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Sample records for endoscopic ultrasound elastography

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Chang, Jian-Min; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Chiorean, Liliana; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-12-21

    Elastography is a new ultrasound modality that provides images and measurements related to tissue stiffness. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has played an important role in the diagnosis and management of numerous abdominal and mediastinal diseases. Elastography by means of EUS examination can assess the elasticity of tumors in the proximity of the digestive tract that are hard to reach with conventional transcutaneous ultrasound probes, such as pancreatic masses and mediastinal or abdominal lymph nodes, thus improving the diagnostic yield of the procedure. Results from previous studies have promised benefits for EUS elastography in the differential diagnosis of lymph nodes, as well as for assessing masses with pancreatic or gastrointestinal (GI) tract locations. It is important to mention that EUS elastography is not considered a modality that can replace biopsy. However, it may be a useful adjunct, improving the accuracy of EUS-fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) by selecting the most suspicious area to be targeted. Even more, it may be useful for guiding further clinical management when EUS-FNAB is negative or inconclusive. In the present paper we will discuss the current knowledge of EUS elastography, including the technical aspects, along with its applications in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes, as well as its aid in the differentiation between normal pancreatic tissues and chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, the emergent indication and future perspectives are summarized, such as the benefit of EUS elastography in EUS-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, and its uses for characterization of lesions in liver, biliary tract, adrenal glands and GI tract.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound elastography, and pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakaguro, Masato; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-11-01

    We report a case series of five patients with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma who received surgical treatment and compared the preoperative contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and EUS elastography patterns with the surgical specimens. The contrast-enhanced EUS indicated vascular tumors with gradual enhancement in four patients and a hypovascular tumor in one patient. The elastography indicated an elastic score of 3 (hard lesion with softer border) in two patients and a score of 5 (hard lesion, which included the surrounding area) in two patients. In tumors with an elastic score of 5, the pathology exhibited abundant hyalinizing fibrous stroma or massive tumor invasion to the surrounding tissue. We concluded that acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various patterns of EUS contrast-enhancement and elastography, depending on the pathologic phenotype.

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound elastography, and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakaguro, Masato; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case series of five patients with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma who received surgical treatment and compared the preoperative contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and EUS elastography patterns with the surgical specimens. The contrast-enhanced EUS indicated vascular tumors with gradual enhancement in four patients and a hypovascular tumor in one patient. The elastography indicated an elastic score of 3 (hard lesion with softer border) in two patients and a score of 5 (hard lesion, which included the surrounding area) in two patients. In tumors with an elastic score of 5, the pathology exhibited abundant hyalinizing fibrous stroma or massive tumor invasion to the surrounding tissue. We concluded that acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various patterns of EUS contrast-enhancement and elastography, depending on the pathologic phenotype. PMID:27853750

  5. Contrast-enhanced (endoscopic) ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound elastography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Jenssen, Christian; Hocke, Michael; Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Cui, Xin-Wu; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Iordache, Sevastita; Saftoiu, Adrian; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the largest group of subepithelial tumors (SET) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They may show malignant behavior, in contrast to other SET. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is frequently used to characterize SET. With the introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) into EUS (CE-EUS), distinct enhancement patterns can be detected. In the presented study, the characteristic features of CE-EUS in GIST are analyzed and compared with those of other SET. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients from four centers with SET of the upper and middle GI tract were included and received endoscopic or transcutaneous CEUS. The results were compared with EUS-guided tissue acquisition, forceps biopsy, or surgical resection. Results: Forty-two out of 62 (68%) patients had SET of the stomach, 17/62 (27%) of the small intestine, 2/62 (3%) of the esophagus, and 1/62 (2%) extraintestinal. Eighty-one percent underwent surgery. Leiomyoma was found in 5/62 (8%) and GIST in 57/62 patients (92%). Thirty-nine out of 57 (68%) patients had GIST lesions in the stomach, 17/57 (30%) had GIST of the small intestine, and 1/57 (2%) patients had extraintestinal GISTs. GIST size was 62.6 ± 42.1 (16–200) mm. Hyperenhancement had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 98%, 100%, 100%, 93%, and 98% for the diagnosis of GIST. Fifty out of 57 patients with GIST (88%) showed avascular areas in the center of the lesions. Conclusion: CE-EUS and CEUS show hyperenhancement and avascular areas in a high percentage of GIST but not in leiomyoma. Thus, GIST and leiomyoma can be discriminated accurately. PMID:28218202

  6. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography for differentiating between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and inflammatory masses: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Wei; Shi, Jian; Lin, Yong; Zeng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) elastography for differentiating between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and pancreatic inflammatory masses (PIM). METHODS: Electronic databases (updated to December 2012) and manual bibliographical searches were carried out. A meta-analysis of all diagnostic clinical trials evaluating the accuracy of EUS elastography in differentiating PDAC from PIM was conducted. Heterogeneity was assessed among the studies. The meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of EUS elastography in differentiating PDAC from PIM in homogeneous studies. RESULTS: Ten studies involving 781 patients were included in the analysis. Significant heterogeneity in sensitivity was observed among the studies (Cochran Q test = 24.16, df = 9, P = 0.0041, I2 = 62.8%), while heterogeneity in specificity was not observed (Cochran Q test = 5.93, df = 9, P = 0.7473, I2 = 0.0%). The area under the curve under the Sports Rights Owners Coalition was 0.8227. Evaluation of heterogeneity suggested that the different diagnostic standards used in the included studies were the source of heterogeneity. In studies using the color pattern as the diagnostic standard, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR), negative LR and diagnostic OR were 0.99 (0.97-1.00), 0.76 (0.67-0.83), 3.36 (2.39-4.72), 0.03 (0.01-0.07) and 129.96 (47.02-359.16), respectively. In studies using the hue histogram as the diagnostic standard, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive LR, negative LR and diagnostic OR were 0.92 (0.89-0.95), 0.68 (0.57-0.78), 2.84 (2.05-3.93), 0.12 (0.08-0.19) and 24.69 (12.81-47.59), respectively. CONCLUSION: EUS elastography is a valuable method for the differential diagnosis between PDAC and PIM. And a preferable diagnostic standard should be explored and improvements in specificity are required. PMID:24115828

  8. Contrast enhancement and elastography in endoscopic ultrasound: an update of clinical applications in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is fundamental in the characterization of many diseases concerning different organs, i.e. pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal pathologic conditions, and lymph nodes of unknown origin. It is also well known that many factors can hamper the accuracy of EUS, i.e. biliary stents, chronic pancreatitis, poor operator's expertise. These factors can also lead to suboptimal accuracy when cytological confirmation through EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is indicated. In recent years, new technological tools have rapidly increased their clinical impact improving the diagnostic power of EUS and EUS-FNA. Among these new tools, the most investigated and useful ones are represented by contrast harmonic-EUS (CH-EUS) and EUS-elastography (EUS-E). The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a review of the literature, an update of the applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E in the routine clinical practice in pancreatic diseases. We discussed the first reports and applications of these techniques in our previous review published in Minerva Medica. The applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E to the study of pancreatic diseases appear feasible and safe. The use of both techniques is very simple and does not require any relevant additional workload for the endoscopic personnel. CH-EUS is now considered an important and accurate tool in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. CH-EUS targeted FNA is an active field of research. However the available studies show that CH-EUS increases FNA accuracy by a little extent, without statistical significance; moreover, CH-EUS FNA showed a trend toward being more efficient vs. simple EUS FNA (less needle passes and more abundance in cytological material) but this trend did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, the clinical impact of EUS-E in terms of differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still under

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  10. Intravascular ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, A F; de Korte, C L; Céspedes, E I

    1998-10-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound Blastography. The response of a tissue to mechanical excitation is a function of its mechanical properties. Excitation can be dynamic or quasistatic in nature. The response (e.g. displacement, velocity, compression) can be measured via ultrasound. This is the main principle underlying ultrasound elasticity imaging, sonoelasticity imaging, or ultrasound elastography. It is of great interest to know the local hardness of vessel wall and plaques. Intravascular elastography yields information unavailable or inconclusive if obtained from IVUS alone and thus contributes to more correct diagnosis. Potentially it can be used for therapy guidance. During the last decade several working groups used elastography in intravascular applications with varying success. In this paper we discuss the various approaches by different working groups. Focus will be on the approach of the Rotterdam group. Using a 30 MHz IVUS catheter, RF data are acquired from vessels in vitro at different intraluminal pressures. Local tissue displacement estimation by cross-correlation is followed by computation of the local strain. The resulting image supplies local information on the elastic properties of the vessel and plaque with high spatial resolution. Feasibility and usefulness are shown by means of phantom measurements. Furthermore, initial in vitro results of femoral arteries and correlation with histology are discussed. Phantom data show that the elastograms reveal information not presented by the echogram. In vitro artery data prove that in principle elastography is capable of identifying plaque composition where echography fails.

  11. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  12. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications.

  13. Ultrasound Elastography and MR Elastography for Assessing Liver Fibrosis: Part 1, Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Cloutier, Guy; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography, including a glossary of relevant terminology, a classification of elastography techniques, and a discussion of their respective strengths and limitations. Conclusion Elastography is an emerging technique for the non-invasive assessment of mechanical tissue properties. These techniques report metrics related to tissue stiffness such as shear wave speed, magnitude of the complex shear modulus, and Young’s modulus. PMID:25905647

  14. Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalapathy, Suresh; Nayar, Manu K

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is now firmly established as one of the essential tools for diagnosis in most gastrointestinal MDTs across the UK. However, the ability to provide therapy with EUS has resulted in a significant impact on the management of the patients. These include drainage of peripancreatic collections, EUS-guided endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, EUS-guided coeliac plexus blocks, etc. The rapid development of this area in endoscopy is a combination of newer tools and increasing expertise by endosonographers to push the boundaries of intervention with EUS. However, the indications are limited and we are at the start of the learning curve for these high-risk procedures. These therapies should, therefore, be confined to centres with a robust multidisciplinary team, including interventional endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. PMID:28261439

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  16. Initial experience with real-time elastography using an ultrasound bronchoscope for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Andreo García, Felipe; Centeno Clemente, Carmen Ángela; Sanz Santos, José; Barturen Barroso, Ángel; Hernández Gallego, Alba; Ruiz Manzano, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Real-time elastography performed during endoscopic ultrasonography is a relatively new method for characterizing tissue stiffness, and has been used successfully as a predictor of malignancy in mediastinal lymph nodes. This case report describes our practical experience with this technique using an ultrasound bronchoscope to examine mediastinal lymph nodes. We present a case of sectorial endobronchial ultrasound and the first published case of endoscopic ultrasound elastography using ultrasound bronchoscope in two patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Qualitative tissue color pattern was obtained in both cases and correlated with pathological evaluation. The initial feasibility results are promising and suggest that ultrasound bronchoscopy techniques, such as guided nodal staging, merit additional studies. It may be important to categorize the risk of malignancy to facilitate sampling decisions.

  17. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.

    2008-08-11

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  18. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Sílvio L.; Carneiro, Antônio. A. O.

    2008-08-01

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  19. [Radiology Update Ultrasound Elastography – Quintessence for the Primary Care Physician].

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Gubler, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Rominger, Marga

    2016-02-03

    Ultrasound elastography visualizes and measures elasticity of tissue. Depending on the methods there are four types of elastography: strain elastography (SE), transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and shear wave elastography (SWE). Due to the fact that pathological changes in the tissue in most of the cases mean a lower elasticity, ultrasound elastography is able to diagnose diseases such as liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, to help in the diagnosis of suspicious lesions in mamma, prostate and thyroid gland. So far, ultrasound elastography is not yet able to replace other standardized diagnostic tools but can add valuable diagnostic information.

  20. Ultrasound elastography of the prostate: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Tissier, A-M; Khairoune, A; Khoury, G; Eiss, D; Hélénon, O

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the cancer exhibiting the highest incidence rate and it appears as the second cause of cancer death in men, after lung cancer. Prostate cancer is difficult to detect, and the treatment efficacy remains limited despite the increase use of biological tests (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] dosage), the development of new imaging modalities, and the use of invasive procedures such as biopsy. Ultrasound elastography is a novel imaging technique capable of mapping tissue stiffness of the prostate. It is known that prostatic cancer tissue is often harder than healthy tissue (information used by digital rectal examination [DRE]). Two elastography techniques have been developed based on different principles: first, quasi-static (or strain) technique, and second, shear wave technique. The tissue stiffness information provided by US elastography should improve the detection of prostate cancer and provide guidance for biopsy. Prostate elastography provides high sensitivity for detecting prostate cancer and shows high negative predictive values, ensuring that few cancers will be missed. US elastography should become an additional method of imaging the prostate, complementing the conventional transrectal ultrasound and MRI. This technique requires significant training (especially for quasi-static elastography) to become familiar with acquisition process, acquisition technique, characteristics and limitations, and to achieve correct diagnoses.

  1. A novel fast full inversion based breast ultrasound elastography technique.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hirad; Fenster, Aaron; Samani, Abbas

    2013-04-07

    Cancer detection and classification have been the focus of many imaging and therapeutic research studies. Elastography is a non-invasive technique to visualize suspicious soft tissue areas where tissue stiffness is used as image contrast mechanism. In this study, a breast ultrasound elastography system including software and hardware is proposed. Unlike current elastography systems that image the tissue strain and present it as an approximation to relative tissue stiffness, this system is capable of imaging the breast absolute Young's modulus in fast fashion. To improve the quality of elastography images, a novel system consisting of two load cells has been attached to the ultrasound probe. The load cells measure the breast surface forces to be used for calculating the tissue stress distribution throughout the breast. To facilitate fast imaging, this stress calculation is conducted by an accelerated finite element method. Acquired tissue displacements and surface force data are used as input to the proposed Young's modulus reconstruction technique. Numerical and tissue mimicking phantom studies were conducted for validating the proposed system. These studies indicated that fast imaging of breast tissue absolute Young's modulus using the proposed ultrasound elastography system is feasible. The tissue mimicking phantom study indicated that the system is capable of providing reliable absolute Young's modulus values for both normal tissue and tumour as the maximum Young's modulus reconstruction error was less than 6%. This demonstrates that the proposed system has a good potential to be used for clinical breast cancer assessment.

  2. A novel fast full inversion based breast ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Hirad; Fenster, Aaron; Samani, Abbas

    2013-04-01

    Cancer detection and classification have been the focus of many imaging and therapeutic research studies. Elastography is a non-invasive technique to visualize suspicious soft tissue areas where tissue stiffness is used as image contrast mechanism. In this study, a breast ultrasound elastography system including software and hardware is proposed. Unlike current elastography systems that image the tissue strain and present it as an approximation to relative tissue stiffness, this system is capable of imaging the breast absolute Young’s modulus in fast fashion. To improve the quality of elastography images, a novel system consisting of two load cells has been attached to the ultrasound probe. The load cells measure the breast surface forces to be used for calculating the tissue stress distribution throughout the breast. To facilitate fast imaging, this stress calculation is conducted by an accelerated finite element method. Acquired tissue displacements and surface force data are used as input to the proposed Young’s modulus reconstruction technique. Numerical and tissue mimicking phantom studies were conducted for validating the proposed system. These studies indicated that fast imaging of breast tissue absolute Young’s modulus using the proposed ultrasound elastography system is feasible. The tissue mimicking phantom study indicated that the system is capable of providing reliable absolute Young’s modulus values for both normal tissue and tumour as the maximum Young’s modulus reconstruction error was less than 6%. This demonstrates that the proposed system has a good potential to be used for clinical breast cancer assessment.

  3. Dynamic programming on a tree for ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Roozbeh; Boily, Mathieu; Martineau, Paul A.; Rivaz, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Elastography is an emerging imaging technique that allows estimation of the mechanical characteristics of tissue. Two issues that need to be addressed before widespread use of elastography in clinical environments are real time constraints and deteriorating effects of signal decorrelation between pre- and post-compression images. Previous work has used Dynamic Programming (DP) to estimate tissue deformation. However, in case of large signal decorrelation, DP can fail. In this paper we, have proposed a novel solution to this problem by solving DP on a tree instead of a single Radio-Frequency line. Formulation of DP on a tree allows exploiting significantly more information, and as such, is more robust and accurate. Our results on phantom and in-vivo human data show that DP on tree significantly outperforms traditional DP in ultrasound elastography.

  4. Contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasound: Instrumentation, echoprocessors, and echoendoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Lariño-Noia, Jose; Domínguez-Muñoz, J. Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become as one the best diagnostic and therapeutic methods for the management of several intraintestinal and extraintestinal diseases, among them to highlight pancreaticobiliary indications, mediastinal evaluation, and the analysis of gastrointestinal lesions. Over the years, there has been an enormous evolution in the systems available to perform EUS. Newer processors and echoendoscopes are available nowadays, with the ability to perform new imaging analysis, such as elastography and contrast enhancement. In the present article, we will review which systems are available nowadays, focusing also in the technical advances associated. PMID:28218199

  5. Applications of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luz, Leticia Perondi; Al-Haddad, Mohammad Ali; Sey, Michael Sai Lai; DeWitt, John M

    2014-06-28

    Since the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS has assumed a growing role in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The objective of this review is to discuss the various applications of EUS and EUS-FNA in PDAC. Initially, its use for detection, diagnosis and staging will be described. EUS and EUS-FNA are highly accurate modalities for detection and diagnosis of PDAC, this high accuracy, however, is decreased in specific situations particularly in the presence of chronic pancreatitis. Novel techniques such as contrast-enhanced EUS, elastography and analysis of DNA markers such as k-ras mutation analysis in FNA samples are in progress and might improve the accuracy of EUS in the detection of PDAC in this setting and will be addressed. EUS and EUS-FNA have recently evolved from a diagnostic to a therapeutic technique in the management of PDAC. Significant developments in therapeutic EUS have occurred including advances in celiac plexus interventions with direct injection of ganglia and improved pain control, EUS-guided fiducial and brachytherapy seed placement, fine-needle injection of intra-tumoral agents and advances in EUS-guided biliary drainage. The future role of EUS and EUS in management of PDAC is still emerging.

  6. Real-time quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Treece, Graham; Lindop, Joel; Chen, Lujie; Housden, James; Prager, Richard; Gee, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a technique used for clinical imaging of tissue stiffness with a conventional ultrasound machine. It was first proposed two decades ago, but active research continues in this area to the present day. Numerous clinical applications have been investigated, mostly related to cancer imaging, and though these have yet to prove conclusive, the technique has seen increasing commercial and clinical interest. This paper presents a review of the most widely adopted, non-quantitative, techniques focusing on technical innovations rather than clinical applications. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, concentrating instead on placing the various techniques in context according to the authors' perspective of the field. PMID:22866230

  7. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  8. Propofol use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny G; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are often lengthier and more complex, thus requiring higher doses of sedatives for patient comfort and compliance. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with information regarding the use, safety profile, and merits of propofol for sedation in advanced endoscopic procedures like ERCP and EUS, based on the current literature. PMID:24833847

  9. Update on ultrasound elastography: miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal.

    PubMed

    Correas, J M; Drakonakis, E; Isidori, A M; Hélénon, O; Pozza, C; Cantisani, V; Di Leo, N; Maghella, F; Rubini, A; Drudi, F M; D'ambrosio, F

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions.

  10. Role of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound in lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hocke, Michael; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosing unclear lymph node (LN) enlargements in the mediastinum and abdomen is the most important indication of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-fine needle aspiration (FNA) after the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic diseases. Investigating LNs in these areas can happen in different clinical settings. Mostly, it is the first modality in general LN diseases without any peripheral LN enlargements. On the other hand, it can be the question of LN involvement in a known or suspected primary tumor. Due to EUS-FNA cytology, those questions can be answered highly, accurately. However, a primary discrimination of LNs might be helpful to increase the diagnostic value of the FNA cytology, especially in cases with multiple LN enlargements and hard to reach enlarged LNs for example by vessel interposition. Because of the unreliability of B-mode criteria, further diagnostic improvements such as elastography and contrast-enhanced EUS are investigated to increase the accuracy of the initial diagnosis. PMID:28218194

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Christopher W; Sandha, Gurpal S

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an important part of modern gastrointestinal endoscopy and now has an integral role in the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatic diseases. Furthermore, as EUS technology has advanced, it has increasingly become a therapeutic procedure, and the prospect of multiple applications of interventional EUS for the pancreas is truly on the near horizon. However, this review focuses on the established diagnostic and therapeutic roles of EUS that are used in current clinical practice. In particular, the diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, cystic pancreatic lesions and solid masses of the pancreas are discussed. The newer enhanced imaging modalities of elastography and contrast enhancement are evaluated in this context. The main therapeutic aspects of pancreatic EUS are then considered, namely celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis for pain control in chronic pancreatitis and pancreas cancer, and EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:25110426

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  13. A new shear wave imaging system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound elastography is able to provide a non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) technique is a quantitative method for tissue stiffness assessment. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire 2D quantitative images of tissue elasticity distribution. In this study, a new shear wave imaging system is proposed and evaluated. Detailed delineation of hardware and image processing algorithms are presented. Programmable devices are selected to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. Analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transform based shear wave speed determination method are proposed with parallel computation ability. Tissue mimicking phantom imaging, and in vitro imaging measurements are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The system has the ability to provide a new choice for quantitative mapping of the tissue elasticity, and has good potential to be implemented into commercial ultrasound scanner.

  14. Reliability and validity of quantifying absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Fukashiro, Senshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Muscle hardness is a mechanical property that represents transverse muscle stiffness. A quantitative method that uses ultrasound elastography for quantifying absolute human muscle hardness has been previously devised; however, its reliability and validity have not been completely verified. This study aimed to verify the reliability and validity of this quantitative method. The Young's moduli of seven tissue-mimicking materials (in vitro; Young's modulus range, 20-80 kPa; increments of 10 kPa) and the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (in vivo) were quantified using ultrasound elastography. On the basis of the strain/Young's modulus ratio of two reference materials, one hard and one soft (Young's moduli of 7 and 30 kPa, respectively), the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials and medial gastrocnemius muscle were calculated. The intra- and inter-investigator reliability of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations (≤6.9%) and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients (≥0.77) obtained from all measurements. The correlation coefficient between the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials obtained using a mechanical method and ultrasound elastography was 0.996, which was equivalent to values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The Young's moduli of the medial gastrocnemius muscle obtained using ultrasound elastography were within the range of values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The reliability and validity of the quantitative method for measuring absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography were thus verified.

  15. Ultrasound Vascular Elastography as a Tool for Assessing Atherosclerotic Plaques – A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, B.; Ewertsen, C.; Carlsen, J.; Nielsen, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread disease that accounts for nearly 3-quarters of deaths due to cardiovascular disease. Ultrasound elastography might be able to reliably identify characteristics associated with vulnerable plaques. There is a need for the evaluation of elastography and its ability to distinguish between vulnerable and stable plaques. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the literature on vascular elastography. A systematic search of the available literature for studies using elastography for assessing atherosclerotic plaques was conducted using the MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. A standardized template was used to extract relevant data following the PRISMA 2009 checklist. 20 articles were included in this paper. The studies were heterogeneous. All studies reported that elastography was a feasible technique and provided additional information compared to B-mode ultrasound alone. Most studies reported higher strain values for vulnerable plaques. Ultrasound elastography has potential as a clinical tool in the assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. Elastography is able to distinguish between different plaque types, but there is considerable methodological variation between studies. There is a need for larger studies in a clinical setting to determine the full potential of elastography. PMID:27896334

  16. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Summary This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi

  17. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  18. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-11-28

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role.

  19. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role. PMID:26640331

  20. Prostate clinical study of a full inversion unconstrained ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer detection at early stages is crucial for desirable treatment outcome. Among available imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) elastography is being developed as an effective clinical tool for prostate cancer diagnosis. Current clinical US elastography systems utilise strain imaging where tissue strain images are generated to approximate the tissue elastic modulus distribution. While strain images can be generated in real-time fashion, they lack the accuracy necessary for having desirable sensitivity and specificity. To improve strain imaging, full inversion based elastography techniques were proposed. Among these techniques, a constrained elastography technique was developed which showed promising results as long as the tumor and prostate geometry can be obtained accurately from the imaging modality used in conjunction with the elastography system. This requirement is not easy to fulfill, especially with US imaging. To address this issue, we present an unconstrained full inversion prostate elastography method in conjunction with US imaging where knowledge of tissue geometry is not necessary. One of the reasons that full inversion elastography techniques have not been routinely used in the clinic is lack of clinical validation studies. To our knowledge, no quasistatic full inversion based prostate US elastography technique has been applied in vivo before. In this work, the proposed method was applied to clinical prostate data and reconstructed elasticity images were compared to corresponding annotated histopathology images which is the first quasi-static full inversion based prostate US elastography technique applied successfully in vivo. Results demonstrated a good potential for clinical utility of the proposed method.

  1. Imaging feedback of histotripsy treatments using ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Histotripsy is a cavitation-based ultrasound therapy that mechanically fractionates soft solid tissues into fluid-like homogenates. This paper investigates the feasibility of imaging the tissue elasticity change during the histotripsy process as a tool to provide feedback for the treatments. The treatments were performed on agar tissue phantoms and ex vivo kidneys using 3-cycle ultrasound pulses delivered by a 750-kHz therapeutic array at peak negative/positive pressure of 17/108 MPa and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. Lesions with different degrees of damage were created with increasing numbers of therapy pulses from 0 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. The elasticity of the lesions was measured with ultrasound shear wave elastography, in which a quasi-planar shear wave was induced by acoustic radiation force generated by the therapeutic array, and tracked with ultrasound imaging at 3000 frames per second. Based on the shear wave velocity calculated from the sequentially captured frames, the Young's modulus was reconstructed. Results showed that the lesions were more easily identified on the shear wave velocity images than on B-mode images. As the number of therapy pulses increased from 0 to 2000 pulses/location, the Young's modulus decreased exponentially from 22.1 ± 2.7 to 2.1 ± 1.1 kPa in the tissue phantoms (R2 = 0.99, N = 9 each), and from 33.0 ± 7.1 to 4.0 ± 2.5 kPa in the ex vivo kidneys (R2 = 0.99, N = 8 each). Correspondingly, the tissues transformed from completely intact to completely fractionated as examined via histology. A good correlation existed between the lesions' Young's modulus and the degree of tissue fractionation as examined with the percentage of remaining structurally intact cell nuclei (R2 = 0.91, N = 8 each). These results indicate that lesions produced by histotripsy can be detected with high sensitivity using shear wave elastography. Because the decrease in the tissue elasticity corresponded well with the morphological and

  2. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners with time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE).

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Macdonald, Michael; Behler, Russell; Lanning, Justin; Wang, Michael; Urban, Matthew; Manduca, Armando; Zhao, Heng; Callstrom, Matthew; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James; Chen, Shigao

    2015-02-01

    Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography presents 2-D quantitative shear elasticity maps of tissue, which are clinically useful for both focal lesion detection and diffuse disease diagnosis. Realization of 2-D shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners, however, is challenging because of the low tracking pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) of these systems. Although some clinical and research platforms support software beamforming and plane-wave imaging with high PRF, the majority of current clinical ultrasound systems do not have the software beamforming capability, which presents a critical challenge for translating the 2-D shear-wave elastography technique from laboratory to clinical scanners. To address this challenge, this paper presents a time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) method for shear-wave tracking on conventional ultrasound scanners. TAST takes advantage of the parallel beamforming capability of conventional systems and realizes high-PRF shear-wave tracking by sequentially firing tracking vectors and aligning shear wave data in the temporal direction. The comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) technique was used to simultaneously produce multiple shear wave sources within the field-of-view (FOV) to enhance shear wave SNR and facilitate robust reconstructions of 2-D elasticity maps. TAST and CUSE were realized on a conventional ultrasound scanner. A phantom study showed that the shear-wave speed measurements from the conventional ultrasound scanner were in good agreement with the values measured from other 2-D shear wave imaging technologies. An inclusion phantom study showed that the conventional ultrasound scanner had comparable performance to a state-of-the-art shear-wave imaging system in terms of bias and precision in measuring different sized inclusions. Finally, in vivo case analysis of a breast with a malignant mass, and a liver from a healthy subject demonstrated the feasibility of using the conventional ultrasound

  3. WFUMB Guidelines and Recommendations on the Clinical Use of Ultrasound Elastography: Part 4. Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, David; Barr, Richard; Bojunga, Joerg; Cantisani, Vito; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Dighe, Manjiri; Vinayak, Sudhir; Xu, Jun-Mei; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2017-01-01

    The World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (WFUMB) has produced guidelines for the use of elastography techniques including basic science, breast and liver. Here we present elastography in thyroid diseases. For each available technique, procedure, reproducibility, results and limitations are analyzed and recommendations are given. Finally, recommendations are given based on the level of evidence of the published literature and on the WFUMB expert group's consensus. The document has a clinical perspective and is aimed at assessing the usefulness of elastography in the management of thyroid diseases.

  4. Current Status of Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ryozawa, Shomei; Fujita, Naotaka; Irisawa, Atsushi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2017-03-20

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is being used increasingly in the management of pancreatic fluid collection, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of the gallbladder, and other conditions. The role of interventional EUS is rapidly expanding and new interventions are continuously emerging. The development of devices could be a major breakthrough in the field of interventional EUS. New devices would enable the expansion of its role even further and prompt its widespread use in clinical practice. This review focuses on the current status of interventional EUS, especially highlighting the topics that are drawing endoscopists' interest at present. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. System for robot-assisted real-time laparoscopic ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Seth; Deshmukh, Nishikant; Kang, Hyun Jae; Taylor, Russell; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-02-01

    Surgical robots provide many advantages for surgery, including minimal invasiveness, precise motion, high dexterity, and crisp stereovision. One limitation of current robotic procedures, compared to open surgery, is the loss of haptic information for such purposes as palpation, which can be very important in minimally invasive tumor resection. Numerous studies have reported the use of real-time ultrasound elastography, in conjunction with conventional B-mode ultrasound, to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. Several groups (including our own) have reported integration of ultrasound with the da Vinci robot, and ultrasound elastography is a very promising image guidance method for robotassisted procedures that will further enable the role of robots in interventions where precise knowledge of sub-surface anatomical features is crucial. We present a novel robot-assisted real-time ultrasound elastography system for minimally invasive robot-assisted interventions. Our system combines a da Vinci surgical robot with a non-clinical experimental software interface, a robotically articulated laparoscopic ultrasound probe, and our GPU-based elastography system. Elasticity and B-mode ultrasound images are displayed as picture-in-picture overlays in the da Vinci console. Our system minimizes dependence on human performance factors by incorporating computer-assisted motion control that automatically generates the tissue palpation required for elastography imaging, while leaving high-level control in the hands of the user. In addition to ensuring consistent strain imaging, the elastography assistance mode avoids the cognitive burden of tedious manual palpation. Preliminary tests of the system with an elasticity phantom demonstrate the ability to differentiate simulated lesions of varied stiffness and to clearly delineate lesion boundaries.

  6. Case study: could ultrasound and elastography visualized densified areas inside the deep fascia?

    PubMed

    Luomala, Tuulia; Pihlman, Mika; Heiskanen, Jouko; Stecco, Carla

    2014-07-01

    Many manual techniques describe palpable changes in the subcutaneous tissue. Many manual therapists have perceived palpable tissue stiffness and how it changes after treatment. No clear demonstration exists of the presence of specific alterations in the subcutaneous tissue and even less a visualization of their changes following manual therapy. This case study visualizes by ultrasound and elastography an alteration of the deep fascia in a 40-year-old male with subacute pain in the calf area. Ultrasound and elastography permits visualization of gliding, echogenicity and elasticity of deep fascia and their changes, after manual therapy (Fascial Manipulation(©)). This study suggests the possible use of the ultrasound and elastography to furnish a more objective picture of the "sensations" that are commonly reported by manual therapists, and which supports clinicians in the diagnosis of the myofascial pain.

  7. Ultrasound elastography: the new frontier in direct measurement of muscle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Joline E; Eby, Sarah F; Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Brault, Jeffrey S; Chen, Shigao; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The use of brightness-mode ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation has increased dramatically. The continuing evolution of ultrasound technology has also produced ultrasound elastography, a cutting-edge technology that can directly measure the mechanical properties of tissue, including muscle stiffness. Its real-time and direct measurements of muscle stiffness can aid the diagnosis and rehabilitation of acute musculoskeletal injuries and chronic myofascial pain. It can also help monitor outcomes of interventions affecting muscle in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases, and it can better inform the functional prognosis. This technology has implications for even broader use of ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation practice, but more knowledge about its uses and limitations is essential to its appropriate clinical implementation. In this review, we describe different ultrasound elastography techniques for studying muscle stiffness, including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear-wave elastography. We discuss the basic principles of these techniques, including the strengths and limitations of their measurement capabilities. We review the current muscle research, discuss physiatric clinical applications of these techniques, and note directions for future research.

  8. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology.

  9. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro-Poças, F; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests.

  10. Value of Strain Elastography Ultrasound in Differentiation of Breast Masses and Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Atabey, Aysun Okar; Arıbal, Erkin; Ergelen, Rabia; Kaya, Handan

    2014-01-01

    Objective US elastography is an emerging technique that can be used during breast US examination. The increasing awareness of breast cancer led to an increase in mammography and breast US examinations. The specificity of these techniques is not high enough to prevent unnecessary biopsies. There is still a need for a more specific technique that can overcome this problem. This study aimed to evaluate the value of strain elastography in breast lesions. Materials and Methods In this study, 110 lesions of 96 patients were evaluated with strain elastography. Five score system was used for lesion scoring. The histopathologic results of lesions were obtained and were accepted as gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the technique were calculated. Histopathologic and strain elastography results were correlated. Results The sensitivity of US strain elastography was calculated as 83%, the specificity as 89%, the positive predictive value as 79% and the negative predictive value as 91%. There were no score 1 lesions. All score 2 lesions were benign. Score 5 had the highest true positivity rate. Conclusion We believe that ultrasound elastography is an effective imaging technique that can be used as an adjunct for differential diagnosis, prior to the decision to biopsy a lesion in certain cases.

  11. Ultrasound-based elastography for the diagnosis of portal hypertension in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Şirli, Roxana; Sporea, Ioan; Popescu, Alina; Dănilă, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    Progressive fibrosis is encountered in almost all chronic liver diseases. Its clinical signs are diagnostic in advanced cirrhosis, but compensated liver cirrhosis is harder to diagnose. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference method for staging the severity of fibrosis, but due to its drawbacks (inter and intra-observer variability, sampling errors, unequal distribution of fibrosis in the liver, and risk of complications and even death), non-invasive methods were developed to assess fibrosis (serologic and elastographic). Elastographic methods can be ultrasound-based or magnetic resonance imaging-based. All ultrasound-based elastographic methods are valuable for the early diagnosis of cirrhosis, especially transient elastography (TE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, which have similar sensitivities and specificities, although ARFI has better feasibility. TE is a promising method for predicting portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients, but it cannot replace upper digestive endoscopy. The diagnostic accuracy of using ARFI in the liver to predict portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients is debatable, with controversial results in published studies. The accuracy of ARFI elastography may be significantly increased if spleen stiffness is assessed, either alone or in combination with liver stiffness and other parameters. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography, the ElastPQ technique and strain elastography all need to be evaluated as predictors of portal hypertension. PMID:26556985

  12. Ultrasound-Based Carotid Elastography for Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques Validated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengwu; Pan, Xiaochang; He, Qiong; Huang, Manwei; Huang, Lingyun; Zhao, Xihai; Yuan, Chun; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-based carotid elastography has been developed to estimate the mechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaques. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vivo capability of carotid elastography in vulnerable plaque detection using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging as reference. Ultrasound radiofrequency data of 46 carotid plaques from 29 patients (74 ± 5 y old) were acquired and inter-frame axial strain was estimated with an optical flow method. The maximum value of absolute strain rate for each plaque was derived as an indicator for plaque classification. Magnetic resonance imaging of carotid arteries was performed on the same patients to classify the plaques into stable and vulnerable groups for carotid elastography validation. The maximum value of absolute strain rate was found to be significantly higher in vulnerable plaques (2.15 ± 0.79 s(-1), n = 27) than in stable plaques (1.21 ± 0.37 s(-1), n = 19) (p < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed, and the area under the curve was 0.848. Therefore, the in vivo capability of carotid elastography to detect vulnerable plaques, validated by magnetic resonance imaging, was proven, revealing the potential of carotid elastography as an important tool in atherosclerosis assessment and stroke prevention.

  13. Considering Angle Selection When Using Ultrasound Electrode Displacement Elastography to Evaluate Radiofrequency Ablation of Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Pin-Yu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Teng, Jianfu

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive treatment to thermally destroy tumors. Ultrasound-based electrode-displacement elastography is an emerging technique for evaluating the region of RFA-induced lesions. The angle between the imaging probe and the RFA electrode can influence electrode-displacement elastography when visualizing the ablation zone. We explored the angle effect on electrode-displacement elastography to measure the ablation zone. Phantoms embedded with meatballs were fabricated and then ablated using an RFA system to simulate RFA-induced lesions. For each phantom, a commercial ultrasound scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear probe was used to acquire raw image data at different angles, ranging from 30° to 90° at increments of 10°, to construct electrode-displacement images and facilitate comparisons with tissue section images. The results revealed that the ablation regions detected using electrode-displacement elastography were highly correlated with those from tissue section images when the angle was between 30° and 60°. However, the boundaries of lesions were difficult to distinguish, when the angle was larger than 60°. The experimental findings suggest that angle selection should be considered to achieve reliable electrode-displacement elastography to describe ablation zones. PMID:24971347

  14. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  15. Quasi-static elastography and its application in investigation of focused ultrasound induced tissue lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Ling, Tao; Shen, Yong; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapy has always been a key factor for a successful therapy. Although B-mode ultrasound has long been used for monitoring FUS therapy, the gray scale changes can not precisely reflect the lesion formation inside the tissue, while MR thermometry is considered to be too expensive. In this study, elastography had been performed using a commercial ultrasound system to investigate lesions produced by FUS irradiation in vitro. Several motion detection algorithms had been performed to improve the motion detection accuracy in the elastography. The effects of different algorithms on the motion detection accuracy were compared. Experimental results on the FUS induced lesion in swine muscle were introduced. The results indicated that lesions induced by small dosage of FUS inside the tissue can be successfully detected, which has a profound clinical meaning for the monitoring of FUS therapy.

  16. Object detection in ultrasound elastography for use in HIFU treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alex; Mankani, Soumya; Choo, Chang

    2014-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), has applications in treating various cancers, such as prostate, liver and breast cancer. In order for HIFU to be effective and efficient it needs to be guided by an imaging modality. While there are several options for guiding HIFU treatment, one of the most promising is ultrasound elastography. Current commercial devices use Brightness-Mode (B-mode) imaging or MRI, and are manual processes. Ultrasound elastography, allows complete automation of HIFU treatment due to the enhanced image, that elastography provides. The elastic image provides more information and less noise. To show that segmentation was possible on elastic images, nine algorithms were implemented in matlab and used on three distinct images for object detection. The three images used, have varying properties regarding object intensity and placement, as well as different noise patterns. Using PSNR, to gauge the effectiveness of each algorithm, it was shown that segmentation was possible on all images using different algorithms. The bilateral-shock-bilateral algorithm proved to be an overall effective algorithm in every situation with a PSNR of 83.87db on the phantom image. The segmentation results clearly highlight any object in the images. Future work includes fine tuning the algorithm with different phantom images and in-vivo images to distinguish between noise and desired object.

  17. Evaluation of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Women with Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Using Ultrasound Elastography1

    PubMed Central

    Falou, Omar; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Prematilake, Sameera; Sofroni, Ervis; Papanicolau, Naum; Iradji, Sara; Jahedmotlagh, Zahra; Lemon-Wong, Sharon; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Zubovits, Judit; Spayne, Jacqueline; Dent, Rebecca; Trudeau, Maureen; Boileau, Jean Francois; Wright, Frances C; Yaffe, Martin J; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Ultrasound elastography is a new imaging technique that can be used to assess tissue stiffness. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of ultrasound elastography for monitoring treatment response of locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy. METHODS: Fifteen women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy had the affected breast scanned before, 1, 4, and 8 weeks following therapy initiation, and then before surgery. Changes in elastographic parameters related to tissue biomechanical properties were then determined and compared to clinical and pathologic tumor response after mastectomy. RESULTS: Patients who responded to therapy demonstrated a significant decrease (P < .05) in strain ratios and strain differences 4 weeks after treatment initiation compared to non-responding patients. Mean strain ratio and mean strain difference for responders was 81 ± 3% and 1 ± 17% for static regions of interest (ROIs) and 81 ± 3% and 6 ± 18% for dynamic ROIs, respectively. In contrast, these parameters were 102±2%, 110±17%, 101±4%, and 109±30% for non-responding patients, respectively. Strain ratio using static ROIs was found to be the best predictor of treatment response, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity obtained 4 weeks after starting treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that ultrasound elastography can be potentially used as an early predictor of tumor therapy response in breast cancer patients. PMID:23418613

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound Practice Survey in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Drigo, Juliana Marques; Castillo, Cecilia; Wever, Wallia; Obaldía, José Ricardo Ruíz; Fillipi, Sheila; Ribeiro, Manoel C. S. A.; Rossini, Lucio G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important imaging modality for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, no official data exists regarding clinical EUS practice in Latin America (LA). This study assessed current EUS practice and training. Patients and Methods: A direct mail survey questionnaire was sent to 268 Capítulo Latino Americano de Ultrasonido Endoscópico members between August 2012 and January 2013. The questionnaire was sent out in English, Spanish and Portuguese languages and was available through the following site: http://www.cleus-encuesta.com. Responses were requested only from physicians who perform EUS. Results: A total of 70 LA physicians answered the questionnaire until January 2013. Most of the participants were under 42 years of age (53%) and 80% were men. Most participants (45.7%) perform EUS in Brazil, 53% work in a private hospital. The majority (70%) also perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A total 42% had performed EUS for 2 years or less and 22.7% for 11 years or more. Only 10% performed more than 5000 EUS. The most common indication was an evaluation of pancreatic-biliary-ampullary lesions. Regarding training, 48.6% had more than 6 months of dedicated hands-on EUS and 37% think that at least 6 months of formal training is necessary to acquire competence. Furthermore, 64% think that more than 50 procedures for pancreatic-biliary lesions are necessary. Conclusion: This survey provides insight into the status of EUS in LA. EUS is performed mostly by young endoscopists in LA. Diagnostic upper EUS is the most common EUS procedure. Most endosonographers believe that formal training is necessary to acquire competence. PMID:24949398

  19. On the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection

    PubMed Central

    Deprez, Jean-François; Brusseau, Elisabeth; Fromageau, Jérémie; Cloutier, Guy; Basset, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pressure ulcers are areas of soft tissue breakdown induced by a sustained mechanical stress that damages the skin and underlying tissues. They represent a considerable burden to the society in terms of health care and cost. Yet, techniques for prevention and detection of pressure ulcers still remain very limited. In this article, the authors investigated the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection. Elastography is an imaging technique providing local information on biological tissue mechanical properties. It is relevant for pressure ulcer detection as this pathology is associated with a gradual stiffening of damaged tissues, beginning in the deeper tissues and progressing toward the skin surface. Methods A 2D ultrasound elastography method was proposed and its ability in terms of pressure ulcer detection was validated through numerical simulations and physical acquisitions on pressure ulcer mimicking phantoms. In vivo experiments on a rat model are also reported. A maintained pressure was applied on the animal thigh, with a view to generate a pressure ulcer, and ultrasound data were acquired and processed before and after application of this pressure. Results Numerical simulations demonstrated that a pressure ulcer can theoretically be detected at a very early stage with ultrasound elastography. Even when the ulcer region was characterized by a low stiffening (ratio of 1.8 relative to normal tissues), the corresponding elastogram clearly underlined the pathological area. This observation was confirmed by the results obtained on a physical phantom mimicking a pressure ulcer at an early stage. Computed elastograms showed strain differences between areas mimicking healthy and pathological tissues. Results corresponding to in vivo experiments revealed a difference in the way tissues behaved before and after the pressure was applied on the animal thigh, which strongly suggests the presence of a pathological area. Conclusions

  20. Ultrasound-Assisted Endoscopic Partial Plantar Fascia Release

    PubMed Central

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure. PMID:24265989

  1. The Use of 2D Ultrasound Elastography for Measuring Tendon Motion and Strain

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the fidelity of a 2D ultrasound elastography method for the measurement of tendon motion and strain. Ultrasound phantoms and ex vivo porcine flexor tendons were cyclically stretched to 4% strain while cine ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data and video data were simultaneously collected. 2D ultrasound elastography was used to estimate tissue motion and strain from RF data, and surface tissue motion and strain were separately estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). There were strong correlations (R2 > 0.97) between DIC and RF measurements of phantom displacement and strain, and good agreement in estimates of peak phantom strain (DIC: 3.5 ± 0.2%; RF: 3.7 ± 0.1%). For tendon, elastographic estimates of displacement profiles also correlated well with DIC measurements (R2 > 0.92), and exhibited similar estimated peak tendon strain (DIC: 2.6 ± 1.4%; RF: 2.2 ± 1.3%). Elastographic tracking with B-Mode images tended to under-predict peak strain for both the phantom and tendon. This study demonstrates the capacity to use quantitative elastographic techniques to measure tendon displacement and strain within an ultrasound image window. The approach may be extendible to in vivo use on humans, which would allow for the non-invasive analysis of tendon deformation in both normal and pathological states. PMID:24388164

  2. Tendon motion and strain patterns evaluated with two-dimensional ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chernak, Laura A.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 2D ultrasound elastography to assess tendon tissue motion and strains under axial loading conditions. Four porcine flexor tendons were cyclically loaded to 4% peak strain using a servo hydraulic test system. An ultrasound transducer was positioned to image a longitudinal cross-section of the tendon during loading. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected at 63 frames per second simultaneously with applied force and crosshead displacement. A grid of nodes was manually positioned on an ultrasound image of the unloaded tendon. Small kernels (2 × 1 mm) centered at each node were then cross-correlated with search regions centered at corresponding nodal locations in the subsequent frame. Frame-to-frame nodal displacements were defined as the values that maximized the normalized cross-correlations. This process was repeated across all frames in the loading cycle, providing a measurement of the 2D trajectories of tissue motion through out the loading cycle. The high resolution displacement measures along the RF beam direction were spatially differentiated to estimate the transverse (relative to tend on fibers) tissue strains. The nodal displacements obtained using this method were very repeatable, with average along-fiber trajectories that were highly correlated (r2>0.98) with the prescribed crosshead displacements. The elastography transverse strains were also repeatable and were consistent with average transverse strains estimated via changes in tendon width. The apparent Poisson’s ratios (0.82-1.64) exceeded the incompressibility limit, but are comparable to values found for tendon in prior experimental and computational studies. The results demonstrate that 2D ultrasound elastography is a promising approach for noninvasively assessing localized tissue motion and strain patterns. PMID:22939179

  3. Photoacoustic elastography.

    PubMed

    Hai, Pengfei; Yao, Junjie; Li, Guo; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-02-15

    Elastography can noninvasively map the elasticity distribution in biological tissue, which can potentially be used to reveal disease conditions. In this Letter, we have demonstrated photoacoustic elastography by using a linear-array photoacoustic computed tomography system. The feasibility of photoacoustic elastography was first demonstrated by imaging the strains of single-layer and bilayer gelatin phantoms with various stiffness values. The measured strains agreed well with theoretical values, with an average error of less than 5.2%. Next, in vivo photoacoustic elastography was demonstrated on a mouse leg, where the fat and muscle distribution was mapped based on the elasticity contrast. We confirmed the photoacoustic elastography results by ultrasound elastography performed simultaneously.

  4. External Vibration Multi-directional Ultrasound Shearwave Elastography (EVMUSE): Application in Liver Fibrosis Staging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Sanchez, William; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave speed can be used to assess tissue elasticity, which is associated with tissue health. Ultrasound shear wave elastography techniques based on measuring the propagation speed of the shear waves induced by acoustic radiation force are becoming promising alternatives to biopsy in liver fibrosis staging. However, shear waves generated by such methods are typically very weak. Therefore, the penetration may become problematic, especially for overweight or obese patients. In this study, we developed a new method called External Vibration Multi-directional Ultrasound Shearwave Elastography (EVMUSE), in which external vibration from a loudspeaker was used to generate a multi-directional shear wave field. A directional filter was then applied to separate the complex shear wave field into several shear wave fields propagating in different directions. A two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed map was reconstructed from each individual shear wave field, and a final 2D shear wave speed map was constructed by compounding these individual wave speed maps. The method was validated using two homogeneous phantoms and one multi-purpose tissue-mimicking phantom. Ten patients undergoing liver Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) were also studied with EVMUSE to compare results between the two methods. Phantom results showed EVMUSE was able to quantify tissue elasticity accurately with good penetration. In vivo EVMUSE results were well correlated with MRE results, indicating the promise of using EVMUSE for liver fibrosis staging. PMID:25020066

  5. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F.; Mansour, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1–2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment. PMID:26077987

  6. Ultrasound Elastography--Review of Techniques and Its Clinical Applications in Pediatrics--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Pawluś, Aleksander; Szymańska, Kinga; Łasecki, Mateusz; Ziajkiewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Sonoelastography is a novel technique that uses ultrasound waves to assess the elasticity of tissues noninvasively. It provides an ultrasound-based method to detect and display the relative stiffness of tissue. The main principle of sonoelastography is the measurement of tissue distortion in response to external compression. Changes in elasticity and tissues deformation elicited by compression are measured, processed and then shown in real time presentation with color-coded elastograms. Most of the elastography applications are well known and have been described in detail in adults, e.g. evaluation of liver fibrosis or thyroid nodules. Similarly, most of sonoelastographic studies are based on groups of adults. The purpose of this review article is to bring this technology closer to pediatric clinicians and to summarize some of its current clinical applications that are being pursued. In this part we take into consideration utility of elastography in evaluation pathologies of musculoskeletal system, lymphatic nodes, thyroid, kidneys in pediatric patients and also elastography of placenta.

  7. Attenuation measuring ultrasound shearwave elastography and in vivo application in post-transplant liver patients.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Qiang, Bo; Urban, Matthew W; Zhao, Heng; Sanchez, William; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2017-01-21

    Ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography techniques are used to assess mechanical properties of soft tissues. Tissue stiffness is related to various pathologies such as fibrosis, loss of compliance, and cancer. One way to perform elastography is measuring shear wave velocity of propagating waves in tissue induced by intrinsic motion or an external source of vibration, and relating the shear wave velocity to tissue elasticity. All tissues are inherently viscoelastic and ignoring viscosity biases the velocity-based estimates of elasticity and ignores a potentially important parameter of tissue health. We present attenuation measuring ultrasound shearwave elastography (AMUSE), a technique that independently measures both shear wave velocity and attenuation in tissue and therefore allows characterization of viscoelasticity without using a rheological model. The theoretical basis for AMUSE is first derived and validated in finite element simulations. AMUSE is validated against the traditional methods for assessing shear wave velocity (phase gradient) and attenuation (amplitude decay) in tissue mimicking phantoms and excised tissue. The results agreed within one standard deviation. AMUSE was used to measure shear wave velocity and attenuation in 15 transplanted livers in patients with potential acute rejection, and the results were compared with the biopsy findings in a preliminary study. The comparison showed excellent agreement and suggests that AMUSE can be used to separate transplanted livers with acute rejection from livers with no rejection.

  8. Attenuation measuring ultrasound shearwave elastography and in vivo application in post-transplant liver patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Qiang, Bo; Urban, Matthew W.; Zhao, Heng; Sanchez, William; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography techniques are used to assess mechanical properties of soft tissues. Tissue stiffness is related to various pathologies such as fibrosis, loss of compliance, and cancer. One way to perform elastography is measuring shear wave velocity of propagating waves in tissue induced by intrinsic motion or an external source of vibration, and relating the shear wave velocity to tissue elasticity. All tissues are inherently viscoelastic and ignoring viscosity biases the velocity-based estimates of elasticity and ignores a potentially important parameter of tissue health. We present attenuation measuring ultrasound shearwave elastography (AMUSE), a technique that independently measures both shear wave velocity and attenuation in tissue and therefore allows characterization of viscoelasticity without using a rheological model. The theoretical basis for AMUSE is first derived and validated in finite element simulations. AMUSE is validated against the traditional methods for assessing shear wave velocity (phase gradient) and attenuation (amplitude decay) in tissue mimicking phantoms and excised tissue. The results agreed within one standard deviation. AMUSE was used to measure shear wave velocity and attenuation in 15 transplanted livers in patients with potential acute rejection, and the results were compared with the biopsy findings in a preliminary study. The comparison showed excellent agreement and suggests that AMUSE can be used to separate transplanted livers with acute rejection from livers with no rejection.

  9. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment.

  10. Elastography for the pancreas: Current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Natsuko; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2016-04-14

    Elastography for the pancreas can be performed by either ultrasound or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). There are two types of pancreatic elastographies based on different principles, which are strain elastography and shear wave elastography. The stiffness of tissue is estimated by measuring the grade of strain generated by external pressure in the former, whereas it is estimated by measuring propagation speed of shear wave, the transverse wave, generated by acoustic radiation impulse (ARFI) in the latter. Strain elastography is difficult to perform when the probe, the pancreas and the aorta are not located in line. Accordingly, a fine elastogram can be easily obtained in the pancreatic body but not in the pancreatic head and tail. In contrast, shear wave elastography can be easily performed in the entire pancreas because ARFI can be emitted to wherever desired. However, shear wave elastography cannot be performed by EUS to date. Recently, clinical guidelines for elastography specialized in the pancreas were published from Japanese Society of Medical Ultrasonics. The guidelines show us technical knacks of performing elastography for the pancreas.

  11. Comparison Between Neck and Shoulder Stiffness Determined by Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography and a Muscle Hardness Meter.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Kusama, Saki

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this study were to compare neck and shoulder stiffness values determined by shear wave ultrasound elastography with those obtained with a muscle hardness meter and to verify the correspondence between objective and subjective stiffness in the neck and shoulder. Twenty-four young men and women participated in the study. Their neck and shoulder stiffness was determined at six sites. Before the start of the measurements, patients rated their present subjective symptoms of neck and shoulder stiffness on a 6-point verbal scale. At all measurement sites, the correlation coefficients between the values of muscle hardness indices determined by the muscle hardness meter and shear wave ultrasound elastography were not significant. Furthermore, individuals' subjective neck and shoulder stiffness did not correspond to their objective symptoms. These results suggest that the use of shear wave ultrasound elastography is essential to more precisely assess neck and shoulder stiffness.

  12. Shear Wave Elastography May Add a New Dimension to Ultrasound Evaluation of Thyroid Nodules: Case Series with Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Slapa, Rafal Z.; Piwowonski, Antoni; Jakubowski, Wieslaw S.; Bierca, Jacek; Szopinski, Kazimierz T.; Slowinska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Migda, Bartosz; Mlosek, R. Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Although elastography can enhance the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, its diagnostic performance is not ideal at present. Further improvements in the technique and creation of robust diagnostic criteria are necessary. The purpose of this study was to compare the usefulness of strain elastography and a new generation of elasticity imaging called supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) in differential evaluation of thyroid nodules. Six thyroid nodules in 4 patients were studied. SSWE yielded 1 true-positive and 5 true-negative results. Strain elastography yielded 5 false-positive results and 1 false-negative result. A novel finding appreciated with SSWE, were punctate foci of increased stiffness corresponding to microcalcifications in 4 nodules, some not visible on B-mode ultrasound, as opposed to soft, colloid-inspissated areas visible on B-mode ultrasound in 2 nodules. This preliminary paper indicates that SSWE may outperform strain elastography in differentiation of thyroid nodules with regard to their stiffness. SSWE showed the possibility of differentiation of high echogenic foci into microcalcifications and inspissated colloid, adding a new dimension to thyroid elastography. Further multicenter large-scale studies of thyroid nodules evaluating different elastographic methods are warranted. PMID:22685685

  13. The ultrasound elastography inverse problem and the effective criteria.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Atefeh; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Nikazad, Touraj

    2013-11-01

    The elastography (elasticity imaging) is one of the recent state-of-the-art methods for diagnosis of abnormalities in soft tissue. The idea is based on the computation of the tissue elasticity distribution. This leads to the inverse elasticity problem; in that, displacement field and boundary conditions are known, and elasticity distribution of the tissue is aimed for computation. We treat this problem by the Gauss-Newton method. This iterative method results in an ill-posed problem, and therefore, regularization schemes are required to deal with this issue. The impacts of the initial guess for tissue elasticity distribution, contrast ratio between elastic modulus of tumor and normal tissue, and noise level of the input data on the estimated solutions are investigated via two different regularization methods. The numerical results show that the accuracy and speed of convergence vary when different regularization methods are applied. Also, the semi-convergence behavior has been observed and discussed. At the end, we signify the necessity of a clever initial guess and intelligent stopping criteria for the iterations. The main purpose here is to highlight some technical factors that have an influence on elasticity image quality and diagnostic accuracy, and we have tried our best to make this article accessible for a broad audience.

  14. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  15. Correlation between Ultrasound Elastography and Histologic Characteristics of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li; Qiong, Wu; Yan, Wang; Youben, Fan; Bing, Hu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between elastography and histologic characteristics including fibrosis and calcification. We also wanted to investigate whether other clinicopathologic indexes influence the strain ratio (SR) of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). We retrospectively reviewed 126 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) from 103 patients who underwent ultrasonography and elastography before surgery. The histologic characteristics and clinicopathologic indexes were compared with the SR of ultrasound elastography (UE). The results showed that there was a significantly positive correlation between fibrosis degree and SR measurements (r = 0.754, p = 0.000); the SR was significantly different between the groups with and without calcification (11.34 ± 10.08 vs. 6.81 ± 7.33, p = 0.000). The standard coefficients of collagen and stromal calcification were 0.684 and 0.194, respectively. There was no significant correlation between SR and indices such as size, position, co-existence with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), multifocality or cervical lymph node (CLN) metastasis. In conclusion, we found that the SR of UE is positively correlated with the fibrosis of PTC. Stromal calcification will elevate the SR dramatically, but psammoma bodies will not when they exist in the absence of stromal calcification. PMID:28327620

  16. Reprint of "Update on ultrasound elastography: Miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal".

    PubMed

    Correas, J M; Drakonakis, E; Isidori, A M; Hélénon, O; Pozza, C; Cantisani, V; Di Leo, N; Maghella, F; Rubini, A; Drudi, F M; D'ambrosio, F

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions.

  17. Remote ultrasound palpation for robotic interventions using absolute elastography.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Caitlin; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-01-01

    Although robotic surgery has addressed many of the challenges presented by minimally invasive surgery, haptic feedback and the lack of knowledge of tissue stiffness is an unsolved problem. This paper presents a system for finding the absolute elastic properties of tissue using a freehand ultrasound scanning technique, which utilizes the da Vinci Surgical robot and a custom 2D ultrasound transducer for intraoperative use. An external exciter creates shear waves in the tissue, and a local frequency estimation method computes the shear modulus. Results are reported for both phantom and in vivo models. This system can be extended to any 6 degree-of-freedom tracking method and any 2D transducer to provide real-time absolute elastic properties of tissue.

  18. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography.

  19. In Vivo Estimation of Perineal Body Properties Using Ultrasound Quasistatic Elastography in Nulliparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luyun; Low, Lisa Kane; DeLancey, John OL; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-01-01

    Objective The perineal body must undergo a remarkable transformation during pregnancy to accommodate an estimated stretch ratio of over 3.3 in order to permit vaginal delivery of the fetal head. Yet measurements of perineal body elastic properties are lacking in vivo, whether in the pregnant or non-pregnant state. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop a method for measuring perineal body elastic modulus and to test its feasibility in young nulliparous women. Methods An UltraSONIX RP500 ultrasound system was equipped with elastography software. Approximately 1 Hz free-hand sinusoidal compression loading of the perineum was used to measure the relative stiffness of the perineal body compared to that of a custom reference standoff pad with a modulus of 36.7 kPa. Measurements were made in 20 healthy nulliparous women. Four subjects were invited back for second and third visits to evaluate within- and between-visit repeatability using the coefficient of variation. Results The mean± SD elastic compression modulus of the perineal body was 28.9 ± 4.7 kPa. Within- and between-visit repeatability averaged 3.4% and 8.3%, respectively. Conclusion Ultrasound elastography using a standoff pad reference provides a valid method for evaluating the elastic modulus of the perineal body in living women. PMID:25801422

  20. Ultrasound Elastography--Review of Techniques and Its Clinical Applications in Pediatrics--Part 1.

    PubMed

    Pawluś, Aleksander; Sokołowska-Dąbek, Dąbrówka; Szymańska, Kinga; Inglot, Marcin S; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Sonoelastography is a novel technique that uses ultrasound waves to assess the elasticity of tissues noninvasively. It provides an ultrasound-based method to detect and display the relative stiffness of tissue. The main principle of sonoelastography is the measurement of tissue distortion in response to external compression. Changes in elasticity and tissue deformation elicited by compression are measured, processed and then shown in real time presentation with color-coded elastograms. One of the most important applications of sonoelastography is the evaluation of liver diseases, mainly liver fibrosis assessment and staging. Although in terms of definite diagnosis the liver biopsy still remains the golden standard, elastography seems to be a very inexpensive, repeatable and noninvasive method to evaluate most of liver conditions. The technique is also applicable in detection and differential diagnosis of focal lesions. It provides better imaging information and therefore more accurate evaluation of the lesions nature, e.g. in liver, lymphatic nodes or thyroid gland. Most of the applications mentioned above are well known and have been described in details in adults. Similarly, most of sonoelastographic studies are based on groups of adults. The purpose of this review article is to bring this technology closer to pediatric clinicians and to summarize some of its current clinical applications that are being pursued. In this part we focus on utility of elastography in liver assessment in pediatric patients.

  1. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  3. Comparison of fractional wave equations for power law attenuation in ultrasound and elastography.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2014-04-01

    A set of wave equations with fractional loss operators in time and space are analyzed. The fractional Szabo equation, the power law wave equation and the causal fractional Laplacian wave equation are all found to be low-frequency approximations of the fractional Kelvin-Voigt wave equation and the more general fractional Zener wave equation. The latter two equations are based on fractional constitutive equations, whereas the former wave equations have been derived from the desire to model power law attenuation in applications like medical ultrasound. This has consequences for use in modeling and simulation, especially for applications that do not satisfy the low-frequency approximation, such as shear wave elastography. In such applications, the wave equations based on constitutive equations are the viable ones.

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound for chronic abdominal pain and gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Dill, B; Dill, J E; Berkhouse, L; Palmer, S T

    1999-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a major advance in gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS, which is invaluable in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancer, is now being used in the diagnosis of chronic upper abdominal pain. EUS combined with stimulated biliary drainage (EUS/SBD) aids in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, microlithiasis, and various conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the EUS/SBD procedure and nursing care. Two case histories illustrating potential benefits to patients are presented.

  5. Application of high-resolution ultrasound, real-time elastography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating solid thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Ting; Gong, Hai-Yan; Li, Cui-Ying; Ye, Xin-Hua; Lin, Hong-Jun; Shen, Mei-Ping; Duan, Yu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) is a sensitive tool for identifying thyroid nodules. Real-time elastography (RTE) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are newly developed methods which could measure tissue elasticity and perfusion features. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficiency of HRUS, RTE, CEUS and their combined use in the differentiation of benign and malignant solid thyroid nodules. In total, 111 consecutive patients with 145 thyroid nodules who were scheduled for surgery were included in the study. All of them underwent HRUS, RTE, and CEUS examination. The independent ultrasound (US) predictors for malignancy were determined and quantified using logistic regression analysis, based on which a risk-scoring model was established for each method. The diagnostic efficiency of each method was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. HRUS showed the best diagnostic efficiency among the 3 US methods, with 74.6% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity. CEUS had higher sensitivity (85.7%), whereas RTE alone did not show much advantage. Combined use of RTE and HRUS increased the sensitivity (92.1%). The HRUS-RTE-CEUS combination could increase both the sensitivity and specificity (87.3%, 91.5%), with the best AUC (0.935) among all the methods. The overall diagnostic value of HRUS in predicting malignancy is the best among the 3 US methods. Combined use of RTE and CEUS and HRUS could improve the diagnostic efficiency for solid thyroid nodules. PMID:27828854

  6. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials.

  7. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  8. Noninvasive vascular ultrasound elastography applied to the characterization of experimental aneurysms and follow-up after endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Fromageau, Jérémie; Lerouge, Sophie; Maurice, Roch Listz; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2008-11-21

    Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to noninvasively characterize abdominal aneurysms with ultrasound (US) elastography before and after endovascular treatment. Twenty three dogs having bilateral aneurysms surgically created on iliac arteries with venous patches were investigated. In a first set of experiments, the feasibility of elastography to differentiate vascular wall elastic properties between the aneurismal neck (healthy region) and the venous patch (pathological region) was evaluated on six dogs. Lower strain values were found in venous patches (p < 0.001). In a second set of experiments, 17 dogs having endovascular repair (EVAR) by stent graft (SG) insertion were examined three months after SG implantation. Angiography, color Doppler US, examination of macroscopic sections and US elastography were used. The value of elastography was validated with the following end points by considering a solid thrombus of a healed aneurysm as a structure with small deformations and a soft thrombus associated with endoleaks as a more deformable tissue: (1) the correlation between the size of healed organized thrombi estimated by elastography and by macroscopic examinations; (2) the correlation between the strain amplitude measured within vessel wall elastograms and the leak size; and (3) agreement on the presence and size of endoleaks as determined by elastography and by combined reference imaging modalities (angiography + Doppler US). Mean surfaces of solid thrombi estimated with elastography were found correlated with those measured on macroscopic sections (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Quantitative strain values measured within the vessel wall were poorly linked with the leak size (r = 0.12, p = 0.5). However, the qualitative evaluation of leak size in the aneurismal sac was very good, with a Kappa agreement coefficient of 0.79 between elastography and combined reference imaging modalities. In summary, complementing B-scan and color Doppler, noninvasive US

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Tarantino, Ilaria; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-16

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) develop secondary to either fluid leakage or liquefaction of pancreatic necrosis following acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, surgery or abdominal trauma. Pancreatic fluid collections include acute fluid collections, acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and pancreatic necrosis. Before the introduction of linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s and the subsequent development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage (EUS-GD) procedures, the available options for drainage in symptomatic PFCs included surgical drainage, percutaneous drainage using radiological guidance and conventional endoscopic transmural drainage. In recent years, it has gradually been recognized that, due to its lower morbidity rate compared to the surgical and percutaneous approaches, endoscopic treatment may be the preferred first-line approach for managing symptomatic PFCs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage has the following advantages, when compared to other alternatives such as surgical, percutaneous and non-EUS-guided endoscopic drainage. EUS-GD is less invasive than surgery and therefore does not require general anesthesia. The morbidity rate is lower, recovery is faster and the costs are lower. EUS-GD can avoid local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the fluid collection, it can have direct access to the fluid cavity, unlike percutaneous drainage which traverses the abdominal wall. Complications such as bleeding, inadvertent puncture of adjacent viscera, secondary infection and prolonged periods of drainage with resultant pancreatico-cutaneous fistulae may be avoided. The only difference between EUS and non-EUS drainage is the initial step, namely, gaining access to the pancreatic fluid collection. All the subsequent steps are similar, i.e., insertion of guide-wires with fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilatation of the cystogastrostomy and insertion of

  10. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  11. WFUMB guidelines and recommendations for clinical use of ultrasound elastography: Part 1: basic principles and terminology.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Palmeri, Mark L; Hall, Timothy J; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Barr, Richard G; Castera, Laurent; Choi, Byung Ihn; Chou, Yi-Hong; Cosgrove, David; Dietrich, Christoph F; Ding, Hong; Amy, Dominique; Farrokh, Andre; Ferraioli, Giovanna; Filice, Carlo; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Nakashima, Kazutaka; Schafer, Fritz; Sporea, Ioan; Suzuki, Shinichi; Wilson, Stephanie; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-05-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images of the anatomy (as opposed to blood flow) reveal differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues (mainly echogenicity but also, to some extent, attenuation), whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images are able to reveal the differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (e.g., elasticity and viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathologic lesions. Typically, all elasticity measurement and imaging methods introduce a mechanical excitation and monitor the resulting tissue response. Some of the most widely available commercial elasticity imaging methods are 'quasi-static' and use external tissue compression to generate images of the resulting tissue strain (or deformation). In addition, many manufacturers now provide shear wave imaging and measurement methods, which deliver stiffness images based upon the shear wave propagation speed. The goal of this review is to describe the fundamental physics and the associated terminology underlying these technologies. We have included a questions and answers section, an extensive appendix, and a glossary of terms in this manuscript. We have also endeavored to ensure that the terminology and descriptions, although not identical, are broadly compatible across the WFUMB and EFSUMB sets of guidelines on elastography (Bamber et al. 2013; Cosgrove et al. 2013).

  12. Ultrasound dynamic micro-elastography applied to the viscoelastic characterization of soft tissues and arterial walls.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Cédric; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative noninvasive methods that provide in vivo assessment of mechanical characterization of living tissues, organs and artery walls are of interest because information on their viscoelastic properties in the presence of disease can affect diagnosis and treatment options. This article proposes the dynamic micro-elastography (DME) method to characterize viscoelasticity of small homogeneous soft tissues, as well as the adaptation of the method for vascular applications [vascular dynamic micro-elastography (VDME)]. The technique is based on the generation of relatively high-frequency (240-1100 Hz) monochromatic or transient plane shear waves within the medium and the tracking of these waves from radio-frequency (RF) echoes acquired at 25 MHz with an ultrasound biomicroscope (Vevo 770, Visualsonics). By employing a dedicated shear wave gated strategy during signal acquisition, postprocessed RF sequences could achieve a very high frame rate (16,000 images per s). The proposed technique successfully reconstructed shear wave displacement maps at very high axial (60 mum) and lateral (250 mum) spatial resolutions for motions as low as a few mum. An inverse problem formulated as a least-square minimization, involving analytical simulations (for homogenous and vascular geometries) and experimental measurements were performed to retrieve storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli as a function of the shearing frequency. Viscoelasticity measurements of agar-gelatin materials and of a small rat liver were proven feasible. Results on a very thin wall (3 mm thickness) mimicking artery enabled to validate the feasibility and the reliability of the vascular inverse problem formulation. Subsequently, the G' and G'' of a porcine aorta showed that both parameters are strongly dependent on frequency, suggesting that the vascular wall is mechanically governed by complex viscoelastic laws.

  13. [Transabdominal ultrasound examination, contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination and endoscopic ultrasound scanning in the determination of the aetiology and the degree of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Møller Andersen, Anders; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Novovic, Srdan; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Nissen, Flemming Helge; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    A transabdominal ultrasound examination is part of the standard work-up for patients with acute pancreatitis. Transabdominal ultrasound examination displays a high sensitivity for the detection of gallbladder stones. With the recent introduction of contrast enhancement in ultrasound it has become possible to determine the severity of acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound has shown a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of stones in the common bile duct and is an important peroperative surgical tool in endoscopic transgastric necrosectomi as well.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  15. Quantification of pancreatic stiffness on intraoperative ultrasound elastography and evaluation of its relationship with postoperative pancreatic fistula.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Masahide; Watanabe, Jota; Kushihata, Fumiki; Tohyama, Taiji; Kuroda, Taira; Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Kumagi, Teru; Hisano, Yoshiko; Sugita, Atsuro; Takada, Yasutsugu

    2015-03-01

    "Soft pancreas" has often been reported as a predictive factor for postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) after pancreatectomy. However, pancreatic stiffness is judged subjectively by surgeons, without objective criteria. In the present study, pancreatic stiffness was quantified using intraoperative ultrasound elastography, and its relevance to POPF and histopathology was investigated. Forty-one patients (pancreatoduodenectomy, 30; distal pancreatectomy, 11) who underwent intraoperative elastography during pancreatectomy were included. The elastic ratio was determined at the pancreatic resection site (just above the portal vein) and at the remnant pancreas (head or tail). Correlations between the incidence of POPF and patient characteristics, operative variables, and the elastic ratio were examined. In addition, the relationship between the elastic ratio and the percentage of the exocrine gland at the resection stump was investigated. For pancreatoduodenectomy patients, main pancreatic duct diameter < 3.2 mm and elastic ratio < 2.09 were significant risk factors for POPF. In addition, the elastic ratio, but not main pancreatic duct diameter, was significantly associated with the percentage of exocrine gland area at the pancreatic resection stump. Pancreatic stiffness can be quantified using intraoperative elastography. Elastography can be used to diagnose "soft pancreas" and may thus be useful in predicting the occurrence of POPF.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound guided vascular access and therapy (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Lakhtakia, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to develop minimally invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. EUS has now stepped into the therapeutic arena. EUS provides the unique advantage of both real-time imaging and access to structures within and adjacent to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hence, EUS-guided therapeutic techniques continue to evolve in several directions enabling a variety of minimally invasive therapies for pancreatic and biliary pathologies. Furthermore, the close proximity of the GI tract to vascular structures in the mediastinum and abdomen permits EUS-guided vascular access and therapy. Studies have demonstrated several EUS-guided vascular interventions by using standard endoscopic accessories and available tools from the interventional radiology armamentarium. This article provides an overview of the literature including clinical and nonclinical studies for the management of nonvariceal and variceal GI bleeding, formation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IPSS), and EUS-guided cardiac access and therapy. PMID:26374574

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Pancreatobiliary Endoscopy in Surgically Altered Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Lee, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the mainstay of therapy for pancreatobiliary diseases. While ERCP is safe and highly effective in the general population, the procedure remains challenging or impossible in patients with surgically altered anatomy (SAA). Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows transmural access to the bile or pancreatic duct (PD) prior to ductal drainage using ERCP-based techniques. Also known as endosonography-guided cholangiopancreatography (ESCP), the procedure provides multiple advantages over overtube-assisted enteroscopy ERCP or percutaneous or surgical approaches. However, the procedure should only be performed by endoscopists experienced in both EUS and ERCP and with the proper tools. In this review, various EUS-guided diagnostic and therapeutic drainage techniques in patients with SAA are examined. Detailed step-by-step procedural descriptions, technical tips, feasibility, and safety data are also discussed. PMID:27894187

  18. A Coupled Subsample Displacement Estimation Method for Ultrasound-Based Strain Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining accurate displacement estimates along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for several clinical applications such as shear strain imaging, modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging, where a full description of the two or three dimensional (2D/3D) deformation field is required. In this study we propose an improved speckle tracking algorithm where axial and lateral motion estimations are simultaneously performed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, using conventional ultrasound echo data, this algorithm first finds an iso-contour in the vicinity of the peak correlation between two segments of the pre- and post-deformation ultrasound radiofrequency echo data. The algorithm then attempts to find the center of the iso-contour of the correlation function that corresponds to the unknown (sub-sample) motion vector between these two segments of echo data. This algorithm has been tested using computer-simulated data, studies with a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results show that the method improves the accuracy of both lateral and axial tracking. Such improvements are more significant when the deformation is small or along the lateral direction. Results from the tissue-mimicking phantom study are consistent with findings observed in computer simulations. Using in vivo breast lesion data we found that, compared to the 2D quadratic subsample displacement estimation methods, higher quality axial strain and shear strain images (e.g. 18.6% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for shear strain images) can be obtained for large deformations (up to 5% frame-to-frame and 15% local strains) in a multi-compression technique. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could improve the image quality of ultrasound-based strain elastography (SE) with current clinical equipment. PMID

  19. A coupled subsample displacement estimation method for ultrasound-based strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining accurate displacement estimates along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for several clinical applications such as shear strain imaging, modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging, where a full description of the two or three-dimensional (2D/3D) deformation field is required. In this study we propose an improved speckle tracking algorithm where axial and lateral motion estimations are simultaneously performed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, using conventional ultrasound echo data, this algorithm first finds an iso-contour in the vicinity of the peak correlation between two segments of the pre- and post-deformation ultrasound radiofrequency echo data. The algorithm then attempts to find the center of the iso-contour of the correlation function that corresponds to the unknown (sub-sample) motion vector between these two segments of echo data. This algorithm has been tested using computer-simulated data, studies with a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results show that the method improves the accuracy of both lateral and axial tracking. Such improvements are more significant when the deformation is small or along the lateral direction. Results from the tissue-mimicking phantom study are consistent with findings observed in computer simulations. Using in vivo breast lesion data we found that, compared to the 2D quadratic subsample displacement estimation methods, higher quality axial strain and shear strain images (e.g. 18.6% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for shear strain images) can be obtained for large deformations (up to 5% frame-to-frame and 15% local strains) in a multi-compression technique. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could improve the image quality of ultrasound-based strain elastography with current clinical equipment.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer: innovative applications beyond the basics

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Joseph; Kistler, C. Andrew; Yan, Linda; Dargan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become a mainstay in assisting in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. In addition, EUS provides a modality to treat chronic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis. Currently, there is growing data and utilization of EUS in more diverse and innovative applications aimed at providing more sophisticated diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic options for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS delivery of chemotherapy, viral and biological vectors and fiducial markers may eventually revolutionize the way clinicians approach the care of a patient with pancreatic cancer. PMID:28078128

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Oncologic Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the early 1990s, its application has been extended to various diseases. For pancreatic cancer, EUS-FNA can obtain specimens from the tumor itself with fewer complications than other methods. Interventional EUS enables various therapeutic options: local ablation, brachytherapy, placement of fiducial markers for radiotherapy, and direct injection of antitumor agents into cancer. This paper will focus on EUS-guided oncologic therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23533319

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound: A quantification method

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Dong, Yi; Froehlich, Eckhart; Hocke, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been recently standardized by guidelines and recommendations. The European Federation of Societies for US in Medicine and Biology position paper describes the use for DCE-US. Comparatively, little is known about the use of contrast-enhanced endoscopic US (CE-EUS). This current paper reviews and discusses the clinical use of CE-EUS and DCE-US. The most important clinical use of DCE-US is the prediction of tumor response to new drugs against vascular angioneogenesis. PMID:28218195

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

  5. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result.

  6. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  7. Validation of Ultrasound Elastography Imaging for Nondestructive Characterization of Stiffer Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoyan; Goss, Monika; Hernandez, Christopher; Mansour, Joseph M; Exner, Agata

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound elastography (UE) has been widely used as a "digital palpation" tool to characterize tissue mechanical properties in the clinic. UE benefits from the capability of noninvasively generating 2-D elasticity encoded maps. This spatial distribution of elasticity can be especially useful in the in vivo assessment of tissue engineering scaffolds and implantable drug delivery platforms. However, the detection limitations have not been fully characterized and thus its true potential has not been completely discovered. Characterization studies have focused primarily on the range of moduli corresponding to soft tissues, 20-600 kPa. However, polymeric biomaterials used in biomedical applications such as tissue scaffolds, stents, and implantable drug delivery devices can be much stiffer. In order to explore UE's potential to assess mechanical properties of biomaterials in a broader range of applications, this work investigated the detection limit of UE strain imaging beyond soft tissue range. To determine the detection limit, measurements using standard mechanical testing and UE on the same polydimethylsiloxane samples were compared and statistically evaluated. The broadest detection range found based on the current optimized setup is between 47 kPa and 4 MPa which exceeds the modulus of normal soft tissue suggesting the possibility of using this technique for stiffer materials' mechanical characterization. The detectable difference was found to be as low as 157 kPa depending on sample stiffness and experimental setup.

  8. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  9. Transient MR elastography (t-MRE) using ultrasound radiation force: theory, safety, and initial experiments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rares; Beuf, Olivier; Milot, Laurent; Grenier, Denis; Lyonnet, Denis; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility of using ultrasound radiation force as a safe vibration source for transient MR elastography (t-MRE). We present a theoretical framework to predict the phase shift of the complex MRE signal, the temperature elevation due to ultrasound, and safety indicators (I(SPPA), I(SPTA), MI). Next, we report wave images acquired in porcine liver samples in vitro. MR thermometry was used to estimate the temperature elevation induced by ultrasound. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results with regard to the feasibility of using radiation force for t-MRE in a clinical setting, and a specific echo-planar imaging (EPI) MRE sequence is proposed.

  10. The AutoQual ultrasound elastography method for quantitative assessment of lateral strain in post-rupture Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Phillip G; Alsousou, Joseph; Cooper, Ashley; Thompson, Mark S; Noble, J Alison

    2013-10-18

    This paper presents the AutoQual elastography method: a novel algorithm that improves the quality of 2D displacement field calculation from ultrasound radio frequency (RF) sequences of acutely ruptured Achilles tendons to determine image-lateral strain fields and has potential use for ligaments and muscles. This method uses 2D bicubic spline interpolation of the RF signal, Quality Determined Search, Automatic Search Range and Adaptive Block Size components as a novel combination that is designed to improve continuity and decrease displacement field noise, especially in areas of low signal strength. We present a simple experiment for quantitatively comparing the AutoQual method to a multiscale (MS) elastography method from ultrasound RF sequences of a 5% agar phantom for rigid body motion and known lateral strain loads with speeds up to 5mm/s. We finally present examples of four in vivo Achilles tendons in various damage states and with manual or artificially controlled passive flexion of the foot. Results show that the AutoQual method offers a substantial improvement on the MS method, achieving similar performance for rigid body tracking at all speeds, a lower normalized square error at all strains induced and a more continuous strain field at higher compression rates. AutoQual also showed a greater average normalized cross correlation for image blocks in the area of interest, a lower standard deviation of the strain field and a visually more acceptable point tracking for in vivo examples. This work demonstrates lateral ultrasound elastography which is robust to the complex passive motion of the Achilles and to various imaging artifacts associated with imaging tendon rupture. This method potentially has a wide clinical application for assessing in vivo strains in and hence mechanical function of any near skin surface tissues that are longitudinally loaded.

  11. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (Ispta; 35, 133 and 240 W cm-2) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  12. A PDE-based Regularization Algorithm toward Reducing Speckle Tracking Noise: A Feasibility Study for Ultrasound Breast Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Xu, Yan; Xu, Zhengfu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining accurate ultrasonically-estimated displacements along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for various clinical elastography applications (e.g. modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging). In this study, a partial differential equation (PDE)-based regularization algorithm was proposed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, the proposed PDE-based algorithm, utilizing two-dimensional displacement estimates from a conventional elastography system, attempted to iteratively reduce noise contained in the original displacement estimates by mathematical regularization. In this study, the physical constraint used by the above-mentioned mathematical regularization was tissue incompressibility. This proposed algorithm was tested using computer-simulated data, a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results showed that the method significantly improved the accuracy of lateral tracking (e.g. 17X at 0.5% compression). From in vivo breast lesion data investigated, we have found that, as compared to the conventional method, higher quality axial and lateral strain images (e.g. at least 78% improvements among the estimated contrast-to-noise ratios of lateral strain images) were obtained. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could be useful to improve the image quality for ultrasound elastography with current clinical equipment as a post-processing tool. PMID:25452434

  13. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-07

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (I(spta); 35, 133 and 240 W cm(-2)) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  14. Ultrasonic Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, Rémi

    Elastography is a new ultrasound-based imaging technique that provides images (called elastograms) of internal strain in soft tissues under a static compression. The strain is related to the stiffness of the tissues, which is in turn related to the pathological state of tissues. For example, it has been known for long that breast and prostate cancer are stiffer than normal tissues, and palpation is a standard medical practice.

  15. Carotid plaque elasticity estimation using ultrasound elastography, MRI, and inverse FEA - A numerical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwstadt, H A; Fekkes, S; Hansen, H H G; de Korte, C L; van der Lugt, A; Wentzel, J J; van der Steen, A F W; Gijsen, F J H

    2015-08-01

    The material properties of atherosclerotic plaques govern the biomechanical environment, which is associated with rupture-risk. We investigated the feasibility of noninvasively estimating carotid plaque component material properties through simulating ultrasound (US) elastography and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and solving the inverse problem with finite element analysis. 2D plaque models were derived from endarterectomy specimens of nine patients. Nonlinear neo-Hookean models (tissue elasticity C1) were assigned to fibrous intima, wall (i.e., media/adventitia), and lipid-rich necrotic core. Finite element analysis was used to simulate clinical cross-sectional US strain imaging. Computer-simulated, single-slice in vivo MR images were segmented by two MR readers. We investigated multiple scenarios for plaque model elasticity, and consistently found clear separations between estimated tissue elasticity values. The intima C1 (160 kPa scenario) was estimated as 125.8 ± 19.4 kPa (reader 1) and 128.9 ± 24.8 kPa (reader 2). The lipid-rich necrotic core C1 (5 kPa) was estimated as 5.6 ± 2.0 kPa (reader 1) and 8.5 ± 4.5 kPa (reader 2). A scenario with a stiffer wall yielded similar results, while realistic US strain noise and rotating the models had little influence, thus demonstrating robustness of the procedure. The promising findings of this computer-simulation study stimulate applying the proposed methodology in a clinical setting.

  16. Evaluation of Post-stroke Spastic Muscle Stiffness Using Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Ho, Yu-Chun; Hsiao, Ming-Yen; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2017-03-09

    Current clinical evaluations of post-stroke upper limb spasticity are subjective and qualitative. We proposed a quantitative measurement of post-stroke spastic muscle stiffness by using shear-wave ultrasound elastography and tested its reliability. Acoustic radiation force impulse with shear wave velocity (SWV) detection was used to evaluate stiffness of the biceps brachii muscles at 90° and 0° elbow flexion. In 21 control subjects, SWV did not significantly differ between dominant and non-dominant sides at either flexion angle (0°: p = 0.311, 90°: p = 0.436). In 31 patients who had recent stroke, SWV was significantly greater on the paretic side than on the non-paretic side at both 90° (2.23 ± 0.15 m/s vs. 1.88 ± 0.08 m/s, p = 0.036) and 0° (3.28 ± 0.11 m/s vs. 2.93 ± 0.06 m/s, p = 0.002). The physical appearance of arms and forearms of our patients and controls prevented blinding of the rater to paretic or non-paretic side. At 90°, SWV on the paretic side correlated positively with modified Ashworth scale and modified Tardieu scale (spasticity severity) and negatively with Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement score (motor function impairment). The intra-class correlation coefficients of intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for SWV measurements were classified as excellent. In conclusion, high SWV was associated with high spasticity and poor function of the post-stroke upper limb, suggesting possible use as a reliable quantitative measure for disease progression and treatment follow-up.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in the papilla and the periampullary region.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Cecilia

    2010-08-16

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) provides relevant information when an ampullary or periampullary tumor is suspected. Early detection, T and N staging and Fine Needle Aspiration plus cithologic confirmation, are some of the expected benefits. Exclusion of benign findings like choledocholithiasis or chronic pancreatitis is also important. A correct understanding of the complex ampullary and periampullary anatomy is needed. Knowledge of the individual clinical history and other previous diagnostic images all contribute to a successful EUS examination. Radial and lineal EUS images are uniquely detailed and, at the moment, it seems to be the best way to exclude or confirm malignant or benign findings. We propose a procedural algorithm, including EUS, for suspected ampullary or periampullary tumors. This review summarizes the vast amount of information to be found spread in the literature, and recognizes this small anatomic area as the origin for a clinical entity with proper clinical presentation, proper imaging and proper therapeutic resolutions. The benefits of performing EUS for its study are highlighted.

  18. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle injection for oncological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jeremy; Khalid, Amaara; Cosgrove, Natalie; Soomro, Ayesha; Mazhar, Syed Mohsin; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness and precision of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has lead to both its widespread use as a diagnostic and staging modality for gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary malignancies, and to its expanding role as a therapeutic modality. EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis is now a well-accepted modality for palliation of pain in patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided ablation, brachytherapy, fiducial marker placement, and antitumor agent injection have been described as methods of performing minimally invasive oncological therapy. EUS-fine needle injection may be performed as adjunctive, alternative, or palliative treatment. This review summarizes the studies to date that have described these methods. A literature search using the PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed. While most published studies to date are limited with disappointing outcomes, the concept of a role of EUS in oncological therapy seems promising. PMID:26691224

  20. Duplication cysts: Diagnosis, management, and the role of endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Roy; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplication cysts are rare congenital gastrointestinal malformation in young patients and adults. They consist of foregut duplication cysts, small bowel duplication cysts, and large bowel duplication cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used as a modality for the evaluation and diagnosis of duplication cysts. EUS is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate duplication cysts since it can distinguish between solid and cystic lesions. The question of whether or not to perform EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) on a lesion suspected of being a duplication cyst is controversial as these lesions can become infected with significant consequences, although EUS-FNA is often required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to rule out more ominous lesions. This manuscript will review the literature on duplication cysts throughout the body and will also focus on the role of EUS and FNA with regards to these lesions.

  1. Clinical effects of eosinophilic esophagitis observed using endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Abe, Yoko; Saito, Akiko; Imbe, Koh; Hoshi, Koki; Igarashi, Ryo

    2014-08-01

    A 50-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for dysphagia and several episodes of esophageal food impaction during the prior three months. Complete blood count and basic biochemical tests were normal. No eosinophilia was found. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed the presence of concentric rings (esophageal "trachealization") and stenosis along the middle and distal esophagus. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed circumferential thickening of all layers in the same part. Cytopathologic evaluation of a specimen obtained by endoscopic biopsy of the thickened area in the distal esophagus showed eosinophilic infiltration (20 eosinophils per high-powered field). She was diagnosed as having eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Topical steroid therapy was started. A tendency of dysphagia for relief and improvement of characteristic EGD findings began early, but wall thickening in EUS remained. Past reports of the related literature have described that thickness of submucosa and muscularis propria remained after therapy, although significant reduction in the mucosal thickness was provided by short-term steroid therapy. One explanation for early relapse is insufficient reduction in the submucosa and muscularis propria. Consequently, our patient was given steroids until thickness on EUS improved. EUS is regarded as useful for evaluating the curative effect in patients with EoE.

  2. Technical tips for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takeshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Interventional procedures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) have recently been developed. For biliary drainage, EUS-guided trans-luminal drainage has been reported. In this procedure, the transduodenal approach for extrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, and the transgastric approach for intrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS). These procedures have several effects, such as internal drainage and avoiding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis, and they are indicated for an inaccessible ampulla of Vater due to duodenal obstruction or surgical anatomy. EUS-HGS has particularly wide indications and clinical impact as an alternative biliary drainage method. In this procedure, it is necessary to dilate the fistula, and several devices and approaches have been reported. Stent selection is also important. In previous reports, the overall technical success rate was 82% (221/270), the clinical success rate was 97% (218/225), and the overall adverse event rate for EUS-HGS was 23% (62/270). Adverse events of EUS-biliary drainage are still high compared with ERCP or PTCD. EUS-HGS should continue to be performed by experienced endoscopists who can use various strategies when adverse events occur. PMID:27099437

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions in special situations

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was introduced in 1982 and has since become a popular advanced procedure for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Initially, EUS was most commonly used for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases and tissue acquisition. EUS was first used for guided cholangiography in 1996, followed by EUS-guided biliary drainage in 2001. Advancements in equipment and endoscopic accessories have led to an expansion of EUS-guided procedures, which now include EUS-guided drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses or collections, intra-vascular treatment of refractory variceal and nonvariceal bleeding, transmural pancreatic drainage, common bile duct stone clearance, enteral feeding tube placement and entero-enteric anastomosis. Patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomies have greatly benefited from EUS also. This systematic review describes and discusses EUS procedures performed in uncommon diseases and conditions, as well as applications on more vulnerable patients such as young children and pregnant women. In these cases, routine approaches do not always apply, and thus may require the use of innovative and unconventional techniques. Increased knowledge of such special applications will help increase the success rates of these procedures and provide a foundation for additional advances and utilizations of the technique. PMID:26839650

  4. Endoscopic Ultrasound Does Not Accurately Stage Early Adenocarcinoma or High-Grade Dysplasia of the Esophagus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    MeSH search terms: " endoscopic ultrasound," "Barrett’s esophagus ," "adeno· carcinoma," "Barrett’s esophagus and high grade dyspla.c;ia...adenocarcinoma of the esophagus ; EMR, endoscopic mucosal resection; EUS, endoscopic ul- trasound; HGD, high-grade dysplasia. <D 2010 by the AGA Institute... esophagus and early adenocarcinoma found EUS examination to have perfecr accuracy for differentiating Tl CLINICAL GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY Vol

  5. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners.

  6. Diagnostic Criteria and Accuracy of Categorizing Malignant Thyroid Nodules by Ultrasonography and Ultrasound Elastography with Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Naglaa Mostafa; Elkhatib, Yasser Atta

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common medical and surgical concern. Thyroid ultrasound (US) is the primary imaging modality used for initial evaluation and assortment of nodules for fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology/biopsy. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is believed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of US in distinguishing benign from malignant nodules. The aim of the work described here is to evaluate the diagnostic criteria and accuracy of US and USE in the diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules. A prospective study of 88 patients who have thyroid nodules was performed. US, color Doppler, and USE were evaluated using a Philips iU22 equipped with a 5 to 12 MHz, linear transducer, followed by FNA of the each scanned nodule. The most sensitive US criteria for malignant nodules were a height-to-width ratio greater than one and the absence of a halo sign (sensitivity 0.875% and 1.000%, respectively). The most specific criteria for malignancy were a spiculated/blurred margin and the presence of microcalcifications (specificity 0.968% and 0.888%, respectively). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the cutoff diagnostic criteria of malignancy are two US characteristics and an elastography score of 4. The diagnostic accuracy of US for malignant thyroid nodules increases by combining US and USE.

  7. Solid hypo-echoic thyroid nodules on ultrasound: the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Zhang, Jin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study described here was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant solid hypo-echoic thyroid nodules (SHTNs) on ultrasound. In this retrospective study, 183 histologically proven SHTNs in 159 patients were enrolled. Conventional US, as well as Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI) and Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTQ) of ARFI elastography, was performed on each nodule. The VTI features of SHTNs were divided into six grades, where higher grades represent harder tissue. VTQ was expressed as shear wave velocity, where higher shear wave velocity values indicate stiffer tissue. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and Youden index for ultrasound and ARFI were assessed. The 183 pathologically proven SHTNs included 117 benign and 66 malignant lesions. Nodules classified as VTI grades IV to VI were more frequently malignant (49/66, 74.2%) than benign (10/117, 8.5%) (p < 0.001). The mean shear wave velocity of VTQ for malignant SHTNs (mean ± standard deviation, 4.65 ± 2.68 m/s; range, 1.36-9 m/s) was significantly higher than that for benign SHTNs (2.34 ± 0.85 m/s, 0-5.7 m/s) (p < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and Youden index were 27.3%-84.8%, 13.7%-89.7%, 39.3%-69.4%, 35.7%-60%, 61.5%-78.5%, and -0.015 to 0.37 for ultrasound; 68.2%, 76.9%, 73.8%, 62.5%, 81.1% and 0.451 for VTQ; and 74.2%, 91.5%, 85.2%, 83.1%, 86.3% and 0.657 for VTI, respectively. ARFI elastography performed at a superior level, compared with conventional ultrasound, in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign SHTNs. The diagnostic performance of VTI is higher than that of VTQ.

  8. Development of oil-in-gelatin phantoms for viscoelasticity measurement in ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Man M; Zhou, Shiwei; Robert, Jean-Luc; Shamdasani, Vijay; Xie, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Because tissues consist of solid and fluid materials, their mechanical properties should be characterized in terms of both elasticity and viscosity. Although the elastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms have been extensively studied and well characterized in commercially available phantoms, their viscous properties have not been fully investigated. In this article, a set of 14 tissue-mimicking phantoms with different concentrations of gelatin and castor oil were fabricated and characterized in terms of acoustic and viscoelastic properties. The results indicate that adding castor oil to gelatin phantoms decreases shear modulus, but increases shear wave dispersion. For 3% gelatin phantoms containing 0%, 10%, 20% and 40% oil, the measured shear moduli are 2.01 ± 0.26, 1.68 ± 0.25, 1.10 ± 0.22 and 0.88 ± 0.17 kPa, and the Voigt-model coupled shear viscosities are 0.60 ± 0.11, 0.89 ± 0.07, 1.05 ± 0.11 and 1.06 ± 0.13 Pa·s, respectively. The results also confirm that increasing the gelatin concentration increases shear modulus. For phantoms containing 3%, 4%, 5%, 6% and 7% gelatin, the measured shear moduli are 2.01 ± 0.26, 3.10 ± 0.34, 4.18 ± 0.84, 8.05 ± 1.00 and 10.24 ± 1.80 kPa at 0% oil and 1.10 ± 0.22, 1.97 ± 0.20, 3.13 ± 0.63, 4.60 ± 0.60 and 8.43 ± 1.39 kPa at 20% oil, respectively. The phantom recipe developed in this study can be used in validating ultrasound shear wave elastography techniques for soft tissues.

  9. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  10. Real-time 1-D/2-D transient elastography on a standard ultrasound scanner using mechanically induced vibration.

    PubMed

    Azar, Reza Zahiri; Dickie, Kris; Pelissier, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Transient elastography has been well established in the literature as a means of assessing the elasticity of soft tissue. In this technique, tissue elasticity is estimated from the study of the propagation of the transient shear waves induced by an external or internal source of vibration. Previous studies have focused mainly on custom single-element transducers and ultrafast scanners which are not available in a typical clinical setup. In this work, we report the design and implementation of a transient elastography system on a standard ultrasound scanner that enables quantitative assessment of tissue elasticity in real-time. Two new custom imaging modes are introduced that enable the system to image the axial component of the transient shear wave, in response to an externally induced vibration, in both 1-D and 2-D. Elasticity reconstruction algorithms that estimate the tissue elasticity from these transient waves are also presented. Simulation results are provided to show the advantages and limitations of the proposed system. The performance of the system is also validated experimentally using a commercial elasticity phantom.

  11. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: an endoscopic ultrasound based imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S

    2014-02-01

    In patients with portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC), appearance and location of collateral channels depends on extent and location of occlusive thrombus in the porto-mesenteric venous system. If the porto-mesenteric venous system is occluded near the formation of portal vein, blood tends to flow through collateral channels that form varices in and around the common bile duct. Though endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered the investigative modality of choice for evaluating common bile duct obstruction, its role in evaluating collateral pathways in and around the common bile duct is poorly defined. This article reviews the anatomy, genesis and appearance of these collateral pathways in PCC. EUS identifies different layers of the common bile duct (CBD) wall and, in PCC, where varices are in close contact with or part of these different layers, can establish the relationship between them. Thus, EUS appears to be the investigation of choice for tracing the origin and course of collaterals in PCC. Careful study of varices in the common bile duct wall prior to ERCP for bile duct stones or biliary strictures may help to plan the procedure and to manage anticipated complications such as hemobilia.

  12. New developments in endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Arora, Ayush

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has opened new horizons in minimally invasive therapies for diverse gastrointestinal pathologies. Digestive Disease Weak 2015 held in Washington, DC., USA featured exciting research articles on EUS-guided therapeutic procedures. EUS-guided biliary drainage has been attempted and described for many years. There seems to be a lot of interest among various international groups to compare this technique with other alternatives in terms of efficacy and safety. Similarly, EUS-guided pancreatic drainage of cysts and fluid collections continues to evolve with new stents and devices being developed specifically for deployment under endosonographic guidance. EUS-guided ablation of cystic pancreatic tumors is innovative but not always effective. Combining alcohol ablation with injecting chemotherapeutic agents may improve long-term results regarding efficacy. Similarly, for solid pancreatic tumors there appears to be ongoing interest and continuing efforts in injecting different chemotherapeutic or ablative agents, delivering fiducials for radiation guidance and even attempting ablation with radiofrequency. Gastric variceal treatment and EUS-guided anastomoses also continue to be investigated. This review article is focused on the recent developments in EUS-guided therapies presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2015.

  13. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-02-03

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur.

  15. The role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Manoop S.; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra; Saxena, Payal; Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal cancer. Despite a significant advancement in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of PC is nearly identical to the incidence rates. Early detection of tumor or its precursor lesions with dysplasia may be the most effective approach to improve survival. Screening strategies should include identification of the population at high risk of developing PC, and an intense application of screening tools with adequate sensitivity to detect PC at an early curable stage. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem to be the most promising modalities for PC screening based on the data so far. EUS had an additional advantage over MRI by being able to obtain tissue sample during the same examination. Several questions remain unanswered at this time regarding the age to begin screening, frequency of screening, management of asymptomatic pancreatic lesions detected on screening, timing of resection, and extent of surgery and impact of screening on survival. Novel techniques such as needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), along with biomarkers, may be helpful to identify pancreatic lesions with more aggressive malignant potential. Further studies will hopefully lead to the development of strategies combining EUS with other technological/biological advancements that will be cost-effective and have an impact on survival. PMID:26879161

  16. The effects of fatty deposits on the accuracy of the Fibroscan® liver transient elastography ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2012-06-01

    A new generation of ultrasound transient elastography (TE) systems have emerged which exploit the well-known correlation between the liver's pathological and mechanical properties through measurements of the Young's elastic modulus; however, little work has been carried out to examine the effect that fatty deposits may have on the TE measurement accuracy. An investigation was carried out on the effects on the measurement accuracy of a TE ultrasound system, the Fibroscan®, caused by overlaying fat layers of varying thickness on healthy liver-mimicking phantoms, simulating in vivo conditions for obese patients. Furthermore, a steatosis effect similar to that in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was simulated to investigate its effect on the TE system. A range of novel elastography fat-mimicking materials were developed using 6-10 wt% poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel capable of achieving a range of acoustic velocities (1482-1530 m s-1) and attenuation coefficients (0.4-1 dB MHz-1 cm-1) for simulating different liver states. Laboratory-based acoustic velocities and attenuation coefficients were measured while the Young's modulus was established through a gold standard compression testing method. A significant variation of the Young's elastic modulus was measured in healthy phantoms with overlaying fat layers of thicknesses exceeding 45 mm, impinging on the scanners region of interest, overestimating the compression tested values by up to 11 kPa in some cases. Furthermore, Fibroscan® measurements of the steatosis phantoms showed a consistent overestimation (˜54%), which strongly suggests that the speed of sound mismatch between that of liver tissue and that assumed by the scanner is responsible for the high clinical cut-offs established in the case of ALD and NAFLD.

  17. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion.

  18. Noninvasive assessment of the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles using ultrasound real-time tissue elastography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Ishijima, Takahiro; Morise, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles could be estimated by measuring the elasticity of these muscles under several levels of muscle contraction through ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE). Ten healthy men performed submaximal voluntary contractions (MVC) in each manual muscle testing position for the middle deltoid, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, levator scapulae, and rhomboid major. The elasticity of these muscles was measured using ultrasound RTE during the task. The strain ratio of the muscle to an acoustic coupler was calculated as an assessment index of the muscle elasticity. Higher strain ratio values imply lower elasticity. In addition, the electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes attached only to the middle deltoid and upper trapezius. The strain ratios were negatively correlated with the normalized root mean square values for the middle deltoid (r=-0.659, p<0.001) and upper trapezius (r=-0.554, p<0.001). The strain ratios of all the muscles decreased with an increase from 10% MVC force to 30% MVC force. Ultrasound RTE may be useful for noninvasively assessing the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles at certain shoulder positions with low levels of muscle contraction.

  19. Comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE): a novel method for two-dimensional shear elasticity imaging of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2012-09-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear wave speed map (40 × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally, a 2-D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound.

  20. [Strategies for screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk patients: the place of endoscopic ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Béchade, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Screening high-risk individuals with imaging tests, such endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography, can lead to the detection and treatment of predominantly asymptomatic premalignant lesions. These pancreatic lesions consist of resectable, mostly branch-type non invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound features of chronic pancreatitis are highly prevalent in high-risk individuals and these directly correlate with multifocal lobulocentric parenchymal atrophy due to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Long-term, multi-prospective studies are needed to determine if screening for early pancreatic adenocarcinoma and timely intervention results in decreased pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality in high-risk individuals.

  1. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  2. Ultrasound Elastography for Determination of the Age of Venous Thrombi. Evaluation of Thrombus Evolution in Patients After Sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Agnieszka; Popiela, Tadeusz; Walecki, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease involving intravenous clot formation. It may occur spontaneously or after provoking events, such as traumatic injuries to the pelvis, upper and lower extermities, immobilization, intravascular procedures, including venous catheterization or injection. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a rapid and non-invasive technique for evaluation of venous disease. It is a very sensitive method for detection of thrombi, but has some limitations, e.g. inability to distinguish between an old and fresh thrombus. Elastography as a method for evaluation of tissue elasticity and allows more accurate assessment of venous thombosis. The thrombus solidifies significantly during the process of remodeling, thereby changing elasticity, while the tissues located around the vessel remain unchanged. Moreover, the homogeneity of the thrombus is also changed. These factors allow for exact determination of the age of the thrombus depending on changes of its elasticity. Material/Methods The object of this study was to assess thrombus age in patients with saphenous vein insufficiency treated with sclerotherapy. We examined 34 patients, 30 women and 4 men, aged 18–62 years. All short-listed patients with initial 7–8 mm vessel diameter underwent treatment with 3% Aetoxysklerol mixed with CO2 and other respiratory gases. Data acquisition was performed using an Esaote MyLab Twice device with LA523 linear probe. Results On the sixth day after the treatment 31 patients presented uniform, hypoechogenic thrombus in B-mode image. Ultrasound-based elasticity images (elastography) showed significant predominant red and green areas. Blue area was either invisible or appeared in insignificant grade on examined area. The mosaic image of colors appeared on 2 patients. On the fourteenth day of study 21 patients still presented hypoechogenic thrombus, whereas mixed echogenicity of thrombus appeared on 11 patients. On 28 examined patients mosaics of

  3. Building a virtual simulation platform for quasistatic breast ultrasound elastography using open source software: A preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Helminen, Emily; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quasistatic ultrasound elastography (QUE) is being used to augment in vivo characterization of breast lesions. Results from early clinical trials indicated that there was a lack of confidence in image interpretation. Such confidence can only be gained through rigorous imaging tests using complex, heterogeneous but known media. The objective of this study is to build a virtual breast QUE simulation platform in the public domain that can be used not only for innovative QUE research but also for rigorous imaging tests. Methods: The main thrust of this work is to streamline biomedical ultrasound simulations by leveraging existing open source software packages including Field II (ultrasound simulator), VTK (geometrical visualization and processing), FEBio [finite element (FE) analysis], and Tetgen (mesh generator). However, integration of these open source packages is nontrivial and requires interdisciplinary knowledge. In the first step, a virtual breast model containing complex anatomical geometries was created through a novel combination of image-based landmark structures and randomly distributed (small) structures. Image-based landmark structures were based on data from the NIH Visible Human Project. Subsequently, an unstructured FE-mesh was created by Tetgen. In the second step, randomly positioned point scatterers were placed within the meshed breast model through an octree-based algorithm to make a virtual breast ultrasound phantom. In the third step, an ultrasound simulator (Field II) was used to interrogate the virtual breast phantom to obtain simulated ultrasound echo data. Of note, tissue deformation generated using a FE-simulator (FEBio) was the basis of deforming the original virtual breast phantom in order to obtain the postdeformation breast phantom for subsequent ultrasound simulations. Using the procedures described above, a full cycle of QUE simulations involving complex and highly heterogeneous virtual breast phantoms can be accomplished for

  4. Treatment of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Mark Richards, Dafydd; Carr, Nicholas

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transgastric injection of thrombin under endoscopic ultrasound guidance. There has been no recurrence on follow-up CT angiography, and thus complex surgery or endovascular intervention has been avoided.

  5. Accuracy of Tumor Sizing in Breast Cancer: A Comparison of Strain Elastography, 3-D Ultrasound and Conventional B-Mode Ultrasound with and without Compound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Stachs, Angrit; Pandjaitan, Alexander; Martin, Annett; Stubert, Johannes; Hartmann, Steffi; Gerber, Bernd; Glass, Änne

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of strain elastography (SE), 3-D ultrasound (US), B-mode US with compound imaging (CI) and B-mode US without compound imaging for lesion sizing in breast cancer. The prospective study included 93 patients with invasive breast cancer. The largest tumor diameters measured by B-mode US, B-mode US with CI, SE and 3-D US were compared in Bland-Altman plots versus pathology as reference. A general linear model repeated measures (GLM Rep) was applied to investigate factors influencing tumor sizing. All methods underestimated pathologic size, with SE (-0.08 ± 7.7 mm) and 3-D US (-1.4 ± 6.5 mm) having the smallest mean differences from pathology. Bland-Altman plots revealed that B-mode US, B-mode US with CI and 3-D US systematically underestimated large tumor sizes, and only SE was technically comparable to pathology. The study indicates that sonographic underestimation of tumor size occurs mainly in tumors >20 mm; in this subgroup, SE is superior to other ultrasound methods.

  6. A case report of intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound during robotic assisted Heller myotomy for severe esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalek, Mohamed; Abbas, Abbas; Joshi, Virendra; Hariri, Nizar; Kandil, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the best described primary esophageal motility disorder. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered a useful adjunct for grading and establishing the prognosis of these patients. Recent experience using Da Vinci robotic assisted myotomy has demonstrated that this is a safe and effective approach of treatment. The benefit of magnification and three dimensional imaging helps prevent esophageal perforation and identify residual circular muscle fibers. This paper reports the relative efficacy and safety of intraoperative ultrasound during robotic assisted myotomy in a patient with severe achalasia. Intraoperative esophageal endoscopic ultrasound is a safe technique that may improve the success rate of surgery by confirming the adequacy of myotomy, thereby decreasing the likelihood of recurrent symptoms.

  7. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  8. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  9. Forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound-guided NOTES interventions: A study on peritoneoscopic potential

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Uk; Aizan, Hassanuddin; Song, Tae Jun; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Su-Hui; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of diagnostic and therapeutic transgastric (TG) peritoneoscopic interventions with a forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound (FV-EUS). METHODS: This prospective endoscopic experimental study used an animal model. Combined TG peritoneoscopic interventions and EUS examination of the intra-abdominal organs were performed using an FV-EUS on 10 animal models (1 porcine and 9 canine). The procedures carried out include EUS evaluation and endoscopic biopsy of intraperitoneal organs, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA), and argon plasma coagulation (APC) for hemostatic control. The animals were kept alive for 7 d, and then necropsy was performed to evaluate results and complications. RESULTS: In all 10 animals, TG peritoneoscopy, followed by endoscopic biopsy for the liver, spleen, abdominal wall, and omentum, was performed successfully. APC helped control minor bleeding. Visualization of intra-abdominal solid organs with real-time EUS was accomplished with ease. Intraperitoneal EUS-FNA was successfully performed on the liver, spleen, and kidney. Similarly, a successful outcome was achieved with EUS-RFA of the hepatic parenchyma. No adverse events were recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: Peritoneoscopic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) interventions through FV-EUS were feasible in providing evaluation and performing endoscopic procedures. It promises potential as a platform for future EUS-based NOTES. PMID:24222961

  10. Ultrasound shear wave elastography and liver fibrosis: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Joyce Anyona; Verjee, Suleman; Vinayak, Sudhir; Amersi, Farin; Ghesani, Munir

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the accuracy of shear wave elastography (SWE) alone and in combination with aminotransferase platelet ratio index (APRI) score in the staging of liver fibrosis. METHODS A multicenter prospective study was conducted to assess the accuracy of SWE (medians) and APRI to predict biopsy results. The analysis focused on distinguishing the different stages of liver disease, namely, F0 from F1-4, F0-1 from F2-4, F0-2 from F3-4 and F0-3 from F4; F0-F1 from F2-F4 being of primary interest. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was computed using logistic regression model. The role of age, gender and steatosis was also assessed. RESULTS SWE alone accurately distinguished F0-1 from F2-4 with a high probability. The AUROC using SWE alone was 0.91 compared to 0.78 for using the APRI score alone. The APRI score, when used in conjunction with SWE, did not make a significant contribution to the AUROC. SWE and steatosis were the only significant predictors that differentiated F0-1 from F2-4 with an AUROC of 0.944. CONCLUSION Our study validates the use of SWE in the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, the probability of a correct diagnosis is significantly enhanced with the addition of steatosis as a prognostic factor. PMID:28105257

  11. Radiation force of ultrasound as shear wave source in microscopic magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Shadi F.; Ozer, M. Bulent; Xu, Huihui; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2005-09-01

    Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (micro-MRE) is a high-resolution imaging technique for measuring the viscoelastic properties of small synthetic and biological samples. Taking MRE to the microscopic scale requires stronger static fields, stronger magnetic field gradients, higher performance RF coils, and more compact, higher frequency shear wave actuators. Prior work by our group has been conducted at 11.74 T. A needle attached to a vibrating cantilever beam was placed in contact with the surface of the sample to generate shear waves up to 800 Hz. At higher frequencies, the excited shear waves attenuate within an extremely short distance such that only a very small region in the vicinity of the actuator can be studied due to inherent dynamic range limitations. In principle, modulated focused radiation force of US should be able to create a localized shear wave source within the test sample at a distance from the US transducer, thereby enabling micro-MRE probing of the sample at very high frequencies (up to 5 kHz). A confocal US transducer was fabricated to create such a source within the working constraints of the micro-MRE system. Initial feasibility studies are reviewed in this presentation. [Research supported by NIH Grant No. EB004885-01.

  12. Giardia lamblia infection diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Nelson, John J; Eves, Matthew; Boudreaux, Carole

    2007-06-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease worldwide. We report the case of a 59-yr-old male who presented to his primary care physician with complaints of abdominal pain and weight loss. Imaging studies revealed a liver mass and a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the liver mass proved to be benign, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the head of the pancreas showed no evidence of malignancy; however, numerous pear-shaped, binucleated, flagellated organisms morphologically consistent with trophozoites of Giardia lamblia were identified in the specimen. With the increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for sampling of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic lesions, cytopathologists examining such specimens will need to be familiar with the diagnostic characteristics of this protozoal parasite.

  13. A Man with Pancreatic Head Mass Lesion on Endoscopic Ultrasound and Granuloma on Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Neda; Heidarnezhad, Arash; Soheili, Setareh; Mohammad-Alizadeh, Amir Houshang; Nikmanesh, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma is an unlikely malignancy accounting for less than 0.5% of pancreatic tumors. Clinical presentation is often nonspecific and may be clinically misdiagnosed as pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Here we present an Iranian case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a 47-year-old male suffering from jaundice and 20% weight loss. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a mixed echoic mass lesion at the head of pancreas. The patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of solid pancreatic mass and histopathologic diagnosis revealed granuloma. Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy was performed and eventually histological examination showed granuloma that was coherent with the diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma. Primary pancreatic lymphoma is a rare entity presenting with nonspecific symptoms, laboratory and radiological findings. Computed tomography results in combination with clinical and radiological studies generally provide guidance for appropriate investigation. PMID:28100998

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. PMID:27818584

  15. Applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound on biliary, focal liver lesions and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the clinical applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound (CH-EUS) have increased steadily. The development of second-generation ultrasound contrast agents has allowed superior visualization of the microvasculature and tissue perfusion of the target lesion. This methodology has proven useful in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes. In addition, the applicability of CH-EUS has expanded to nonpancreas structures such as biliary, focal liver lesions, and vascular disease. This article focuses primarily on the novel applications of CH-EUS in biliary tract and visceral vascular diseases. PMID:28218196

  16. Non-invasive assessment of human multifidus muscle stiffness using ultrasound shear wave elastography: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Baptiste; Vergari, Claudio; Gad, Hisham; Sandoz, Baptiste; Skalli, Wafa; Laporte, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of numeric data for the mechanical characterization of spine muscles, especially in vivo data. The multifidus muscle is a major muscle for the stabilization of the spine and may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP). Supersonic shear wave elastography (SWE) has not yet been used on back muscles. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the feasibility of ultrasound SWE to measure the elastic modulus of lumbar multifidus muscle in a passive stretching posture and at rest with a repeatable and reproducible method. A total of 10 asymptotic subjects (aged 25.5 ± 2.2 years) participated, 4 females and 6 males. Three operators performed 6 measurements for each of the 2 postures on the right multifidus muscle at vertebral levels L2-L3 and L4-L5. Repeatability and reproducibility have been assessed according to ISO 5725 standard. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for intra- and inter-observer reliability were rated as both excellent [ICC=0.99 and ICC=0.95, respectively]. Reproducibility was 11% at L2-L3 level and 19% at L4-L5. In the passive stretching posture, shear modulus was significantly higher than at rest (µ < 0.05). This preliminary work enabled to validate the feasibility of measuring the shear modulus of the multifidus muscle with SWE. This kind of measurement could be easily introduces into clinical routine like for the medical follow-up of chronic LBP or scoliosis treatments.

  17. Three-dimensional electrode displacement elastography using the Siemens C7F2 fourSight four-dimensional ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Shyam; Fisher, Ted G; Varghese, Tomy; Hall, Timothy J; Jiang, Jingfeng; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; Lee, Fred T

    2008-08-01

    Because ablation therapy alters the elastic modulus of tissues, emerging strain imaging methods may enable clinicians for the first time to have readily available, cost-effective, real-time guidance to identify the location and boundaries of thermal lesions. Electrode displacement elastography is a method of strain imaging tailored specifically to ultrasound-guided electrode-based ablative therapies (e.g., radio-frequency ablation). Here tissue deformation is achieved by applying minute perturbations to the unconstrained end of the treatment electrode, resulting in localized motion around the end of the electrode embedded in tissue. In this article, we present a method for three-dimensional (3D) elastographic reconstruction from volumetric data acquired using the C7F2 fourSight four-dimensional ultrasound transducer, provided by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (Issaquah, WA, USA). Lesion reconstruction is demonstrated for a spherical inclusion centered in a tissue-mimicking phantom, which simulates a thermal lesion embedded in a normal tissue background. Elastographic reconstruction is also performed for a thermal lesion created in vitro in canine liver using radio-frequency ablation. Postprocessing is done on the acquired raw radio-frequency data to form surface-rendered 3D elastograms of the inclusion. Elastographic volume estimates of the inclusion compare reasonably well with the actual known inclusion volume, with 3D electrode displacement elastography slightly underestimating the true inclusion volume.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage versus percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baniya, Ramkaji; Upadhaya, Sunil; Madala, Seetharamprasad; Subedi, Subash Chandra; Shaik Mohammed, Tabrez; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    The failure rate of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for biliary cannulation is approximately 6%–7% in cases of obstructive jaundice. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is the procedure of choice in such cases. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD) is a novel technique that allows biliary drainage by echoendoscopy and fluoroscopy using a stent from the biliary tree to the gastrointestinal tract. Information in PubMed, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane review were analyzed to obtain studies comparing EGBD and PTBD. Six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Technical (odds ratio (OR): 0.34; confidence interval (CI) 0.10–1.14; p=0.05) and clinical (OR: 1.48; CI 0.46–4.79; p=0.51) success rates were not statistically significant between the EGBD and PTBD groups. Mild adverse events were nonsignificantly different (OR: 0.36; CI 0.10–1.24; p=0.11) but not the moderate-to-severe adverse events (OR: 0.16; CI 0.08–0.32; p≤0.00001) and total adverse events (OR: 0.34; CI 0.20–0.59; p≤0.0001). EGBD is equally effective but safer than PTBD.

  19. The Expanding Role of Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound in Pancreatobiliary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong Wan

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been described as a good imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases. However, differential diagnosis of certain lesions based only on B-mode ultrasound images can be challenging. Clinical use of ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the utility of EUS from that of detection to characterization of pancreatobiliary lesions based on the enhancement features of contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS). Current low mechanical index techniques for CE-EUS using second-generation contrast agents have a number of distinct advantages over conventional diagnostic modalities in evaluating pancreatobiliary lesions, including real-time assessment of perfusion pattern, availability, and the absence of exposure to radiation. This article describes the technical aspects of CE-EUS and reviews the expanding indications in pancreatobiliary diseases and further development of this technique. PMID:26503571

  20. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for chronic liver disease: comparison with ultrasound-based scores of experienced radiologists, Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate whether acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography provides better diagnostic performance for diagnosis of chronic liver disease and correlates better with Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests, compared with an ultrasound (US) scoring system based on visual assessment of conventional B-mode US images by experienced radiologists. Five hundred and twenty-one patients with clinically proven chronic liver disease (n = 293), fatty liver (n = 95) or normal liver (n = 133) were included in this study. B-mode liver US and ARFI elastography were performed in all patients. ARFI elastography was performed at least five times, with each measurement obtained at a different area of the right hepatic lobe; mean shear wave velocity (SWV) was calculated for each patient. The mean SWV was compared with US-based scores from two radiologists (based on liver surface nodularity, parenchyma echotexture and hepatic vein contour), Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests. The mean SWV of the normal liver group was 1.08 m/s ± 0.15; of the fatty liver group, 1.02 m/s ± 0.16; and of the chronic liver disease group, 1.66 m/s ± 0.60 (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the mean SWV in ARFI elastography was significantly higher than that of the conventional B-mode US-based scores by two radiologists (0.89 vs. 0.74 and 0.77, p < 0.05), with a sensitivity of 75.4% and a specificity of 89.5% at the cut-off value of 1.22 m/s. The sensitivity of the mean SWV was significantly higher than the US-based scores (p < 0.001), although the specificity was not (p > 0.05). The mean SWV was better correlated with Child-Pugh scores and all liver function tests (except total protein) than the US-based scores from two radiologists. In conclusion, ARFI elastography showed better diagnostic performance than visual assessment of experienced radiologists for diagnosis of chronic liver disease, as well as for

  1. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation therapy for tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ying; Li, Zhao-Shen; Jin, Zhen-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has evolved into a useful therapeutic tool for treating a broad range of tumors since being introduced into clinical practice as a diagnostic modality nearly three decades ago. In particular, EUS-guided fine-needle injection has proven a successful minimally invasive approach for treating benign lesions such as pancreatic cysts, relieving pancreatic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis, and controlling local tumor growth of unresectable malignancies by direct delivery of anti-tumor agents. One such ablative agent, ethanol, is capable of safely ablating solid or cystic lesions in hepatic tissues via percutaneous injection. Recent research and clinical interest has focused on the promise of EUS-guided ethanol ablation as a safe and effective method for treating pancreatic tumor patients with small lesions or who are poor operative candidates. Although it is not likely to replace radical resection of localized lesions or systemic treatment of metastatic tumors in all patients, EUS-guided ablation is an ideal method for patients who refuse or are not eligible for surgery. Moreover, this treatment modality may play an active role in the development of future pancreatic tumor treatments. This article reviews the most recent clinical applications of EUS-guided ethanol ablation in humans for treating pancreatic cystic tumors, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and metastatic lesions. PMID:23801831

  3. The role of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) allows characterization, differentiation, and staging of focal pancreatic masses. The method has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma which is visualized as hypo-enhanced as compared to the rest of the parenchyma while chronic pancreatitis and neuroendocrine tumors are generally either iso-enhanced or hyper-enhanced. The development of contrast-enhanced low mechanical index harmonic imaging techniques used in real time during endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allowed perfusion imaging and the quantification of intensity of the contrast signal through time-intensity curve analysis. Thus, contrast harmonic imaging-EUS has been used to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on lower values of the peak enhancement. Future applications of CE-EUS in pancreatic adenocarcinoma include not only use of targeted contrast agents for early detection, tridimensional and fusion techniques for enhanced staging and resectability assessment but also novel applications of perfusion imaging for monitoring ablative therapy, improved local detection through EUS-guided sampling of portal vein flow or enhanced drug delivery through sonoporation and ultrasound-induced release of the drugs locally. PMID:28000627

  4. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Cannon, L.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 µm Al2O3 and 3 µm Al2O3, were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s-1, respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  5. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Isolated Gastric Cavernous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinlong; Sao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma is extremely rare in the stomach. Historically, endoscopy, computed tomography and MRI had been used to diagnose gastric cavernous haemangioma. Biopsy, is not an option due to its vascular nature and submucosal location. We report an isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma that was diagnosed by end-oscopic ultrasound in a 25-year-old male and treated by laparotomy. The final diagnosis of cavernous haemagioma was confirmed by post-operative pathology. There was no recurrence during 3-month follow-up period. PMID:27790564

  6. The role of viscosity estimation for oil-in-gelatin phantom in shear wave based ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Dong, Changfeng; Yin, Yin; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Zheng, Yi; Shen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Tianfu; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping

    2015-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastography utilizes mechanical excitation or acoustic radiation force to induce shear waves in deep tissue. The tissue response is monitored to obtain elasticity information about the tissue. During the past two decades, tissue elasticity has been extensively studied and has been used in clinical disease diagnosis. However, biological soft tissues are viscoelastic in nature. Therefore, they should be simultaneously characterized in terms of elasticity and viscosity. In this study, two shear wave-based elasticity imaging methods, shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) and acoustic radiation force impulsive (ARFI) imaging, were compared. The discrepancy between the measurements obtained by the two methods was analyzed, and the role of viscosity was investigated. To this end, four types of gelatin phantoms containing 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% castor oil were fabricated to mimic different viscosities of soft tissue. For the SDUV method, the shear elasticity μ1 was 3.90 ± 0.27 kPa, 4.49 ± 0.16 kPa, 2.41 ± 0.33 kPa and 1.31 ± 0.09 kPa; and the shear viscosity μ2 was 1.82 ± 0.31 Pa•s, 2.41 ± 0.35 Pa•s, 2.65 ± 0.13 Pa•s and 2.89 ± 0.14 Pa•s for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively in both cases. For the ARFI measurements, the shear elasticity μ was 7.30 ± 0.20 kPa, 8.20 ± 0.31 kPa, 7.42 ± 0.21 kPa and 5.90 ± 0.36 kPa for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively. The SDUV results demonstrated that the elasticity first increased from 0% to 20% oil and then decreased for the 30% and 40% oil. The viscosity decreased consistently as the concentration of castor oil increased from 0% to 40%. The elasticity measured by ARFI showed the same trend as that of the SDUV but exceeded the results measured by SDUV. To clearly validate the impact of viscosity on the elasticity estimation, an independent measurement of the elasticity and viscosity by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was conducted on these four types of gelatin

  7. Estimation of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel mechanical properties with four ultrasound elastography methods and comparison with gold standard testings.

    PubMed

    Fromageau, Jérémie; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Schmitt, Cédric; Maurice, Roch L; Mongrain, Rosaire; Cloutier, Guy

    2007-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are very useful in the field of tissue characterization and essential in elastography for the purpose of validating motion estimators. This study is dedicated to the characterization of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel (PVA-C) for these types of applications. A strict fabrication procedure was defined to optimize the reproducibility of phantoms having a similar elasticity. Following mechanical stretching tests, the phantoms were used to compare the accuracy of four different elastography methods. The four methods were based on a one-dimensional (1-D) scaling factor estimation, on two different implementations of a 2-D Lagrangian speckle model estimator (quasistatic elastography methods), and on a 1-D shear wave transient elastography technique (dynamic method). Young's modulus was investigated as a function of the number of freeze-thaw cycles of PVA-C, and of the concentration of acoustic scatterers. Other mechanical and acoustic parameters-such as the speed of sound, shear wave velocity, mass density, and Poisson's ratio-also were assessed. The Poisson's ratio was estimated with good precision at 0.499 for all samples, and the Young's moduli varied in a range of 20 kPa for one freeze-thaw cycle to 600 kPa for 10 cycles. Nevertheless, above six freeze-thaw cycles, the results were less reliable because of sample geometry artifacts. However, for the samples that underwent less than seven freeze-thaw cycles, the Young's moduli estimated with the four elastography methods showed good matching with the mechanical tensile tests with a regression coefficient varying from 0.97 to 1.07, and correlations R2 varying from 0.93 to 0.99, depending on the method.

  8. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  9. Assessing Age-Related Changes in the Biomechanical Properties of Rabbit Lens Using a Coaligned Ultrasound and Optical Coherence Elastography System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Wang, Shang; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Liu, Chih-hao; Aglyamov, Salavat; Emelianov, Stanislav; Manns, Fabrice; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the capability of a novel, coaligned focused ultrasound and phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (US-OCE) system to assess age-related changes in biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens in situ. Methods. Low-amplitude elastic deformations in young and mature rabbit lenses were measured by an US-OCE system consisting of a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system coaligned with a focused ultrasound system used to produce a transient force on the lens surface. Uniaxial compressional tests were used to validate the OCE data. Results. The OCE measurements showed that the maximum displacements of the young rabbit lenses were significantly larger than those of the mature lenses, indicating a gradual increase of the lens stiffness with age. Temporal analyses of the displacements also demonstrate a similar trend of elastic properties in these lenses. The stress-strain measurements using uniaxial mechanical tests confirmed the results obtained by the US-OCE system. Conclusions. The results demonstrate that the US-OCE system can be used for noninvasive analysis and quantification of lens biomechanical properties in situ and possibly in vivo. PMID:25613945

  10. The Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound in the Diagnosis and Management of Primary Gastric Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schizas, Dimitrios; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tsilimigras, Diamantis I.; Scotiniotis, Ilias

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered a valuable diagnostic tool during the workup of malignant gastric lesions, including primary gastric lymphomas (PGL). Although endoscopy combined with multiple biopsies remains essential in the establishment of PGL diagnosis, EUS utilization in locoregional disease staging has been well documented in the literature. Data also support the possible role of EUS in prediction of response to first-line treatment, that is, Helicobacter pylori eradication. However, its application in the posttreatment setting remains problematic, since concordance rates between endosonography and histology findings during follow-up seem to vary substantially. The aim of the present review is to summarize all available data regarding the role of EUS in the management of PGL.

  11. Role of contrast harmonic-endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Incidental pancreatic cysts (PCs) are frequently encountered in the general population often in asymptomatic patients who undergo imaging tests to investigate unrelated conditions. The detection of a PC poses a significant clinical dilemma, as the differential diagnosis is quite broad ranging from benign to malignant conditions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has been reported to be an accurate tool in the differential diagnosis; however, its sensitivity is suboptimal and false negative results do occur. Contrast harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) was demonstrated to be a useful tool to investigate pancreatic solid lesions to differentiate between benign and malignant ones. In the setting of PCs, CH-EUS could help identify areas of malignant growth inside the cystic cavities. Several studies have reported promising results showing malignant areas in PCs as hyperenhanced lesions. Confirmation of malignancy can then be obtained by FNA, which should be precisely targeted according to the findings of the contrast harmonic study. PMID:28218197

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Pancreatic Cystic and Solid Masses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor is one of the most difficult diseases to diagnose and treat because of its anatomical location and characteristics. Recently, there have been several innovative trials on the treatment of pancreatic tumors using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) because it allows selective access to the difficult to reach target organ along the gastrointestinal tract and can differentiate vessels by color Doppler. Among these trials, several have investigated EUS-guided ethanol lavage with or without paclitaxel for pancreatic cystic tumors. These studies show a 33% to 79% complete resolution rate with a favorable safety profile. Compared to EUS-guided ethanol lavage for pancreatic cystic tumors, EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation is considered a less invasive treatment method for pancreatic cancer. Although there are still several difficulties and concerns about complications, one clinical study reported 72.8% feasibility with favorable safety, and therefore, we anticipate the results of ongoing studies with these new less invasive techniques. PMID:26240804

  13. Diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with hypoglicemia and insulinoma suspected

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Acosta-Villavicencio, Gladys Yolanda; Chan, Carlos; Hernández-Calleros, Jorge; Uscanga, Luis; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Noninvasive imaging techniques have shown limitations to identify insulinomas. In few studies reported so far, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has proven to be able to locate lesions. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of computed tomography versus EUS for the detection of insulinomas. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective manner prospectively collected data were analyzed. Patients with hypoglucemia and hyperinsulinemia were included. Diagnostic yield was measured in relationship to sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy. Surgical specimens were considered the gold standard. Results: Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of EUS was 100%, 95.4% and 95.4%, respectively. In the case of CT the sensitivity was 60%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 7%, and accuracy were 68%. Conclusions: EUS is useful in the preoperative assessment of patients with hypoglycemia and serum hyperinsulinemia. PMID:25789285

  14. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype detector system with a CTR better than 240 ps FWHM. We discuss the challenges in simulating such a system and introduce reconstruction algorithms based on graphics processing units (GPU).

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatments: Are we getting evidence based - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Lisotti, Andrea; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Virgilio, Clara; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The continued need to develop less invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. These include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, EUS-guided necrosectomy, EUS-guided cholangiography and biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatography and pancreatic duct drainage, EUS-guided gallbladder drainage, EUS-guided drainage of abdominal and pelvic fluid collections, EUS-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS-guided pancreatic cyst ablation, EUS-guided vascular interventions, EUS-guided delivery of antitumoral agents and EUS-guided fiducial placement and brachytherapy. However these procedures are technically challenging and require expertise in both EUS and interventional endoscopy, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and gastrointestinal stenting. We undertook a systematic review to record the entire body of literature accumulated over the past 2 decades on EUS-guided interventions with the objective of performing a critical appraisal of published articles, based on the classification of studies according to levels of evidence, in order to assess the scientific progress made in this field. PMID:25024600

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound criteria to predict the need for intervention in pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The natural course and treatment strategies for asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic pancreatic necrosis are still poorly defined. The aim of this retrospective study was to establish criteria for the need of intervention in patients with pancreatic necrosis. Methods A total of 31 consecutive patients (18 male, median age 58 yrs.) diagnosed with pancreatic necrosis by endoscopic ultrasound, in whom a decision for initial conservative treatment was made, were followed for the need of interventions such as endoscopic or surgical intervention, or death. Results After a median follow-up of 243 days, 21 patients remained well without intervention and in 10 patients an endpoint event occurred. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis of the clinical and endosonographic parameters, liquid content was the single independent predictor for intervention (p = 0.0006). The presence of high liquid content in the pancreatic necrosis resulted in a 64% predicted endpoint risk as compared to 2% for solid necrosis. Conclusions Pancreatic necrotic cavities with high liquid content are associated with a high risk of complications. Therefore, close clinical monitoring is needed and early elective intervention might be considered in these patients. PMID:22584080

  18. PMN-PT single crystal for endoscopic ultrasound 2D array application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuhang; Liang, Huageng; Zhu, Benpeng; Zhou, Dan; Yang, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal, a 24 × 24 row-column addressing endoscopic two-dimensional array has been successfully fabricated using novel flanged electrodes and "semi-kerf" technologies. Each row/column array element was measured to have an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, a center frequency of 5MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of approximately 88% at -6 dB. Of particular significance was that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate element exhibits much higher sensitivity compared with lead zirconate titanate-based 2D arrays with similar operational frequency and element area. According to the Field II simulated results, although the obtained beamwidth at -6 dB was a little inferior to that of the fully sampled 24 × 24 two-dimensional array, it is believed that the beamwidth can be improved by appropriately increasing the element number. These results demonstrated that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single-crystal 2D array is a promising candidate for real-time three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound imaging.

  19. Results from the commissioning of a multi-modal endoscope for ultrasound and time of flight PET

    SciTech Connect

    Bugalho, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration has developed a multi-modal imaging system combining Ultrasound with Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography into an endoscopic imaging device. The objective of the project is to obtain a coincidence time resolution of about 200 ps FWHM and to achieve about 1 mm spatial resolution of the PET system, while integrating all the components in a very compact detector suitable for endoscopic use. This scanner aims to be exploited for diagnostic and surgical oncology, as well as being instrumental in the clinical test of new biomarkers especially targeted for prostate and pancreatic cancer. (authors)

  20. Basic technique in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: What needle is the best?

    PubMed Central

    Lachter, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Basic technique for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of solid lesions has developed during 30 years of EUS, as endoscopes and accessory equipment, particularly needles, have been developed. Systematic high-quality examinations require understanding and planning. Needles used for EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) have gone through many improvements; some 18 characteristics of any needle are presented and these come under consideration whenever choosing the best needle for each procedure. The bright future of EUS and FNA for solid lesions currently still leaves much room for continued developments. PMID:24949410

  1. Right adrenal gland prospective evaluation through transgastric endoscopic ultrasound: an alternative approach

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Pedro C.; Pinto-Marques, Pedro; Almeida, Ines; Gomes, Pedro C.; Serra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided right adrenal gland (RAG) evaluation is frequently unsuccessful and, when feasible, requires a cumbersome maneuver through the duodenum. In our experience, the use of a recent ultrasound platform has enabled transgastric detection of the RAG with a simple maneuver. The aim of this study was to determine the RAG transgastric EUS detection rate and identify predictive factors for failure. Methods: Consecutive patients referred to EUS in a single center were prospectively included over a 6-month period. Success was defined as RAG transgastric EUS detection within 180 seconds. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with failure. Results: Among 100 patients, the success rate for RAG transgastric EUS detection was 75 %, with a median maneuver duration of 45 seconds [interquartile range, 25 – 70 seconds]. Two incidental RAG lesions were detected. Of possible demographic and anthropometric predictive factors for failure, only age (OR 1.04; P = 0.04) was statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The transgastric EUS approach for RAG detection is simple, fast and effective. PMID:27853745

  2. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: basic principles, present situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-11-14

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS.

  3. Venous elastography: validation of a novel high-resolution ultrasound method for measuring vein compliance using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rohan; Patel, Prashant; Park, Dae W; Cichonski, Thomas J; Richards, Michael S; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Weitzel, William F

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography for the noninvasive assessment of tissue properties has enjoyed widespread success. With the growing emphasis in recent years on arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) for dialysis vascular access in patients with end-stage renal disease, and on reducing AVF failures, there is increasing interest in ultrasound for the preoperative evaluation of the mechanical and elastic properties of arteries and veins. This study used high-resolution ultrasound with phase-sensitive speckle tracking to obtain in vivo vein elasticity measurements during dilation. The results of this novel ultrasound technique were then compared to a computer model of venous strain. The computer model and ultrasound analysis of the vessel wall demonstrated internally consistent positive and negative longitudinal strain values as the vein wall underwent dilation. These results support further investigation of the use of phase-sensitive speckle tracking for ultrasound venous mapping for preoperative vascular access evaluation.

  4. [Contribution of endoscopic ultrasound to the diagnosis of pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma. Apropos of two cases].

    PubMed

    Repiso, Alejandro; Gómez-Rodríguez, Rafael; Aso, Sonsoles; Domper, Francisco; Buendía, Encarnación; González de Frutos, Concepción; Pérez-Grueso, María José; Rodríguez-Merlo, Rufo; Carrobles, José María

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic metastases represent 2% of pancreatic tumors. The neoplasms most frequently metastasizing to the pancreas are breast, lung, melanoma and kidney tumors. We present the cases of two patients with pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma diagnosed 4 and 8 years after the diagnosis and surgical treatment of the primary renal tumor. In both patients, endoscopic ultrasound was useful in the detection and characterization of these pancreatic lesions and allowed fine-needle aspiration for cytological study to be performed.

  5. Clear cell neuroendocrine tumor of pancreas: Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration diagnosis of an uncommon variant

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Bakshi, Pooja; Singla, Vikas; Verma, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    The cytomorphologic features of clear cell neuroendocrine tumor of pancreas have been rarely reported in cytology literature. The cytomorphology of this rare variant mimics many primary and metastatic clear cell tumors of the pancreas. However, a precise cytological diagnosis can be rendered by awareness of this entity and judicious use of immunohistochemistry. We report one such case in a young woman diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration. The tumor cells showed positive staining with synaptophysin, chromogranin, and also with inhibin. PMID:27081395

  6. Design of a phased array for the generation of adaptive radiation force along a path surrounding a breast lesion for dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekeom, Didace; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    This work demonstrates, with numerical simulations, the potential of an octagonal probe for the generation of radiation forces in a set of points following a path surrounding a breast lesion in the context of dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging. Because of the in-going wave adaptive focusing strategy, the proposed method is adapted to induce shear wave fronts to interact optimally with complex lesions. Transducer elements were based on 1-3 piezocomposite material. Three-dimensional simulations combining the finite element method and boundary element method with periodic boundary conditions in the elevation direction were used to predict acoustic wave radiation in a targeted region of interest. The coupling factor of the piezocomposite material and the radiated power of the transducer were optimized. The transducer's electrical impedance was targeted to 50 Ω. The probe was simulated by assembling the designed transducer elements to build an octagonal phased-array with 256 elements on each edge (for a total of 2048 elements). The central frequency is 4.54 MHz; simulated transducer elements are able to deliver enough power and can generate the radiation force with a relatively low level of voltage excitation. Using dynamic transmitter beamforming techniques, the radiation force along a path and resulting acoustic pattern in the breast were simulated assuming a linear isotropic medium. Magnitude and orientation of the acoustic intensity (radiation force) at any point of a generation path could be controlled for the case of an example representing a heterogeneous medium with an embedded soft mechanical inclusion.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound sedation in the United Kingdom: Is life without propofol tolerable?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jennifer Anne; Irvine, Andrew James; Hopper, Andrew Derek

    2017-01-21

    There is compelling evidence to support the quality, cost effectiveness and safety profile of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). However in the United Kingdom, it is recommended that the administration and monitoring of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures should be the responsibility of a dedicated and appropriately trained anaesthetist only. The majority of United Kingdom EUS procedures are performed with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation rather than anaesthetist led propofol lists due to anaesthetist resource availability. We sought to prospectively determine the tolerability and safety of EUS with benzodiazepine and opiate sedation in single United Kingdom centre. Two hundred consecutive patients undergoing either EUS or oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) with conscious sedation were prospectively recruited with a 1:1 enrolment ratio. Patients completed questionnaires pre and post procedure detailing anticipated and actual pain experienced on a 1-10 visual analogue scale. Demographics, procedure duration, sedation doses and willingness to repeat the procedure were also recorded. EUS procedures lasted significantly longer than OGDs (15 min vs 6 min, P < 0.0001), however, there was no difference in anticipated pain scores between the groups (EUS 3.37/10 vs OGD 3.47/10, P = 0.46). Pain scores indicated EUS was better tolerated than OGD (1.16/10 vs 1.88/10, P = 0.03) although higher doses of sedation were used for EUS procedures. There were no complications identified in either group. We feel our study demonstrates that the tolerability of EUS with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation is acceptable.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound sedation in the United Kingdom: Is life without propofol tolerable?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer Anne; Irvine, Andrew James; Hopper, Andrew Derek

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the quality, cost effectiveness and safety profile of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). However in the United Kingdom, it is recommended that the administration and monitoring of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures should be the responsibility of a dedicated and appropriately trained anaesthetist only. The majority of United Kingdom EUS procedures are performed with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation rather than anaesthetist led propofol lists due to anaesthetist resource availability. We sought to prospectively determine the tolerability and safety of EUS with benzodiazepine and opiate sedation in single United Kingdom centre. Two hundred consecutive patients undergoing either EUS or oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) with conscious sedation were prospectively recruited with a 1:1 enrolment ratio. Patients completed questionnaires pre and post procedure detailing anticipated and actual pain experienced on a 1-10 visual analogue scale. Demographics, procedure duration, sedation doses and willingness to repeat the procedure were also recorded. EUS procedures lasted significantly longer than OGDs (15 min vs 6 min, P < 0.0001), however, there was no difference in anticipated pain scores between the groups (EUS 3.37/10 vs OGD 3.47/10, P = 0.46). Pain scores indicated EUS was better tolerated than OGD (1.16/10 vs 1.88/10, P = 0.03) although higher doses of sedation were used for EUS procedures. There were no complications identified in either group. We feel our study demonstrates that the tolerability of EUS with opiate and benzodiazepine sedation is acceptable. PMID:28210094

  9. Is endoscopic ultrasound examination necessary in the management of esophageal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    DaVee, Tomas; Ajani, Jaffer A; Lee, Jeffrey H

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts at early diagnosis, accurate staging and advanced treatments, esophageal cancer (EC) continues to be an ominous disease worldwide. Risk factors for esophageal carcinomas include obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hard-alcohol use and tobacco smoking. Five-year survival rates have improved from 5% to 20% since the 1970s, the result of advances in diagnostic staging and treatment. As the most sensitive test for locoregional staging of EC, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) influences the development of an optimal oncologic treatment plan for a significant minority of patients with early cancers, which appropriately balances the risks and benefits of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. EUS is costly, and may not be available at all centers. Thus, the yield of EUS needs to be thoughtfully considered for each patient. Localized intramucosal cancers occasionally require endoscopic resection (ER) for histologic staging or treatment; EUS evaluation may detect suspicious lymph nodes prior to exposing the patient to the risks of ER. Although positron emission tomography (PET) has been increasingly utilized in staging EC, it may be unnecessary for clinical staging of early, localized EC and carries the risk of false-positive metastasis (over staging). In EC patients with evidence of advanced disease, EUS or PET may be used to define the radiotherapy field. Multimodality staging with EUS, cross-sectional imaging and histopathologic analysis of ER, remains the standard-of-care in the evaluation of early esophageal cancers. Herein, published data regarding use of EUS for intramucosal, local, regional and metastatic esophageal cancers are reviewed. An algorithm to illustrate the current use of EUS at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is presented. PMID:28223720

  10. Real-time 3-d intracranial ultrasound with an endoscopic matrix array transducer.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    A transducer originally designed for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was adapted for real-time volumetric endoscopic imaging of the brain. The transducer consists of a 36 x 36 array with an interelement spacing of 0.18 mm. There are 504 transmitting and 252 receive channels placed in a regular pattern in the array. The operating frequency is 4.5 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 30%. The transducer is fabricated on a 10-layer flexible circuit from Microconnex (Snoqualmie, WA, USA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of real-time 3-D intracranial ultrasound with this device. The Volumetrics Medical Imaging (Durham, NC, USA) 3-D scanner was used to obtain images in a canine model. A transcalvarial acoustic window was created under general anesthesia in the animal laboratory by placing a 10-mm burr hole in the high parietal calvarium of a 50-kg canine subject. The burr-hole was placed in a left parasagittal location to avoid the sagittal sinus, and the transducer was placed against the intact dura mater for ultrasound imaging. Images of the lateral ventricles were produced, including real-time 3-D guidance of a needle puncture of one ventricle. In a second canine subject, contrast-enhanced 3-D Doppler color flow images were made of the cerebral vessels including the complete Circle of Willis. Clinical applications may include real-time 3-D guidance of cerebrospinal fluid extraction from the lateral ventricles and bedside evaluation of critically ill patients where computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are unavailable.

  11. Role of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound in submucosal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Gincul, Rodica; Lefort, Christine; Napoleon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of endoscopy, gastrointestinal submucosal lesions are now more commonly discovered. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is superior to all other imaging techniques for the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMTs), it is still suboptimal for differentiating hypoechoic lesions arising from the fourth sonographic gastrointestinal wall layer, which encompass tumors with very different prognosis. EUS tissue acquisition has provided with the unique opportunity to obtain histological confirmation, but it is not accurate enough to evaluate the malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In the last years, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) emerged as a powerful imaging modality to assess the microperfusion patterns of pancreatic tumors. Based on the distinct microvascularity of malignant SMTs, it was hypothesized that CH-EUS might also assist in the differential diagnosis of SMTs. Preliminary experience in this field is now available and suggests CH-EUS as a performant modality to distinguish between benign SMTs and GISTs and to evaluate the malignant potential of GISTs. High expectations are also relied on CH-EUS for the monitoring of antiangiogenic treatments of GISTs and the evaluation of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). PMID:28000626

  12. Role of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound in submucosal tumors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Gincul, Rodica; Lefort, Christine; Napoleon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of endoscopy, gastrointestinal submucosal lesions are now more commonly discovered. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is superior to all other imaging techniques for the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMTs), it is still suboptimal for differentiating hypoechoic lesions arising from the fourth sonographic gastrointestinal wall layer, which encompass tumors with very different prognosis. EUS tissue acquisition has provided with the unique opportunity to obtain histological confirmation, but it is not accurate enough to evaluate the malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In the last years, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) emerged as a powerful imaging modality to assess the microperfusion patterns of pancreatic tumors. Based on the distinct microvascularity of malignant SMTs, it was hypothesized that CH-EUS might also assist in the differential diagnosis of SMTs. Preliminary experience in this field is now available and suggests CH-EUS as a performant modality to distinguish between benign SMTs and GISTs and to evaluate the malignant potential of GISTs. High expectations are also relied on CH-EUS for the monitoring of antiangiogenic treatments of GISTs and the evaluation of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

  13. Performance and Clinical Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine Needle Aspiration for Diagnosing Gastrointestinal Intramural Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Park, Eun Young; Moon, Sung Jin; Lim, Chul Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the performance, clinical role, and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in gastrointestinal intramural lesions. Methods Procedural and pathologic data were reviewed from consecutive patients undergoing EUS-FNA for intramural lesions. Final diagnoses were determined by surgical histopathologic conformation and the diagnosis of malignancy, including clinical follow-up with repeat imaging. Results Forty-six patients (mean age, 47 years; 24 males) underwent EUS-FNA. Lesions were located in the stomach (n=31), esophagus (n=5), and duodenum (n=10). The median lesion size was 2 cm (range, 1 to 20.6). Final diagnoses were obtained in 22 patients (48%). EUS-FNA was diagnostic in 40 patients (87%). The diagnostic accuracy of cytology for differentiating between benign and malignant lesions was 82%; diagnostic error occurred in three patients (6%). The cytologic results influenced clinical judgment in 78% cases. The primary reasons for negative or no clinical impact were false-negative results, misdirected patient management, and inconclusive cytology. Conclusions EUS-FNA exhibited an 87% diagnostic yield for gastrointestinal intramural lesions; the accuracy of cytology for differentiating malignancy was 82%. The limitations of EUS-FNA were primarily because of nondiagnostic sampling (9%) and probable diagnostic error (6%); these factors may influence the clinical role of EUS-FNA. PMID:24340255

  14. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in the molecular diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bournet, Barbara; Gayral, Marion; Torrisani, Jérôme; Selves, Janick; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most deadly types of tumor. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is a safe, cost-effective, and accurate technique for evaluating and staging pancreatic tumors. However, EUS-FNA may be inconclusive or doubtful in up to 20% of cases. This review underlines the clinical interest of the molecular analysis of samples obtained by EUS-FNA in assessing diagnosis or prognosis of pancreatic cancer, especially in locally advanced tumors. On EUS-FNA materials DNA, mRNA and miRNA can be extracted, amplified, quantified and subjected to methylation assay. Kras mutation assay, improves diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. When facing to clinical and radiological presentations of pseudo-tumorous chronic pancreatitis, wild-type Kras is evocative of benignity. Conversely, in front of a pancreatic mass suspected of malignancy, a mutated Kras is highly evocative of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This strategy can reduce false-negative diagnoses, avoids the delay of making decisions and reduces loss of surgical resectability. Similar approaches are conducted using analysis of miRNA expression as well as Mucin or markers of invasion (S100P, S100A6, PLAT or PLAU). Beyond the diagnosis approach, the prediction of response to treatment can be also investigated form biomarkers expression within EUS-FNA materials. PMID:25152579

  15. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol injection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the caudate lobe

    PubMed Central

    Nakaji, So; Hirata, Nobuto; Mikata, Rintaro; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurately puncturing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) that arise from the caudate lobe is generally considered to be technically difficult. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the feasibility and safety (the therapeutic outcomes and adverse events) of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol injection as a novel treatment for HCC in the caudate lobe. Patients and methods: Twelve patients with early-stage HCC of the caudate lobe that were treated with EUS-guided ethanol injection at two tertiary referral centers were reviewed retrospectively. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of the treatment, a local control curve and an overall survival curve were constructed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 31.0 months. The 1-year local control rate was 80.2 %, and recurrent lesions developed in 2 cases (after 3 and 9 months, respectively). The overall survival rate was 91.7 %, 75.0 %, and 53.3 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Concerning procedure-related adverse events (AEs), 2 patients suffered episodes of fever lasting a few days; however, no serious AEs occurred. Conclusions: EUS-guided ethanol injection could be a useful treatment for early-stage HCC in the caudate lobe because of its simplicity and reduced invasiveness. PMID:27747288

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  17. A novel three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound technique for the freehand examination of the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Scott; Christie, Derek; Plevris, John N

    2011-11-01

    This study details the development and evaluation of a freehand radial three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound (3D-EUS) technique for use in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. It comprised of a commercial EUS system, a custom acquisition system to simultaneous acquire radial B-mode images and corresponding incremental changes in position of the scope as it was withdrawn and a custom 3D-EUS package written in Matlab™, to reconstruct and analyse the volume. This technique was evaluated using an EUS phantom with embedded objects of known dimensions and volumes and with clinical images acquired during routine cancer staging. For the phantom measurements, average Z-dimensional error was <1% and volume errors were 1.4% (volume(1) = 48930 mm(3)) and 4.5% (volume(2) = 5100 mm(3)). Application of this technique to EUS acquired clinical images produced excellent characterisation of oesophageal structures and accurate dimension and volume measurements. It also enabled the endoscopist to review "off-line" the EUS examination in case important information was missed.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Sanchez-Ocaña, Ramon; Peñas, Irene; de la Serna, Carlos; Shah, Janak; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Gaidhane, Monica; Grimm, Ian; Baron, Todd; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical gastrojejunostomy and enteral self-expanding metal stents are efficacious for the management of gastric outlet obstruction but limited by high complication rates and short-term efficacy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy (EUS-GJ) is a novel alternative option. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent EUS-GJ between March 2014 and September 2015 as part of a prospective multicenter registry at four academic centers in two countries were included. Technical success was defined as successful placement of a gastrojejunal lumen-apposing metal stent. Clinical success was defined as the ability of the patient to tolerate an oral diet. Post-procedural adverse events were recorded. Results: The study included 26 patients, of whom 11 (42 %) were male. Technical success was achieved in 24 patients (92 %). Clinical success was achieved in 22 patients (85 %). Of the 4 patients in whom clinical success was not achieved, 2 had persistent nausea and vomiting despite a patent EUS-GJ and required enteral feeding for nutrition, 1 died before the initiation of an oral diet, and 1 underwent surgery for suspected perforation. Adverse events, including peritonitis, bleeding, and surgery, occurred in 3 patients (11.5 %). Conclusion: EUS-GJ is an emerging procedure that has efficacy and safety comparable with those of current therapies and should hold a place as a new minimally invasive option for patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Clinical trial identification number: NCT01522573 PMID:27004243

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: Assessment of the procedure, technical details and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A; Kaabi, Saad Al

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) has become increasingly popular and become first line management option in many centers. Use of therapeutic echoendoscopes has greatly increased the applicability of EUS guided transmural drainage. Drainage is indicated in symptomatic PFCs, PFC related infection, bleed, luminal obstruction, fistulization and biliary obstruction. EUS guided transmural drainage of PFCs is preferred in patients with non bulging lesions, portal hypertension, bleeding tendency and in those whom conventional drainage has failed. In the present decade significant progress has been made in minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. There are newer stent designs, access devices and techniques for more efficient drainage of PFCs. In this review, we discuss the EUS guided drainage of PFCs in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25901214

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: Assessment of the procedure, technical details and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rajesh; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A; Kaabi, Saad Al

    2015-04-16

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) has become increasingly popular and become first line management option in many centers. Use of therapeutic echoendoscopes has greatly increased the applicability of EUS guided transmural drainage. Drainage is indicated in symptomatic PFCs, PFC related infection, bleed, luminal obstruction, fistulization and biliary obstruction. EUS guided transmural drainage of PFCs is preferred in patients with non bulging lesions, portal hypertension, bleeding tendency and in those whom conventional drainage has failed. In the present decade significant progress has been made in minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. There are newer stent designs, access devices and techniques for more efficient drainage of PFCs. In this review, we discuss the EUS guided drainage of PFCs in acute pancreatitis.

  1. Development of EndoTOFPET-US, a multi-modal endoscope for ultrasound and time of flight positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2014-02-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US project aims at delevoping a multi-modal imaging device that combines Ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography into an endoscopic imaging device. The goal is to obtain a coincidence time resolution of about 200 ps FWHM and sub-millimetric spatial resolution for the PET head, integrating the components in a very compact detector suitable for endoscopic use. The scanner will be exploited for the clinical test of new bio-markers especially targeted for prostate and pancreatic cancer as well as for diagnostic and surgical oncology. This paper focuses on the status of the Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomograph under development for the EndoTOFPET-US project.

  2. Effects of premedication with Pronase for endoscopic ultrasound of the stomach: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Xin; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Guo, Jin-Tao; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the effects of premedication with Pronase for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) examination of the stomach. METHODS This was a prospective, randomized and controlled clinical study. All patients were randomly assigned to either the Pronase group or placebo group. The pretreatment solution was a mixed solution of 20000 U of Pronase and 60 mL sodium bicarbonate solution in the Pronase group, while an equal amount of sodium bicarbonate solution was administered to the placebo group. All operators, image evaluators and experimental recorders in EUS did not participate in the preparation and allocation of pretreatment solution. Two blinded investigators assessed the obscurity scores for the EUS images according to the size of artifacts (including ultrasound images of the gastric cavity and the gastric wall). Differences in imaging quality, the duration of examination and the usage of physiological saline during the examination process between the Pronase group and the control group were compared. RESULTS No differences existed in patient demographics between the two groups. For the gastric cavity, the Pronase group had significantly lower mean obscurity scores than the placebo group (1.0476 ± 0.77 vs 1.6129 ± 0.96, respectively, P = 0.000). The mean obscurity scores for the gastric mucosal surface were significantly lower in the Pronase group than the placebo group (1.2063 ± 0.90 vs 1.7581 ± 0.84, respectively, P = 0.001). The average EUS procedure duration for the Pronase group was 11.60 ± 3.32 min, which was significantly shorter than that of the placebo group (13.13 ± 3.81 min, P = 0.007). Less saline was used in the Pronase group than the placebo group, and the difference was significant (417.94 ± 121.38 mL vs 467.42 ± 104.52 mL, respectively, P = 0.016). CONCLUSION The group that had Pronase premedication prior to the EUS examination had clearer images than the placebo group. With Pronase premedication, the examination time was shorter, and the

  3. High Frame-Rate Imaging Applied to Quasi-static Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Basset, Olivier; Cachard, Christian; Tortoli, Piero

    Ultrasound elastography is an imaging technique addressed to investigate the tissue elastic properties. In freehand elastography, the ultrasound probe is moved by the operator to compress the tissue while the echo RF-data are processed to estimate the axial strain tensor by calculating the gradient of the corresponding displacement.

  4. When trainees reach competency in performing endoscopic ultrasound: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Neal; Ou, George; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert; Telford, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Background/Study aim The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) recommends that trainees complete 150 endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures before assessing competency. However, this recommendation is largely based on limited evidence and expert opinion. With new evidence suggesting that this historical threshold is underestimating training requirements, we evaluated the learning curve for achieving competency in EUS. Patients/Materials and methods Two investigators independently searched MEDLINE for full-text citations assessing the learning curve for achieving competency in EUS in the period 1946 to 25 March 2016. A learning curve was defined as either a tabulated or graphic representation of competency as a function of increasing EUS experience. Results Eight studies assessing 28 trainees and 7051 EUS procedures were included. When stratifying studies based on procedural indication: three studies assessed competency in evaluating mucosal lesions, three studies assessed competency in EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), and two studies assessed comprehensive competency. Among studies assessing mucosal lesion T-staging accuracy, competency was achieved by 65 to 231 procedures. Among studies assessing EUS-FNA, competency was achieved by 30 to 40 procedures. Among the two studies assessing comprehensive competency in EUS, competency was not achieved in either study across all trainees. Only four of 17 trainees reached competency by 225 to 295 EUS procedures. Conclusion As EUS competency assessment has evolved to more closely reflect independent clinical practice, the number of procedures required to achieve competency has risen well above ASGE recommendations. Advanced endoscopy training programs and specialty societies need to re-assess the structure of EUS training.

  5. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting.

  6. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  7. When trainees reach competency in performing endoscopic ultrasound: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Neal; Ou, George; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert; Telford, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study aim The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) recommends that trainees complete 150 endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures before assessing competency. However, this recommendation is largely based on limited evidence and expert opinion. With new evidence suggesting that this historical threshold is underestimating training requirements, we evaluated the learning curve for achieving competency in EUS. Patients/Materials and methods Two investigators independently searched MEDLINE for full-text citations assessing the learning curve for achieving competency in EUS in the period 1946 to 25 March 2016. A learning curve was defined as either a tabulated or graphic representation of competency as a function of increasing EUS experience. Results Eight studies assessing 28 trainees and 7051 EUS procedures were included. When stratifying studies based on procedural indication: three studies assessed competency in evaluating mucosal lesions, three studies assessed competency in EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), and two studies assessed comprehensive competency. Among studies assessing mucosal lesion T-staging accuracy, competency was achieved by 65 to 231 procedures. Among studies assessing EUS-FNA, competency was achieved by 30 to 40 procedures. Among the two studies assessing comprehensive competency in EUS, competency was not achieved in either study across all trainees. Only four of 17 trainees reached competency by 225 to 295 EUS procedures. Conclusion As EUS competency assessment has evolved to more closely reflect independent clinical practice, the number of procedures required to achieve competency has risen well above ASGE recommendations. Advanced endoscopy training programs and specialty societies need to re-assess the structure of EUS training. PMID:28367496

  8. Optimal biliary access point and learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy with transmural stenting

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongwook; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) with transmural stenting has increased for biliary decompression in patients with an inaccessible papilla, the optimal biliary access point and the learning curve of EUS-HGS have not been studied. We evaluated the optimal biliary access point and learning curve for technically successful EUS-HGS. Methods: 129 consecutive patients (male n = 81, 62.3%; malignant n = 113, 87.6%) who underwent EUS-HGS due to an inaccessible papilla were enrolled. EUS finding and procedure times according to each needle puncture attempt in EUS-HGS were prospectively measured. Learning curves of EUS-HGS were calculated for two main outcome measurements (procedure time and adverse events) by using the moving average method and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis, respectively. Results: A total of 174 EUS-HGS attempts were performed in 129 patients. The mean number of needle punctures was 1.35 ± 0.57. Using the logistic regression model, bile duct diameter of the puncture site ⩽ 5 mm [odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71–8.1, p < 0.01] and hepatic portion length [linear distance from the mural wall to the punctured bile duct wall on EUS; mean hepatic portion length was 27 mm (range 10–47 mm)] > 3 cm (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.7–12, p < 0.01) were associated with low technical success. Procedure time and adverse events were shorter after 24 cases, and stabilized at 33 cases of EUS-HGS, respectively. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a bile duct diameter > 5 mm and hepatic portion length 1 cm to ⩽ 3 cm on EUS may be suitable for successful EUS-HGS. In our learning curve analysis, over 33 cases might be required to achieve the plateau phase for successful EUS-HGS. PMID:28286558

  9. Is Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) necessary in the pre-therapeutic assessment of Barrett’s esophagus with early neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sordo, Jacobo Ortiz; Konda, Vani J.A.; Chennat, Jennifer; Madrigal-Hoyos, Erika; Posner, Mitchell C.; Ferguson, Mark K.

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered the most accurate tool for the TNM staging of esophageal cancer, but its role in early Barrett’s neoplasia is still debatable. The aim was to evaluate the utility of EUS in Barrett’s patients prior to therapy. Retrospective review of 109 patients enrolled in a treatment protocol for Barrett’s neoplasia in our institution. EUS assessment was classified as suspicious for invasion in 19 patients; 84% of them had no evidence of invasion in final pathology. The assessment of depth of invasion of Barrett’s neoplasia based solely on EUS findings leads to overstaging in most patients. PMID:23205307

  10. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future. PMID:26087785

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab. PMID:28203161

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided inoculation of transmissible venereal tumor in the colon: A large animal model for colon neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Manoop S.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Suzuki, Rei; Shetty, Anil; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Nau, William; Stafford, Roger Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background: To develop and evaluate the feasibility of emerging interventions, animal models with accurate anatomical environment are required. Objectives: We aimed to establish a clinically relevant colorectal tumor model with canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) utilizing endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging guidance. Design: Survival study using a canine model. Setting: Endoscopic animal research laboratory at a tertiary cancer center. Materials and Methods: This study involved five canines. Interventions: A colorectal tumor model was established and evaluated in five canines under cyclosporine immune suppression. Under endoscopic imaging guidance, saline was injected into the submucosal layer forming a bleb. Subsequently, CTVT was inoculated into the bleb under EUS guidance. Endoscopy was the primary method of assessing tumor growth. Tumors developed in 60-130 days. Upon detection of lesions >1 cm, the animals were euthanized and the tumors were harvested for histopathological characterization. Main outcome measurements: Success rate of tumor growth. The presence or absence of vasculature inside tumors. Results: Colorectal tumor successfully developed in three out of the five animals (60%). Among the ones with tumor growth, average inoculated CTVT volume, incubation time, and tumor size was 1.8 cc, 65.7 days, and 2.0 cm, respectively. The two animals without tumor growth were observed for >100 days. In all the tumors, vascular structure was characterized with CD31 imunohistochemical stain. Limitations: Small number of animals. Conclusion: We succeeded in creating a new colorectal tumor canine model with CTVT utilizing EUS. PMID:27080606

  14. Hegemony and cost-effectiveness of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the field of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    De Angelis, C; Manfrè, S F; Bruno, M; Pellicano, R

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a group of neoplasms arising from the diffuse neuroendocrine system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They often represent a diagnostic challenge because of their little dimensions, the deep localization into the retroperitoneum or in extramucosal sites, the possibility to be multilocated and the heterogeneous patterns of presentation. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a cost-effective technique that enables to look very definitely at a suspicious mass and at the surrounding area both within the GI wall and in the pancreas, allowing to precisely assess T and N stage. Under EUS-guidance it is possible to obtain tissue samples in order to reach a definitive diagnosis and to establish the tumor grade. In the therapeutic field, EUS is crucial to assess the safety and the feasibility of resective endoscopic techniques for the GI-wall NETs and it can guide local ablative techniques for pancreatic NETs. After treatment, EUS can be successfully useful to assess complete endoscopic resection and to follow-up resected or ablated patients. It is so evident that EUS has a role in the whole route of NETs management, from diagnosis, evaluation, grading and staging assessment, to therapy and consequent follow-up.

  15. Repeat endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration after a first negative procedure is useful in pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix I.; Martínez-Lozano, Jorge Adolfo; Rosales-Salinas, Anamaría; Bernal-Méndez, Ambrosio Rafael; Guerrero-Velásquez, Camilo; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no consensus about the ideal method for diagnosis in patients who have already undergone endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), and the inconclusive material is often obtained. The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of the second EUS-FNA of pancreatic lesions. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients with EUS-FNA of pancreatic lesions is performed. All patients who underwent more than one EUS-FNA for the evaluation of suspected pancreatic cancer over a 7-year period were included in the analysis. Results: A total of 296 EUS-FNAs of the pancreas were performed in 257 patients. The diagnostic yield with the first EUS-FNA was 78.6% (202/257). Thirty-nine (13.3%) FNAs were repeated in 34 patients; 17 (50%) patients were women. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 58.8 ± 16.1 years. The location of the lesions in the pancreatic gland, from which the second biopsies were taken, was head of the pancreas, n = 28 (82.4%), body of the pancreas, n = 3 (8.8%), and tail, n = 3 (8.8%). The mean ± SD of the size of the lesion was 36.3 ± 14.6 mm. The second EUS-FNA was more likely to be positive for diagnosis in patients with an “atypical“ histological result in the first EUS-FNA (odds ratio [OR]: 4.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9–18.3), in contrast to patients with a first EUS-FNA reported as “normal” (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.06–0.71). Overall, the diagnostic yield of the second EUS-FNA was 58.8% (20/34) with an increase to 86.3% overall (222/257). Conclusion: Repeat EUS-FNA in pancreatic lesions is necessary in patients with a negative first EUS-FNA because it improves the diagnostic yield. PMID:27503159

  16. Sampling of the adrenal glands by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Stelow, Edward B; Debol, Steven M; Stanley, Michael W; Mallery, Shawn; Lai, Rebecca; Bardales, Ricardo H

    2005-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has proven to be a valuable modality for the primary diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal, and perigastrointestinal malignancy. Aside from assessing thoracic and abdominal lymph nodes and the liver for metastases, EUS can assess and sample the adrenal glands, which are frequently involved by metastatic disease, but can also harbor benign primary neoplasms. The cytology files at our institution were reviewed for all cases of EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal glands. Clinical histories, sonographic findings, and cytologic findings of all cases were reviewed. Results were compared with overall EUS-guided FNA performance and the performance of non-EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal. The utility of cell block immunohistochemistry (IHC) in these cases was reviewed. Between 1/1/00 and 5/15/04 there were 24 cases of EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal gland from 22 different patients (13 men; 9 women) at our institution. This represented 1.4% of overall EUS-guided FNA and 77% of adrenal gland FNA. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 86 yr (mean 69 +/- 11 yr). Most patients had other cancers or mass lesions and were being staged at the time of the procedure (19 of 22). Almost all FNAs were of the left adrenal gland (23 of 24). Lesion size ranged from 0.9 to 7.9 cm (mean 2.5 +/- 1.6 cm). Diagnostic material was present in all cases when compared with an overall EUS-guided FNA diagnostic rate of 88%. Material for cell block was present in 21 cases, and IHC was used in 3 cases. Final diagnoses were as follows: cortical tissue consistent with cortical adenoma (19), metastatic adenocarcinoma (3), pheochromocytoma (1), and adrenal cortical carcinoma (1). EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal gland is primarily used in the staging of other malignancies when lesions of the left adrenal are recognized sonographically. Diagnostic tissue is easily obtained, including material for cell block IHC, which allows definitive diagnosis in cases that

  17. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an accurate technique for sampling the pancreas and mediastinum; however, limited data are available for other mass lesions. The aim of this study was to explore the value of EUS-FNA in the differential diagnosis of all mass lesions. Data from patients who underwent EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of mass lesions, including pancreatic, mediastinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The accuracy was calculated by comparing the results of FNA with the results of pathological examination or follow-up surveillances in non-operated cases. A total of 150 cases were included. The location of the mass varied from the pancreas (n=62) to the mediastinum (n=29), gastrointestinal tract (n=36), celiac cavity and retroperitoneum (n=23). The sensitivity and Youdens index of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of all lesions were 92.97% and 0.93 respectively. The accuracy of diagnosis of pancreatic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions was 85.48, 89.66, 83.33 and 78.23%, respectively. Masses were categorized into parenchymal organs (n=66), luminal organs (n=36) and enlarged lymph nodes (n=33). Lesions in parenchymal organs were likely to be bigger than those in luminal organs (P=0.03) and enlarged lymph nodes (P=0.01). For solid and cystic masses, which constituted 63.3 and 14.7% of the total masses, no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed (P=0.56); however, lesion sizes were significantly different between these two groups (P=0.04) and the majority of cystic masses were identified in women (P=0.03). Malignant lesions were more common in older (P=0.01) and male (P=0.03) patients. In conclusion, EUS-FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of unexplained mass lesions; it influences the management of patients by enabling the appropriate treatment to be identified. PMID:27446324

  18. Contemporary use of elastography in liver fibrosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Maja; Kjaergaard, Maria; Thielsen, Peter; Krag, Aleksander

    2015-10-13

    The risk and speed of progression from fibrosis to compensated and decompensated cirrhosis define the prognosis in liver diseases. Therefore, early detection and preventive strategies affect outcomes. Patients with liver disease have traditionally been diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, in part due to lack of non-invasive markers. Ultrasound elastography to measure liver stiffness can potentially change this paradigm. The purpose of this review was therefore to summarize advances in the field of ultrasound elastography with focus on diagnosis of liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and clinically significant portal hypertension, techniques and limitations. Four types of ultrasound elastography exist, but there is scarce evidence comparing the different techniques. The majority of experience concern transient elastography for diagnosing fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C. That said, the role of elastography in other aetiologies such as alcoholic- and non-alcoholic liver fibrosis still needs clarification. Although elastography can be used to diagnose liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, its true potential lies in the possibility of multiple, repeated measurements that allow for treatment surveillance, continuous risk stratification and monitoring of complications. As such, elastography may be a powerful tool for personalized medicine. While elastography is an exciting technique, the nature of ultrasound imaging limits its applicability, due to the risk of failures and unreliable results. Key factors that limit the applicability of liver stiffness measurements are as follows: liver vein congestion, cholestasis, a recent meal, inflammation, obesity, observer experience and ascites. The coming years will show whether elastography will be widely adapted in general care.

  19. High-flow nasal oxygen availability for sedation decreases the use of general anesthesia during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Roman; Natov, Nikola S; Rocuts-Martinez, Klifford A; Finkelman, Matthew D; Phan, Tom V; Hegde, Sanjay R; Knapp, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine whether high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) availability influences the use of general anesthesia (GA) in patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and associated outcomes. METHODS In this retrospective study, patients were stratified into 3 eras between October 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014 based on HFNO availability for deep sedation at the time of their endoscopy. During the first and last 3-mo eras (era 1 and 3), no HFNO was available, whereas it was an option during the second 3-mo era (era 2). The primary outcome was the percent utilization of GA vs deep sedation in each period. Secondary outcomes included oxygen saturation nadir during sedation between periods, as well as procedure duration, and anesthesia-only time between periods and for GA vs sedation cases respectively. RESULTS During the study period 238 ERCP or EUS cases were identified for analysis. Statistical testing was employed and a P < 0.050 was significant unless the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used. General anesthesia use was significantly lower in era 2 compared to era 1 with the same trend between era 2 and 3 (P = 0.012 and 0.045 respectively). The oxygen saturation nadir during sedation was significantly higher in era 2 compared to era 3 (P < 0.001) but not between eras 1 and 2 (P = 0.028) or 1 and 3 (P = 0.069). The procedure time within each era was significantly longer under GA compared to deep sedation (P ≤ 0.007) as was the anesthesia-only time (P ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSION High-flow nasal oxygen availability was associated with decreased GA utilization and improved oxygenation for ERCP and EUS during sedation. PMID:28058020

  20. Sonographic Elastography of the Thyroid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Duymus, Mahmut; Avcu, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thyroid gland disorders include benign and malignant thyroid nodules and diffuse thyroid disorders. The incidence of malignant thyroid nodules is low and the prognosis is good. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer and diffuse parenchymal disorders is generally based on clinical manifestations and histopathological evaluation. Ultrasonography has its place in the diagnostics and follow-up of thyroid disorders. Ultrasonographic elastography is a new, developing method that shows increase in clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to review the data on thyroid ultrasound elastography. PMID:27103947

  1. Texture generation in compressional photoacoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, J. W.; Zabihian, B.; Widlak, T.; Glatz, T.; Liu, M.; Drexler, W.; Scherzer, O.

    2015-03-01

    Elastography is implemented by applying a mechanical force to a specimen and visualizing the resulting displacement. As a basis of elastographic imaging typically ultrasound, optical coherence tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are used. Photoacoustics has not been viewed as a primary imaging modality for elastography, but only as a complementary method to enhance the contrast in ultrasound elastography. The reason is that photoacoustics is considered speckle free [3], which hinders application of speckle tracking algorithms. However, while conventional ultrasound only uses a single frequency, photoacoustics utilizes a broad frequency spectrum. We are therefore able to generate artificial texture by using a frequency band limited part of the recorded data. In this work we try to assess the applicability of this technique to photoacoustic tomography. We use Agar phantoms with predefined Young's moduli and laterally apply a 50μm static compression. Pre- and post compression data are recorded via a Fabry Pérot interferometer planar sensor setup and reconstructed via a non-uniform-FFT reconstruction algorithm. A displacement vector field, between pre- and post compressed data is then determined via optical flow algorithms. While the implementation of texture generation during post processing reduces image quality overall, it turns out that it improves the detection of moving patterns and is therefore better suited for elastography.

  2. What we need to know when performing and interpreting US elastography.

    PubMed

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, So Yeon; Suh, Chong Hyun; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-09-01

    According to the increasing need for accurate staging of hepatic fibrosis, the ultrasound (US) elastography techniques have evolved significantly over the past two decades. Currently, US elastography is increasingly used in clinical practice. Previously published studies have demonstrated the excellent diagnostic performance of US elastography for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Although US elastography may seem easy to perform and interpret, there are many technical and clinical factors which can affect the results of US elastography. Therefore, clinicians who are involved with US elastography should be aware of these factors. The purpose of this article is to present a brief overview of US techniques with the relevant technology, the clinical indications, diagnostic performance, and technical and biological factors which should be considered in order to avoid misinterpretation of US elastography results.

  3. Integration of single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy into ultrasound-guided endoscopic lung cancer staging of mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; van der Leest, Cor; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Kascáková, Slávka; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Amelink, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of a single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy probe into the endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) procedure utilized for lung cancer staging. A mathematical model is developed to extract information about the physiological and morphological properties of lymph tissue from single-fiber reflectance spectra, e.g., microvascular saturation, blood volume fraction, bilirubin concentration, average vessel diameter, and Mie slope. Model analysis of data from a clinical pilot study shows that the single-fiber reflectance measurement is capable of detecting differences in the physiology between normal and metastatic lymph nodes. Moreover, the clinical data show that probe manipulation within the lymph node can perturb the in vivo environment, a concern that must be carefully considered when developing a sampling strategy. The data show the feasibility of this novel technique; however, the potential clinical utility has yet to be determined.

  4. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Padda, Manmeet S; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R

    2010-09-28

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas.

  5. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J.; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas. PMID:21060710

  6. Integration of single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy into ultrasound-guided endoscopic lung cancer staging of mediastinal lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; van der Leest, Cor; Aerts, Joachim G. J. V.; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Kaščáková, Slávka; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of a single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy probe into the endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) procedure utilized for lung cancer staging. A mathematical model is developed to extract information about the physiological and morphological properties of lymph tissue from single-fiber reflectance spectra, e.g., microvascular saturation, blood volume fraction, bilirubin concentration, average vessel diameter, and Mie slope. Model analysis of data from a clinical pilot study shows that the single-fiber reflectance measurement is capable of detecting differences in the physiology between normal and metastatic lymph nodes. Moreover, the clinical data show that probe manipulation within the lymph node can perturb the in vivo environment, a concern that must be carefully considered when developing a sampling strategy. The data show the feasibility of this novel technique; however, the potential clinical utility has yet to be determined.

  7. The value of endoscopic ultrasound in a 47-year-old man with cystic lesions of the liver and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Alizadeh, Amir Houshang; Parhizkar, Baran; Rajabalinia, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), like other tumors, are clinically silent, producing symptoms only as a consequence of tumor growth. Pancreatic NETs account for only 1% of pancreatic cancers by incidence, while representing 10% of all pancreatic cancers by 28-year limited duration prevalence. Here, we present a 47-year-old man with abdominal pain, icterus, itching and 8 kg weight loss during 5 months. Elevated liver enzymes, direct bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase were observed. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a prominence at the head of the pancreas and also liver cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound of the pancreas was performed and a specimen was obtained via fine needle aspiration. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and the result was compatible with NET. The patient referred to receive chemotherapy.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  9. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86

  10. Maximizing the endosonography: The role of contrast harmonics, elastography and confocal endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seicean, Andrada; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Seicean, Radu

    2017-01-01

    New technologies in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation have been developed because of the need to improve the EUS and EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) diagnostic rate. This paper reviews the principle, indications, main literature results, limitations and future expectations for each of the methods presented. Contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS uses a low mechanical index and highlights slow-flow vascularization. This technique is useful for differentiating solid and cystic pancreatic lesions and assessing biliary neoplasms, submucosal neoplasms and lymph nodes. It is also useful for the discrimination of pancreatic masses based on their qualitative patterns; however, the quantitative assessment needs to be improved. The detection of small solid lesions is better, and the EUS-FNA guidance needs further research. The differentiation of cystic lesions of the pancreas and the identification of the associated malignancy features represent the main indications. Elastography is used to assess tissue hardness based on the measurement of elasticity. Despite its low negative predictive value, elastography might rule out the diagnosis of malignancy for pancreatic masses. Needle confocal laser endomicroscopy offers useful information about cystic lesions of the pancreas and is still under evaluation for use with solid pancreatic lesions of lymph nodes. PMID:28104978

  11. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. METHODS Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. RESULTS There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:28028373

  12. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015 PMID:27652305

  13. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Dong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  14. Gangliocytic paraganglioma, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Endoscopic ultrasound findings presented

    SciTech Connect

    Smithline, A.E.; Hawes, R.H.; Kopecky, K.K.; Cummings, O.W.; Kumar, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is an uncommon benign neurogenic tumor of the digestive tract that is usually located in the descending duodenum. Patients with GP usually present with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which reflects the tendency of the tumor to ulcerate the mucosa. The authors report a patient in whom the tumor was overlooked on routine radiologic examinations and initial endoscopy. It was discovered in the distal transverse duodenum at small bowel enteroscopy. The findings of endoscopic ultrasonography are correlated with radiographic and histologic examination. 10 refs.

  15. ANTHROPOMORPHIC BREAST PHANTOMS FOR TESTING ELASTOGRAPHY SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Frank, Gary R.; Shi, Hairong; Jiang, Jingfeng; Hall, Timothy J.; Varghese, Tomy; Doyley, Marvin M.; Weaver, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Two equivalent anthropomorphic breast phantoms were constructed, one for use in ultrasound elastography and the other in magnetic resonance (MR) elastography. A complete description of the manufacturing methods is provided. The materials used were oil-in-gelatin dispersions, where the volume percent oil differentiates the materials, primarily according to Young’s moduli. Values of Young’s moduli are in agreement with in vitro ranges for the corresponding normal and abnormal breast tissues. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties are reasonably well represented. Phantoms of the type described promise to aid researchers who are developing hardware and software for elastography. Examples of ultrasound and MR elastograms of the phantoms are included to demonstrate the utility of the phantoms. Also, the level of stability of elastic properties of the component materials is quantified over a 15-month period. Such phantoms can serve as performance-assessing intermediaries between simple phantoms (consisting, for example, of homogeneous cylindrical inclusions in a homogeneous background) and a full-scale clinical trial. Thus, premature clinical trials may be avoided. PMID:16785008

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  17. Elastography in Chronic Liver Disease: Modalities, Techniques, Limitations, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa Babu, Aparna; Wells, Michael L; Teytelboym, Oleg M; Mackey, Justin E; Miller, Frank H; Yeh, Benjamin M; Ehman, Richard L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease has multiple causes, many of which are increasing in prevalence. The final common pathway of chronic liver disease is tissue destruction and attempted regeneration, a pathway that triggers fibrosis and eventual cirrhosis. Assessment of fibrosis is important not only for diagnosis but also for management, prognostic evaluation, and follow-up of patients with chronic liver disease. Although liver biopsy has traditionally been considered the reference standard for assessment of liver fibrosis, noninvasive techniques are the emerging focus in this field. Ultrasound-based elastography and magnetic resonance (MR) elastography are gaining popularity as the modalities of choice for quantifying hepatic fibrosis. These techniques have been proven superior to conventional cross-sectional imaging for evaluation of fibrosis, especially in the precirrhotic stages. Moreover, elastography has added utility in the follow-up of previously diagnosed fibrosis, the assessment of treatment response, evaluation for the presence of portal hypertension (spleen elastography), and evaluation of patients with unexplained portal hypertension. In this article, a brief overview is provided of chronic liver disease and the tools used for its diagnosis. Ultrasound-based elastography and MR elastography are explored in depth, including a brief glimpse into the evolution of elastography. Elastography is based on the principle of measuring tissue response to a known mechanical stimulus. Specific elastographic techniques used to exploit this principle include MR elastography and ultrasonography-based static or quasistatic strain imaging, one-dimensional transient elastography, point shear-wave elastography, and supersonic shear-wave elastography. The advantages, limitations, and pitfalls of each modality are emphasized. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  18. Eosinophilic esophageal myositis diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ryo; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Yamamoto, Shogo; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is diagnosed by microscopic findings of eosinophilic infiltration into the squamous epithelium. In contrast, another disease concept termed "eosinophilic esophageal myositis (EoEM)" has been proposed, whereby there is eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria instead. A 60-year-old man was referred to our hospital for chest pain, dysphagia, and several episodes of esophageal food impaction. Although EoE was suspected based on clinical features, biopsy specimens showed no mucosal eosinophilic infiltration. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed thickening of the muscularis propria layer and subsequent EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) revealed eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria. Although the patient's symptoms gradually improved after steroid administration, complete remission was not achieved after 1 year of treatment. This case may reflect a disorder distinct from typical EoE based on eosinophilic infiltration of the muscularis propria but not the squamous epithelium, and we, therefore, diagnosed it as EoEM using the EUS-FNA findings as reference.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jane; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Cai, Guoping; Theoharis, Constantine G A; Ustun, Berrin; Beckman, Danita; Aslanian, Harry R; Harigopal, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with a high propensity for local, regional, and distant spread. Distant metastasis of MCC to the pancreas is uncommonly seen and may impose a diagnostic challenge cytologically. Here we report a case of MCC with pancreatic metastasis, which was diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The aspirates revealed both single and clustered epithelial cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei with stippled chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. Immunocytochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CK20, synaptophysin, CD56, and CD117. The neoplastic cells were also identified by flow cytometry as non-hematopoietic cells which were positive for CD56 and negative for CD45. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA. There have been several reports of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed only at the time of surgical resection. However, a preoperative diagnosis allows for appropriate management while sparing a patient the morbidity of unnecessary procedures.

  20. Diagnosis of pancreatic lesions collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kameta, Eri; Sugimori, Kazuya; Kaneko, Takashi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Miwa, Haruo; Sato, Takeshi; Ishii, Yasuaki; Sue, Soichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Yuki; Shibata, Wataru; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Maeda, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUF-FNA) has improved the diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) facilitates the production of millions of sequences concurrently. Therefore, in the current study, to improve the detectability of oncogenic mutations in pancreatic lesions, an NGS system was used to diagnose EUS-FNA samples. A total of 38 patients with clinically diagnosed EUS-FNA specimens were analyzed; 27 patients had pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 11 had non-PDAC lesions. DNA samples were isolated and sequenced by NGS using an Ion Personal Genome Machine system. The Cancer Hotspot Panel v2, which includes 50 cancer-related genes and 2,790 COSMIC mutations, was used. A >2% mutation frequency was defined as positive. KRAS mutations were detected in 26 of 27 PDAC aspirates (96%) and 0 of 11 non-PDAC lesions (0%). The G12, G13, and Q61 KRAS mutations were found in 25, 0, and 1 of the 27 PDAC samples, respectively. Mutations were confirmed by TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction analysis. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 27 PDAC aspirates (44%). SMAD4 was observed in 3 PDAC lesions and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A in 4 PDAC lesions. Therefore, the current study was successfully able to develop an NGS assay with high clinical sensitivity for EUS-FNA samples. PMID:27895743

  1. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  2. Diagnosis of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas using endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Amir; Kahn, Melissa; Jamil, Laith H

    2015-05-16

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the pancreas is a particularly rare entity. Diagnosis of this tumor is tentatively made after ruling out metastatic SCC from another primary site and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the pancreas. Here we discuss the case of a 76-year-old woman who was found to have a solitary pancreatic lesion and multiple hepatic lesions. Results of computed tomography-guided biopsy of the liver lesions were consistent with a metastatic carcinoma displaying squamous differentiation; therefore, an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) of the pancreatic mass was performed. Meticulous histopathological examination of the pancreatic specimen at multiple levels revealed moderately well-differentiated SCC with no glandular component. An extensive metastatic work-up did not reveal an extra-pancreatic origin for this SCC; hence, a diagnosis of primary SCC of the pancreas was established. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the diagnosis of a primary SCC of the pancreas using EUS-guided CNB. We believe that CNB has a diagnostic yield equivalent to that of fine-needle aspiration for recognizing pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, when cytological examinations reveal atypical squamous epithelial cells suggestive of malignancy, CNB may provide a better tissue specimen, from which to determine the presence of a glandular component. Such an assessment will differentiate pancreatic SCC from ASC.

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Rendezvous Drainage of Biliary Obstruction Using a New Flexible 19-Gauge Fine Needle Aspiration Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhouwen; Igbinomwanhia, Efehi; Elhanafi, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. A successful endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) biliary drainage is dependent on accurate puncture of the bile duct and precise guide wire manipulation across the ampulla of Vater. We aim to study the feasibility of using a flexible 19-gauge fine aspiration needle in the performance of EUS-RV biliary drainage. Method. This is a retrospective case series of EUS-RV biliary drainage procedures at a single center. Patients who failed ERCP during the same session for benign or malignant biliary obstruction underwent EUS-RV using a flexible, nitinol covered, 19-gauge needle for biliary access and guide wire manipulation. Result. 24 patients underwent EUS-RV biliary drainage via extrahepatic access while 1 attempt was via intrahepatic access. The technical success rate was 80%, including 83.3% of cases via extrahepatic access. There was no significant difference in success rate of inpatient and outpatient procedures, benign or malignant indications, or type of guide wire used. Adverse events included mild pancreatitis (3 patients) and cholangitis (1 patient). Conclusion. A flexible 19-gauge needle for biliary access can be safe and effective when used to perform EUS-RV biliary drainage. Direct comparison between the nitinol needle and conventional metal needles in the performance of EUS guided biliary drainage is needed. PMID:27822005

  4. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Jinga, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The negative predictive value of endoscopic ultrasonography fine-needle aspiration is relatively low. To achieve the improvement of the diagnostic yield, the following were proposed: a higher number of passes, the presence of the rapid on-site cytopathologist evaluation, the fanning technique, or the repetition of the fine needle biopsy. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endosonography may better identify the targeted area in the lesions by avoiding the inside necrosis and the vessels of fibrosis, so it can guide the fine-needle aspiration. Both techniques are complementary, not competitive, and they can be done in the same session. The combined technique is simple, safe, and requires only a few minutes with minimal extra costs compared to standard fine-needle aspiration. It minimally increases the diagnostic rate, and it permits the decrease of the number of passes. However, we will know its real clinical impact only in the future and whether it will be incorporated into the lesion assessment process.

  5. Usefulness of strain elastography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a widely used technique for assessing the mechanical characteristics of tissues. Although there are several ultrasound elastography techniques, strain elastography (SE) is currently the most widely used technique for visualizing an elastographic map in real time. Among its various indications, SE is especially useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal system. In this article, we review the SE techniques for clinical practice and describe the images produced by these techniques in the context of the musculoskeletal system. SE provides information about tissue stiffness and allows real-time visualization of the image; however, SE cannot completely replace gray-scale, color, or power Doppler ultrasonography. SE can increase diagnostic accuracy and may be useful for the follow-up of benign lesions. PMID:26810195

  6. The impact of endoscopic ultrasound findings on clinical decision making in Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia or early esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bulsiewicz, W J; Dellon, E S; Rogers, A J; Pasricha, S; Madanick, R D; Grimm, I S; Shaheen, N J

    2014-07-01

    The clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for staging patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) prior to endoscopic therapy is unclear. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with HGD or IMC referred to an American medical center for endoscopic treatment between 2004 and 2010. All patients had pretreatment staging by EUS. We examined the frequency that EUS findings consistent with advanced disease (tumor invasion into the submucosa, lymph node involvement, or regional metastasis) led to a change in management. The analysis was stratified by nodularity and pre-EUS histology. We identified one hundred thirty-five patients with HGD (n = 106, 79%) or IMC (n = 29, 21%) had staging by EUS (79 non-nodular, 56 nodular). Pathologic lymph nodes or metastases were not found by EUS. There were no endosonographic abnormalities noted in any patient with non-nodular mucosa (0/79). Abnormal EUS findings were present in 8/56 patients (14%) with nodular neoplasia (five IMC, three HGD). Endoscopic mucosal resection was performed in 44 patients with a nodule, with 13% (6/44) having invasive cancer. In nodular neoplasia, the EUS and endoscopic mucosal resection were abnormal in 24% (5/21) and 40% (6/15) of those with IMC and 9% (3/35) and 0% (0/29) of those with HGD, respectively. In this study we found that EUS did not alter management in patients with non-nodular HGD or IMC. Because the diagnostic utility of EUS in subjects with non-nodular Barrett's esophagus is low, the value of performing endoscopic mucosal resection in this setting is questionable. For patients with nodular neoplasia, resection of the nodule with histological examination had greater utility than staging by EUS.

  7. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Seicean, Andrada; Jinga, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The negative predictive value of endoscopic ultrasonography fine-needle aspiration is relatively low. To achieve the improvement of the diagnostic yield, the following were proposed: a higher number of passes, the presence of the rapid on-site cytopathologist evaluation, the fanning technique, or the repetition of the fine needle biopsy. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endosonography may better identify the targeted area in the lesions by avoiding the inside necrosis and the vessels of fibrosis, so it can guide the fine-needle aspiration. Both techniques are complementary, not competitive, and they can be done in the same session. The combined technique is simple, safe, and requires only a few minutes with minimal extra costs compared to standard fine-needle aspiration. It minimally increases the diagnostic rate, and it permits the decrease of the number of passes. However, we will know its real clinical impact only in the future and whether it will be incorporated into the lesion assessment process. PMID:28218198

  8. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  9. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with endoscopic ultrasound for the treatment of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2000-05-01

    In 1995, PDT was approved for palliative use in patients with esophageal cancer. We report our experience using PDT to treat esophageal cancer patients previously treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In our series, nine patients referred for PDT with persistent esophageal cancer after chemo-radiation therapy. We found: (1) All patients were men with a mean age of 63 years and eight out of nine had adenocarcinoma with Barrett's esophagus; (2) All patients required endoscopic dilation after PDT; (3) At a mean follow up of 4 months, two T2N0 patients had no demonstrable tumor and all three T3N0 patients had greater than 50% tumor reduction (the partially responsive T3N0 patients will be offered repeat PDT); (4) Patients with metastatic disease (T3N1 or M1) had effective dysphagia palliation. Thus, PDT is safe and effective in ablating all or most tumor in patients with persistent esophageal cancer after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  10. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; He, Xu; Tian, Chuan; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures.

  11. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your test will be done. Alternative Names Sonogram Images Abdominal ultrasound Ultrasound in pregnancy 17 week ultrasound ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  12. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  13. Use of a novel covered self-expandable metal stent with an anti-migration system for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Villalobos-Garita, Álvaro; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The development of pseudocysts in patients with chronic pancreatitis has been reported in 23%-60% of cases and drainage is indicated when they become symptomatic. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage with the placement of plastic or metallic stents to create a cystogastric anastomosis has been shown to be a reliable and efficacious maneuver. Metallic stent use appears to be a safe and effective alternative that shortens the length of time of the procedure and maintains a greater diameter in the cystogastric communication. However, important migration rates have been reported. The use of new metallic stents that are specially designed to prevent migration represents a promising development in the treatment of these group of patients that appears to be safe and effective for pseudocyst drainage and could importantly reduce migration rates, while at the same time having the advantage of a single step procedure and a larger fistula diameter in the endoscopic cystogastric anastomosis. PMID:23772268

  14. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. Results The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:28243045

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  16. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  17. Strain US Elastography for the Characterization of Thyroid Nodules: Advantages and Limitation.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Grazhdani, Hektor; Drakonaki, Elena; D'Andrea, Vito; Di Segni, Mattia; Kaleshi, Erton; Calliada, Fabrizio; Catalano, Carlo; Redler, Adriano; Brunese, Luca; Drudi, Francesco Maria; Fumarola, Angela; Carbotta, Giovanni; Frattaroli, Fabrizio; Di Leo, Nicola; Ciccariello, Mauro; Caratozzolo, Marcello; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules, with their high prevalence in the general population, represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Ultrasound (US), although absolutely reliable in detecting thyroid nodules, is still not accurate enough to differentiate them into benign and malignant. A promising novel modality, US elastography, has been introduced in order to further increase US accuracy. The purpose of this review article is to assess the thyroid application of US strain elastography, also known as real-time elastography or quasistatic elastography. We provide a presentation of the technique, and of up-to-date literature, analyzing the most prominent results reported for thyroid nodules differentiation. The practical advantages and limitations of strain elastography are extensively discussed herein.

  18. Strain US Elastography for the Characterization of Thyroid Nodules: Advantages and Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Vito; Grazhdani, Hektor; Drakonaki, Elena; D'Andrea, Vito; Di Segni, Mattia; Kaleshi, Erton; Calliada, Fabrizio; Catalano, Carlo; Brunese, Luca; Drudi, Francesco Maria; Fumarola, Angela; Carbotta, Giovanni; Frattaroli, Fabrizio; Di Leo, Nicola; Ciccariello, Mauro; Caratozzolo, Marcello; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules, with their high prevalence in the general population, represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Ultrasound (US), although absolutely reliable in detecting thyroid nodules, is still not accurate enough to differentiate them into benign and malignant. A promising novel modality, US elastography, has been introduced in order to further increase US accuracy. The purpose of this review article is to assess the thyroid application of US strain elastography, also known as real-time elastography or quasistatic elastography. We provide a presentation of the technique, and of up-to-date literature, analyzing the most prominent results reported for thyroid nodules differentiation. The practical advantages and limitations of strain elastography are extensively discussed herein. PMID:25954310

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted direct peritoneal visualization with a small-caliber scope: A proof of concept study in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Shin, Dongsuk; Irisawa, Atsushi; Fleming, Jason B.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery techniques can diagnose peritoneal findings that suggest tumor cell dissemination. However, they have not been incorporated into routine practice, mainly owing to their complexity. To develop a minimally invasive endoscopic technique for the diagnosis of peritoneal findings, we conducted feasibility study using an acute swine model. Materials and Methods: This study involved six domestic pigs. Trans-gastric access to the peritoneal cavity was performed utilizing an endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) technique. After dilation of the needle hole with a biliary dilatation catheter and balloon, a small-caliber scope was inserted into the peritoneal cavity. Peritoneal images were obtained with the scope and a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME). Main outcome measurements were technical feasibility and time needed to access the peritoneal cavity. Results: Direct visualization of the peritoneum was successful in all six pigs and gained access to the gross appearance of the peritoneal cavity. HRME imaging with topical contrast agent also obtained reasonable quality images representing nuclei of the peritoneal mesothelium. Average operation time from the initiation of EUS-FNA to acquiring peritoneal images was 26.5 min (range 15-40 min). Autopsy found no damage to the adjacent organs, and stomach wall defects were tightly closed with hemostasis clips. Conclusion: EUS-assisted direct peritoneal visualization with small-caliber scope is technically feasible. HRME may assist in the diagnosis of findings on the peritoneum. PMID:25485270

  20. High risk of acute pancreatitis after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali A.; Shahid, Haroon; Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Huntington, William; Ghumman, Saad S.; Loren, David E.; Kowalski, Thomas E.; Laique, Sobia; Hayat, Umar; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Data on the risk of acute pancreatitis following endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic cystic lesions are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions, and determine whether there was a difference in pancreatitis risk in patients with side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (SB-IPMN). Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions was performed. The primary outcome measure was development of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA. Factors associated with acute pancreatitis were examined by statistical analysis to determine independent predictors of acute pancreatitis. Statistical significance was determined at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: We identified 186 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions and 557 with solid lesions in which EUS-FNA was performed. The median size of the cysts was 19 mm (range: 10-66 mm). There were 37 IPMNs, 33 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 58 serous cysts and 46 pseudocysts and 12 solid-cystic ductal carcinomas. The majority of patients (75%) with solid lesions were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Patients with pancreatic cysts had a statistically greater frequency of developing pancreatitis after EUS-FNA when compared to those with solid lesions (2.6% vs. 0.36% respectively; P = 0.13). In patients with cysts, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (with and without pancreatitis) with regard to a cyst location, size of the cyst, and number of needle passes or trainee involvement. Patients with SB-IPMN had a statistically higher frequency of pancreatitis after EUS-FNA compared to those with other cyst types (8% vs. 1.3% respectively; odds ratio = 6.4, 95% confidence intervals = 1.0-40.3, P = 0.05). Discussion: Patients with SB-IPMN are at a higher risk of developing acute pancreatitis after

  1. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses

    PubMed Central

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. METHODS Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. RESULTS Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. CONCLUSION Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle. PMID:27818598

  2. Intra-channel stent release technique for fluoroless endoscopic ultrasound-guided lumen-apposing metal stent placement: changing the paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Anderloni, Andrea; Attili, Fabia; Carrara, Silvia; Galasso, Domenico; Di Leo, Milena; Costamagna, Guido; Repici, Alessandro; Kunda, Rastislav; Larghi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, a novel lumen-apposing fully covered self-expanding metal stent (LA-FCSEMS) mounted on an electrocautery-enhanced delivery system has been developed to perform endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transluminal drainage. From early experience, however, release of the proximal flange of the stent has mostly been done using endoscopic view guidance to ensure proper positioning. Aim We describe a new technique that we have named the Intra-Channel Stent Release Technique (ICSRT) to perform stent placement under complete EUS control, without the use of either fluoroscopic or endoscopic views. Material and methods Data on all consecutive patients who underwent EUS-guided drainage using the new ICSRT between June 2014 and April 2016 were retrospectively retrieved from two institution databases. All EUS procedures were performed by experienced endoscopists with the patient under conscious or deep sedation. The total procedure and stent deployment time, and adverse events related to stent positioning with the ICSRT were evaluated. Results One hundred consecutive patients (51 women; mean age ± SD, 66 ± 15.2 years, range 34 – 95) underwent EUS-guided transluminal drainage with the Hot AXIOS™ device using the new ICSRT. The procedure was technically successful in all but one patient (1 %). The mean total procedural time was 21.9 minutes (range 7 – 50), while the mean time for stent placement was 3.2 minutes (range 1 – 15). No major adverse events occurred. Discussion The ICSRT has been used to deploy the newly developed lumen-apposing FCSEMS under complete EUS guidance without fluoroscopic and/or endoscopic assistance. The technique appears to be safe and highly effective and should be learned by all interventional endosonographers in order to be able to perform drainage in all clinical scenarios.

  3. Diagnostic Performance of Shear Wave Elastography Parameters Alone and in Combination with Conventional B-Mode Ultrasound Parameters for the Characterization of Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective, Dual-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Zalewska, Elwira Bakuła; Gumińska, Anna; Słapa, Rafał Zenon; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Wareluk, Paweł; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2016-12-01

    The aims of our study were to determine whether shear wave elastography (SWE) can improve the conventional B-mode differentiation of thyroid lesions, determine the most accurate SWE parameter for differentiation and assess the influence of microcalcifications and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis on SWE values. We examined 119 patients with 169 thyroid nodules who prospectively underwent B-mode ultrasound and SWE using the same ultrasound machine. The parameters assessed using SWE were: mean elasticity within the entire lesion (SWE-whole) and mean (SWE-mean) and maximum (SWE-max) elasticity for a 2-mm-diameter region of interest in the stiffest portion of the lesion, excluding microcalcifications. The discriminant powers of a generalized estimating equation model including B-mode parameters only and a generalized estimation equation model including both B-mode and SWE parameters were assessed and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, in association with pathologic verification. In total, 50 and 119 malignant and benign lesions were detected. In generalized estimated equation regression, the B-mode parameters associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for malignant lesions were microcalcifications (OR = 4.3), hypo-echogenicity (OR = 3.13) and irregular margins (OR = 10.82). SWE-max was the only SWE independent parameter in differentiating between malignant and benign tumors (OR = 2.95). The area under the curve for the B-mode model was 0.85, whereas that for the model combining B-mode and SWE parameters was 0.87. There was no significant difference in mean SWE values between patients with and without chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The results of the present study suggest that SWE is a valuable tool for the characterization of thyroid nodules, with SWE-max being a significant parameter in differentiating benign and malignant lesions, independent of conventional B-mode parameters. The combination of SWE parameters and

  4. Crawling wave optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Meemon, Panomsak; Yao, Jianing; Chu, Ying-Ju; Zvietcovich, Fernando; Parker, Kevin J; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-03-01

    Elastography is a technique that measures and maps the local elastic property of biological tissues. Aiming for detection of micron-scale inclusions, various optical elastography, especially optical coherence elastography (OCE), techniques have been investigated over the past decade. The challenges of current optical elastography methods include the decrease in elastographic resolution as compared with its parent imaging resolution, the detection sensitivity and accuracy, and the cost of the overall system. Here we report for the first time, we believe, on an elastography technique-crawling wave optical coherence elastography (CRW-OCE)-which significantly lowers the requirements on the imaging speed and opens the path to high-resolution and high-sensitivity OCE at relatively low cost. Methods of crawling wave excitation, data acquisition, and crawling wave tracking are presented.

  5. Copolymer-in-oil phantom materials for elastography.

    PubMed

    Oudry, J; Bastard, C; Miette, V; Willinger, R; Sandrin, L

    2009-07-01

    Phantoms that mimic mechanical and acoustic properties of soft biological tissues are essential to elasticity imaging investigation and to elastography device characterization. Several materials including agar/gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylamide gels have been used successfully in the past to produce tissue phantoms, as reported in the literature. However, it is difficult to find a phantom material with a wide range of stiffness, good stability over time and high resistance to rupture. We aim at developing and testing a new copolymer-in-oil phantom material for elastography. The phantom is composed of a mixture of copolymer, mineral oil and additives for acoustic scattering. The mechanical properties of phantoms were evaluated with a mechanical test instrument and an ultrasound-based elastography technique. The acoustic properties were investigated using a through-transmission water-substituting method. We showed that copolymer-in-oil phantoms are stable over time. Their mechanical and acoustic properties mimic those of most soft tissues: the Young's modulus ranges from 2.2-150 kPa, the attenuation coefficient from 0.4-4.0 dB.cm(-1) and the ultrasound speed from 1420-1464 m/s. Their density is equal to 0.90 +/- 0.04 g/cm3. The results suggest that copolymer-in-oil phantoms are attractive materials for elastography.

  6. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  7. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. ‘ground truth’) in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity—one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast

  8. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-07

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. 'ground truth') in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity-one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast. In

  9. In vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen by using high-resolution microendoscopy system under endoscopic ultrasound guidance: A preliminary study using a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Shin, Dongsuk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Coghlan, Lezlee; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful to obtain specimens from lesions underlying deep parts of the liver and spleen. However, the development of novel ancillary techniques must be explored to reduce the number of needle passes and potential adverse effects during this procedure. We conducted an animal study using a swine to demonstrate technical feasibility of in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the high-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) system under EUS guidance. We successfully performed the study. No significant acute adverse events occurred during the procedure. The HRME system could obtain clear images representing cytology-level morphology of spleen and liver. Hence, it is found out that in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the HRME system under EUS guidance is technically feasible. PMID:27503155

  10. Ultrasound studies on the shift of cervical tissues in different head and neck positions--impact on transoral endoscopic, minimally invasive and conventional thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Krüger, Jochen

    2011-09-01

    During the development of a transoral endoscopic, minimally invasive approach for thyroidectomy, the question arose as to how the distances of the submandibular gland (SG)-hyoid bone (HB)-thyroid gland (TG) change in differing head positions and how the TG itself changes shape. In a prospective, two-armed ultrasound study we studied 20 healthy volunteers each, all with no history of neck surgery or thyroid disease. Distances were measured in normal, reclined and "reclined with open mouth" positions. We found no remarkable differences and the distances were comparable with conventional open or minimally invasive thyroidectomy approaches. The TG lengthened significantly during reclination. This may result in a difficult preparation in the region of the suspensory ligament and may therefore increase the rate of postoperative vocal cord palsy caused by stretching of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. A supine flat position may minimize the risk of this postoperative complication of thyroidectomy.

  11. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  12. Development of a model based on biochemical, real-time tissue elastography and ultrasound data for the staging of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi-Hao; Li, Qiao; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Ying, Li

    2016-01-01

    The liver fibrosis index (LFI), based on real-time tissue elastography (RTE), is a method currently used to assess liver fibrosis. However, this method may not consistently distinguish between the different stages of fibrosis, which limits its accuracy. The aim of the present study was to develop novel models based on biochemical, RTE and ultrasound data for predicting significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 85 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were prospectively enrolled and underwent a liver biopsy and RTE. The parameters for predicting significant fibrosis and cirrhosis were determined by conducting multivariate analyses. The splenoportal index (SPI; P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.023) were confirmed as independent predictors of significant fibrosis. Using multivariate analyses for identifying parameters that predict cirrhosis, significant differences in γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT; P=0.049), SPI (P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.001) were observed. Based on these observations, the novel model LFI-SPI score (LSPS) was developed to predict the occurrence of significant liver fibrosis, with an area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.87. The diagnostic accuracy of the LSPS model was superior to that of the LFI (AUROC=0.76; P=0.0109), aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI; AUROC=0.64; P=0.0031), fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4; AUROC= 0.67; P= 0.0044) and FibroScan (AUROC=0.68; P=0.0021) models. In addition, the LFI-SPI-GGT score (LSPGS) was developed for the purposes of predicting liver cirrhosis, demonstrating an AUROC value of 0.93. The accuracy of LSPGS was similar to that of FibroScan (AUROC=0.85; P=0.134), but was superior to LFI (AUROC= 0.81; P= 0.0113), APRI (AUROC= 0.67; P<0.0001) and FIB-4 (AUROC=0.719; P=0.0005). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the use of LSPS and LSPGS may complement current methods of diagnosing significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with CHB

  13. Optical Coherence Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Oldenburg, Amy L.; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Sampson, David D.

    The mechanical properties of tissue are pivotal in its function and behavior, and are often modified by disease. From the nano- to the macro-scale, many tools have been developed to measure tissue mechanical properties, both to understand the contribution of mechanics in the origin of disease and to improve diagnosis. Optical coherence elastography is applicable to the intermediate scale, between that of cells and whole organs, which is critical in the progression of many diseases and not widely studied to date. In optical coherence elastography, a mechanical load is imparted to a tissue and the resulting deformation is measured using optical coherence tomography. The deformation is used to deduce a mechanical parameter, e.g., Young's modulus, which is mapped into an image, known as an elastogram. In this chapter, we review the development of optical coherence elastography and report on the latest developments. We provide a focus on the underlying principles and assumptions, techniques to measure deformation, loading mechanisms, imaging probes and modeling, including the inverse elasticity problem.

  14. The role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: SEED-SEPD-AEG Joint Guideline.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; González-Panizo-Tamargo, Fernando; Barturen, Ángel; Calderón, Ángel; Esteban, José Miguel; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Gimeno-García, Antonio; Ginés, Angels; Lariño, José; Pérez-Carreras, Mercedes; Romero, Rafael; Súbtil, José Carlos; Vila, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in our environment, and represents the first cause of cancer related death in western countries. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients may be complicated, with endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), classically performed by gastroenterologists, playing a very important role. As this disease is not closely related to the "digestive tract", gastroenterologists have been forced to update their knowledge on this field o adequately diagnose this significant group of patients. The recent advent of modern and promising techniques like endobronchial ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA) have prompted new approaches for diagnosis and staging of this type of patients. In this clinical guideline, the "Sociedad Española de Endoscopia Digestiva" (SEED), "Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva" (SEPD) and the "AsociaciónEspañola de Gastroenterología", have jointed efforts to update the existing knowledge on the field and provide their members with evidence based recommendations.

  15. Ultrasound-Based Guidance for Partial Breast Irradiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Tracked ultrasound elastography can be used for guidance in partial breast radiotherapy by visualizing the hard...scar tissue around the lumpectomy cavity. For clinical success, the elastography method needs to be robust to the sources of decorrelation between...out-of-plane motion of the probe. In this wok, we present a novel elastography technique that is based on analytic minimization of a regularized cost

  16. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  17. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  18. Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System and Ultrasound Elastography: Diagnostic Accuracy as a Tool in Recommending Repeat Fine-Needle Aspiration for Solid Thyroid Nodules with Non-Diagnostic Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology.

    PubMed

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2016-02-01

    The Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TIRADS) has been found to be accurate in the stratification of malignancy risk, and elastography has been found to have a high negative predictive value in non-diagnostic thyroid nodules. Through assessment of 104 solid non-diagnostic thyroid nodules, this study investigated the role of both in recommending repeat ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration for solid thyroid nodules with non-diagnostic cytology. All nodules were classified by TIRADS (categories 4a, 4b, 4c and 5), and elastography scores were assigned according to the Rago and Asteria criteria. The malignancy risks for TIRADS categories 4a, 4b, 4c and 5 were 12.5%, 25.0%, 25.8% and 16.7%, respectively. Elastography revealed the highest diagnostic performance for TIRADS category 4a, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value and accuracy of 100%, 85.7%, 100%, 50% and 87.5% for the Asteria criteria. Observation may be considered for non-diagnostic solid nodules that have no other suspicious ultrasonographic features and are also benign on real-time strain elastography using the Asteria criteria.

  19. Cervical elastography during pregnancy: a critical review of current approaches with a focus on controversies and limitations.

    PubMed

    Fruscalzo, Arrigo; Mazza, Edoardo; Feltovich, Helen; Schmitz, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    In normal pregnancy, the cervix functions as a protective mechanical barrier that must remain tight and closed. Premature remodeling and consecutive shortening occur in many cases of spontaneous preterm birth. Although the complex underlying physiology of normal and abnormal cervical remodeling is not fully understood, it is clear that cervical softening occurs prior to delivery, and inappropriate timing seems to be associated with preterm delivery. Also, degree of cervical softness is a component of the Bishop score currently used clinically to predict successful induction of labor. Therefore, the assessment of changes in cervical stiffness with ultrasound elastography techniques might be useful in the prediction of preterm delivery or successful induction of labor. Two different approaches for cervical elastography for quantitative determination of the physical properties of the pregnant cervix have been developed: strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Recently, several feasibility studies showed the reliability of these cervical elastography techniques for the prediction of preterm delivery and successful labor induction. In this review, we contrast strain elastography, which determines only relative values of tissue stiffness because the applied transducer pressure is unknown, with shear wave elastography, which provides, in principle at least, a more objective description of tissue softness. While more promising preliminary results involving these approaches to assessing cervical softness have been recently published, current limitations in technical implementation need to be addressed before elastography techniques will become clinically useful. We discuss these limitations and present challenges for future studies and equipment development.

  20. Resolution of axial shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear strain due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear strain elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear strain elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the strain value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear strain values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear strain profile oriented at 45° to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear strain along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45° orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift.

  1. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  2. The integration of 18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography and endoscopic ultrasound in the treatment-planning process for esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre . E-mail: a_konski@fccc.edu; Doss, Mohan; Milestone, Barton; Haluszka, Oleh; Hanlon, Alexandra; Freedman, Gary; Adler, Lee

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is important in radiation therapy treatment planning. We evaluated the impact of PET and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) compared with CT simulation in the planning of radiation fields for patients with esophageal carcinoma. Material and methods: Twenty-five patients presenting with esophageal carcinoma for radiation therapy underwent PET scans in the treatment position after conventional CT simulation. Patients underwent PET/CT scanning after being injected with 10 to 20 mCi of [F-18]-2-deoxy-2-fluro-D-glucose. The length of the abnormality seen on the CT portion of the PET/CT scan vs. the PET scan alone was determined independently by 2 separate investigators. The length of the GTV and detection of regional adenopathy by PET was also correlated with EUS in 18 patients. Of the 18 patients who had EUS, 2 had T2 tumors and 16 had T3 tumors. Eighteen patients had adenocarcinoma and 7 had squamous cell carcinoma. Nine tumors were located at the gastroesophageal junction, 8 at the lower esophagus, 7 in the middle esophagus, and 1 in the cervical esophagus. The PET scans were reviewed to determine the length of the abnormality by use of a standard uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 to delineate the tumor extent. Results: The mean length of the cancer was 5.4 cm (95% CI 4.4-6.4 cm) as determined by PET scan, 6.77 cm (95% CI, 5.6-7.9 cm) as determined by CT scan, and 5.1 cm (95% CI, 4.0-6.1 cm) for the 22 patients who had endoscopy. The length of the tumors was significantly longer as measured by CT scans compared with PET scans (p = 0.0063). EUS detected significantly more patients with periesophageal and celiac lymphadenopathy compared to PET and CT. The SUV of the esophageal tumors was higher in patients with peri-esophageal lymphadenopathy identified on PET scans. Conclusion: Endoscopic ultrasound and PET scans can add additional information to aid the radiation oncologist's ability to precisely identify the GTV in

  3. Comparing cost-effectiveness between endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with predefined risks: A study from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Netinatsunton, Nisa; Attasaranya, Siriboon; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Witeerungrot, Teepawit; Jongboonyanuparp, Theeratus; Piratvisuth, Teerha; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) achieves results comparable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stone, but studies from the western have shown EUS to be less expensive in patients with intermediate risk for CBD stones. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of EUS and ERCP in the diagnosis of CBD stones in a developing country. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done with 141 patients with suspected CBD stones, categorized as having high or intermediate risk for CBD stone. All underwent EUS, and the high-risk patients had ERCP after the EUS. For intermediate-risk patients, an ERCP was done at the discretion of the attending physician. The CBD stone was confirmed by ERCP in patients who underwent both EUS and ERCP. Patients who received EUS only were followed up every 3 months for 1 year. The false negative rate in patients with EUS and ERCP was estimated in the clinical follow-up. Result: One hundred and forty-one patients (141: 83 females, 58 males) with a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 55.71 ±18.68 years were recruited. Ninety-four (94) patients underwent both EUS and ERCP. ERCP confirmed the diagnosis in 83 of 85 patients (97.6%) with CBD stone detected by EUS. Forty-seven (47) patients with a negative EUS and no ERCP done were symptom-free during the follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS were 97.6%, 80%, 97.6%, and 80% respectively. An EUS-based strategy for high-risk patients was 15% more expensive than an ERCP-based strategy, but the EUS-based strategy reduced the cost to 37.78% less than the ERCP-based strategy in intermediate-risk patients. The EUS-based strategy was cost-saving when the CBD stone prevalence was less than 52.5%. Conclusion: EUS is safer and less costly than ERCP for CBD stone diagnosis in patients with intermediate risk. PMID:27386473

  4. Analisys of pectoralis major tendon in weightlifting athletes using ultrasonography and elastography

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ferretti, Mario; Kawakami, Eduardo Felipe Kin Ito; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Corrêa; Yamada, Andre Fukunishi; de Oliveira, Gabriela Clemente; Cohen, Moisés; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate tendinopathy of the pectoralis major muscle in weightlifting athletes using ultrasound and elastography. Methods This study included 20 patients, 10 with rupture of the pectoralis major muscle and 10 control patients. We evaluated pectoralis major muscle contralateral tendon with ultrasonographic and elastography examinations. The ultrasonographic examinations were performed using a high-resolution B mode ultrasound device. The elastography evaluation was classified into three patterns: (A), if stiff (more than 50% area with blue staining); (B), if intermediate (more than 50% green); and (C), if softened (more than 50% red). Results Patients’ mean age was 33±5.3 years. The presence of tendinous injury measured by ultrasound had a significant different (p=0.0055), because 80% of cases had tendinous injury versus 10% in the Control Group. No significant differences were seen between groups related with change in elastography (p=0.1409). Conclusion Long-term bodybuilders had ultrasound image with more tendinous injury than those in Control Group. There was no statistical significance regarding change in tendon elasticity compared with Control Group. PMID:26761551

  5. 2D ultrasonic elastography with lateral displacement estimation using statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Haolin; Cheng, Yangjie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is the method of obtaining relative stiffness information of biological tissue, which plays an important role in early diagnosis. Generally, a gradient-based strain imaging algorithm assumes that motion only occurs in an axial direction. However, because tissue has different relative stiffness, the scatter presents lateral motion under high freehand compression. Therefore, errors occur in estimating the cross-correlation phase in the calculation window. A 2D elastography algorithm with lateral displacement estimation using statistics was proposed to reduce errors. The new method was investigated through simulation, and the experiment confirmed that errors introduced by lateral tissue movement have been greatly reduced with no sacrifice of real-time ultrasonic imaging quality.

  6. Toward optical guidance during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations of pancreatic masses using single fiber reflectance spectroscopy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; van Gerven, P.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Sven Mieog, J.; Amelink, Arjen; Veselic, Maud; Morreau, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses suffer from sample errors and low-negative predictive values. Fiber-optic spectroscopy in the visible to near-infrared wavelength spectrum can noninvasively extract physiological parameters from tissue and has the potential to guide the sampling process and reduce sample errors. We assessed the feasibility of single fiber (SF) reflectance spectroscopy measurements during EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses and its ability to distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic tissue. A single optical fiber was placed inside a 19-gauge biopsy needle during EUS-FNA and at least three reflectance measurements were taken prior to FNA. Spectroscopy measurements did not cause any related adverse events and prolonged procedure time with ˜5 min. An accurate correlation between spectroscopy measurements and cytology could be made in nine patients (three benign and six malignant). The oxygen saturation and bilirubin concentration were significantly higher in benign tissue compared with malignant tissue (55% versus 21%, p=0.038; 166 μmol/L versus 17 μmol/L, p=0.039, respectively). To conclude, incorporation of SF spectroscopy during EUS-FNA was feasible, safe, and relatively quick to perform. The optical properties of benign and malignant pancreatic tissue are different, implying that SF spectroscopy can potentially guide the FNA sampling.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Bradley W.; Harvey, Harold A.; Dye, Charles E.; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  10. A meta-analysis and systematic review: Success of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures and a failed ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Bechtold, Matthew L.; Forcione, David; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: In patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) guided biliary stenting fails in 5% to 10% patients due to difficult anatomy/inability to cannulate the papilla. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been described. Primary outcomes were to evaluate the biliary drainage success rates with EUS and compare it to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Secondary outcomes were to evaluate overall procedure related complications. Methods: Study selection criteria: Studies evaluating the efficacy of EUS-BD and comparing EUS-BD versus PTBD in inoperable malignant biliary stricture patients with a failed ERCP were included in this analysis. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, and Ovid journals. Two authors independently searched and extracted data. The study design was written in accordance to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Subgroup analyses of prospective studies and EUS-BD versus PTBD were performed. Statistical method: Pooled proportions were calculated using fixed and random effects model. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity among studies. Results: Initial search identified 846 reference articles, of which 124 were selected and reviewed. Sixteen studies (N = 528) that met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. In the pooled patient population, the percentage of patients that had a successful biliary drainage with EUS was 90.91% (95% CI = 88.10–93.38). The proportion of patients that had overall procedure related complications with EUS-PD was 16.46% (95% CI = 13.20–20.01). The pooled odds ratio for successful biliary drainage in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was 3.06 (95% CI = 1.11–8.43). The risk difference for overall procedure related complications in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was −0.21 (95% CI = −0

  11. Confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography using a ring ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-24

    We designed and developed a confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography system. A ring ultrasound transducer was used to achieve reflection mode excitation and generate an oscillating acoustic radiation force in order to generate displacements within the tissue, which were detected using the phase-resolved optical coherence elastography method. Both phantom and human tissue tests indicate that this system is able to sense the stiffness difference of samples and quantitatively map the elastic property of materials. Our confocal setup promises a great potential for point by point elastic imaging in vivo and differentiation of diseased tissues from normal tissue.

  12. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of spherical masses with polarized torsional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadj Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Trop, Isabelle; Cloutier, Guy

    2012-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance (SWIR) is a technique for dynamic ultrasound elastography of confined mechanical inclusions. It was developed for breast tumor imaging and tissue characterization. This method relies on the polarization of torsional shear waves modeled with the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. To validate modeling, an invitro set-up was used to measure and image the first three eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a soft sphere. A preliminary invivo SWIR measurement on a breast fibroadenoma is also reported. Results revealed the potential of SWIR elastography to detect and mechanically characterize breast lesions for early cancer detection.

  13. Strain index: a new visualizing parameter for US elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Cabrera, Dario; de Luis-García, R.; Tristán-Vega, A.; Alberola-López, Carlos; Ruiz-Alzola, Juan

    2008-03-01

    Elastography, an ultrasound modality based on the relation between tissue strain and its mechanical properties, has a strong potential in the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors. For instance, tissue affected by breast and prostate cancer undergoes a change in its elastic properties. These changes can be measured using ultrasound signals. The standard way to visualize the elastic properties of tissues in elastography is the representation of the axial strain. Other approaches investigate the information contained in shear strain elastograms, vorticity or the representation of the full strain tensor. In this paper, we propose to represent the elastic behaviour of tissues through the visualization of the Strain Index, related with the trace of the strain tensor. Based on the mathematical interpretation of the strain tensor, this novel parameter is equivalent to the sum of the eigenvalues of the strain tensor, and constitutes a measure of the total amount of strain of the soft tissue. In order to show the potential of this visualization approach, a tissue-mimicking phantom was modeled as a 10x10x5 cm region containing a centered 10mm cylindrical inclusion three times stiffer than the surrounding material, and its elastic behavior was simulated using finite elements software. Synthetic pre- and post-compression (1.25%) B-mode images were computer-generated with ultrasound simulator. Results show that the visualization of the tensor trace significantly improves the representation and detection of inclusions, and can help add insight in the detection of different types of tumors.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage for acute cholecystitis: Long-term outcomes after removal of a self-expandable metal stent

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Ken; Takenaka, Mamoru; Kitano, Masayuki; Omoto, Shunsuke; Miyata, Takeshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Yamao, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the long-term outcomes of this procedure after removal of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). The efficacy and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage (EUS-GBD) with SEMS were also assessed. METHODS Between January 2010 and April 2015, 12 patients with acute calculous cholecystitis, who were deemed unsuitable for cholecystectomy, underwent EUS-GBD with a SEMS. EUS-GBD was performed under the guidance of EUS and fluoroscopy, by puncturing the gallbladder with a needle, inserting a guidewire, dilating the puncture hole, and placing a SEMS. The SEMS was removed and/or replaced with a 7-Fr plastic pigtail stent after cholecystitis improved. The technical and clinical success rates, adverse event rate, and recurrence rate were all measured. RESULTS The rates of technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were 100%, 100%, and 0%, respectively. After cholecystitis improved, the SEMS was removed without replacement in eight patients, whereas it was replaced with a 7-Fr pigtail stent in four patients. Recurrence was seen in one patient (8.3%) who did not receive a replacement pigtail stent. The median follow-up period after EUS-GBD was 304 d (78-1492). CONCLUSION EUS-GBD with a SEMS is a possible alternative treatment for acute cholecystitis. Long-term outcomes after removal of the SEMS were excellent. Removal of the SEMS at 4-wk after SEMS placement and improvement of symptoms might avoid migration of the stent and recurrence of cholecystitis due to food impaction. PMID:28216973

  15. Prospective validation of microRNA signatures for detecting pancreatic malignant transformation in endoscopic-ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Adam E.; Krell, Jonathan; Prado, Mireia Mato; Gall, Tamara M.H.; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Funel, Niccola; Giovannetti, Elisa; Castellano, Leandro; Basyouny, Mohamed; Habib, Nagy A.; Kaltsidis, Harry; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Stebbing, Justin; Jiao, Long R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease. Novel biomarkers are required to aid treatment decisions and improve patient outcomes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially ideal diagnostic biomarkers, as they are stable molecules, and tumour and tissue specific. Results Logistic regression analysis revealed an endoscopic-ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) 2-miRNA classifier (miR-21 + miR-155) capable of distinguishing benign from malignant pancreatic lesions with a sensitivity of 81.5% and a specificity of 85.7% (AUC 0.930). Validation FNA cohorts confirmed both miRNAs were overexpressed in malignant disease, while circulating miRNAs performed poorly. Methods Fifty-five patients with a suspicious pancreatic lesion on cross-sectional imaging were evaluated by EUS-FNA. At echo-endoscopy, the first part of the FNA was sent for cytological assessment and the second part was used for total RNA extraction. Candidate miRNAs were selected after careful review of the literature and expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Validation was performed on an independent cohort of EUS-FNAs, as well as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and plasma samples. Conclusions We provide further evidence for using miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers for pancreatic malignancy. We demonstrate the feasibility of using fresh EUS-FNAs to establish miRNA-based signatures unique to pancreatic malignant transformation and the potential to enhance risk stratification and selection for surgery. PMID:27086919

  16. Targeted next generation sequencing of endoscopic ultrasound acquired cytology from ampullary and pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the potential to aid patient stratification for optimal therapy selection

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Ferga C.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Voss, Jesse S.; Minot, Douglas M.; Tu, Zheng Jin; Henry, Michael R.; Graham, Rondell P.; Vasmatzis, George; Cheville, John C.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Levy, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Less than 10% of registered drug intervention trials for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) include a biomarker stratification strategy. The ability to identify distinct mutation subsets via endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS FNA) molecular cytology could greatly aid clinical trial patient stratification and offer predictive markers. We identified chemotherapy treatment naïve ampullary adenocarcinoma and PDAC patients who underwent EUS FNA to assess multigene mutational frequency and diversity with a surgical resection concordance assessment, where available. Methods Following strict cytology smear screening criteria, targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) using a 160 cancer gene panel was performed. Results Complete sequencing was achieved in 29 patients, whereby 83 pathogenic alterations were identified in 21 genes. Cytology genotyping revealed that the majority of mutations were identified in KRAS (93%), TP53 (72%), SMAD4 (31%), and GNAS (10%). There was 100% concordance for the following pathogenic alterations: KRAS, TP53, SMAD4, KMT2D, NOTCH2, MSH2, RB1, SMARCA4, PPP2R1A, PIK3R1, SCL7A8, ATM, and FANCD2. Absolute multigene mutational concordance was 83%. Incremental cytology smear mutations in GRIN2A, GATA3 and KDM6A were identified despite re-examination of raw sequence reads in the corresponding resection specimens. Conclusions EUS FNA cytology genotyping using a 160 cancer gene NGS panel revealed a broad spectrum of pathogenic alterations. The fidelity of cytology genotyping to that of paired surgical resection specimens suggests that EUS FNA represents a suitable surrogate and may complement the conventional stratification criteria in decision making for therapies and may guide future biomarker driven therapeutic development. PMID:27203738

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate-derived preclinical pancreatic cancer models reveal panitumumab sensitivity in KRAS wild-type tumors.

    PubMed

    Berry, William; Algar, Elizabeth; Kumar, Beena; Desmond, Christopher; Swan, Michael; Jenkins, Brendan J; Croagh, Daniel

    2017-05-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely refractory to existing therapies used in unselected patient trials, thus emphasizing the pressing need for new approaches for patient selection in personalized medicine. KRAS mutations occur in 90% of PC patients and confer resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (e.g., panitumumab), suggesting that KRAS wild-type PC patients may benefit from targeted panitumumab therapy. Here, we use tumor tissue procured by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) to compare the in vivo sensitivity in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of KRAS wild-type and mutant PC tumors to panitumumab, and to profile the molecular signature of these tumors in patients with metastatic or localized disease. Specifically, RNASeq of EUS-FNA-derived tumor RNA from localized (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 20) PC cases revealed a comparable transcriptome profile. Screening the KRAS mutation status of tumor genomic DNA obtained from EUS-FNAs stratified PC patients into either KRAS wild-type or mutant cohorts, and the engraftment of representative KRAS wild-type and mutant EUS-FNA tumor samples into NOD/SCID mice revealed that the growth of KRAS wild-type, but not mutant, PDXs was selectively suppressed with panitumumab. Furthermore, in silico transcriptome interrogation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived KRAS wild-type (n = 38) and mutant (n = 132) PC tumors revealed 391 differentially expressed genes. Taken together, our study validates EUS-FNA for the application of a novel translational pipeline comprising KRAS mutation screening and PDXs, applicable to all PC patients, to evaluate personalized anti-EGFR therapy in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration plus KRAS and GNAS mutation in malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Bournet, Barbara; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Grand, David; Roques, Céline; Breibach, Florence; Cros, Jérome; Muscari, Fabrice; Carrère, Nicolas; Selves, Janick; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background: KRAS and GNAS mutations are common in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia of the pancreas (IPMN). The aims of this study were to assess the role of pre-therapeutic cytopathology combined with KRAS and GNAS mutation assays within cystic fluid sampled by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to predict malignancy of IPMN. Patients and methods: We prospectively included 37 IPMN patients with clinical and/or imaging predictors of malignancy (men: 24; mean age: 69.5 years). Cytopathology (performed on cystic fluid and/or IPMN nodules), KRAS (Exon 2, codon 12) and GNAS (Exon 8, codon 201) mutations assays (using TaqMan® allelic discrimination) were performed on EUS-FNA material. The final diagnosis was obtained from IPMN resections (n = 18); surgical biopsies, EUS-FNA analyses, and follow-up (n = 19): 10 and 27 IPMN were benign and malignant, respectively. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of cytopathology alone to diagnose IPMN malignancy were 55 %, 100 %, 100 %, 45 %, and 66 %, respectively. When KRAS-mutation analysis was combined with cytopathology these values were 92 %, 50 %, 83 %, 71 %, and 81 %, respectively. GNAS assays did not improve the performances of cytopathology alone or those of cytopathology plus a KRAS assay. Conclusions: In patients with a likelihood of malignant IPMN at pre-therapeutic investigation, testing for KRAS mutations in cystic fluid sampling by EUS-FNA improved the results of cytopathology for the diagnosis of malignancy whereas GNAS mutation assay did not. PMID:27995180

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salla, Charitini; Chatzipantelis, Paschalis; Konstantinou, Panagiotis; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Dappola, Victoria

    2007-10-14

    We describe the clinical, imaging and cytopathological features of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS-guided) fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of an unexplained episodic abdominal pain for 2 mo and a short history of hypertension in the endocrinology clinic. Clinical laboratory examinations revealed polycystic ovary syndrome, splenomegaly and low serum amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a mass of the pancreatic tail with solid and cystic consistency. EUS confirmed the mass, both in body and tail of the pancreas, with distinct borders, which caused dilation of the peripheral part of the pancreatic duct (major diameter 3.7 mm). The patient underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA cytology specimens consisted of single cells and aggregates of uniform malignant cells, forming microadenoid structures, branching, papillary clusters with delicate fibrovascular cores and nuclear overlapping. Naked capillaries were also seen. The nuclei of malignant cells were round or oval, eccentric with fine granular chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves in some of them. The malignant cells were periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-Alcian blue (+) and immunocytochemically they were vimentin (+), CA 19.9 (+), synaptophysin (+), chromogranin (-), neuro-specific enolase (-), a1-antitrypsin and a1-antichymotrypsin focal positive. Cytologic findings were strongly suggestive of SPTP. Biopsy confirmed the above cytologic diagnosis. EUS-guided FNA diagnosis of SPTP is accurate. EUS findings, cytomorphologic features and immunostains of cell block help distinguish SPTP from pancreatic endocrine tumors, acinar cell carcinoma and papillary mucinous carcinoma.

  20. Single-dose intra-procedural ceftriaxone during endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic cysts is safe and effective: results from a single tertiary center

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amir; Qi, Rose; Nagubandi, Shyam; Lee, Eric; Kwan, Vu

    2017-01-01

    Background Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is universally used for the investigation and diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions (PCL). Infectious complications following EUS-FNA of PCL are rare. Antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of infection is recommended; however, there is no consensus on the optimal regimen or route of administration. Potential advantages of a single-dose intravenous (IV) antibiotic over a prolonged oral regimen include simplicity, guaranteed delivery and fewer antibiotic related adverse events, but there are only limited data to support this. We aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of a single 1 g dose of IV ceftriaxone in preventing infectious complications following EUS-FNA of PCL. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of EUS-FNA of PCL procedures performed at our center. We reviewed patient medical records for any presentation to a hospital in our district within 30 days of the procedure. An infectious complication was defined as fever/rigors, or bacteremia, or abdominal pain accompanied by imaging or laboratory results suggestive of infection, within 30 days of the procedure. Data collection included patient demographics, procedural data and outcome. Results EUS-FNA of 204 PCL (mean size 18.0 mm) was performed. Successful fluid aspiration was achieved in 94% of cases. Single-dose IV ceftriaxone was given in 146/204 (72%) cases. Four patients had a complication (pancreatitis n=1, post-procedural pain n=3). No infectious complications and no IV antibiotic-related adverse events were identified. Conclusion A single dose of IV ceftriaxone appears to be a safe, effective and convenient intervention for preventing infectious complications after FNA. PMID:28243046

  1. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  2. [Ultrasound diagnostics of diffuse liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Jung, E M; Wiggermann, P; Stroszczynski, C; Reiser, M F; Clevert, D-A

    2012-08-01

    The current improvements in modern high resolution ultrasound technology, like Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI), Speckle Reduction Imaging (SRI), partial color coding of B-mode (Color Coded Imaging), and also the advent of ultrasound based elastography as well as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offer fundamentally new ways to characterize diffuse alterations of the liver parenchyma. Besides metabolic disease, disorders of liver fat distribution, infectious and malignant diseases can cause diffuse alterations of the liver parenchyma. In case of liver fibrosis, only a combination of different ultrasound techniques including CEUS, allows the differentiation between benign dysplastic and malignant lesions. Ultrasound elastography allows assessing the extent of the fibrosis. This article focuses on the different ultrasound based diagnostic possibilities in case of diffuse liver disease.

  3. Endoscopic egomotion computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, Tobias; Ruthotto, Steffen; Rupp, Stephan; Winter, Christian; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Computer assistance in Minimally Invasive Surgery is a very active field of research. Many systems designed for Computer Assisted Surgery require information about the instruments' positions and orientations. Our main focus lies on tracking a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to generate 3D ultrasound volumes. State-of-the-art tracking methods such as optical or electromagnetic tracking systems measure pose with respect to a fixed extra-body coordinate system. This causes inaccuracies of the reconstructed ultrasound volume in the case of patient motion, e.g. due to respiration. We propose attaching an endoscopic camera to the ultrasound probe and calculating the camera motion from the video sequence with respect to the organ surface. We adapt algorithms developed for solving the relative pose problem to recreate the camera path during the ultrasound sweep over the organ. By this image-based motion estimation camera motion can only be determined up to an unknown scale factor, known as the depth-speed-ambiguity. We show, how this problem can be overcome in the given scenario, exploiting the fact, that the distance of the camera to the organ surface is fixed and known. Preprocessing steps are applied to compensate for endoscopic image quality deficiencies.

  4. Are transient and shear wave elastography useful tools in Gaucher disease?

    PubMed

    Webb, Muriel; Zimran, Ari; Dinur, Tama; Shibolet, Oren; Levit, Stella; Steinberg, David M; Salomon, Ophira

    2016-12-23

    Up to now, there are no reliable biochemical markers or imaging that could reveal early tissue damage in Gaucher disease. Therefore, we addressed whether elastography technique can serve as a tool for evaluating patients with Gaucher disease. The study included 42 patients with Gaucher disease type I and 33 patients with liver cirrhosis as well as 22 healthy volunteers. Ultrasound and Doppler examination was performed on each participant prior to apply transient and 2D shear wave elastography. In Gaucher disease the median stiffness of the spleen as assessed by transient elastography (TE) and shear wave elastography (SWE) was 35KPa and 22KPa respectively in contrast to the median stiffness of healthy controls (16.95 and 17.5KPa, p=0.0028 and p=0.0002, respectively) and of patients with cirrhosis (45KPa and 34.5KPa, p=0.015 and p<0.0001 respectively). The liver stiffness in GD as measured by TE and SWE had median values of 7.1KPa and 7KPa respectively, slightly higher than in the healthy controls, but much smaller than for the cirrhotic patients (medians of 24.2KPa and 21KPa). In conclusion, a transient and shear wave elastography show a significant promise as noninvasive and reproducible tools to differentiate Gaucher disease from healthy controls and among those with splenomegaly from cirrhotic patients.

  5. Inability of shear-wave elastography to distinguish malignant from benign prostate tissue – a comparison of biopsy, whole-mount sectioning and shear-wave elastography

    PubMed Central

    Görner, Claudia; Wendler, Johann Jakob; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd; Lux, Anke; Siedentopf, Sandra; Schostak, Martin; Pech, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study was designed to assess the possible usefulness of shear-wave elastography in differentiating between benign and malignant tissue in prostate neoplasia. Patients and methods A total of 120 prostate tissue samples were obtained from 10 patients treated by radical prostatectomy and investigated pre-operatively by ultrasound elastography followed by directed biopsy. After resection, whole-mount sectioning and histological examination was performed. The predictions based on shear-wave elastography were compared with biopsy and histological results. Results The comparison between the results of shear-wave elastography and those of biopsy was performed by receiver operating characteristic analysis, which suggested an optimum cut-off tissue elasticity value of 50 kPa, in agreement with earlier studies aimed at distinguishing between benign and malignant tissue. However, the diagnostic selectivity (and thus the diagnostic power) was poor (area under the curve 0.527, which hardly differs from the value of 0.500 that would correspond to a complete lack of predictive power); furthermore, application of this cut-off value to the samples led to a sensitivity of only 74% and a specificity of only 43%. An analogous comparison between the results of shear-wave elastography and those of whole-mount histology, which itself is more reliable than biopsy, gave an even poorer diagnostic selectivity (sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 35%). Meaningful association with Gleason score was not found for D’Amico risk groups (p = 0.35). Conclusions The (negative) findings of this investigation add to the dissonance among results of studies investigating the possible value of shear-wave elastography as a diagnostic tool to identify malignant neoplasia. There is a clear need for further research to elucidate the diversity of study results and to identify the usefulness, if any, of the method in question. PMID:28138406

  6. MR elastography of hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Adam J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Perrinez, Phillip R.; Weaver, John B.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    Hydrocephalus occurs due to a blockage in the transmission of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in either the ventricles or subarachnoid space. Characteristics of this condition include increased intracranial pressure, which can result in neurologic deterioration [1]. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an imaging technique that estimates the mechanical properties of tissue in vivo. While some investigations of brain tissue have been performed using MRE [2,3,4,5], the effects due to changes in interstitial pressure and fluid content on the mechanical properties of the brain remain unknown. The purpose of this work is to assess the potential of MRE to differentiate between the reconstructed properties of normal and hydrocephalic brains. MRE data was acquired in 18 female feline subjects, 12 of which received kaolin injections resulting in an acute form of hydrocephalus. In each animal, four MRE scans were performed during the process including one pre-injection and three post-injection scans. The elastic parameters were obtained using a subzone-based reconstruction algorithm that solves Navier's equations for linearly elastic materials [6]. The remaining cats were used as controls, injected with saline instead of kaolin. To determine the state of hydrocephalus, ventricular volume was estimated from segmenting anatomical images. The mean ventricular volume of hydrocephalic cats significantly increased (P <~ 0.0001) between the first and second scans. The mean volume was not observed to increase (P >~ 0.5) for the control cats. Also, there was an observable increase in the recorded elastic shear modulus of brain tissue in the normal and hydrocephalic acquisitions. Results suggest that MRE is able to detect changes in the mechanical properties of brain tissue resulting from kaolin-induced hydrocephalus, indicating the need for further study.

  7. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  8. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  9. Angle-independent myocardial elastography: theoretical analysis and clinical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Lee, Wei-Ning; Fung-kee-Fung, Simon D.

    2007-03-01

    Several methods have been introduced in the past few years to quantify left-ventricular strain in order to detect myocardial ischemia and infarction. Myocardial Elastography is one of these methods, which is based on ultrasound Radio-Frequency (RF) signal processing at high frame rates for the highest precision and resolution of strain estimation. Myocardial elastography estimates displacement and strain during the natural contraction of the myocardium using cross-correlation techniques. We have previously shown that imaging of the myocardial strain at high precision allows the correct assessment of the contractility of the cardiac muscle and thus measurement of the extent of ischemia or infarct. In this paper, for the first time in echocardiography, we show how angle-independent techniques can be used to estimate and image the mechanics of normal and pathological myocardia, both in simulations and in vivo. First, the fundamental limits of 2D normal and principal strain component estimation are determined using an ultrasound image formation model and a 2D short-axis view of a 3D left-ventricular, finite-element model, in normal and ischemic configurations. Two-dimensional (i.e., lateral and axial) cumulative displacement and strain components were iteratively estimated and imaged using 1D cross-correlation and recorrelation techniques in a 2D search. Validation of these elastographic findings in one normal human subject was performed. Principal strains were also imaged for the characterization of normal myocardium. In conclusion, the feasibility of angle-independent, 2D myocardial elastography technique was shown through the calculation of the in-plane principal strains, which was proven essential in the reliable depiction of strains independent of the beam-tissue angle or the type of sonographic view used.

  10. Elastography - the movement begins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. S.; Robinson, D. E.; Dadd, M. J.

    2000-06-01

    The advent of real-time ultrasound in the 1970s, together with a growing interest in tissue characterization, led to a number of investigators using the nature of tissue motion to distinguish healthy from diseased tissue. Our group at the (then) Ultrasonics Institute demonstrated the use of phase methods for detecting very small tissue motions, using natural stimuli. The method could also be applied in the lag (autocorrelation) domain to directly measure the amount of deformation to high accuracy. This method was also applied to measuring the amount of dilatation of blood vessels using both conventional and intravascular ultrasound. A basic limitation of these techniques was the poor spatial resolution, and quasistatic methods soon replaced this method of measuring tissue deformation. However, a new way of assessing the health of tissues had been established.

  11. Slow-pull and different conventional suction techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid lesions using 22-gauge needles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ying; Ding, Qing-Yu; Lv, Yang; Guo, Wen; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and compare them with different suction techniques. METHODS From July 2010 to December 2015, 102 patients with pancreatic solid lesions who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with 22-gauge needles were retrospectively evaluated. EUS-FNA diagnosis was based on a cytological examination, and final diagnosis was based on a comprehensive standard of cytological diagnosis, surgical pathology and clinical or imaging follow-up. Cytological specimens were characterized for cellularity and blood contamination. The cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were analyzed. RESULTS Of all of the EUS-FNA procedures, the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were used in 31, 19, 34 and 18 procedures, respectively. There were significant differences between these four suction techniques in terms of cytological diagnostic accuracy (90.3% vs 63.2% vs 58.8% vs 55.6%, P = 0.019), sensitivity (88.2% vs 41.7% vs 40.0% vs 36.4%, P = 0.009) and blood contamination (score ≥ 2 for 29.0% vs 52.6% vs 70.6% vs 72.2%, P = 0.003). The accuracy and sensitivity of the slow-pull technique were significantly higher than those of the suction techniques using 5-mL (P = 0.03, P = 0.014), 10-mL (P = 0.005; P = 0.006) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.01, P = 0.01). Blood contamination was significantly lower in the slow-pull technique than in the suction techniques with 10-mL (P = 0.001) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION The slow-pull technique may increase the cytological diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity with slight blood contamination during EUS-FNA when using 22-gauge needles for solid pancreatic masses. PMID:27818594

  12. Learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic lesions in a novel ex-vivo simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Cohen, J.; Gromski, M. A.; Saito, K.; Loundou, A.; Matthes, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is essential in the management of digestive cancers. However, teaching and learning this technique remain challenging due to the lack of cost-effective models. Material and methods: This was a prospective experimental study using a complete porcine upper gastrointestinal ex-vivo organ package, placed in an Erlangen Active Simulator for Interventional Endoscopy (EASIE-R), and prepared with one cyst and two solid masses (2 cm). Five fellows inexperienced in EUS-FNA were enrolled, performing 10 procedures on each lesion, alternatively. The total time, number of attempts for success, of needle view losses, and of scope handling were recorded, associated with an independent skills rating by procedure. We compared the first 15 procedures with the last 15 for each fellow. Results: The fellows successfully performed all procedures in 2 to 40 minutes, requiring 1 to 6 attempts. All (5/5) improved their total time taken (P < 0.001), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (P < 0.05), scope handling (P < 0.005), and skills rating (P < 0.001), whereas 4/5 (80 %) improved their number of attempts. The overall evaluation showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the total time taken (11.2 ± 7.8 vs 4.3 ± 2.2 minutes), number of attempts (2.6 ± 1.2 vs 1.2 ± 0.7), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (2.3 ± 2 vs 0.5 ± 0.7), and need for scope handling (1.1 ± 1.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.2). We also observed an improvement in skills rating (5 ± 1.9 vs. 7.7 ± 1.1). Conclusion: This newly designed ex-vivo model seems to be an effective way to improve the initial learning of EUS-FNA, by performing 30 procedures. PMID:27995190

  13. Impact and safety of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration on patients with cirrhosis and pyrexia of unknown origin in India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Narendra; Bansal, Rinkesh Kumar; Puri, Rajesh; Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Nasa, Mukesh; Shah, Vinit; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Sud, Randhir; Soin, Arvinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Etiologic diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin is important in patients with cirrhosis for optimal management and to prevent flare up of infectious disease after liver transplantation. However, there is very limited literature available on this subject. The present study aimed to examine the safety and impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with cirrhosis. Methods: The study was conducted between January 2014 and January 2016 at a tertiary care center. A total of 50 (47 lymph nodes, 3 adrenal) EUS guided FNAs were performed in 46 patients. Data are presented as median (25 – 75 IQR). Results: The study included 46 patients (40 males) whose mean age was 47.9 ± 11.1 (SD) years; mean Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score and mean MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) score were 10 (8 – 11) and 18 (12 – 20), respectively. The Child Pugh class was A in 4, B in 14, and C in 28 (including three patients with adrenal FNAs). Indications for FNA were pyrexia of unknown origin and lymphadenopathy on CT imaging. The cytopathological diagnoses were metastatic disease in 1 (adrenal), granulomatous change in 10 (6 positive with acid fast bacilli stain), histoplasmosis in three (two adrenals, one lymph node), 32 lymph nodes were reactive and four lymph node FNAs showed inadequate cellularity. The pathologic nodes had significantly lower long-to-short axis ratio [1.25 (1.09 – 1.28) versus 1.46 (1.22 – 1.87), P = 0.020]; a higher proportion of hypoechoic echotexture (5 versus 3, P = 0.017), and sharply defined borders (4 versus 2, P = 0.029). Complications included mild hepatic encephalopathy related to sedation in two patients with Child’s C status. Conclusion: EUS guided FNA is safe in patients with cirrhosis and modified the management in 14/46 (30.4 %) patients. PMID:27652300

  14. Effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound for detecting mural nodules in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas and for making therapeutic decisions

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Mitsuru; Itoi, Takao; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Ishii, Kentaro; Kamada, Kentaro; Umeda, Junko; Tanaka, Reina; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There have been few studies to date evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) for detecting mural nodules in patients with branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) of the pancreas. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of CE-EUS for detecting mural nodules in BD-IPMN. Patients and Methods: Of the 427 BD-IPMN patients, 21 patients (4.9%) in whom the presence of mural nodules was suggested by CE computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in whom the presence of nodule-like lesions as shown by fundamental EUS, were examined by CE-EUS. Results: The mean diameter of cystic lesions was 29.8 ± 12.8 mm. The mean diameter of mural nodules was 9.5 ± 5.7 mm. BD-IPMN was detected in the pancreatic head in 16 cases, pancreatic body in 2 cases, and pancreatic tail in 3 cases. The mean follow-up period was 17.2 ± 11.9 months. The detection rates of mural nodule-like lesions in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 36.8%, 63.2%, and 100%, respectively. The detection rates of true mural nodules in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 100%, respectively. The echo levels of mural nodule-like lesions on fundamental EUS were hyperechoic in 6 patients, isoechoic in 9 patients, and hypoechoic in 6 patients. The final diagnosis was mucus lumps in 14 patients and mural nodules in 7 patients. The contrast patterns observed were avascular, isovascular, and hypervascular in 14, 3, and 4 patients, respectively. No patients showed a hypovascular pattern. Fourteen patients showing an avascular pattern were diagnosed as having mucus lumps, and they were able to avoid surgical resection. Of the 7 patients who were diagnosed as having mural nodules, 5 underwent surgical resection. The pathological findings were adenocarcinoma in 2 patients and adenoma in 3 patients. Of the 3 adenoma patients, fundamental EUS demonstrated a hypoechoic

  15. Feasibility of monitoring HIFU prostate cancer therapy using elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, Remi; Chapelon, Jean Y.; Bertrand, Michel J.; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of elastographic monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. Since pathological tissues and HIFU-induced lesions exhibit different elastic properties than normal tissues, elastography is potentially able to achieve these goals. An ultrasound scanner was connected to a PC to acquire RF images. This setup is compatible with a HIFU device used for prostate cancer therapy by transrectal route. The therapy transducer and the biplane-imaging probe are covered with a balloon filled with a coupling liquid. Compression of the prostate is applied by inflating the balloon, while imaging sector scans of the prostate. In-vivo elastograms of the prostate were acquired before HIFU treatment. Problems inherent to in-vivo acquisitions are reported, such as undesired tangential displacements during the radial compression. This study shows the potential for in-vivo elastogram acquisition of HIFU-induced lesions in the human prostate.

  16. Could Elastography Be Used in the Prediction of Morbidly Adherent Placentation?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wei Ling; Clapham, Teresa; Angstetra, Donald; Narayan, Rajit

    2016-01-01

    Morbidly adherent placentation (MAP) is a condition in which the placenta is abnormally attached to the uterine myometrium. MAP is a complication of pregnancy that can cause significant morbidity to the mother and fetus and therefore early diagnosis is crucial in its management and prevention of adverse outcomes. Ultrasonography remains the primary diagnostic tool for MAP, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serving as a secondary diagnostic modality. Elastography is a relatively new concept in ultrasound based imaging, which has found application in several fields of medicine, including obstetrics, primarily for evaluation of the firmness of cervical tissue in a preterm labour setting. We report a case on a patient who was diagnosed with placenta increta on ultrasound, aided by elastography and her subsequent management with an en bloc hysterectomy. PMID:27965906

  17. Thyroid Ultrasound: State of the Art Part 1 - Thyroid Ultrasound reporting and Diffuse Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri; Barr, Richard; Bojunga, Jörg; Cantisani, Vito; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Cosgrove, David; Cui, Xin Wu; Dong, Yi; Fenner, Franziska; Radzina, Maija; Vinayak, Sudhir; Xu, Jun Mei; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2017-01-31

    Accurate differentiation of focal thyroid nodules (FTL) and thyroid abnormalities is pivotal for proper diagnostic and therapeutic work-up. In these two part articles, the role of ultrasound techniques in the characterization of FTL and evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases is described to expand on the recently published World Federation in Ultrasound and Medicine (WFUMB) thyroid elastography guidelines and review how this guideline fits into a complete thyroid ultrasound exam.

  18. Monitoring stiffness contrast in elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos; Bharat, Shyam; Varghese, Tomy; Techavipoo, Udomchai; Liu, Wu

    2005-03-01

    Elastography is an imaging modality used to image tissue strains resulting from external quasi-static compression of tissue. Therefore, elastograms can be used to study variations in the stiffness of thermally coagulated regions of tissue. In this study, the variations in stiffness contrast of lesions formed by radio frequency (RF) ablation of canine liver tissue have been investigated. RF ablation was performed on in vitro canine liver tissue over a range of temperatures from 70 - 100 degrees C, and over a range of ablation times from 1 -- 8 minutes. Elastography was then performed on these samples and on normal tissue. It was expected that stiffness contrast would increase with increasing lesion temperature and ablation duration, on the basis that higher temperature and greater ablation durations lead to increased protein denaturation. This increase was seen with ablation duration, but is not obvious with ablation temperature. These and other results will be discussed.

  19. Elastography for hepato-biliary-pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yosuke; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-10-01

    Palpation is a subjective and non-sharable diagnostic method. Recently, palpation has been supported and replaced by elastography, which provides a novel parameter of "stiffness" as a visual representation or quantified value. Today, elastography is performed using two major modalities: strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Strain elastography converts the extent of deformation during external compression into colors, displaying these colors as a strain map in a motion picture representing the relative elasticity inside the region of interest. Shear wave elastography can quantify the elasticity of a target by calculating the velocity of shear waves generated by a probe. In addition to superficial organs, elastography has also been applied to upper abdominal organs, including the liver, pancreas and spleen. The visualization of the stiffness of focal lesions in the liver or the pancreas has enabled a more sensitive and specific depiction of small, non-palpable nodules, which are difficult to depict using B-mode ultrasonography. The quantification of stiffness also enables non-invasive estimates of liver fibrosis, the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency and the risk of recurrence of viral hepatitis after transplantation. In this article, we review the major reports that have recently been published describing the effective application of elastography to solid upper abdominal organs in a clinical setting.

  20. [SWE elastography in assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Pawluś, Aleksander; Kucharska, Marta; Inglot, Marcin

    2015-02-15

    Liver fibrosis is a relatively common consequence of chronic liver diseases, especially chronic viral hepatitis B and C. Biopsy still remains the gold standard in the assessment of liver fibrosis. However, due to its invasiveness and possible complications, less or even non-invasive methods are being developed, e.g. using biochemical parameters (Fibrotest) or elastography. Elastography is a new diagnostic tool that aims to evaluate stiffness of the tissues. Elastography techniques that are used in the assessment of liver fibrosis are transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) and shear-wave elastography (SWE). SWE is a novel real-time two-dimensional elastography technique, which allows one to estimate stiffness quantitatively in kilopascals (kPa). Moreover, lapping elastography over regular B-mode allows precise choice of the region of interest. Therefore SWE creates the opportunity for accurate assessment of liver fibrosis. In this paper we describe processes leading to liver fibrosis as well as methods of liver fibrosis assessment, e.g. liver biopsy, biochemical tests or elastography. The main goal of this paper is to present the SWE technique, its role in liver fibrosis assessment and a short review of the most important clinical studies on SWE. We also present several examples of SWE examinations performed on patients with different stages of liver fibrosis - F0 to F4 on the METAVIR scale.

  1. Ultrasound-Based Guidance for Partial Breast Irradiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    acquisition from more than 15 patients • Developed the 2D AM method which calculates high quality 2D strain images in real-time • Introduced ElastMI...Elastography using Multiple Images), a novel method which generates high quality strain images by utilizing multiple ultrasound images...the lumpectomy is relatively thin and demands a high resolution elastography method . Also, incoherent fluid motions in the cavity causes large

  2. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  3. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  4. A novel shape similarity based elastography system for prostate cancer assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haisu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Samani, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer among men worldwide and remains the second leading cancer-related cause of death in mature men. The disease can be cured if it is detected at early stage. This implies that prostate cancer detection at early stage is very critical for desirable treatment outcome. Conventional techniques of prostate cancer screening and detection, such as Digital Rectal Examination (DRE), Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) and Trans Rectal Ultra-Sonography (TRUS), are known to have low sensitivity and specificity. Elastography is an imaging technique that uses tissue stiffness as contrast mechanism. As the association between the degree of prostate tissue stiffness alteration and its pathology is well established, elastography can potentially detect prostate cancer with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a novel elastography technique which, unlike other elastography techniques, does not require displacement data acquisition system. This technique requires the prostate's pre-compression and postcompression transrectal ultrasound images. The conceptual foundation of reconstructing the prostate's normal and pathological tissues elastic moduli is to determine these moduli such that the similarity between calculated and observed shape features of the post compression prostate image is maximized. Results indicate that this technique is highly accurate and robust.

  5. Application of Elastography for the Noninvasive Assessment of Biomechanics in Engineered Biomaterials and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Borden, Mark; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The elastic properties of engineered biomaterials and tissues impact their post-implantation repair potential and structural integrity, and are critical to help regulate cell fate and gene expression. The measurement of properties (e.g., stiffness or shear modulus) can be attained using elastography, which exploits noninvasive imaging modalities to provide functional information of a material indicative of the regeneration state. In this review, we outline the current leading elastography methodologies available to characterize the properties of biomaterials and tissues suitable for repair and mechanobiology research. We describe methods utilizing magnetic resonance, ultrasound, and optical coherent elastography, highlighting their potential for longitudinal monitoring of implanted materials in vivo, in addition to spatiotemporal limits of each method for probing changes in cell-laden constructs. Micro-elastography methods now allow acquisitions at length scales approaching 5–100 μm in two and three dimensions. Many of the methods introduced in this review are therefore capable of longitudinal monitoring in biomaterials and tissues approaching the cellular scale. However, critical factors such as anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasity—inherent in many soft tissues—are often not fully described and therefore require further advancements and future developments. PMID:26790865

  6. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  7. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-03-07

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses.

  8. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis.

  9. Probabilistic elastography: estimating lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Risholm, Petter; Ross, James; Washko, George R; Wells, William M

    2011-01-01

    We formulate registration-based elastography in a probabilistic framework and apply it to study lung elasticity in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. The elasticity calculations are based on a Finite Element discretization of a linear elastic biomechanical model. We marginalize over the boundary conditions (deformation) of the biomechanical model to determine the posterior distribution over elasticity parameters. Image similarity is included in the likelihood, an elastic prior is included to constrain the boundary conditions, while a Markov model is used to spatially smooth the inhomogeneous elasticity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to characterize the posterior distribution over elasticity from which we extract the most probable elasticity as well as the uncertainty of this estimate. Even though registration-based lung elastography with inhomogeneous elasticity is challenging due the problem's highly underdetermined nature and the sparse image information available in lung CT, we show promising preliminary results on estimating lung elasticity contrast in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue.

  10. Optical coherence elastography: current status and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2011-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has several advantages over other imaging modalities, such as angiography and ultrasound, due to its inherently high in vivo resolution, which allows for the identification of morphological tissue structures. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) benefits from the superior spatial resolution of OCT and has promising applications, including cancer diagnosis and the detailed characterization of arterial wall biomechanics, both of which are based on the elastic properties of the tissue under investigation. We present OCE principles based on techniques associated with static and dynamic tissue excitation, and their corresponding elastogram image-reconstruction algorithms are reviewed. OCE techniques, including the development of intravascular- or catheter-based OCE, are in their early stages of development but show great promise for surgical oncology or intravascular cardiology applications.

  11. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  12. Model-based optical coherence elastography using acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat; Wang, Shang; Karpiouk, Andrei; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) stimulation is actively used in ultrasound elastography to estimate mechanical properties of tissue. Compared with ultrasound imaging, OCT provides advantage in both spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, a combination of ARF and OCT technologies can provide a unique opportunity to measure viscoelastic properties of tissue, especially when the use of high intensity radiation pressure is limited for safety reasons. In this presentation we discuss a newly developed theoretical model of the deformation of a layered viscoelastic medium in response to an acoustic radiation force of short duration. An acoustic impulse was considered as an axisymmetric force generated on the upper surface of the medium. An analytical solution of this problem was obtained using the Hankel transform in frequency domain. It was demonstrated that layers at different depths introduce different frequency responses. To verify the developed model, experiments were performed using tissue-simulating, inhomogeneous phantoms of varying mechanical properties. The Young's modulus of the phantoms was varied from 5 to 50 kPa. A single-element focused ultrasound transducer (3.5 MHz) was used to apply the radiation force with various durations on the surface of phantoms. Displacements on the phantom surface were measured using a phase-sensitive OCT at 25 kHz repetition frequency. The experimental results were in good agreement with the modeling results. Therefore, the proposed theoretical model can be used to reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue based on ARF/OCT measurements.

  13. Elastography using harmonic ultrasonic imaging: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Raghavendra Reddy; Krouskop, Thomas A; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-04-01

    Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) is a relatively new modality that has had a significant impact in the ultrasound field. In the recent past, imaging the mechanical properties of tissues using elastography has also gained great interest. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of combining these two state-of-the-art ultrasound-imaging modalities. The performance of elastograms obtained using harmonic ultrasonic signals is studied with simulations and compared to the performance of conventional elastograms using standard statistical methods. Experiments are used as a proof of the technical feasibility of generating tissue-harmonic elastograms using experimental harmonic signals. The results of our simulation study indicate that all image quality factors considered in this study (elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, elastographic contrast-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution) may be improved when using harmonic ultrasonic signals, provided that the ultrasound system is characterized by high bandwidth, high sampling frequency and large lateral sampling. Preliminary experimental results suggest that it is technically feasible to generate experimental elastograms using harmonic signals, provided that the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio of the pre- and postcompression harmonic frames is sufficiently high to guarantee reliable values of correlation.

  14. Swept-source anatomic optical coherence elastography of porcine trachea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Mitran, Sorin; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative endoscopic imaging is at the vanguard of novel techniques in the assessment upper airway obstruction. Anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) has the potential to provide the geometry of the airway lumen with high-resolution and in 4 dimensions. By coupling aOCT with measurements of pressure, optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be performed to characterize airway wall stiffness. This can aid in identifying regions of dynamic collapse as well as informing computational fluid dynamics modeling to aid in surgical decision-making. Toward this end, here we report on an anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system powered by a wavelength-swept laser source. The system employs a fiber-optic catheter with outer diameter of 0.82 mm deployed via the bore of a commercial, flexible bronchoscope. Helical scans are performed to measure the airway geometry and to quantify the cross-sectional-area (CSA) of the airway. We report on a preliminary validation of aOCT for elastography, in which aOCT-derived CSA was obtained as a function of pressure to estimate airway wall compliance. Experiments performed on a Latex rubber tube resulted in a compliance measurement of 0.68+/-0.02 mm2/cmH2O, with R2=0.98 over the pressure range from 10 to 40 cmH2O. Next, ex vivo porcine trachea was studied, resulting in a measured compliance from 1.06+/-0.12 to 3.34+/-0.44 mm2/cmH2O, (R2>0.81). The linearity of the data confirms the elastic nature of the airway. The compliance values are within the same order-of-magnitude as previous measurements of human upper airways, suggesting that this system is capable of assessing airway wall compliance in future human studies.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  16. Lorentz force optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Singh, Manmohan; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Liu, Chih-Hao; Li, Jiasong; Schill, Alexander; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying tissue biomechanical properties can assist in detection of abnormalities and monitoring disease progression and/or response to a therapy. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) has emerged as a promising technique for noninvasively characterizing tissue biomechanical properties. Several mechanical loading techniques have been proposed to induce static or transient deformations in tissues, but each has its own areas of applications and limitations. This study demonstrates the combination of Lorentz force excitation and phase-sensitive OCE at ˜1.5 million A-lines per second to quantify the elasticity of tissue by directly imaging Lorentz force-induced elastic waves. This method of tissue excitation opens the possibility of a wide range of investigations using tissue biocurrents and conductivity for biomechanical analysis.

  17. Quantitative photoacoustic elastography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    We report quantitative photoacoustic elastography (QPAE) capable of measuring Young's modulus of biological tissue in vivo in humans. By combining conventional PAE with a stress sensor having known stress-strain behavior, QPAE can simultaneously measure strain and stress, from which Young's modulus is calculated. We first demonstrate the feasibility of QPAE in agar phantoms with different concentrations. The measured Young's modulus values fit well with both the empirical expectation based on the agar concentrations and those measured in an independent standard compression test. Next, QPAE was applied to quantify the Young's modulus of skeletal muscle in vivo in humans, showing a linear relationship between muscle stiffness and loading. The results demonstrated the capability of QPAE to assess the absolute elasticity of biological tissue noninvasively in vivo in humans, indicating its potential for tissue biomechanics studies and clinical applications.

  18. Development of a training phantom for compression breast elastography—comparison of various elastography systems and numerical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Kavitha; Reddy, Machireddy Ramasubba; Seshadri, Suresh; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The elastic properties of tissue are related to tissue composition and pathological changes. It has been observed that many pathological processes increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. Ultrasound compression elastography is a method of characterization of elastic properties that has been the focus of many research efforts in the last two decades. In medical radiology, compression elastography is provided as an additional tool with ultrasound B-mode in the existing scanners, and the combined features of elastography and echography act as a promising diagnostic method in breast cancer detection. However, the full capability of the ultrasound elastography technique together with B-mode has not been utilized by novice radiologists due to the nonavailability of suitable, appropriately designed tissue-mimicking phantoms. Since different commercially available ultrasound elastographic scanners follow their own unique protocols, training novice radiologists is becoming cumbersome. The main focus of this work is to develop a tissue-like agar-based phantom, which mimics breast tissue with common abnormal lesions like fibroadenoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in a clinically perceived way and compares the sonographic and elastographic appearances using different commercially available systems. In addition, the developed phantoms are simulated using the finite-element method, and ideal strain images are generated. Strain images from experiment and simulation are compared based on image contrast parameters, namely contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) and observed strain, and they are in good agreement. The strain image contrast of malignant inclusions is significantly improved compared to benign inclusions, and the trend of CTE is similar for all elastographic scanners under investigation. PMID:26697511

  19. Fabrication and performance of endoscopic ultrasound radial arrays based on PMN-PT single crystal/epoxy 1-3 composite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cheung, Kwok Fung; Chen, Yan; Lau, Sien Ting; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Luo, Hao Su; Dai, Jiyan; Chan, Helen Lai Wa

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, 0.7Pb(Mg(¹/₃)Nb(²/₃)O₃-0.3PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT) single crystal/epoxy 1/3 composite was used as the active material of the endoscopic ultrasonic radial array transducer, because this composite exhibited ultrahigh electromechanical coupling coefficient (k(t) = 0.81%), very low mechanical quality factor (Q(m) = 11) and relatively low acoustic impedance (Z(t) = 12 MRayls). A 6.91 MHz PMN-PT/epoxy 1/3 composite radial array transducer with 64 elements was tested in a pulseecho response measurement. The -6-dB bandwidth of the composite array transducer was 102%, which was ~30% larger than that of traditional lead zirconate titanate array transducer. The two-way insertion loss was found to be -32.3 dB. The obtained results show that this broadband array transducer is promising for acquiring high-resolution endoscopic ultrasonic images in many clinical applications.

  20. Fabrication and Performance of Endoscopic Ultrasound Radial Arrays Based on PMN-PT Single Crystal/Epoxy 1-3 Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dan; Cheung, Kwok Fung; Chen, Yan; Lau, Sien Ting; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Luo, Hao Su; Dai, Jiyan; Chan, Helen Lai Wa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) single crystal/epoxy 1–3 composite was used as the active material of the endoscopic ultrasonic radial array transducer, because this composite exhibited ultrahigh electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt = 0.81%), very low mechanical quality factor (Qm = 11) and relatively low acoustic impedance (Zt = 12 MRayls). A 6.91 MHz PMN-PT/epoxy 1–3 composite radial array transducer with 64 elements was tested in a pulse-echo response measurement. The −6-dB bandwidth of the composite array transducer was 102%, which was ~30% larger than that of traditional lead zirconate titanate array transducer. The two-way insertion loss was found to be −32.3 dB. The obtained results show that this broadband array transducer is promising for acquiring high-resolution endoscopic ultrasonic images in many clinical applications. PMID:21342833

  1. Differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses: contrast-enhanced harmonic (CEH-EUS), quantitative-elastography (QE-EUS), or both?

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, Björn; Lariño-Noia, Jose; Abdulkader-Nallib, Ihab; Dominguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound (CEH-EUS) and quantitative-elastography endoscopic ultrasound (QE-EUS) are considered useful tools for the evaluation of solid pancreatic tumors (SPT). The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CEH-EUS, QE-EUS, and the combination of both for the differential diagnosis of SPT. Methods Sixty-two consecutive patients (mean age 64.3 years, range 32–89 years, 44 male) who underwent EUS for the evaluation of SPT were prospectively included. EUS was performed with a linear Pentax-EUS and a Hitachi-Preirus processor. The mass (area A) and a reference area B were selected during QE-EUS, and results expressed as B/A (strain ratio). A strain histogram of the mass was also evaluated. Microvascularization of the tumor was evaluated over 2 min during CEH-EUS after intravenous injection of 4.8 mL SonoVue. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology of surgical specimens or EUS-guided tissue acquisition and clinical follow-up in non-operated cases. Diagnostic accuracy of CEH-EUS, QE-EUS, and their combination was calculated. Results Median size of the masses was 32 mm (range 12-111). Final diagnosis was pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45), neuroendocrine tumor (n = 3), inflammatory mass (n = 10), pancreatic metastasis (n = 2), autoimmune pancreatitis (n = 1), and a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1). Overall accuracies for determination of malignancy using QE-EUS, CEH-EUS, their combination, and EUS-guided tissue acquisition were 98.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 91.4–99.7), 85.5% (95% CI: 74.7–92.2), 91.9% (95% CI: 82.5–96.5), and 91.5% (95% CI: 83.6–99.5), respectively. Conclusion The combination of QE-EUS and CEH-EUS is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of SPT, giving complementary information. However, this combination does not significantly increase the diagnostic accuracy of either of the techniques performed alone. PMID:28344791

  2. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  3. [Ultrasonographic elastography in alimentary tract lesions diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Wojtuńi, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Jałocha, Łukasz; Krzysztof, Kosik; Błaszak, Antoni; Wojtkowiak, Marek

    2009-05-01

    Technology development in data processing in ultrasonography let new imaging method feasible. New method of imaging is elastography (elastosonography, ultrasonographic elastography). It relays on the presumption that pathologically changed tissues have different elasticity and change their shape in different way than health tissue. Elastography is used in lesions in alimentary tract diagnostics. Sensitivity and specificity in malignant lesions differentiation is 85% and 90%. In elastography there is used conventional ultrasonography device that is equipped with additional transformator that is located in probe. Examination is performed with multiple pressing the organ. Imaging is acquired in real-time regime they are colour-coded and they are created during compression. As a result of computer analysis images are generated in two colours. On the basis of character of normal and increased rigidity images were classified in five point scale from one to five. Indication to elastography is suspicion of malignant lesions in traditional ultrasonography and monitoring of liver cirrhosis and fibrosis. More trials are required to evaluate this method more reliably. Then it could be recommended for everyday clinical use.

  4. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated.

  5. Clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with signet-ring cells of the pancreas: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Komura, Takuya; Marukawa, Yohei; Ohta, Hajime; Kasashima, Satomi; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Yano, Masaaki; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    A man in his 60s visited our hospital because of a pancreatic head tumor. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed that the tumor consisted of a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and adenocarcinoma, including signet-ring cell carcinoma, and that the ratio of these components was approximately 50:50. Therefore, he was diagnosed with mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Because of liver and lymph node metastases, systemic chemotherapy was initiated using a regimen for the NEC component based on an increase in neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Although the patient achieved stable disease after two chemotherapy cycles, the tumor increased in size after three cycles, which was associated with a gradual increase in carcinoembryonic antigen and a decrease in NSE level. An EUS-FNA reexamination revealed that the adenocarcinoma component accounted for 90 % of the tumor. Thus, an adenocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen was started, and a slight reduction in tumor size was observed. Here, we report an extremely rare and remarkable case of MANEC of the pancreas that demonstrates the effectiveness of EUS-FNA for helping to decide the chemotherapy regimen.

  6. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  7. Nondestructive inspection for internal defects of rail based on photoacoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingjian; Fu, Ying; Liu, Ting; Cheng, Xingzhen; Leng, Guanji; Feng, Naizhang

    2015-11-01

    Laser ultrasonic technique is used for the nondestructive testing technology of surface damage, but ignores the density variation in the sample. Photoacoustic elastography is adopted to obtain more rail information (such as the internal defects, the variation of sample's interior density) of the sample by collecting Rayleigh wave on rail surface and shear wave within the rail. In this paper, it is proved that the internal defects and the variation of density can be detected by photoacoustic elastography, using finite element analysis (FEA). We first use FEA to simulate the ultrasound excitation on the steel material surface excited by the laser source. Two cases of sample are modeled and analyzed, one is with defects of different depth and the other is with different density. Then, an isotropic model using ANSYS is employed and shear wave propagation is modeled. The preliminary results successfully recapitulate the trend of the change of shear wave's velocities, which shows that the defects can enhance the amplitude of shear wave. In addition, the velocities of shear wave would increase when the density of the sample enlarges. Results from computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of photoacoustic elastography with application to quantitative analysis for the structures of sample.

  8. Clinical applications of transient elastography

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu Sik

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease represents a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As prognosis and management depend mainly on the amount and progression of liver fibrosis, accurate quantification of liver fibrosis is essential for therapeutic decision-making and follow-up of chronic liver diseases. Even though liver biopsy is the gold standard for evaluation of liver fibrosis, non-invasive methods that could substitute for invasive procedures have been investigated during past decades. Transient elastography (TE, FibroScan®) is a novel non-invasive method for assessment of liver fibrosis with chronic liver disease. TE can be performed in the outpatient clinic with immediate results and excellent reproducibility. Its diagnostic accuracy for assessment of liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in patients with chronic viral hepatitis; as a result, unnecessary liver biopsy could be avoided in some patients. Moreover, due to its excellent patient acceptance, TE could be used for monitoring disease progression or predicting development of liver-related complications. This review aims at discussing the usefulness of TE in clinical practice. PMID:22893866

  9. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Ehman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a rapidly developing technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue. The technology can be considered to be an imaging-based counterpart to palpation, commonly used by physicians to diagnose and characterize diseases. The success of palpation as a diagnostic method is based on the fact that the mechanical properties of tissues are often dramatically affected by the presence of disease processes such as cancer, inflammation, and fibrosis. MRE obtains information about the stiffness of tissue by assessing the propagation of mechanical waves through the tissue with a special magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. The technique essentially involves three steps: generating shear waves in the tissue,acquiring MR images depicting the propagation of the induced shear waves andprocessing the images of the shear waves to generate quantitative maps of tissue stiffness, called elastograms. MRE is already being used clinically for the assessment of patients with chronic liver diseases and is emerging as a safe, reliable and noninvasive alternative to liver biopsy for staging hepatic fibrosis. MRE is also being investigated for application to pathologies of other organs including the brain, breast, blood vessels, heart, kidneys, lungs and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review article is to introduce this technology to clinical anatomists and to summarize some of the current clinical applications that are being pursued. PMID:20544947

  10. Measuring shear-wave speed with point shear-wave elastography and MR elastography: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Riwa; Suga, Mikio; Koyama, Atsuhisa; Omatsu, Tokuhiko; Tachibana, Yasuhiko; Ebner, Daniel K; Obata, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare shear-wave speed (SWS) measured by ultrasound-based point shear-wave elastography (pSWE) and MR elastography (MRE) on phantoms with a known shear modulus, and to assess method validity and variability. Methods 5 homogeneous phantoms of different stiffnesses were made. Shear modulus was measured by a rheometer, and this value was used as the standard. 10 SWS measurements were obtained at 4 different depths with 1.0–4.5 MHz convex (4C1) and 4.0–9.0 MHz linear (9L4) transducers using pSWE. MRE was carried out once per phantom, and SWSs at 5 different depths were obtained. These SWSs were then compared with those from a rheometer using linear regression analyses. Results SWSs obtained with both pSWE as well as MRE had a strong correlation with those obtained by a rheometer (R2>0.97). The relative difference in SWS between the procedures was from −25.2% to 25.6% for all phantoms, and from −8.1% to 6.9% when the softest and hardest phantoms were excluded. Depth dependency was noted in the 9L4 transducer of pSWE and MRE. Conclusions SWSs from pSWE and MRE showed a good correlation with a rheometer-determined SWS. Although based on phantom studies, SWSs obtained with these methods are not always equivalent, the measurement can be thought of as reliable and these SWSs were reasonably close to each other for the middle range of stiffness within the measurable range. PMID:28057657

  11. Fundamental performance assessment of 2-D myocardial elastography in a phased-array configuration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Lee, Wei-Ning; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-10-01

    Two-dimensional myocardial elastography, an RF-based, speckle-tracking technique, uses 1-D cross-correlation and recorrelation methods in a 2-D search, and can estimate and image the 2-D transmural motion and deformation of the myocardium so as to characterize the cardiac function. Based on a 3-D finite-element (FE) canine left-ventricular model, a theoretical framework was previously developed by our group to evaluate the estimation quality of 2-D myocardial elastography using a linear array. In this paper, an ultrasound simulation program, Field II, was used to generate the RF signals of a model of the heart in a phased-array configuration and under 3-D motion conditions; thus simulating a standard echocardiography exam. The estimation method of 2-D myocardial elastography was adapted for use with such a configuration. All elastographic displacements and strains were found to be in good agreement with the FE solutions, as indicated by the mean absolute error (MAE) between the two. The classified first and second principal strains approximated the radial and circumferential strains, respectively, in the phased-array configuration. The results at different sonographic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(s)) showed that the MAEs of the axial, lateral, radial, and circumferential strains remained relatively constant when the SNR(s) was equal to or higher than 20 dB. The MAEs of the strain estimation were not significantly affected when the acoustic attenuation was included in the simulations. A significantly reduced number of scatterers could be used to speed up the simulation, without sacrificing the estimation quality.The proposed framework can further be used to assess the estimation quality, explore the theoretical limitation and investigate the effects of various parameters in 2-D myocardial elastography under more realistic conditions.

  12. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P < 0.05). Strain ratios between the two methods did not differ. Strain elastography was feasible for estimating thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability.

  13. [Endoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Rushfeldt, Christian; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Aabakken, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the stomach/gastrointestinal tract was developed in the 1990s in Japan as a minimally invasive method of removing early-stage tumours, using a gastro-/coloscope instead of open or laparoscopic surgery. Its advantages are obvious, in that the patient is spared more major surgery, the hospital saves on resources as well as admission to a ward, and society is spared the costs of days of sickness absence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is considered the most difficult technique, but it allows for the accurate dissection of large tumours. In 1999, Japanese surgeon Takuji Gotoda and his team were the first to perform these types of dissections of early cancers in the rectum using a diathermic needle and a flexible scope.

  14. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  15. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  16. The integration of single fiber reflectance (SFR) spectroscopy during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) in pancreatic masses: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Amelink, Arjen; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2016-03-01

    EUS-FNA can be used for pathological confirmation of a suspicious pancreatic mass. However, performance depends on an on-site cytologist and time between punction and final pathology results can be long. SFR spectroscopy is capable of extracting biologically relevant parameters (e.g. oxygenation and blood volume) in real-time from a very small tissue volume at difficult locations. In this study we determined feasibility of the integration of SFR spectroscopy during EUSFNA procedures in pancreatic masses. Patients with benign and malignant pancreatic masses who were scheduled for an EUS-FNA were included. The working guide wire inside the 19 gauge endoscopic biopsy needle was removed and the sterile single fiber (300 μm core and 700 μm outer diameter, wide-angle beam, NA 0.22) inserted through the needle. Spectroscopy measurements in the visiblenear infrared wavelength region (400-900 nm) and autofluorescence measurements (excitation at 405 nm) were taken three times, and subsequently cytology was obtained. Wavelength dependent optical properties were compared to cytology results. We took measurements in 13 patients with corresponding cytology results (including mucinous tumor, ductal adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, and pancreatitis). In this paper we show the first analyzed results comparing normal pancreatic tissue with cancerous tissue in the same patient. We found a large difference in blood volume fraction, and blood oxygenation was higher in normal tissue. Integration of SFR spectroscopy is feasible in EUS-FNA procedures, the workflow hardly requires changes and it takes little time. The first results differentiating normal from tumor tissue are promising.

  17. Multimodal classification of prostate tissue: a feasibility study on combining multiparametric MRI and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Nir, Guy; Kozlowski, Piotr; Black, Peter; Jones, Edward C.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The common practice for biopsy guidance is through transrectal ultrasound, with the fusion of ultrasound and MRI-based targets when available. However, ultrasound is only used as a guidance modality in MR-targeted ultrasound-guided biopsy, even though previous work has shown the potential utility of ultrasound, particularly ultrasound vibro-elastography, as a tissue typing approach. We argue that multiparametric ultrasound, which includes B-mode and vibro-elastography images, could contain information that is not captured using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and therefore play a role in refining the biopsy and treatment strategies. In this work, we combine mpMRI with multiparametric ultrasound features from registered tissue areas to examine the potential improvement in cancer detection. All the images were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy and cancer detection was validated based on 36 whole mount histology slides. We calculated a set of 24 texture features from vibro-elastography and B-mode images, and five features from mpMRI. Then we used recursive feature elimination (RFE) and sparse regression through LASSO to find an optimal set of features to be used for tissue classification. We show that the set of these selected features increases the area under ROC curve from 0.87 with mpMRI alone to 0.94 with the selected mpMRI and multiparametric ultrasound features, when used with support vector machine classification on features extracted from peripheral zone. For features extracted from the whole-gland, the area under the curve was 0.75 and 0.82 for mpMRI and mpMRI along with ultrasound, respectively. These preliminary results provide evidence that ultrasound and ultrasound vibro-elastography could be used as modalities for improved cancer detection in combination with MRI.

  18. Endoscopic Palliation of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Sherman, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has an increasingly important role in the palliation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic biliary drainage is still requested in the majority of patients who present with obstructive jaundice, and the increased use of self-expandable metallic stents has reduced the incidence of premature stent occlusion. First-line use of metallic stents is expected to be utilized more frequently as neoadjuvant protocols are improved. The efficacy of endoscopy for palliating gastroduodenal obstruction has advanced with the development of through-the-scope, self-expandable gastroduodenal stents. There have been advances in pain management, with endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis reducing opiate requirements and pain for patients with unresectable malignancy. Future applications of endoscopy in pancreatic cancer may include fine needle injection of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the lesion itself. This review will summarize the evidence of endoscopy in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23187846

  19. Elastography--the movement begins.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L S; Robinson, D E; Dadd, M J

    2000-06-01

    The advent of real-time ultrasound in the 1970s, together with a growing interest in tissue characterization, led to a number of investigators using the nature of tissue motion to distinguish healthy from diseased tissue. Our group at the (then) Ultrasonics Institute demonstrated the use of phase methods for detecting very small tissue motions, using natural stimuli. The method could also be applied in the lag (autocorrelation) domain to directly measure the amount of deformation to high accuracy. This method was also applied to measuring the amount of dilatation of blood vessels using both conventional and intravascular ultrasound. A basic limitation of these techniques was the poor spatial resolution, and quasistatic methods soon replaced this method of measuring tissue deformation. However, a new way of assessing the health of tissues had been established.

  20. Investigation of the Effects of Myocardial Anisotropy for Shear Wave Elastography using Impulsive Force and Harmonic Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (> 200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart. PMID:26674613

  1. Investigation of the effects of myocardial anisotropy for shear wave elastography using impulsive force and harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Matthew W.; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (>200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart.

  2. Investigation of the effects of myocardial anisotropy for shear wave elastography using impulsive force and harmonic vibration.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2016-01-07

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (>200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart.

  3. Point shear wave elastography method for assessing liver stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ferraioli, Giovanna; Tinelli, Carmine; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Zicchetti, Mabel; Dal Bello, Barbara; Filice, Gaetano; Filice, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the validity of the point shear-wave elastography method by evaluating its reproducibility and accuracy for assessing liver stiffness. METHODS: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. Consecutive patients with chronic viral hepatitis scheduled for liver biopsy (LB) (Group 1) and healthy volunteers (Group 2) were studied. In each subject 10 consecutive point shear-wave elastography (PSWE) measurements were performed using the iU22 ultrasound system (Philips Medical Systems, Bothell, WA, United States). Patients in Group 1 underwent PSWE, transient elastography (TE) using FibroScan (Echosens, Paris, France) and ultrasound-assisted LB. For the assessment of PSWE reproducibility two expert raters (rater 1 and rater 2) independently performed the examinations. The performance of PSWE was compared to that of TE using LB as a reference standard. Fibrosis was staged according to the METAVIR scoring system. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for F ≥ 2, F ≥ 3 and F = 4. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of PSWE were assessed by calculating Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient. RESULTS: To assess the performance of PSWE, 134 consecutive patients in Group 1 were studied. The median values of PSWE and TE (in kilopascals) were 4.7 (IQR = 3.8-5.4) and 5.5 (IQR = 4.7-6.5), respectively, in patients at the F0-F1 stage and 3.5 (IQR = 3.2-4.0) and 4.4 (IQR = 3.5-4.9), respectively, in the healthy volunteers in Group 2 (P < 10-5). In the univariate analysis, the PSWE and TE values showed a high correlation with the fibrosis stage; low correlations with the degree of necroinflammation, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT); and a moderate negative correlation with the platelet count. A multiple regression analysis confirmed the correlations of both PSWE and TE with fibrosis stage and GGT but not with

  4. Key parameters for precise lateral displacement estimation in ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-01-01

    Complementary to axial, lateral and elevational displacement and strain can provide important information on the mechanical properties of biological soft tissues. In this paper, the effects of key parameters on the lateral displacement estimation were investigated in simulations and validated in phantom experiments. The performance of the lateral estimator was evaluated by measuring its associated bias, and jitter (i.e., standard deviation). Simulation results showed that the bias and jitter undergo periodic variations depending on the lateral displacement, with a period equal to the pitch (i.e., adjacent element distance). The performance of the lateral estimation was improved, when a smaller pitch, or a larger beamwidth, was used. The effects of the pitch were found to be greater than those of the beamwidth. The results of the phantom experiments were shown in good agreement with the simulation findings, including the periodic variation of the performance with lateral displacement, effects of pitch and beamwidth. In conclusion, smaller pitches and wider beamwidths were found to be key in reducing the jitter error in the lateral displacement estimation. The same results also hold for tracking in the elevational direction.

  5. Tracked Ultrasound Elastography for Neo-adjuvant Chemotherapy Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    in the size of the resolution cell . Also, uniform force can be applied to the tissue due to the flat surface of the probe. This is an important...E=F>B=@ QF9f;9BFQR;BQDL9B<gF=BW9B;=E@:B= N9 ;I9hAQRE;O=>;I99RQJ;EDE;OE@QY9JG;I9:B=:=J9W@9;I=WJ9R9D;JQ>9dE@eQY9:QEBJJADI;IQ;EF9QDI:QEB;I9RQ;9BQRQFW=A;e...BQDLEFYJOJ;9@J=>9R9D;B=@QYF9;EDjkSlQFW=:;EDQR;BQDL9B<MJEFY:IQF;=@QFWmnopqprQFE@QR9f:9BE@9F;JGd9JI=d;IQ;;I9:B=:=J9W;9DIFEhA9JJEYFEsDQF;ROE@:B= N9 ;I99RQJ

  6. Shearwave Elastography Increases Diagnostic Accuracy in Characterization of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wei Lin; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Mohd-Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of shearwave elastography (SWE) in differentiating between benign and malignant breast lesions. One hundred and fifty-nine lesions were assessed using B-mode ultrasound (US) and SWE parameters were recorded (Emax, Emean, Emin, Eratio, SD). SWE measurements were then correlated with histopathological diagnosis. The final sample contained 85 benign and 74 malignant lesions. The maximum stiffness (Emax) with a cutoff point of ≥ 56.0 kPa (based on ROC curves) provided sensitivity of 100.0%, specificity of 97.6%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 97.4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in detecting malignant lesions. A cutoff of ≥80 kPa managed to downgrade 95.5% of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4a lesions to BI-RADS 3, negating the need for biopsy. Using a combination of BI-RADS and SWE, the authors managed to improve the PPV from 2.3% to 50% in BI-RADS 4a lesions. SWE of the breast provides highly specific and sensitive quantitative values that are beneficial in the characterization of breast lesions. Our results showed that Emax is the most accurate value for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. PMID:27015196

  7. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  8. Validation of Shear Wave Elastography in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; Greenleaf, James F.; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a very dynamic tissue, thus accurate quantification of skeletal muscle stiffness throughout its functional range is crucial to improve the physical functioning and independence following pathology. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound-based technique that characterizes tissue mechanical properties based on the propagation of remotely induced shear waves. The objective of this study is to validate SWE throughout the functional range of motion of skeletal muscle for three ultrasound transducer orientations. We hypothesized that combining traditional materials testing (MTS) techniques with SWE measurements will show increased stiffness measures with increasing tensile load, and will correlate well with each other for trials in which the transducer is parallel to underlying muscle fibers. To evaluate this hypothesis, we monitored the deformation throughout tensile loading of four porcine brachialis whole-muscle tissue specimens, while simultaneously making SWE measurements of the same specimen. We used regression to examine the correlation between Young's modulus from MTS and shear modulus from SWE for each of the transducer orientations. We applied a generalized linear model to account for repeated testing. Model parameters were estimated via generalized estimating equations. The regression coefficient was 0.1944, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.1463 – 0.2425) for parallel transducer trials. Shear waves did not propagate well for both the 45° and perpendicular transducer orientations. Both parallel SWE and MTS showed increased stiffness with increasing tensile load. This study provides the necessary first step for additional studies that can evaluate the distribution of stiffness throughout muscle. PMID:23953670

  9. Adapting the Lagrangian speckle model estimator for endovascular elastography: Theory and validation with simulated radio-frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Roch L.; Ohayon, Jacques; Finet, Gérard; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is known to be the reference tool for preoperative vessel lesion assessments and for endovascular therapy planning. Nevertheless, IVUS echograms only provide subjective information about vessel wall lesions. Since changes in the vascular tissue stiffness are characteristic of vessel pathologies, catheter-based endovascular ultrasound elastography (EVE) has been proposed in the literature as a method for outlining the elastic properties of vessel walls. In this paper, the Lagrangian Speckle Model Estimator (LSME) is formulated for investigations in EVE, i.e., using a polar coordinate system. The method was implemented through an adapted version of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm, using the optical flow equations to compute the Jacobbian matrix. The theoretical framework was validated with simulated ultrasound rf data of mechanically complex vessel wall pathologies. The results, corroborated with Ansys finite element software, demonstrated the potential of EVE to provide useful information about the heterogeneous nature of atherosclerotic plaques.

  10. Adapting the Lagrangian speckle model estimator for endovascular elastography: theory and validation with simulated radio-frequency data.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Roch L; Ohayon, Jacques; Finet, Gérard; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is known to be the reference tool for preoperative vessel lesion assessments and for endovascular therapy planning. Nevertheless, IVUS echograms only provide subjective information about vessel wall lesions. Since changes in the vascular tissue stiffness are characteristic of vessel pathologies, catheter-based endovascular ultrasound elastography (EVE) has been proposed in the literature as a method for outlining the elastic properties of vessel walls. In this paper, the Lagrangian Speckle Model Estimator (LSME) is formulated for investigations in EVE, i.e., using a polar coordinate system. The method was implemented through an adapted version of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm, using the optical flow equations to compute the Jacobbian matrix. The theoretical framework was validated with simulated ultrasound rf data of mechanically complex vessel wall pathologies. The results, corroborated with Ansys finite element software, demonstrated the potential of EVE to provide useful information about the heterogeneous nature of atherosclerotic plaques.

  11. Diagnostic features of quantitative comb-push shear elastography for breast lesion differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Max; Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kumar, Viksit; Meixner, Duane; Fazzio, Robert T.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Background Lesion stiffness measured by shear wave elastography has shown to effectively separate benign from malignant breast masses. The aim of this study was to evaluate different aspects of Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) performance in differentiating breast masses. Methods With written signed informed consent, this HIPAA- compliant, IRB approved prospective study included patients from April 2014 through August 2016 with breast masses identified on conventional imaging. Data from 223 patients (19–85 years, mean 59.93±14.96 years) with 227 suspicious breast masses identifiable by ultrasound (mean size 1.83±2.45cm) were analyzed. CUSE was performed on all patients. Three regions of interest (ROI), 3 mm in diameter each, were selected inside the lesion on the B-mode ultrasound which also appeared in the corresponding shear wave map. Lesion elasticity values were measured in terms of the Young’s modulus. In correlation to pathology results, statistical analyses were performed. Results Pathology revealed 108 lesions as malignant and 115 lesions as benign. Additionally, 4 lesions (BI-RADS 2 and 3) were considered benign and were not biopsied. Average lesion stiffness measured by CUSE resulted in 84.26% sensitivity (91 of 108), 89.92% specificity (107 of 119), 85.6% positive predictive value, 89% negative predictive value and 0.91 area under the curve (P<0.0001). Stiffness maps showed spatial continuity such that maximum and average elasticity did not have significantly different results (P > 0.21). Conclusion CUSE was able to distinguish between benign and malignant breast masses with high sensitivity and specificity. Continuity of stiffness maps allowed for choosing multiple quantification ROIs which covered large areas of lesions and resulted in similar diagnostic performance based on average and maximum elasticity. The overall results of this study, highlights the clinical value of CUSE in differentiation of breast masses based on their

  12. Shear wave elastography using amplitude-modulated acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Arnal, Bastien; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Investigating the elasticity of ocular tissue (cornea and intraocular lens) could help the understanding and management of pathologies related to biomechanical deficiency. In previous studies, we introduced a setup based on optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography (SWE) with high resolution and high sensitivity. SWE determines tissue stiffness from the propagation speed of shear waves launched within tissue. We proposed acoustic radiation force to remotely induce shear waves by focusing an ultrasound (US) beam in tissue, similar to several elastography techniques. Minimizing the maximum US pressure is essential in ophthalmology for safety reasons. For this purpose, we propose a pulse compression approach. It utilizes coded US emissions to generate shear waves where the energy is spread over a long emission, and then numerically compressed into a short, localized, and high-energy pulse. We used a 7.5-MHz single-element focused transducer driven by coded excitations where the amplitude is modulated by a linear frequency-swept square wave (1 to 7 kHz). An inverse filter approach was used for compression. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing shear wave elastography measurements in tissue-mimicking phantoms at low US pressures (mechanical index <0.6). PMID:25554970

  13. The role of real-time elastography in the evaluation of post chemotherapy hepatotoxicity in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Baghiu, Maria Despina; Branzaniuc, Klara; Chinceşan, Mihaela; Adrienne, Horvath; Buzoianu, Anca; Mărginean, C

    2011-01-01

    The drugs hepatotoxicity represents a major problem of the iatrogenic pathology, with various manifestations, directly through the hepatotoxic effect or through idiosycrasy reactions. The hepatic affection induced by chemotherapy appears in children in cases of prolonged therapy, chronic diseases, or other associated conditions. Hepatotoxicity clinically develops through hepatic disorder, cholestatic or mixed hepato-cholestatic manifestations and systematic affection. There are no specific hystological or biochemical characteristics for diagnostic of hepatotoxicity. The international criteria for asessing the hepatotoxicity includes the bilirubin, the transaminasis, GGT, FA, albumin and the flow on the vein. It has been noticed that these parameters are not enough for the right assesssment of the chemotherapics' hepatotoxicity. Thus it is required the abdominal ultrasonography and computerised tomography for the identification of billiary tract, vascularisation, associated conditions and the degree of fibrosis; also, the hepatic biopsy may be necessary. The ultrasound elastography is a method which can give information related to the elasticity/stiffness of the examined tissue and degree of fibrosis. Acustic radiation force imaging(ARFI) is an elastographic method which allows valid, accurate and flexible evaluation of liver stiffness, a quantification with a strong correlation with the fibrosis stage, not influenced by steatosis. In conclusion, the hepatic toxicity showed by alterated hepatic biochemical tests and by symptomes of hepatopathy needs a proper appreciation of the hepatic modifications, which can be obtained through hepatic biopsy or by assessing the hepatic elasticity through elastography. Thus, real-time elastography is an useful tool in assessing the chemotherapics hepatotoxicity in children with cancer.

  14. Improved shear wave motion detection using coded excitation for transient elastography.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Nian; Diao, Xian-Fen; Lin, Hao-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Shen, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Si-Ping; Qin, Zheng-Di; Chen, Xin

    2017-03-15

    Transient elastography (TE) is well adapted for use in studying liver elasticity. However, because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, the weak ultrasound signal can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and make it challenging to detect the shear wave motion in a severe noise environment, such as within deep tissues and within obese patients. This paper, therefore, investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in TE for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide robustness to weak ultrasound signals compared with traditional short pulse. The Barker 7, Barker 13, and short pulse were used for detecting the shear wave in the TE application. Two phantom experiments and one in vitro liver experiment were done to explore the performances of the coded excitation in TE measurement. The results show that both coded pulses outperform the short pulse by providing superior shear wave signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), robust shear wave speed measurement, and higher penetration intensity. In conclusion, this study proved the feasibility of applying coded excitation in shear wave detection for TE application. The proposed method has the potential to facilitate robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue.

  15. Improved shear wave motion detection using coded excitation for transient elastography

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Nian; Diao, Xian-Fen; Lin, Hao-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Shen, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Si-Ping; Qin, Zheng-Di; Chen, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Transient elastography (TE) is well adapted for use in studying liver elasticity. However, because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, the weak ultrasound signal can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and make it challenging to detect the shear wave motion in a severe noise environment, such as within deep tissues and within obese patients. This paper, therefore, investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in TE for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide robustness to weak ultrasound signals compared with traditional short pulse. The Barker 7, Barker 13, and short pulse were used for detecting the shear wave in the TE application. Two phantom experiments and one in vitro liver experiment were done to explore the performances of the coded excitation in TE measurement. The results show that both coded pulses outperform the short pulse by providing superior shear wave signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), robust shear wave speed measurement, and higher penetration intensity. In conclusion, this study proved the feasibility of applying coded excitation in shear wave detection for TE application. The proposed method has the potential to facilitate robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue. PMID:28295027

  16. Shear wave elastography in medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gumińska, Anna; Bakuła-Zalewska, Elwira; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Słapa, Rafał Z.; Wareluk, Paweł; Krauze, Agnieszka; Ziemiecka, Agnieszka; Migda, Bartosz; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a modern method for the assessment of tissue stiffness. There has been a growing interest in the use of this technique for characterizing thyroid focal lesions, including preoperative diagnostics. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the clinical usefulness of SWE in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) diagnostics. Materials and methods A total of 169 focal lesions were identified in the study group (139 patients), including 6 MTCs in 4 patients (mean age: 45 years). B-mode ultrasound and SWE were performed using Aixplorer (SuperSonic, Aix-en-Provence), with a 4–15 MHz linear probe. The ultrasound was performed to assess the echogenicity and echostructure of the lesions, their margin, the halo sign, the height/width ratio (H/W ratio), the presence of calcifications and the vascularization pattern. This was followed by an analysis of maximum and mean Young's (E) modulus values for MTC (EmaxLR, EmeanLR) and the surrounding thyroid tissues (EmaxSR, EmeanSR), as well as mean E-values (EmeanLRz) for 2 mm region of interest in the stiffest zone of the lesion. The lesions were subject to pathological and/or cytological evaluation. Results The B-mode assessment showed that all MTCs were hypoechogenic, with no halo sign, and they contained micro- and/ or macrocalcifications. Ill-defined lesion margin were found in 4 out of 6 cancers; 4 out of 6 cancers had a H/W ratio > 1. Heterogeneous echostructure and type III vascularity were found in 5 out of 6 lesions. In the SWE, the mean value of EmaxLR for all of the MTCs was 89.5 kPa and (the mean value of EmaxSR for all surrounding tissues was) 39.7 kPa Mean values of EmeanLR and EmeanSR were 34.7 kPa and 24.4 kPa, respectively. The mean value of EmeanLRz was 49.2 kPa. Conclusions SWE showed MTCs as stiffer lesions compared to the surrounding tissues. The lesions were qualified for fine needle aspiration biopsy based on B-mode assessment. However, the diagnostic algorithm for MTC is based on the

  17. Quantitative Ultrasound for Nondestructive Characterization of Engineered Tissues and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Mercado, Karla P; Hocking, Denise C

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive, non-destructive technologies for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the development of artificial tissues are critical for the advancement of tissue engineering. Current standard techniques for evaluating engineered tissues, including histology, biochemical assays and mechanical testing, are destructive approaches. Ultrasound is emerging as a valuable tool for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered tissues and biomaterials longitudinally during fabrication and post-implantation. Ultrasound techniques are rapid, non-invasive, non-destructive and can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of ultrasound imaging, quantitative ultrasound techniques, and elastography, with representative examples of applications of these ultrasound-based techniques to the field of tissue engineering.

  18. The use of ultrasound in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzik, Torsten; Kannengiesser, Klaus; Petersen, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    Imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) plays a pivotal role in the primary diagnosis, as well as during the management of patients with known IBD. The evolution of ultrasound equipment and the growing expertise of examiners have both enhanced the role of intestinal ultrasound in the assessment of the gastrointestinal tract in IBD patients. Intestinal ultrasound has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity, as well as high positive and negative predictive value, in the detection or exclusion of intestinal inflammatory activity in IBD. The obvious advantages of intestinal ultrasound over other imaging modalities include non-invasiveness, rapid availability and low costs. This review summarizes the current developments in the use of intestinal ultrasound for the detection of IBD and its complications, and discusses its use in the management of patients with IBD. Indications for the use of intestinal ultrasound in daily practice are presented, expanded by new developments such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and elastography. PMID:28243033

  19. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC. PMID:27906671

  20. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-03

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC.

  1. Ultrafast Harmonic Coherent Compound (UHCC) imaging for high frame rate echocardiography and Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Chatelin, Simon; Villemain, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Transthoracic shear wave elastography of the myocardium remains very challenging due to the poor quality of transthoracic ultrafast imaging and the presence of clutter noise, jitter, phase aberration, and ultrasound reverberation. Several approaches, such as, e.g., diverging-wave coherent compounding or focused harmonic imaging have been proposed to improve the imaging quality. In this study, we introduce ultrafast harmonic coherent compounding (UHCC), in which pulse-inverted diverging-waves are emitted and coherently compounded, and show that such an approach can be used to enhance both Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) and high frame rate B-mode Imaging. UHCC SWE was first tested in phantoms containing an aberrating layer and was compared against pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and against ultrafast coherent compounding (UCC) imaging at the fundamental frequency. In-vivo feasibility of the technique was then evaluated in six healthy volunteers by measuring myocardial stiffness during diastole in transthoracic imaging. We also demonstrated that improvements in imaging quality could be achieved using UHCC B-mode imaging in healthy volunteers. The quality of transthoracic images of the heart was found to be improved with the number of pulse-inverted diverging waves with reduction of the imaging mean clutter level up to 13.8-dB when compared against UCC at the fundamental frequency. These results demonstrated that UHCC B-mode imaging is promising for imaging deep tissues exposed to aberration sources with a high frame-rate. PMID:26890730

  2. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  3. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  4. Endoscopic management of pain in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Willingham, Field F; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the United States. Due to its aggressive behavior and lack of effective therapies, palliation plays a critical role in the management of the disease. Most patients with pancreatic cancer suffer from severe pain, which adversely predicts prognosis and significantly impacts the quality of life. Therefore pain management plays a central role in palliation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid agents are often first line medications in pain management, but they do not target the underlying pathophysiology of pain and their use is limited by adverse effects and dependence. The proposed mechanisms of pain development in pancreatic cancer include neurogenic inflammation and ductal hypertension which may be targeted by endoscopic therapies. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) and pancreatic duct stent placement are the two primary endoscopic modalities for palliative management in pancreatic cancer patients with refractory pain.  Other endoscopic treatments such as biliary stent placement and enteral stent placement for biliary and duodenal obstruction may also help palliate pain in addition to their role in decompression. This article reviews the existing evidence for these endoscopic interventions for pain management in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  6. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sabra, Karim G.; Conti, Stephane; Roux, Philippe; Kuperman, W. A.

    2007-05-07

    Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.

  7. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Conti, Stephane; Roux, Philippe; Kuperman, W. A.

    2007-05-01

    Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.

  8. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  9. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  11. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  12. 3-Dimensional shear wave elastography of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-ling; Chang, Cai; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fen; Chen, Jia-jian; Qu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Color patterns of 3-dimensional (3D) shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising method in differentiating tumoral nodules recently. This study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of color patterns of 3D SWE in breast lesions, with special emphasis on coronal planes. A total of 198 consecutive women with 198 breast lesions (125 malignant and 73 benign) were included, who underwent conventional ultrasound (US), 3D B-mode, and 3D SWE before surgical excision. SWE color patterns of Views A (transverse), T (sagittal), and C (coronal) were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Distribution of SWE color patterns was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.001). In malignant lesions, “Stiff Rim” was significantly more frequent in View C (crater sign, 60.8%) than in View A (51.2%, P = 0.013) and View T (54.1%, P = 0.035). AUC for combination of “Crater Sign” and conventional US was significantly higher than View A (0.929 vs 0.902, P = 0.004) and View T (0.929 vs 0.907, P = 0.009), and specificity significantly increased (90.4% vs 78.1%, P = 0.013) without significant change in sensitivity (85.6% vs 88.0%, P = 0.664) as compared with conventional US. In conclusion, combination of conventional US with 3D SWE color patterns significantly increased diagnostic accuracy, with “Crater Sign” in coronal plane of the highest value. PMID:27684820

  13. Orbital endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Selva, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive "keyhole" surgery performed using endoscopic visualization is increasing in popularity and is being used by almost all surgical subspecialties. Within ophthalmology, however, endoscopic surgery is not commonly performed and there is little literature on the use of the endoscope in orbital surgery. Transorbital use of the endoscope can greatly aid in visualizing orbital roof lesions and minimizing the need for bone removal. The endoscope is also useful during decompression procedures and as a teaching aid to train orbital surgeons. In this article, we review the history of endoscopic orbital surgery and provide an overview of the technique and describe situations where the endoscope can act as a useful adjunct to orbital surgery.

  14. Needle optical coherence elastography for the measurement of microscale mechanical contrast deep within human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Tien, Alan; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging imaging technique that probes microscale mechanical contrast in tissues with the potential to differentiate healthy and malignant tissues. However, conventional OCE techniques are limited to imaging the first 1 to 2 mm of tissue in depth. We demonstrate, for the first time, OCE measurements deep within human tissues using needle OCE, extending the potential of OCE as a surgical guidance tool. We use needle OCE to detect tissue interfaces based on mechanical contrast in both normal and malignant breast tissues in freshly excised human mastectomy samples, as validated against histopathology. Further, we demonstrate the feasibility of in situ measurements >4 cm from the tissue surface using ultrasound guidance of the OCE needle probe. With further refinement, our method may potentially aid in accurate detection of the boundary of the tumor to help ensure full removal of all malignant tissues, which is critical to the success of breast-conserving surgery.

  15. Feasibility of CEUS and strain elastography in one case of ileum Crohn stricture and literature review.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Andrea; Biscontri, Marco; Matergi, Marco; Stumpo, Michela; Minacci, Chiara

    2016-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and strain elastography (SE) are diagnostic imaging methods, which are still not routinely used in the clinical management of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, there are studies in the literature reporting on the use of both CEUS and SE in patients with bowel obstruction due to Crohn's disease, documenting the usefulness of these two methods in the differentiation between inflammation and fibrosis affecting the bowel wall. The aim of this case report is to evaluate the usefulness of CEUS and SE performed in a patient with Crohn's disease, who was admitted to hospital with bowel obstruction due to terminal ileal stricture and submitted to ileocecal resection. CEUS and SE identified and to some extent also characterized the inflammatory and fibrotic processes affecting the bowel wall. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the surgical specimen confirmed the presence of inflammatory phenomena (exudates, ulcers, and fistulas) and fibrosis as suggested by ultrasound (US) imaging methods.

  16. Incidentally detection of non-palpable testicular nodules at scrotal ultrasound: what is new?

    PubMed

    Valentino, Massimo; Bertolotto, Michele; Martino, Pasquale; Barozzi, Libero; Pavlica, Pietro

    2014-12-30

    The increased use of ultrasound in patients with urological and andrological symptoms has given an higher detection of intra-testicular nodules. Most of these lesions are hypoechoic and their interpretation is often equivocal. Recently, new ultrasound techniques have been developed alongside of B-mode and color-Doppler ultrasound. Although not completely standardized, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and tissue elastography (TE), added to traditional ultrasonography, can provide useful information about the correct interpretation of incidentally detected non-palpable testicular nodules. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate these new techniques in the patient management.

  17. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-07

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G') and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G' and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green's function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G' and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study was

  18. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G‧) and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G‧ and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green’s function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G‧ and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study

  19. Real-time elastography in the assessment of liver fibrosis: a review of qualitative and semi-quantitative methods for elastogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Corradi, Francesco; Cevasco, Luca; Revelli, Matteo; Marziano, Andrea; Molini, Lucio; Cenderello, Giovanni; Cassola, Giovanni; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Despite its invasiveness, liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis. Non-invasive ultrasound-based techniques are increasingly employed to assess parenchymal stiffness and the progression of chronic diffuse liver diseases. Real-time elastography is a rapidly evolving technique that can reveal the elastic properties of tissues. This review examines qualitative and semi-quantitative methods developed for analysis of real-time liver elastograms, to estimate parenchymal stiffness and, indirectly, the stage of fibrosis. Qualitative analysis is the most immediate approach for elastogram analysis, but this method increases intra- and inter-observer variability, which is seen as a major limitation of real-time elastography. Semi-quantitative methods include analysis of the histogram derived from color-coded maps, as well as calculation of the elastic ratio and fibrosis index.

  20. A feasibility study of carotid elastography for risk assessment of atherosclerotic plaques validated by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochang; Huang, Lingyun; Huang, Manwei; Zhao, Xihai; He, Le; Yuan, Chun; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2014-03-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. One of its main reasons is rupture of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Conventional B-mode ultrasound images and Doppler/color flow measurements are mostly used to evaluate degree of stenosis, which underestimates plaque vulnerability. Alternatively, the correspondence between multi-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, plaque composition and histology has been well established. In this study, the feasibility of ultrasound carotid elastography in risk assessment of carotid atherosclerotic plaques is investigated. Preliminarily in-vivo results on a small number of human subjects are initially validated by multi-contrast, highresolution MRI, and it shows that maximum strain rate might be feasible to evaluate the plaque vulnerability.

  1. Role of ultrasound in colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Renáta; Fábián, Anna; Szepes, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an undervalued non-invasive examination in the diagnosis of colonic diseases. It has been replaced by the considerably more expensive magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, despite the fact that, as first examination, it can usefully supplement the diagnostic process. Transabdominal ultrasound can provide quick information about bowel status and help in the choice of adequate further examinations and treatment. Ultrasonography, as a screening imaging modality in asymptomatic patients can identify several colonic diseases such as diverticulosis, inflammatory bowel disease or cancer. In addition, it is widely available, cheap, non-invasive technique without the use of ionizing radiation, therefore it is safe to use in childhood or during pregnancy, and can be repeated at any time. New ultrasound techniques such as elastography, contrast enhanced and Doppler ultrasound, mini-probes rectal and transperineal ultrasonography have broadened the indication. It gives an overview of the methodology of various ultrasound examinations, presents the morphology of normal bowel wall and the typical changes in different colonic diseases. We will pay particular attention to rectal and transperineal ultrasound because of their outstanding significance in the diagnosis of rectal and perineal disorders. This article seeks to overview the diagnostic impact and correct indications of bowel ultrasound. PMID:27920469

  2. Lorentz force megahertz optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Singh, Manmohan; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Liu, Chih-Hao; Li, Jiasong; Schill, Alexander; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a rapidly developing technique for assessing tissue biomechanical properties. This study demonstrates the first use of the Lorentz force to induce elastic waves within tissue to quantify the elasticity of tissue in combination with a phase-sensitive OCE system at ~1.5 million A-scans per second. The feasibility of this technique was tested on tissue-mimicking agar phantoms of various concentrations. The results as assessed by OCE were in good agreement with standard mechanical testing of the samples. After the preliminary experiments, the stiffness of porcine liver was examined. The results demonstrate that Lorentz force MHz OCE can be applied to study the elasticity of biological tissue effectively and has the potential for clinical applications due to rapid excitation and imaging.

  3. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a console ... ultrasound that require biopsy are not cancers. Many facilities do not offer ultrasound screening, and the procedure ...

  13. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Ultrasound 2D strain estimator based on image registration for ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Torres, Mylin; Kirkpatrick, Stephanie; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to calculate 2D strain through the registration of the pre- and post-compression (deformation) B-mode image sequences based on an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm (INRA). Compared with the most commonly used cross-correlation (CC) method, our approach is not constrained to any particular set of directions, and can overcome displacement estimation errors introduced by incoherent motion and variations in the signal under high compression. This INRA method was tested using phantom and in vivo data. The robustness of our approach was demonstrated in the axial direction as well as the lateral direction where the standard CC method frequently fails. In addition, our approach copes well under large compression (over 6%). In the phantom study, we computed the strain image under various compressions and calculated the signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNS) ratios. The SNR and CNS values of the INRA method were much higher than those calculated from the CC-based method. Furthermore, the clinical feasibility of our approach was demonstrated with the in vivo data from patients with arm lymphedema.

  15. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  16. Transient elastography: Kill two birds with one stone?

    PubMed

    Wong, Grace Lai-Hung

    2013-05-27

    Assessment of liver fibrosis and steatosis is crucial in chronic liver diseases in order to determine the prognosis, the need of treatment, as well as monitor disease progression and response to treatment. Liver biopsy is limited by its invasiveness and patient acceptability. Transient elastography (TE, Fibroscan(®)) is a non-invasive tool with satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility to estimate liver fibrosis and steatosis. TE has been well validated in major liver diseases including chronic hepatitis B and C, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. As alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is one of the major confounding factors of liver stiffness in chronic hepatitis B, an ALT-based algorithm has been developed and higher liver stiffness measurements (LSM) cutoff values for different stages of liver fibrosis should be used in patients with elevated ALT levels up to 5 times of the upper limit of normal. Otherwise falsely-high LSM results up to cirrhotic range may occur during ALT flare. TE is also useful in predicting patient prognosis such as development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), portal hypertension, post-operative complications in HCC patients, and also survival. Unfortunately, failed acquisition of TE is common in obese patients. Furthermore, obese patients may have higher LSM results even in the same stage of liver fibrosis. The new XL probe, a larger probe with lower ultrasound frequency and deeper penetration, increases the success rate of TE in obese patients. The median LSM value with XL probe was found to be lower than that by the conventional M probe, hence cutoff values approximately 1.2 to 1.3 kPa lower than those of M probe should be adopted. Recent studies revealed a novel ultrasonic controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) of the machine is a useful parameter to detect even low-grade steatosis noninvasively. CAP may also be used to quantify liver steatosis by

  17. Elastography Method for Reconstruction of Nonlinear Breast Tissue Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. G.; Liu, Y.; Wang, G.; Sun, L. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Elastography is developed as a quantitative approach to imaging linear elastic properties of tissues to detect suspicious tumors. In this paper a nonlinear elastography method is introduced for reconstruction of complex breast tissue properties. The elastic parameters are estimated by optimally minimizing the difference between the computed forces and experimental measures. A nonlinear adjoint method is derived to calculate the gradient of the objective function, which significantly enhances the numerical efficiency and stability. Simulations are conducted on a three-dimensional heterogeneous breast phantom extracting from real imaging including fatty tissue, glandular tissue, and tumors. An exponential-form of nonlinear material model is applied. The effect of noise is taken into account. Results demonstrate that the proposed nonlinear method opens the door toward nonlinear elastography and provides guidelines for future development and clinical application in breast cancer study. PMID:19636362

  18. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma co-exists with Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Is strain elastography still useful?

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wu, Qiong; Hu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    To study the performance of strain elastography in differentiating papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) combined with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), conventional ultrasound scan (US) and strain elastography (SE) were performed on 558 nodules smaller than 10 mm by one examiner before surgeries. Serum concentrations of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) (normal range: 0-60 U/ml) were measured. Continuous variables were analyzed by independent t test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was applied to calculate the cut-off values of strain ratio (SR) and elastography score (ES). The comparison of AUCs is performed by Z test. 482 nodules were diagnosed as PTMC and there were 181 nodules co-existed with HT. SR measurements were lower in PTMC co-existed with HT when comparing to those without HT. (7.292±6.581 vs 11.319±13.155, p<0.000). Taking the data from all of the 558 nodules, the best cut-off of diagnosing PTMC was SR>2.58. When taking the data from 181 PTMC with HT, the best cut-off was SR>2.10. The diagnostic value of SR>2.1 were higher than ES>3, conventional US and combining US and SE (z=3.595, 4.876, 4.420, p<0.001), but cut-off of SR>2.1 did not show significant enhancement of diagnostic value compared to SR>2.58 (z=0.439, p=0.8903>0.001) in PTMC with HT. There is a negative relation between SR and titer of TPO-Ab (r=-0.650, p<0.0001). PTMC with high TPO-Ab (>1000) titer presented lower SR (5.972±4.118 vs 8.379±9.172, p=0.009). Although SR measurements were lower in nodules co-existed with HT when comparing those without HT, using a regular ES and cut-off of SR measurement would not influence the diagnosing performance. SE is still very useful for diagnosing PTMC with HT. PTMC with high TPO-Ab titer might require a lower cut-off of SR.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Precise tumor-staging is critical in the management of early esophageal caner. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows the endoscopist a view beyond the esophageal wall which opens the door to a variety of new gastroenterologic techniques. Endoscopic mucosal resection, laser photoablation and photodynamic therapy may be successfully employed in early esophageal cancer management. Combination radiation therapy and chemotherapy have shown better responses in advanced cancer. Expandable metallic stents may also provide palliation with inoperable esophageal cancer. The efficacy of EUS in the management of esophageal cancer is critically reviewed.

  20. Muscle elastography: a new imaging technique for multiple sclerosis spasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Illomei, G; Spinicci, G; Locci, E; Marrosu, M G

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity is currently evaluated on the basis of neurological examinations such as Ashworth Scale (AS) and 0-10 NRS. Severity of spasticity is difficult to quantify. We investigated the use of real time elastography (RTHE) ultrasounds for evaluating objectively the muscle fibers status in MS spasticity patients and their changes after a new antispasticity treatment. Two studies were performed. In study A, 110 MS patients underwent a neurological evaluation based on the AS and RTHE. The RTHE images were scored with the new 1-5 muscle fibers rigidity imaging scale, here called MEMSs (Muscle Elastography Multiple Sclerosis Score). The correlation between AS and MEMSs was found to be statistically significant. In study B, 55 MS patients treated with THC:CBD oromucosal spray for their resistant spasticity were followed prospectively. MS spasticity was evaluated by the 0-10 NRS scale at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. MEMSs' figures were obtained at both timepoints. Responders to THC:CBD oromucosal spray (pre-defined as an improvement ≥20% in their 0-10 NRS spasticity score vs. baseline) were 65% of sample. These patients had a mean 0-10 NRS reduction of 1.87 and a MEMSs reduction of 1.97 (P values <0.0001). The remaining 35% of patients, classified as clinically non-responders, showed still a significant mean reduction in MEMSs (0.8, P = 0.002). Our overall results showed that RTHE, operativized throughout MEMSs, could be an objective gold standard to evaluate MS muscle spasticity as well as the effectiveness of antispasticity therapy.

  1. Evaluating the Significance of Viscoelasticity in Diagnosing Early-Stage Liver Fibrosis with Transient Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; He, Qiong; Luo, Jianwen; Yang, Xueping; Shao, Jinhua; Xing, Huichun

    2017-01-01

    Transient elastography quantifies the propagation of a mechanically generated shear wave within a soft tissue, which can be used to characterize the elasticity and viscosity parameters of the tissue. The aim of our study was to combine numerical simulation and clinical assessment to define a viscoelastic index of liver tissue to improve the quality of early diagnosis of liver fibrosis. This is clinically relevant, as early fibrosis is reversible. We developed an idealized two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model of the liver to evaluate the effects of different viscoelastic values on the propagation characteristics of the shear wave. The diagnostic value of the identified viscoelastic index was verified against the clinical data of 99 patients who had undergone biopsy and routine blood tests for staging of liver disease resulting from chronic hepatitis B infection. Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and the shear wave attenuation fitting coefficient (AFC) were calculated from the ultrasound data obtained by performing transient elastography. Receiver operating curve analysis was used to evaluate the reliability and diagnostic accuracy of LSM and AFC. Compared to LSM, the AFC provided a higher diagnostic accuracy to differentiate early stages of liver fibrosis, namely F1 and F2 stages, with an overall specificity of 81.48%, sensitivity of 83.33% and diagnostic accuracy of 81.82%. AFC was influenced by the level of LSM, ALT. However, there are no correlation between AFC and Age, BMI, TBIL or DBIL. Quantification of the viscoelasticity of liver tissue provides reliable measurement to identify and differentiate early stages of liver fibrosis. PMID:28107385

  2. Multifrequency time-harmonic elastography for the measurement of liver viscoelasticity in large tissue windows.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Trong, Manh Nguyen; Guo, Jing; Eggers, Jonathan; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    Elastography of the liver for the non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis is an established method. However, investigations of obese patients or patients with ascites are often limited by small and superficial elastographic windows. Therefore, multifrequency time-harmonic elastography (THE) based on time-resolved A-line ultrasound has recently been developed for measuring liver viscoelasticity in wide soft tissue windows and at greater depths. In this study, THE was integrated into a clinical B-mode scanner connected to a dedicated actuator bed driven by superimposed vibrations of 30- to 60-Hz frequencies. The resulting shear waves in the liver were captured along multiple profiles 7 to 14 cm in width and automatically processed for reconstruction of mean efficient shear wave speed and shear wave dispersion slope. This new modality was tested in healthy volunteers and 22 patients with clinically proven cirrhosis. Patients could be separated from controls by higher shear wave speeds (3.11 ± 0.64 m/s, 2.14-4.81 m/s, vs. 1.74 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.60-1.91 m/s) without significant degradation of data by high body mass index or ascites. Furthermore, the wave speed dispersion slope was significantly (p = 0.0025) lower in controls (5.2 ± 1.8 m/s/kHz) than in patients (39.1 ± 32.2 m/s/kHz). In conclusion, THE is useful for the diagnosis of cirrhosis in large tissue windows.

  3. Magnetic hyperthermia dosimetry by biomechanical properties revealed in magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in magnetic hyperthermia to treat solid tumors. Under an appropriate AC magnetic field, energy can be transferred to the MNPs to heat up the intended tissue target while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of MNP thermal therapy is desirable in order to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. Typical hyperthermia dosimetry often relies on changes in imaging properties or temperature measurements based on the thermal distribution. Alternative dosimetric indicators can include the biomechanical properties of the tissue, reflecting the changes due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration during hyperthermia treatments. Tissue stiffness can be probed by elastography modalities including MRI, ultrasound imaging, and optical coherence elastography (OCE), with OCE showing the highest displacement sensitivity (tens of nanometers). Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) is one type of OCE that utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the tissue stiffness. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of evaluating the hyperthermia dose based on the elasticity changes revealed by MM-OCE. Superparamagnetic MNPs were applied to ex vivo tissue specimens for both magnetic hyperthermia and MM-OCE experiments, where temperature and elastic modulus were obtained. A correlation between temperature rise and measured stiffness was observed. In addition, we found that with repetitive sequential treatments, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results potentially suggest that MM-OCE could indicate the irreversible changes the tissue undergoes during thermal therapy, which supports the idea for MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosage control in future applications.

  4. Quantitative micro-elastography: imaging of tissue elasticity using compression optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Kelsey M; Chin, Lixin; McLaughlin, Robert A; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-10-27

    Probing the mechanical properties of tissue on the microscale could aid in the identification of diseased tissues that are inadequately detected using palpation or current clinical imaging modalities, with potential to guide medical procedures such as the excision of breast tumours. Compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) maps tissue strain with microscale spatial resolution and can delineate microstructural features within breast tissues. However, without a measure of the locally applied stress, strain provides only a qualitative indication of mechanical properties. To overcome this limitation, we present quantitative micro-elastography, which combines compression OCE with a compliant stress sensor to image tissue elasticity. The sensor consists of a layer of translucent silicone with well-characterized stress-strain behaviour. The measured strain in the sensor is used to estimate the two-dimensional stress distribution applied to the sample surface. Elasticity is determined by dividing the stress by the strain in the sample. We show that quantification of elasticity can improve the ability of compression OCE to distinguish between tissues, thereby extending the potential for inter-sample comparison and longitudinal studies of tissue elasticity. We validate the technique using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate the ability to map elasticity of freshly excised malignant and benign human breast tissues.

  5. Quantitative micro-elastography: imaging of tissue elasticity using compression optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Chin, Lixin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-01-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of tissue on the microscale could aid in the identification of diseased tissues that are inadequately detected using palpation or current clinical imaging modalities, with potential to guide medical procedures such as the excision of breast tumours. Compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) maps tissue strain with microscale spatial resolution and can delineate microstructural features within breast tissues. However, without a measure of the locally applied stress, strain provides only a qualitative indication of mechanical properties. To overcome this limitation, we present quantitative micro-elastography, which combines compression OCE with a compliant stress sensor to image tissue elasticity. The sensor consists of a layer of translucent silicone with well-characterized stress-strain behaviour. The measured strain in the sensor is used to estimate the two-dimensional stress distribution applied to the sample surface. Elasticity is determined by dividing the stress by the strain in the sample. We show that quantification of elasticity can improve the ability of compression OCE to distinguish between tissues, thereby extending the potential for inter-sample comparison and longitudinal studies of tissue elasticity. We validate the technique using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate the ability to map elasticity of freshly excised malignant and benign human breast tissues. PMID:26503225

  6. Quantitative micro-elastography: imaging of tissue elasticity using compression optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Chin, Lixin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-10-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of tissue on the microscale could aid in the identification of diseased tissues that are inadequately detected using palpation or current clinical imaging modalities, with potential to guide medical procedures such as the excision of breast tumours. Compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) maps tissue strain with microscale spatial resolution and can delineate microstructural features within breast tissues. However, without a measure of the locally applied stress, strain provides only a qualitative indication of mechanical properties. To overcome this limitation, we present quantitative micro-elastography, which combines compression OCE with a compliant stress sensor to image tissue elasticity. The sensor consists of a layer of translucent silicone with well-characterized stress-strain behaviour. The measured strain in the sensor is used to estimate the two-dimensional stress distribution applied to the sample surface. Elasticity is determined by dividing the stress by the strain in the sample. We show that quantification of elasticity can improve the ability of compression OCE to distinguish between tissues, thereby extending the potential for inter-sample comparison and longitudinal studies of tissue elasticity. We validate the technique using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate the ability to map elasticity of freshly excised malignant and benign human breast tissues.

  7. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates and spherical shells using geometry-specific equations of motion. MRE and finite element modeling (FEM) of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from FEM and MRE data and a linear correlation of r2 ≥ 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using MRE and FEM data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. PMID:19780146

  9. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2008-02-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  10. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described.

  11. General review of magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing “virtual palpation”, MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  12. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  13. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehman, E. C.; Rossman, P. J.; Kruse, S. A.; Sahakian, A. V.; Glaser, K. J.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  14. Wideband MR elastography for viscoelasticity model identification

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Temel K.; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The growing clinical use of MR Elastography (MRE) requires the development of new quantitative standards for measuring tissue stiffness. Here, we examine a soft tissue mimicking phantom material (Ecoflex) over a wide frequency range (200 Hz to 7.75 kHz). The recorded data are fit to a cohort of viscoelastic models of varying complexity (integer and fractional order). This was accomplished using multiple sample sizes by employing geometric focusing of the shear wave front to compensate for the changes in wavelength and attenuation over this broad range of frequencies. The simple axisymmetric geometry and shear wave front of this experiment allows us to calculate the frequency-dependent complex-valued shear modulus of the material. The data were fit to several common models of linear viscoelasticity, including those with fractional derivative operators, and we identified the best possible matches over both a limited frequency band (often used in clinical studies) and over the entire frequency span considered. In addition to demonstrating the superior capability of the fractional order viscoelastic models, this study highlights the advantages of measuring the complex-valued shear modulus over as wide a range of frequencies as possible. PMID:23001852

  15. Detection of small inclusions by elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Masmoudi, Mohamed; Souchon, Rémi; Trompette, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The problem of parameter identification for elastostatics equilibrium equations in two-dimensional inhomogeneous domains is considered. Elastic properties of a linear isotropic material depend on two parameters: Young's modulus E and Poisson coefficient ν, and our objective is to determine the values and the spatial distribution of E in a plane domain Ω, where ν is assumed to be constant. It is assumed that the input data are directional displacements in Ω under a small quasistatic compression; this is consistent with an existing imaging modality called elastography. We prove that this problem involves a compact operator. A method is proposed here to identify the spatial distribution of E up to a multiplicative factor. It is based on an implementation of the Gauss-Newton method that is obtained without the calculation of the Jacobian matrix. It is performed by the use of conjugate gradient, through a combination of reverse (adjoint) and forward (direct) differentiation that makes sense in the case of compact operators. Our method is validated both with numerical and experimental results.

  16. Endoscopic Management of Esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Christopher R; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D

    2016-02-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of sinonasal origin. These tumors typically present with unilateral nasal obstruction and epistaxis, and diagnosis is confirmed on biopsy. Over the past 15 years, significant advances have been made in endoscopic technology and techniques that have made this tumor amenable to expanded endonasal resection. There is growing evidence supporting the feasibility of safe and effective resection of esthesioneuroblastoma via an expanded endonasal approach. This article outlines a technique for endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma and reviews the current literature on esthesioneuroblastoma with emphasis on outcomes after endoscopic resection of these malignant tumors.

  17. Virtual touch tissue imaging on acoustic radiation force impulse elastography: a new technique for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; He, Yong; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Jun-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Objectives- Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography is a newly developed ultrasound elasticity imaging technique that included both Virtual Touch tissue quantification and Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI; Siemens Medical Solutions, Mountain View, CA). This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of VTI in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules. Methods- This study included 192 consecutive patients with thyroid nodules (n = 219) who underwent surgery for compressive symptoms or suspicion of malignancy. Tissue stiffness on VTI elastography was scored from 1 (soft) to 6 (hard). The VTI scores between malignant and benign thyroid nodules were compared. The intraobserver and interobserver agreement for VTI elastography was also assessed. Results- On VTI elastography: score 1 was found in 84 nodules (all benign); score 2 in 37 nodules (3 papillary carcinomas and 34 benign nodules); score 3 in 25 nodules (1 medullary carcinoma, 6 papillary carcinomas, and 18 benign nodules); score 4 in 53 nodules (50 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); score 5 in 17 nodules (14 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); and score 6 in 3 nodules (all papillary carcinomas). A VTI elasticity score of 4 or greater was highly predictive of malignancy (P< .01), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 87.0% (67 of 77), 95.8% (136 of 142), 91.8% (67 of 73), 93.1% (136 of 146), and 92.7% (203 of 219), respectively. The κ values were 0.69 for intraobserver agreement and 0.85 for interobserver agreement. Conclusions- Virtual Touch tissue elasticity imaging has great potential as an adjunctive tool combined with conventional sonography for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

  18. Real-time elastography as a noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak, Lamiaa; Nabeel, Mohammed M.; Hassan, Ehsan; Omran, Dalia; Zakaria, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus is a worldwide problem. Noninvasive methods for liver fibrosis assessment as ultrasound-based approaches have emerged to replace liver biopsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of real-time elastography (RTE) in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), compared with transient elastography and liver biopsy. Methods RTE, FibroScan and liver biopsy were performed in 50 CHC patients. In addition, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and routine laboratory values were included in the analysis. Results RTE was able to diagnose significant hepatic fibrosis (F ≥2) according to METAVIR scoring system at cut-off value of 2.49 with sensitivity 100%, specificity 66%, and area under the receiver-operating characteristics (AUROC) 0.8. FibroScan was able to predict significant fibrosis at cut-off value 7.5 KPa with sensitivity 88%, specificity 100%, and AUROC 0.94.APRI was able to predict significant hepatic fibrosis (F ≥2) with sensitivity 54%, specificity 80%, and AUROC 0.69. There was a significant positive correlation between the FibroScan score and RTE score (r=0.6, P=0.001). Conclusions Although FibroScan is superior in determining significant hepatic fibrosis, our data suggest that RTE may be a useful and promising noninvasive method for liver fibrosis assessment in CHC patients especially in cases with technical limitations for FibroScan. PMID:27366038

  19. Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease Using Myocardial Elastography with Diverging Wave Imaging: Validation against Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Waase, Marc; Gambhir, Alok; Bunting, Ethan; Sayseng, Vincent; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-02-28

    Myocardial elastography (ME) is an ultrasound-based technique that can image 2-D myocardial strains. The objectives of this study were to illustrate that 2-D myocardial strains can be imaged with diverging wave imaging and differ, on average, between normal and coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. In this study, 66 patients with symptoms of CAD were imaged with myocardial elastography before a nuclear stress test or an invasive coronary angiography. Radial cumulative strains were estimated in all patients. The end-systolic radial strain in the total cross section of the myocardium was significantly higher in normal patients (17.9 ± 8.7%) than in patients with reversible perfusion defect (6.2 ± 9.3%, p < 0.001) and patients with significant (-0.9 ± 7.4%, p < 0.001) and non-significant (3.7 ± 5.7%, p < 0.01) lesions. End-systolic radial strain in the left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary artery territory was found to be significantly higher in normal patients than in CAD patients. These preliminary findings indicate that end-systolic radial strain measured with ME is higher on average in healthy persons than in CAD patients and that ME has the potential to be used for non-invasive, radiation-free early detection of CAD.

  20. Navigation system for flexible endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Figl, Michael; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Häfner, Michael; Kollmann, Christian; Bergmann, Helmar

    2003-05-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) features flexible endoscopes equipped with a radial or linear array scanhead allowing high resolution examination of organs adjacent to the upper gastrointestinal tract. An optical system based on fibre-glass or a CCD-chip allows additional orientation. However, 3-dimensional orientation and correct identification of the various anatomical structures may be difficult. It therefore seems desirable to merge real-time US images with high resolution CT or MR images acquired prior to EUS to simplify navigation during the intervention. The additional information provided by CT or MR images might facilitate diagnosis of tumors and, ultimately, guided puncture of suspicious lesions. We built a grid with 15 plastic spheres and measured their positions relatively to five fiducial markers placed on the top of the grid. For this measurement we used an optical tracking system (OTS) (Polaris, NDI, Can). Two sensors of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) (Aurora, NDI, Can) were mounted on a flexible endoscope (Pentax GG 38 UX, USA) to enable a free hand ultrasound calibration. To determine the position of the plastic spheres in the emitter coordinate system of the EMTS we applied a point-to-point registration (Horn) using the coordinates of the fiducial markers in both coordinate systems (OTS and EMTS). For the transformation between EMTS to the CT space the Horn algorithm was adopted again using the fiducial markers. Visualization was enabled by the use of the AVW-4.0 library (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester/MN, USA). To evaluate the suitability of our new navigation system we measured the Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) of the diverse registrations and the Target Registration Error (TRE) for the complete transformation from the US space to the CT space. The FRE for the ultrasound calibration amounted to 4.3 mm +/- 4.2 mm, resulting from 10 calibration procedures. For the transformation from the OTS reference system to the

  1. [Ultrasound of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active versus inactive nodes, and in particular benign versus malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also show promising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  2. [Ultrasound of the Thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active vs. inactive nodes, and in particular benign vs. malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also showpromising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  3. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  4. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  5. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  6. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  7. Endoscopic mucosectomy: an alternative treatment for superficial esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R

    2000-01-01

    Recent trends in the management of superficial esophageal cancer consist of improved detection, pretherapeutic staging and reliable criteria for curative endoscopic therapy. The endoscopic treatment is legitimate when the cancer is at an early stage, intra-epithelial or microinvasive (m1 or m2) and N0. Submucosal cancer should not be treated with a curative intent by endotherapy. Concerning squamous cell cancer, the oriental and occidental pathologists include high-grade dysplasia in the same group as intramucosal cancer. The distinction is however maintained for adenocarcinoma in the Barrett's esophagus. Indications of endoscopic rather than surgical treatment rely on: (1) the small size of the tumor (not more than 2 cm in diameter); (2) the endoscopic morphology in the type 0 of the Japanese classification with the flat subtypes IIa and IIb rather than type IIc--there is high risk of submucosal invasion for the polypoid (type I) or ulcerated superficial cancer (type III); and (3) the endoscopic ultrasound staging, with confirmed integrity of the hyperechoic submucosal layer. The high-frequency (20 MHz) miniprobe is preferred to the standard (7.5 MHz) instrument. The elective procedure for tumor eradication is endoscopic mucosectomy. The technique is associated with a 6.8% risk of severe complications (hemorrhage or perforation) and a recurrence rate of 3%-7%. The 5-year survival rate is similar to that of surgery (over 80%). In the small group of patients with superficial esophageal cancer (less than 10% of the disease) endoscopic treatment may now be proposed in about 30% of cases, surgery is preferred for submucosal cancer and for neoplasia with a large surface. Areas of high-grade dysplasia in the Barrett's esophagus offer a new and increasing sector of indications. The concurrent endoscopic procedure of destruction--photodynamic therapy--is preferred for the destruction of lesions with poorly delineated limits.

  8. AN OVERVIEW OF ELASTOGRAPHY – AN EMERGING BRANCH OF MEDICAL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Hall, Timothy J.; Urban, Matthew W.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Garra, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    From times immemorial manual palpation served as a source of information on the state of soft tissues and allowed detection of various diseases accompanied by changes in tissue elasticity. During the last two decades, the ancient art of palpation gained new life due to numerous emerging elasticity imaging (EI) methods. Areas of applications of EI in medical diagnostics and treatment monitoring are steadily expanding. Elasticity imaging methods are emerging as commercial applications, a true testament to the progress and importance of the field. In this paper we present a brief history and theoretical basis of EI, describe various techniques of EI and, analyze their advantages and limitations, and overview main clinical applications. We present a classification of elasticity measurement and imaging techniques based on the methods used for generating a stress in the tissue (external mechanical force, internal ultrasound radiation force, or an internal endogenous force), and measurement of the tissue response. The measurement method can be performed using differing physical principles including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, X-ray imaging, optical and acoustic signals. Until recently, EI was largely a research method used by a few select institutions having the special equipment needed to perform the studies. Since 2005 however, increasing numbers of mainstream manufacturers have added EI to their ultrasound systems so that today the majority of manufacturers offer some sort of Elastography or tissue stiffness imaging on their clinical systems. Now it is safe to say that some sort of elasticity imaging may be performed on virtually all types of focal and diffuse disease. Most of the new applications are still in the early stages of research, but a few are becoming common applications in clinical practice. PMID:22308105

  9. Elastography in Distinguishing Benign from Malignant Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Colakoglu, Bulent; Yildirim, Duzgun; Alis, Deniz; Ucar, Gokhan; Samanci, Cesur; Ustabasioglu, Fethi Emre; Bakir, Alev; Ulusoy, Onur Levent

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to test the diagnostic success of strain elastography in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules. Materials and Methods: The size, echogenicity, and halo integrity of 293 thyroid nodules and the presence of microcalcification in these nodules were evaluated on gray-scale examination. Doppler characteristics and elastography patterns were also evaluated and recorded. Nodules were classified in four categories (patterns 1–4) based on elastographic examination. Results: According to the cytopathological findings, 222 nodules were benign, and 71 nodules were malignant. The risk of a nodule to be malignant was 3.8 times increased by hypoechogenicity, 7.7 times increased by the presence of microcalcification, and 11.5 times increased by the absence of halo. On Doppler patterns, the presence of central vascularity increased the malignancy risk of a nodule by 5.8 times. According to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, patterns 3 and 4 were malignant, and patterns 1 and 2 were benign. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of elastography were 100%, 80.2%, 61.7%, 100%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Strain elastography can be used as a noninvasive method in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules and in identifying the patients who would undergo surgery. PMID:28123841

  10. Endoscopic management of ejaculatory duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Aggour, A; Mostafa, H; Maged, W

    1998-01-01

    A total of 191 patients were evaluated at our department for azoospermia, and 11 were found to have azoospermia due to ejaculatory duct obstruction as proved by normal serum hormones, normal testicular biopsy, low ejaculate volume and absence of fructose in semen. Also transrectal ultrasound was performed, revealing distended seminal vesicles and dilated ejaculatory ducts. All these criteria together suggested ejaculatory duct obstruction as a cause of azoospermia. All patients underwent endoscopic management for treatment of their ejaculatory duct obstruction in the form of resection and/or incision of the ejaculatory duct ostium inside the urethra and patency was checked intraoperatively by injection of sterile methylene blue in the vas and visualizing the efflux of the blue dye endoscopically. Intraoperative patency was documented in 10 patients and postoperative patency by follow-up semen analysis in 7 patients (70% patency rate) of which 2 (20% pregnancy rate) were able to conceive within 2 years of endoscopic treatment. Postoperative complications included acute urinary retention in 1 patient, haematuria in 5 and recurrent epididymitis in 2 patients.

  11. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  12. Endoscopic management of choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali S; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Khashab, Mouen A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis in patients with cirrhosis often requires diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy such as endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients with underlying cirrhosis may have coagulopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and other comorbidities associated with cirrhosis that can make endoscopic therapy challenging and can be associated with a higher risk of adverse events. Given the unique derangements of physiologic parameters associated with cirrhosis this population requires a truly multifaceted and multidisciplinary understanding between therapeutic endoscopists, hepatologists and anesthesiologists. For therapeutic endoscopists, it is critical to be aware of the specific issues unique to this population of patients to optimize outcomes and avoid adverse events. The epidemiology of gallstone disease, the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with varying degree of hepatic dysfunction, and a review of the available literature in this area are presented.

  13. Comparison of windowing effects on elastography images: Simulation, phantom and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rifat; Arfin, Rishad; Rubel, Monir Hossan; Islam, Kazi Khairul; Jia, Congxian; Metaxas, Dimitris; Garra, Brian S; Alam, S Kaisar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have evaluated the use of smooth windows for ultrasound elastography. In ultrasound elastography, local tissue strain is estimated using operations such as cross-correlation on local segments of RF data. In this process, local data segments are selected by multiplying the RF data by a rectangular window. Such data truncation causes non-ideal spectral behavior, which can be mitigated by using smooth windows. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of smooth windows may improve the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) of strain images. The effects of using smooth windows have not been fully characterized for time-domain strain estimators. Thus, we have compared the elastographic performance of rectangular, Hanning, Gaussian, and Chebyshev windows used in conjunction with cross-correlation based algorithm and adaptive stretching algorithm using finite element method (FEM) simulation, experimental phantom, and in vivo data. Smooth windows are found to improve the SNRe by up to 3.94 for FEM data and by up to 1.76 for phantom data which represent 76% and 60.52% improvements, respectively. CNRe improves by up to 12.23 for FEM simulated data and by up to 4.28 for phantom data which represent 213.07% and 248.2% improvements, respectively. Mean structural similarity (MSSIM) was used for assessing the image perceptual quality and smooth windows improved it by up to 0.22 (85.98% improvement) for simulated data. We have evaluated these parameters at 1-6% applied strains for the experimental phantom and at 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and 12% applied strains for FEM simulation. We observed a maximum deterioration in axial resolution of 0.375 mm (which is on the order of the wavelength, 0.3mm) due to smooth windows. "Salt-and-pepper" noise from false-peak errors has also been reduced. Smooth windows increased the lesion-to-background contrast (by increasing the CNRe by 213.07%) of a low contrast lesion (10-dB). For the in vivo

  14. Visualization of bonding at an inclusion boundary using axial-shear strain elastography: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Garra, Brian S.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-05-01

    Ultrasound elastography produces strain images of compliant tissues under quasi-static compression. In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. The overall hypothesis of this work is that the pattern of axial-shear strain distribution around the inclusion/background interface is completely determined by the bonding at the interface after normalization for inclusion size and applied strain levels, and that it is feasible to extract certain features from the axial-shear strain elastograms to quantify this pattern. The mechanical model used in this study consisted of a single stiff circular inclusion embedded in a homogeneous softer background. First, we performed a parametric study using finite-element analysis (FEA) (no ultrasound involved) to identify possible features that quantify the pattern of axial-shear strain distribution around an inclusion/background interface. Next, the ability to extract these features from axial-shear strain elastograms, estimated from simulated pre- and post-compression noisy RF data, was investigated. Further, the feasibility of extracting these features from in vivo breast data of benign and malignant tumors was also investigated. It is shown using the FEA study that the pattern of axial-shear strain distribution is determined by the degree of bonding at the inclusion/background interface. The results suggest the feasibility of using normalized features that capture the region of positive and negative axial-shear strain area to quantify the pattern of the axial-shear strain distribution. The simulation results showed that it was feasible to extract the features, as identified in the FEA study, from axial-shear strain elastograms. However, an effort must be made to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms with the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNRasse) possible, without compromising the resolution. The in vivo

  15. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  16. Outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Gopal, R Krishna; Yalamanchili, Ranjith K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis, is a disabling condition that responds well to the conventional methods of treatment. Patients who do not respond to conservative treatment may require surgical intervention. This study evaluates the outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis, with resection of posterosuperior eminence of the calcaneum. Materials and Methods: This present study included 25 heels from 23 consecutive patients with posterior heel pain, who did not respond to conservative treatment and underwent endoscopic decompression of the retrocalcaneal bursae and excision of bony spurs. The functional outcome was evaluated by comparing the pre and postoperative American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores. The Maryland ankle and foot score was used postoperatively to assess the patient's satisfaction at the one-year followup. Results: The University of Maryland scores of 25 heels were categorized as the nonparametric categories, and it was observed that 16 patients had an excellent outcome, six good, three fair and there were no poor results. The AOFAS scores averaged 57.92 ± 6.224 points preoperatively and 89.08 ± 5.267 points postoperatively (P < 0.001), at an average followup of 16.4 months. The 12 heels having noninsertional tendinosis on ultrasound had low AOFAS scores compared to 13 heels having retrocalcaneal bursitis alone. At one year followup, correlation for preoperative ultrasound assessment of tendoachilles degeneration versus postoperative Maryland score (Spearman correlation) had shown a strong negative correlation. Conclusion: Endoscopic calcaneal resection is highly effective in patients with mild or no degeneration and yields cosmetically better results with fewer complications. Patients with degenerative changes in Achilles tendon had poorer outcomes in terms of subjective satisfaction. PMID:23325968

  17. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Słapa, Rafał Z; Jakubowski, Wiesław S; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  19. Ultrasound imaging of the liver and bile ducts – expectations of a clinician

    PubMed Central

    Pawełas, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Since diseases of the liver and bile ducts are common, a clinician is faced by the need to implement an appropriate diagnostic process. It is necessary to apply diagnostic methods that enable appropriate assessment of the most common pathologies of the liver, i.e. fibrosis, steatosis and focal lesions, as well as initial assessment of the bile ducts. These goals can be achieved using ultrasound methods based on conventional sonography, contrast-enhanced sonography and elastography. The assessment of fatty liver and bile duct dilatation using ultrasound reaches satisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity. The usage of contrast agents enables unambiguous differentiation between benign and malignant focal lesions, frequently allowing them to be identified accurately without the assistance of other imaging modalities. Elastography has enabled reliable assessment of liver fibrosis. Its results are comparable to those of the standard method, i.e. liver biopsy. PMID:26673784

  20. Ultrasound imaging of the liver and bile ducts - expectations of a clinician.

    PubMed

    Skoczylas, Krzysztof; Pawełas, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Since diseases of the liver and bile ducts are common, a clinician is faced by the need to implement an appropriate diagnostic process. It is necessary to apply diagnostic methods that enable appropriate assessment of the most common pathologies of the liver, i.e. fibrosis, steatosis and focal lesions, as well as initial assessment of the bile ducts. These goals can be achieved using ultrasound methods based on conventional sonography, contrast-enhanced sonography and elastography. The assessment of fatty liver and bile duct dilatation using ultrasound reaches satisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity. The usage of contrast agents enables unambiguous differentiation between benign and malignant focal lesions, frequently allowing them to be identified accurately without the assistance of other imaging modalities. Elastography has enabled reliable assessment of liver fibrosis. Its results are comparable to those of the standard method, i.e. liver biopsy.

  1. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  2. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  3. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  4. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  5. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  6. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  7. High Resolution Anatomic and Elastographic Transrectal Ultrasound for Improved Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    strain estimation technique in elastography ." Ultrason Imaging 24: 109–118. Tay, P. C., S. T. Acton, et al. (2006). "Ultrasound despeckling using an...incrementally increasing pressure. Strain , related to elasticity, can be calculated from the displace ment image . Our second objective is to use a...that has been found to be optimal for strain imaging (Lubinski, Emelianov et al. 1999).An example B-mode image obtained by the transrectal I-Beam

  8. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-04-16

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist's role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed.

  9. Endoscopic Endonasal Odontoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Mascari, Carmelo; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Odontoidectomy is the treatment of choice for irreducible ventral cervical-medullary compression. The endonasal endoscopic approach is an innovative approach for odontoidectomy. The aim of this article is to identify in which conditions this approach is indicated, discussing variants of the technique for selected cases of craniovertebral malformation with platybasia. We believe that the technical difficulties of this approach are balanced by the advantages for patients. Some conditions related to the patient and to the anatomy of the craniovertebral junction may favor adoption of the endoscopic endonasal approach, which should be considered complementary and not alternative to standard approaches.

  10. Advances in balloon endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    In September 2003, a double-balloon endoscope (DBE) composed of balloons attached to a scope and an overtube was released in Japan prior to becoming available in other parts of the world. The DBE was developed by Dr. Yamamoto (1), and 5 different types of scopes with different uses have already been marketed. In April 2007, a single-balloon small intestinal endoscope was released with a balloon attached only to the overtube as a subsequent model. This article presents a detailed account of the development of these scopes up to the present time.

  11. Shear wave elastography plaque characterization with mechanical testing validation: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widman, E.; Maksuti, E.; Larsson, D.; Urban, M. W.; Bjällmark, A.; Larsson, M.

    2015-04-01

    Determining plaque vulnerability is critical when selecting the most suitable treatment for patients with atherosclerotic plaque. Currently, clinical non-invasive ultrasound-based methods for plaque characterization are limited to visual assessment of plaque morphology and new quantitative methods are needed. In this study, shear wave elastography (SWE) was used to characterize hard and soft plaque mimicking inclusions in six common carotid artery phantoms by using phase velocity analysis in static and dynamic environments. The results were validated with mechanical tensile testing. In the static environment, SWE measured a mean shear modulus of 5.8  ±  0.3 kPa and 106.2  ±  17.2 kPa versus 3.3  ±  0.5 kPa and 98.3  ±  3.4 kPa measured by mechanical testing in the soft and hard plaques respectively. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the plaques’ shear moduli throughout a simulated cardiac cycle. The results show good agreement between SWE and mechanical testing and indicate the possibility for in vivo arterial plaque characterization using SWE.

  12. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  13. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of venous thrombi: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Cédric; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Henni, Anis Hadj; Qi, Shijie; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) is proposed for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) elasticity assessment. This new imaging technique takes advantage of properly polarized shear waves to induce resonance of a confined mechanical heterogeneity. Realistic phantoms (n = 9) of DVT total and partial clot occlusions with elasticities from 406 to 3561 Pa were built for in vitro experiments. An ex vivo study was also performed to evaluate the elasticity of two fresh porcine venous thrombi in a pig model. Transient shear waves at 45-205 Hz were generated by the vibration of a rigid plate (plane wavefront) or by a needle to simulate a radiation pressure on a line segment (cylindrical wavefront). Induced propagation of shear waves was imaged with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a finite element method was developed to simulate tested experimental conditions. An inverse problem was then formulated considering the first resonance frequency of the DVT inclusion. Elasticity agreements between SWIRE and a reference spectroscopy instrument (RheoSpectris) were found in vitro for total clots either in plane (r(2) = 0.989) or cylindrical (r(2) = 0.986) wavefront configurations. For total and partial clots, elasticity estimation errors were 9.0 ±4.6% and 9.3 ±11.3%, respectively. Ex vivo, the blood clot elasticity was 498 ±58 Pa within the inferior vena cava and 436 ±45 Pa in the right common iliac vein (p = 0.22). To conclude, the SWIRE technique seems feasible to quantitatively assess blood clot elasticity in the context of DVT ultrasound imaging.

  14. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in cancer: Technique, analysis, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Kay M.; Ehman, Richard L.; McGee, Kiaran P.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties are significantly altered with the development of cancer. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique capable of quantifying tissue mechanical properties in vivo. This review describes the basic principles of MRE and introduces some of the many promising MRE methods that have been developed for the detection and characterization of cancer, evaluation of response to therapy, and investigation of the underlying mechanical mechanisms associated with malignancy. PMID:26592944

  15. Robust intravascular optical coherence elastography driven by acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mastik, Frits; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2007-07-01

    High strain spots in the vessel wall indicate the presence of vulnerable plaques. The majority of acute cardiovascular events are preceded by rupture of such a plaque in a coronary artery. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be extended, in principle, to an elastography technique, mapping the strain in the vascular wall. However, the susceptibility of OCT to frame-to-frame decorrelation, caused by tissue and catheter motion, inhibits reliable tissue displacement tracking and has to date obstructed the development of OCT-based intravascular elastography. We introduce a new technique for intravascular optical coherence elastography, which is robust against motion artifacts. Using acoustic radiation force, we apply a pressure to deform the tissue synchronously with the line scan rate of the OCT instrument. Radial tissue displacement can be tracked based on the correlation between adjacent lines, instead of subsequent frames in conventional elastography. The viability of the method is demonstrated with a simulation study. The root mean square (rms) error of the displacement estimate is 0.55 μm, and the rms error of the strain is 0.6%. It is shown that high-strain spots in the vessel wall, such as observed at the sites of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions, can be detected with the technique. Experiments to realize this new elastographic method are presented. Simultaneous optical and ultrasonic pulse-echo tracking demonstrate that the material can be put in a high-frequency oscillatory motion with an amplitude of several micrometers, more than sufficient for accurate tracking with OCT. The resulting data are used to optimize the acoustic pushing sequence and geometry.

  16. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  17. Measurement of elastic nonlinearity of soft solid with transient elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catheline, S.; Gennisson, J.-L.; Fink, M.

    2003-12-01

    Transient elastography is a powerful tool to measure the speed of low-frequency shear waves in soft tissues and thus to determine the second-order elastic modulus μ (or the Young's modulus E). In this paper, it is shown how transient elastography can also achieve the measurement of the nonlinear third-order elastic moduli of an Agar-gelatin-based phantom. This method requires speed measurements of polarized elastic waves measured in a statically stressed isotropic medium. A static uniaxial stress induces a hexagonal anisotropy (transverse isotropy) in solids. In the special case of uniaxially stressed isotropic media, the anisotropy is not caused by linear elastic coefficients but by the third-order nonlinear elastic constants, and the medium recovers its isotropic properties as soon as the uniaxial stress disappears. It has already been shown how transient elastography can measure the elastic (second-order) moduli in a media with transverse isotropy such as muscles. Consequently this method, based on the measurement of the speed variations of a low-frequency (50-Hz) polarized shear strain waves as a function of the applied stress, allows one to measure the Landau moduli A, B, C that completely describe the third-order nonlinearity. The several orders of magnitude found among these three constants can be justified from the theoretical expression of the internal energy.

  18. The Journey of Elastography: Background, Current Status, and Future Possibilities in Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Faruk, Tasnuva; Islam, Md Kafiul; Arefin, Sams; Haq, Md Zahurul

    2015-10-01

    Elastography is a promising way to assess tissue differences regarding stiffness or elasticity for what was historically assessed manually by palpation. Combined with conventional imaging modalities (eg, ultrasonography [US]), elastography can potentially evaluate the stiffness of a breast lesion and consequently help to detect malignant breast tumor from benign ones. Recent studies show that ultrasonographic elastography (USE) provides higher image quality compared with conventional B-mode US or mammography during breast cancer diagnosis, which eventually helps to reduce false-positive results (ie, increased specificity) and therefore is useful in avoiding breast biopsy. This article reviews the basics of elastography technique, classifications, diagnosis results obtained from clinical studies to date for differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions, and its future possibilities. In addition, this article generalizes different elastography methods, modes, and associated imaging modalities in a simpler way and attempts to identify misconceptions and confusion related to existing elastography techniques. It also makes an effort to identify the gaps of information that need to be filled so that interested researchers can get an overall idea of elastography-based methods in a convenient way to carry out their research on breast elastography for prospective future applications, eg, breast cancer diagnosis or even in intraoperative breast tumor localization.

  19. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Tanter, M.

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  20. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  1. Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Won-Ju; Park, Chang-Hwan; Chung, Kyoung-Myeun; Park, Seon-Young; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Ki, Ho-seok; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.

  2. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  3. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society - update. The liver, gallbladder and bile ducts examinations.

    PubMed

    Walas, Maria Krystyna; Skoczylas, Krzysztof; Gierbliński, Ireneusz

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasonography, which usually constitutes an initial imaging method of the gallbladder, liver and bile ducts diseases, allows for final diagnosis or determines another diagnostic step. The continuously progressing technological advancement forces to broaden the indications for ultrasound diagnostics and enables easier and more precise imaging of the tested structures. Performing the examination in accordance with current standards allows for the optimization of the sensitivity and specificity parameters of ultrasound examinations in the diagnosis of the liver, gallbladder and bile ducts pathologies as well as minimizes the probability of error-making. This article presents a recommended liver, gallbladder and bile ducts ultrasound technique which indicates an optimal positioning of the patient for the exam as well as the sites of the ultrasound transducer application. Minimum technical parameters of the apparatus have been specified with respect to the requirements of modern ultrasound techniques which enable imaging with the use of contrast agents and elastography. Furthermore, the article proposes a standard exam description containing essential patient-related data and provides required ultrasound evaluation parameters for the tested organs. Attention has been drawn to the appropriate manner of preparing the patient for the examination and the features of the tested structures have been presented. The article also contains a brief description of the liver, gallbladder and bile ducts diseases which are most often diagnosed by ultrasound examinations. Moreover, the use of elastography as well as contrast-enhanced examinations in the diagnostics of fibrosis and focal changes in the liver have been discussed. This article has been prepared on the basis of the Ultrasound Examination Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society (2011) and updated with reference to the latest findings in pertinent literature.

  4. DaVinci canvas: a telerobotic surgical system with integrated, robot-assisted, laparoscopic ultrasound capability.

    PubMed

    Leven, Joshua; Burschka, Darius; Kumar, Rajesh; Zhang, Gary; Blumenkranz, Steve; Dai, Xiangtian Donald; Awad, Mike; Hager, Gregory D; Marohn, Mike; Choti, Mike; Hasser, Chris; Taylor, Russell H

    2005-01-01

    We present daVinci Canvas: a telerobotic surgical system with integrated robot-assisted laparoscopic ultrasound capability. DaVinci Canvas consists of the integration of a rigid laparoscopic ultrasound probe with the daVinci robot, video tracking of ultrasound probe motions, endoscope and ultrasound calibration and registration, autonomous robot motions, and the display of registered 2D and 3D ultrasound images. Although we used laparoscopic liver cancer surgery as a focusing application, our broader aim was the development of a versatile system that would be useful for many procedures.

  5. Duodenal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: Two Cases and the Evaluation of Endoscopic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Choel Woong; Ha, Jong Kun; Hong, Young Mi; Park, Jin Hyun; Park, Soo Bum; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma mainly arises in the stomach, with fewer than 30% arising in the small intestine. We describe here two cases of primary duodenal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma which were evaluated by endoscopic ultrasonography. A 52-year-old man underwent endoscopy due to abdominal pain, which demonstrated a depressed lesion on duodenal bulb. Endoscopic ultrasonographic finding was hypoechoic lesion invading the submucosa. The other case was a previously healthy 51-year-old man. Endoscopy showed a whitish granular lesion on duodenum third portion. Endoscopic ultrasonography image was similar to the first case, whereas abdominal computed tomography revealed enlargement of multiple lymph nodes. The first case was treated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori, after which the mucosal change and endoscopic ultrasound finding were normalized in 7 months. The second case was treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone, and rituximab every 3 weeks. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the patient achieved complete remission. PMID:24143321

  6. Postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Min; Park, Chang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, management, and outcome of postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Materials and Methods Ninety patients undergoing endoscopic treatment for VUR were retrospectively reviewed and classified into two groups according to ureteral obstruction: the nonobstruction group (83 cases, 122 ureters; mean age, 7.0±2.8 years) and the obstruction group (7 cases, 10 ureters; mean age, 6.2±8.1 years). We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, injection material, laterality, voiding dysfunction, constipation, renal scarring, preoperative and postoperative ultrasound findings, endoscopic findings, injection number, and injection volume. Additionally, we reviewed the clinical manifestations, natural course, management, and outcome of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Results The incidence of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment was 7.6% (10/132 ureters). The type of bulking agent used and injection volume tended to be associated with ureteral obstruction. However, no significant risk factors for obstruction were identified between the two groups. Three patients showed no symptoms or signs after the onset of ureteral obstruction. Most of the patients with ureteral obstruction experienced spontaneous resolution within 1 month with conservative therapy. Two patients required temporary ureteral stents to release the ureteral obstruction. Conclusions In our experience, the incidence of ureteral obstruction was slightly higher than in previous reports. Our study identified no predictive risk factors for developing ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Although most of the ureteral obstructions resolved spontaneously within 1 month, some cases required drainage to relieve symptoms or to prevent renal function deterioration. PMID:26175873

  7. A GPU-accelerated 3D Coupled Sub-sample Estimation Algorithm for Volumetric Breast Strain Elastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Yuqi; Hall, Timothy J; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-01-31

    Our primary objective of this work was to extend a previously published 2D coupled sub-sample tracking algorithm for 3D speckle tracking in the framework of ultrasound breast strain elastography. In order to overcome heavy computational cost, we investigated the use of a graphic processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the 3D coupled sub-sample speckle tracking method. The performance of the proposed GPU implementation was tested using a tissue-mimicking (TM) phantom and in vivo breast ultrasound data. The performance of this 3D sub-sample tracking algorithm was compared with the conventional 3D quadratic subsample estimation algorithm. On the basis of these evaluations, we concluded that the GPU implementation of this 3D sub-sample estimation algorithm can provide high-quality strain data (i.e. high correlation between the pre- and the motion-compensated post-deformation RF echo data and high contrast-to-noise ratio strain images), as compared to the conventional 3D quadratic sub-sample algorithm. Using the GPU implementation of the 3D speckle tracking algorithm, volumetric strain data can be achieved relatively fast (approximately 20 seconds per volume [2.5 cm 2.5 cm 2.5 cm]).

  8. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  9. A systematic review of elastography, electrical impedance scanning, and digital infrared thermography for breast cancer screening and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenburg, Thomas D; Willis, Cameron D; Mundy, Linda; Hiller, Janet E

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study aimed to systematically identify and evaluate all the available evidence of safety, effectiveness and diagnostic accuracy for three emerging classes of technology promoted for breast cancer screening and diagnosis: Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI), electrical impedance scanning (EIS) and elastography. A systematic search of seven biomedical databases (EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, CRD, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Current Contents Connect) was conducted through March 2011, along with a manual search of reference lists from relevant studies. The principal outcome measures were safety, effectiveness, and diagnostic accuracy. Data were extracted using a standardised form, and validated for accuracy by the secondary authors. Study quality was appraised using the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies tool, while heterogeneity was assessed using forest plots, Cooks' distance and standardised residual scatter plots, and I (2) statistics. From 6,808 search results, 267 full-text articles were assessed, of which 60 satisfied the inclusion criteria. No effectiveness studies were identified. Only one EIS screening accuracy study was identified, while all other studies involved symptomatic populations. Significant heterogeneity was present among all device classes, limiting the potential for meta-analyses. Sensitivity and specificity varied greatly for DITI (Sens 0.25-0.97, Spec 0.12-0.85), EIS (Sens 0.26-0.98, Spec 0.08-0.81) and ultrasound elastography (Sens 0.35-1.00, Spec 0.21-0.99). It is concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the use of these technologies for breast cancer screening. Moreover, the high level of heterogeneity among studies of symptomatic women limits inferences that may be drawn regarding their use as diagnostic tools. Future research employing standardised imaging, research and reporting methods is required.

  10. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Saclarides, Theodore John

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer. PMID:26491409

  11. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited.

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  13. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure.

  14. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  15. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  16. Ex vivo and in vivo assessment of the non-linearity of elasticity properties of breast tissues for quantitative strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Takeshi; Ueno, Ei; Matsumura, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Bando, Hiroko; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the background to the image variations in strain elastography (strain imaging [SI]) depending on the manner of manipulation (compression magnitude) during elasticity image (EI) acquisition. Thirty patients with 33 breast lesions who had undergone surgery followed by SI assessment in vivo were analyzed. An analytical approach to tissue elasticity based on the stress-elastic modulus (Young's modulus) relationship was adopted. Young's moduli were directly measured ex vivo in surgical specimens ranging from 2.60 kPa (fat) to 16.08 kPa (invasive carcinoma) under the weak-stress condition (<0.2-0.4 kPa, which corresponds to the appropriate "light touch" technique in SI investigation. The contrast (ratio) of lesion to fat in elasticity ex vivo gradually decreased as the stress applied increased (around 1.0 kPa) on the background of significant non-linearity of the breast tissue. Our results indicate that the differences in non-linearity in elasticity between the different tissues within the breast under minimal stress conditions are closely related to the variation in EI quality. The significance of the "pre-load compression" concept in tissue elasticity evaluation is recognized. Non-linearity of elasticity is an essential attribute of living subjects and could provide useful information having a considerable impact on clinical diagnosis in quantitative ultrasound elastography.

  17. Optimal Design of Damper Layer for Static Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takayuki; Watanabe, Yasuaki; Sekimoto, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    An effective method in static elastography for improving the nonuniformity of stress applied by the shape of a transducer head is to insert a damper between the tissue being analyzed and the transducer head. We previously demonstrated the effectiveness of inserting a damper through computer simulations of structural and acoustic analyses on tissue models with flat surfaces. In this study, the optimal values were obtained for two parameters of the damper: Young's modulus and damper thickness. An effective damper shape was also determined through structural analyses.

  18. Review of MR Elastography Applications and Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Kevin J.; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The technique of MR elastography (MRE) has emerged as a useful modality for quantitatively imaging the mechanical properties of soft tissues in vivo. Recently, MRE has been introduced as a clinical tool for evaluating chronic liver disease, but many other potential applications are being explored. These applications include measuring tissue changes associated with diseases of the liver, breast, brain, heart, and sk