stiffness and force-displacement profiles. The results revealed that for nonlinear virtual materials, surgeons applied significantly greater magnitudes of force than novices. Furthermore, for the softer nonlinear and linear materials, surgeons were significantly more accurate in reproducing forces than novices. The results of this study suggest that the magnitudes of force measured using haptic simulators may be used to objectively differentiate experts' haptic skill from that of novices. This knowledge can inform the design of virtual reality surgical simulators and lead to the future incorporation of haptic skills training in medical school curricula.

  13. Can a teaching assistant experience in a surgical anatomy course influence the learning curve for nontechnical skill development for surgical residents?

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Mark J; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown that for most residents, one of the most difficult milestones in the path to achieving professional expertise in a surgical career is overcoming the learning curve. This view point commentary provides a reflection from the two senior medical students who have participated in the Student-as-Teacher program developed by the Department of Anatomy at Mayo Clinic, designed to prepare students for their teaching assistant (TA) role in anatomy courses. Both students participated as TAs in a six week surgical anatomy course for surgical first assistant students offered by the School of Health Sciences at Mayo Clinic. Development of teaching skills, nontechnical leadership, communication, and assessment skills, are discussed in relation to their benefits in preparing senior medical students for surgical residency. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Ready for OR or not? Human reader supplements Eyesi scoring in cataract surgical skills assessment.

    PubMed

    Selvander, Madeleine; Asman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To compare the internal computer-based scoring with human-based video scoring of cataract modules in the Eyesi virtual reality intraocular surgical simulator, a comparative case series was conducted at the Department of Clinical Sciences - Ophthalmology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Seven cataract surgeons and 17 medical students performed one video-recorded trial with each of the capsulorhexis, hydromaneuvers, and phacoemulsification divide-and-conquer modules. For each module, the simulator calculated an overall score for the performance ranging from 0 to 100. Two experienced masked cataract surgeons analyzed each video using the Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS) for individual models and modified Objective Structured Assessment of Surgical Skills (OSATS) for all three modules together. The average of the two assessors' scores for each tool was used as the video-based performance score. The ability to discriminate surgeons from naïve individuals using the simulator score and the video score, respectively, was compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The ROC areas for simulator score did not differ from 0.5 (random) for hydromaneuvers and phacoemulsification modules, yielding unacceptably poor discrimination. OSACSS video scores all showed good ROC areas significantly different from 0.5. The OSACSS video score was also superior compared to the simulator score for the phacoemulsification procedure: ROC area 0.945 vs 0.664 for simulator score (P = 0.010). Corresponding values for capsulorhexis were 0.887 vs 0.761 (P = 0.056) and for hydromaneuvers 0.817 vs 0.571 (P = 0.052) for the video scores and simulator scores, respectively. The ROC area for the combined procedure was 0.938 for OSATS video score and 0.799 for simulator score (P=0.072). Video-based scoring of the phacoemulsification procedure was superior to the innate simulator scoring system in distinguishing cataract

  15. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  16. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study.

    PubMed

    Zambas, Shelaine I; Smythe, Elizabeth A; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of "advanced" physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting.

  17. Video gaming enhances psychomotor skills but not visuospatial and perceptual abilities in surgical trainees.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A M; Boyle, E M; Traynor, O; Walsh, T; Hill, A D K

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the identification and assessment of underlying aptitudes or innate abilities that could potentially predict excellence in the technical aspects of operating. However, before the assessment of innate abilities is introduced for high-stakes assessment (such as competitive selection into surgical training programs), it is essential to determine that these abilities are stable and unchanging and are not influenced by other factors, such as the use of video games. The aim of this study was to investigate whether experience playing video games will predict psychomotor performance on a laparoscopic simulator or scores on tests of visuospatial and perceptual abilities, and to examine the correlation, if any, between these innate abilities. Institutional ethical approval was obtained. Thirty-eight undergraduate medical students with no previous surgical experience were recruited. All participants completed a self-reported questionnaire that asked them to detail their video game experience. They then underwent assessment of their psychomotor, visuospatial, and perceptual abilities using previously validated tests. The results were analyzed using independent samples t tests to compare means and linear regression curves for subsequent analysis. Students who played video games for at least 7 hours per week demonstrated significantly better psychomotor skills than students who did not play video games regularly. However, there was no difference on measures of visuospatial and perceptual abilities. There was no correlation between psychomotor tests and visuospatial or perceptual tests. Regular video gaming correlates positively with psychomotor ability, but it does not seem to influence visuospatial or perceptual ability. This study suggests that video game experience might be beneficial to a future career in surgery. It also suggests that relevant surgical skills may be gained usefully outside the operating room in activities that are not

  18. Self-assessment in laparoscopic surgical skills training: Is it reliable?

    PubMed

    Ganni, Sandeep; Chmarra, Magdalena K; Goossens, Richard H M; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2017-06-01

    The concept of self-assessment has been widely acclaimed for its role in the professional development cycle and self-regulation. In the field of medical education, self-assessment has been most used to evaluate the cognitive knowledge of students. The complexity of training and evaluation in laparoscopic surgery has previously acted as a barrier in determining the benefits self-assessment has to offer in comparison with other fields of medical education. Thirty-five surgical residents who attended the 2-day Laparoscopic Surgical Skills Grade 1 Level 1 curriculum were invited to participate from The Netherlands, India and Romania. The competency assessment tool (CAT) for laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used for self- and expert-assessment and the resulting distributions assessed. A comparison between the expert- and self-assessed aggregates of scores from the CAT agreed with previous studies. Uniquely to this study, the aggregates of individual sub-categories-'use of instruments'; 'tissue handling'; and errors 'within the component tasks' and the 'end product' from both self- and expert-assessments-were investigated. There was strong positive correlation (r s > 0.5; p < 0.001) between the expert- and self-assessment in all categories with only the 'tissue handling' having a weaker correlation (r s = 0.3; p = 0.04). The distribution of the mean of the differences between self-assessment and expert-assessment suggested no significant difference between the scores of experts and the residents in all categories except the 'end product' evaluation where the difference was significant (W = 119, p = 0.03). Self-assessment using the CAT form gives results that are consistently not different from expert-assessment when assessing one's proficiency in surgical skills. Areas where there was less agreement could be explained by variations in the level of training and understanding of the assessment criteria.

  19. [Current and future use of surgical skills simulation in gynecologic resident education: a French national survey].

    PubMed

    Crochet, P; Aggarwal, R; Berdah, S; Yaribakht, S; Boubli, L; Gamerre, M; Agostini, A

    2014-05-01

    Simulation is a promising method to enhance surgical education in gynecology. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline information on the current use of simulators across French academic schools. Two questionnaires were created, one specifically for residents and one for professors. Main issues included the type of simulators used and the kind of use made for training purposes. Opinions and agreement about the use of simulators were also asked. Twenty-six percent of residents (258/998) and 24% of professors (29/122) answered the questionnaire. Sixty-five percent of residents (167/258) had experienced simulators. Laparoscopic pelvic-trainers (84%) and sessions on alive pigs (63%) were most commonly used. Residents reported access to simulators most commonly during introductory sessions (51%) and days of academic workshops (38%). Residents believed simulators very useful for training. Professors agreed that simulators should become a required part of residency training, but were less enthusiastic regarding simulation becoming a part of certification for practice. Surgical skills simulators are already experienced by a majority of French gynecologic residents. However, the use of these educational tools varies among surgical schools and remains occasional for the majority of residents. There was a strong agreement that simulation technology should be a component of training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. 'The Days of Brilliancy are Past': Skill, Styles and the Changing Rules of Surgical Performance, ca. 1820-1920.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines how, over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the appreciation of skill in surgery shifted in characteristic ways. Skill is a problematic category in surgery. Its evaluation is embedded into wider cultural expectations and evaluations, which changed over time. The paper examines the discussions about surgical skill in a variety of contexts: the highly competitive environment of celebrity practitioners in the amphitheatres of early nineteenth-century Britain; the science-oriented, technocratic German-language university hospitals later in the century; and the elitist surgeons of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century United States with their concerns about distancing themselves from commercialism and cheap showmanship. For analysing the interaction of surgical practices with their various contexts the paper makes use of the concept of 'performance' and examines how the rules of surgical performance varied according to the prevailing technical, social, and moral conditions. Over the course of the century, surgical performance looked more and more recognisably modern, increasingly following the ideals of replicability, universality and standardisation. The changing ideals of surgical skill are a crucial element of the complex history of the emergence of modern surgery, but also an illuminating example of the history of skill in modern medicine.

  1. Student-led learning: a new teaching paradigm for surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Hoogenes, Jen; Mironova, Polina; Safir, Oleg; McQueen, Sydney A; Abdelbary, Hesham; Drexler, Michael; Nousiainen, Markku; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Alman, Benjamin; Reznick, Richard K; Sonnadara, Ranil R

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education and simulation are being used more frequently in surgical skills curricula. We explored a novel student-led learning paradigm, which allows trainees to become more active participants in the learning process while maintaining expert guidance and supervision. Twelve first-year orthopedic residents were randomized to either a student-led (SL) or a traditional instructor-led group during an intensive, month-long, laboratory-based technical skills training course. A rigorous qualitative-description approach was used for analysis. Four prominent themes emerged: instructional style, feedback, peer and instructor collaboration, and self-efficacy. Compared with the instructor-led group, there was more peer assistance, feedback, collaboration, and hands-on and active learning observed in the SL group. The flexible and socially rich nature of the SL learning environment may aid in development of both technical and nontechnical skills early in residency and ultimately privilege later clinical learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoscopic Septoplasty-Two Handed Technique with Endoscope Holder: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubarak M; Parab, Sapna R

    2016-12-01

    The popularity of endoscopes has been expanding not only in diagnostics but also in therapeutics. The traditional septal surgery also has come under the purview of endoscopic surgery in the last few decades. Endoscopic septoplasty has definitely many advantages over the conventional procedure. But the only disadvantage of endoscopic surgery is that it is a single handed technique as the other hand is used for holding the endoscope which may compromise the overall surgical time as the hemostasis and suctioning of the surgical field off the blood cannot be done simultaneously, in addition to the surgeon fatigue associated with holding the endoscope in the left hand. Endoscope holder allows both hands of the surgeon to be free for surgical manipulation and also imitates more or less same actions of the left hand. To report the preliminary use of Khan's endoscope holder for endoscopic septoplasty. Prospective Non Randomized Clinical Study. Khan's Endoscope Holder, which was primarily designed for endoscopic ear surgery, has been used for two handed technique of endoscopic septoplasty. The design of the Endoscope holder is described in detail. A total of 49 endoholder assisted endoscopic septoplasties were operated from Nov 2014 to Jan 2015 in MIMER Medical College and Sushrut ENT Hospital, Talegaon D, Pune, India. Our Endoscope Holder is a good option for two handed technique in Endoscopic Septoplasty due to its advantages. The study reports the successful usage and applicability of the endo holder for endoscopic Septoplasty. Level of evidence IV.

  3. The effectiveness of and satisfaction with high-fidelity simulation to teach cardiac surgical resuscitation skills to nurses.

    PubMed

    McRae, Marion E; Chan, Alice; Hulett, Renee; Lee, Ai Jin; Coleman, Bernice

    2017-06-01

    There are few reports of the effectiveness or satisfaction with simulation to learn cardiac surgical resuscitation skills. To test the effect of simulation on the self-confidence of nurses to perform cardiac surgical resuscitation simulation and nurses' satisfaction with the simulation experience. A convenience sample of sixty nurses rated their self-confidence to perform cardiac surgical resuscitation skills before and after two simulations. Simulation performance was assessed. Subjects completed the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience scale and demographics. Self-confidence scores to perform all cardiac surgical skills as measured by paired t-tests were significantly increased after the simulation (d=-0.50 to 1.78). Self-confidence and cardiac surgical work experience were not correlated with time to performance. Total satisfaction scores were high (mean 80.2, SD 1.06) indicating satisfaction with the simulation. There was no correlation of the satisfaction scores with cardiac surgical work experience (τ=-0.05, ns). Self-confidence scores to perform cardiac surgical resuscitation procedures were higher after the simulation. Nurses were highly satisfied with the simulation experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoscopic Extra-articular Surgical Removal of Heterotopic Ossification of the Rectus Femoris Tendon in a Series of Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando; Piuzzi, Nicolás S.; Oñativia, José Ignacio; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martín; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcific deposits in tendon, muscles, and periarticular areas are very common. Heterotopic ossification of the rectus femoris (HORF) is a rare condition, and several theories exist regarding the etiopathogenesis, which appears to be multifactorial with traumatic, genetic, and local metabolic factors involved. Although HORF typically responds to nonoperative treatment, when this approach fails, endoscopic treatment is a minimally invasive technique to address the pathology. Purpose: To report the clinical and radiological outcomes of 9 athletes with HORF who underwent endoscopic resection. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Nine male athletes were treated with endoscopic extra-articular resection of HORF after failure of a 6-month course of nonoperative treatment. All patients were studied with radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Outcomes were assessed clinically using the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), a visual analog scale for sport activity–related pain (VAS-SRP), patient satisfaction, and ability and time to return to the preoperative sport level. Radiographic assessment was performed to determine recurrence. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 23-47 years). Mean follow-up was 44 months (range, 14-73 months). All patients had improved mHHS scores from a mean preoperative of 65.6 (SD, 8.2) to 93.9 (SD, 3.6). Pain decreased from a mean 8.2 preoperatively (SD, 0.9) to 0.4 (SD, 0.7) at last follow-up. There were no complications, and all patients were able to return to their previous sports at the same level except for 1 recreational athlete. There was only 1 radiological recurrence at last follow-up in an asymptomatic patient. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of athletes with HORF treated with endoscopic resection. We found this extra-articular endoscopic technique to be safe and effective, showing clinical outcome improvement and 90% chance of

  5. Endoscopic Extra-articular Surgical Removal of Heterotopic Ossification of the Rectus Femoris Tendon in a Series of Athletes.

    PubMed

    Comba, Fernando; Piuzzi, Nicolás S; Oñativia, José Ignacio; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martín; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Calcific deposits in tendon, muscles, and periarticular areas are very common. Heterotopic ossification of the rectus femoris (HORF) is a rare condition, and several theories exist regarding the etiopathogenesis, which appears to be multifactorial with traumatic, genetic, and local metabolic factors involved. Although HORF typically responds to nonoperative treatment, when this approach fails, endoscopic treatment is a minimally invasive technique to address the pathology. To report the clinical and radiological outcomes of 9 athletes with HORF who underwent endoscopic resection. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Nine male athletes were treated with endoscopic extra-articular resection of HORF after failure of a 6-month course of nonoperative treatment. All patients were studied with radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Outcomes were assessed clinically using the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), a visual analog scale for sport activity-related pain (VAS-SRP), patient satisfaction, and ability and time to return to the preoperative sport level. Radiographic assessment was performed to determine recurrence. The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 23-47 years). Mean follow-up was 44 months (range, 14-73 months). All patients had improved mHHS scores from a mean preoperative of 65.6 (SD, 8.2) to 93.9 (SD, 3.6). Pain decreased from a mean 8.2 preoperatively (SD, 0.9) to 0.4 (SD, 0.7) at last follow-up. There were no complications, and all patients were able to return to their previous sports at the same level except for 1 recreational athlete. There was only 1 radiological recurrence at last follow-up in an asymptomatic patient. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of athletes with HORF treated with endoscopic resection. We found this extra-articular endoscopic technique to be safe and effective, showing clinical outcome improvement and 90% chance of return to full activity. We also found 10% recurrence rate of

  6. Designing safety into the minimally invasive surgical revolution: a commentary based on the Jacques Perissat Lecture of the International Congress of the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2009-01-01

    Surgical errors with minimally invasive surgery differ from those in open surgery. Perforations are typically the result of trocar introduction or electrosurgery. Infections include bioburdens, notably enteric viruses, on complex instruments. Retained foreign objects are primarily unretrieved device fragments and lost gallstones or other specimens. Fires and burns come from illuminated ends of fiber-optic cables and from electrosurgery. Pressure ischemia is more likely with longer endoscopic surgical procedures. Gas emboli can occur. Minimally invasive surgery is more dependent on complex equipment, with high likelihood of failures. Standardization, checklists, and problem reporting are solutions for minimizing failures. The necessity of electrosurgery makes education about best electrosurgical practices important. The recording of minimally invasive surgical procedures is an opportunity to debrief in a way that improves the reliability of future procedures. Safety depends on reliability, designing systems to withstand inevitable human errors. Safe systems are characterized by a commitment to safety, formal protocols for communications, teamwork, standardization around best practice, and reporting of problems for improvement of the system. Teamwork requires shared goals, mental models, and situational awareness in order to facilitate mutual monitoring and backup. An effective team has a flat hierarchy; team members are empowered to speak up if they are concerned about problems. Effective teams plan, rehearse, distribute the workload, and debrief. Surgeons doing minimally invasive surgery have a unique opportunity to incorporate the principles of safety into the development of their discipline.

  7. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  8. A Study to Compare the Quality of Surgical Field Using Total Intravenous Anesthesia (with Propofol) versus Inhalational Anesthesia (with Isoflurane) for Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, K. S.; Kaur, Manbir; Gupta, Ruchi; Singh, Sukhjinder; Bhanupreet; Tavleen

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) being a delicate technique, intraoperative bleeding is one of the major challenges. Even a little bleeding can adversely affect the surgeon's ability to visualize the region to be operated. General anesthesia is preferred over topical anesthesia in FESS. This study was conducted to compare the surgical field using total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and inhalational anesthesia with isoflurane for FESS. Secondary outcomes such as intraoperative blood loss and the incidence of perioperative complications were also recorded. Subjects and Methods: A total of sixty patients in the age group of 16–60 years with physical status American Society of Anesthesiologists Classes I and II, undergoing FESS were randomly divided into two groups of thirty each after taking informed consent and approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee. Thirty patients in Group I: received isoflurane-based inhalational anesthesia and other Thirty patients in Group II: were administered TIVA with propofol. Various parameters were recorded and statistically analyzed. Results: There was improved quality of surgical field at the end of surgery in the Group II as compared to Group I. Total blood loss during surgery and incidence of intraoperative complications were less in Group II as compared to Group I. Conclusion: This study concludes that in FESS, using TIVA with propofol decreases blood loss and the incidence of complications during surgery in addition to providing good quality of surgical field.

  9. Simulator training on pulsatile vascular models significantly improves surgical skills and the quality of carotid patch plasty.

    PubMed

    Duschek, Nikolaus; Assadian, Afshin; Lamont, Peter M; Klemm, Klaus; Schmidli, Jürg; Mendel, Herbert; Eckstein, Hans-Henning

    2013-04-01

    Vascular surgeons perform numerous highly sophisticated and delicate procedures. Due to restrictions in training time and the advent of endovascular techniques, new concepts including alternative environments for training and assessment of surgical skills are required. Over the past decade, training on simulators and synthetic models has become more sophisticated and lifelike. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of a 3-day intense training course in open vascular surgery on both specific and global vascular surgical skills. Prospective observational cohort analysis with various parameter measurements of both surgical skills and the technical quality of the finished product, performed before and after 3 days of simulator training of 10 participants (seven male and three female) in a vascular surgery training course. The simulator model used was a conventional carotid endarterectomy with a Dacron patch plasty on a lifelike carotid bench model under pulsatile pressure. The primary end points were assessment of any changes in the participants' surgical skills and in the technical quality of their completed carotid patches documented by procedure-based assessment forms. Scores ranging from 1 (inadequate) to 5 (excellent) were compared by a related-sample Wilcoxon signed test. Interobserver reliability was estimated by Cronbach's alpha (CA). A significant improvement in surgical skills tasks was observed (P < .001). The mean score increased significantly by 21.5% from fair (3.43 ± 0.93) to satisfactory (4.17 ± 0.69; P < .001). The mean score for the quality of the carotid patch increased significantly by 0.96 (27%) from fair (3.55 ± 0.87) to satisfactory (4.51 ± 0.76; P < .01). The median interassessor reliability for the quality of the carotid patch was acceptable (CA = 0.713) and for surgical skills was low (CA = 0.424). This study shows that lifelike simulation featuring pulsatile flow can increase surgical skills and technical quality in a highly

  10. Is Teaching Simple Surgical Skills Using an Operant Learning Program More Effective Than Teaching by Demonstration?

    PubMed

    Levy, I Martin; Pryor, Karen W; McKeon, Theresa R

    2016-04-01

    A surgical procedure is a complex behavior that can be constructed from foundation or component behaviors. Both the component and the composite behaviors built from them are much more likely to recur if it they are reinforced (operant learning). Behaviors in humans have been successfully reinforced using the acoustic stimulus from a mechanical clicker, where the clicker serves as a conditioned reinforcer that communicates in a way that is language- and judgment-free; however, to our knowledge, the use of operant-learning principles has not been formally evaluated for acquisition of surgical skills. Two surgical tasks were taught and compared using two teaching strategies: (1) an operant learning methodology using a conditioned, acoustic reinforcer (a clicker) for positive reinforcement; and (2) a more classical approach using demonstration alone. Our goal was to determine whether a group that is taught a surgical skill using an operant learning procedure would more precisely perform that skill than a group that is taught by demonstration alone. Two specific behaviors, "tying the locking, sliding knot" and "making a low-angle drill hole," were taught to the 2014 Postgraduate Year (PGY)-1 class and first- and second-year medical students, using an operant learning procedure incorporating precise scripts along with acoustic feedback. The control groups, composed of PGY-1 and -2 nonorthopaedic surgical residents and first- and second-year medical students, were taught using demonstration alone. The precision and speed of each behavior was recorded for each individual by a single experienced surgeon, skilled in operant learning. The groups were then compared. The operant learning group achieved better precision tying the locking, sliding knot than did the control group. Twelve of the 12 test group learners tied the knot and precisely performed all six component steps, whereas only four of the 12 control group learners tied the knot and correctly performed all six

  11. Assessment of competence in surgical skills using functional magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marie C; Frodl, Thomas; D'Souza, Arun; Fagan, Andrew J; Ridgway, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is fundamental to modern medical practice; safe surgery saves lives. Ensuring surgical competence is becoming more difficult at a time when surgeons are being trained in fewer hours. Accurate objective assessment of technical skills ability is lacking in standardization. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has a long history in neuroscience, psychiatry, and cognitive studies. Many studies have explored levels of perceived expertise in sports and musical ability. Little has been published on actual rather than perceived motor skills. This study sought to assess the feasibility of utilizing a novel assessment method by measuring blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes (BOLD) in specific brain regions via fMRI during a surgical skills task. Images were acquired using fMRI in a pilot study of 9 subjects (3 experts, 3 intermediates, and 3 novices) when performing and imagining performing a basic surgical procedure: hand tying of surgical knots. Level of expertise was based on years of experience and clinical grade. The quality and quantity of knots were assessed objectively by 2 experts who were independent of the study and blinded to the ability of the candidate. The effect of subject head motion caused by the task itself was assessed. The efficacy of fMRI data analyses in removing artifacts caused by this noise source in the data was explored. Shifts of less than 1 voxel (3 × 3 × 3.55 mm(3)) were recorded in all participants and were successfully corrected in all cases in the fMRI preprocessing step. Decreased BOLD activity was observed in experts compared to novices when "knot tying" was compared with the control "finger tap." Increased BOLD activity was observed in experts compared with novices when "imagining a task" in the primary visual cortex, an area important in perceptual learning. Experts and intermediates performed consistently with 100% square knots. Novices had an average of 2 slip knots. Regarding knot quantity, the number

  12. Value of fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery training in a fourth-year medical school advanced surgical skills elective.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David A; Mattos, Mark A; Bouwman, David L

    2012-10-01

    Few data are available describing the benefits of initiating fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) training during medical school. We hypothesized that an intense 1-month surgical skills elective that included FLS task training for fourth-year medical students (MS4s) would result in performance levels indistinguishable from graduating chief residents (PGY5) who had received clinical skill training and access to self-guided FLS curriculum. From July 2007 through June 2011, 114 MS4s participated in a 1-month advanced surgical skills elective. The curriculum for the elective included cadaver dissections, patient management presentations, and surgical skill training (open surgical skills and basic laparoscopic skills modules performed on FLS trainers and virtual reality laparoscopic simulators). From June 2009 through June 2011, 21 PGY5s graduated who had never received formalized FLS skills training. These residents were tested on FLS by a certified proctor and the results recorded. The performance outcome measure was task completion time. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare the performance measures for each group. All PGY5s achieved FLS certification on their first attempt and completed enough cases for graduation. The MS4 group showed significantly better performance than the PGY5 group in the peg transfer and circle cut (P < 0.05). No difference was seen in the knot tying tasks between the two groups (P > 0.05) Incorporating FLS training into a 1 month-long medical school surgery elective enabled MS4s to achieve FLS performance similar to, or better than, the performance achieved by PGY5 surgery residents. We support the integration of FLS skills task training as a standard part of the skills training curriculum for medical students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cyst Gastrostomy and Necrosectomy for the Management of Sterile Walled-Off Pancreatic Necrosis: a Comparison of Minimally Invasive Surgical and Endoscopic Outcomes at a High-Volume Pancreatic Center.

    PubMed

    Khreiss, Mohammad; Zenati, Mazen; Clifford, Amber; Lee, Kenneth K; Hogg, Melissa E; Slivka, Adam; Chennat, Jennifer; Gelrud, Andres; Zeh, Herbert J; Papachristou, Georgios I; Zureikat, Amer H

    2015-08-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON) is a sequela of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in 15-40% of cases. We sought to compare the outcomes of minimally invasive surgical and endoscopic cyst gastrostomy (CG) and necrosectomy for the management for sterile WON at a tertiary care high-volume pancreas center. This is a retrospective review of patients who underwent minimally invasive surgical or endoscopic CG and necrosectomy for clinically sterile WON between 2008 and 2013. Peri-procedural outcomes including costs were analyzed and compared. Twenty patients underwent minimally invasive surgical (robotic = 14, laparoscopic = 6) CG and necrosectomy, and 20 patients underwent endoscopic treatment. The surgical cohort had a larger median cyst size and higher CCI score. For the surgical cohort, median OR time was 167.5 min, estimated blood loss was 30 ml, and 65% underwent concomitant cholecystectomy. There was no mortality in either group and no difference in complication rates (20%). The failure rate was similar (15 versus 10%, P = 0.66). Although surgery was associated with a lower re-intervention rate (0 versus 1, P = 0.008), the endotherapy group was associated with shorter total LOS (inclusive of re-interventions) (7 versus 3 days, P = 0.032). The cost of the index procedure was significantly higher for the surgery group (P = 0.014); however, when considering all readmissions and re-interventions until resolution of the WON, the total cost was similar for both groups. Minimally invasive surgical and endoscopic CG and necrosectomy are comparable treatments for sterile WON in terms of outcomes and overall cost. The surgical approach may be considered advantageous when a concomitant cholecystectomy is required.

  14. A virtual reality endoscopic simulator augments general surgery resident cancer education as measured by performance improvement.

    PubMed

    White, Ian; Buchberg, Brian; Tsikitis, V Liana; Herzig, Daniel O; Vetto, John T; Lu, Kim C

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of death in the USA. The need for screening colonoscopies, and thus adequately trained endoscopists, particularly in rural areas, is on the rise. Recent increases in required endoscopic cases for surgical resident graduation by the Surgery Residency Review Committee (RRC) further emphasize the need for more effective endoscopic training during residency to determine if a virtual reality colonoscopy simulator enhances surgical resident endoscopic education by detecting improvement in colonoscopy skills before and after 6 weeks of formal clinical endoscopic training. We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected surgery resident data on an endoscopy simulator. Residents performed four different clinical scenarios on the endoscopic simulator before and after a 6-week endoscopic training course. Data were collected over a 5-year period from 94 different residents performing a total of 795 colonoscopic simulation scenarios. Main outcome measures included time to cecal intubation, "red out" time, and severity of simulated patient discomfort (mild, moderate, severe, extreme) during colonoscopy scenarios. Average time to intubation of the cecum was 6.8 min for those residents who had not undergone endoscopic training versus 4.4 min for those who had undergone endoscopic training (p < 0.001). Residents who could be compared against themselves (pre vs. post-training), cecal intubation times decreased from 7.1 to 4.3 min (p < 0.001). Post-endoscopy rotation residents caused less severe discomfort during simulated colonoscopy than pre-endoscopy rotation residents (4 vs. 10%; p = 0.004). Virtual reality endoscopic simulation is an effective tool for both augmenting surgical resident endoscopy cancer education and measuring improvement in resident performance after formal clinical endoscopic training.

  15. Assessment of laparoscopic psychomotor skills in interns using the MIST Virtual Reality Simulator: a prerequisite for those considering surgical training?

    PubMed

    Cope, Daron H; Fenton-Lee, Douglas

    2008-04-01

    Selection for surgical training in Australia is currently based on assessment of a structured curriculum vitae, referral reports from selected clinicians and an interview. The formal assessment of laparoscopic psychomotor skill and ability to attain skills is not currently a prerequisite for selection. The aim of this study was to assess the innate psychomotor skills of interns and also to compare interns with an interest in pursuing a surgical career to interns with those with no interest in pursuing a surgical career. Twenty-two interns were given the opportunity to carry out tasks on the Minimal Invasive Surgical Trainer, Virtual Reality (Mentice, Gothenburg, Sweden) Simulator. The candidates were required to complete six tasks, repeated six times each. Scores for each task were calculated objectively by the simulator software. Demographic data were similar between the two groups. Although some candidates who were interested in pursuing a surgical career performed poorly on the simulator, there was no significant difference when comparing the two groups. The Minimal Invasive Surgical Trainer, Virtual Reality (Mentice) Simulator provides an objective and comparable assessment of laparoscopic psychomotor skills. We can conclude that interns have varying inherent ability as judged by the simulator and this does not seem to have an influence on their career selection. There was no significant difference in the scores between the two groups. Interns with and without inherent abilities have aspirations to pursue surgical careers and their aptitude does not seem to influence this decision. Surgical colleges could use psychomotor ability assessments to recruit candidates to pursue a career in surgery. Trainees needing closer monitoring and additional training could be identified early and guided to achieve competency.

  16. Open lobectomy simulator is an effective tool for teaching thoracic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Carter, Yvonne M; Marshall, M Blair

    2009-05-01

    Simulation has long been appreciated and used in professional industry training. The effectiveness of high-fidelity, low-cost simulators in such settings has led to its integration into surgical education for skill development. Simulation may possibly have a role in surgical specialty training. Replicas of a human torso with a posterolateral thoracotomy incision were constructed from poultry netting and casting fiberglass, and used to house a previously prepared bovine lung. After reviewing computerized instructional material, student volunteers were asked to perform a lobectomy with the assistance of a thoracic surgeon, who also evaluated the subjects. Objective data were collected from knowledge-based examinations and technical skills evaluation scales. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student's t test. The initial success rate was 88.9% (16 of 18). Significant improvements were appreciated in both subjective and objective measures by the third week with weekly repetition. The average operative time was reduced to 34.8 +/- 5 minutes from 48.5 +/- 4.9 minutes (p = 0.01). The average task-specific score was 7.8 +/- 0.8 (versus 5.6 +/- 2.1; p = 0.05), and students achieved an average global performance score of 28.6 +/- 3.8 (p = 0.01). Scores on knowledge-based examinations also significantly improved. This open lobectomy simulation can be used to effectively teach thoracic surgery techniques. Our results prove the effectiveness of simulation training in thoracic surgery. Additional studies will determine whether simulation is effective for different training levels in thoracic surgery.

  17. Teaching surgical skills using video internet communication in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Autry, Amy M; Knight, Sharon; Lester, Felicia; Dubowitz, Gerald; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Nsubuga, Yosam; Muyingo, Mark; Korn, Abner

    2013-07-01

    To study the feasibility and acceptability of using video Internet communication to teach and evaluate surgical skills in a low-resource setting. This case-controlled study used video Internet communication for surgical skills teaching and evaluation. We randomized intern physicians rotating in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Mulago Hospital at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, to the control arm (usual practice) or intervention arm (three video teaching sessions with University of California, San Francisco faculty). We made preintervention and postintervention videos of all interns tying knots using a small video camera and uploaded the files to a file hosting service that offers cloud storage. A blinded faculty member graded all of the videos. Both groups completed a survey at the end of the study. We randomized 18 interns with complete data for eight in the intervention group and seven in the control group. We found score improvement of 50% or more in six of eight (75%) interns in the intervention group compared with one of seven (14%) in the control group (P=.04). Scores declined in five of the seven (71%) controls but in none in the intervention group. Both intervention and control groups used attendings, colleagues, and the Internet as sources for learning about knot-tying. The control group was less likely to practice knot-tying than the intervention group. The trainees and the instructors felt this method of training was enjoyable and helpful. Remote teaching in low-resource settings, where faculty time is limited and access to visiting faculty is sporadic, is feasible, effective, and well-accepted by both learner and teacher. II.

  18. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Moraites, Eleni; Vaughn, Olushola Akinshemoyin; Hill, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a surgical technique most commonly used in the treatment of severe palmar hyperhidrosis in selected patients. The procedure also has limited use in the treatment axillary and craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is associated with a high rate of the development of compensatory hyperhidrosis, which may affect patient satisfaction with the procedure and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prospective, Randomized Ex Vivo Trial to Assess the Ideal Stapling Site for Endoscopic Fundoplication with Medigus Ultrasonic Surgical Endostapler

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Endoscopic fundoplication is an emerging technique for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study is to determine the ideal position of the staples in relation to gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Methods. Ten endoscopic fundoplication procedures were performed in each group using fresh ex vivo porcine stomachs: Group A: 2 staples each at 3 cm above the GEJ and 180° apart; Group B: 2 staples at 3 cm and 90° apart; Group C: 2 staples at 4 cm and 180° apart; Group D: 3 staples at 3 cm with 90° between each staple (180° total). After the procedure, the stomach was gradually filled with water. Gastric yield pressure (GYP) was determined by detection of reflux of the water in esophagus or by rupture of staples. Results. Mean increase of GYPs (±SD) after the procedure was as follows: Group A: 16.9 ± 8.7; Group B: 8.1 ± 7.9; Group C: 12.2 ± 9.4; Group D: 22.7 ± 13.3. GYP in Group A and Group D was higher than Group B (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, resp.). Conclusions. We recommend the placement of 3 staples at 3 cm distance from the GEJ, which resulted in the highest increase of GYP. PMID:27547219

  20. Preliminary data on endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteric reflux with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer (Vantris®): surgical outcome following single injection.

    PubMed

    Chertin, Boris; Arafeh, Wael Abu; Zeldin, Alexander; Kocherov, Stanislav

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of single injection of a new non-biodegradable agent (Vantris(®)) Manufactured by Promedon, Cordoba, Argentina for treatment of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR). 38 children (11 males and 27 females) with a mean age of 5.3 ± 3.8 years underwent endoscopic treatment of VUR using Vantris. VUR was unilateral in 17 and bilateral in 21 patients, comprising 59 renal refluxing units (RRU). The VUR was primary in 42 RRU and 17 comprised complex cases: 3 duplex systems, 1 with prune belly syndrome, and 13 after failed previous endoscopic correction with Deflux(®). VUR was Grade I in 5, II in 11, III in 23, IV in 15 and V in 5 RRU. All patients completed 3 months of follow up. The reflux was corrected in 56 (94.9%) of the 59 RRU (35/38 patients) after a single injection. Of the 38 patients, 21 completed 1 year of follow up, at which time ultrasound demonstrated no change compared with 1 month after injection. Eight of these 21 children underwent 1 year radionuclide cystography, and no reflux recurrence was shown. Our short-term data show that Vantris injection provides a high level of reflux resolution. Long-term follow up with this tissue-augmenting substance is required. Copyright © 2010 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The relationship between patient satisfaction and emotional intelligence skills of nurses working in surgical clinics

    PubMed Central

    Oyur Celik, Gülay

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the patient satisfaction and emotional intelligence skills of nurses working in the surgical clinic. Methods The study included two groups: a total of 79 nurses working for the surgical clinics of a university hospital in the city of Izmir and a total of 113 inpatients between January 1 and February 20, 2015. The nurses were asked to fill out the Emotional Intelligence Scale and a 12-question self-description form, while the patients were given the Scale of Satisfaction for Nursing Care and an 11-question self-description form. Results We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between the satisfaction scores and emphatic concern, utilization of emotions, and emotional awareness subheadings of the patients (P<0.05). Conclusion Our study results suggest that emotional intelligence should be one of the determinants of the objectives and that it should be recognized among the quality indicators to improve the quality of health care services. PMID:28860719

  2. Real-time synchronization of kinematic and video data for the comprehensive assessment of surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Dosis, Aristotelis; Bello, Fernando; Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Gillies, Duncan; Darzi, Ara

    2004-01-01

    Surgical dexterity in operating theatres has traditionally been assessed subjectively. Electromagnetic (EM) motion tracking systems such as the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD) have been shown to produce valid and accurate objective measures of surgical skill. To allow for video integration we have modified the data acquisition and built it within the ROVIMAS analysis software. We then used ActiveX 9.0 DirectShow video capturing and the system clock as a time stamp for the synchronized concurrent acquisition of kinematic data and video frames. Interactive video/motion data browsing was implemented to allow the user to concentrate on frames exhibiting certain kinematic properties that could result in operative errors. We exploited video-data synchronization to calculate the camera visual hull by identifying all 3D vertices using the ICSAD electromagnetic sensors. We also concentrated on high velocity peaks as a means of identifying potential erroneous movements to be confirmed by studying the corresponding video frames. The outcome of the study clearly shows that the kinematic data are precisely synchronized with the video frames and that the velocity peaks correspond to large and sudden excursions of the instrument tip. We validated the camera visual hull by both video and geometrical kinematic analysis and we observed that graphs containing fewer sudden velocity peaks are less likely to have erroneous movements. This work presented further developments to the well-established ICSAD dexterity analysis system. Synchronized real-time motion and video acquisition provides a comprehensive assessment solution by combining quantitative motion analysis tools and qualitative targeted video scoring.

  3. Electromagnetic motion analysis in the assessment of surgical skill: Relationship between time and movement.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Sean; Datta, Vivek; Mandalia, Mirren; Bassett, Paul; Darzi, Ara

    2002-09-01

    Electromagnetic motion analysis is a promising method of assessing surgical skill in a skills-laboratory setting. There is a very strong correlation between movement and time data, and this study was conducted to determine whether this relationship is fixed, or whether it can vary. : After a pilot study, four subjects were recruited. Each performed 30 trials of a simple standardized suturing task, alternating between 'normal', 'precise', and 'fast' strategies. The number of movements, and time to complete each task were recorded. Comparing the 'fast' to 'normal' strategies, there was a significant decrease in total number of movements per trial (P < 0.001), and time taken (P < 0.001). Regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the time taken and the number of movements, and revealed significant differences between both the fast (P = 0.006), and precise (P = 0.002) strategies, when compared to the normal strategy. This study confirms that the relationship between time and movements is not fixed, but varies with the operative strategy adopted for this simple suturing task.

  4. Perspective: authentic patient perspectives in simulations for procedural and surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Debra; Kneebone, Roger

    2010-05-01

    In this article, the authors consider the role of the patient in simulation-based training and assessment of clinical procedural skills. In recent years, there has been a progressive shift of emphasis from teacher-centered to student-centered education, resulting in a redefinition of approaches to medical education. Traditional models of transmission of information from an expert to a novice have been supplanted by a more student-centered approach. However, medical education is not a matter for teacher and student alone. At the center is always the patient, around whom everything must ultimately rotate. A further shift is occurring. The patient is becoming the focal point of medical teaching and learning. It is argued that this shift is necessary and that simulation in its widest sense can be used to support this process. However, sensitivity to what we are simulating is essential, especially when simulations purport to address patient perspectives. The essay first reviews the history of medical education "centeredness," then outlines ways in which real and simulated patients are currently involved in medical education. Patient-focused simulation (PFS) is described as a means of offering patients' perspectives during the acquisition of clinical procedural and surgical skills. The authors draw on their experiences of developing PFS and preliminary work to "authenticate" simulations from patient perspectives. The essay concludes with speculation on the value of a "complementarity" model that acknowledges the authentic and equal perspectives of patients, students, clinicians, and teachers.

  5. Learning basic surgical skills with mental imagery: using the simulation centre in the mind.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Charles W; Sadoski, Mark; van Walsum, Kim; Bramson, Rachel; Wiprud, Robert; Fossum, Theresa W

    2008-06-01

    Although surgeons and athletes frequently use mental imagery in preparing to perform, mental imagery has not been extensively researched as a learning technique in medical education. A mental imagery rehearsal technique was experimentally compared with textbook study to determine the effects of each on the learning of basic surgical skills. Sixty-four Year 2 medical students were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups in which they undertook either mental imagery or textbook study. Both groups received the usual skills course of didactic lectures, demonstrations, physical practice with pigs' feet and a live animal laboratory. One group received additional training in mental imagery and the other group was given textbook study. Performance was assessed at 3 different time-points using a reliable rating scale. Analysis of variance on student performance in live rabbit surgery revealed a significant interaction favouring the imagery group over the textbook study group. The mental imagery technique appeared to transfer learning from practice to actual surgery better than textbook study.

  6. Innovative approach using interprofessional simulation to educate surgical residents in technical and nontechnical skills in high-risk clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Nicksa, Grace A; Anderson, Cristan; Fidler, Richard; Stewart, Lygia

    2015-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies stress nontechnical skills that can be difficult to evaluate and teach to surgical residents. During emergencies, surgeons work in interprofessional teams and are required to perform certain procedures. To obtain proficiency in these skills, residents must be trained. To educate surgical residents in leadership, teamwork, effective communication, and infrequently performed emergency surgical procedures with the use of interprofessional simulations. SimMan 3GS was used to simulate high-risk clinical scenarios (15-20 minutes), followed by debriefings with real-time feedback (30 minutes). A modified Oxford Non-Technical Skills scale (score range, 1-4) was used to assess surgical resident performance during the first half of the academic year (July-December 2012) and the second half of the academic year (January-June 2013). Anonymous online surveys were used to solicit participant feedback. Simulations were conducted in the operating room, intensive care unit, emergency department, ward, and simulation center. A total of 43 surgical residents (postgraduate years [PGYs] 1 and 2) participated in interdisciplinary clinical scenarios, with other health care professionals (nursing, anesthesia, critical care, medicine, respiratory therapy, and pharmacy; mean number of nonsurgical participants/session: 4, range 0-9). Thirty seven surgical residents responded to the survey. Simulation of high-risk clinical scenarios: postoperative pulmonary embolus, pneumothorax, myocardial infarction, gastrointestinal bleeding, anaphylaxis with a difficult airway, and pulseless electrical activity arrest. Evaluation of resident skills: communication, leadership, teamwork, problem solving, situation awareness, and confidence in performing emergency procedures (eg, cricothyroidotomy). A total of 31 of 35 (89%) of the residents responding found the sessions useful. Additionally, 28 of 33 (85%) reported improved confidence

  7. [Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal study of skull base anatomy].

    PubMed

    Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; López-Álvarez, Beatriz; Lloret-García, Jaime; Sanchez-del Campo, Jose; Gras-Albert, Juan Ramon; Moreno-López, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Training in dissection of the paranasal sinuses and the skull base is essential for anatomical understanding and correct surgical techniques. Three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of endoscopic skull base anatomy increases spatial orientation and allows depth perception. To show endoscopic skull base anatomy based on the 3D technique. We performed endoscopic dissection in cadaveric specimens fixed with formalin and with the Thiel technique, both prepared using intravascular injection of coloured material. Endonasal approaches were performed with conventional 2D endoscopes. Then we applied the 3D anaglyph technique to illustrate the pictures in 3D. The most important anatomical structures and landmarks of the sellar region under endonasal endoscopic vision are illustrated in 3D images. The skull base consists of complex bony and neurovascular structures. Experience with cadaver dissection is essential to understand complex anatomy and develop surgical skills. A 3D view constitutes a useful tool for understanding skull base anatomy. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical problems and complex procedures: issues for operative time in robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Schachner, Thomas; Weidinger, Felix; Lehr, Eric J; Vesely, Mark; Bonatti, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB) is a viable option for closed chest coronary surgery, but it requires learning curves and longer operative times. This study evaluated the effect of extended operation times on the outcome of patients undergoing TECAB. From 2001 to 2009, 325 patients underwent TECAB with the da Vinci telemanipulation system. Correlations between operative times and preoperative, intraoperative, and early postoperative parameters were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to define the threshold of the procedure duration above which intensive care unit stay and ventilation time were prolonged. Demographic data, intraoperative and postoperative parameters, and survival data were compared. Patients with prolonged operative times more often underwent multivessel revascularization (P < .001) and beating-heart TECAB (P =.023). Other preoperative parameters were not associated with longer operative times. Incidences of technical difficulties and conversions (P < .001) were higher among patients with longer operative times. Prolonged intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation, hospital stay, and with requirement of blood products were associated with longer operative times. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed operative times >445 minutes and >478 minutes to predict prolonged (>48 hours) intensive care unit stay and mechanical ventilation, respectively. Patients with procedures >478 minutes had longer hospital stays and higher perioperative morbidity and mortality. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed decreased survival among patients with operative times >478 minutes. Multivessel revascularization and conversions lead to prolonged operative times in totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting. Longer operative times significantly influence early postoperative and midterm outcomes. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  9. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Larsen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    A gastrointestinal fistula is a common occurrence, especially after surgery. Patients who develop a fistula may have an infection, surgically altered anatomy, nutritional deficiency, or organ failure, making surgical revision more difficult. With advancements in flexible endoscopic devices and technology, new endoscopic options are available for the management of gastrointestinal fistulae. Endoscopically deployable stents, endoscopic suturing devices, through-the-scope and over-the-scope clips, sealants, and fistula plugs can be used to treat fistulae. These therapies are even more effective in combination. Despite the inherent challenges in patients with fistulae, endoscopic therapies for treatment of fistulae have demonstrated safety and efficacy, allowing many patients to avoid surgical fistula repair. In this paper, we review the emerging role of endoscopy in the management of gastrointestinal fistulae. PMID:28845140

  10. Do soft skills predict surgical performance?: a single-center randomized controlled trial evaluating predictors of skill acquisition in virtual reality laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Maschuw, K; Schlosser, K; Kupietz, E; Slater, E P; Weyers, P; Hassan, I

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) training in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) is feasible in surgical residency and beneficial for the performance of MIS by surgical trainees. Research on stress-coping of surgical trainees indicates the additional impact of soft skills on VR performance in the surgical curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of structured VR training and soft skills on VR performance of trainees. The study was designed as a single-center randomized controlled trial. Fifty first-year surgical residents with limited experience in MIS ("camera navigation" in laparoscopic cholecystectomy only) were randomized for either 3 months of VR training or no training. Basic VR performance and defined soft skills (self-efficacy, stress-coping, and motivation) were assessed prior to randomization using basic modules of the VR simulator LapSim(®) and standardized psychological questionnaires. Three months after randomization VR performance was reassessed. Outcome measurement was based on the results derived from the most complex of the basic VR modules ("diathermy cutting") as the primary end point. A correlation analysis of the VR end-point performance and the psychological scores was done in both groups. Structured VR training enhanced VR performance of surgical trainees. An additional correlation to high motivational states (P < 0.05) was found. Low levels of self-efficacy and negative stress-coping were related to poor VR performance in the untrained control group (P < 0.05). This correlation was absent in the trained intervention group (P > 0.05). Low self-efficacy and negative stress-coping strategies seem to predict poor VR performance. However, structured training along with high motivational states is likely to balance out this impairment.

  11. Surgical crisis management skills training and assessment: a simulation[corrected]-based approach to enhancing operating room performance.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Forrest, Damien; Pandey, Vikas; Undre, Shabnam; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2006-07-01

    Intraoperative surgical crisis management is learned in an unstructured manner. In aviation, simulation training allows aircrews to coordinate and standardize recovery strategies. Our aim was to develop a surgical crisis simulation and evaluate its feasibility, realism, and validity of the measures used to assess performance. Surgical trainees were exposed to a bleeding crisis in a simulated operating theater. Assessment of performance consisted of a trainee's technical ability to control the bleeding and of their team/human factors skills. This assessment was performed in a blinded manner by 2 surgeons and one human factors expert. Other measures consisted of time measures such as time to diagnose the bleeding (TD), inform team members (TT), achieve control (TC), and close the laceration (TL). Blood loss was used as a surrogate outcome measures. There were considerable variations within both senior (n = 10) and junior (n = 10) trainees for technical and team skills. However, while the senior trainees scored higher than the juniors for technical skills (P = 0.001), there were no differences in human factors skills. There were also significant differences between the 2 groups for TD (P = 0.01), TC (P = 0.001), and TL (0.001). The blood loss was higher in the junior group. We have described the development of a novel simulated setting for the training of crisis management skills and the variability in performance both in between and within the 2 groups.

  12. The Effect of Endoscopic Resection on Short-Term Surgical Outcomes in Patients with Additional Laparoscopic Gastrectomy after Non-Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Eom, Bang-Wool; Yoon, Hong-Man; Kim, Yong-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong-Yeul; Kim, Young-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in early gastric cancer causes an artificial gastric ulcer and local inflammation that has a negative intraprocedural impact on additional laparoscopic gastrectomy in patients with noncurative ESD. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ESD on short-term surgical outcomes and evaluated the risk factors. Materials and Methods From January 2003 to January 2013, 1,704 patients of the National Cancer Center underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy with lymph node dissection because of preoperative stage Ia or Ib gastric cancer. They were divided into 2 groups: (1) with preoperative ESD or (2) without preoperative ESD. Clinicopathologic factors and short-term surgical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated along with risk factors such as preoperative ESD. Results Several characteristics differed between patients who underwent ESD-surgery (n=199) or surgery alone (n=1,505). The mean interval from the ESD procedure to the operation was 43.03 days. Estimated blood loss, open conversion rate, mean operation time, and length of hospital stay were not different between the 2 groups. Postoperative complications occurred in 23 patients (11.56%) in the ESD-surgery group and in 189 patients (12.56%) in the surgery-only group, and 3 deaths occurred among patients with complications (1 patient [ESD-surgery group] vs. 2 patients [surgery-only group]; P=0.688). A history of ESD was not significantly associated with postoperative complications (P=0.688). Multivariate analysis showed that male sex (P=0.008) and laparoscopic total or proximal gastrectomy (P=0.000) were independently associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions ESD did not affect short-term surgical outcomes during and after an additional laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:28337361

  13. The Effect of Endoscopic Resection on Short-Term Surgical Outcomes in Patients with Additional Laparoscopic Gastrectomy after Non-Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Ryu, Keun-Won; Eom, Bang-Wool; Yoon, Hong-Man; Kim, Yong-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong-Yeul; Kim, Chan-Gyoo; Choi, Il-Ju; Kim, Young-Woo

    2017-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in early gastric cancer causes an artificial gastric ulcer and local inflammation that has a negative intraprocedural impact on additional laparoscopic gastrectomy in patients with noncurative ESD. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ESD on short-term surgical outcomes and evaluated the risk factors. From January 2003 to January 2013, 1,704 patients of the National Cancer Center underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy with lymph node dissection because of preoperative stage Ia or Ib gastric cancer. They were divided into 2 groups: (1) with preoperative ESD or (2) without preoperative ESD. Clinicopathologic factors and short-term surgical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated along with risk factors such as preoperative ESD. Several characteristics differed between patients who underwent ESD-surgery (n=199) or surgery alone (n=1,505). The mean interval from the ESD procedure to the operation was 43.03 days. Estimated blood loss, open conversion rate, mean operation time, and length of hospital stay were not different between the 2 groups. Postoperative complications occurred in 23 patients (11.56%) in the ESD-surgery group and in 189 patients (12.56%) in the surgery-only group, and 3 deaths occurred among patients with complications (1 patient [ESD-surgery group] vs. 2 patients [surgery-only group]; P=0.688). A history of ESD was not significantly associated with postoperative complications (P=0.688). Multivariate analysis showed that male sex (P=0.008) and laparoscopic total or proximal gastrectomy (P=0.000) were independently associated with postoperative complications. ESD did not affect short-term surgical outcomes during and after an additional laparoscopic gastrectomy.

  14. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  15. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released.

  16. Different Goals, Different Pathways: The Role of Metacognition and Task Engagement in Surgical Skill Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Aimee K; Jabbour, Ibrahim J; Williams, Brian H; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand why learning goals and performance goals may produce different outcomes in surgical skills training for novices, with specific attention to metacognition and task engagement. Third-year medical students were randomized to a performance or learning-goal condition during a knot tying and suturing training program. Performance was assessed by blinded videotaped review. Demographics, goal orientation, and metacognition were captured with pre- and posttraining questionnaires. A total of 90 students participated in the training program. Trainees in the learning goals group demonstrated better performance on knot tying (4.30 ± 0.78 vs 3.86 ± 0.95; p < 0.05) and suturing (4.10 ± 0.77 vs 3.54 ± 0.73; p < 0.001). Participants in the learning goals group reported higher task engagement during both knot tying (4.32 ± 0.66 vs 3.90 ± 0.52; p < 0.001) and suturing (4.48 ± 0.42 vs 4.01 ± 0.46; p < 0.001). Additionally, the learning goals group also reported higher metacognition during both knot tying (3.88 ± 0.75 vs 3.59 ± 0.52; p < 0.05) and suturing (3.96 ± 0.75 vs 3.68 ± 0.48; p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that learning goals may be optimal for trainees learning new surgical tasks because they elicit increased task engagement and metacognition among trainees. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison between two double-button endoscopically assisted surgical techniques for the treatment acute acromioclavicular dislocations.

    PubMed

    Vulliet, P; Le Hanneur, M; Cladiere, V; Loriaut, P; Boyer, P

    2017-08-31

    To compare clinical and radiological outcomes between two endoscopically assisted double-button techniques in high-grade acute acromioclavicular separations. A retrospective single-center study was conducted in patients with acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation Rockwood types III and V, from 2009 to 2014. All were treated endoscopically, with a 1-year minimum follow-up. Two consecutive series were conducted; the first (TR group) received the TightRope(®) system, whereas last series (DB group) was treated with the Dog Bone(®) button technology (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Primary endpoints were last follow-up values of Constant score (CS) and Quick-DASH (QD) score. Moreover, the posttraumatic displacement and its evolution were assessed on bilateral Zanca radiographs. A displacement of 5 mm or greater the day after surgery was considered as a lack of reduction; the same difference on last follow-up X-rays was considered as a loss of reduction. Forty patients were reviewed: 22 in the TR group and 18 in the DB group. After a mean follow-up of 27.7 ± 8.3 months, CS and QD averaged, respectively, 94.3 ± 4.4 and 2.0 ± 2.6 in the TR series, whereas they averaged, respectively, 95 ± 6.1 and 3.4 ± 3.3 in the DB series after a mean follow-up of 24.1 ± 5 months (PCS = 0.16, PQDS = 0.08). Lack of reduction and loss of reduction rates were significantly higher in the DB group, with P = 0.0005 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Both techniques provided good to excellent functional outcomes. However, considering inferior radiological results using the Dog Bone(®) device, we would prefer the TightRope(®) device in acute acromioclavicular dislocations. IV: Therapeutic study-cases series.

  18. Teaching facial fracture repair: A novel method of surgical skills training using three-dimensional biomodels.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Neil; Mainprize, James; Edwards, Glenn; Binhammer, Paul; Antonyshyn, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    The facial fracture biomodel is a three-dimensional physical prototype of an actual facial fracture. The biomodel can be used as a novel teaching tool to facilitate technical skills training in fracture reduction and fixation, but more importantly, can help develop diagnostic and management competence. To introduce the 'facial fracture biomodel' as a teaching aid, and to provide preliminary evidence of its effectiveness in teaching residents the principles of panfacial fracture repair. Computer three-dimensional image processing and rapid prototyping were used to generate an accurate physical model of a panfacial fracture, mounted in a silicon 'soft tissue' base. Senior plastic surgery residents in their third, fourth and fifth years of training across Canada were invited to participate in a workshop using this biomodel to simulate panfacial fracture repair. A short didactic presentation outlining the 'patient's' clinical and radiological findings, and key principles of fracture repair, was given by a consultant plastic surgeon before the exercise. The residents completed a pre- and postbiomodel questionnaire soliciting information regarding background, diagnosis and management, and feedback. A total of 29 residents completed both pre- and postbiomodel questionnaires. Statistically significant results were found in the following areas: diagnosis of all fracture patterns (P=8.2×10(-7) [t test]), choice of incisions for adequate exposure (P=0.04 [t test]) and identifying sequence of repair (P=0.019 [χ(2) test]). Subjective evaluation of workshop effectiveness revealed a statistically significant increase in 'comfort level' only among third year trainees. Overall, positive feedback was reported among all participants. Biomodelling is a promising ancillary teaching aid that can assist in teaching residents technical skills, as well as how to assess and plan surgical repair.

  19. The effect of computer navigation on trainee learning of surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Wade; Dubrowski, Adam; Tabloie, Farshid; Backstein, David

    2007-12-01

    While computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery technology may facilitate performance and learning in the expert, its effects on the trainee are unclear. Motor learning theory suggests that, while the real-time feedback provided by computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery should improve performance, it may be detrimental to learning. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery on the learning of surgical skills by trainees. Forty-five participants were randomized to one of three training groups-conventional training, computer navigation, or knowledge of results-in which they learned technical skills related to total hip replacement. Outcomes were assessed in a pretest session and in ten-minute and six-week retention and transfer tests. All groups demonstrated improved accuracy and precision in the determination of the abduction angle and the version angle of the acetabular cups during training (p < 0.001). The computer navigation group demonstrated significantly better accuracy and precision in early training (p < 0.05) and better precision throughout training (p < 0.05). No significant degradation in performance was observed between the immediate and the delayed testing for any group, suggesting that there was task learning in all groups with no negative effects of the tested training modalities on learning. In this study, the concurrent augmented feedback provided by computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery resulted in improved early performance and equivalent learning. While we did not observe a compromise in learning, further investigation is required to ensure that computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery does not compromise trainee learning in more complex tasks.

  20. Chicken wing training model for endoscopic microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Sivakanthan, Sananthan; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos Diogenes; Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Objectives To present and validate a chicken wing model for endoscopic endonasal microsurgical skill development. Setting A surgical environment was constructed using a Styrofoam box and measurements from radiological studies. Endoscopic visualization and instrumentation were utilized in a manner to mimic operative setting. Design Five participants were instructed to complete four sequential tasks: (1) opening the skin, (2) exposing the main artery in its neurovascular sheath, (3) opening the neurovascular sheath, and (4) separating the nerve from the artery. Time to completion of each task was recorded. Participants Three junior attendings, one senior resident, and one medical student were recruited internally. Main Outcome Measures Time to perform the surgical tasks measured in seconds. Results The average time of the first training session was 48.8 minutes; by the 10th training session, the average time was 22.4 minutes. The range of improvement was 25.7 minutes to 72.4 minutes. All five participants exhibited statistically significant decrease in time after 10 trials. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that an improvement of 50% was achieved by an average of five attempts at the 95% confidence interval. Conclusions The ex vivo chicken wing model is an inexpensive and relatively realistic model to train endoscopic dissection using microsurgical techniques.

  1. Setting of an endoscopic nasal reference point for surgical access to the anterior base through an anatomical study on cadavers.

    PubMed

    Zanuncio, Andressa Vinha; Crosara, Paulo Fernando Tormin Borges; Becker, Helena Maria Gonçalves; Becker, Celso Gonçalves; Guimarães, Roberto Eustáquio Dos Santos

    Diseases of paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and skull base can be treated by endonasal operations using a nasal rigid endoscope. When conducting this kind of surgery, anatomical references are critical for safety. To measure the distance from the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus to the skull base, according to socio-demographic characteristics, and to detail an anatomical reference point for paranasal sinus operations and for an access to the anterior skull base, comparing anatomical variations between right and left sides, gender, height, weight, age, and ethnicity in cadavers. Measures were taken from the 90° angle (the starting point where deflection of the skull base begins to form the anterior wall of the sphenoid, also known as Δ90°) to the upper, middle, and lower points of the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus. This study used 60 cadavers aged over 17 years, and evaluated these bodies with respect to age, height, BMI, weight, gender, and ethnicity, comparing measurements of right and left sides. The measurements were >1.5cm in all cadavers and did not vary with age, height, weight, gender, and ethnicity on their right and left sides. The lack of association between the measurement from Δ90° to the upper, middle, and lower posterior walls of the maxillary sinus (categorical or quantitative) is noteworthy, considering the characteristics studied. The methodology defined the nasal point of reference, considering an absence of variation in the cadavers' characteristics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. The surgical challenge of carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in chronic ear disease: a pitfall for endoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Pauna, H F; Monsanto, R C; Schachern, P A; Costa, S S; Kwon, G; Paparella, M M; Cureoglu, S

    2017-04-01

    Endoscopic procedures are becoming common in middle ear surgery. Inflammation due to chronic ear disease can cause bony erosion of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals, making them more vulnerable during surgery. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not chronic ear disease increases dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals. Comparative human temporal bone study. Otopathology laboratory. We selected 78 temporal bones from 55 deceased donors with chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma and then compared those two groups with a control group of 27 temporal bones from 19 deceased donors with no middle ear disease. We analysed the middle ear, carotid artery canal and Fallopian canal, looking for signs of dehiscence of its bony coverage, using light microscopy. We found an increased incidence in dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease. The size of the carotid artery canal dehiscence was larger in the middle ear-diseased groups, and its bony coverage, when present, was also thinner compared to the control group. Dehiscence of the carotid artery canal was more frequently located closer to the promontory. The incidence of Fallopian canal dehiscence was significantly higher in temporal bones from donors older than 18 years with chronic middle ear disease. The increased incidence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease elevates the risk of adverse events during middle ear surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cost comparison between surgical treatments and endoscopic submucosal dissection in patients with early gastric cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younhee; Kim, Young Woo; Choi, Il Ju; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jong Hee; Kwon, Jin Won; Lee, Ja Youn; Lee, Na Rae; Seol, Sang Yong

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether medical costs can be reduced using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instead of conventional surger-ies in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). Pa-tients who underwent open gastrectomy (OG), laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG), and ESD for EGC were recruited from three medical institutions in 2009. For macro-costing, the medical costs for each patient were derived from the ex-penses incurred during the patient's hospital stay and 1-year follow-up. The overall costs in micro-costing were determined by multiplying the unit cost with the resources used during the patients' hospitalization. A total of 194 patients were included in this study. The hospital stay for ESD was 5 to 8 days and was significantly shorter than the 12-day hospital stay for OG or the 11- to 17-day stay for LAG. Using macro-costing, the average medical costs for ESD during the hospital stay ranged from 2.1 to 3.4 million Korean Won (KRW) per patient, and the medical costs for conventional surgeries were estimated to be between 5.1 million and 8.2 million KRW. There were no significant differences in the 1-year follow-up costs between ESD and conventional surger-ies. ESD patients had lower medical costs than those patients who had conventional surgeries for EGC with conservative indications. (Gut Liver, 2015;9174-180).

  4. A randomized controlled trial evaluating endoscopic and laparoscopic training in skills transfer for novices performing a simulated NOTES task.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Jean; Sodergren, Mikael Hans; Sugden, Colin; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Gillen, Sonja; Feussner, Huburtus; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2013-12-01

    The NOSCAR white paper lists training as an important step to the safe clinical application of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate whether training novices in either a laparoscopic or endoscopic simulator curriculum would affect performance in a NOTES simulator task. A total of 30 third-year medical undergraduates were recruited. They were randomized to 3 groups: no training (control; n = 10), endoscopy training on a validated colonoscopy simulator protocol (n = 10), and training on a validated laparoscopy simulator curriculum (n = 10). All participants subsequently completed a simulated NOTES task, consisting of 7 steps, on the ELITE (endoscopic-laparoscopic interdisciplinary training entity) model. Performance was assessed as time taken to complete individual steps, overall task time, and number of errors. The endoscopy group was significantly faster than the control group at accessing the peritoneal cavity through the gastric incision (median 27 vs 78 s; P = .015), applying diathermy to the base of the appendix (median 103.5 vs 173 s; P = .014), and navigating to the gallbladder (median 76 vs 169.5 s; P = .049). Endoscopy participants completed the full NOTES procedure in a shorter time than the laparoscopy group (median 863 vs 2074 s; P < .001). This study highlights the importance of endoscopic training for a simulated NOTES task that involves both navigation and resection with operative maneuvers. Although laparoscopic training confers some benefit for operative steps such as applying diathermy to the gallbladder fossa, this was not as beneficial as training in endoscopy.

  5. Comparing video games and laparoscopic simulators in the development of laparoscopic skills in surgical residents.

    PubMed

    Adams, Barbara J; Margaron, Franklin; Kaplan, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    The video game industry has become increasingly popular over recent years, offering photorealistic simulations of various scenarios while requiring motor, visual, and cognitive coordination. Video game players outperform nonplayers on different visual tasks and are faster and more accurate on laparoscopic simulators. The same qualities found in video game players are highly desired in surgeons. Our investigation aims to evaluate the effect of video game play on the development of fine motor and visual skills. Specifically, we plan to examine if handheld video devices offer the same improvement in laparoscopic skill as traditional simulators, with less cost and more accessibility. We performed an Institutional Review Board-approved study, including categorical surgical residents and preliminary interns at our institution. The residents were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 study arms, including a traditional laparoscopic simulator, XBOX 360 gaming console, or Nintendo DS handheld gaming system. After an introduction survey and baseline timed test using a laparoscopic surgery box trainer, residents were given 6 weeks to practice on their respective consoles. At the conclusion of the study, the residents were tested again on the simulator and completed a final survey. A total of 31 residents were included in the study, representing equal distribution of each class level. The XBOX 360 group spent more time on their console weekly (6 hours per week) compared with the simulator (2 hours per week), and Nintendo groups (3 hours per week). There was a significant difference in the improvement of the tested time among the 3 groups, with the XBOX 360 group showing the greatest improvement (p = 0.052). The residents in the laparoscopic simulator arm (n = 11) improved 4.6 seconds, the XBOX group (n = 10) improved 17.7 seconds, and the Nintendo DS group (n = 10) improved 11.8 seconds. Residents who played more than 10 hours of video games weekly had the fastest times on the simulator

  6. A preliminary evaluation of an innovative synthetic soft tissue simulation module ('Skilltray') for use in basic surgical skills workshops.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W E; Lee, P W; Sunderland, G T; Day, R P

    1996-11-01

    The results of a preliminary evaluation comparing the relative merits of biological (freshly-prepared animal offal tissue) and synthetic (Skilltray) simulation modalities are presented, subsequent to their use during two basic surgical skills courses organised by The Royal College of Surgeons of England and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow in September 1995, and at which 18 SHO grade surgical trainees attended. Each trainee completed a questionnaire at the end of the first session on the second day of the course to assist the evaluation. Our conclusions were as follows: 1. The synthetic tissues evaluated provided a useful and functionally reproducible means for learning the basic exercises included in the mandatory skills course. 2. Freshly-prepared animal tissues undoubtedly provided a more "realistic' medium for rehearsing the basic surgical techniques taught. Trainees preferred to use the synthetic tissues initially and then to progress to the fresh equivalents subsequently. 3. The Skilltray provided all the requisite elements for rehearsing basic tissue handling, suturing, and anastomotic techniques in a self-contained, easily transportable module. We would suggest that such a unit be given to each participant to take away at the end of the basic skills course, to enable consolidation of the skills learned. 4. Where the use of fresh tissues is not possible the highly functional nature of the synthetic simulators evaluated make it acceptable then to use them as the only training modality.

  7. The Effect of 3-Dimensional Simulation on Neurosurgical Skill Acquisition and Surgical Performance: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Clark, Anna D; Barone, Damiano G; Candy, Nicholas; Guilfoyle, Mathew; Budohoski, Karol; Hofmann, Riikka; Santarius, Thomas; Kirollos, Ramez; Trivedi, Rikin A

    In recent years, 3-dimensional (3D) simulation of neurosurgical procedures has become increasingly popular as an addition to training programmes. However, there remains little objective evidence of its effectiveness in improving live surgical skill. This review analysed the current literature in 3D neurosurgical simulation, highlighting remaining gaps in the evidence base for improvement in surgical performance and suggests useful future research directions. An electronic search of the databases was conducted to identify studies investigating 3D virtual reality (VR) simulation for various types of neurosurgery. Eligible studies were those that used a combination of metrics to measure neurosurgical skill acquisition on a simulation trainer. Studies were excluded if they did not measure skill acquisition against a set of metrics or if they assessed skills that were not used in neurosurgical practice. This was not a systematic review however, the data extracted was tabulated to allow comparison between studies RESULTS: This study revealed that the average overall quality of the included studies was moderate. Only one study assessed outcomes in live surgery, while most other studies assessed outcomes on a simulator using a variety of metrics. It is concluded that in its current state, the evidence for 3D simulation suggests it as a useful supplement to training programmes but more evidence is needed of improvement in surgical performance to warrant large-scale investment in this technology. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. "Reflection-Before-Practice" Improves Self-Assessment and End-Performance in Laparoscopic Surgical Skills Training.

    PubMed

    Ganni, Sandeep; Botden, Sanne M B I; Schaap, Dennis P; Verhoeven, Bas H; Goossens, Richard H M; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2017-08-16

    To establish whether a systematized approach to self-assessment in a laparoscopic surgical skills course improves accordance between expert- and self-assessment. A systematic training course in self-assessment using Competency Assessment Tool was introduced into the normal course of evaluation within a Laparoscopic Surgical Skills training course for the test group (n = 30). Differences between these and a control group (n = 30) who did not receive the additional training were assessed. Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (n = 27), and GSL Medical College, Rajahmundry, India (n = 33). Sixty postgraduate year 2 and 3 surgical residents who attended the 2-day Laparoscopic Surgical Skills grade 1 level 1 curriculum were invited to participate. The test group (n = 30) showed better accordance between expert- and self-assessment (difference of 1.5, standard deviation [SD] = 0.2 versus 3.83, SD = 0.6, p = 0.009) as well as half the number (7 versus 14) of cases of overreporting. Furthermore, the test group also showed higher overall mean performance (mean = 38.1, SD = 0.7 versus mean = 31.8, SD = 1.0, p < 0.001) than the control group (n = 30). The systematic approach to self-assessment can be viewed as responsible for this and can be seen as "reflection-before-practice" within the framework of reflective practice as defined by Donald Schon. Our results suggest that "reflection-before-practice" in implementing self-assessment is an important step in the development of surgical skills, yielding both better understanding of one's strengths and weaknesses and also improving overall performance. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in SurgeryThe Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of expert instruction and computer-based video training in teaching fundamental surgical skills to medical students.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Markku; Brydges, Ryan; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2008-04-01

    Practice using computer-based video instruction (CBVI) leads to improvements in surgical skills proficiency. This study investigated the benefits of the introduction of (a) learner-directed, interactive video training and (b) the addition of expert instruction on the learning and retention of the basic surgical skills of suturing and knot-tying in medical students. Using bench models, students were pre-tested on a suturing and knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were then randomly assigned to three practice conditions: self-study with video; self-study with interactive video; or the combination of self-study with interactive video with the addition of subsequent expert instruction. All participants underwent 18 trials of practice in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed by an immediate post-test and a retention test one month later. Performance was evaluated using expert- and computer-based assessments. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in expert- and computer-based assessments between groups at pre-test. Although all three groups demonstrated significant improvements on both measures between the pre- and post-tests as well as between pre-tests and retention-tests (P < .01), no significant differences were detected among the three groups. This study shows that in surgical novices, neither the inclusion of expert instruction nor the addition of self-directed interaction with video leads to further improvements in skill development or retention. These findings further support the possible implementation of CBVI within surgical skills curricula.

  10. Evaluation of the expectations, learning and competencies of surgical skills by undergraduate veterinary students performing canine ovariohysterectomies.

    PubMed

    Bowlt, K L; Murray, J K; Herbert, G L; Delisser, P; Ford-Fennah, V; Murrell, J; Friend, E J

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the development of surgical skills of veterinary undergraduates and determine the number of canine ovariohysterectomies required to achieve competency and reduce levels of student concern. This was compared to student expectations and that of employers regarding surgical ability and provision of support to new graduates. A questionnaire regarding surgical concerns was sent to final year veterinary students enrolled within the University of Bristol, UK. A questionnaire was also sent to 200 UK veterinary practices regarding their impressions of surgical competence of new graduates and their provision of supervision. The responses were compared. Eleven additional final year students performed five canine ovariohysterectomies and graded their concerns. The number of supervised canine ovariohysterectomies required until competency was determined. 80·4% of final year veterinary undergraduates replied that the surgical procedure which they were most concerned about their ability to perform was canine ovariohysterectomy. Students and veterinary practitioners differed in their opinions regarding whether they considered canine ovariohysterectomy to be a "day one skill" and what were desirable levels of supervision. Completing a minimum of four canine ovariohysterectomies led to 81·8% of students being assessed as competent. An unrealistically high expectation of competency by students may be a source of stress and concern. Employers should aim to provide hands-on support whilst new graduates complete at least four canine ovariohysterectomies. Postoperative haemorrhage is uncommon but is the main concern for students. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  11. Improving Rhinology Skills with Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew Y; Fried, Marvin P; Gibber, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The convergence of technology and medicine has led to many advances in surgical training. Novel surgical simulators have led to significantly improved skills of graduating surgeons, leading to decreased time to proficiency, improved efficiency, decreased errors, and improvement in patient safety. Endoscopic sinus surgery poses a steep learning curve given the complex 3-dimensional anatomy of the nasal and paranasal cavities, and the necessary visual-spatial motor skills and bimanual dexterity. This article focuses on surgical simulation in rhinological training and how innovative high-fidelity and low-fidelity simulators can maximize resident training and improve procedural skills before operating in the live environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lower rates of symptom recurrence and surgical revision after primary compared with secondary endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Jusué-Torres, Ignacio; Elder, Benjamin D; Hoffberger, Jamie; Lu, Jennifer; Blitz, Ari M; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus; however, the success of ETV in patients who have previously undergone shunt placement remains unclear. The present study analyzed 103 adult patients with aqueductal stenosis who underwent ETV for obstructive hydrocephalus and evaluated the effect of previous shunt placement on post-ETV outcomes. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of 151 consecutive patients who were treated between 2007 and 2013 with ETV for hydrocephalus. One hundred three (68.2%) patients with aqueductal stenosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus were included in the analysis. Postoperative ETV patency and aqueductal and cisternal flow were assessed by high-resolution, gradient-echo MRI. Post-ETV Mini-Mental State Examination, Timed Up and Go, and Tinetti scores were compared with preoperative values. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed comparing the post-ETV outcomes in patients who underwent a primary (no previous shunt) ETV (n = 64) versus secondary (previous shunt) ETV (n = 39). RESULTS The majority of patients showed significant improvement in symptoms after ETV; however, no significant differences were seen in any of the quantitative tests performed during follow-up. Symptom recurrence occurred in 29 (28.2%) patients after ETV, after a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 0.8-8.0) months post-ETV failure. Twenty-seven (26.2%) patients required surgical revision after their initial ETV. Patients who received a secondary ETV had higher rates of symptom recurrence (p = 0.003) and surgical revision (p = 0.003), particularly in regard to additional shunt placement/revision post-ETV (p = 0.005). These differences remained significant after multivariate analysis for both symptom recurrence (p = 0.030) and surgical revision (p = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS Patients with obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis exhibit symptomatic improvement after ETV, with a

  13. Practical skills teaching in contemporary surgical education: how can educational theory be applied to promote effective learning?

    PubMed

    Sadideen, Hazim; Kneebone, Roger

    2012-09-01

    Teaching practical skills is a core component of undergraduate and postgraduate surgical education. It is crucial to optimize our current learning and teaching models, particularly in a climate of decreased clinical exposure. This review explores the role of educational theory in promoting effective learning in practical skills teaching. Peer-reviewed publications, books, and online resources from national bodies (eg, the UK General Medical Council) were reviewed. This review highlights several aspects of surgical education, modeling them on current educational theory. These include the following: (1) acquisition and retention of motor skills (Miller's triangle; Fitts' and Posner's theory), (2) development of expertise after repeated practice and regular reinforcement (Ericsson's theory), (3) importance of the availability of expert assistance (Vygotsky's theory), (4) learning within communities of practice (Lave and Wenger's theory), (5) importance of feedback in learning practical skills (Boud, Schon, and Endes' theories), and (6) affective component of learning. It is hoped that new approaches to practical skills teaching are designed in light of our understanding of educational theory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endoscopic retroauricular thyroidectomy: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Holsinger, F Christopher; Tufano, Ralph P; Park, Jae Hong; Sim, Nam Suk; Kim, Won Shik; Choi, Eun Chang; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2016-01-01

    We sought to seek the potential role of endoscopic thyroidectomy with the retroauricular (RA) approach prior to future comparative study with the robotic RA thyroidectomy. Therefore, this study aims to verify the surgical feasibility of endoscopic RA thyroidectomy. Eighteen patients who underwent endoscopic RA thyroidectomy for clinically suspicious papillary thyroid carcinoma or benign lesions from January to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. All endoscopic operations via RA or modified facelift approach were successfully performed, without any significant intraoperative complications or conversion to open surgery. Based on patient-reported outcome questionnaires, all patients were satisfied with their postoperative surgical scars. Endoscopic RA thyroidectomy is technically feasible and safe with satisfactory cosmetic results for patients where indicated.

  15. A Validated Orthopaedic Surgical Simulation Model for Training and Evaluation of Basic Arthroscopic Skills.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Ryan P; Pauyo, Thierry; Sutton, J Carl; Coughlin, Larry P; Bergeron, Stephane G

    2015-09-02

    To our knowledge, there is currently no validated educational model to evaluate and teach basic arthroscopic skills that is widely accessible to orthopaedic residency training programs. The primary objective was to design and to validate a surgical simulation model by demonstrating that subjects with increasing level of training perform better on basic arthroscopic simulation tasks. The secondary objective was to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the model. Prospectively recruited participants were divided by level of training into four groups. Subjects performed six basic arthroscopic tasks using a box model: (1) probing, (2) grasping, (3) tissue resection, (4) shaving, (5) tissue liberation and suture-passing, and (6) knot-tying. A score was calculated according to time required to complete each task and deductions for technical errors. A priori total global score, of a possible 100 points, was calculated by averaging scores from all six tasks using equal weights. A total of forty-nine participants were recruited for this study. Participants were grouped by level of training: Group 1 (novice: fifteen medical students and interns), Group 2 (junior residents: twelve postgraduate year-2 or postgraduate year-3 residents), Group 3 (senior residents: sixteen postgraduate year-4 or postgraduate year-5 residents), and Group 4 (six arthroscopic surgeons). The mean total global score (and standard deviation) differed significantly between groups (p < 0.001): 29.0 ± 13.6 points for Group 1, 40.3 ± 12.1 points for Group 2, 57.6 ± 7.4 points for Group 3, and 72.4 ± 3.0 points for Group 4. Pairwise comparison with Tukey correction confirmed construct validity by showing significant improvement in overall performance by increasing level of training between all groups (p < 0.05). The model proved to be highly reliable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 for both inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. A simulation model was successfully

  16. Systematic Review of Voluntary Participation in Simulation-Based Laparoscopic Skills Training: Motivators and Barriers for Surgical Trainee Attendance.

    PubMed

    Gostlow, Hannah; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    To examine and report on evidence relating to surgical trainees' voluntary participation in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. Specifically, the underlying motivators, enablers, and barriers faced by surgical trainees with regard to attending training sessions on a regular basis. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed; CINAHL; EMBASE; Cochrane Collaboration) was conducted between May and July 2015. Studies were included on whether they reported on surgical trainee attendance at voluntary, simulation-based laparoscopic skills training sessions, in addition to qualitative data regarding participant's perceived barriers and motivators influencing their decision to attend such training. Factors affecting a trainee's motivation were categorized as either intrinsic (internal) or extrinsic (external). Two randomised control trials and 7 case series' met our inclusion criteria. Included studies were small and generally poor quality. Overall, voluntary simulation-based laparoscopic skills training was not well attended. Intrinsic motivators included clearly defined personal performance goals and relevance to clinical practice. Extrinsic motivators included clinical responsibilities and available free time, simulator location close to clinical training, and setting obligatory assessments or mandated training sessions. The effect of each of these factors was variable, and largely dependent on the individual trainee. The greatest reported barrier to attending voluntary training was the lack of available free time. Although data quality is limited, it can be seen that providing unrestricted access to simulator equipment is not effective in motivating surgical trainees to voluntarily participate in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. To successfully encourage participation, consideration needs to be given to the factors influencing motivation to attend training. Further research, including better designed randomised control trials and large

  17. Design and validation of a cost-effective physical endoscopic simulator for fundamentals of endoscopic surgery training.

    PubMed

    King, Neil; Kunac, Anastasia; Johnsen, Erik; Gallina, Gregory; Merchant, Aziz M

    2016-11-01

    The American Board of Surgery will require graduating surgical residents to achieve proficiency in endoscopy. Surgical simulation can help residents to prepare for this proficiency test, accelerate skill acquisition, shorten the learning, and improve patient safety. Currently, endoscopic simulators are extremely cost-prohibitive. We therefore designed an inexpensive physical endoscopic simulator to (1) facilitate Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery skills training and (2) teach basic colonoscopy skills, for <$200.00. We constructed the Rutgers Open Source Colonoscopy Simulator (ROSCO) from easily acquired commercial materials. For construct validation, we compared novices to experts in a two-arm non-randomized study. Each participant performed the five tasks and a full cecal intubation on the simulator. Face and content validity surveys were taken by the experts, after the construct validity study to determine the simulator's ability to achieve the intended task with "realism." Data were collected on (1) cost and construction, (2) time to completion of individual tasks, (3) percentage of task completion, and (4) survey statistics. Our simulator requires no advanced expertise, costs $62.77 US, and weighs 8.5 pounds. The ROSCO simulator was clearly able to distinguish expert from novice. Expert task times for completing all five tasks, performing the loop reduction, and reaching the splenic and hepatic flexures on the simulator were significantly better than novice times (p < 0.05). All participants were able to complete all five tasks on the simulator 100 % of the time. Three out of five experts "Agreed" or "Strongly Agreed" with five out of the six statements regarding the simulator's teaching ability. Four out of five experts rated each of the five specific aspects of the simulator as "Realistic" or "Very Realistic." We have designed a low-cost colonoscopy simulator with easily available materials and which requires very little advanced construction expertise

  18. Dedicated Research Time During Surgery Residency Leads to a Significant Decline In Self-Assessed Clinical Aptitude and Surgical Skills.

    PubMed

    Grova, Monica M; Yang, Anthony D; Humphries, Misty D; Galante, Joseph M; Salcedo, Edgardo S

    2017-05-19

    The surgical community commonly perceives a decline in surgical and patient care skills among residents who take dedicated time away from clinical activity to engage in research. We hypothesize that residents perceive a decline in their skills because of dedicated research time. UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, an institutional tertiary care center. General surgery residents and graduates from UC Davis general surgery residency training program, who had completed at least 1 year of research during their training. A total of 35 people were asked to complete the survey, and 19 people submitted a completed survey. Participants were invited to complete an online survey. Factors associated with the decline in skills following their research years were examined. All statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS Statistics software. A total of 19 current or former general surgery residents responded to the survey (54% response rate). Overall, 42% described their research as "basic science." Thirteen residents (68%) dedicated 1 year to research, while the remainder spent 2 or more years. Basic science researchers were significantly more likely to report a decrease in clinical judgment (75% vs. 22%, p = 0.013) as well as a decrease in patient care skills (63% vs. 0%, p = 0.002). Residents who dedicated at least 2 years to research were more likely to perceive a decline in overall aptitude and surgical skills (100% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), and a decline in patient care skills (67% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Most residents who dedicate time for research perceive a decline in their overall clinical aptitude and surgical skills. This can have a dramatic effect on the confidence of these residents in caring for patients and leading a care team once they re-enter clinical training. Residents who engaged in 2 or more years of research were significantly more likely to perceive these problems. Further research should determine how to keep residents who are interested in academics

  19. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST.

  20. Saturated Salt Solution Method: A Useful Cadaver Embalming for Surgical Skills Training

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  1. Ready for the OR? – Clinical anatomy and basic surgical skills for students in their preclinical education

    PubMed Central

    Böckers, Anja; Lippold, Dominique; Fassnacht, Ulrich; Schelzig, Hubert; Böckers, Tobias M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical students’ first experience in the operating theatre often takes place during their electives and is therefore separated from the university’s medical curriculum. In the winter term 2009/10, the Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Ulm implemented an elective called “Ready for the OR” for 2nd year medical students participating in the dissection course. We attempted to improve learning motivation and examination results by transferring anatomical knowledge into a surgical setting and teaching basic surgical skills in preparation of the students’ first participation in the OR. Out of 69 online applicants, 50 students were randomly assigned to the Intervention Group (FOP) or the Control Group. In 5 teaching session students learned skills like scrubbing, stitching or the identification of frequently used surgical instruments. Furthermore, students visited five surgical interventions which were demonstrated by surgical colleagues on donated bodies that have been embalmed using the Thiel technique. The teaching sessions took place in the institute’s newly built “Theatrum Anatomicum” for an ideal simulation of a surgical setting. The learning outcomes were verified by OSPE. In a pilot study, an intervention group and a control group were compared concerning their examination results in the dissection course and their learning motivation through standardized SELLMO-test for students. Participants gained OSPE results between 60.5 and 92% of the maximum score. “Ready for the OR” was successfully implemented and judged an excellent add-on to anatomy teaching by the participants. However, we could not prove a significant difference in learning motivation or examination results. Future studies should focus on the learning orientation, the course’s long-term learning effects and the participants’ behavior in a real surgery setting. PMID:21866247

  2. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  3. Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery cognitive examination: development and validity evidence.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Benjamin K; Vassiliou, Melina C; Dunkin, Brian J; Mellinger, John D; Fanelli, Robert D; Martinez, Jose M; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Sillin, Lelan F; Delaney, Conor P; Velanovich, Vic; Fried, Gerald M; Korndorffer, James R; Marks, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    Flexible endoscopy is an integral part of surgical care. Exposure to endoscopic procedures varies greatly in surgical training. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons has developed the Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES), which serves to teach and assess the fundamental knowledge and skills required to practice flexible endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes the validity evidence in the development of the FES cognitive examination. Core areas in the practice of gastrointestinal endoscopy were identified through facilitated expert focus groups to establish validity evidence for the test content. Test items then were developed based on the content areas. Prospective enrollment of participants at various levels of training and experience was used for beta testing. Two FES cognitive test versions then were developed based on beta testing data. The Angoff and contrasting group methods were used to determine the passing score. Validity evidence was established through correlation of experience level with examination score. A total of 220 test items were developed in accordance with the defined test blueprint and formulated into two versions of 120 questions each. The versions were administered randomly to 363 participants. The correlation between test scores and training level was high (r = 0.69), with similar results noted for contrasting groups based on endoscopic rotation and endoscopic procedural experience. Items then were selected for two test forms of 75 items each, and a passing score was established. The FES cognitive examination is the first test with validity evidence to assess the basic knowledge needed to perform flexible endoscopy. Combined with the hands-on skills examination, this assessment tool is a key component for FES certification.

  4. Laparoscopic surgical skills training: an investigation of the potential of using surgeons' visual search behaviour as a performance indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Dong, Leng; Gale, Alastair G.; Rees, Benjamin; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a difficult perceptual-motor task and effective and efficient training in the technique is important. Viewing previously recorded laparoscopic operations is a possible available training technique for surgeons to increase their knowledge of such minimal access surgery (MAS). It is not well known whether this is a useful technique, how effective it is or what effect it has on the surgeon watching the recorded video. As part of an on-going series of studies into laparoscopic surgery, an experiment was conducted to examine whether surgical skill level has an effect on the visual search behaviour of individuals of different surgical experience when they examine such imagery. Medically naive observers, medical students, junior surgeons and experienced surgeons viewed a laparoscopic recording of a recent operation. Initial examination of the recorded eye movement data indicated commonalities between all observers, largely irrespective of surgical experience. This, it is argued, is due to visual search in this situation largely being driven by the dynamic nature of the images. The data were then examined in terms of surgical steps and also in terms of interventions when differences were found related to surgical experience. Consequently, it is argued that monitoring the eye movements of trainee surgeons whilst they watch pre-recorded operations is a potential useful adjunct to existing training regimes.

  5. Evaluation of surgical training in the era of simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaharan, Shazrinizam; Neary, Paul

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess where we currently stand in relation to simulator-based training within modern surgical training curricula. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed database using keywords “simulation”, “skills assessment” and “surgery”. The studies retrieved were examined according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time period reviewed was 2000 to 2013. The methodology of skills assessment was examined. RESULTS: Five hundred and fifteen articles focussed upon simulator based skills assessment. Fifty-two articles were identified that dealt with technical skills assessment in general surgery. Five articles assessed open skills, 37 assessed laparoscopic skills, 4 articles assessed both open and laparoscopic skills and 6 assessed endoscopic skills. Only 12 articles were found to be integrating simulators in the surgical training curricula. Observational assessment tools, in the form of Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) dominated the literature. CONCLUSION: Observational tools such as OSATS remain the top assessment instrument in surgical training especially in open technical skills. Unlike the aviation industry, simulation based assessment has only now begun to cross the threshold of incorporation into mainstream skills training. Over the next decade we expect the promise of simulator-based training to finally take flight and begin an exciting voyage of discovery for surgical trainees. PMID:25228946

  6. Evaluation of surgical training in the era of simulation.

    PubMed

    Shaharan, Shazrinizam; Neary, Paul

    2014-09-16

    To assess where we currently stand in relation to simulator-based training within modern surgical training curricula. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed database using keywords "simulation", "skills assessment" and "surgery". The studies retrieved were examined according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time period reviewed was 2000 to 2013. The methodology of skills assessment was examined. Five hundred and fifteen articles focussed upon simulator based skills assessment. Fifty-two articles were identified that dealt with technical skills assessment in general surgery. Five articles assessed open skills, 37 assessed laparoscopic skills, 4 articles assessed both open and laparoscopic skills and 6 assessed endoscopic skills. Only 12 articles were found to be integrating simulators in the surgical training curricula. Observational assessment tools, in the form of Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) dominated the literature. Observational tools such as OSATS remain the top assessment instrument in surgical training especially in open technical skills. Unlike the aviation industry, simulation based assessment has only now begun to cross the threshold of incorporation into mainstream skills training. Over the next decade we expect the promise of simulator-based training to finally take flight and begin an exciting voyage of discovery for surgical trainees.

  7. Multimedia educational tools for cognitive surgical skill acquisition in open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shariff, U; Kullar, N; Haray, P N; Dorudi, S; Balasubramanian, S P

    2015-05-01

    Conventional teaching in surgical training programmes is constrained by time and cost, and has room for improvement. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a multimedia educational tool developed for an index colorectal surgical procedure (anterior resection) in teaching and assessment of cognitive skills and to evaluate its acceptability amongst general surgical trainees. Multimedia educational tools in open and laparoscopic anterior resection were developed by filming multiple operations which were edited into procedural steps and substeps and then integrated onto interactive navigational platforms using Adobe® Flash® Professional CS5 10.1. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on general surgical trainees to evaluate the effectiveness of online multimedia in comparison with conventional 'study day' teaching for the acquisition of cognitive skills. All trainees were assessed before and after the study period. Trainees in the multimedia group evaluated the tools by completing a survey. Fifty-nine trainees were randomized but 27% dropped out, leaving 43 trainees randomized to the multimedia group (n = 25) and study day group (n = 18) who were available for analysis. Posttest scores improved significantly in both groups (P < 0.01). The change in scores (mean ± SD) in the multimedia group was not significantly different from the study day group (6.02 ± 5.12 and 5.31 ± 3.42, respectively; P = 0.61). Twenty-five trainees completed the evaluation survey and experienced an improvement in their decision making (67%) and in factual and anatomical knowledge (88%); 96% agreed that the multimedia tool was a useful additional educational resource. Multimedia tools are effective for the acquisition of cognitive skills in colorectal surgery and are well accepted as an educational resource. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Can fatigue affect acquisition of new surgical skills? A prospective trial of pre- and post-call general surgery residents using the da Vinci surgical skills simulator.

    PubMed

    Robison, Weston; Patel, Sonya K; Mehta, Akshat; Senkowski, Tristan; Allen, John; Shaw, Eric; Senkowski, Christopher K

    2017-08-24

    To study the effects of fatigue on general surgery residents' performance on the da Vinci Skills Simulator (dVSS). 15 General Surgery residents from various postgraduate training years (PGY2, PGY3, PGY4, and PGY5) performed 5 simulation tasks on the dVSS as recommended by the Robotic Training Network (RTN). The General Surgery residents had no prior experience with the dVSS. Participants were assigned to either the Pre-call group or Post-call group based on call schedule. As a measure of subjective fatigue, residents were given the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) prior to their dVSS testing. The dVSS MScore™ software recorded various metrics (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills, OSATS) that were used to evaluate the performance of each resident to compare the robotic simulation proficiency between the Pre-call and Post-call groups. Six general surgery residents were stratified into the Pre-call group and nine into the Post-call group. These residents were also stratified into Fatigued (10) or Nonfatigued (5) groups, as determined by their reported ESS scores. A statistically significant difference was found between the Pre-call and Post-call reported sleep hours (p = 0.036). There was no statistically significant difference between the Pre-call and Post-call groups or between the Fatigued and Nonfatigued groups in time to complete exercise, number of attempts, and high MScore™ score. Despite variation in fatigue levels, there was no effect on the acquisition of robotic simulator skills.

  9. Management of surgical margins after endoscopic laser surgery for early glottic cancers: a multicentric evaluation in French-speaking European countries.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Nicolas; Vergez, Sébastien; Babin, Emmanuel; Baumstarck, Karine; Santini, Laure; Dessi, Patrick; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the practices of ENT surgeons for the management of surgical margins after endoscopic laser surgery for early glottic cancers. A questionnaire was sent to different surgeons managing cancers of the larynx in France, Belgium and Switzerland. A descriptive and comparative analysis of practices across centers was performed. Sixty-nine surgeons completed the questionnaire (58 in France, 10 in Belgium and 1 in Switzerland). In case of very close or equivocal resection margins after definitive histological examination, 67 % of surgeons perform close follow-up, 28 % further treatment and 5 % had no opinion. Factors resulting in a significant change in the management of equivocal or very close margins were: the country of origin (p = 0.011), the specialty of the multidisciplinary team leader (p = 0.001), the fact that radiation equipment is located in the same center (p = 0.027) and the access to IMRT technique (p = 0.027). In case of positive resection margins, 80 % of surgeons perform further treatment, 15 % surveillance, and 5 % had no opinion. The only factor resulting in a significant change in the management of positive margins was the number of cancers of the larynx treated per year (p = 0.011). It is important to spare, on one hand equivocal or very close margins and on the other hand, positive margins. Postoperative management should be discussed depending on intraoperative findings, patient, practices of multidisciplinary team, and surgeon experience. This management remains non-consensual and writing a good practice guideline could be useful.

  10. Endoscopic vertical band gastroplasty with an endoscopic sewing machine.

    PubMed

    Awan, Amjad N; Swain, C P

    2002-02-01

    Vertical band gastroplasty is an accepted surgical operation for the treatment of obesity. It is performed by means of an open technique. This is a description of a new endoscopic technique for gastroplasty. An endoscopic sewing machine was mounted on a flexible upper endoscope. On a postmortem specimen of porcine gastroesophageal tissue an area of the stomach, about 8-cm long and 4-cm wide, extending from and in line with the esophagus, was marked. A flexible plastic ring about 3 cm in diameter was sutured to the stomach along the lesser curvature at 8 cm from the gastroesophageal junction with an endoscopic sewing machine. Vertical gastroplasty was accomplished by suturing together the anterior and posterior walls of the stomach with the endoscopic sewing machine. Hence, a gastroplasty was fashioned as an 8-cm-long tube along the lesser curvature of the stomach extending from the gastroesophageal junction to the outlet ring. An endoscopic gastroplasty for obesity was successfully performed by using an endoscopic sewing machine on a postmortem specimen of porcine stomach. The technical feasibility of endoscopic vertical ring gastroplasty should be tested in a live animal model. This will serve as the next phase in the development of this interventional endoscopic technique, which has potential for clinical applicability.

  11. Olecranon extrabursal endoscopic bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chen G; McGuire, Duncan T; Morse, Levi P; Bain, Gregory I

    2013-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis is a common clinical problem. It is often managed conservatively because of the high rates of wound complications with the conventional open surgical technique. Conventional olecranon bursoscopy utilizes an arthroscope and an arthroscopic shaver, removing the bursa from inside-out. We describe an extrabursal endoscopic technique where the bursa is not entered but excised in its entirety under endoscopic vision. A satisfactory view is obtained with less morbidity than the open method, while still avoiding a wound over the sensitive point of the olecranon.

  12. Surgical Technologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... A small number of states regulate surgical technologists. Education Surgical technologists typically need postsecondary education. Many community ... the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education Typical level of education that most workers need ...

  13. Simulation-Based Cutaneous Surgical-Skill Training on a Chicken-Skin Bench Model in a Medical Undergraduate Program

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Rafael; Saad-Hossne, Rogério; Martinhão Souto, Luís Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because of ethical and medico-legal aspects involved in the training of cutaneous surgical skills on living patients, human cadavers and living animals, it is necessary the search for alternative and effective forms of training simulation. Aims: To propose and describe an alternative methodology for teaching and learning the principles of cutaneous surgery in a medical undergraduate program by using a chicken-skin bench model. Materials and Methods: One instructor for every four students, teaching materials on cutaneous surgical skills, chicken trunks, wings, or thighs, a rigid platform support, needled threads, needle holders, surgical blades with scalpel handles, rat-tooth tweezers, scissors, and marking pens were necessary for training simulation. Results: A proposal for simulation-based training on incision, suture, biopsy, and on reconstruction techniques using a chicken-skin bench model distributed in several sessions and with increasing levels of difficultywas structured. Both feedback and objective evaluations always directed to individual students were also outlined. Conclusion: The teaching of a methodology for the principles of cutaneous surgery using a chicken-skin bench model versatile, portable, easy to assemble, and inexpensive is an alternative and complementary option to the armamentarium of methods based on other bench models described. PMID:23723471

  14. Lamb’s head: The model for novice education in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skitarelić, Neven; Mladina, Ranko

    2015-01-01

    Structured training in endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (EESS) and skull base surgery is essential considering serious potential complications. We have developed a detailed concept on training these surgical skills on the lamb’s head. This simple and extremely cheap model offers the possibility of training even more demanding and advanced procedures in human endonasal endoscopic surgery such as: frontal sinus surgery, orbital decompression, cerebrospinal fluid-leak repair followed also by the naso-septal flap, etc. Unfortunately, the sphenoid sinus surgery cannot be practiced since quadrupeds do not have this sinus. Still, despite this anatomical limitation, it seems that the lamb’s head can be very useful even for the surgeons already practicing EESS, but in a limited edition because of a lack of the experience and dexterity. Only after gaining the essential surgical skills of this demanding field it makes sense to go for the expensive trainings on the human cadaveric model. PMID:26413487

  15. The Learning and Development of Low-Skilled Workers Training to Become Surgical Technologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Judith Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how low-skilled workers who participated in a health care training program learned to acquire the technical, cognitive, and developmental competencies they needed to gain skilled employment in higher-level positions in the field and thus advance their careers. The data methods used were: (1) in-depth…

  16. The Learning and Development of Low-Skilled Workers Training to Become Surgical Technologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Judith Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how low-skilled workers who participated in a health care training program learned to acquire the technical, cognitive, and developmental competencies they needed to gain skilled employment in higher-level positions in the field and thus advance their careers. The data methods used were: (1) in-depth…

  17. Validation of an Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill for Surgical Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Heather; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the concurrent validity of the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS), a new test of technical skills for general surgery residents. Correlations between OSATS scores and faculty rankings were generally high for six senior residents but low for six junior residents at the University of Toronto. (MDM)

  18. An intensive vascular surgical skills and simulation course for vascular trainees improves procedural knowledge and self-rated procedural competence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, William P; Doucet, Danielle R; Simons, Jessica P; Wyman, Allison; Aiello, Francesco A; Arous, Elias; Schanzer, Andres; Messina, Louis M

    2017-03-01

    Surgical skills and simulation courses are emerging to meet the demand for vascular simulation training for vascular surgical skills, but their educational effect has not yet been described. We sought to determine the effect of an intensive vascular surgical skills and simulation course on the procedural knowledge and self-rated procedural competence of vascular trainees and to assess participant feedback regarding the course. Participants underwent a 1.5-day course covering open and endovascular procedures on high-fidelity simulators and cadavers. Before and after the course, participants completed a written test that assessed procedural knowledge concerning index open vascular and endovascular procedures. Participants also assessed their own procedural competence in open and endovascular procedures on a 5-point Likert scale (1: no ability to perform, 5: performs independently). Scores before and after the course were compared among postgraduate year (PGY) 1-2 and PGY 3-7 trainees. Participants completed a survey to rate the relevance and realism of open and endovascular simulations. Fifty-eight vascular integrated residents and vascular fellows (PGY 1-7) completed the course and all assessments. After course participation, procedural knowledge scores were significantly improved among PGY 1-2 residents (50% correct before vs 59% after; P < .0001) and PGY 3-7 residents (52% correct before vs 63% after; P = .003). Self-rated procedural competence was significantly improved among PGY 1-2 (2.2 ± 0.1 before vs 3.1 ± 0.1 after; P < .0001) and PGY 3-7 (3.0 ± 0.1 before vs 3.7 ± 0.1 after; P ≤ .0001). Self-rated procedural competence significantly improved for both endovascular (2.4 ± 0.1 before vs 3.3 ± 0.1 after; P < .0001) and open procedures (2.7 ± 0.1 before vs 3.5 ± 0.1 after; P < .0001). More than 93% of participants reported they were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the relevance and realism of the open and endovascular simulations

  19. Three-dimensional endoscopic visualization in functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tobias; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter K; Simon, Christian; Sertel, Serkan

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stereoscopic vision in sinus surgery has been achieved with the microscope so far. The introduction of two-dimensional (2D) endoscopes set a milestone in the visualization of the surgical field and paved the way to functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), although the 2D endoscopes cannot provide a stereoscopic visualization. The latest technology of 3D endoscopes allows stereoscopic vision. We provide a clinical investigation of all commercially available 3D endoscopes in FESS to compare their clinical value and efficacy to routinely used conventional 2D HD endoscopes. In this prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study, 46 patients with polypoid chronic rhinosinusitis underwent FESS with one of the following three endoscopes: 2D 0° high definition (HD), 3D 0° standard definition (SD) and 3D 0° HD. Four surgeons qualitatively assessed endoscopes on stereoscopic depth perception (SDP) of the surgeon, sharpness and brightness of the image, as well as their comfort in use during surgery. Surgeons assessed the brightness of the control (2D HD) significantly better than 3D SD (p = 0.009) and brightness of 3D HD was rated significantly better than 3D SD (p = 0.038). Stereoscopic depth perception (SDP) of 3D SD was assessed highly significantly better than the control (2D HD) (p = 0.021), whereas 3D HD displayed best SDP (p = 0.0001). The comfort in use was rated significantly higher in the 3D HD group compared to the control group (p = 0.025). No significant differences in sharpness could be seen among all endoscopes. 3D HD endoscopy provides an improvement in SDP and brightness of the surgical field. It enhances the intraoperative visualization and is therefore an important and efficient development in endoscopic sinus surgery.

  20. [Chances and Potential of a Modern Surgical Skills Lab as Substantial Practical Part of the Study of Human Medicine - "The Magdeburg Model"].

    PubMed

    Piatek, S; Altmann, S; Haß, H-J; Werwick, K; Winkler-Stuck, K; Zardo, P; von Daake, S; Baumann, B; Rahmanzadeh, A; Chiapponi, C; Reschke, K; Meyer, F

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: Surgical education of medical students within "skills labs" have not been standardised throughout Germany as yet; there is a substantial impact of available aspects such as personal and space at the various medical schools. Aim: The aim of this contribution is to illustrate the concept of a surgical skills lab in detail, including curricular teaching and integrated facultative courses at the Medical School, University of Magdeburg ("The Magdeburg Model") in the context of a new and reconstructed area for the skills lab at the Magdeburg's apprenticeship center for medical basic abilities (MAMBA). Method: We present an overview on the spectrum of curricular and facultative teaching activities within the surgical part of the skills lab. Student evaluation of this teaching concept is implemented using the programme "EvaSys" and evaluation forms adapted to the single courses. Results: By establishing MAMBA, the options for a practice-related surgical education have been substantially improved. Student evaluations of former courses presented within the skills lab and the chance of moving the skills lab into a more generous and reconstructed area led to a reorganisation of seminars and courses. New additional facultative courses held by student tutors have been introduced and have shown to be of great effect, in particular, because of their interdisciplinary character. Conclusion: Practice-related surgical education within a skills lab may have the potential to effectively prepare medical students for their professional life. In addition, it allows one to present and teach the most important basic skills in surgery, which need to be pursued by every student. An enthusiastic engagement of the Office for Student Affairs can be considered the crucial and indispensable link between clinical work and curricular as well as facultative teaching with regard to organisation and student evaluation. The practice-related teaching parts and contents at the surgical

  1. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  2. Digital video recordings for training, assessment, and revalidation of surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Gambadauro, Pietro; Magos, Adam

    2010-10-01

    Surgical training is undergoing drastic changes, and new strategies should be adopted to keep quality standards. The authors review and advocate the use of surgical recordings as a useful complement to current training, assessment, and revalidation modalities. For trainees, such recordings would promote quality-based and competence-based surgical training and allow for self-evaluation. Video logbooks could be used to aid interaction between trainer and trainee, and facilitate formative assessment. Recordings of surgery could also be integrated into trainees' portfolios and regular assessments. Finally, such recordings could make surgeons' revalidation more sensible. The routine use of records of surgical procedures could become an integral component of the standard of care. This would have been an unattractive suggestion until recently, as analogue recording techniques are inconvenient, cumbersome, and time consuming. Today, however, with the advent of inexpensive digital technologies, such a concept is realistic and is likely to improve patient care.

  3. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  4. Endoscopic septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Getz, Anne E; Hwang, Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Successful septoplasty involves accurate assessment of septal pathology and sound technique to avoid persistent symptoms and new complications. This review highlights endoscopic septoplasty techniques and instrumentation, as well as the indications for and advantages of endoscopic septoplasty as compared with traditional headlight septoplasty. Isolated lesions such as septal spurs and contact points may be better addressed with limited endoscopic techniques. Powered instrumentation has been utilized with reported success. Operative time and outcomes of endoscopic septoplasty are at least commensurate with, and at times superior to, traditional techniques. Endoscopic technology greatly enhances visualization during septoplasty. Discrete septal pathologies such as isolated deflection, spurs, perforations, and contact points can be addressed in a directed fashion. These advantages can be especially important in revision cases. Endoscopic technique in conjunction with video imaging is valuable for the education of residents and staff.

  5. The virtual reality simulator dV-Trainer(®) is a valid assessment tool for robotic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Perrenot, Cyril; Perez, Manuela; Tran, Nguyen; Jehl, Jean-Philippe; Felblinger, Jacques; Bresler, Laurent; Hubert, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Exponential development of minimally invasive techniques, such as robotic-assisted devices, raises the question of how to assess robotic surgery skills. Early development of virtual simulators has provided efficient tools for laparoscopic skills certification based on objective scoring, high availability, and lower cost. However, similar evaluation is lacking for robotic training. The purpose of this study was to assess several criteria, such as reliability, face, content, construct, and concurrent validity of a new virtual robotic surgery simulator. This prospective study was conducted from December 2009 to April 2010 using three simulators dV-Trainers(®) (MIMIC Technologies(®)) and one Da Vinci S(®) (Intuitive Surgical(®)). Seventy-five subjects, divided into five groups according to their initial surgical training, were evaluated based on five representative exercises of robotic specific skills: 3D perception, clutching, visual force feedback, EndoWrist(®) manipulation, and camera control. Analysis was extracted from (1) questionnaires (realism and interest), (2) automatically generated data from simulators, and (3) subjective scoring by two experts of depersonalized videos of similar exercises with robot. Face and content validity were generally considered high (77 %). Five levels of ability were clearly identified by the simulator (ANOVA; p = 0.0024). There was a strong correlation between automatic data from dV-Trainer and subjective evaluation with robot (r = 0.822). Reliability of scoring was high (r = 0.851). The most relevant criteria were time and economy of motion. The most relevant exercises were Pick and Place and Ring and Rail. The dV-Trainer(®) simulator proves to be a valid tool to assess basic skills of robotic surgery.

  6. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  7. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  8. Representing flexible endoscope shapes with hermite splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Fowler, Sharyle A.; Hookey, Lawrence C.; Ellis, Randy E.

    2010-02-01

    Navigation of a flexible endoscope is a challenging surgical task: the shape of the end effector of the endoscope, interacting with surrounding tissues, determine the surgical path along which the endoscope is pushed. We present a navigational system that visualized the shape of the flexible endoscope tube to assist gastrointestinal surgeons in performing Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). The system used an electromagnetic positional tracker, a catheter embedded with multiple electromagnetic sensors, and graphical user interface for visualization. Hermite splines were used to interpret the position and direction outputs of the endoscope sensors. We conducted NOTES experiments on live swine involving 6 gastrointestinal and 6 general surgeons. Participants who used the device first were 14.2% faster than when not using the device. Participants who used the device second were 33.6% faster than the first session. The trend suggests that spline-based visualization is a promising adjunct during NOTES procedures.

  9. Supracerebellar Infratentorial Endoscopic and Endoscopic-Assisted Approaches to Pineal Lesions: Technical Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Rita; Felbaum, Daniel R; Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad

    2017-06-09

    The pineal gland has a deep central location, making it a surgeon's no man's land. Surgical pathology within this territory presents a unique challenge and an opportunity for employment of various surgical techniques. In modern times, the microsurgical technique has been competing with the endoscope for achieving superior surgical results. We describe two cases utilizing a purely endoscopic and an endoscopic-assisted supracerebellar infratentorial approach in accessing lesions of the pineal gland. We also discuss our early learning experience with these approaches.

  10. [Endoscopic treatments for Barrett oesophagus].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Ariane; Prat, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    High grade dysplasia and superficial carcinomas (with no extension under muscularis mucosae) can be indications for endoscopic treatments of Barrett oesophagus. When an endoscopic treatment is considered, a gastroscopy with use of acetic acid and planimetry and the confirmation of high-grade dysplasia by a new examination after PPI treatment and a pathologic second confirmation is needed. For high-grade dysplasia in focalised and visible lesions, an endoscopic resection by EMR or ESD should be proposed: it allows a more accurate pathologic examination and can be an effective curative treatment. After endoscopic resection of visible high grade dysplasia lesions, a complete eradication of Barrett oesophagus may be proposed to prevent dysplasia recurrence. In case of extensive high-grade dysplasia or to eradicate Barrett oesophagus residual lesions, radiofrequency ablation is the preferred endoscopic technique. Photodynamic therapy may also be proposed for more invasive lesions or after other endoscopic techniques with mucosal scars. Surgical oesophagus resection is still recommended for diffuse high-grade dysplasia in young patients or in case of pathologic pejorative criteria in endoscopic resection specimen. In case of Low-grade dysplasia, either endoscopic surveillance should be performed every six or 12 months or radiofrequency ablation could be proposed in the yield of prospective studies.

  11. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  12. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-31

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations.

  13. Peroral endoscopic myotomy: an evolving treatment for achalasia.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Robert; Ikeda, Haruo; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was first performed in Japan in 2008 for uncomplicated achalasia. With excellent results, it was adopted by highly skilled endoscopists around the world and the indications for POEM were expanded to include advanced sigmoid achalasia, failed surgical myotomy, patients with previous endoscopic treatments and even other spastic oesophageal motility disorders. With increased uptake and performance of POEM, variations in technique and improved management of adverse events have been developed. Now, 6 years since the first case and with >3,000 procedures performed worldwide, long-term data has shown the efficacy of POEM to be long-lasting. A growing body of literature also exists pertaining to the learning curve, application of novel technologies, extended indications and physiologic changes with POEM. Ultimately, this once experimental procedure is evolving towards becoming the preferred treatment for achalasia and other spastic oesophageal motility disorders.

  14. Objective Structured Assessments of Technical Skills (OSATS) Does Not Assess the Quality of the Surgical Result Effectively.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald D; Long, Steven; Thomas, Geb W; Putnam, Matthew D; Bechtold, Joan E; Karam, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Performance assessment in skills training is ideally based on objective, reliable, and clinically relevant indicators of success. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) is a reliable and valid tool that has been increasingly used in orthopaedic skills training. It uses a global rating approach to structure expert evaluation of technical skills with the experts working from a list of operative competencies that are each rated on a 5-point Likert scale anchored by behavioral descriptors. Given the observational nature of its scoring, the OSATS might not effectively assess the quality of surgical results. (1) Does OSATS scoring in an intraarticular fracture reduction training exercise correlate with the quality of the reduction? (2) Does OSATS scoring in a cadaveric extraarticular fracture fixation exercise correlate with the mechanical integrity of the fixation? Orthopaedic residents at the University of Iowa (six postgraduate year [PGY]-1s) and at the University of Minnesota (seven PGY-1s and eight PGY-2s) undertook a skills training exercise that involved reducing a simulated intraarticular fracture under fluoroscopic guidance. Iowa residents participated three times during 1 month, and Minnesota residents participated twice with 1 month between their two sessions. A fellowship-trained orthopaedic traumatologist rated each performance using a modified OSATS scoring scheme. The quality of the articular reduction obtained was then directly measured. Regression analysis was performed between OSATS scores and two metrics of articular reduction quality: articular surface deviation and estimated contact stress. Another skills training exercise involved fixing a simulated distal radius fracture in a cadaveric specimen. Thirty residents, distributed across four PGY classes (PGY-2 and PGY-3, n = 8 each; PGY-4 and PGY-5, n = 7 each), simultaneously completed the exercise at individual stations. One of three faculty hand surgeons independently scored

  15. A Review of Endoscopic Simulation: Current Evidence on Simulators and Curricula.

    PubMed

    King, Neil; Kunac, Anastasia; Merchant, Aziz M

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower endoscopy is an important tool that is being utilized more frequently by general surgeons. Training in therapeutic endoscopic techniques has become a mandatory requirement for general surgery residency programs in the United States. The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery has been developed to train and assess competency in these advanced techniques. Simulation has been shown to increase the skill and learning curve of trainees in other surgical disciplines. Several types of endoscopy simulators are commercially available; mechanical trainers, animal based, and virtual reality or computer-based simulators all have their benefits and limitations. However they have all been shown to improve trainee's endoscopic skills. Endoscopic simulators will play a critical role as part of a comprehensive curriculum designed to train the next generation of surgeons. We reviewed recent literature related to the various types of endoscopic simulators and their use in an educational curriculum, and discuss the relevant findings. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ‘The Days of Brilliancy are Past’: Skill, Styles and the Changing Rules of Surgical Performance, ca. 1820–1920

    PubMed Central

    Schlich, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how, over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the appreciation of skill in surgery shifted in characteristic ways. Skill is a problematic category in surgery. Its evaluation is embedded into wider cultural expectations and evaluations, which changed over time. The paper examines the discussions about surgical skill in a variety of contexts: the highly competitive environment of celebrity practitioners in the amphitheatres of early nineteenth-century Britain; the science-oriented, technocratic German-language university hospitals later in the century; and the elitist surgeons of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century United States with their concerns about distancing themselves from commercialism and cheap showmanship. For analysing the interaction of surgical practices with their various contexts the paper makes use of the concept of ‘performance’ and examines how the rules of surgical performance varied according to the prevailing technical, social, and moral conditions. Over the course of the century, surgical performance looked more and more recognisably modern, increasingly following the ideals of replicability, universality and standardisation. The changing ideals of surgical skill are a crucial element of the complex history of the emergence of modern surgery, but also an illuminating example of the history of skill in modern medicine. PMID:26090735

  17. Use of Performance Measures to Evaluate, Document Competence and Deterioration of ASSET Surgical Skills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    33 Appendix 9: Management of Vascular Trauma by Senior Surgical Residents: Perception Does Not Equal Reality...69 Appendix 30: Perception Does Not Equal Reality for Resident Vascular Trauma...holding ASSET courses 5) The database and video recordings associated with this study should be de-identified and made available for other users and

  18. Endoscopic septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Nathan B; Smith, Timothy L

    2009-04-01

    Endoscopic septoplasty has gained popularity since Lanza and colleagues and Stammberger first described the technique. This technique has several advantages over the traditional "headlight" septoplasty. These advantages include superior visualization, accommodation of limited and minimally invasive septoplasty, and usefulness as an effective teaching tool. This article reviews and illustrates the endoscopic septoplasty technique and discusses its limitations and advantages.

  19. Assessing the surgical skills of trainees in the operating theatre: a prospective observational study of the methodology.

    PubMed

    Beard, J D; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Crossley, J

    2011-01-01

    To compare user satisfaction and acceptability, reliability and validity of three different methods of assessing the surgical skills of trainees by direct observation in the operating theatre across a range of different surgical specialties and index procedures. A 2-year prospective, observational study in the operating theatres of three teaching hospitals in Sheffield. The assessment methods were procedure-based assessment (PBA), Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Non-technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS). The specialties were obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) and upper gastrointestinal, colorectal, cardiac, vascular and orthopaedic surgery. Two to four typical index procedures were selected from each specialty. Surgical trainees were directly observed performing typical index procedures and assessed using a combination of two of the three methods (OSATS or PBA and NOTSS for O&G, PBA and NOTSS for the other specialties) by the consultant clinical supervisor for the case and the anaesthetist and/or scrub nurse, as well as one or more independent assessors from the research team. Information on user satisfaction and acceptability of each assessment method from both assessor and trainee perspectives was obtained from structured questionnaires. The reliability of each method was measured using generalisability theory. Aspects of validity included the internal structure of each tool and correlation between tools, construct validity, predictive validity, interprocedural differences, the effect of assessor designation and the effect of assessment on performance. Of the 558 patients who were consented, a total of 437 (78%) cases were included in the study: 51 consultant clinical supervisors, 56 anaesthetists, 39 nurses, 2 surgical care practitioners and 4 independent assessors provided 1635 assessments on 85 trainees undertaking the 437 cases. A total of 749 PBAs, 695 NOTSS and 191 OSATSs were performed. Non-O&G clinical supervisors and

  20. Novel Concept of Attaching Endoscope Holder to Microscope for Two Handed Endoscopic Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubarak M; Parab, Sapna R

    2016-06-01

    The well established techniques in tympanoplasty are routinely performed with operating microscopes for many decades now. Endoscopic ear surgeries provide minimally invasive approach to the middle ear and evolving new science in the field of otology. The disadvantage of endoscopic ear surgeries is that it is one-handed surgical technique as the non-dominant left hand of the surgeon is utilized for holding and manipulating the endoscope. This necessitated the need for development of the endoscope holder which would allow both hands of surgeon to be free for surgical manipulation and also allow alternate use of microscope during tympanoplasty. To report the preliminary utility of our designed and developed endoscope holder attachment gripping to microscope for two handed technique of endoscopic tympanoplasty. Prospective Non Randomized Clinical Study. Our endoscope holder attachment for microscope was designed and developed to aid in endoscopic ear surgery and to overcome the disadvantage of single handed endoscopic surgery. It was tested for endoscopic Tympanoplasty. The design of the endoscope holder attachment is described in detail along with its manipulation and manoeuvreing. A total of 78 endoholder assisted type 1 endoscopic cartilage tympanoplasties were operated to evaluate its feasibility for the two handed technique and to evaluate the results of endoscopic type 1 cartilage tympanoplasty. In early follow up period ranging from 6 to 20 months, the graft uptake was seen in 76 ears with one residual perforation and 1 recurrent perforations giving a success rate of 97.435 %. Our endocsope holder attachment for gripping microscope is a good option for two handed technique in endoscopic type 1 cartilage tympanoplasty. The study reports the successful application and use of our endoscope holder attachment for gripping microscope in two handed technique of endoscopic type 1 cartilage tympanoplasty and comparable results with microscopic techniques. IV.

  1. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for removal of superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms: A technical review

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Noriaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now the most common endoscopic treatment in Japan for intramucosal gastrointestinal neoplasms (non-metastatic). ESD is an invasive endoscopic surgical procedure, requiring extensive knowledge, skill, and specialized equipment. ESD starts with evaluation of the lesion, as accurate assessment of the depth and margin of the lesion is essential. The devices and strategies used in ESD vary, depending on the nature of the lesion. Prior to the procedure, the operator must be knowledgeable about the treatment strategy(ies), the device(s) to use, the electrocautery machine settings, the substances to inject, and other aspects. In addition, the operator must be able to manage complications, should they arise, including immediate recognition of the complication(s) and its treatment. Finally, in case the ESD treatment is not successful, the operator should be prepared to apply alternative treatments. Thus, adequate knowledge and training are essential to successfully perform ESD. PMID:22523613

  2. Optic Nerve Injury Secondary to Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: an Analysis of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hyun Jun; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jeung-Gweon

    2005-01-01

    Major orbital complications after the endoscopic sinus surgeries are rare and of these, optic nerve injury is one of the most serious. This study was to undertaken to analyze 3 cases of optic nerve injury after endoscopic sinus surgery. The three cases included one patient with a loss of visual acuity and visual field defect, and two patients with total blindness. In all cases, no improvement of visual acuity was observed despite treatment. It is important to frequently check the location and direction of the endoscope during surgery to avoid optic nerve injury. In addition, surgeons must have a precise knowledge of the detailed anatomy through cadaver dissections, an ability to interpret the PNS CT scan and experienced procedural surgical skills. PMID:15861507

  3. Improvement of psychometric properties of the objective structured clinical examination when assessing problem solving skills of surgical clerkship.

    PubMed

    Al-Naami, Mohammed Y; El-Tinay, Omer F; Khairy, Gamal A; Mofti, Safdar S; Anjum, Muhammad N

    2011-03-01

    To improve the psychometric properties of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and elevate staff motivation. The OSCE was conducted in May 2006 at the Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as a pilot study for 95 students split over 2 consecutive days lasting 120 minutes each day. There were 15 actual stations on each day consisting of 10 stations that addressed problem solving skills, and 5 addressed clinical skills testing. The stability of the OSCE measured by Cronbach's alpha on day one was 0.87, and 0.88 on day 2. The internal consistency of the OSCE measured by Carmine's theta on day one was 0.76, and 0.79 on day 2. Overall, OSCE's reliability for each day was high (r=0.8), without a significant difference between the 2 days. Credibility and comprehensiveness of the the OSCE were considered good by both staff and students. Accuracy of the OSCE measured by Pearson's correlation with multiple choice question scores was 0.65. Feasibility of the OSCE has also improved remarkably compared with previous OSCEs. The OSCE proved to be highly reliable, and a valid format when more problem solving skills testing has been emphasized for the final year surgical clerkship. Feasibility has also improved remarkably after using this strategy, marked by more staff participation and enthusiasm.

  4. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning.

  5. Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles