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Sample records for endoscopic ultrasound elastography

  1. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques have recently become available as advanced diagnostic tools for tissue characterization. Strain elastography is a real-time technique used with transcutaneous ultrasound (US) and endoscopic US. Convincing evidence is available demonstrating a significant value of strain elastography for the discrimination of benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs). This paper reviews preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of performing real-time elastography during endobronchial US (EBUS) and a potential application of this technique for selection of LNs for EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer and extrathoracic malignancies. PMID:27503154

  2. Contrast enhancement and elastography in endoscopic ultrasound: an update of clinical applications in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is fundamental in the characterization of many diseases concerning different organs, i.e. pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal pathologic conditions, and lymph nodes of unknown origin. It is also well known that many factors can hamper the accuracy of EUS, i.e. biliary stents, chronic pancreatitis, poor operator's expertise. These factors can also lead to suboptimal accuracy when cytological confirmation through EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is indicated. In recent years, new technological tools have rapidly increased their clinical impact improving the diagnostic power of EUS and EUS-FNA. Among these new tools, the most investigated and useful ones are represented by contrast harmonic-EUS (CH-EUS) and EUS-elastography (EUS-E). The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a review of the literature, an update of the applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E in the routine clinical practice in pancreatic diseases. We discussed the first reports and applications of these techniques in our previous review published in Minerva Medica. The applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E to the study of pancreatic diseases appear feasible and safe. The use of both techniques is very simple and does not require any relevant additional workload for the endoscopic personnel. CH-EUS is now considered an important and accurate tool in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. CH-EUS targeted FNA is an active field of research. However the available studies show that CH-EUS increases FNA accuracy by a little extent, without statistical significance; moreover, CH-EUS FNA showed a trend toward being more efficient vs. simple EUS FNA (less needle passes and more abundance in cytological material) but this trend did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, the clinical impact of EUS-E in terms of differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still under

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography strain histograms in the evaluation of patients with pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Opačić, Dalibor; Rustemović, Nadan; Kalauz, Mirjana; Markoš, Pave; Ostojić, Zvonimir; Majerović, Matea; Ledinsky, Iva; Višnjić, Ana; Krznarić, Juraj; Opačić, Milorad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy of the strain histogram endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-based method for the diagnostic differentiation of patients with pancreatic masses. METHODS: In a prospective single center study, 149 patients were analyzed, 105 with pancreatic masses and 44 controls. Elastography images were recorded using commercially available ultrasound equipment in combination with EUS linear probes. Strain histograms (SHs) were calculated by machine integrated software in regions of interest and mean values of the strain histograms were expressed as Mode 1 (over the mass) and Mode 2 (over an adjacent part of pancreatic tissue, representing the reference area). The ratio between Mode 2 and Mode 1 was calculated later, representing a new variable, the strain histogram ratio. After the final diagnosis was established, two groups of patients were formed: a pancreatic cancer group with positive cytology achieved by fine needle aspiration puncture or histology after surgery (58 patients), and a mass-forming pancreatitis group with negative cytology and follow-up after 3 and 6 mo (47 patients). All statistical analyses were conducted in SPSS 14.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, United States). RESULTS: Results were obtained with software for strain histograms with reversed hue scale (0 represents the hardest tissue structure and 255 the softest). Based on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve coordinates, the cut-off point for Mode 1 was set at the value of 86. Values under the cut-off point indicated the presence of pancreatic malignancy. Mode 1 reached 100% sensitivity and 45% specificity with overall accuracy of 66% (95%CI: 61%-66%) in detection of pancreatic malignant tumors among the patients with pancreatic masses. The positive and negative predictive values were 54% and 100%, respectively. The cut-off for the new calculated variable, the SH ratio, was set at the value 1.153 based on the ROC curve coordinates. Values equal or above the cut-off value

  4. Introduction to ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  5. [Endoscopic ultrasonography elastography in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Rustemović, Nadan; Opacić, Milorad; Cuković-Cavka, Silvija

    2009-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) elastography is a new technique for detecting the elastic properties of examined tissues during real time ultrasonography. The method is a very valuable tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of pathologic processes affecting the gastrointestinal tract and its adjacent organs. It represents a major advance in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal malignancies, especially pancreatic carcinoma. EUS also provides guidance for fine needle aspiration (FNA) of undiagnosed masses and lymph nodes. Establishing the diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis is sometimes very difficult. When inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is confined to the colon, there is a lack of diagnostic tools for distinction between Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis, which is especially important in definitive phenotyping before surgical decision. Our ongoing studies emphasize the role of EUS elastography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease phenotype and primary sclerosing cholangitis. As there are no literature data on this issue, we recommend further investigations in this promising new area of research. PMID:20235372

  6. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: liver.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Masatoshi; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Iijima, Hiroko; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Yada, Norihisa; Fujimoto, Kenji; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Hirooka, Masashi; Sumino, Yasukiyo; Kumada, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    In diffuse liver disease, it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis of liver fibrosis prior to determining indications for therapy or predicting treatment outcome and malignant potential. Although liver biopsy has long been the gold standard in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, it is still an invasive method. In addition, the sampling error is an intrinsic problem of liver biopsy. Non-invasive serological methods for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis can be affected by factors unrelated to the liver. Recently, after the introduction of FibroScan, it became possible to measure liver fibrosis directly and non-invasively by elastography, which has attracted attention as a non-invasive imaging diagnostic tool for liver fibrosis. In addition, real-time tissue elastography is currently being used to conduct clinical trials at many institutions. Moreover, virtual touch quantification enables the observation of liver stiffness at any location by simply observing B-mode images. Furthermore, the recently developed ShearWave elastography visualizes liver stiffness on a color map. Elastography is thought to be useful for all types of diffuse liver diseases. Because of its association with portal hypertension and liver carcinogenesis, elastography is expected to function as a novel prognostic tool for liver disease. Although various elastographic devices have been developed by multiple companies, each device has its own measurement principle, method, and outcome, creating confusion in clinical settings. Therefore, it is extremely important to understand the characteristics of each device in advance. The objective of this guideline, which describes the characteristics of each device based on the latest knowledge, is for all users to be able to make the correct diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis by ultrasound elastography.

  7. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  8. Initial experience with real-time elastography using an ultrasound bronchoscope for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Andreo García, Felipe; Centeno Clemente, Carmen Ángela; Sanz Santos, José; Barturen Barroso, Ángel; Hernández Gallego, Alba; Ruiz Manzano, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Real-time elastography performed during endoscopic ultrasonography is a relatively new method for characterizing tissue stiffness, and has been used successfully as a predictor of malignancy in mediastinal lymph nodes. This case report describes our practical experience with this technique using an ultrasound bronchoscope to examine mediastinal lymph nodes. We present a case of sectorial endobronchial ultrasound and the first published case of endoscopic ultrasound elastography using ultrasound bronchoscope in two patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Qualitative tissue color pattern was obtained in both cases and correlated with pathological evaluation. The initial feasibility results are promising and suggest that ultrasound bronchoscopy techniques, such as guided nodal staging, merit additional studies. It may be important to categorize the risk of malignancy to facilitate sampling decisions. PMID:25443586

  9. Initial experience with real-time elastography using an ultrasound bronchoscope for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Andreo García, Felipe; Centeno Clemente, Carmen Ángela; Sanz Santos, José; Barturen Barroso, Ángel; Hernández Gallego, Alba; Ruiz Manzano, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Real-time elastography performed during endoscopic ultrasonography is a relatively new method for characterizing tissue stiffness, and has been used successfully as a predictor of malignancy in mediastinal lymph nodes. This case report describes our practical experience with this technique using an ultrasound bronchoscope to examine mediastinal lymph nodes. We present a case of sectorial endobronchial ultrasound and the first published case of endoscopic ultrasound elastography using ultrasound bronchoscope in two patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma. Qualitative tissue color pattern was obtained in both cases and correlated with pathological evaluation. The initial feasibility results are promising and suggest that ultrasound bronchoscopy techniques, such as guided nodal staging, merit additional studies. It may be important to categorize the risk of malignancy to facilitate sampling decisions.

  10. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.

    2008-08-11

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  11. Dynamic programming on a tree for ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Roozbeh; Boily, Mathieu; Martineau, Paul A.; Rivaz, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Elastography is an emerging imaging technique that allows estimation of the mechanical characteristics of tissue. Two issues that need to be addressed before widespread use of elastography in clinical environments are real time constraints and deteriorating effects of signal decorrelation between pre- and post-compression images. Previous work has used Dynamic Programming (DP) to estimate tissue deformation. However, in case of large signal decorrelation, DP can fail. In this paper we, have proposed a novel solution to this problem by solving DP on a tree instead of a single Radio-Frequency line. Formulation of DP on a tree allows exploiting significantly more information, and as such, is more robust and accurate. Our results on phantom and in-vivo human data show that DP on tree significantly outperforms traditional DP in ultrasound elastography.

  12. Ultrasound Elastography and MR Elastography for Assessing Liver Fibrosis: Part 2, Diagnostic Performance, Confounders, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Cloutier, Guy; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the article is to review the diagnostic performance of ultrasound and MR elastography techniques for detection and staging of liver fibrosis, the main current clinical applications of elastography in the abdomen. CONCLUSION Technical and instrument-related factors and biologic and patient-related factors may constitute potential confounders of stiffness measurements for assessment of liver fibrosis. Future developments may expand the scope of elastography for monitoring liver fibrosis and predict complications of chronic liver disease. PMID:25905762

  13. Applications of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Leticia Perondi; Al-Haddad, Mohammad Ali; Sey, Michael Sai Lai; DeWitt, John M

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS has assumed a growing role in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The objective of this review is to discuss the various applications of EUS and EUS-FNA in PDAC. Initially, its use for detection, diagnosis and staging will be described. EUS and EUS-FNA are highly accurate modalities for detection and diagnosis of PDAC, this high accuracy, however, is decreased in specific situations particularly in the presence of chronic pancreatitis. Novel techniques such as contrast-enhanced EUS, elastography and analysis of DNA markers such as k-ras mutation analysis in FNA samples are in progress and might improve the accuracy of EUS in the detection of PDAC in this setting and will be addressed. EUS and EUS-FNA have recently evolved from a diagnostic to a therapeutic technique in the management of PDAC. Significant developments in therapeutic EUS have occurred including advances in celiac plexus interventions with direct injection of ganglia and improved pain control, EUS-guided fiducial and brachytherapy seed placement, fine-needle injection of intra-tumoral agents and advances in EUS-guided biliary drainage. The future role of EUS and EUS in management of PDAC is still emerging. PMID:24976719

  14. Applications of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luz, Leticia Perondi; Al-Haddad, Mohammad Ali; Sey, Michael Sai Lai; DeWitt, John M

    2014-06-28

    Since the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS has assumed a growing role in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The objective of this review is to discuss the various applications of EUS and EUS-FNA in PDAC. Initially, its use for detection, diagnosis and staging will be described. EUS and EUS-FNA are highly accurate modalities for detection and diagnosis of PDAC, this high accuracy, however, is decreased in specific situations particularly in the presence of chronic pancreatitis. Novel techniques such as contrast-enhanced EUS, elastography and analysis of DNA markers such as k-ras mutation analysis in FNA samples are in progress and might improve the accuracy of EUS in the detection of PDAC in this setting and will be addressed. EUS and EUS-FNA have recently evolved from a diagnostic to a therapeutic technique in the management of PDAC. Significant developments in therapeutic EUS have occurred including advances in celiac plexus interventions with direct injection of ganglia and improved pain control, EUS-guided fiducial and brachytherapy seed placement, fine-needle injection of intra-tumoral agents and advances in EUS-guided biliary drainage. The future role of EUS and EUS in management of PDAC is still emerging.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound: Elastographic lymph node evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Jenssen, Christian; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Cui, Xin-Wu; Giovannini, Marc; Hocke, Michael; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Saftoiu, Adrian; Sun, Siyu; Chiorean, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Different imaging techniques can bring different information which will contribute to the final diagnosis and further management of the patients. Even from the time of Hippocrates, palpation has been used in order to detect and characterize a body mass. The so-called virtual palpation has now become a reality due to elastography, which is a recently developed technique. Elastography has already been proving its added value as a complementary imaging method, helpful to better characterize and differentiate between benign and malignant masses. The current applications of elastography in lymph nodes (LNs) assessment by endoscopic ultrasonography will be further discussed in this paper, with a review of the literature and future perspectives. PMID:26374575

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound: Elastographic lymph node evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Arcidiacono, Paolo G.; Cui, Xin-Wu; Giovannini, Marc; Hocke, Michael; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Saftoiu, Adrian; Sun, Siyu; Chiorean, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Different imaging techniques can bring different information which will contribute to the final diagnosis and further management of the patients. Even from the time of Hippocrates, palpation has been used in order to detect and characterize a body mass. The so-called virtual palpation has now become a reality due to elastography, which is a recently developed technique. Elastography has already been proving its added value as a complementary imaging method, helpful to better characterize and differentiate between benign and malignant masses. The current applications of elastography in lymph nodes (LNs) assessment by endoscopic ultrasonography will be further discussed in this paper, with a review of the literature and future perspectives. PMID:26374575

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound: Indian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Vora, Agam

    2015-09-01

    Mediastinoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that allows visualization and tissue sampling of mediastinal nodes. Mediastinoscopy has been extremely valuable in the evaluation and staging of lung cancer and therefore has been considered the gold standard for this purpose for over 30 years. Historically, this procedure has been associated with a low morbidity and mortality and a high sensitivity for diagnosing lung cancer with certain procedural limitations. Recently, it has been reported that not only is mediastinoscopy use limited in community practice, concomitant biopsy rates are limited as well.1 While mediastinoscopy does provide a tissue diagnosis, the procedure has its limitations. Cervical mediastinoscopy allows access to nodal stations 2, 3, 4 and 7, leaving out commonly involved pulmonary ligament and aortopulmonary window nodes.1 It requires general anesthesia and has a morbidity of 1% and a mortality of 0.2%. The procedure adds considerable expense to the staging workup. The estimated current cost is $1,700 for the procedure alone and $7,500 for a mediastinoscopy with a 2-day hospital stay. This prompted the development of endobronchial ultrasound(EBUS) in the 1990s.2. PMID:27608860

  18. New endoscopic ultrasound techniques for digestive tract diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Sheng; Zhang, Zhao-Hong; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is one of the most important modalities for the diagnosis of digestive tract diseases. EUS has been evolving ever since it was introduced. New techniques such as elastography and contrast enhancement have emerged, increasing the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of EUS for the diagnosis of digestive tract diseases including pancreatic masses and lymphadenopathy. EUS-elastography evaluates tissue elasticity and therefore, can be used to differentiate various lesions. Contrast-enhanced EUS can distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic lesions and lymphadenopathy using the intravenous injection of contrast agents. This review discusses the principles and types of these new techniques, as well as their clinical applications and limitations. PMID:25944994

  19. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  20. Tracked regularized ultrasound elastography for targeting breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivaz, Hassan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Fleming, Ioana; Zellars, Richard; Boctor, Emad; Hager, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Tracked ultrasound elastography can be used for guidance in partial breast radiotherapy by visualizing the hard scar tissue around the lumpectomy cavity. For clinical success, the elastography method needs to be robust to the sources of decorrelation between ultrasound images, specifically fluid motions inside the cavity, change of the appearance of speckles caused by compression or physiologic motions, and out-of-plane motion of the probe. In this paper, we present a novel elastography technique that is based on analytic minimization of a regularized cost function. The cost function incorporates similarity of RF data intensity and displacement continuity, making the method robust to small decorrelations present throughout the image. We also exploit techniques from robust statistics to make the method resistant to large decorrelations caused by sources such as fluid motion. The analytic displacement estimation works in real-time. Moreover, the tracked data, used for targeting the radiotherapy, is exploited for discarding frames with excessive out-of-plane motion. Simulation, phantom and patient results are presented.

  1. Ultrasound elastography: enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana N.; Rivaz, Hassan; Macura, Katarzyna; Su, Li-Ming; Hamper, Ulrike; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L., II; Lotan, Tamara; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2009-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy using the laparoscopic and robot-assisted approach lacks tactile feedback. Without palpation, the surgeon needs an affordable imaging technology which can be easily incorporated into the laparoscopic surgical procedure, allowing for precise real time intraoperative tumor localization that will guide the extent of surgical resection. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a novel ultrasound imaging technology that can detect differences in tissue density or stiffness based on tissue deformation. USE was evaluated here as an enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy. USE using a 2D Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm was applied on data from ex vivo human prostate specimens. It proved consistent in identification of lesions; hard and soft, malignant and benign, located in the prostate's central gland or in the peripheral zone. We noticed the 2D DP method was able to generate low-noise elastograms using two frames belonging to the same compression or relaxation part of the palpation excitation, even at compression rates up to 10%. Good preliminary results were validated by pathology findings, and also by in vivo and ex vivo MR imaging. We also evaluated the use of ultrasound elastography for imaging cavernous nerves; here we present data from animal model experiments.

  2. Ultrasound-Assisted Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Hattori, Soichi; Shinga, Kotaro; Ichikawa, Ken; Yamada, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Various surgical procedures for carpal tunnel syndrome exist, such as open release, ultrasound-guided percutaneous release, and endoscopic release. Postoperative pain, scarring, and slow recovery to normal function are reported complications of open release. Damage to vessels and the median nerve and its branches underlying the transverse carpal ligament is a reported complication of ultrasound-guided percutaneous release. Damage to the superficial palmar arch and incomplete release are reported complications of endoscopic release. By performing endoscopic carpal tunnel release with ultrasound assistance, we could visualize neurovascular structures directly with the endoscope and also indirectly with ultrasound to minimize complications. We could also evaluate the morphologic changes of the median nerve dynamically before and after the release. We discuss the technique for this procedure and outline pearls and pitfalls for success. PMID:27656366

  3. An experimental phantom study on the effect of calcifications on ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Adriana; Bayat, Mahdi; Denis, Max; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of single macrocalcifications and groups of microcalcifications on shear wave elastography. Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity when they are evaluated by shear wave elastography. PMID:26737132

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  5. Reliability and validity of quantifying absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Fukashiro, Senshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Muscle hardness is a mechanical property that represents transverse muscle stiffness. A quantitative method that uses ultrasound elastography for quantifying absolute human muscle hardness has been previously devised; however, its reliability and validity have not been completely verified. This study aimed to verify the reliability and validity of this quantitative method. The Young's moduli of seven tissue-mimicking materials (in vitro; Young's modulus range, 20-80 kPa; increments of 10 kPa) and the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (in vivo) were quantified using ultrasound elastography. On the basis of the strain/Young's modulus ratio of two reference materials, one hard and one soft (Young's moduli of 7 and 30 kPa, respectively), the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials and medial gastrocnemius muscle were calculated. The intra- and inter-investigator reliability of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations (≤6.9%) and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients (≥0.77) obtained from all measurements. The correlation coefficient between the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials obtained using a mechanical method and ultrasound elastography was 0.996, which was equivalent to values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The Young's moduli of the medial gastrocnemius muscle obtained using ultrasound elastography were within the range of values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The reliability and validity of the quantitative method for measuring absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography were thus verified.

  6. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Summary This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi

  7. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi-center studies to

  8. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  10. Controlled Study of Traditional Ultrasound and Ultrasound Elastography on the Diagnosis of Breast Masses.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Wang, Ling; Wu, Haojie; Wei, Xiangkun; Duan, Yajie; Xu, Lingyao; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Liu

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to explore the application values of traditional ultrasound (contrast ultrasound [CUS]) and ultrasound elastography (UE) (including gray-scale ultrasound, color Doppler flow imaging, spectral Doppler ultrasound) in the diagnosis of breast masses. Postoperative histopathological diagnosis was used as the gold standard. One hundred seventy benign and malignant breast lesions from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy differences of breast malignancy diagnosed by UE and CUS were compared. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy rates of breast malignancy diagnosed by UE were 98.7%, 90.2%, and 97.7%, whereas that by CUS were 93.6%, 76.1%, and 78.9%, respectively. The specificity and diagnosis rate of UE in the differential diagnosis of malignant breast lesions are superior to those of CUS and have an important clinical value.

  11. Correlates of mammographic density in B-mode ultrasound and real time elastography.

    PubMed

    Jud, Sebastian Michael; Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin; Faschingbauer, Florian; Uder, Michael; Wittenberg, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Matthias W; Adamietz, Boris R

    2012-07-01

    The aim of our study involved the assessment of B-mode imaging and elastography with regard to their ability to predict mammographic density (MD) without X-rays. Women, who underwent routine mammography, were prospectively examined with additional B-mode ultrasound and elastography. MD was assessed quantitatively with a computer-assisted method (Madena). The B-mode and elastography images were assessed by histograms with equally sized gray-level intervals. Regression models were built and cross validated to examine the ability to predict MD. The results of this study showed that B-mode imaging and elastography were able to predict MD. B-mode seemed to give a more accurate prediction. R for B-mode image and elastography were 0.67 and 0.44, respectively. Areas in the B-mode images that correlated with mammographic dense areas were either dark gray or of intermediate gray levels. Concerning elastography only the gray levels that represent extremely stiff tissue correlated positively with MD. In conclusion, ultrasound seems to be able to predict MD. Easy and cheap utilization of regular breast ultrasound machines encourages the use of ultrasound in larger case-control studies to validate this method as a breast cancer risk predictor. Furthermore, the application of ultrasound for breast tissue characterization could enable comprehensive research concerning breast cancer risk and breast density in young and pregnant women.

  12. Correlates of mammographic density in B-mode ultrasound and real time elastography.

    PubMed

    Jud, Sebastian Michael; Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin; Faschingbauer, Florian; Uder, Michael; Wittenberg, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Matthias W; Adamietz, Boris R

    2012-07-01

    The aim of our study involved the assessment of B-mode imaging and elastography with regard to their ability to predict mammographic density (MD) without X-rays. Women, who underwent routine mammography, were prospectively examined with additional B-mode ultrasound and elastography. MD was assessed quantitatively with a computer-assisted method (Madena). The B-mode and elastography images were assessed by histograms with equally sized gray-level intervals. Regression models were built and cross validated to examine the ability to predict MD. The results of this study showed that B-mode imaging and elastography were able to predict MD. B-mode seemed to give a more accurate prediction. R for B-mode image and elastography were 0.67 and 0.44, respectively. Areas in the B-mode images that correlated with mammographic dense areas were either dark gray or of intermediate gray levels. Concerning elastography only the gray levels that represent extremely stiff tissue correlated positively with MD. In conclusion, ultrasound seems to be able to predict MD. Easy and cheap utilization of regular breast ultrasound machines encourages the use of ultrasound in larger case-control studies to validate this method as a breast cancer risk predictor. Furthermore, the application of ultrasound for breast tissue characterization could enable comprehensive research concerning breast cancer risk and breast density in young and pregnant women. PMID:22123663

  13. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners with time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE).

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Macdonald, Michael; Behler, Russell; Lanning, Justin; Wang, Michael; Urban, Matthew; Manduca, Armando; Zhao, Heng; Callstrom, Matthew; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James; Chen, Shigao

    2015-02-01

    Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography presents 2-D quantitative shear elasticity maps of tissue, which are clinically useful for both focal lesion detection and diffuse disease diagnosis. Realization of 2-D shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners, however, is challenging because of the low tracking pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) of these systems. Although some clinical and research platforms support software beamforming and plane-wave imaging with high PRF, the majority of current clinical ultrasound systems do not have the software beamforming capability, which presents a critical challenge for translating the 2-D shear-wave elastography technique from laboratory to clinical scanners. To address this challenge, this paper presents a time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) method for shear-wave tracking on conventional ultrasound scanners. TAST takes advantage of the parallel beamforming capability of conventional systems and realizes high-PRF shear-wave tracking by sequentially firing tracking vectors and aligning shear wave data in the temporal direction. The comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) technique was used to simultaneously produce multiple shear wave sources within the field-of-view (FOV) to enhance shear wave SNR and facilitate robust reconstructions of 2-D elasticity maps. TAST and CUSE were realized on a conventional ultrasound scanner. A phantom study showed that the shear-wave speed measurements from the conventional ultrasound scanner were in good agreement with the values measured from other 2-D shear wave imaging technologies. An inclusion phantom study showed that the conventional ultrasound scanner had comparable performance to a state-of-the-art shear-wave imaging system in terms of bias and precision in measuring different sized inclusions. Finally, in vivo case analysis of a breast with a malignant mass, and a liver from a healthy subject demonstrated the feasibility of using the conventional ultrasound

  14. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Marin, Juana; Vila, Juan Jose; Perez-Miranda, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration has become the main technique for evaluating pancreatobiliary disorders and has proved to have a higher diagnostic yield than positron emission tomography, computed tomography (CT) and transabdominal ultrasound for recognising early pancreatic tumors. As a diagnostic modality for pancreatic cancer, EUS has proved rates higher than 90%, especially for lesions less than 2-3 cm in size in which it reaches a sensitivity rate of 99% vs 55% for CT. Besides, EUS has a very high negative predictive value and thus EUS can reliably exclude pancreatic cancer. The complication rate of EUS is as low as 1.1%-3.0%. New technical developments such as elastography and the use of contrast agents have recently been applied to EUS, improving its diagnostic capability. EUS has been found to be superior to the recent multidetector CT for T staging with less risk of overstaying in comparison to both CT and magnetic resonance imaging, so that patients are not being ruled out of a potentially beneficial resection. The accuracy for N staging with EUS is 64%-82%. In unresectable cancers, EUS also plays a therapeutic role by means of treating oncological pain through celiac plexus block, biliary drainage in obstructive jaundice in patients where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is not affordable and aiding radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25232461

  15. Quantified ultrasound elastography in the assessment of cutaneous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Michael A; Mehregan, Darius; Siegel, Eliot L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of high-frequency ultrasound and ultrasound elastography (USE) in discriminating benign from malignant skin lesions in a prospective cohort study and to introduce the use of a “strain ratio” for evaluation of skin lesions. Methods: A commercial ultrasound system with a 14-MHz transducer was used to visualize skin lesions requiring biopsy on clinical evaluation. Anatomic ultrasound and USE imaging of the skin lesions was performed using 2- to 4-mm gel stand-off pads. A region of interest was manually selected over the area of each lesion with the lowest strain. The concept of a strain ratio of the compressibility of the normal skin at the corresponding layer to that of the least compressible region of a lesion in question was created and applied. This ratio was subsequently correlated with blind histopathological evaluation for malignancy. Results: 55 patients were included in the study with a total of 67 lesions evaluated. 29 lesions were malignant and 38 benign. All malignant lesions had strain ratios ≥3.9. All benign lesions had strain ratios ≤3.0. A diagnostic value between 3.0 and 3.9 would result in 100% sensitivity and specificity in the characterization of these lesions as malignant. Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrated that USE plus strain ratio appears to be a promising modality in providing diagnostic determination between cancerous and benign primary solitary skin lesions prior to biopsy. Advances in knowledge: This is the first reported study applying an original mathematical elastographic ratio, or strain ratio, to evaluate primary solitary skin lesions. PMID:26268142

  16. Thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragnesh; Guider, Julie; Rahimi, Erik; Guha, Sushovan; Zhang, Songlin; Thosani, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluating superior mediastinal structures, especially the thymus gland. We report a case of thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using EUS elastography with strain ratio and fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 64-year-old woman presented with altered mental status and was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis. Further work-up suggested a superior mediastinal mass, for which she underwent EUS. A hypoechoic mass was found in the superior mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch. Real-time EUS elastography showed a predominantly blue hue to the mass concerning for malignancy. FNA of the mass was performed, which revealed numerous large neoplastic cells under a background of a small lymphoid infiltrate. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for PAX8, pancytokeratin, and CAM5.2. The pathologic and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with thymic carcinoma. PMID:27386480

  17. Case study: could ultrasound and elastography visualized densified areas inside the deep fascia?

    PubMed

    Luomala, Tuulia; Pihlman, Mika; Heiskanen, Jouko; Stecco, Carla

    2014-07-01

    Many manual techniques describe palpable changes in the subcutaneous tissue. Many manual therapists have perceived palpable tissue stiffness and how it changes after treatment. No clear demonstration exists of the presence of specific alterations in the subcutaneous tissue and even less a visualization of their changes following manual therapy. This case study visualizes by ultrasound and elastography an alteration of the deep fascia in a 40-year-old male with subacute pain in the calf area. Ultrasound and elastography permits visualization of gliding, echogenicity and elasticity of deep fascia and their changes, after manual therapy (Fascial Manipulation(©)). This study suggests the possible use of the ultrasound and elastography to furnish a more objective picture of the "sensations" that are commonly reported by manual therapists, and which supports clinicians in the diagnosis of the myofascial pain.

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  19. Ultrasound Elastography: The New Frontier in Direct Measurement of Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Joline E.; Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Brault, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Shigao; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The use of brightness-mode ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation has increased dramatically. The continuing evolution of ultrasound technology has also produced ultrasound elastography, a cutting-edge technology that can directly measure the mechanical properties of tissue, including muscle stiffness. Its real-time and direct measurements of muscle stiffness can aid the diagnosis and rehabilitation of acute musculoskeletal injuries and chronic myofascial pain. It can also help monitor outcomes of interventions affecting muscle in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases, and it can better inform the functional prognosis. This technology has implications for even broader use of ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation practice, but more knowledge about its uses and limitations is essential to its appropriate clinical implementation. In this review, we describe different ultrasound elastography techniques for studying muscle stiffness, including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear-wave elastography. We discuss the basic principles of these techniques, including the strengths and limitations of their measurement capabilities. We review the current muscle research, discuss physiatric clinical applications of these techniques, and note directions for future research. PMID:25064780

  20. Validity of measurement of shear modulus by ultrasound shear wave elastography in human pennate muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yoshitake, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe's principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20° obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction. PMID:25853777

  1. Validity of measurement of shear modulus by ultrasound shear wave elastography in human pennate muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yoshitake, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe's principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20° obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction.

  2. Value of ultrasound elastography in the diagnosis of native kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peride, Ileana; Rădulescu, Daniela; Niculae, Andrei; Ene, Vladimir; Bratu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Checheriță, Ionel Alexandru

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, ultrasound elastography, an already widely used technique in the diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis, has raised the attention of nephrologists as a potential valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of renal fibrosis. Due to renal deep location and anatomic complexity, the shear wave techniques are the most appropriate elastography methods for exploring native kidneys. Recent research offers promising results, but further larger studies are required for a better standardization of this method and also for establishing reference values of normal kidney elasticity. This article reviews the studies conducted for exploring the native kidney, highlighting the advantages and limitations of ultrasound elastography for assessing fibrosis development in chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27622414

  3. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Poças, F.; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  4. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro-Poças, F; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Pancreaticocutaneous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Haseeb, Abdul; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.; Levy, Michael J.; Fujii, Larissa L.; Pearson, Randall K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Gleeson, Ferga C.; Peterson, Bret T.; Swaroop Vege, Santhi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticocutaneous fistulas (PCFs) may be refractory to medical therapy or endoscopic retrograde cholangopancreaticography. Four patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided management of refractory PCFs, which were internalized by endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural puncture of the pancreatic duct (n = 2), fistula tract (n = 1), or both (n = 1), with placement of transmural stents providing internal drainage to the stomach (n = 3) or duodenum (n = 1). Drainage from PCFs ceased in all patients, and all percutaneous drains were removed; internal stents were left in place indefinitely. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions may successfully treat PCFs, allowing removal of percutaneous drains, and are an attractive alternative for patients who might otherwise require pancreatic resection.

  6. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  7. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  8. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  9. Ultrasound elastography in the evaluation of thyroid pathology. Current status.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Lodise, Pietro; Grazhdani, Hektor; Mancuso, Ester; Maggini, Elena; Di Rocco, Giorgio; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Calliada, Fabrizio; Redler, Adriano; Ricci, Paolo; Catalano, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Thyroid pathology including thyroid nodules and diffuse thyroid diseases represents often a diagnosing challenge for clinicians. US, although highly accurate in identifying thyroid nodules and diffuse thyroid diseases, is still not sufficiently accurate to evaluate them. US-elastography has been introduced in order to further increase US accuracy in many fields and eventually for thyroid disease. The aim of the present paper it to provide an update of the literature on different available techniques and the results reported both for thyroid nodules differentiation and for diffuse thyroid disease evaluation. Advantages and limitations of elastography are also discussed.

  10. Quasi-static elastography and its application in investigation of focused ultrasound induced tissue lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Ling, Tao; Shen, Yong; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapy has always been a key factor for a successful therapy. Although B-mode ultrasound has long been used for monitoring FUS therapy, the gray scale changes can not precisely reflect the lesion formation inside the tissue, while MR thermometry is considered to be too expensive. In this study, elastography had been performed using a commercial ultrasound system to investigate lesions produced by FUS irradiation in vitro. Several motion detection algorithms had been performed to improve the motion detection accuracy in the elastography. The effects of different algorithms on the motion detection accuracy were compared. Experimental results on the FUS induced lesion in swine muscle were introduced. The results indicated that lesions induced by small dosage of FUS inside the tissue can be successfully detected, which has a profound clinical meaning for the monitoring of FUS therapy.

  11. Elastography Using Multi-Stream GPU: An Application to Online Tracked Ultrasound Elastography, In-Vivo and the da Vinci Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Nishikant P.; Kang, Hyun Jae; Billings, Seth D.; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for real-time ultrasound (US) elastography will advance interventions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer by advancing methods such as thermal monitoring of tissue ablation. A multi-stream graphics processing unit (GPU) based accelerated normalized cross-correlation (NCC) elastography, with a maximum frame rate of 78 frames per second, is presented in this paper. A study of NCC window size is undertaken to determine the effect on frame rate and the quality of output elastography images. This paper also presents a novel system for Online Tracked Ultrasound Elastography (O-TRuE), which extends prior work on an offline method. By tracking the US probe with an electromagnetic (EM) tracker, the system selects in-plane radio frequency (RF) data frames for generating high quality elastograms. A novel method for evaluating the quality of an elastography output stream is presented, suggesting that O-TRuE generates more stable elastograms than generated by untracked, free-hand palpation. Since EM tracking cannot be used in all systems, an integration of real-time elastography and the da Vinci Surgical System is presented and evaluated for elastography stream quality based on our metric. The da Vinci surgical robot is outfitted with a laparoscopic US probe, and palpation motions are autonomously generated by customized software. It is found that a stable output stream can be achieved, which is affected by both the frequency and amplitude of palpation. The GPU framework is validated using data from in-vivo pig liver ablation; the generated elastography images identify the ablated region, outlined more clearly than in the corresponding B-mode US images. PMID:25541954

  12. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  13. Ultrasound elastography in the head and neck. Part I. Basic principles and practical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Kunwar S.S.; Lee, Yolanda Y.P.; Yuen, Edmund H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a rapidly developing field of imaging that measures and displays tissue elasticity or stiffness properties using ultrasound. In recent years, real-time USE modes have appeared on commercially available clinical ultrasound machines, stimulating an explosion of research into potential oncologic and non-oncologic clinical applications of USE. Preliminary evidence suggests that USE can differentiate benign and malignant conditions accurately in several different tissues. This article presents an overview of the basic principles of different USE technologies that are currently under investigation in the head and neck region. In addition, more practical aspects pertaining to the optimal performance of USE at this site are discussed. PMID:23876352

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided intravascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Binmoeller, Kenneth F; Sendino, Oriol; Kane, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract provides a unique "window" to access vascular structures in the mediastinum and abdomen. The advent of interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has enabled access to these structures with a standard fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle. Sclerosants, cyanoacrylate, and coils can be delivered through the lumen of the FNA needle. EUS-guided treatment of gastric varices has theoretical advantages over conventional endoscopy-guided treatment. Controlled studies are needed to determine the role of EUS-guided treatment for primary and secondary prevention of variceal bleeding. There is a growing list of novel indications for EUS-guided vascular therapy that include portal vein angiography and pressure measurements, intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, and micro coil embolization of vascular structures. Additionally, access and therapy of the heart and surrounding structures appears feasible. PMID:25366271

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Embolization of a Pancreatic Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Paul M.; Yeaton, Paul; Bishop, Thomas; Wessinger, John

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms are rare complications of chronic pancreatitis and are associated with a high mortality. In this article we demonstrate a novel utilization of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to embolize a large pancreatic pseudoaneurysm when gold standard therapies had proven futile.

  16. Value of liver elastography and abdominal ultrasound for detection of complications of allogeneic hemopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Karlas, T; Weber, J; Nehring, C; Kronenberger, R; Tenckhoff, H; Mössner, J; Niederwieser, D; Tröltzsch, M; Lange, T; Keim, V

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic complications contribute to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hemopoietic SCT. Liver Doppler ultrasound and elastography represent promising methods for pretransplant risk assessment and early detection of complications. Ultrasound (liver and spleen size, liver perfusion) and elastography (transient elastography (TE); right liver lobe acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (r-ARFI); left liver lobe ARFI (l-ARFI)) were prospectively evaluated in patients with indications for allo-SCT. Measurements were performed before and repeatedly after SCT. Results were compared with the incidence of life-threatening complications and death during the first 150 days after SCT. Of 59 included patients, 16 suffered from major complications and 9 of them died within the follow-up period. At baseline, liver and spleen size, liver perfusion, TE and r-ARFI did not differ significantly between patients with and without severe complications. In contrast, l-ARFI was significantly elevated in patients who later developed severe complications (1.58±0.30 m/s vs 1.37±0.27 m/s, P=0.030). After SCT, l-ARFI values remained elevated and TE showed increasing liver stiffness in patients with complications. The value of conventional liver ultrasound for prediction of severe SCT complications is limited. Increased values for TE and l-ARFI are associated with severe SCT complications and demand further evaluation.

  17. Imaging of the pancreatic duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Arya, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard investigation for anatomic exploration of the pancreatic duct (PD) is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive method for exploration of the PD. A comprehensive evaluation of the course of PD and its branches has not been described by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). In this article, we describe the techniques of imaging of PD using linear EUS. PMID:26374577

  18. An H∞ Strategy for Strain Estimation in Ultrasound Elastography Using Biomechanical Modeling Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinwei; Lu, Minhua; Chen, Siping; Liu, Huafeng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of ultrasound elastography is to identify lesions by reconstructing the hardness characteristics of tissue reconstructed from ultrasound data. Conventional quasi-static ultrasound elastography is easily applied to obtain axial strain components along the compression direction, with the results inverted to represent the distribution of tissue hardness under the assumption of constant internal stresses. However, previous works of quasi-static ultrasound elastography have found it difficult to obtain the lateral and shear strain components, due to the poor lateral resolution of conventional ultrasound probes. The physical nature of the strain field is a continuous vector field, which should be fully described by the axial, lateral, and shear strain components, and the clinical value of lateral and shear strain components of deformed tissue is gradually being recognized by both engineers and clinicians. Therefore, a biomechanical-model-constrained filtering framework is proposed here for recovering a full displacement field at a high spatial resolution from the noisy ultrasound data. In our implementation, after the biomechanical model constraint is integrated into the state-space equation, both the axial and lateral displacement components can be recovered at a high spatial resolution from the noisy displacement measurements using a robust filter, which only requires knowledge of the worst-case noise levels in the measurements. All of the strain components can then be calculated by applying a gradient operator to the recovered displacement field. Numerical experiments on synthetic data demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of our approach, and experiments on phantom data and in-vivo clinical data also produced satisfying results. PMID:24058460

  19. Tendon motion and strain patterns evaluated with two-dimensional ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chernak, Laura A; Thelen, Darryl G

    2012-10-11

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 2D ultrasound elastography to assess tendon tissue motion and strain under axial loading conditions. Four porcine flexor tendons were cyclically loaded to 4% peak strain using a servo hydraulic test system. An ultrasound transducer was positioned to image a longitudinal cross-section of the tendon during loading. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected at 63 frames per second simultaneously with applied force and crosshead displacement. A grid of nodes was manually positioned on an ultrasound image of the unloaded tendon. Small kernels (2×1 mm) centered at each node were then cross-correlated with search regions centered at corresponding nodal locations in the subsequent frame. Frame-to-frame nodal displacements were defined as the values that maximized the normalized cross-correlations. This process was repeated across all frames in the loading cycle, providing a measurement of the 2D trajectories of tissue motion throughout the loading cycle. The high resolution displacement measures along the RF beam direction were spatially differentiated to estimate the transverse (relative to tendon fibers) tissue strains. The nodal displacements obtained using this method were very repeatable, with average along-fiber trajectories that were highly correlated (average r=0.99) with the prescribed crosshead displacements. The elastography transverse strains were also repeatable and were consistent with average transverse strains estimated via changes in tendon width. The apparent Poisson's ratios (0.82-1.64) exceeded the incompressibility limit, but are comparable to values found for tendon in prior experimental and computational studies. The results demonstrate that 2D ultrasound elastography is a promising approach for noninvasively assessing localized tissue motion and strain patterns. PMID:22939179

  20. Choledocholithiasis diagnostics - endoscopic ultrasound or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography?

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław

    2014-06-01

    It is estimated that 3.4% of patients qualified for cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis have a coexisting choledocholithiasis. For decades, endoscopic ascending retrograde cholangiopancreatography has been the golden diagnostic standard in cases of suspected choledocholithiasis. The method is associated with a relatively high rate of complications, including acute pancreatitis, the incidence of which is estimated to range between 0.74% and 1.86%. The mechanism of this ERCP-induced complication is not fully understood, although factors increasing the risk of acute pancreatitis, such as sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, previous acute pancreatitis, narrow bile ducts or difficult catheterization of Vater's ampulla are known. It has been suggested to discontinue the diagnostic endoscopic retrograde ascending cholangiopancreatography and replace it with endoscopic ultrasonography due to possible and potentially dangerous complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography has sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 95% regardless of gallstone diameter, as opposed to magnetic resonance cholangiography. However, both of these parameters depend on the experience of the performing physician. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography allows to limit the number of performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures by more than 2/3. Ascending endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography combined with an endoscopic incision into the Vater's ampulla followed by a mechanical evacuation of stone deposits from the ducts still remains a golden standard in the treatment of choledocholithiasis. Despite some limitations such as potentially increased treatment costs as well as the necessity of the procedure to be performed by a surgeon experienced in both endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography as well as endoscopic ultrasonography, the diagnostic endoscopic ultrasonography followed by a simultaneous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography aimed at gallstone removal is

  1. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment.

  2. Ultrasound Elastography--Review of Techniques and Its Clinical Applications in Pediatrics--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Pawluś, Aleksander; Szymańska, Kinga; Łasecki, Mateusz; Ziajkiewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Sonoelastography is a novel technique that uses ultrasound waves to assess the elasticity of tissues noninvasively. It provides an ultrasound-based method to detect and display the relative stiffness of tissue. The main principle of sonoelastography is the measurement of tissue distortion in response to external compression. Changes in elasticity and tissues deformation elicited by compression are measured, processed and then shown in real time presentation with color-coded elastograms. Most of the elastography applications are well known and have been described in detail in adults, e.g. evaluation of liver fibrosis or thyroid nodules. Similarly, most of sonoelastographic studies are based on groups of adults. The purpose of this review article is to bring this technology closer to pediatric clinicians and to summarize some of its current clinical applications that are being pursued. In this part we take into consideration utility of elastography in evaluation pathologies of musculoskeletal system, lymphatic nodes, thyroid, kidneys in pediatric patients and also elastography of placenta. PMID:26469119

  3. Comparison Between Neck and Shoulder Stiffness Determined by Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography and a Muscle Hardness Meter.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Kusama, Saki

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this study were to compare neck and shoulder stiffness values determined by shear wave ultrasound elastography with those obtained with a muscle hardness meter and to verify the correspondence between objective and subjective stiffness in the neck and shoulder. Twenty-four young men and women participated in the study. Their neck and shoulder stiffness was determined at six sites. Before the start of the measurements, patients rated their present subjective symptoms of neck and shoulder stiffness on a 6-point verbal scale. At all measurement sites, the correlation coefficients between the values of muscle hardness indices determined by the muscle hardness meter and shear wave ultrasound elastography were not significant. Furthermore, individuals' subjective neck and shoulder stiffness did not correspond to their objective symptoms. These results suggest that the use of shear wave ultrasound elastography is essential to more precisely assess neck and shoulder stiffness.

  4. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  5. The ultrasound elastography inverse problem and the effective criteria.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Atefeh; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Nikazad, Touraj

    2013-11-01

    The elastography (elasticity imaging) is one of the recent state-of-the-art methods for diagnosis of abnormalities in soft tissue. The idea is based on the computation of the tissue elasticity distribution. This leads to the inverse elasticity problem; in that, displacement field and boundary conditions are known, and elasticity distribution of the tissue is aimed for computation. We treat this problem by the Gauss-Newton method. This iterative method results in an ill-posed problem, and therefore, regularization schemes are required to deal with this issue. The impacts of the initial guess for tissue elasticity distribution, contrast ratio between elastic modulus of tumor and normal tissue, and noise level of the input data on the estimated solutions are investigated via two different regularization methods. The numerical results show that the accuracy and speed of convergence vary when different regularization methods are applied. Also, the semi-convergence behavior has been observed and discussed. At the end, we signify the necessity of a clever initial guess and intelligent stopping criteria for the iterations. The main purpose here is to highlight some technical factors that have an influence on elasticity image quality and diagnostic accuracy, and we have tried our best to make this article accessible for a broad audience.

  6. Contrast enhanced endoscopic ultrasound: More than just a fancy Doppler.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Rachid M; Yan, Brian M

    2010-07-16

    Contrast enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CEUS) is a new modality that takes advantage of vascular structure and blood flow to distinguish different clinical entities. Contrast agents are microbubbles that oscillate when exposed to ultrasonographic waves resulting in characteristic acoustic signals that are then converted to colour images. This permits exquisite imaging of macro- and microvasculature, providing information to help delineate malignant from non-malignant processes. The use of CEUS may significantly increase the sensitivity and specificity over conventional endoscopic ultrasound. Currently available contrast agents are safe, with infrequent adverse effects. This review summarizes the theory and technique behind CEUS and the current and future clinical applications.

  7. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  8. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  9. VISUALIZING THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION WITHIN VASCULAR TISSUES USING INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson’s ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson’s ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  10. A stochastic filtering approach to recover strain images from quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Model-based reconstruction algorithms have shown potentials over conventional strain-based methods in quasi-static elastographic image by using realistic finite element (FE) or bio-mechanical model constraints. However, it is still difficult to properly handle the discrepancies between the model constraint and ultrasound data, and the measurement noise. Methods In this paper, we explore the usage of Kalman filtering algorithm for the estimation of strain imaging in quasi-static ultrasound elastography. The proposed strategy formulates the displacement distribution through biomechanical models, and the ultrasound-derived measurements through observation equations. Through this filtering strategy, the discrepancies are quantitatively modelled as one Gaussian white noise, and the measurement noise of ultrasound data is modelled as another independent Gaussian white noise. The optimal estimation of kinematic functions, i.e. the full displacement and velocity field, are computed through this Kalman filter. Then the strain images can be easily calculated from the estimated displacement field. Results The accuracy and robustness of our proposed framework is first evaluated in synthetic data in controlled conditions, and the performance of this framework is then evaluated in the real data collected from elastography phantoms and patients with favourable results. Conclusions The potential of our algorithm is to provide the distribution of mechanically meaningful strain under a proper biomechanical model constraint. We address the model-data discrepancy and measurement noise by introducing process noise and measurement noise in our framework, and then the mechanically meaningful strain is estimated through the Kalman filter in the minimum mean square error (MMSE) sense. PMID:24521481

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  12. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Denis, Max; Bayat, Mahdi; Stan, Daniela L.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE). Methods SuperSonic Imagine (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE. Results Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax) estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm) showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa). We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean) values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis. PMID:26368939

  13. Thermal safety simulations of transient temperature rise during acoustic radiation force-based ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbo; Herman, Bruce A; Soneson, Joshua E; Harris, Gerald R

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasound transient elastography is a new diagnostic imaging technique that uses acoustic radiation force to produce motion in solid tissue via a high-intensity, long-duration "push" beam. In our previous work, we developed analytical models for calculating transient temperature rise, both in soft tissue and at a bone/soft tissue interface, during a single acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging frame. The present study expands on these temperature rise calculations, providing applicable range assessment and error analysis for a single ARFI frame. Furthermore, a "virtual source" approach is described for temperature and thermal dose calculation under multiple ARFI frames. By use of this method, the effect of inter-frame cooling duration on temperature prediction is analyzed, and a thermal buildup phenomenon is revealed. Thermal safety assessment indicates that the thermal dose values, especially at the absorptive bone/soft tissue interface, could approach recommended dose thresholds if the cooling interval of multiple-frame ARFI elastography is too short.

  14. Comparison of fractional wave equations for power law attenuation in ultrasound and elastography.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2014-04-01

    A set of wave equations with fractional loss operators in time and space are analyzed. The fractional Szabo equation, the power law wave equation and the causal fractional Laplacian wave equation are all found to be low-frequency approximations of the fractional Kelvin-Voigt wave equation and the more general fractional Zener wave equation. The latter two equations are based on fractional constitutive equations, whereas the former wave equations have been derived from the desire to model power law attenuation in applications like medical ultrasound. This has consequences for use in modeling and simulation, especially for applications that do not satisfy the low-frequency approximation, such as shear wave elastography. In such applications, the wave equations based on constitutive equations are the viable ones.

  15. Elastic modulus of muscle and tendon with shear wave ultrasound elastography: variations with different technical settings.

    PubMed

    Kot, Brian Chin Wing; Zhang, Zhi Jie; Lee, Arthur Wai Chun; Leung, Vivian Yee Fong; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2012-01-01

    Standardization on Shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE) technical settings will not only ensure that the results are accurate, but also detect any differences over time that may be attributed to true physiological changes. The present study evaluated the variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon using SWUE when different technical aspects were altered. The results of this study indicated that variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon were found when different transducer's pressure and region of interest (ROI)'s size were applied. No significant differences in elastic modulus of the rectus femoris muscle and patellar tendon were found with different acquisition times of the SWUE sonogram. The SWUE on the muscle and tendon should be performed with the lightest transducer's pressure, a shorter acquisition time for the SWUE sonogram, while measuring the mean elastic modulus regardless the ROI's size.

  16. Reliability of ultrasound elastography for the quantification of transversus abdominis elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Ryota; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The transversus abdominis (TrA), which is considered to be involved in controlling spinal stability, is covered by two muscles (i.e. the external and internal oblique muscles) as well as subcutaneous fat. Therefore, there were doubts about whether it was possible to perform highly reliable measurements of muscle elasticity. Purpose To investigate the reliability of ultrasound elastography for the quantification of elasticity of the TrA. Material and Methods A skilled and an unskilled operator of ultrasound elastography measured TrA elasticity in 10 healthy men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 172.0 ± 5.2 cm; weight, 72.3 ± 12.0 kg) in the supine position. The tests were repeated six times; of the six measured values, a group of four measurements showing the lowest coefficient of variation (CV) was adopted and the mean values were used for further analysis. This procedure was repeated twice on each participant on two different days. Results The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) between days for skilled and unskilled operators were 0.86 (P < 0.00) and 0.59 (P = 0.02), respectively, and the CVs were 8.7% and 13.8%, respectively. The ICCs between operators and CVs were in the range of 0.56–0.57 (P = 0.02–0.03) and 13.5–15.5%, respectively. No systematic error was found for any comparison. Conclusion The reliabilities of the skilled and unskilled operators were high and moderate, respectively. PMID:26413315

  17. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  18. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s(-1)) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D

  19. Noninvasive vascular ultrasound elastography applied to the characterization of experimental aneurysms and follow-up after endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromageau, Jérémie; Lerouge, Sophie; Listz Maurice, Roch; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to noninvasively characterize abdominal aneurysms with ultrasound (US) elastography before and after endovascular treatment. Twenty three dogs having bilateral aneurysms surgically created on iliac arteries with venous patches were investigated. In a first set of experiments, the feasibility of elastography to differentiate vascular wall elastic properties between the aneurismal neck (healthy region) and the venous patch (pathological region) was evaluated on six dogs. Lower strain values were found in venous patches (p < 0.001). In a second set of experiments, 17 dogs having endovascular repair (EVAR) by stent graft (SG) insertion were examined three months after SG implantation. Angiography, color Doppler US, examination of macroscopic sections and US elastography were used. The value of elastography was validated with the following end points by considering a solid thrombus of a healed aneurysm as a structure with small deformations and a soft thrombus associated with endoleaks as a more deformable tissue: (1) the correlation between the size of healed organized thrombi estimated by elastography and by macroscopic examinations; (2) the correlation between the strain amplitude measured within vessel wall elastograms and the leak size; and (3) agreement on the presence and size of endoleaks as determined by elastography and by combined reference imaging modalities (angiography + Doppler US). Mean surfaces of solid thrombi estimated with elastography were found correlated with those measured on macroscopic sections (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Quantitative strain values measured within the vessel wall were poorly linked with the leak size (r = 0.12, p = 0.5). However, the qualitative evaluation of leak size in the aneurismal sac was very good, with a Kappa agreement coefficient of 0.79 between elastography and combined reference imaging modalities. In summary, complementing B-scan and color Doppler, noninvasive US

  20. NON-RIGID IMAGE REGISTRATION BASED STRAIN ESTIMATOR FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound elastography (IVUSe) could improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease by revealing vulnerable plaques through their mechanical tissue properties. To improve the performance of IVUSe, we developed and implemented a non-rigid image-registration method to visualize the radial and circumferential component of strain within vascular tissues. We evaluated the algorithm’s performance with four initialization schemes using simulated and experimentally acquired ultrasound images. Applying the registration method to radio-frequency (RF) echo frames improved the accuracy of displacements compared to when B-mode images were employed. However, strain elastograms measured from RF echo frames produce erroneous results when both the zero-initialization method and the mesh-refinement scheme were employed. For most strain levels, the cross-correlation-initialization method produced the best performance. The simulation study predicted that elastograms obtained from vessels with average strains in the range of 3%–5% should have high elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe)–on the order of 4.5 and 7.5 for the radial and circumferential components of strain, respectively. The preliminary in vivo validation study (phantom and an atherosclerotic rabbit) demonstrated that the non-rigid registration method could produce useful radial and circumferential strain elastograms under realistic physiologic conditions. The results of this investigation were sufficiently encouraging to warrant a more comprehensive in vivo validation. PMID:23245827

  1. Ultrasound Elastography Used for Preventive Non-Invasive Screening in Early Detection of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Florian; Stahmeyer, Jona T.; Rossol, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    Background Early discovery of liver fibrosis is becoming more popular because of enhanced incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Ultrasound-based liver elastography is a method used to approve suspected liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. We assessed the clinical usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elasticity imaging (ARFI-SWEI) as a preventive screening method to uncover fibrosis. Methods We screened 382 patients by native routine sonography for abnormal liver results and divided them into six groups: group 1: normal liver, groups 2-4: fatty liver grade I-III, group 5: liver cirrhosis, and group 6: inhomogenic liver tissue. Then ARFI-SWEI was performed and the results were compared with published shear wave velocity cut-off values that were predictive of each fibrosis stage (F0-4). A control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers. Results The part of liver fibrosis ≥ F2 was in groups 1-4: 20-32%, group 5: 100%, and group 6: 91%. Main causes for fibrosis stage ≥ F2 were (non)-alcoholic steatohepatitis, chronic viral or autoimmune hepatitis and chronic heart failure. Conclusions Screening of the liver tissue in b-mode ultrasound can underestimate possible liver fibrosis; by using ARFI-SWEI, liver fibrosis can be uncovered early. It is a suitable preventive method comparable to colonoscopy for colon cancer. PMID:27540438

  2. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  3. Performance study of a new time-delay estimation algorithm in ultrasonic echo signals and ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Shaswary, Elyas; Xu, Yuan; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-07-01

    Time-delay estimation has countless applications in ultrasound medical imaging. Previously, we proposed a new time-delay estimation algorithm, which was based on the summation of the sign function to compute the time-delay estimate (Shaswary et al., 2015). We reported that the proposed algorithm performs similar to normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and sum squared differences (SSD) algorithms, even though it was significantly more computationally efficient. In this paper, we study the performance of the proposed algorithm using statistical analysis and image quality analysis in ultrasound elastography imaging. Field II simulation software was used for generation of ultrasound radio frequency (RF) echo signals for statistical analysis, and a clinical ultrasound scanner (Sonix® RP scanner, Ultrasonix Medical Corp., Richmond, BC, Canada) was used to scan a commercial ultrasound elastography tissue-mimicking phantom for image quality analysis. The statistical analysis results confirmed that, in overall, the proposed algorithm has similar performance compared to NCC and SSD algorithms. The image quality analysis results indicated that the proposed algorithm produces strain images with marginally higher signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios compared to NCC and SSD algorithms. PMID:27010697

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  5. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD. PMID:27392204

  6. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary and pancreatic duct interventions

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    When endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography fails to decompress the pancreatic or biliary system, alternative interventions are required. In this situation, endosonography guided cholangio-pancreatography (ESCP), percutaneous radiological therapy or surgery can be considered. Small case series reporting the initial experience with ESCP have been superseded by comprehensive reports of large cohorts. Although these reports are predominantly retrospective, they demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided biliary and pancreatic interventions are associated with high levels of technical and clinical success. The procedural complication rates are lower than those seen with percutaneous therapy or surgery. This article describes and discusses data published in the last five years relating to EUS-guided biliary and pancreatic intervention. PMID:25400865

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound guided vascular access and therapy (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Lakhtakia, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to develop minimally invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. EUS has now stepped into the therapeutic arena. EUS provides the unique advantage of both real-time imaging and access to structures within and adjacent to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hence, EUS-guided therapeutic techniques continue to evolve in several directions enabling a variety of minimally invasive therapies for pancreatic and biliary pathologies. Furthermore, the close proximity of the GI tract to vascular structures in the mediastinum and abdomen permits EUS-guided vascular access and therapy. Studies have demonstrated several EUS-guided vascular interventions by using standard endoscopic accessories and available tools from the interventional radiology armamentarium. This article provides an overview of the literature including clinical and nonclinical studies for the management of nonvariceal and variceal GI bleeding, formation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IPSS), and EUS-guided cardiac access and therapy. PMID:26374574

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  10. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  11. Comparison between shear wave dispersion magneto motive ultrasound and transient elastography for measuring tissue-mimicking phantom viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Thiago W J; Sampaio, Diego R Thomaz; Bruno, Alexandre Colello; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been developed over the last several years to analyze the mechanical properties of soft tissue. Elastography, for example, was proposed to evaluate soft tissue stiffness in an attempt to reduce the need for invasive procedures, such as breast biopsies; however, its qualitative nature and the fact that it is operator-dependent have proven to be limitations of the technique. Quantitative shearwave- based techniques have been proposed to obtain information about tissue stiffness independent of the operator. This paper describes shear wave dispersion magnetomotive ultrasound (SDMMUS), a new shear-wave-based method in which a viscoelastic medium labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles is displaced by an external tone burst magnetic field. As in magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS), SDMMUS uses ultrasound to detect internal mechanical vibrations induced by the interaction between a magnetic field and magnetic nanoparticles. These vibrations generated shear waves that were evaluated to estimate the viscoelastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. These phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of gelatin and labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. The elasticity and viscosity obtained with SDMMUS agreed well with the results obtained by traditional ultrasound-based transient elastography.

  12. Relationship between ultrasound elastography and myofibroblast distribution in breast cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yi; Guo, Xia; Ma, Binlin; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Lisha

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between ultrasound elastography (USE) scoring and myofibroblast distribution with expression features of α-SMA + /CD34− in patients of Uyghur and Han ethnicities with breast masses in Xinjiang, China. The data was used to evaluate its clinical significance in the early diagnosis of breast cancer. A total of 300 patients with breast masses were included in the study, which involved conventional sonography and USE, with histopathologic diagnosis as the reference standard. Myofibroblast distribution was investigated by detecting the expression levels of α-SMA and CD34 in lesions using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Out of 300 lesions, 185 were histologically malignant and 115 benign. The mean elasticity score for malignant lesions was significantly higher than for benign lesions. The expression level of α-SMA was elevated while the expression level of CD34 was lower in malignancies, compared with benign lesions. The expression of α-SMA was positively associated with the USE scores, while a negative relationship was observed between CD34 expression and USE scoring. The combination of USE and molecular diagnosis provides a promising modality for the early diagnosis and evaluation of the risks in particular types of breast cancer. PMID:26846996

  13. Ultrasound and Point Shear Wave Elastography in Livers of Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Mjelle, Anders Batman; Mulabecirovic, Anesa; Hausken, Trygve; Havre, Roald Flesland; Gilja, Odd Helge; Vesterhus, Mette

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography (pSWE) is an ultrasound-based method for non-invasive quantification of liver fibrosis. The objective of this study was to explore liver pSWE in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) for assessment of fibrosis. Fifty-five non-transplant patients with PSC (38 males, 17 females; mean age: 46.4 y) were included and compared with 24 matched controls. Median (range) PSC duration was 8.1 (0-33) y. Ultrasonographic scanning followed by liver stiffness measurement by pSWE was performed using a conventional ultrasound system (Philips iU22). Signs of liver fibrosis on B-mode were identified in 21 patients (38%). Splenomegaly was found in 19 patients (35%) and ascites in two patients (4%). Successful pSWE measurements were achieved in the right liver lobe of all individuals and in the left liver lobe of 36 patients (65.5%). PSC patients had significantly higher median shear wave velocity (SWV) than controls in the right liver (median [range] SWV 1.26 [0.73-2.57] m/s vs. 1.09 [0.88-1.25] m/s, p < 0.001). SWV measured in the left liver lobe and spleen did not differ between PSC patients and controls. Our findings indicate that PSC patients have increased median SWV, indicating more fibrosis compared with controls; however, a wide range of SWV values were obtained among PSC patients, possibly reflecting the various stages in disease development. PMID:27262519

  14. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-10-21

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Its application in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension is increasing. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for development of portal hypertension sequale such as ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastroesophageal varices. Bleeding esophageal and gastric varices are among the most common causes of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Thus, early detection and treatment improve the outcome in this population. EUS can improve the detection and diagnosis of gastroesophageal varices and collateral veins and can provide endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices such as EUS-guided sclerotherapy of esophageal collateral vessels and EUS-guided cynoacrylate (Glue) injection of gastric varices. EUS can also provide knowledge on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy of portal hypertension. Furthermore, EUS can provide assessment and prediction of variceal recurrence after endoscopic therapy and assessment of portal hemodynamics such as E-Flow and Doppler study of the azygous and portal veins. Moreover, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may provide cytologic diagnosis of focal hepatic tumors and analysis of free abdominal fluid. Using specialized EUS-guided needle biopsy, a sample of liver tissue can be obtained to diagnose and evaluate for chronic liver disease. EUS-guided fine needle injection can be used to study portal vein pressure and hemodynamics, and potentially could be used to assist in exact measurement of portal vein pressure and placement of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:25339809

  15. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Its application in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension is increasing. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for development of portal hypertension sequale such as ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastroesophageal varices. Bleeding esophageal and gastric varices are among the most common causes of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Thus, early detection and treatment improve the outcome in this population. EUS can improve the detection and diagnosis of gastroesophageal varices and collateral veins and can provide endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices such as EUS-guided sclerotherapy of esophageal collateral vessels and EUS-guided cynoacrylate (Glue) injection of gastric varices. EUS can also provide knowledge on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy of portal hypertension. Furthermore, EUS can provide assessment and prediction of variceal recurrence after endoscopic therapy and assessment of portal hemodynamics such as E-Flow and Doppler study of the azygous and portal veins. Moreover, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may provide cytologic diagnosis of focal hepatic tumors and analysis of free abdominal fluid. Using specialized EUS-guided needle biopsy, a sample of liver tissue can be obtained to diagnose and evaluate for chronic liver disease. EUS-guided fine needle injection can be used to study portal vein pressure and hemodynamics, and potentially could be used to assist in exact measurement of portal vein pressure and placement of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:25339809

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized.

  17. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  18. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  19. Elastography in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2016-10-01

    Elastography is a recently developed ultrasound technique applicable to various medical specialties. It provides information on the physical properties of tissues in the context of physiologic and pathologic alterations. In this review we explain the physical principles of the method, the information provided by the different elastography techniques, and its new applications in clinical dermatology.

  20. Transient MR elastography (t-MRE) using ultrasound radiation force: theory, safety, and initial experiments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rares; Beuf, Olivier; Milot, Laurent; Grenier, Denis; Lyonnet, Denis; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility of using ultrasound radiation force as a safe vibration source for transient MR elastography (t-MRE). We present a theoretical framework to predict the phase shift of the complex MRE signal, the temperature elevation due to ultrasound, and safety indicators (I(SPPA), I(SPTA), MI). Next, we report wave images acquired in porcine liver samples in vitro. MR thermometry was used to estimate the temperature elevation induced by ultrasound. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results with regard to the feasibility of using radiation force for t-MRE in a clinical setting, and a specific echo-planar imaging (EPI) MRE sequence is proposed.

  1. A PDE-Based Regularization Algorithm Toward Reducing Speckle Tracking Noise: A Feasibility Study for Ultrasound Breast Elastography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Xu, Yan; Xu, Zhengfu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining accurate ultrasonically estimated displacements along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for various clinical elastography applications (e.g., modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging). In this study, a partial differential equation (PDE)-based regularization algorithm was proposed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, the proposed PDE-based algorithm, utilizing two-dimensional (2D) displacement estimates from a conventional elastography system, attempted to iteratively reduce noise contained in the original displacement estimates by mathematical regularization. In this study, tissue incompressibility was the physical constraint used by the above-mentioned mathematical regularization. This proposed algorithm was tested using computer-simulated data, a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results demonstrated that the method significantly improved the accuracy of lateral tracking (e.g., a factor of 17 at 0.5% compression). From in vivo breast lesion data investigated, we have found that, as compared with the conventional method, higher quality axial and lateral strain images (e.g., at least 78% improvements among the estimated contrast-to-noise ratios of lateral strain images) were obtained. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could be useful for improving the image quality of ultrasound elastography with current clinical equipment as a post-processing tool.

  2. Carotid plaque elasticity estimation using ultrasound elastography, MRI, and inverse FEA - A numerical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwstadt, H A; Fekkes, S; Hansen, H H G; de Korte, C L; van der Lugt, A; Wentzel, J J; van der Steen, A F W; Gijsen, F J H

    2015-08-01

    The material properties of atherosclerotic plaques govern the biomechanical environment, which is associated with rupture-risk. We investigated the feasibility of noninvasively estimating carotid plaque component material properties through simulating ultrasound (US) elastography and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and solving the inverse problem with finite element analysis. 2D plaque models were derived from endarterectomy specimens of nine patients. Nonlinear neo-Hookean models (tissue elasticity C1) were assigned to fibrous intima, wall (i.e., media/adventitia), and lipid-rich necrotic core. Finite element analysis was used to simulate clinical cross-sectional US strain imaging. Computer-simulated, single-slice in vivo MR images were segmented by two MR readers. We investigated multiple scenarios for plaque model elasticity, and consistently found clear separations between estimated tissue elasticity values. The intima C1 (160 kPa scenario) was estimated as 125.8 ± 19.4 kPa (reader 1) and 128.9 ± 24.8 kPa (reader 2). The lipid-rich necrotic core C1 (5 kPa) was estimated as 5.6 ± 2.0 kPa (reader 1) and 8.5 ± 4.5 kPa (reader 2). A scenario with a stiffer wall yielded similar results, while realistic US strain noise and rotating the models had little influence, thus demonstrating robustness of the procedure. The promising findings of this computer-simulation study stimulate applying the proposed methodology in a clinical setting. PMID:26130603

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound in gastroenterology: From diagnosis to therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Mekky, Mohamed A; Abbas, Wael A

    2014-01-01

    Since its advent in 1980, the scope of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has grown to include a wide range of indications, and it is now being incorporated as an integral part of everyday practice in the field of gastroenterology. Its use is extending from an adjuvant imaging aid to utilization as a therapeutic tool for various gastrointestinal disorders. EUS was first used to visualize remote organs, such as the pancreas and abdominal lymph nodes. When fine needle aspiration was introduced, the indications for EUS expanded to include tissue sampling for diagnostic purposes. At the same time, the needle can be used to convey a potential therapy to the internal organs, allowing access to remote sites. In this review, we aim to highlight the expanding spectrum of EUS indications and uses in the field of gastroenterology. PMID:24976718

  4. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle injection for oncological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jeremy; Khalid, Amaara; Cosgrove, Natalie; Soomro, Ayesha; Mazhar, Syed Mohsin; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness and precision of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has lead to both its widespread use as a diagnostic and staging modality for gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary malignancies, and to its expanding role as a therapeutic modality. EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis is now a well-accepted modality for palliation of pain in patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided ablation, brachytherapy, fiducial marker placement, and antitumor agent injection have been described as methods of performing minimally invasive oncological therapy. EUS-fine needle injection may be performed as adjunctive, alternative, or palliative treatment. This review summarizes the studies to date that have described these methods. A literature search using the PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed. While most published studies to date are limited with disappointing outcomes, the concept of a role of EUS in oncological therapy seems promising. PMID:26691224

  6. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher G; Siddiqui, Uzma D

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  7. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher G; Siddiqui, Uzma D

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes.

  8. Reconstruction of elasticity: a stochastic model-based approach in ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The convectional strain-based algorithm has been widely utilized in clinical practice. It can only provide the information of relative information of tissue stiffness. However, the exact information of tissue stiffness should be valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods In this study we propose a reconstruction strategy to recover the mechanical properties of the tissue. After the discrepancies between the biomechanical model and data are modeled as the process noise, and the biomechanical model constraint is transformed into a state space representation the reconstruction of elasticity can be accomplished through one filtering identification process, which is to recursively estimate the material properties and kinematic functions from ultrasound data according to the minimum mean square error (MMSE) criteria. In the implementation of this model-based algorithm, the linear isotropic elasticity is adopted as the biomechanical constraint. The estimation of kinematic functions (i.e., the full displacement and velocity field), and the distribution of Young’s modulus are computed simultaneously through an extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results In the following experiments the accuracy and robustness of this filtering framework is first evaluated on synthetic data in controlled conditions, and the performance of this framework is then evaluated in the real data collected from elastography phantom and patients using the ultrasound system. Quantitative analysis verifies that strain fields estimated by our filtering strategy are more closer to the ground truth. The distribution of Young’s modulus is also well estimated. Further, the effects of measurement noise and process noise have been investigated as well. Conclusions The advantage of this model-based algorithm over the conventional strain-based algorithm is its potential of providing the distribution of elasticity under a proper biomechanical model constraint. We address the model

  9. Technical tips for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takeshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Interventional procedures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) have recently been developed. For biliary drainage, EUS-guided trans-luminal drainage has been reported. In this procedure, the transduodenal approach for extrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, and the transgastric approach for intrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS). These procedures have several effects, such as internal drainage and avoiding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis, and they are indicated for an inaccessible ampulla of Vater due to duodenal obstruction or surgical anatomy. EUS-HGS has particularly wide indications and clinical impact as an alternative biliary drainage method. In this procedure, it is necessary to dilate the fistula, and several devices and approaches have been reported. Stent selection is also important. In previous reports, the overall technical success rate was 82% (221/270), the clinical success rate was 97% (218/225), and the overall adverse event rate for EUS-HGS was 23% (62/270). Adverse events of EUS-biliary drainage are still high compared with ERCP or PTCD. EUS-HGS should continue to be performed by experienced endoscopists who can use various strategies when adverse events occur. PMID:27099437

  10. CEUS and strain elastography in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Rubini, Antonello; Miniagio, Guglielmo

    2013-07-18

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer, but diagnosis is often delayed. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is currently the gold standard for evaluating gastric cancer. Also other imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are employed for identifying gastric cancer, but particularly for cancer staging. Ultrasound (US) is a first-line imaging modality used to examine organs in the abdomen, and during these examinations gastric cancer may be incidentally detected. Very few studies in the literature have investigated the role of US in gastric disease. However, more recently, some authors have reported on the use of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) and US-elastography in gastric disease using both endoscopic and transabdominal approach. In this paper, we present a case of gastric cancer studied by CEUS and transabdominal US-elastography.

  11. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  12. A novel fusion imaging system for endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Navigation of a flexible endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) probe inside the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is problematic due to the small window size and complex anatomy. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of a novel fusion imaging (FI) system which uses electromagnetic (EM) sensors to co-register the live EUS images with the pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) data with a novel navigation algorithm and catheter. Methods: An experienced gastroenterologist and a novice EUS operator tested the FI system on a GI tract bench top model. Also, the experienced gastroenterologist performed a case series of 20 patients during routine EUS examinations. Results: On the bench top model, the experienced and novice doctors reached the targets in 67 ± 18 s and 150 ± 24 s with a registration error of 6 ± 3 mm and 11 ± 4 mm, respectively. In the case series, the total procedure time was 24.6 ± 6.6 min, while the time to reach the clinical target was 8.7 ± 4.2 min. Conclusions: The FI system is feasible for clinical use, and can reduce the learning curve for EUS procedures and improve navigation and targeting in difficult anatomic locations. PMID:26879165

  13. The role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra; Saxena, Payal; Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal cancer. Despite a significant advancement in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of PC is nearly identical to the incidence rates. Early detection of tumor or its precursor lesions with dysplasia may be the most effective approach to improve survival. Screening strategies should include identification of the population at high risk of developing PC, and an intense application of screening tools with adequate sensitivity to detect PC at an early curable stage. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem to be the most promising modalities for PC screening based on the data so far. EUS had an additional advantage over MRI by being able to obtain tissue sample during the same examination. Several questions remain unanswered at this time regarding the age to begin screening, frequency of screening, management of asymptomatic pancreatic lesions detected on screening, timing of resection, and extent of surgery and impact of screening on survival. Novel techniques such as needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), along with biomarkers, may be helpful to identify pancreatic lesions with more aggressive malignant potential. Further studies will hopefully lead to the development of strategies combining EUS with other technological/biological advancements that will be cost-effective and have an impact on survival.

  14. The effects of fatty deposits on the accuracy of the Fibroscan® liver transient elastography ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2012-06-01

    A new generation of ultrasound transient elastography (TE) systems have emerged which exploit the well-known correlation between the liver's pathological and mechanical properties through measurements of the Young's elastic modulus; however, little work has been carried out to examine the effect that fatty deposits may have on the TE measurement accuracy. An investigation was carried out on the effects on the measurement accuracy of a TE ultrasound system, the Fibroscan®, caused by overlaying fat layers of varying thickness on healthy liver-mimicking phantoms, simulating in vivo conditions for obese patients. Furthermore, a steatosis effect similar to that in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was simulated to investigate its effect on the TE system. A range of novel elastography fat-mimicking materials were developed using 6-10 wt% poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel capable of achieving a range of acoustic velocities (1482-1530 m s-1) and attenuation coefficients (0.4-1 dB MHz-1 cm-1) for simulating different liver states. Laboratory-based acoustic velocities and attenuation coefficients were measured while the Young's modulus was established through a gold standard compression testing method. A significant variation of the Young's elastic modulus was measured in healthy phantoms with overlaying fat layers of thicknesses exceeding 45 mm, impinging on the scanners region of interest, overestimating the compression tested values by up to 11 kPa in some cases. Furthermore, Fibroscan® measurements of the steatosis phantoms showed a consistent overestimation (˜54%), which strongly suggests that the speed of sound mismatch between that of liver tissue and that assumed by the scanner is responsible for the high clinical cut-offs established in the case of ALD and NAFLD.

  15. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion.

  16. Noninvasive assessment of the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles using ultrasound real-time tissue elastography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Ishijima, Takahiro; Morise, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles could be estimated by measuring the elasticity of these muscles under several levels of muscle contraction through ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE). Ten healthy men performed submaximal voluntary contractions (MVC) in each manual muscle testing position for the middle deltoid, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, levator scapulae, and rhomboid major. The elasticity of these muscles was measured using ultrasound RTE during the task. The strain ratio of the muscle to an acoustic coupler was calculated as an assessment index of the muscle elasticity. Higher strain ratio values imply lower elasticity. In addition, the electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes attached only to the middle deltoid and upper trapezius. The strain ratios were negatively correlated with the normalized root mean square values for the middle deltoid (r=-0.659, p<0.001) and upper trapezius (r=-0.554, p<0.001). The strain ratios of all the muscles decreased with an increase from 10% MVC force to 30% MVC force. Ultrasound RTE may be useful for noninvasively assessing the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles at certain shoulder positions with low levels of muscle contraction. PMID:26263838

  17. Quantitative shear-wave optical coherence elastography with a programmable phased array ultrasound as the wave source.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Huang, Zhihong; Shen, Tueng; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement a beam-steering ultrasound as the wave source for shear-wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) to achieve an extended range of elastic imaging of the tissue sample. We introduce a linear phased array ultrasound transducer (LPAUT) as the remote and programmable wave source and a phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) as the sensitive shear-wave detector. The LPAUT is programmed to launch acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) focused at desired locations within the range of OCT imaging, upon which the elasticity map of the entire OCT B-scan cross section is recovered by spatial compounding of the elastic maps derived from each launch of AFRIs. We also propose a directional filter to separate the shear-wave propagation at different directions in order to reduce the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the shear-wave propagation within tissue. The feasibility of this proposed approach is then demonstrated by determining the stiffness of tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentrations of 0.5% and 1% and also by imaging the Young's modulus of retinal and choroidal tissues within a porcine eye ball ex vivo. The approach opens up opportunities to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative assessment of tissue biomechanical property.

  18. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE): A Novel Method for Two-dimensional Shear Elasticity Imaging of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear wave speed map (40 mm × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally a 2D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise-ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound. PMID:22736690

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and useful ancillary methods

    PubMed Central

    Tadic, Mario; Stoos-Veic, Tajana; Kusec, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    The role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in evaluating pancreatic pathology has been well documented from the beginning of its clinical use. High spatial resolution and the close proximity to the evaluated organs within the mediastinum and abdominal cavity allow detection of small focal lesions and precise tissue acquisition from suspected lesions within the reach of this method. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is considered of additional value to EUS and is performed to obtain tissue diagnosis. Tissue acquisition from suspected lesions for cytological or histological analysis allows, not only the differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions, but, in most cases, also the accurate distinction between the various types of malignant lesions. It is well documented that the best results are achieved only if an adequate sample is obtained for further analysis, if the material is processed in an appropriate way, and if adequate ancillary methods are performed. This is a multi-step process and could be quite a challenge in some cases. In this article, we discuss the technical aspects of tissue acquisition by EUS-guided-FNA (EUS-FNA), as well as the role of an on-site cytopathologist, various means of specimen processing, and the selection of the appropriate ancillary method for providing an accurate tissue diagnosis and maximizing the yield of this method. The main goal of this review is to alert endosonographers, not only to the different possibilities of tissue acquisition, namely EUS-FNA, but also to bring to their attention the importance of proper sample processing in the evaluation of various lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and other accessible organs. All aspects of tissue acquisition (needles, suction, use of stylet, complications, etc.) have been well discussed lately. Adequate tissue samples enable comprehensive diagnoses, which answer the main clinical questions, thus enabling targeted therapy. PMID:25339816

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it’s still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage. PMID:25610532

  1. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA.

  2. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  3. Amplitude-modulated ultrasound radiation force combined with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Tissue stiffness can be measured from the propagation speed of shear waves. Acoustic radiation force (ARF) can generate shear waves by focusing ultrasound in tissue for ~100 μs. Safety considerations and electronics abilities limit ultrasound pressures. We previously presented shear wave elastography combining ARF and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) [1]. Here, we use amplitude-modulated ARF to enhance shear wave signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at low pressures. Experiments were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms. ARF was applied using a single-element transducer, driven by a 7.5 MHz, 3-ms, sine wave modulated in amplitude by a linear-swept frequency (1 to 7 kHz). Pressures between 1 to 3 MPa were tested. Displacements were tracked using PhS-OCT and numerically compressed using pulse compression methods detailed in previous work [2]. SNR was compared to that of 200-μs bursts. Stiffness maps were reconstructed using time-of-flight computations. 200-μs bursts give barely detectable displacements at 1 MPa (3.7 dB SNR). Pulse compression gives 36.2 dB at 1.5 MPa. In all cases with detectable displacements, shear wave speeds were determined in 5%-gelatin and 10%-gelatin phantoms and compared to literature values. Applicability to ocular tissues (cornea, intraocular lens) is under investigation.

  4. Ultrasound assisted optical elastography for measurement of tissue stiffness: contribution to the measurement from scattering coefficient variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat Chandran, R. S.; Usha Devi, C.; Vasu, R. M.; Sood, A. K.

    2007-05-01

    In ultrasound assisted optical elastography (UAOE) the amplitude of vibration inside the object introduced by an ultrasound (US) beam is read out by a coherent light beam. The measurement is the depth of modulation in the intensity autocorrelation of light that intercepted the insonified region and detected at the boundary. It is observed that the measured depth of modulation is owing to refractive index modulation and scattering coefficient modulation, in addition to the tissue-particle vibration. Since elasticity is measured from the amplitude of vibration it is essential to characterize and separate the contribution to the modulation from refractive index and scattering coefficient modulations. In this work we report the contribution of the scattering coefficient modulation in the insonified region to the measured modulation in the autocorrelation. We found through simulation studies that the contribution from scattering coefficient is small compared to the vibration. In addition, this contribution becomes smaller as the stiffness in the region increases. We also provide a means of quantifying this contribution so that the effect of vibration amplitude can be separated from the overall measured modulation depth.

  5. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  6. Metachronous bilateral segmental testicular infarction: multi-parametric ultrasound imaging with grey-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and real-time tissue elastography (RTE).

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketul V; Huang, Dean Y; Sidhu, Paul S

    2014-09-01

    Segmental testicular infarction is a rare cause of acute scrotal pain. The appearances on grey-scale sonography are often indistinguishable from that of a testicular tumour, resulting in unnecessary orchiectomy. We report a case of acute bilateral testicular infarction, of unknown etiology, which was conservatively managed to resolution following a confident diagnosis achieved with the aid of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and real-time tissue elastography (RTE) along with conventional grey-scale and Doppler sonography. The evolving appearances on each of the sonographic modalities are described. We discuss the importance of complementing conventional sonography with CEUS and RTE in order to make a confident diagnosis and avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

  7. Building a virtual simulation platform for quasistatic breast ultrasound elastography using open source software: A preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Helminen, Emily; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quasistatic ultrasound elastography (QUE) is being used to augment in vivo characterization of breast lesions. Results from early clinical trials indicated that there was a lack of confidence in image interpretation. Such confidence can only be gained through rigorous imaging tests using complex, heterogeneous but known media. The objective of this study is to build a virtual breast QUE simulation platform in the public domain that can be used not only for innovative QUE research but also for rigorous imaging tests. Methods: The main thrust of this work is to streamline biomedical ultrasound simulations by leveraging existing open source software packages including Field II (ultrasound simulator), VTK (geometrical visualization and processing), FEBio [finite element (FE) analysis], and Tetgen (mesh generator). However, integration of these open source packages is nontrivial and requires interdisciplinary knowledge. In the first step, a virtual breast model containing complex anatomical geometries was created through a novel combination of image-based landmark structures and randomly distributed (small) structures. Image-based landmark structures were based on data from the NIH Visible Human Project. Subsequently, an unstructured FE-mesh was created by Tetgen. In the second step, randomly positioned point scatterers were placed within the meshed breast model through an octree-based algorithm to make a virtual breast ultrasound phantom. In the third step, an ultrasound simulator (Field II) was used to interrogate the virtual breast phantom to obtain simulated ultrasound echo data. Of note, tissue deformation generated using a FE-simulator (FEBio) was the basis of deforming the original virtual breast phantom in order to obtain the postdeformation breast phantom for subsequent ultrasound simulations. Using the procedures described above, a full cycle of QUE simulations involving complex and highly heterogeneous virtual breast phantoms can be accomplished for

  8. Treatment of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Mark Richards, Dafydd; Carr, Nicholas

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transgastric injection of thrombin under endoscopic ultrasound guidance. There has been no recurrence on follow-up CT angiography, and thus complex surgery or endovascular intervention has been avoided.

  9. A pilot study evaluating real-time shear wave ultrasound elastography of miscellaneous non-nodal neck masses in a routine head and neck ultrasound clinic.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kunwar S S; Yuen, Edmund H Y; Cho, Carmen C M; Tong, Cina S L; Lee, Yolanda Y P; Ahuja, Anil T

    2012-06-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWE) for miscellaneous non-nodal/salivary/thyroid neck lesions. Forty-six lesions undergoing conventional sonography also underwent SWE. Elastic moduli from the stiffest areas in lesions were correlated with diagnosis. Forty lesions were benign (9 lipomas, 8 lymphatic/venous vascular malformations, 7 thyroglossal duct cysts, 4 branchial cleft cysts, 4 abscesses/phlegmons, 3 neurogenic tumors and 1 each of paraganglioma, sebaceous cyst, pseudotumor, hypertrophic scar, ranula) and 6 were malignant (1 malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 2 primary squamous cell carcinomas and 3 intramuscular metastases [2 squamous cell carcinomas, 1 malignant melanoma]).Median stiffness of malignant lesions (226.4 kPa, range 55.6 to 300.0) was higher than benign lesions (28.3 kPa, range 4.0 to 300.0) (p < 0.001). SWE cut-off with highest accuracy (174.4 kPa) achieved 83.3% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity, and the cut-off with 100% sensitivity (55.6 kPa) achieved 75% specificity. All malignant lesions were suspected on conventional sonography. The preliminary data indicate that SWE is feasible for miscellaneous neck lesions. SWE would not have altered management in terms of detecting undisclosed malignancies, although as a quantitative technique, it may increase the diagnostic confidence of less experienced operators performing head and neck ultrasound.

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion.

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication.

    PubMed

    Marina-Breysse, Manuel; Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion. PMID:27642527

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion. PMID:27642527

  13. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  14. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  15. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  16. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  17. Primary Pancreatic Malignant Lymphoma Diagnosed from Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration Findings.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Moriyama, Ichiro; Ishihara, Shunji; Sonoyama, Hiroki; Yamashita, Noritsugu; Tada, Yasumasa; Oka, Akihiko; Oshima, Naoki; Yuki, Takafumi; Kawashima, Kousaku; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with upper abdominal pain and jaundice. Computed tomography showed a 9-cm mass that was penetrated by the common hepatic artery in the pancreatic head area. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed no stenosis or obstruction of the main pancreatic duct, and a cytologic examination of the patient's pancreatic juice was negative. Next, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was performed. The immunohistological findings of the specimen revealed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The size of the tumor was significantly reduced after 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone). PMID:26726082

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Antegrade Stenting in an Occluded Biliary Self-expandable Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Eltayeb, Mohanned; Thaniah, Salem

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an attractive option for patients who cannot undergo conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and do not want surgery or percutaneous drainage procedures. We present the use of EUS-antegrade (EUS-AG) insertion of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in a patient with a common hepatic duct cholangiocarcinoma, as well as a huge gastric lipoma, after recurrent biliary obstruction of a prior SEMS inserted via ERCP in the same session as a duodenal stent insertion for gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:27488330

  19. Multiparametric sonographic imaging of a capillary hemangioma of the testis: appearances on gray-scale, color Doppler, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Silvia; Konstantatou, Eleni; Huang, Dean Y; Deganello, Annamaria; Philippidou, Marianna; Brown, Christian; Sellars, Maria E; Sidhu, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a lobular capillary hemangioma in a 66-year-old man, who presented with left testicular pain, with an asymptomatic incidental right testicular lesion found on ultrasonography. The sonographic examination demonstrated a heterogeneous mainly iso-echoic intratesticular lesion with marked vascularity on the color Doppler examination. Further evaluation with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and strain elastography was performed; the multiparametric imaging suggested a benign tumor. The multidisciplinary team decision with patient consent was to perform a radical orchiectomy with subsequent histopathology confirming a benign lobular capillary hemangioma.

  20. Design, development and characterization of cyst phantom for ultrasound elastography applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishore; Andrews, M E; Jayashankar, V; Mishra, A K; Suresh, S

    2008-01-01

    Polyacrylamide based tissue mimicking phantom with embedded cysts is designed and analyzed for better understanding of cyst elastograms. Cysts filled with different fluids of varying density and bulk moduli are embedded in the phantom. Characterization is done based on parameters measured from the ultrasound B mode and elastogram of the cystic lesions. Such a phantom can serve as tool for better understanding of the elastographic appearance of cysts. Thus simple and complex cysts can be easily distinguished. It can also be used to teach a complex procedure like ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:19163330

  1. Urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis-induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC) due to biliary lithiasis is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent biliary decompression. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is the current gold standard for biliary decompression, it can sometimes be difficult because of failed biliary cannulation. In this retrospective case series, we describe three cases of successful biliary drainage with recovery from septic shock after urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) was performed for AOSC due to biliary lithiasis. In all three cases, technical success in inserting the stents was achieved and the patients completely recovered from AOSC with sepsis in a few days after EUS-CDS. There were no procedure-related complications. When initial ERCP fails, EUS-CDS can be an effective life-saving endoscopic biliary decompression procedure that shortens the procedure time and prevents post-ERCP pancreatitis, particularly in patients with AOSC-induced sepsis. PMID:27122677

  2. Multiple pancreatic metastases from malignant melanoma: Conclusive diagnosis with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jana, Tanima; Caraway, Nancy P; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, ranging from 2% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies. Differentiating a primary pancreatic malignancy from a metastasis can be difficult due to similarities on imaging findings, but is crucial to ensure proper treatment. Although transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provide useful images, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine needle aspiration (FNA) is often needed to provide a cytologic diagnosis. Here, we present a unique case of malignant melanoma with pancreatic metastases. It is important for clinicians to recognize the possibility of melanoma metastasizing to the pancreas and the role of EUS with FNA in providing cytological confirmation.

  3. Multiple pancreatic metastases from malignant melanoma: Conclusive diagnosis with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jana, Tanima; Caraway, Nancy P; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, ranging from 2% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies. Differentiating a primary pancreatic malignancy from a metastasis can be difficult due to similarities on imaging findings, but is crucial to ensure proper treatment. Although transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provide useful images, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine needle aspiration (FNA) is often needed to provide a cytologic diagnosis. Here, we present a unique case of malignant melanoma with pancreatic metastases. It is important for clinicians to recognize the possibility of melanoma metastasizing to the pancreas and the role of EUS with FNA in providing cytological confirmation. PMID:26020050

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

  5. Non-invasive assessment of human multifidus muscle stiffness using ultrasound shear wave elastography: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Baptiste; Vergari, Claudio; Gad, Hisham; Sandoz, Baptiste; Skalli, Wafa; Laporte, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of numeric data for the mechanical characterization of spine muscles, especially in vivo data. The multifidus muscle is a major muscle for the stabilization of the spine and may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP). Supersonic shear wave elastography (SWE) has not yet been used on back muscles. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the feasibility of ultrasound SWE to measure the elastic modulus of lumbar multifidus muscle in a passive stretching posture and at rest with a repeatable and reproducible method. A total of 10 asymptotic subjects (aged 25.5 ± 2.2 years) participated, 4 females and 6 males. Three operators performed 6 measurements for each of the 2 postures on the right multifidus muscle at vertebral levels L2-L3 and L4-L5. Repeatability and reproducibility have been assessed according to ISO 5725 standard. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for intra- and inter-observer reliability were rated as both excellent [ICC=0.99 and ICC=0.95, respectively]. Reproducibility was 11% at L2-L3 level and 19% at L4-L5. In the passive stretching posture, shear modulus was significantly higher than at rest (µ < 0.05). This preliminary work enabled to validate the feasibility of measuring the shear modulus of the multifidus muscle with SWE. This kind of measurement could be easily introduces into clinical routine like for the medical follow-up of chronic LBP or scoliosis treatments. PMID:27435466

  6. The safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won Jae; Brugge, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is widely used in the evaluation of various pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of PCLs provides cyst fluid, which is used for the differentiation of PCLs. EUS-FNA of PCLs is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. Contrary to the concerns expressed by some investigators, preoperative EUS-FNA of mucinous PCLs is unlikely to increase the frequency of postoperative peritoneal seeding. PMID:26643695

  7. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage Using a Fully Covered Metallic Stent after Failed Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jintao; Sun, Siyu; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Study Aims. Endoscopic ultrasound- (EUS-) guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an alternative treatment for biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In this study, we present the outcomes of inpatients with obstructive jaundice treated with EUS-BD using a fully covered metallic stent after failed ERCP. Patients and Methods. A total of 21 patients with biliary obstruction due to malignant tumors and prior unsuccessful ERCP underwent EUS via an intra- or extrahepatic approach with fully covered metallic stent between March 2014 and October 2015. A single endoscopist performed all procedures. Results. Seven patients underwent hepatogastrostomy (HGS) and 14 underwent choledochoduodenostomy (CDS). The technical and clinical success rates were both 100%. There was no difference in efficacy between HGS and CDS. Adverse events occurred in three patients, including two in the HGS group (1 bile leakage and 1 sepsis) and one in the CDS group (sepsis). Four patients died as a result of their primary tumors during a median follow-up period of 13 months (range: 3-21 months). No patient presented with stent migration. Conclusion. EUS-BD using a fully covered metallic stent appears to be a safe and effective method for the treatment of obstructive jaundice. PMID:27594881

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and real-time elastography in the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xin; Liu, Huai-Jun; Jia, Hong-Li; Fang, Qin-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) or real-time elastography (RTE) alone, as well as a combination of CEUS and RTE, in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules was investigated. Between August 2012 and June 2014, a total of 97 consecutive patients (50 male and 47 female patients; mean age, 48.6±12.4; age range, 27–70 years) with thyroid nodules referred for surgical treatment were examined by CEUS and RTE. The final diagnosis was obtained based on histological findings. Image analysis of the CEUS and RTE scans was performed. Considering the postoperative pathological results as the golden standard, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed. Subsequently, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of CEUS alone, RTE alone and CEUS + RTE combination were calculated. Pathological examination showed 66 papillary carcinomas and 43 benign lesions, including 21 adenomas and 22 nodular goiters. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 81.82, 90.70, 93.10, 90.70 and 85.32%, respectively. In the case of RTE, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 80.30, 88.37, 91.38, 88.37 and 83.49%, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of CEUS + RTE had a sensitivity of 95.45%, specificity of 95.35%, PPV of 96.92%, NPV of 95.35% and accuracy of 95.41%. Therefore, the CEUS + RTE combination showed a significantly higher sensitivity and specificity compared with CEUS or RTE alone (all P<0.05). Based on ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CEUS, RTE and CEUS + RTE combination was 0.883, 0.863 and 0.959, respectively. The AUC of RTE alone was significantly lower compared with that of the CEUS + RTE combination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CEUS + RTE combination significantly increases the diagnostic performance for differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid nodules compared with

  10. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Cannon, L.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 µm Al2O3 and 3 µm Al2O3, were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s-1, respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  11. Liver elastography, comments on EFSUMB elastography guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Molo, Chiara De; Ignee, Andre; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-01-01

    Recently the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Guidelines and Recommendations have been published assessing the clinical use of ultrasound elastography. The document is intended to form a reference and to guide clinical users in a practical way. They give practical advice for the use and interpretation. Liver disease forms the largest section, reflecting published experience to date including evidence from meta-analyses with shear wave and strain elastography. In this review comments and illustrations on the guidelines are given. PMID:24151351

  12. Diagnostic utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy for glomus tumor of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Chinen, Kenji; Murakami, Takahiro; Kunishima, Fumihito

    2015-06-14

    A 52-year-old man was referred for further investigation of a gastric submucosal tumor on the greater curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a hypoechoic solid mass, which was primarily connected to the muscular layer of the stomach. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The pathological examination showed proliferation of oval-shaped cells with nest formation, which stained strongly positive for muscle actin, and negative for c-kit, CD34, CD56, desmin, S-100, chromogranin, and neuron-specific enolase. Therefore, we performed laparoscopy and endoscopy cooperative surgery based on the preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach. The final histological diagnosis confirmed the preoperative diagnosis. Although preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach is difficult with conventional images and endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy is an essential tool to gain histological evidence of glomus tumor of the stomach for early diagnosis.

  13. Failed common bile duct cannulation during pregnancy: Rescue with endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous procedure.

    PubMed

    Singla, Vikas; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) stones can lead to serious complications and require intervention with either endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or laparoscopic techniques for urgent relief. On an average 10%-20% of the patients with gall bladder stones can have associated CBD stones. CBD stones during pregnancy can be associated with hazardous complications for both the mother and the fetus. Failed cannulation while performing ERCP during pregnancy is a technically demanding situation, which requires immediate rescue with special techniques. Conventional rescue techniques may not be feasible and can be associated with hazardous consequences. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided rendezvous technique has now emerged as a safe alternative, and in one of our patients, this technique was successfully attempted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature on EUS-guided rendezvous procedure during pregnancy. PMID:27386479

  14. Usefulness of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of hepatic, gallbladder and biliary tract Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Almashhrawi, Ashraf; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the liver is a safe procedure in the diagnosis and staging of hepatobiliary malignancies with a minimal major complication rate. EUS-FNA is useful for liver lesions poorly accessible to other imaging modalities of the liver. EUS-guided FNA of biliary neoplasia and malignant biliary stricture is superior to the conventional endoscopic brushing and biopsy. PMID:25400873

  15. Usefulness of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of hepatic, gallbladder and biliary tract Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Almashhrawi, Ashraf; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the liver is a safe procedure in the diagnosis and staging of hepatobiliary malignancies with a minimal major complication rate. EUS-FNA is useful for liver lesions poorly accessible to other imaging modalities of the liver. EUS-guided FNA of biliary neoplasia and malignant biliary stricture is superior to the conventional endoscopic brushing and biopsy. PMID:25400873

  16. The role of viscosity estimation for oil-in-gelatin phantom in shear wave based ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Dong, Changfeng; Yin, Yin; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Zheng, Yi; Shen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Tianfu; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping

    2015-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastography utilizes mechanical excitation or acoustic radiation force to induce shear waves in deep tissue. The tissue response is monitored to obtain elasticity information about the tissue. During the past two decades, tissue elasticity has been extensively studied and has been used in clinical disease diagnosis. However, biological soft tissues are viscoelastic in nature. Therefore, they should be simultaneously characterized in terms of elasticity and viscosity. In this study, two shear wave-based elasticity imaging methods, shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) and acoustic radiation force impulsive (ARFI) imaging, were compared. The discrepancy between the measurements obtained by the two methods was analyzed, and the role of viscosity was investigated. To this end, four types of gelatin phantoms containing 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% castor oil were fabricated to mimic different viscosities of soft tissue. For the SDUV method, the shear elasticity μ1 was 3.90 ± 0.27 kPa, 4.49 ± 0.16 kPa, 2.41 ± 0.33 kPa and 1.31 ± 0.09 kPa; and the shear viscosity μ2 was 1.82 ± 0.31 Pa•s, 2.41 ± 0.35 Pa•s, 2.65 ± 0.13 Pa•s and 2.89 ± 0.14 Pa•s for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively in both cases. For the ARFI measurements, the shear elasticity μ was 7.30 ± 0.20 kPa, 8.20 ± 0.31 kPa, 7.42 ± 0.21 kPa and 5.90 ± 0.36 kPa for 0%, 20%, 30% and 40% oil, respectively. The SDUV results demonstrated that the elasticity first increased from 0% to 20% oil and then decreased for the 30% and 40% oil. The viscosity decreased consistently as the concentration of castor oil increased from 0% to 40%. The elasticity measured by ARFI showed the same trend as that of the SDUV but exceeded the results measured by SDUV. To clearly validate the impact of viscosity on the elasticity estimation, an independent measurement of the elasticity and viscosity by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was conducted on these four types of gelatin

  17. Diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma of the colon by endoscopic ultrasound: Biopsy is not needed!

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Manoop S.; Annangi, Srinadh; Koduru, Pramoda; Aggarwal, Aakash; Suzuki, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lymphangioma of the colon (CLC) is a rare benign lesion that is usually asymptomatic and found incidentally during colonoscopy. Limitations in the conventional noninvasive diagnostic techniques have led to surgical resection of these lesions for diagnostic confirmation. Classic endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of colonic cystic lymphangioma are submucosal anechoic cystic spaces with septations, intact muscularis propria, and no solid component. Patients who are asymptomatic with lesions having classic appearance as cystic lymphangioma with EUS can be observed without any intervention. We herein report a case of cystic lymphangioma of distal transverse colon in an asymptomatic patient diagnosed noninvasively using 20-MHz miniprobe EUS and managed conservatively without any surgical intervention. PMID:27803907

  18. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Isolated Gastric Cavernous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinlong; Sao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma is extremely rare in the stomach. Historically, endoscopy, computed tomography and MRI had been used to diagnose gastric cavernous haemangioma. Biopsy, is not an option due to its vascular nature and submucosal location. We report an isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma that was diagnosed by end-oscopic ultrasound in a 25-year-old male and treated by laparotomy. The final diagnosis of cavernous haemagioma was confirmed by post-operative pathology. There was no recurrence during 3-month follow-up period. PMID:27790564

  19. Needle Fracture during Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Suspicious Thoracic Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Bartosz; Manière, Thibaut; Déry, Vincent; Désilets, Étienne

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is used to make a cytopathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions located around the gastrointestinal tract. It is a safe technique with few complications. The most common complications of EUS-FNA are related to pancreatic lesions (pancreatitis, bleeding, and abdominal pain). Rare complications have been noted such as stent malfunction, air embolism, infection, neural and vascular injuries, and tumor cell seeding. There are very few studies examining equipment malfunctions. We report a case of needle fracture during the EUS-FNA of suspicious thoracic lymph nodes in a 79-year-old man investigated for unexplained weight loss. PMID:27555874

  20. Needle Fracture during Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Suspicious Thoracic Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manière, Thibaut; Déry, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is used to make a cytopathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions located around the gastrointestinal tract. It is a safe technique with few complications. The most common complications of EUS-FNA are related to pancreatic lesions (pancreatitis, bleeding, and abdominal pain). Rare complications have been noted such as stent malfunction, air embolism, infection, neural and vascular injuries, and tumor cell seeding. There are very few studies examining equipment malfunctions. We report a case of needle fracture during the EUS-FNA of suspicious thoracic lymph nodes in a 79-year-old man investigated for unexplained weight loss. PMID:27555874

  1. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Kaar, M.; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A.; Birkfellner, W.; Hummel, J.; Figl, M.

    2014-09-01

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm ± 2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm.

  2. Yield of Contrast-Enhanced Power Doppler Endoscopic Ultrasonography and Strain Ratio Obtained by EUS-Elastography in the Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Solid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Fátima A. F.; da Silva, Patricia M.; Monges, Genevieve; Bories, Erwan; Pesenti, Christian; Caillol, Fabrice; Delpero, Jean R.; Giovannini, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the gold standard for diagnosing pancreatic lesions, its negative predictive value is suboptimal. Our aim was to evaluate the yield of contrast-enhanced EUS (CED-EUS) and of strain ratio EUS-elastography (SR-E-EUS) for differentiating pancreatic solid lesions. Methods: Forty-seven patients (27 men, 20 women, 70 ± 11 years) were consecutively involved in this single-center, prospective study. They were submitted to EUS, SR-E-EUS, CED-EUS with Sonovue®, and EUS-FNA. The final diagnosis was based on the histological assessment of EUS-FNA and/or surgical specimens when available, and on follow-up of at least 6 months. Results: From the 47 focal pancreatic lesions included, 13 (28%) were benign and 34 (72%) malignant. Patients with malignancy were older (70 ± 11 vs. 61 ± 8, P = 0.003), and had larger lesions (34 ± 12 mm vs. 22 ± 11 mm, P = 0.03). Malignant lesions had higher SR-E-EUS (31 ± 32 vs. 8 ± 9, P = 0.001) and more hypovascular pattern (93% vs. 33%, P < 0.001). Logistic regression determined that only hypovascularity (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 1.5-130, P = 0.02) was independently predictive of malignancy. ROC analysis for SR-E-EUS yielded an optimal cutoff of 8 (AUC 0.91, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98) for the best power distinction for malignancy. There was no significant difference concerning sensitivity (79%, 90%, 93%) and specificity rates (85%, 75%, 67%) of EUS-FNA, SR-E-EUS, and CED-EUS, respectively. By analysis of the inconclusive EUS-FNA subset (9 patients, 19%), SR-E-EUS > 8 and hypovascularity showed sensitivity of 80% and 100%, and specificity of 67% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: The clinical utility of CED-EUS and SR-E-EUS remains questionable. The accuracies of CED-EUS and SR-E-EUS are similar to EUS-FNA. Hypovascularity was independently predictive of malignancy. Patients with inconclusive EUS-FNA could benefit from CED-EUS due to the high sensitivity of

  3. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  4. Assessing Age-Related Changes in the Biomechanical Properties of Rabbit Lens Using a Coaligned Ultrasound and Optical Coherence Elastography System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Wang, Shang; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Liu, Chih-hao; Aglyamov, Salavat; Emelianov, Stanislav; Manns, Fabrice; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the capability of a novel, coaligned focused ultrasound and phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (US-OCE) system to assess age-related changes in biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens in situ. Methods. Low-amplitude elastic deformations in young and mature rabbit lenses were measured by an US-OCE system consisting of a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system coaligned with a focused ultrasound system used to produce a transient force on the lens surface. Uniaxial compressional tests were used to validate the OCE data. Results. The OCE measurements showed that the maximum displacements of the young rabbit lenses were significantly larger than those of the mature lenses, indicating a gradual increase of the lens stiffness with age. Temporal analyses of the displacements also demonstrate a similar trend of elastic properties in these lenses. The stress-strain measurements using uniaxial mechanical tests confirmed the results obtained by the US-OCE system. Conclusions. The results demonstrate that the US-OCE system can be used for noninvasive analysis and quantification of lens biomechanical properties in situ and possibly in vivo. PMID:25613945

  5. Correlating Tumor Stiffness with Immunohistochemical Subtypes of Breast Cancers: Prognostic Value of Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography for Differentiating Luminal Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fazzio, Robert T.; Whaley, Dana H.; Ghosh, Karthik; Shah, Sejal; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to correlate quantitatively measured tumor stiffness with immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes of breast cancer. Additionally, the influence of prognostic histologic features (cancer grade, size, lymph node status, and histological type and grade) to the tumor elasticity and IHC profile relationship will be investigated. Methods Under an institutional review board (IRB) approved protocol, B-mode ultrasound (US) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on 157 female patients with suspicious breast lesions. Out of 157 patients 83 breast cancer patients confirmed by pathology were included in this study. The association between CUSE mean stiffness values and the aforementioned prognostic features of the breast cancer tumors were investigated. Results Our results demonstrate that the most statistically significant difference (p = 0.0074) with mean elasticity is tumor size. When considering large tumors (size ≥ 8mm), thus minimizing the statistical significance of tumor size, a significant difference (p< 0.05) with mean elasticity is obtained between luminal A of histological grade I and luminal B (Ki-67 > 20%) subtypes. Conclusion Tumor size is an independent factor influencing mean elasticity. The Ki-67 proliferation index and histological grade were dependent factors influencing mean elasticity for the differentiation between luminal subtypes. Future studies on a larger group of patients may broaden the clinical significance of these findings. PMID:27776153

  6. A Risk Model for Predicting Central Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma Including Conventional Ultrasound and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Li, Xiao-Long; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to propose a new rating system using a risk model including conventional ultrasound (US) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for predicting central lymph node metastasis (LNM) in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC).A total of 252 patients with PTMCs were enrolled, who were preoperatively evaluated by US and ARFI elastography including virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ). Risk factors of independent variables for central LNM were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. A multivariate analysis was performed to create a predicting model and rating system.Of the 252 patients, 72 (28.6%) had central LNMs. Multivariate analysis revealed that rare internal flow (odds ratio [OR]: 4.454), multiple suspicious foci on US (OR: 5.136), capsule involvement (OR: 20.632), and VTI area ratio (VAR) > 1 (OR: 5.621) were independent risk factors for central LNM. The final predicting model was obtained and the risk score (RS) was defined as 1.5 × (if rare internal flow) + 1.6 × (if multiple suspicious foci on US) + 1.7 × (if VAR > 1) + 3.0 × (if capsule involvement). The rating system was divided into 5 stages. Stage I, <1.5; Stage II, 1.5 to 3.0; Stage III, 3.1 to 4.7; Stage IV, 4.8 to 6.3; and Stage V, 6.4 to 7.8. The risk rates of central LNM were 3.4% (2/59) in Stage I, 13.3% (13/98) in Stage II, 54.2% (39/72) in Stage III, 72.2% (13/18) in Stage IV, and 100% (5/5) in Stage V (P < 0.001).The results indicated that rare internal flow, multiple suspicious foci, capsule involvement on US, and VAR > 1 on ARFI elastography are the risk factors for predicting central LNM. The risk model developed in the study clearly predicts the risk of central LNM in patients with PTMC and thus has a potential to avoid unnecessary central compartment node dissection.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... been put in your digestive tract during the test to move the tube more easily. This may make you feel bloated, but this feeling will go away. When you are fully awake, you can be taken home. Rest that day. You may have fluids and light ... The results depend on what is found during the test. If you do not understand the results, or ...

  8. Metastases to the Pancreas Encountered on Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided, Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Pang, Judy C; Roh, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic lesions in the pancreas are very uncommon and may be difficult to differentiate from the more commonly encountered primary neoplasms derived from the exocrine and endocrine pancreas because of the significant overlap in clinical presentation, imaging, and cytologic features. Metastasis to the pancreas may occur years after treatment of the primary neoplasm and is often not considered on initial evaluation because of the rarity of such events. The possibility of a metastasis to the pancreas should be entertained in patients with any prior history of malignancy because a proper diagnosis is essential in identifying surgical candidates, or avoiding potentially unnecessary surgery and facilitating triage to more appropriate nonoperative therapy. Herein, we describe intrapancreatic metastases secondary to renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and lung carcinoma, as documented by cytologic examination of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the pancreatic masses.

  9. Therapeutic role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreaticobiliary disease: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Sheng; Zhang, Zhao-Hong; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    With the development of technology and accessories, the role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from diagnostics to therapeutics. In order to characterise the therapeutic role of EUS, we searched Web of Knowledge database and reviewed articles associated with therapeutic EUS. There are two modalities for the therapeutic purpose: drainage and fine-needle injection. EUS-guided drainage is a promising procedure for the treatment of peripancreatic fluid collection and biliary obstruction; EUS-guided fine-needle injections such as celiac plexus neurolysis, for the purpose of pain relief for pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, has emerged as a promising procedure. The aim of the study was to perform a comprehensive and conscientious review on the techniques, complications and clinical outcomes of those EUS-based procedures. PMID:26675538

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Jamil, Laith H

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy in the adrenal glands. EUS-FNA with biopsy of suspicious masses in either adrenal gland allows for assessment of these lesions while keeping complications relatively rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity, and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of adrenal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to either decrease unnecessary treatment or guide therapy in cancer patients by aiding in either staging of malignancy or treatment of recurrence.v. PMID:27366030

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment beyond Drainage: Hemostasis, Anastomosis, and Others

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s, it has evolved from a primarily diagnostic modality into an instrument that can be used in various therapeutic interventions. EUS-guided fine-needle injection was initially described for celiac plexus neurolysis. By using the fundamentals of this method, drainage techniques emerged for the biliary and pancreatic ducts, fluid collections, and abscesses. More recently, EUS has been used for ablative techniques and injection therapies for patients with for gastrointestinal malignancies. As the search for minimally invasive techniques continued, EUS-guided hemostasis methods have also been described. The technical advances in EUS-guided therapies may appear to be limitless; however, in many instances, these procedures have been described only in small case series. More data are required to determine the efficacy and safety of these techniques, and new accessories will be needed to facilitate their implementation into practice. PMID:25325004

  12. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in diagnosis and management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koduru, Pramoda; Suzuki, Rei; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Ramchandani, Mohan; Makmun, Dadang; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive tumor and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally. The mortality rate remains high despite many advances in treatment. HCC is frequently diagnosed late in its course due to lack of classical symptoms at earlier stages. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool for the diagnostic evaluation, staging, and treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration has been a valuable addition to EUS by being able to obtain tissue under direct visualization. Here, we review the potential role of EUS in the diagnosis and management of HCC. EUS seems to be a safe and reliable alternative method for obtaining tissue for diagnosis of liver cancer, especially for lesions that are inaccessible by traditional methods. EUS could play an important role in the diagnosis and management of HCC. PMID:27508203

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Jamil, Laith H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy in the adrenal glands. EUS-FNA with biopsy of suspicious masses in either adrenal gland allows for assessment of these lesions while keeping complications relatively rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity, and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of adrenal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to either decrease unnecessary treatment or guide therapy in cancer patients by aiding in either staging of malignancy or treatment of recurrence.v PMID:27366030

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Transluminal Drainage for Peripancreatic Fluid Collections: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic drainage for pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) has been increasingly used as a minimally invasive alternative to surgical or percutaneous drainage. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound-guided transluminal drainage (EUS-TD) has become the standard of care and a safe procedure for nonsurgical PFC treatment. EUS-TD ensures a safe puncture, avoiding intervening blood vessels. Single or multiple plastic stents (combined with a nasocystic catheter) were used for the treatment of PFCs for EUS-TD. More recently, the use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (CSEMSs) has provided a safer and more efficient approach route for internal drainage. We focused our review on the best approach and stent to use in endoscopic drainage for PFCs. We reviewed studies of EUS-TD for PFCs based on the original Atlanta Classification, including case reports, case series, and previous review articles. Data on clinical outcomes and adverse events were collected retrospectively. A total of 93 patients underwent EUS-TD of pancreatic pseudocysts using CSEMSs. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 94.6% and 21.1%, respectively. The majority of complications were of mild severity and resolved with conservative therapy. A total of 56 patients underwent EUS-TD using CSEMSs for pancreatic abscesses or infected walled-off necroses. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 87.8% and 9.5%, respectively. EUS-TD can be performed safely and efficiently for PFC treatment. Larger diameter CSEMSs without additional fistula tract dilation for the passage of a standard scope are needed to access and drain for PFCs with solid debris. PMID:25071899

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatments: Are we getting evidence based - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Lisotti, Andrea; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Virgilio, Clara; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The continued need to develop less invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. These include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, EUS-guided necrosectomy, EUS-guided cholangiography and biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatography and pancreatic duct drainage, EUS-guided gallbladder drainage, EUS-guided drainage of abdominal and pelvic fluid collections, EUS-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS-guided pancreatic cyst ablation, EUS-guided vascular interventions, EUS-guided delivery of antitumoral agents and EUS-guided fiducial placement and brachytherapy. However these procedures are technically challenging and require expertise in both EUS and interventional endoscopy, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and gastrointestinal stenting. We undertook a systematic review to record the entire body of literature accumulated over the past 2 decades on EUS-guided interventions with the objective of performing a critical appraisal of published articles, based on the classification of studies according to levels of evidence, in order to assess the scientific progress made in this field. PMID:25024600

  16. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype detector system with a CTR better than 240 ps FWHM. We discuss the challenges in simulating such a system and introduce reconstruction algorithms based on graphics processing units (GPU).

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of AXIOS stent for drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have conventionally been treated with surgery, percutaneous drainage, or with the more recently established endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage modality. Currently, endoscopic plastic or metallic stents are used for PFC drainage. Plastic stents present issues with stent migration and premature occlusion requiring frequent stent exchanges or placement of additional stents. Metallic stents are tubular and may migrate, resulting in inefficient drainage, content leakage, retrieval and replacement, and possible mucosal injury. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed AXIOS stent, a lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS)for PFC drainage. A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 298 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Overall, a 97% technical success rate and a 96% clinical success rate have been reported. Early and late complications related to the placement or removal of LASEMS have been reported, however few cases have presented life-threatening results. EUS-guided PFC drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065729

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  19. New approaches to gastric cancer staging: Beyond endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no single gold standard modality for staging of gastric cancer and several methods have been used complementarily in the each clinical situation. To make up for the shortcomings of conventional modalities such as endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography, numerous attempts with new approaches have been made for gastric cancer staging. For T staging, magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band was evaluated to differentiate mucosal cancer from submucosal cancer. Single/double contrast-enhanced ultrasound and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were also tried to improve diagnostic accuracy of gastric cancer. For intraoperative staging with sentinel node mapping, indocyanine green infrared and fluorescence imaging was introduced. In addition, to detect micrometastasis, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction system with multiple markers was studied. Staging laparoscopy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic diagnosis and percutaneous diagnostic peritoneal lavage were also evaluated. However, most studies reporting new staging methods is preliminary and further studies for validation in clinical practice are needed. In this mini-review, we discuss new progress in gastric cancer staging. Especially, we focus on new diagnostic approach to gastric cancer staging beyond the conventional modalities and briefly review the remarkable clinical results of the studies published over the past three years. PMID:25320516

  20. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: basic principles, present situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-11-14

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS.

  1. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: Basic principles, present situation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS. PMID:25400439

  2. Use of a novel through-the-needle biopsy forceps in endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Shakhatreh, Mohammad H.; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Brijbassie, Alan A.; Grider, Douglas J.; Shen, Perry; Yeaton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cysts are becoming more common. Their differential diagnosis includes benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Distinguishing the type of cyst helps in the management decision making. We report on a novel tissue acquisition device for pancreatic cysts. Methods: Data on two patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) – guided fine-needle aspiration with a new micro forceps device are presented. Results: Two patients had large pancreatic cystic lesions in the pancreatic head. Linear EUS was performed, and tissue samples were obtained with the Moray micro forceps through a 19-gauge needle. In both patients, mucinous columnar epithelium lined the cystic walls. One patient underwent surgical resection, and the other elected surveillance. Examination of the surgical specimen from the first patient confirmed the cyst was a side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), gastric type. Conclusions: The Moray micro forceps is a new tool that can be used to help determine the nature of pancreatic cysts and aid in their risk stratification and management. PMID:27092324

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Sanchez-Ocaña, Ramon; Peñas, Irene; de la Serna, Carlos; Shah, Janak; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Gaidhane, Monica; Grimm, Ian; Baron, Todd; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical gastrojejunostomy and enteral self-expanding metal stents are efficacious for the management of gastric outlet obstruction but limited by high complication rates and short-term efficacy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy (EUS-GJ) is a novel alternative option. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent EUS-GJ between March 2014 and September 2015 as part of a prospective multicenter registry at four academic centers in two countries were included. Technical success was defined as successful placement of a gastrojejunal lumen-apposing metal stent. Clinical success was defined as the ability of the patient to tolerate an oral diet. Post-procedural adverse events were recorded. Results: The study included 26 patients, of whom 11 (42 %) were male. Technical success was achieved in 24 patients (92 %). Clinical success was achieved in 22 patients (85 %). Of the 4 patients in whom clinical success was not achieved, 2 had persistent nausea and vomiting despite a patent EUS-GJ and required enteral feeding for nutrition, 1 died before the initiation of an oral diet, and 1 underwent surgery for suspected perforation. Adverse events, including peritonitis, bleeding, and surgery, occurred in 3 patients (11.5 %). Conclusion: EUS-GJ is an emerging procedure that has efficacy and safety comparable with those of current therapies and should hold a place as a new minimally invasive option for patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Clinical trial identification number: NCT01522573 PMID:27004243

  4. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol injection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the caudate lobe

    PubMed Central

    Nakaji, So; Hirata, Nobuto; Mikata, Rintaro; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurately puncturing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) that arise from the caudate lobe is generally considered to be technically difficult. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the feasibility and safety (the therapeutic outcomes and adverse events) of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol injection as a novel treatment for HCC in the caudate lobe. Patients and methods: Twelve patients with early-stage HCC of the caudate lobe that were treated with EUS-guided ethanol injection at two tertiary referral centers were reviewed retrospectively. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of the treatment, a local control curve and an overall survival curve were constructed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 31.0 months. The 1-year local control rate was 80.2 %, and recurrent lesions developed in 2 cases (after 3 and 9 months, respectively). The overall survival rate was 91.7 %, 75.0 %, and 53.3 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Concerning procedure-related adverse events (AEs), 2 patients suffered episodes of fever lasting a few days; however, no serious AEs occurred. Conclusions: EUS-guided ethanol injection could be a useful treatment for early-stage HCC in the caudate lobe because of its simplicity and reduced invasiveness. PMID:27747288

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  6. Superficial esophageal lesions detected by endoscopic ultrasound enhanced with submucosal edema

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Jun; He, Long-Jun; Shan, Hong-Bo; Wang, Thomas D; Xiong, Huan; Chen, Li-Ming; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Xiao-Hai; Huang, Xin-Xin; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Yin; Zhang, Rong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if there is consistency between endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings and pathological results for detecting lesions of different depth in the esophageal mucosa. METHODS: A canine (Beagle) model was established in which lesions of different depths were created in the esophageal mucosa by thermal burning. Seventy-two hours later, these lesions and adjacent tissue in the esophagus were examined by EUS. EUS findings including infiltrating depth, strength of echogenicity and homogeneity were recorded. Dogs were sacrificed and tissue specimens were obtained. We then compared the EUS findings with the pathology reports. RESULTS: Thermal burns created at different power settings caused lesions of different depth in the esophageal mucosa. When the echo strength was shifted from high, medium, to low echogenicity, an increase in the infiltrating depth of the lesion was noted, which coincided with results of the pathology examination. Obvious submucosal edema visualized by EUS was also detected by pathology. Furthermore, because of the enhancement caused by the submucosal edema, the lesions invading into the submucosa were easily visualized by EUS. CONCLUSION: There is consistency between EUS findings and pathological results of esophageal lesions with different depths. Submucosal edema can serve as an ultrasonic contrast agent. PMID:24379628

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound comes of age: Mature, established, creative and here to stay!

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manoop S

    2014-07-01

    Research in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is alive and kicking! This paper will present recent interesting developments in EUS based on research presented at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) held in Chicago in 2014. Endosonographers are looking at various techniques to improve yield of fine needle aspiration and core biopsies, assess circulating tumor cells, apply EUS for personalized medicine and develop devices to ensure the adequacy of sampling. EUS may open new vistas in understanding of neurogastroenterology and gastrointestinal motility disorders as discussed in this paper. EUS guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, bile duct and gallbladder is feasible, and many randomized trials are being done to compare different techniques. EUS guided delivery of fiducials, drugs, coils or chemo loaded beads in possible. EUS has come off age, has matured and is here to stay! The DDW in 2014 in Chicago was a very active year for EUS. There were numerous papers on different aspects of EUS, some perfecting and improving old techniques, others dealing with randomized trials and many with novel concepts. In this paper, I will highlight some of the papers that were presented. It is not possible to discuss all the abstracts in detail. I have, therefore, chosen selected papers in different aspects of EUS to give the readers a flavor of the kind of research that was presented at DDW. PMID:25184120

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage for the management of acute cholecystitis (with video).

    PubMed

    Peñas-Herrero, Irene; de la Serna-Higuera, Carlos; Perez-Miranda, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage (EUS-GBD) has been introduced as an alternative to percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in non-surgical candidates. A systematic review of the English language literature through PubMed search until June 2014 was conducted. One hundred and fifty-five patients with acute cholecystitis treated with EUS-GBD in eight studies and 12 case reports, and two patients with EUS-GBD for other causes were identified. Overall, technical success was obtained in 153 patients (97.45%) and clinical success in 150 (99.34%) patients with acute cholecystitis. Adverse events developed in less than 8% of patients, all of them managed conservatively. EUS-GBD has been performed with plastic stents, nasobiliary drainage tubes, standard or modified tubular self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) and lumen-apposing metal stents (LAMS) by different authors with apparently similar outcomes. No comparison studies between stent types for EUS-GBD have been reported. EUS-GBD is a promising novel alternative intervention for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in high surgical risk patients. Feasibility, safety and efficacy in published studies from expert centers are very high compared to currently available alternatives. Further studies are needed to establish the safety and long-term outcomes of this procedure in other practice settings before EUS-GBD can be widely disseminated.

  9. Evaluating the Minimal Specimens From Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Kyung; Kang, Ki Joo; Oh, Cho Rong; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Jang, Kee Taek; Park, Sang-Mo; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become one of the most useful diagnostic modalities for the diagnosis of pancreatic mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of analyzing the minimal specimens obtained by EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid masses of pancreas. This study consisted of retrospective and prospective analyses. The retrospective study was performed on 116 patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid masses for cytological smear, histological analysis, and combined analysis including immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In the prospective study, 79 patients were enrolled to evaluate the quality and accuracy of EUS-FNA histological analysis and feasibility of IHC staining. The final diagnoses of all patients included pancreatic cancer (n = 126), nonpancreatic cancer (n = 21), other neoplasm (n = 27), and benign lesions (n = 21). In our retrospective study, the combined analysis was more sensitive than cytological analysis alone (P < 0.01). The overall sensitivity of cytology, histology, and combined analysis was 69.8%, 67.2%, and 81.8%, respectively. In the prospective analysis, 64.2% of all punctures were helpful for determining the diagnosis and 40.7% provided sufficient tissue for IHC staining. Histological analysis was helpful for diagnosis in 74.7% of patients. IHC staining was necessary for a definite diagnosis in 11.4% of patients, especially in the cases of nonmalignant pancreatic mass. Histological analysis and IHC study of EUS-FNA specimens was useful for the accurate diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Combined analysis showed significantly higher sensitivity than cytology alone because IHC staining was helpful for a diagnosis in some patients. PMID:27227937

  10. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound for Preoperative Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-xin; Shan, Hong-bo; Luo, Guang-yu; Li, Yin; Lin, Shi-yong; Wang, Guo-bao; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guo-liang; Li, Jian-jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment options and prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) depend on the primary tumor depth (T-staging) and regional lymph node status (N-staging). Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as a useful staging tool, but studies regarding its benefits have been variable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS for detecting preoperative ESCC. Methods We included in our meta-analysis studies involving EUS-based staging of preoperative ESCC compared with pathological staging. Using a random-effects model, we performed a meta-analysis of the accuracy of EUS by calculating pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity and the diagnostic odds ratio. In addition, we created a summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Results Forty-four studies (n = 2880) met the inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of T1 were 77% (95%CI: 73 to 80) and 95% (95%CI: 94 to 96). Among the T1 patients, EUS had a pooled sensitivity in differentiating T1a and T1b of 84% (95%CI: 80 to 88) and 83% (95%CI: 80 to 86), and a specificity of 91% (95%CI: 88 to 94) and 89% (95%CI: 86 to 92). To stage T4, EUS had a pooled sensitivity of 84% (95%CI: 79 to 89) and a specificity of 96% (95%CI: 95 to 97). The overall accuracy of EUS for T-staging was 79% (95%CI: 77 to 80), and for N-staging, 71% (95%CI: 69 to 73). Conclusions EUS has good diagnostic accuracy for staging ESCC, which has better performance in T1 sub-staging (T1a and T1b) and advanced disease (T4). PMID:27387830

  12. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting. PMID:27541718

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas: An experimental study with pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, Bogdan Silviu; Pirici, Daniel; Mărgăritescu, Claudiu; Săndulescu, Larisa; Fronie, Simona; Pătraşcu, Ştefan; Şurlin, Valeriu; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of pancreatic cancer represents a major objective in clinical research, as it still remains the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths among men and women, with approximately 6% of all cancer-related deaths. Materials and Methods: We studied the assessment of an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) probe through a 19G needle in order to achieve a desirable necrosis area in the pancreas. Radiofrequency ablation of the head of the pancreas was performed on 10 Yorkshire pigs with a weight between 25 kg and 35 kg and a length of 40-70 cm. Using an EUS-guided RFA experimental probe, we ablated an area of 2-3 cm width. The biological samples were harvested after 3 days and 5 days and necropsy was performed 1 week after the procedure. Results: All pigs showed no significant change regarding their behavior and no signs of complication was encountered. Blood analysis revealed increased values of amylase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase on the 3rd day but a decrease on the 5th day. After necropsy and isolation of the pancreas, the ablated area was easily found, describing a solid necrosis. The pathological examination revealed a coagulative necrosis area with minimal invasion and inflammatory tissue at about 2 cm surrounding the lesion. Conclusion: EUS-RFA is a feasible technique and might represent a promising therapy for the future treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, further studies are necessary to investigate EUS-guided RFA as an option for palliation in pancreatic cancer until it can be successfully used in human patients. PMID:26643702

  14. Staging accuracy of esophageal cancer by endoscopic ultrasound: A meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Puli, Srinivas R; Reddy, Jyotsna BK; Bechtold, Matthew L; Antillon, Daphne; Ibdah, Jamal A; Antillon, Mainor R

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the staging of esophageal cancer. METHODS: Only EUS studies confirmed by surgery were selected. Articles were searched in Medline and Pubmed. Two reviewers independently searched and extracted data. Meta-analysis of the accuracy of EUS was analyzed by calculating pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio. Pooling was conducted by both the Mantel-Haenszel method (fixed effects model) and DerSimonian Laird method (random effects model). The heterogeneity of studies was tested using Cochran’s Q test based upon inverse variance weights. RESULTS: Forty-nine studies (n = 2558) which met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of EUS to diagnose T1 was 81.6% (95% CI: 77.8-84.9) and 99.4% (95% CI: 99.0-99.7), respectively. To diagnose T4, EUS had a pooled sensitivity of 92.4% (95% CI: 89.2-95.0) and specificity of 97.4% (95% CI: 96.6-98.0). With Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA), sensitivity of EUS to diagnose N stage improved from 84.7% (95% CI: 82.9-86.4) to 96.7% (95% CI: 92.4-98.9). The P value for the χ2 test of heterogeneity for all pooled estimates was > 0.10. CONCLUSION: EUS has excellent sensitivity and specificity in accurately diagnosing the TN stage of esophageal cancer. EUS performs better with advanced (T4) than early (T1) disease. FNA substantially improves the sensitivity and specificity of EUS in evaluating N stage disease. EUS should be strongly considered for staging esophageal cancer. PMID:18330935

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Self-Expandable Metal Stent Placement for the Treatment of Infected Pancreatic Pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Masrour, Farbod; Mallat, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The standard endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) approach of cystogastrostomy involves the use of series of plastic pigtail stents that are placed through the wall of the cyst. The use of a single stent has also been described in the literature. Here we describe five cases of EUS-guided cystogastrostomy with irrigation of infected pancreatic pseudocysts using a single self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). To our knowledge this has not been described in the literature in the United States. This novice approach will have significant implications in the management of infected pseudocysts with a lower morbidity, mortality and overall cost compared to conventional management such as surgery or percutaneous drainage.

  16. Efforts to improve the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Shibukawa, Goro; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is widely used to obtain a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Good results have been reported for its diagnostic accuracy, with high sensitivity and specificity of around 90%; however, technological developments and adaptations to improve it still further are currently underway. The endosonographic technique can be improved when several tips and tricks useful to overcome challenges of EUS-FNA are known. This review provides various techniques and equipment for improvement in the diagnostic accuracy in EUS-FNA. PMID:27503153

  17. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-11-23

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future.

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of the Pancreatic Tumors: A Promising Tool in Management of Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Radiofrequency ablation is a well-established antitumor treatment and is recognized as one of the least invasive therapeutic modalities for pancreatic neoplasm. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA) delivery can be used to treat both pancreatic cancer and asymptomatic premalignant pancreatic neoplasms and may serve as a less invasive alternative to surgical resection. This is an appealing option that may result in less morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided RFA of pancreatic neoplasms. Methods. A through literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this novel technique. In this review article, we have summarized human case series. The indications, techniques, limitations, and complications reported are discussed. Results. A total of six studies were included. Overall, a 100% technical success rate was reported in human studies. Complications related to endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation delivery have been described; however, few cases have presented life-threatening outcomes. Conclusion. We believe that this novel technique can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27478820

  19. Acquisition of Portal Venous Circulating Tumor Cells From Patients With Pancreaticobiliary Cancers by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Chapman, Christopher G.; Xu, Peng; Koons, Ann; Konda, Vani J.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Waxman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Tumor cells circulate in low numbers in peripheral blood; their detection is used predominantly in metastatic disease. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of sampling portal venous blood via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) to count portal venous circulating tumor cells (CTCs), compared with paired peripheral CTCs, in patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers (PBCs). METHODS In a single-center cohort study, we evaluated 18 patients with suspected PBCs. Under EUS guidance, a 19-gauge EUS fine needle was advanced transhepatically into the portal vein and as many as four 7.5-mL aliquots of blood were aspirated. Paired peripheral blood samples were obtained. Epithelial-derived CTCs were sorted magnetically based on expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecules; only those with a proper morphology and found to be CD45 negative and positive for cytokeratins 8, 18, and/ or 19 and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were considered to be CTCs. For 5 samples, CTCs also were isolated by flow cytometry and based on CD45 depletion. ImageStream was used to determine the relative protein levels of P16, SMAD4, and P53. DNA was extracted from CTCs for sequencing of select KRAS codons. RESULTS There were no complications from portal vein blood acquisition. We detected CTCs in portal vein samples from all 18 patients (100%) vs peripheral blood samples from only 4 patients (22.2%). Patients with confirmed PBCs had a mean of 118.4 ± 36.8 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood, compared with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.4 CTCs/7.5 mL peripheral blood (P < .01). The 9 patients with nonmetastatic, resectable, or borderline-resectable PBCs had a mean of 83.2 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood (median, 62.0 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood). In a selected patient, portal vein CTCs were found to carry the same mutations as those detected in a metastatic lymph node and expressed similar levels of P16, SMAD4, and P53 proteins. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible and safe to collect portal venous blood from

  20. Repeat endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration after a first negative procedure is useful in pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix I.; Martínez-Lozano, Jorge Adolfo; Rosales-Salinas, Anamaría; Bernal-Méndez, Ambrosio Rafael; Guerrero-Velásquez, Camilo; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no consensus about the ideal method for diagnosis in patients who have already undergone endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), and the inconclusive material is often obtained. The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of the second EUS-FNA of pancreatic lesions. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients with EUS-FNA of pancreatic lesions is performed. All patients who underwent more than one EUS-FNA for the evaluation of suspected pancreatic cancer over a 7-year period were included in the analysis. Results: A total of 296 EUS-FNAs of the pancreas were performed in 257 patients. The diagnostic yield with the first EUS-FNA was 78.6% (202/257). Thirty-nine (13.3%) FNAs were repeated in 34 patients; 17 (50%) patients were women. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 58.8 ± 16.1 years. The location of the lesions in the pancreatic gland, from which the second biopsies were taken, was head of the pancreas, n = 28 (82.4%), body of the pancreas, n = 3 (8.8%), and tail, n = 3 (8.8%). The mean ± SD of the size of the lesion was 36.3 ± 14.6 mm. The second EUS-FNA was more likely to be positive for diagnosis in patients with an “atypical“ histological result in the first EUS-FNA (odds ratio [OR]: 4.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9–18.3), in contrast to patients with a first EUS-FNA reported as “normal” (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.06–0.71). Overall, the diagnostic yield of the second EUS-FNA was 58.8% (20/34) with an increase to 86.3% overall (222/257). Conclusion: Repeat EUS-FNA in pancreatic lesions is necessary in patients with a negative first EUS-FNA because it improves the diagnostic yield. PMID:27503159

  1. Performance characteristic of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is unaffected by pancreatic mass size

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Kim, Hwasoon; Reddy, Kartika; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Despite a well-established tool for diagnosis of pancreatic masses, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) studies have shown suboptimal diagnostic performance at divergent mass sizes. Since the impact of gold standard follow-up and presence of on-site evaluation on this observation is unknown, we aimed to study the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA under these strict conditions. Patients and methods: EUS-FNA results from pancreatic mass lesions performed between July 2000 and March 2013 were evaluated. All patients with histological follow-up were then stratified into four groups: Group A ( ≤ 10 mm), Group B (11 – 20 mm), Group C (21 – 40 mm), and Group D (> 40 mm). Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for each group and compared. Results: A total of 612 /3832 (16 %) patients with pancreatic masses who underwent EUS-FNA had histology confirmation. Of these, 81 were excluded due to unavailable lesion size, while the rest formed the study cohort. Mean age (SD) was 65.8 years (9.3) with 51.2 % female. The mean number of passes for the entire cohort was 2.9 (SD 1.9; range 1 – 12); patients in group D had a significantly higher number of passes for on-site diagnosis (P = 0.0124). There was no significant difference between the groups for sensitivity (P = 0.1134) or diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.2111). Proportional trend analysis revealed no significant correlation between size and sensitivity (P = 0.6192). The size of lesion measured by EUS was not associated with sensitivity or specificity after adjusting for age, sex, and pancreatic location. Conclusion: In the presence of rapid on-site cytopathology and when final histology is taken as the gold standard, pancreatic mass size does not affect the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA. PMID:27092323

  2. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an accurate technique for sampling the pancreas and mediastinum; however, limited data are available for other mass lesions. The aim of this study was to explore the value of EUS-FNA in the differential diagnosis of all mass lesions. Data from patients who underwent EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of mass lesions, including pancreatic, mediastinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The accuracy was calculated by comparing the results of FNA with the results of pathological examination or follow-up surveillances in non-operated cases. A total of 150 cases were included. The location of the mass varied from the pancreas (n=62) to the mediastinum (n=29), gastrointestinal tract (n=36), celiac cavity and retroperitoneum (n=23). The sensitivity and Youdens index of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of all lesions were 92.97% and 0.93 respectively. The accuracy of diagnosis of pancreatic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions was 85.48, 89.66, 83.33 and 78.23%, respectively. Masses were categorized into parenchymal organs (n=66), luminal organs (n=36) and enlarged lymph nodes (n=33). Lesions in parenchymal organs were likely to be bigger than those in luminal organs (P=0.03) and enlarged lymph nodes (P=0.01). For solid and cystic masses, which constituted 63.3 and 14.7% of the total masses, no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed (P=0.56); however, lesion sizes were significantly different between these two groups (P=0.04) and the majority of cystic masses were identified in women (P=0.03). Malignant lesions were more common in older (P=0.01) and male (P=0.03) patients. In conclusion, EUS-FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of unexplained mass lesions; it influences the management of patients by enabling the appropriate treatment to be identified. PMID:27446324

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae.

  4. Sonographic Elastography of the Thyroid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Duymus, Mahmut; Avcu, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thyroid gland disorders include benign and malignant thyroid nodules and diffuse thyroid disorders. The incidence of malignant thyroid nodules is low and the prognosis is good. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer and diffuse parenchymal disorders is generally based on clinical manifestations and histopathological evaluation. Ultrasonography has its place in the diagnostics and follow-up of thyroid disorders. Ultrasonographic elastography is a new, developing method that shows increase in clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to review the data on thyroid ultrasound elastography. PMID:27103947

  5. Two-dimensional ultrasound and ultrasound elastography imaging of trigger points in women with myofascial pain syndrome treated by acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Cristina Emöke Erika; Aranha, Maria Fernanda Montans; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2015-04-01

    Chronic pain has been often associated with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), which is determined by myofascial trigger points (MTrP). New features have been tested for MTrP diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate two-dimensional ultrasonography (2D US) and ultrasound elastography (UE) images and elastograms of upper trapezius MTrP during electroacupuncture (EA) and acupuncture (AC) treatment. 24 women participated, aged between 20 and 40 years (M ± SD = 27.33 ± 5.05) with a body mass index ranging from 18.03 to 27.59 kg/m2 (22.59 ± 3.11), a regular menstrual cycle, at least one active MTrP at both right (RTPz) and left trapezius (LTPz) and local or referred pain for up to six months. Subjects were randomized into EA and AC treatment groups and the control sham AC (SHAM) group. Intensity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale; MTrP mean area and strain ratio (SR) by 2D US and UE. A significant decrease of intensity in general, RTPz, and LTPz pain was observed in the EA group (p = 0.027; p < 0.001; p = 0.005, respectively) and in general pain in the AC group (p < 0.001). Decreased MTrP area in RTPz and LTPz were observed in AC (p < 0.001) and EA groups (RTPz, p = 0.003; LTPz, p = 0.005). Post-treatment SR in RTPz and LTPz was lower than pre-treatment in both treatment groups. 2D US and UE effectively characterized MTrP and surrounding tissue, pointing to the possibility of objective confirmation of subjective EA and AC treatment effects.

  6. Texture generation in compressional photoacoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, J. W.; Zabihian, B.; Widlak, T.; Glatz, T.; Liu, M.; Drexler, W.; Scherzer, O.

    2015-03-01

    Elastography is implemented by applying a mechanical force to a specimen and visualizing the resulting displacement. As a basis of elastographic imaging typically ultrasound, optical coherence tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are used. Photoacoustics has not been viewed as a primary imaging modality for elastography, but only as a complementary method to enhance the contrast in ultrasound elastography. The reason is that photoacoustics is considered speckle free [3], which hinders application of speckle tracking algorithms. However, while conventional ultrasound only uses a single frequency, photoacoustics utilizes a broad frequency spectrum. We are therefore able to generate artificial texture by using a frequency band limited part of the recorded data. In this work we try to assess the applicability of this technique to photoacoustic tomography. We use Agar phantoms with predefined Young's moduli and laterally apply a 50μm static compression. Pre- and post compression data are recorded via a Fabry Pérot interferometer planar sensor setup and reconstructed via a non-uniform-FFT reconstruction algorithm. A displacement vector field, between pre- and post compressed data is then determined via optical flow algorithms. While the implementation of texture generation during post processing reduces image quality overall, it turns out that it improves the detection of moving patterns and is therefore better suited for elastography.

  7. What we need to know when performing and interpreting US elastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, So Yeon; Suh, Chong Hyun; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    According to the increasing need for accurate staging of hepatic fibrosis, the ultrasound (US) elastography techniques have evolved significantly over the past two decades. Currently, US elastography is increasingly used in clinical practice. Previously published studies have demonstrated the excellent diagnostic performance of US elastography for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Although US elastography may seem easy to perform and interpret, there are many technical and clinical factors which can affect the results of US elastography. Therefore, clinicians who are involved with US elastography should be aware of these factors. The purpose of this article is to present a brief overview of US techniques with the relevant technology, the clinical indications, diagnostic performance, and technical and biological factors which should be considered in order to avoid misinterpretation of US elastography results. PMID:27729637

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture suture device versus metal clip for gastric defect closure after endoscopic full-thickness resection: A randomized, comparative, porcine study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beibei; Guo, Jintao; Ge, Nan; Sun, Siyu; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Guoxin; Feng, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The secure closure of the wall defect is a critical stage of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR). The aim of this study was to compare the closure of post-EFTR defects using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture suture device (PSD) with the metal clip (MC) technique in a randomized, comparative, porcine study. Methods: We performed a randomized comparative survival study that included 18 pigs. The circular EFTR defects with a diameter of approximately 20 mm were closed with either a PSD or MC. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined preoperatively and on a postoperative day (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Three animals from each group were sacrificed at the end of the 7th, 14th, and 30th POD. Tissue samples retrieved from the closure sites were examined macroscopically and microscopically. Results: Resection and closure were performed in 18 pigs (100%) without major perioperative complications. The mean closure time was significantly longer in the MC group than in the PSD group (25.00 ± 3.16 min vs. 1.56 ± 0.39 min; P < 0.05). Preoperative and POD 7 serum levels of IL-6 did not differ between the two groups. However, on POD 1, the IL-6 levels were observed to be significantly greater in the MC group than in the PSD group (P < 0.005). No significant differences between the PSD and MC groups were observed at necropsy. Conclusion: In this in vivo porcine model, PSD is a feasible device that achieves post-EFTR defect closure with a much shorter closure time and with less immunological responses than the MC technique. PMID:27503160

  9. A randomized controlled cross-over trial and cost analysis comparing endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration and fine needle biopsy*

    PubMed Central

    Aadam, A. Aziz; Wani, Sachin; Amick, Ashley; Shah, Janak N.; Bhat, Yasser M.; Hamerski, Christopher M.; Klapman, Jason B.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Watson, Rabindra R.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Keswani, Rajesh N.; Keefer, Laurie; Das, Ananya; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Techniques to optimize endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition (EUS-TA) in a variety of lesion types have not yet been established. The primary aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic yield (DY) of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for pancreatic and non-pancreatic masses. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients referred for EUS-TA underwent randomization to EUS-FNA or EUS-FNB at four tertiary-care medical centers. A maximum of three passes were allowed for the initial method of EUS-TA and patients were crossed over to the other arm based on on-site specimen adequacy. Results: A total of 140 patients were enrolled. The overall DY was significantly higher with specimens obtained by EUS-FNB compared to EUS-FNA (90.0 % vs. 67.1 %, P = 0.002). While there was no difference in the DY between the two groups for pancreatic masses (FNB: 91.7 % vs. FNA: 78.4 %, P = 0.19), the DY of EUS-FNB was higher than the EUS-FNA for non-pancreatic lesions (88.2 % vs. 54.5 %, P = 0.006). Specimen adequacy was higher for EUS-FNB compared to EUS-FNA for all lesions (P = 0.006). There was a significant rescue effect of crossover from failed FNA to FNB in 27 out of 28 cases (96.5 %, P = 0.0003). Decision analysis showed that the strategy of EUS-FNB was cost saving compared to EUS-FNA over a wide range of cost and outcome probabilities. Conclusions: Results of this RCT and decision analysis demonstrate superior DY and specimen adequacy for solid mass lesions sampled by EUS-FNB. PMID:27227104

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract using a curved-array transducer. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vilmann, P; Khattar, S; Hancke, S

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound examination (EUS) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract for the assessment of mural and extramural pathology has attracted growing international interest in recent years. Since February 1989, EUS has been performed on selected patients in our institution using a new Picker-Pentax fiber-optic ultrasound (US) gastroscope. The instrument consists of a forward-view fiber-optic gastroscope with a 5-MHz curved-array linear US transducer mounted directly behind the lens. The scanning plane lies in the long axis of the scope. Based on in vitro US examinations and EUS of 118 patients over an 18-month period, our preliminary experience with the instrument is described. Using EUS, various lesions in the esophageal wall as well as in the gastric and duodenal walls can be visualized. Furthermore, organs and structures outside the GI tract can be seen, and lesions such as enlarged lymph nodes in the mediastinum and abdomen; solid and cystic masses in the liver, pancreas and retroperitoneum; arterial aneurysms; esophageal varices; and gall stones and calcifications can be demonstrated. The 5-MHz transducer does not provide very detailed information on the GI wall. The direction of the ultrasound scanning planes is difficult to define, as the transducer cannot be seen through the optic lens. The method demands great expertise in endoscopy and ultrasound. Indications for EUS have not been definitively established. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of this technique requires further controlled studies. We believe that EUS using a curved-array linear transducer will provide significant diagnostic information of clinical relevance to gastroenterology. PMID:1948619

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Pancreatic Lesions: A Systematic Review of Technical and Procedural Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bhairvi S.; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Lim, Diego; Rastogi, Amit; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition has emerged over the last decade as an invaluable diagnostic tool in approaching the different pancreatic lesions. Given the safety and minimal invasiveness of this approach combined with the high diagnostic yield, it became the standard of care when dealing with different pancreatic pathologies. However, some variables regarding this procedure remain not fully understood. These can influence the diagnostic yield of the procedure and include the presence of the on-site cytopathologist, the type and size of the needle used as well as obtaining aspiration versus core biopsy, the number of passes and the sampling technique, and the role of suction and stylet use among others. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase for studies that assessed these variables. Eligible studies were analyzed using several parameters such as technique and procedure, with the aim of reviewing results from an evidence-based standpoint. PMID:27011940

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Pancreatic Lesions: A Systematic Review of Technical and Procedural Variables.

    PubMed

    Jani, Bhairvi S; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Lim, Diego; Rastogi, Amit; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition has emerged over the last decade as an invaluable diagnostic tool in approaching the different pancreatic lesions. Given the safety and minimal invasiveness of this approach combined with the high diagnostic yield, it became the standard of care when dealing with different pancreatic pathologies. However, some variables regarding this procedure remain not fully understood. These can influence the diagnostic yield of the procedure and include the presence of the on-site cytopathologist, the type and size of the needle used as well as obtaining aspiration versus core biopsy, the number of passes and the sampling technique, and the role of suction and stylet use among others. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase for studies that assessed these variables. Eligible studies were analyzed using several parameters such as technique and procedure, with the aim of reviewing results from an evidence-based standpoint.

  13. The value of endoscopic ultrasound in a 47-year-old man with cystic lesions of the liver and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Alizadeh, Amir Houshang; Parhizkar, Baran; Rajabalinia, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), like other tumors, are clinically silent, producing symptoms only as a consequence of tumor growth. Pancreatic NETs account for only 1% of pancreatic cancers by incidence, while representing 10% of all pancreatic cancers by 28-year limited duration prevalence. Here, we present a 47-year-old man with abdominal pain, icterus, itching and 8 kg weight loss during 5 months. Elevated liver enzymes, direct bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase were observed. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a prominence at the head of the pancreas and also liver cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound of the pancreas was performed and a specimen was obtained via fine needle aspiration. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and the result was compatible with NET. The patient referred to receive chemotherapy.

  14. Integration of single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy into ultrasound-guided endoscopic lung cancer staging of mediastinal lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; van der Leest, Cor; Aerts, Joachim G. J. V.; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Kaščáková, Slávka; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of a single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy probe into the endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) procedure utilized for lung cancer staging. A mathematical model is developed to extract information about the physiological and morphological properties of lymph tissue from single-fiber reflectance spectra, e.g., microvascular saturation, blood volume fraction, bilirubin concentration, average vessel diameter, and Mie slope. Model analysis of data from a clinical pilot study shows that the single-fiber reflectance measurement is capable of detecting differences in the physiology between normal and metastatic lymph nodes. Moreover, the clinical data show that probe manipulation within the lymph node can perturb the in vivo environment, a concern that must be carefully considered when developing a sampling strategy. The data show the feasibility of this novel technique; however, the potential clinical utility has yet to be determined.

  15. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  16. What are the current and potential future roles for endoscopic ultrasound in the treatment of pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Stephen Y; Irani, Shayan; Kozarek, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Due to the aggressive tumor biology and late manifestations of the disease, long-term survival is extremely uncommon and the current 5-year survival rate is 7%. Over the last two decades, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a diagnostic modality to a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative to radiologic procedures and surgery for pancreatic diseases. EUS-guided celiac plexus intervention is a useful adjunct to conventional analgesia for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided biliary drainage has emerged as a viable option in patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Recently, the use of lumen-apposing metal stent to create gastrojejunal anastomosis under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction has been reported. On the other hand, anti-tumor therapies delivered by EUS, such as the injection of anti-tumor agents, brachytherapy and ablations are still in the experimental stage without clear survival benefit. In this article, we provide updates on well-established EUS-guided interventions as well as novel techniques relevant to pancreatic cancer. PMID:27076870

  17. Foregut duplication of the stomach diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gastric duplication cyst (GDC) with a pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium is an uncommon malformation supposed to originate from a respiratory diverticulum arising from the ventral foregut. Morphologic appearance of GDCs is variable, depending on the density of their contents. GDCs are often misdiagnosed as solid masses by imaging techniques, and as a consequence they may be wrongly overtreated. We report our case of a 56-year-old man with a 5 cm hypoechoic mass of the gastroesophageal junction, incidentally detected by transabdominal ultrasonography. Neither transabdominal ultrasonography nor magnetic resonance clearly outlined the features of the lesion. The patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), which showed a hypoechoic mass arising from the fourth layer of the anterior gastric wall, just below the gastroesophageal junction. According to EUS features, a diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor was suggested. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed a diagnosis of GDC with pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium. We therefore performed an endoscopically-assisted laparoscopic excision of the cyst. In conclusion, whenever a subepithelial gastric mass is found in the upper part of the gastric wall, a duplication cyst, although rare, should be considered. In this case, EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology could provide a cytological diagnosis useful to arrange in advance the more adequate surgical treatment. PMID:23374143

  18. Foregut duplication of the stomach diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Vincenzo; Pezzullo, Angelo M; Zeppa, Pio; Schettino, Pietro; D'Armiento, Maria; Palazzo, Antonietta; Della Pietra, Cristina; Napolitano, Salvatore; Conzo, Giovanni

    2013-02-02

    Gastric duplication cyst (GDC) with a pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium is an uncommon malformation supposed to originate from a respiratory diverticulum arising from the ventral foregut. Morphologic appearance of GDCs is variable, depending on the density of their contents. GDCs are often misdiagnosed as solid masses by imaging techniques, and as a consequence they may be wrongly overtreated. We report our case of a 56-year-old man with a 5 cm hypoechoic mass of the gastroesophageal junction, incidentally detected by transabdominal ultrasonography. Neither transabdominal ultrasonography nor magnetic resonance clearly outlined the features of the lesion. The patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), which showed a hypoechoic mass arising from the fourth layer of the anterior gastric wall, just below the gastroesophageal junction. According to EUS features, a diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor was suggested. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed a diagnosis of GDC with pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium. We therefore performed an endoscopically-assisted laparoscopic excision of the cyst.In conclusion, whenever a subepithelial gastric mass is found in the upper part of the gastric wall, a duplication cyst, although rare, should be considered. In this case, EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology could provide a cytological diagnosis useful to arrange in advance the more adequate surgical treatment.

  19. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-01-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  20. Feasibility and safety of using Soehendra stent retriever as a new technique for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and safety of the use of soehendra stent retriever as a new technique for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage. METHODS: The medical records and endoscopic reports of the patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) owing to failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in our institute between June 2011 and January 2014 were collected and reviewed. All the procedures were performed in the endoscopic suite under intravenous sedation with propofol and full anaesthetic monitoring. Then we used the Soehendra stent retriever as new equipment for neo-tract creation and dilation when performing EUS-BD procedures. The patients were observed in the recovery room for 1-2 h and transferred to the regular ward, patients’ clinical data were reviewed and analysed, clinical outcomes were defined by using several different criteria. Data were analysed by using SPSS 13 and presented as percentages, means, and medians. RESULTS: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. The most common indications for EUS-BD in this series were failed common bile duct cannulation, duodenal obstruction, failed selective intrahepatic duct cannulation, and surgical altered anatomy for 50%, 25%, 16.7%, and 8.3%, respectively. Seven patients underwent EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (58.3%), and 5 underwent EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy (41.7%). The technical success rate was 100%, while the clinical success rate was 91.7%. Major and minor complications occurred in 16.6% and 33.3% of patients, respectively, but there were no procedure-related death. CONCLUSION: Soehendra stent retriever could be used as an alternative instrument for biliary access in endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage. PMID:25759542

  1. Prostate elastography: preliminary in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, S. K.; Feleppa, E. J.; Kalisz, A.; Ramchandran, S.; Ennis, R. D.; Lizzi, Frederick L.; Wuu, C.-S.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-01

    We report preliminary results from our investigation of in vivo prostate elastography. Fewer than 50% of all prostate cancers are typically visible in current clinical imaging modalities. Elastography displays a map of strain that results when tissue is externally compressed. Thus, elastography is ideal for imaging prostate cancers because they are generally stiffer than the surrounding tissue and stiffer regions usually exhibit lower strain in elastograms. In our study, digital radio-frequency (RF) ultrasound echo data were acquired from prostate-cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy. Seed placement is guided by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe, which is held in a mechanical fixture. The probe can be moved in XYZ directions and tilted. The probe face, in contact with the rectal wall, is used to apply a compression force to the immediately adjacent prostate. We also used a water-filled (acoustic) coupling balloon to compress the prostate by increasing the water volume inside the balloon. In each scan plane (transverse), we acquired RF data from successive scans at the scanner frame rate as the deformation force on the rectal wall was continuously increased. We computed strain using 1D RF cross-correlation analysis. The compression method based on fixture displacement produced low-noise elastograms that beautifully displayed the prostate architecture and emphasized stiff areas. Balloon-based compression also produced low-noise elastograms. Initial results demonstrate that elastography may be useful in the detection and evaluation of prostate cancers, occult in conventional imaging modalities.

  2. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86

  3. Enabling technologies for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (N.O.T.E.S) using robotically guided elasticity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, H. T.; Deshmukh, Nishikant; Goldman, Roger; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad; Simaan, Nabil

    2012-02-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (N.O.T.E.S) is a minimally invasive surgical technique that could benefit greatly from additional methods for intraoperative detection of tissue malignancies (using elastography) along with more precise control of surgical tools. Ultrasound elastography has proven itself as an invaluable imaging modality. However, elasticity images typically suffer from low contrast when imaging organs from the surface of the body. In addition, the palpation motions needed to generate elastography images useful for identifying clinically significant changes in tissue properties are difficult to produce because they require precise axial displacements along the imaging plane. Improvements in elasticity imaging necessitate an approach that simultaneously removes the need for imaging from the body surface while providing more precise palpation motions. As a first step toward performing N.O.T.E.S in-vivo, we integrated a phased ultrasonic micro-array with a flexible snake-like robot. The integrated system is used to create elastography images of a spherical isoechoic lesion (approximately 5mm in cross-section) in a tissue-mimicking phantom. Images are obtained by performing robotic palpation of the phantom at the location of the lesion.

  4. Techniques of imaging of the aorta and its first order branches by endoscopic ultrasound (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Mehta, Varun; Rameshbabu, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a useful modality for imaging of the blood vessels of the mediastinum and abdomen. The aorta acts as an important home base during EUS imaging. The aorta and its branches are accessible by standard angiographic methods, but endosonography also provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the aorta and its branches. This article describes the techniques of imaging of different part of the aorta by EUS. PMID:26020043

  5. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies. PMID:27679731

  6. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Dong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies. PMID:27679731

  7. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  8. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Dong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  9. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015 PMID:27652305

  10. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Ethanol Ablation Therapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Mizukawa, Sho; Yabe, Syuntaro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) has been reported. However, the efficacy and safety of the technique remain unclear. We have launched a prospective pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol ablation for p-NETs. The major eligibility criteria are the presence of a pathologically diagnosed grade (G) 1 or G2 p-NET, a tumor size of 2cm, and being a poor candidate for surgery. A total of 5 patients will be treated. The primary endpoint will be the complete ablation rate at 1 month after treatment. PMID:27549680

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Liver Biopsy in the Hands of a Chest Physician.

    PubMed

    Fally, Markus; Nessar, Rafi; Behrendt, Nille; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2016-01-01

    Liver biopsy using transesophageal bronchoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-B-FNA) has never been described before and biopsies of infradiaphragmatic lesions using this technique are not considered to be standard. A patient suspected for primary lung cancer with multiple lesions in the liver was referred to our department. We conducted bronchoscopy and endobronchial ultrasound-guided (EBUS) biopsy from several enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. Thereafter, we conducted EUS-B-FNA from a lesion in the left liver lobe. Pathology showed that the liver lesion represented a metastasis from a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Bronchoscopy and EBUS samples were not able to establish diagnosis. We hereby demonstrated that a diagnostic EUS-B-FNA from a liver metastasis in a patient with lung cancer is possible. This underlines that chest physicians should not forget the esophagus when staging lung cancer. PMID:27287428

  13. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine-needle cytology in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis: A Saudi experience

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad; Alhamad, Esam H.; Zaidi, Shaesta Naseem; Arafah, Maha; AlHabeeb, Fatmah Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine-needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) is a minimally invasive technique for diagnosis of mediastinal masses/lesions. Although most studies have reported the utility of EBUS-TFNA in malignancy, its use has been extended to the benign conditions as well. Objective: The present study focused on utility of EBUS in contributing to reach the final diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Design: From May 2010 to December 2013, 19 of 80 patients who underwent EBUS-TFNA at one center for radiologically suspicious lesions for sarcoidosis, and with no definite histological diagnosis, were included in this retrospective study. Results: When the histological diagnosis was taken as the gold standard, the sensitivity of EBUS-TFNA was 84.2% and specificity 100% with the positive predictive value of 100. The combined diagnostic sensitivity of EBUS-TFNA and transbronchial lung biopsy was 100%. Conclusion: EBUS is a valuable, minimally invasive diagnostic modality to support the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in appropriate clinical setting, after conventional work-up – particularly if patients have suspicious radiological findings. This minimally invasive procedure helps in providing a final diagnosis without exposing the patient to the risk of complications from more invasive procedures. PMID:25558271

  14. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound for staging of colonic cancer proximal to the rectum: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of colonic cancer patients is highly dependent on the depth of tumor invasion (T-stage) as well as the extension of lymph node involvement (N-stage). We aimed to systematically review the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for staging of colonic cancer proximal to the rectum. Patients and Methods: Men and women with colonic adenocarcinomas were included in the study. EUS staging was compared to histopathology as the gold standard. Outcome measures were T- and N-staging accuracies. Articles were searched in PubMed, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and EMBASE. Results: Six studies were identified comparing EUS staging of colonic cancer to histopathology. The pooled-staging sensitivity and specificity were 0.90 and 0.98 for T1 tumors, 0.67 and 0.96 for T2 tumors, and 0.97 and 0.83 for T3/T4 tumors, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for N + disease were 0.59 and 0.78, respectively. Conclusions: EUS is a feasible method for T-staging of cancers of the colon proximal to the rectum. The accuracy of lymph node staging needs to be verified by prospective multicenter studies including larger patient populations. PMID:27803903

  16. Usefulness of strain elastography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a widely used technique for assessing the mechanical characteristics of tissues. Although there are several ultrasound elastography techniques, strain elastography (SE) is currently the most widely used technique for visualizing an elastographic map in real time. Among its various indications, SE is especially useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal system. In this article, we review the SE techniques for clinical practice and describe the images produced by these techniques in the context of the musculoskeletal system. SE provides information about tissue stiffness and allows real-time visualization of the image; however, SE cannot completely replace gray-scale, color, or power Doppler ultrasonography. SE can increase diagnostic accuracy and may be useful for the follow-up of benign lesions. PMID:26810195

  17. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  18. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two- ... sound waves and appear dark or black. An ultrasound can supply vital information about a mother's pregnancy ...

  19. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures.

  20. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  1. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with endoscopic ultrasound for the treatment of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2000-05-01

    In 1995, PDT was approved for palliative use in patients with esophageal cancer. We report our experience using PDT to treat esophageal cancer patients previously treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In our series, nine patients referred for PDT with persistent esophageal cancer after chemo-radiation therapy. We found: (1) All patients were men with a mean age of 63 years and eight out of nine had adenocarcinoma with Barrett's esophagus; (2) All patients required endoscopic dilation after PDT; (3) At a mean follow up of 4 months, two T2N0 patients had no demonstrable tumor and all three T3N0 patients had greater than 50% tumor reduction (the partially responsive T3N0 patients will be offered repeat PDT); (4) Patients with metastatic disease (T3N1 or M1) had effective dysphagia palliation. Thus, PDT is safe and effective in ablating all or most tumor in patients with persistent esophageal cancer after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  2. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; He, Xu; Tian, Chuan; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  3. The role of endoscopic ultrasound on the preoperative T staging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Shi, Huiying; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is used for preoperative assessment of gastric cancer. However, recent studies suggested that EUS staging accuracy is lower than previously thought. We aimed to assess EUS efficacy and image characteristics in preoperative gastric cancer T staging. A retrospective review of clinical and imaging features of 232 gastric carcinoma patients who underwent preoperative EUS assessment of T stage was performed. Only cases with tumor-free resection margin status and no metastases were enrolled. Comparisons of preoperative EUS and postoperative histopathological stagings were also performed to identify vital EUS image features for evaluating gastric carcinoma. EUS accuracy for T staging was 64.2% (149/232) with the highest accuracy for T3 (75.0%). Enlarged lymph nodes, well differentiated histological type and Borrmann IV type were associated with diagnostic accuracy in predicting tumor invasion. Although no factors were associated with overstaging, circumferential lesions ≥1/2, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type had significantly higher risks of understaging. Gastric wall outer edge irregularity was also an indicator of serosal involvement with a sensitivity of 82.0%. The pancreas and colon were more frequent disease extension sites than previously predicted. Although EUS is likely the best and most accurate option that we have used to stage gastric cancer, the finding that factors including circumferential lesions, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type carcinoma were more frequently related to incorrect staging warrants attention. PMID:27603347

  4. The role of endoscopic ultrasound on the preoperative T staging of gastric cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Shi, Huiying; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is used for preoperative assessment of gastric cancer. However, recent studies suggested that EUS staging accuracy is lower than previously thought. We aimed to assess EUS efficacy and image characteristics in preoperative gastric cancer T staging.A retrospective review of clinical and imaging features of 232 gastric carcinoma patients who underwent preoperative EUS assessment of T stage was performed. Only cases with tumor-free resection margin status and no metastases were enrolled. Comparisons of preoperative EUS and postoperative histopathological stagings were also performed to identify vital EUS image features for evaluating gastric carcinoma.EUS accuracy for T staging was 64.2% (149/232) with the highest accuracy for T3 (75.0%). Enlarged lymph nodes, well differentiated histological type and Borrmann IV type were associated with diagnostic accuracy in predicting tumor invasion. Although no factors were associated with overstaging, circumferential lesions ≥1/2, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type had significantly higher risks of understaging. Gastric wall outer edge irregularity was also an indicator of serosal involvement with a sensitivity of 82.0%. The pancreas and colon were more frequent disease extension sites than previously predicted.Although EUS is likely the best and most accurate option that we have used to stage gastric cancer, the finding that factors including circumferential lesions, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type carcinoma were more frequently related to incorrect staging warrants attention. PMID:27603347

  5. Use of a novel covered self-expandable metal stent with an anti-migration system for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Villalobos-Garita, Alvaro; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2013-06-16

    The development of pseudocysts in patients with chronic pancreatitis has been reported in 23%-60% of cases and drainage is indicated when they become symptomatic. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage with the placement of plastic or metallic stents to create a cystogastric anastomosis has been shown to be a reliable and efficacious maneuver. Metallic stent use appears to be a safe and effective alternative that shortens the length of time of the procedure and maintains a greater diameter in the cystogastric communication. However, important migration rates have been reported. The use of new metallic stents that are specially designed to prevent migration represents a promising development in the treatment of these group of patients that appears to be safe and effective for pseudocyst drainage and could importantly reduce migration rates, while at the same time having the advantage of a single step procedure and a larger fistula diameter in the endoscopic cystogastric anastomosis.

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Pancreatic Duct Drainage: The Basics of When and How to Perform EUS-Guided Pancreatic Duct Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Waxman, Irving; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic duct drainage (EUS-PDD) remains a technically challenging procedure. Technical success rates are greater than 70%; however, the average rate of adverse events is nearly 20%, which increases to 55% when stent migration is included. Until recently, a significant difficulty with this technique was the absence of dedicated devices. Proper patient selection is of utmost importance, and EUS-PDD should be reserved for patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Furthermore, EUS-PDD must be performed by experienced endoscopists who are familiar with the technique. The most common indications include chronic pancreatitis induced strictures and stones, disconnected pancreatic ducts, inaccessible ampulla, and post-surgical altered anatomy. This manuscript will review the accessories used, techniques employed, and published literature reporting outcomes as well as adverse events regarding EUS-PDD. PMID:27012290

  7. Use of a novel covered self-expandable metal stent with an anti-migration system for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Villalobos-Garita, Álvaro; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The development of pseudocysts in patients with chronic pancreatitis has been reported in 23%-60% of cases and drainage is indicated when they become symptomatic. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage with the placement of plastic or metallic stents to create a cystogastric anastomosis has been shown to be a reliable and efficacious maneuver. Metallic stent use appears to be a safe and effective alternative that shortens the length of time of the procedure and maintains a greater diameter in the cystogastric communication. However, important migration rates have been reported. The use of new metallic stents that are specially designed to prevent migration represents a promising development in the treatment of these group of patients that appears to be safe and effective for pseudocyst drainage and could importantly reduce migration rates, while at the same time having the advantage of a single step procedure and a larger fistula diameter in the endoscopic cystogastric anastomosis. PMID:23772268

  8. Pathologic evaluation of a new endoscopic ultrasound needle designed to obtain core tissue samples: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas G.; Witt, Benjamin; Chadwick, Barbara; Wells, Jason; Taylor, Linda Jo; Dimaio, Christopher; Schmidt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Standard endoscopic ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) needles are in widespread use. Meaningful differences between the available needles have been difficult to identify. Recently, a new EUS needle (Shark Core®, Covidien, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland), has been introduced in an attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy, tissue yield, and to potentially obtain a core tissue sample. We performed a pilot study prospectively to evaluate this new needle when compared to a standard EUS-FNA needle. Materials and Methods: Analysis of the first 15 patients undergoing EUS-FNA with the Shark Core needle was performed and it was compared to EUS-FNA in 15 patients who underwent EUS-FNA with a standard needle. Results: The Shark Core needle required fewer needle passes to obtain diagnostic adequacy than the standard needle [(χ2(1) = 11.3, P < 0.001]. The Shark Core needle required 1.5 passes to reach adequacy, whereas the standard needle required three passes. For cases with cell blocks, the Shark Core needle produced diagnostic material in 85% of cases [95% confidence interval (CI): 54–98], whereas the standard needle produced diagnostic material in 38% of the cases (95% CI: 9-76). The Shark Core needle produced actual tissue cores 82% of the time (95% CI: 48–98) and the standard needle produced no tissue cores (95% CI: 0-71) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: This pilot study found that the Shark Core needle had a high rate of producing adequate cytologic material for the diagnosis of pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions sampled by EUS with fewer passes required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and with a high rate of tissue cores being obtained when compared to a standard FNA needle. PMID:27386475

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement for image-guided radiation therapy without fluoroscopy: safety and technical feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Dhadham, Gautamy Chitiki; Hoffe, Sarah; Harris, Cynthia L.; Klapman, Jason B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fiducial marker placement for image-guided radiation treatment (IGRT) is becoming more widespread. Most case series report the procedure performed using fluoroscopy for spatial geometry although the benefits of this are unclear. The aim of our study is to report the technical feasibility, safety, and migration rate of fiducial marker placement in a large cohort of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies who underwent EUS-guided fiducial marker placement for IGRT without fluoroscopy. Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients referred for EUS-guided fiducial marker placement from 08/1/07 to 7/31/14 at Moffitt Cancer Center. Results: During the study period, 514 patients underwent placement of 1093 gold fiducial markers under EUS-guidance. Two hundred and forty patients with esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancer had 405 fiducials placed. In 188 patients with pancreatic ancer, 510 fiducials were placed. In 54 patients with rectal cancer, 103 fiducials were placed and 32 patients had 75 fiducials placed into other gastrointestinal tract lesions. Minor bleeding, which resolved spontaneously, occurred in two patients. Technical difficulty in placing fiducials was noted in 18 patients. Intraprocedural fiducial migration was noted in two patients and only 2/1093 fiducials (.002%) in two esophageal patients migrated as noted on simulation computed tomography scan. Conclusions: EUS-guided fiducial marker placement without fluoroscopy is technically feasible and safe. There were minimal intraprocedure/post-procedure complications. Imaging at the time of simulation also revealed the migration rate to be extremely low. These results may allow for more widespread adoption of EUS-guided fiducial marker placement. PMID:27004258

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration: A novel way to diagnose a solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Husney, Jack; Guttmann, Steven; Anyadike, Nnaemeka; Mayer, Ira; Rahmani, Rabin

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoma is a neoplastic production of a single line of plasma cells, usually forming monoclonal immunoglobulin. It most often occurs in the bone marrow; however, in 3% of the cases, solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma arises, which is a proliferation in the soft tissue, outside the bone marrow. In only 10% of the cases is the gastrointestinal tract involved. A 77-year-old female presented with lethargy, abdominal fullness, bilious vomiting, and clay-colored stools. The patient was anemic with initial laboratory results showing increased total and direct bilirubin with elevated transaminases. Despite conservative management, liver function tests (LFTs) continued to increase. On endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), there was mild diffuse mucosal thickening consistent with possible infiltrative disease of the gastric body without any obvious focal lesions. There was a 1.7 cm × 1.8 cm hypoechoic heterogeneous lesion noted in the porta hepatis and fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed. Cytology showed infiltrative plasma cells. The patient was then taken for computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy of the liver. Pathology showed liver involvement by atypical plasma cells in a nodular and sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical staining appropriately identified the solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma. Plasma cell neoplasm is essentially a clonal disease of differentiated B-cells that can encompass a broad spectrum and present as asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to plasma cell neoplasms or multiple myeloma. Five percent of patients with multiple myelomas are diagnosed with extramedullary plasmacytomas, and even less than that are diagnosed as a primary lesion. When the liver is affected, either as a direct diffuse neoplastic plasma cell infiltration, or as a single or multiple space occupying lesion as plasmacytomas, symptomatic features include extrahepatic biliary obstruction, jaundice, or ascites. In our case, the patient was diagnosed

  11. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses

    PubMed Central

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. METHODS Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. RESULTS Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. CONCLUSION Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle.

  12. Secondary tumors of the pancreas diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration: a 10-year experience.

    PubMed

    Waters, Lindsay; Si, Quisheng; Caraway, Nancy; Mody, Dina; Staerkel, Gregg; Sneige, Nour

    2014-09-01

    Determining whether a pancreatic mass is a primary or secondary neoplasm is necessary for appropriate treatment. We reviewed our experience using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors to identify clinical and cytopathologic characteristics of metastatic disease. We reviewed all cases of tumors metastatic to the pancreas evaluated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas during the period from 2002 to 2012. The review included cytologic specimens, clinical history, radiologic findings, primary tumor type, and clinical follow-up. We identified 66 patients with disease metastatic to the pancreas for which cytologic material was available: 38 (58%) men and 28 (42%) women, with an average age of 63 years (range, 40-89 years). Most metastases (98%) were single lesions, and nearly half were located in the head of the pancreas (30/66). The most common site of origin for these metastases was kidney (27 [41%] cases). Follow-up information was available for 65 (98%) patients, and duration of follow-up ranged from <1 to 10 years (mean, 2.3 years). Thirty-three patients (50%) were alive at the time of the most recent follow-up contact. Of the 25 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, clear cell type, 19 (76%) were alive at the time of the most recent follow-up. It was concluded that metastases may mimic primary pancreatic carcinomas both clinically and cytologically. Ancillary studies in conjunction with clinical history are necessary for the accurate diagnosis of FNAs of secondary pancreatic tumors. PMID:24554612

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration: A novel way to diagnose a solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Husney, Jack; Guttmann, Steven; Anyadike, Nnaemeka; Mayer, Ira; Rahmani, Rabin

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoma is a neoplastic production of a single line of plasma cells, usually forming monoclonal immunoglobulin. It most often occurs in the bone marrow; however, in 3% of the cases, solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma arises, which is a proliferation in the soft tissue, outside the bone marrow. In only 10% of the cases is the gastrointestinal tract involved. A 77-year-old female presented with lethargy, abdominal fullness, bilious vomiting, and clay-colored stools. The patient was anemic with initial laboratory results showing increased total and direct bilirubin with elevated transaminases. Despite conservative management, liver function tests (LFTs) continued to increase. On endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), there was mild diffuse mucosal thickening consistent with possible infiltrative disease of the gastric body without any obvious focal lesions. There was a 1.7 cm × 1.8 cm hypoechoic heterogeneous lesion noted in the porta hepatis and fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed. Cytology showed infiltrative plasma cells. The patient was then taken for computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy of the liver. Pathology showed liver involvement by atypical plasma cells in a nodular and sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical staining appropriately identified the solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma. Plasma cell neoplasm is essentially a clonal disease of differentiated B-cells that can encompass a broad spectrum and present as asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to plasma cell neoplasms or multiple myeloma. Five percent of patients with multiple myelomas are diagnosed with extramedullary plasmacytomas, and even less than that are diagnosed as a primary lesion. When the liver is affected, either as a direct diffuse neoplastic plasma cell infiltration, or as a single or multiple space occupying lesion as plasmacytomas, symptomatic features include extrahepatic biliary obstruction, jaundice, or ascites. In our case, the patient was diagnosed

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  15. Predictors of pain response in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided neurolysis for abdominal pain caused by pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Miyata, Takeshi; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Naoshi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures such as EUS-guided celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) and EUS-guided broad plexus neurolysis (EUS-BPN) were developed to treat abdominal cancer-associated pain; however, these procedures are not always effective. The aim of this study was to explore predictors of pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-associated pain. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 112 consecutive patients who underwent EUS-BPN in our institution. EUS-CGN was added in cases of visible celiac ganglia. The neurolytic-spread area was divided into six sections and evaluated by post-procedural computed tomography scanning. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), and a decrease in VAS scores by ⩾3 points after neurolysis was considered a good pain response. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to explore predictors of pain response at 1 and 4 weeks, and complications. Results: A good pain response was obtained in 77.7% and 67.9% of patients at 1 and 4 weeks, respectively. In the multivariable analysis of these patients, the combination method (EUS-BPN plus CGN) was a significant positive predictive factor at 1 week (odds ratio = 3.69, p = 0.017) and 4 weeks (odds ratio = 6.37, p = 0.043). The numbers of neurolytic/contrast spread areas (mean ± SD) were 4.98 ± 1.08 and 4.15 ± 1.12 in patients treated with the combination method and single method, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no significant predictor of complications. Conclusions: EUS-BPN in combination with EUS-CGN was a predictor of a good pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-related pain. The larger number of neurolytic/contrast spread areas may lead to better outcomes in patients receiving combination treatment. PMID:27366217

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration characteristics of primary adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagovic, Veronika; Spier, Bret J; DeLee, Ryan J; Barancin, Courtney; Lindstrom, Mary; Einstein, Michael; Byrne, Siobhan; Harter, Josephine; Agni, Rashmi; Pfau, Patrick R; Frick, Terrence J; Soni, Anurag; Gopal, Deepak V

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is often used to assist in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and may help to diagnose benign versus malignant neoplasms. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding comparative EUS characteristics of various malignant pancreatic neoplasms (primary and metastatic). OBJECTIVE: To compare and characterize primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms, hereafter referred to as nonprimary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (NPPA), diagnosed by EUS-guided FNA. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database. The setting was a tertiary care, academic medical centre. Patients referred for suspected pancreatic neoplasms were evaluated. Based on EUS-FNA characteristics, primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma was differentiated from other malignant neoplasms. The subset of other neoplasms was defined as malignant lesions that were ‘NPPAs’ (ie, predominantly solid or solid/cystic based on EUS appearance and primary malignant lesions or metastatic lesions to the pancreas). Pancreatic masses that were benign cystic lesions (pseudocyst, simple cyst, serous cystadenoma) and focal inflammatory lesions (acute, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis) were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 230 patients were evaluated using EUS-FNA for suspected pancreatic mass lesions. Thirty-eight patients were excluded because they were diagnosed with inflammatory lesions or had purely benign cysts. One hundred ninety-two patients had confirmed malignant pancreatic neoplasms (ie, pancreatic adenocarcinoma [n=144], NPPA [n=48]). When comparing adenocarcinoma with NPPA lesions, there was no significant difference in mean age (P=0.0675), sex (P=0.3595) or average lesion size (P=0.3801). On average, four FNA passes were necessary to establish a cytological diagnosis in both lesion subtypes (P=0.396). Adenocarcinomas were more likely to be located in the pancreatic head

  17. Interobserver agreement among cytopathologists in the evaluation of pancreatic endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology specimens*

    PubMed Central

    Mounzer, Rawad; Yen, Roy; Marshall, Carrie; Sams, Sharon; Mehrotra, Sanjana; Said, Mohamed Sherif; Obuch, Joshua C.; Brauer, Brian; Attwell, Augustin; Fukami, Norio; Shah, Raj; Amateau, Stuart; Hall, Matthew; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert; Rastogi, Amit; Wani, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become the standard of care in the evaluation of solid pancreatic lesions. Limited data exist on interobserver agreement (IOA) among cytopathologists in assessing solid pancreatic EUS-FNA specimens. This study aimed to evaluate IOA among cytopathologists in assessing EUS-FNA cytology specimens of solid pancreatic lesions using a novel standardized scoring system and to assess individual clinical and cytologic predictors of IOA. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic lesions at a tertiary care referral center were included. EUS-FNA slides were evaluated by four blinded cytopathologists using a standardized scoring system that assessed final cytologic diagnosis and quantitative (number of nucleated/diagnostic cells) and qualitative (bloodiness, inflammation/necrosis, contamination, artifact) cytologic parameters. Final clinical diagnosis was based on final cytology, surgical pathology, or 1-year clinical follow-up. IOA was calculated using multi-rater kappa (κ) statistics. Bivariate analyses were performed comparing cases with and without uniform agreement among the cytopathologists followed by logistic regression with backward elimination to model likelihood of uniform agreement. Results: Ninety-nine patients were included (49 % males, mean age 64 years, mean lesion size 26 mm). IOA for final diagnosis was moderate (κ = 0.45, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.4 – 0.49) with minimal improvement when combining suspicious and malignant diagnoses (κ = 0.54, 95 %CI 0.49 – 0.6). The weighted kappa value for overall diagnosis was 0.65 (95 %CI 0.54 – 0.76). IOA was slight to fair (κ = 0.04 – 0.32) for individual cytologic parameters. A final clinical diagnosis of malignancy was the most significant predictor of agreement [OR 3.99 (CI 1.52 – 10.49)]. Conclusions: Interobserver agreement among

  18. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  19. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts by combined cytopathology and cystic content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Amanda K; Zhou, Zhongren

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in incidental discoveries of pancreatic cystic lesions. Pancreatic cysts comprise a wide variety of lesions and include non-neoplastic cysts and neoplastic cysts. Because some pancreatic cysts have more of a malignant potential than others, it is absolutely essential that an accurate diagnosis is rendered so that effective care can be given to each patient. In many centers, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has emerged as the modality of choice that enables one to distinguish between mucinous and non-mucinous lesion, diagnose malignancy and collect cyst fluid for further diagnostic studies, such as pancreatic enzyme levels, molecular analysis and other tumor biomarkers. The current review will focus on EUS-guided FNA and the cytological diagnosis for pancreatic cysts. PMID:26504505

  1. In vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen by using high-resolution microendoscopy system under endoscopic ultrasound guidance: A preliminary study using a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Shin, Dongsuk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Coghlan, Lezlee; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful to obtain specimens from lesions underlying deep parts of the liver and spleen. However, the development of novel ancillary techniques must be explored to reduce the number of needle passes and potential adverse effects during this procedure. We conducted an animal study using a swine to demonstrate technical feasibility of in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the high-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) system under EUS guidance. We successfully performed the study. No significant acute adverse events occurred during the procedure. The HRME system could obtain clear images representing cytology-level morphology of spleen and liver. Hence, it is found out that in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the HRME system under EUS guidance is technically feasible. PMID:27503155

  2. Development of a model based on biochemical, real‑time tissue elastography and ultrasound data for the staging of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi-Hao; Li, Qiao; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Ying, Li

    2016-10-01

    The liver fibrosis index (LFI), based on real‑time tissue elastography (RTE), is a method currently used to assess liver fibrosis. However, this method may not consistently distinguish between the different stages of fibrosis, which limits its accuracy. The aim of the present study was to develop novel models based on biochemical, RTE and ultrasound data for predicting significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 85 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were prospectively enrolled and underwent a liver biopsy and RTE. The parameters for predicting significant fibrosis and cirrhosis were determined by conducting multivariate analyses. The splenoportal index (SPI; P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.023) were confirmed as independent predictors of significant fibrosis. Using multivariate analyses for identifying parameters that predict cirrhosis, significant differences in γ‑glutamyl transferase (GGT; P=0.049), SPI (P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.001) were observed. Based on these observations, the novel model LFI‑SPI score (LSPS) was developed to predict the occurrence of significant liver fibrosis, with an area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.87. The diagnostic accuracy of the LSPS model was superior to that of the LFI (AUROC=0.76; P=0.0109), aspartate aminotransferase‑to‑platelet ratio index (APRI; AUROC=0.64; P=0.0031), fibrosis‑4 index (FIB‑4; AUROC=0.67; P=0.0044) and FibroScan (AUROC=0.68; P=0.0021) models. In addition, the LFI‑SPI‑GGT score (LSPGS) was developed for the purposes of predicting liver cirrhosis, demonstrating an AUROC value of 0.93. The accuracy of LSPGS was similar to that of FibroScan (AUROC=0.85; P=0.134), but was superior to LFI (AUROC=0.81; P=0.0113), APRI (AUROC=0.67; P<0.0001) and FIB‑4 (AUROC=0.719; P=0.0005). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the use of LSPS and LSPGS may complement current methods of diagnosing significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in

  3. Development of a model based on biochemical, real-time tissue elastography and ultrasound data for the staging of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi-Hao; Li, Qiao; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Ying, Li

    2016-01-01

    The liver fibrosis index (LFI), based on real-time tissue elastography (RTE), is a method currently used to assess liver fibrosis. However, this method may not consistently distinguish between the different stages of fibrosis, which limits its accuracy. The aim of the present study was to develop novel models based on biochemical, RTE and ultrasound data for predicting significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 85 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were prospectively enrolled and underwent a liver biopsy and RTE. The parameters for predicting significant fibrosis and cirrhosis were determined by conducting multivariate analyses. The splenoportal index (SPI; P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.023) were confirmed as independent predictors of significant fibrosis. Using multivariate analyses for identifying parameters that predict cirrhosis, significant differences in γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT; P=0.049), SPI (P=0.002) and LFI (P=0.001) were observed. Based on these observations, the novel model LFI-SPI score (LSPS) was developed to predict the occurrence of significant liver fibrosis, with an area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.87. The diagnostic accuracy of the LSPS model was superior to that of the LFI (AUROC=0.76; P=0.0109), aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI; AUROC=0.64; P=0.0031), fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4; AUROC= 0.67; P= 0.0044) and FibroScan (AUROC=0.68; P=0.0021) models. In addition, the LFI-SPI-GGT score (LSPGS) was developed for the purposes of predicting liver cirrhosis, demonstrating an AUROC value of 0.93. The accuracy of LSPGS was similar to that of FibroScan (AUROC=0.85; P=0.134), but was superior to LFI (AUROC= 0.81; P= 0.0113), APRI (AUROC= 0.67; P<0.0001) and FIB-4 (AUROC=0.719; P=0.0005). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the use of LSPS and LSPGS may complement current methods of diagnosing significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with CHB

  4. Development of a training phantom for compression breast elastography-comparison of various elastography systems and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Kavitha; Reddy, Machireddy Ramasubba; Seshadri, Suresh; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2015-10-01

    The elastic properties of tissue are related to tissue composition and pathological changes. It has been observed that many pathological processes increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. Ultrasound compression elastography is a method of characterization of elastic properties that has been the focus of many research efforts in the last two decades. In medical radiology, compression elastography is provided as an additional tool with ultrasound B-mode in the existing scanners, and the combined features of elastography and echography act as a promising diagnostic method in breast cancer detection. However, the full capability of the ultrasound elastography technique together with B-mode has not been utilized by novice radiologists due to the nonavailability of suitable, appropriately designed tissue-mimicking phantoms. Since different commercially available ultrasound elastographic scanners follow their own unique protocols, training novice radiologists is becoming cumbersome. The main focus of this work is to develop a tissue-like agar-based phantom, which mimics breast tissue with common abnormal lesions like fibroadenoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in a clinically perceived way and compares the sonographic and elastographic appearances using different commercially available systems. In addition, the developed phantoms are simulated using the finite-element method, and ideal strain images are generated. Strain images from experiment and simulation are compared based on image contrast parameters, namely contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) and observed strain, and they are in good agreement. The strain image contrast of malignant inclusions is significantly improved compared to benign inclusions, and the trend of CTE is similar for all elastographic scanners under investigation.

  5. Development of a training phantom for compression breast elastography-comparison of various elastography systems and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Kavitha; Reddy, Machireddy Ramasubba; Seshadri, Suresh; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2015-10-01

    The elastic properties of tissue are related to tissue composition and pathological changes. It has been observed that many pathological processes increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. Ultrasound compression elastography is a method of characterization of elastic properties that has been the focus of many research efforts in the last two decades. In medical radiology, compression elastography is provided as an additional tool with ultrasound B-mode in the existing scanners, and the combined features of elastography and echography act as a promising diagnostic method in breast cancer detection. However, the full capability of the ultrasound elastography technique together with B-mode has not been utilized by novice radiologists due to the nonavailability of suitable, appropriately designed tissue-mimicking phantoms. Since different commercially available ultrasound elastographic scanners follow their own unique protocols, training novice radiologists is becoming cumbersome. The main focus of this work is to develop a tissue-like agar-based phantom, which mimics breast tissue with common abnormal lesions like fibroadenoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in a clinically perceived way and compares the sonographic and elastographic appearances using different commercially available systems. In addition, the developed phantoms are simulated using the finite-element method, and ideal strain images are generated. Strain images from experiment and simulation are compared based on image contrast parameters, namely contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) and observed strain, and they are in good agreement. The strain image contrast of malignant inclusions is significantly improved compared to benign inclusions, and the trend of CTE is similar for all elastographic scanners under investigation. PMID:26697511

  6. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  7. The role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: SEED-SEPD-AEG Joint Guideline.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; González-Panizo-Tamargo, Fernando; Barturen, Ángel; Calderón, Ángel; Esteban, José Miguel; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Gimeno-García, Antonio; Ginés, Angels; Lariño, José; Pérez-Carreras, Mercedes; Romero, Rafael; Súbtil, José Carlos; Vila, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in our environment, and represents the first cause of cancer related death in western countries. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients may be complicated, with endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), classically performed by gastroenterologists, playing a very important role. As this disease is not closely related to the "digestive tract", gastroenterologists have been forced to update their knowledge on this field o adequately diagnose this significant group of patients. The recent advent of modern and promising techniques like endobronchial ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA) have prompted new approaches for diagnosis and staging of this type of patients. In this clinical guideline, the "Sociedad Española de Endoscopia Digestiva" (SEED), "Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva" (SEPD) and the "AsociaciónEspañola de Gastroenterología", have jointed efforts to update the existing knowledge on the field and provide their members with evidence based recommendations.

  8. The potential role of elastography in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids are common causes of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and less commonly infertility. The prevalence of such intrauterine lesions increases with age during the reproductive years, and usually decreases after menopause. The first-line imaging examination in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps as well as submucosal fibroidsis ultrasound, but its accuracy is not obvious. Elastography is an ultrasound-based imaging modality that is used to assess the stiffness of examined tissues. Considering the fact that endometrial polyps derive from soft endometrial tissue and submucosal fibroids are made of hard muscle tissue, elastography seems a perfect tool to differentiate between such lesions. I present two groups of patients with AUB and intrauterine lesions suspected on ultrasound. In the first group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the endometrium and softer than the myometrium. During hysteroscopies endometrial polyps were removed. In the second group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the myometrium and harder than the endometrium. During hysteroscopies submucosal fibroids were removed. In both groups, the diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological examination in all cases. It was demonstrated that with the use of elastography it is possible to assess the stiffness of intrauterine lesions, which may be useful in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids. PMID:26327901

  9. The potential role of elastography in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids are common causes of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and less commonly infertility. The prevalence of such intrauterine lesions increases with age during the reproductive years, and usually decreases after menopause. The first-line imaging examination in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps as well as submucosal fibroidsis ultrasound, but its accuracy is not obvious. Elastography is an ultrasound-based imaging modality that is used to assess the stiffness of examined tissues. Considering the fact that endometrial polyps derive from soft endometrial tissue and submucosal fibroids are made of hard muscle tissue, elastography seems a perfect tool to differentiate between such lesions. I present two groups of patients with AUB and intrauterine lesions suspected on ultrasound. In the first group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the endometrium and softer than the myometrium. During hysteroscopies endometrial polyps were removed. In the second group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the myometrium and harder than the endometrium. During hysteroscopies submucosal fibroids were removed. In both groups, the diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological examination in all cases. It was demonstrated that with the use of elastography it is possible to assess the stiffness of intrauterine lesions, which may be useful in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids. PMID:26327901

  10. Villous adenoma of the common hepatic duct: the importance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for relevant diagnosis. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tefas, Cristian; Tanţău, Marcel; Szenftleben, Alexandru; Chiorean, Liliana; Badea, Radu

    2015-12-01

    Adenomas are frequently encountered in the lower digestive tract but are rarely diagnosed in the biliary tree. We report a case of villous adenoma of the common hepatic duct. A 58-year old male was admitted with a four week history of intermittent upper right quadrant pain. Gray scale and contrast-enhanced abdominal ultrasound showed a mass inside the common hepatic duct with arterial enhancement and slow wash-out during the late venous phase. Subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and intraductal ultrasound confirmed the presence of the lesion. The final histopathological examination showed villous adenoma of the common hepatic duct with high-grade dysplasia. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography used in conjecture with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography can help in differentiating biliary tumors. PMID:26649355

  11. Oestreicher and elastography.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Edwin L; Parker, Kevin J

    2015-10-01

    A sphere moving back and forth in tissue generates the kinds of complex displacement fields that are used in elastography. The analytical solution of Hans Oestreicher for this phenomenon [(1951). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 23, 704-714] gives an understanding of the transverse and longitudinal, fast and slow waves that are generated. The results suggest several ways to determine the absorption coefficients of tissues, which together with phase velocity permit the computation of both the real shear modulus and the shear viscosity as functions of frequency. PMID:26520312

  12. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  13. Analisys of pectoralis major tendon in weightlifting athletes using ultrasonography and elastography

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ferretti, Mario; Kawakami, Eduardo Felipe Kin Ito; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Corrêa; Yamada, Andre Fukunishi; de Oliveira, Gabriela Clemente; Cohen, Moisés; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate tendinopathy of the pectoralis major muscle in weightlifting athletes using ultrasound and elastography. Methods This study included 20 patients, 10 with rupture of the pectoralis major muscle and 10 control patients. We evaluated pectoralis major muscle contralateral tendon with ultrasonographic and elastography examinations. The ultrasonographic examinations were performed using a high-resolution B mode ultrasound device. The elastography evaluation was classified into three patterns: (A), if stiff (more than 50% area with blue staining); (B), if intermediate (more than 50% green); and (C), if softened (more than 50% red). Results Patients’ mean age was 33±5.3 years. The presence of tendinous injury measured by ultrasound had a significant different (p=0.0055), because 80% of cases had tendinous injury versus 10% in the Control Group. No significant differences were seen between groups related with change in elastography (p=0.1409). Conclusion Long-term bodybuilders had ultrasound image with more tendinous injury than those in Control Group. There was no statistical significance regarding change in tendon elasticity compared with Control Group. PMID:26761551

  14. Boundary element methods in elastography: a first explorative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Hans-Uwe; Hann, Chris E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Broughton, Robert L.; Van Houten, Elijah

    2007-03-01

    Next to Magnet Resonance Elastography and Ultrasound Elastography, Digital Image Elasto-Tomography (DIET) is a new imaging-technique, using only motion data available on the boundary, to reconstruct mechanical material parameters, i.e. the interior sti.ness of a domain, in order to diagnose tissue related disease such as breast cancer. Where classically Finite Element Methods have been employed to solve this inverse problem, this paper explores a new approach to the reconstruction of mechanical material properties of tissue and tissue defects by the use of Boundary Element Methods (BEM). Using the Boundary Integral Equations for Linear Elasticity in two dimensions within a Conjugate Gradients based inverse solver, material properties of healthy and malicious tissue could be determined from displacement data on the boundary. First simulation results are presented.

  15. Comparing cost-effectiveness between endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with predefined risks: A study from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Netinatsunton, Nisa; Attasaranya, Siriboon; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Witeerungrot, Teepawit; Jongboonyanuparp, Theeratus; Piratvisuth, Teerha; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) achieves results comparable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stone, but studies from the western have shown EUS to be less expensive in patients with intermediate risk for CBD stones. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of EUS and ERCP in the diagnosis of CBD stones in a developing country. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done with 141 patients with suspected CBD stones, categorized as having high or intermediate risk for CBD stone. All underwent EUS, and the high-risk patients had ERCP after the EUS. For intermediate-risk patients, an ERCP was done at the discretion of the attending physician. The CBD stone was confirmed by ERCP in patients who underwent both EUS and ERCP. Patients who received EUS only were followed up every 3 months for 1 year. The false negative rate in patients with EUS and ERCP was estimated in the clinical follow-up. Result: One hundred and forty-one patients (141: 83 females, 58 males) with a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 55.71 ±18.68 years were recruited. Ninety-four (94) patients underwent both EUS and ERCP. ERCP confirmed the diagnosis in 83 of 85 patients (97.6%) with CBD stone detected by EUS. Forty-seven (47) patients with a negative EUS and no ERCP done were symptom-free during the follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS were 97.6%, 80%, 97.6%, and 80% respectively. An EUS-based strategy for high-risk patients was 15% more expensive than an ERCP-based strategy, but the EUS-based strategy reduced the cost to 37.78% less than the ERCP-based strategy in intermediate-risk patients. The EUS-based strategy was cost-saving when the CBD stone prevalence was less than 52.5%. Conclusion: EUS is safer and less costly than ERCP for CBD stone diagnosis in patients with intermediate risk. PMID:27386473

  16. Polymerase chain reaction amplifying mycobacterial DNA from aspirates obtained by endoscopic ultrasound allows accurate diagnosis of mycobacterial disease in HIV-positive patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Martin; Lameris, Roeland; Corcoran, Craig; Rossouw, Theresa M; Slavik, Tomas; Du Plessis, Johannie; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones A O; Stivaktas, Paraskevi; Potgieter, Fritz; Van der Merwe, Schalk W

    2014-09-01

    Abdominal lymphadenopathy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a diagnostic challenge. We performed a prospective cohort study by recruiting 31 symptomatic HIV + patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy and assessing the diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). Mean age was 38 years; 52% were female; and mean CD4 count and viral load were 124 cells/μL and 4 log, respectively. EUS confirmed additional mediastinal nodes in 26%. The porta hepatis was the most common abdominal site. Aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA were subjected to cytology, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Mycobacterial infections were confirmed in 67.7%, and 31% had reactive lymphadenopathy. Cytology and culture had low sensitivity, whereas PCR identified 90% of mycobacterial infections. By combining the appearance of aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA and cytologic specimens, we developed a diagnostic algorithm to indicate when analysis with PCR would be useful. PCR performed on material obtained by EUS-FNA was highly accurate in confirming mycobacterial disease and determining genotypic drug resistance.

  17. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the islet cell tumor of pancreas: a comparison between computerized axial tomography and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Darshana; Eloubeidi, Mohammad; Chhieng, David C; Frost, Andra; Eltoum, Isam A; Roberson, Janie; Jhala, Nirag

    2002-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the cytologic features of islet cell tumor (ICT) of pancreas obtained by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and computed tomography guided FNA (CT-FNA). We also describe the cytologic features associated with malignant ICT. Eleven cytology samples from 121 CT- FNA and 30 EUS- FNA of the pancreas were obtained from nine patients with ICT. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and immunohistochemical stains to determine neuroendocrine differentiation and the hormonal status were evaluated. Cytologic features and specimen adequacy were compared between the two techniques. Cytologic features noted in both benign and malignant ICT were also compared. Nine patients (5 men, 4 women) ranging in age from 29 to 84 years (mean age, 53.8 years). Diagnoses consisted of benign (4) and malignant (5) ICT. EUS-FNA was superior to CT-FNA in obtaining adequate cells (2/2 v 7/9) for the diagnosis and increased cellularity to perform additional immunohistochemical stains (2/2 v 4/7). Single, plasmacytoid cells with finely granular chromatin distribution characterized ICT on cytology. Mitoses (3/5) and necrosis (1/5) were noted in malignant ICT but not in benign ICT. EUS-FNA is superior to CT- FNA for obtaining cells for the diagnosis of ICT. Detection of mitoses and or necrosis from patients with ICT should initiate a search for metastasis.

  18. Repeat Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Cancer: Diagnostic Yield and Associated Change in Access to Appropriate Care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Stanger, Dylan; Shuster, Constantin; Telford, Jennifer; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a high incidence of inconclusive cytopathology at initial EUS-FNA (endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration) for suspected malignant pancreatic lesions. To obtain appropriate preoperative or palliative chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, definitive cytopathology is often required. The utility of repeat EUS-FNA is not well established. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted evaluating the yield of repeat EUS-FNA in determining a cytological diagnosis in patients who had undergone a prior EUS-FNA for diagnosis of suspected malignant pancreatic lesions with inconclusive cytopathology. The wait times to the second procedure and to decisions regarding therapy were calculated. Results. Overall, 45 repeat EUS-FNA procedures were performed over seven years for suspected malignant pancreatic lesions. Cytopathological class (I to IV) changed between first and second EUS-FNA in 32 patients (71%). Of 34 patients with an initially nonconclusive diagnosis, 20 had a conclusive diagnosis (59%) on repeat EUS-FNA. The cumulative yield after repeat EUS-FNA for definite pancreatic adenocarcinoma was 7 (16%). The median time interval between first and second EUS-FNA was 31 (7-175) days. Conclusions. A substantial number of patients had a definitive diagnosis of adenocarcinoma on repeat FNA and were, therefore, subsequently able to access appropriate care. PMID:27648440

  19. Cytologic features of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with "vacuolated cell pattern." report of a case diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Samad, Arbaz; Conway, Andrea B; Attam, Rajeev; Jessurun, Jose; Pambuccian, Stefan E

    2014-04-01

    The "vacuolated cell pattern" has only been recently described as a distinct morphologic variant of pancreatobiliary adenocarcinoma. Herein, we report the endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytologic features of a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with "vacuolated cell pattern" occurring in a 60-year-old man. The aspirate smears and cell block sections from the EUS-FNA of a 23.5 mm hypoechoic pancreatic head mass were highly cellular, showing variably-sized crowded three-dimensional cell clusters, flat sheets, and numerous highly atypical single cells. The background was bloody and showed necrotic debris, but no discernible mucus. The most striking feature of the aspirate was the presence of numerous very large (20-50 µm) vacuoles, occupying the entire cytoplasm, pushing the nuclei to the side and indenting them, that imparted a cribriform appearance to the sheets of neoplastic cells. The non-vacuolated neoplastic cells were large, had abundant dense (squamoid) cytoplasm, irregularly contoured hyperchromatic nuclei, and prominent macronucleoli. Histologic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimen showed a "vacuolated cell pattern" adenocarcinoma composed of poorly formed glands, solid sheets, and infiltrating single cells with pleomorphic nuclei and large cytoplasmic vacuoles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the cytologic features of this rather uncommon morphologic variant of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Recognition of this morphologic variant of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in ESU-FNA samples allows its differentiation from primary and metastatic signet-ring cell carcinomas.

  20. Repeat Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Cancer: Diagnostic Yield and Associated Change in Access to Appropriate Care

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Dylan; Shuster, Constantin; Telford, Jennifer; Lam, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a high incidence of inconclusive cytopathology at initial EUS-FNA (endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration) for suspected malignant pancreatic lesions. To obtain appropriate preoperative or palliative chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, definitive cytopathology is often required. The utility of repeat EUS-FNA is not well established. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted evaluating the yield of repeat EUS-FNA in determining a cytological diagnosis in patients who had undergone a prior EUS-FNA for diagnosis of suspected malignant pancreatic lesions with inconclusive cytopathology. The wait times to the second procedure and to decisions regarding therapy were calculated. Results. Overall, 45 repeat EUS-FNA procedures were performed over seven years for suspected malignant pancreatic lesions. Cytopathological class (I to IV) changed between first and second EUS-FNA in 32 patients (71%). Of 34 patients with an initially nonconclusive diagnosis, 20 had a conclusive diagnosis (59%) on repeat EUS-FNA. The cumulative yield after repeat EUS-FNA for definite pancreatic adenocarcinoma was 7 (16%). The median time interval between first and second EUS-FNA was 31 (7–175) days. Conclusions. A substantial number of patients had a definitive diagnosis of adenocarcinoma on repeat FNA and were, therefore, subsequently able to access appropriate care. PMID:27648440

  1. Learning, techniques, and complications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Polkowski, M; Larghi, A; Weynand, B; Boustière, C; Giovannini, M; Pujol, B; Dumonceau, J-M

    2012-02-01

    This article is the second of a two-part publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) about endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling, including EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and EUS-guided Trucut biopsy. The first part (the Clinical Guideline) focused on the results obtained with EUS-guided sampling, and the role of this technique in patient management, and made recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use. The current Technical Guideline discusses issues related to learning, techniques, and complications of EUS-guided sampling, and to processing of specimens. Technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., rapid on-site cytopathological evaluation, needle diameter, microcore isolation for histopathological examination, and adequate number of needle passes) are discussed and recommendations are made for various settings, including solid and cystic pancreatic lesions, submucosal tumors, and lymph nodes. The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes gastroenterologists, oncologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technical Guideline should be most useful to endoscopists who perform EUS-guided sampling. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided.

  2. Confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography using a ring ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-24

    We designed and developed a confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography system. A ring ultrasound transducer was used to achieve reflection mode excitation and generate an oscillating acoustic radiation force in order to generate displacements within the tissue, which were detected using the phase-resolved optical coherence elastography method. Both phantom and human tissue tests indicate that this system is able to sense the stiffness difference of samples and quantitatively map the elastic property of materials. Our confocal setup promises a great potential for point by point elastic imaging in vivo and differentiation of diseased tissues from normal tissue.

  3. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of spherical masses with polarized torsional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadj Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Trop, Isabelle; Cloutier, Guy

    2012-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance (SWIR) is a technique for dynamic ultrasound elastography of confined mechanical inclusions. It was developed for breast tumor imaging and tissue characterization. This method relies on the polarization of torsional shear waves modeled with the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. To validate modeling, an invitro set-up was used to measure and image the first three eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a soft sphere. A preliminary invivo SWIR measurement on a breast fibroadenoma is also reported. Results revealed the potential of SWIR elastography to detect and mechanically characterize breast lesions for early cancer detection.

  4. The Accuracies of Diagnosing Pancreas Divisum by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and Endoscopic Ultrasound: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhe; Munker, Stefan; Zhou, Boyan; Li, Lin; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), MRCP after secretin stimulation (S-MRCP) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) are all selected to diagnose pancreas divisum. However, the accuracies of three diagnosis remain unclear. The aim is to address the diagnostic accuracies of MRCP, S-MRCP and EUS on pancreas divisum. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from inception to January, 2015. Of the 536 citations retrieved, 16 studies were included. For MRCP diagnosis on pancreas divisum, the area under the hierarchical summary receiver-operating characteristic (HSROC) curve was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87 to 0.92), and for S-MRCP and EUS, 0.99 (95% CI 0.97 to 0.99) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.98). Sensitivity and specificity for MRCP were 0.59 (95% CI 0.45 to 0.71) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.00); for S-MRCP, 0.83 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.92) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.00); for EUS, 0.85 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.94) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.90 to 0.99). Comprehensive comparison of three diagnostic techniques to pancreas divisum, S-MRCP was more reliable than MRCP and EUS on the effect of the diagnostic test. PMID:27734952

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley W; Harvey, Harold A; Dye, Charles E; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T

    2014-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  6. Synthetic aperture elastography: a GPU based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prashant; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging system produces highly accurate axial and lateral displacement estimates; however, low frame rates and large data volumes can hamper its clinical use. This paper describes a real-time SA imaging based ultrasound elastography system that we have recently developed to overcome this limitation. In this system, we implemented both beamforming and 2D cross-correlation echo tracking on Nvidia GTX 480 graphics processing unit (GPU). We used one thread per pixel for beamforming; whereas, one block per pixel was used for echo tracking. We compared the quality of elastograms computed with our real-time system relative to those computed using our standard single threaded elastographic imaging methodology. In all studies, we used conventional measures of image quality such as elastographic signal to noise ratio (SNRe). Specifically, SNRe of axial and lateral strain elastograms computed with real-time system were 36 dB and 23 dB, respectively, which was numerically equal to those computed with our standard approach. We achieved a frame rate of 6 frames per second using our GPU based approach for 16 transmits and kernel size of 60 × 60 pixels, which is 400 times faster than that achieved using our standard protocol.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the differentiation of type 1 and type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuya; Itoh, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yuya; Nakamura, Yosuke; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ohmiya, Naoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of endoscopic ultra-sound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 47 of 56 AIP patients who underwent EUS-FNA and met the Asian diagnostic criteria. On 47 EUS-FNA specimens, we evaluated the presence of adequate material and characteristic features of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) mentioned in the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria and examined if these findings make a contribution to the differential diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 AIP. A disposable 22-gauge needle was used for EUS-FNA. RESULTS: Adequate specimens including pancreatic tissue for differentiating AIP from cancer were obtained from 43 of 47 patients who underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA was performed from the pancreatic head in 21 cases, which is known to be technically difficult when performed by core biopsy; there was no significant difference in the results compared with pancreatic body-tail. Nine of 47 patients met level 1 findings of LPSP and 5 patients met level 2 findings of LPSP. No one met level 1 findings of IDCP, but 3 patients met level 2 findings of IDCP. Of 10 seronegative cases, 2 cases were diagnosed with “definitive type 1 AIP”, and 3 cases were diagnosed with “probable type 2 AIP” when considering both the level 2 histological findings and response to steroids. CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA is useful in the differentiation of type 1 and type 2 AIP, particularly in seronegative cases. PMID:22876041

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas: A multi-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Pannala, Rahul; Hallberg-Wallace, Karyn M.; Smith, Amber L.; Nassar, Aziza; Zhang, Jun; Zarka, Matthew; Reynolds, Jordan P.; Chen, Longwen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology to examine pancreatic neoplasms has led to an increase in the diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common metastasis to the pancreas. Our study examines 33 cases of metastatic RCC to the pancreas sampled by EUS-FNA from four large tertiary care hospitals. Materials and Methods: We searched the cytopathology database for RCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA from January 2005 to January 2015. Patient age, history of RCC, nephrectomy history, follow-up postnephrectomy, radiological impression, and EUS-FNA cytologic diagnosis were reviewed. Results: Thirty-three patients were identified. The average age was 67.5 years (range, 49–84 years). Thirty-two patients had a previous documented history of RCC. One patient had the diagnosis of pancreatic metastasis at the same time of the kidney biopsy. Thirty-one patients had been treated with nephrectomy. Twenty-seven patients were being monitored annually by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-five patients had multiple masses by imaging, but 8 patients had a single mass in the pancreas at the time of EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA of 20 cases showed classic morphology of RCC. Thirteen cases had either “atypical” clinical-radiologic features or morphologic overlaps with primary pancreatic neoplasms or other neoplasms. Cell blocks were made on all 13 cases and immunochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusions: EUS-FNA cytology is useful for the diagnosis of metastatic RCC to the pancreas. Cytomorphology can be aided with patient history, imaging analyses, cell blocks, and immunochemical stains. PMID:27761149

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salla, Charitini; Chatzipantelis, Paschalis; Konstantinou, Panagiotis; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Dappola, Victoria

    2007-10-14

    We describe the clinical, imaging and cytopathological features of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS-guided) fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of an unexplained episodic abdominal pain for 2 mo and a short history of hypertension in the endocrinology clinic. Clinical laboratory examinations revealed polycystic ovary syndrome, splenomegaly and low serum amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a mass of the pancreatic tail with solid and cystic consistency. EUS confirmed the mass, both in body and tail of the pancreas, with distinct borders, which caused dilation of the peripheral part of the pancreatic duct (major diameter 3.7 mm). The patient underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA cytology specimens consisted of single cells and aggregates of uniform malignant cells, forming microadenoid structures, branching, papillary clusters with delicate fibrovascular cores and nuclear overlapping. Naked capillaries were also seen. The nuclei of malignant cells were round or oval, eccentric with fine granular chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves in some of them. The malignant cells were periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-Alcian blue (+) and immunocytochemically they were vimentin (+), CA 19.9 (+), synaptophysin (+), chromogranin (-), neuro-specific enolase (-), a1-antitrypsin and a1-antichymotrypsin focal positive. Cytologic findings were strongly suggestive of SPTP. Biopsy confirmed the above cytologic diagnosis. EUS-guided FNA diagnosis of SPTP is accurate. EUS findings, cytomorphologic features and immunostains of cell block help distinguish SPTP from pancreatic endocrine tumors, acinar cell carcinoma and papillary mucinous carcinoma. PMID:17876886

  10. Prospective validation of microRNA signatures for detecting pancreatic malignant transformation in endoscopic-ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Adam E.; Krell, Jonathan; Prado, Mireia Mato; Gall, Tamara M.H.; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Funel, Niccola; Giovannetti, Elisa; Castellano, Leandro; Basyouny, Mohamed; Habib, Nagy A.; Kaltsidis, Harry; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Stebbing, Justin; Jiao, Long R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease. Novel biomarkers are required to aid treatment decisions and improve patient outcomes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially ideal diagnostic biomarkers, as they are stable molecules, and tumour and tissue specific. Results Logistic regression analysis revealed an endoscopic-ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) 2-miRNA classifier (miR-21 + miR-155) capable of distinguishing benign from malignant pancreatic lesions with a sensitivity of 81.5% and a specificity of 85.7% (AUC 0.930). Validation FNA cohorts confirmed both miRNAs were overexpressed in malignant disease, while circulating miRNAs performed poorly. Methods Fifty-five patients with a suspicious pancreatic lesion on cross-sectional imaging were evaluated by EUS-FNA. At echo-endoscopy, the first part of the FNA was sent for cytological assessment and the second part was used for total RNA extraction. Candidate miRNAs were selected after careful review of the literature and expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Validation was performed on an independent cohort of EUS-FNAs, as well as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and plasma samples. Conclusions We provide further evidence for using miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers for pancreatic malignancy. We demonstrate the feasibility of using fresh EUS-FNAs to establish miRNA-based signatures unique to pancreatic malignant transformation and the potential to enhance risk stratification and selection for surgery. PMID:27086919

  11. KRAS and GNAS Mutations in Pancreatic Juice Collected From the Duodenum of Patients at High Risk for Neoplasia Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, James R.; Norris, Alexis L.; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Debeljak, Marija; Borges, Michael; Harrington, Colleen; Lin, Elaine; Brant, Aaron; Barkley, Thomas; Almario, J. Alejandro; Topazian, Mark; Farrell, James; Syngal, Sapna; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Yu, Jun; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kanda, Mitsuro; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Pancreatic imaging can identify neoplastic cysts but not microscopic neoplasms. Mutation analysis of pancreatic fluid following secretin stimulation might identify microscopic neoplasias in the pancreatic duct system. We determined the prevalence of mutations in KRAS and GNAS genes in pancreatic juice from subjects undergoing endoscopic ultrasound for suspected pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, or pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS Secretin-stimulated juice samples were collected from the duodenum of 272 subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies; 194 subjects were screened because of a family history of, or genetic predisposition to, pancreatic cancer and 78 were evaluated for pancreatic cancer (n=30) or other disorders (controls: pancreatic cysts, pancreatitis, or normal pancreata, n=48). Mutations were detected by digital high-resolution melt-curve analysis and pyrosequencing. The number of replicates containing a mutation determined the mutation score. RESULTS KRAS mutations were detected in pancreatic juice from larger percentages of subjects with pancreatic cancer (73%) or undergoing cancer screening (50%) than controls (19%) (P=.0005). A greater proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer had at least 1 KRAS mutation detected 3 or more times (47%) than screened subjects (21%) or controls (6%, P=.002). Among screened subjects, mutations in KRAS (but not GNAS) were found in similar percentages of patients with or without pancreatic cysts. However, a greater proportion of patients over 50 ys old had KRAS mutations (54.6%) than younger patients (36.3%) (P=.032); the older subjects also more mutations in KRAS (P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in KRAS are detected in pancreatic juice from the duodenum of 73% of patients with pancreatic cancer, and 50% of asymptomatic individuals with a high risk for pancreatic cancer. However, KRAS mutations are detected in pancreatic juice

  12. Correlation of Strain Elastography with Conventional Sonography and FNAC/Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sardessai, Sanjay; Furtado, Renny; Sardessai, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elastography is a new promising technique that can be especially helpful when used as an adjunct to conventional B-mode ultrasound in evaluating breast lesions. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic performance of four interpretation criteria for elastography and to compare the diagnostic performance of sonoelastography with that of conventional sonography in characterising breast lesions as benign or malignant with FNAC/biopsy correlation. Materials and Methods One hundred breast lesions were prospectively evaluated by ultrasound as well as by strain elastography followed by FNAC/ biopsy correlation. The criteria used were Elastography Score, Strain Ratio, Distance Ratio and Area Ratio. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated for each modality. The best cut-off point was calculated for each of the interpretation criteria using the MedCalc version 10.1 software. The diagnostic performance of the interpretation criteria was compared with that of conventional sonography by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve using SPSS software. Results The elastography score was found to have the best performance among the 4 criteria used with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 82.66%, respectively at the best cut-off point between 3 and 4. At a best cut-off point for conventional sonography between BI-RADS categories 4A and 4B, the sensitivity and specificity were found to be 96% and 92% respectively. The area under the curve value was slightly greater for conventional sonography (0.980) than for the elastography score (0.913) using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion While all interpretation criteria were able to differentiate benign and malignant lesions with statistical significance, the elastography score was found to be the most accurate. While conventional ultrasound remains the primary modality for the characterization of breast masses

  13. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  14. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  15. A 3D-elastography-guided system for laparoscopic partial nephrectomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolka, Philipp J.; Keil, Matthias; Sakas, Georgios; McVeigh, Elliot; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2010-02-01

    We present an image-guided intervention system based on tracked 3D elasticity imaging (EI) to provide a novel interventional modality for registration with pre-operative CT. The system can be integrated in both laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomies scenarios, where this new use of EI makes exact intra-operative execution of pre-operative planning possible. Quick acquisition and registration of 3D-B-Mode and 3D-EI volume data allows intra-operative registration with CT and thus with pre-defined target and critical regions (e.g. tumors and vasculature). Their real-time location information is then overlaid onto a tracked endoscopic video stream to help the surgeon avoid vessel damage and still completely resect tumors including safety boundaries. The presented system promises to increase the success rate for partial nephrectomies and potentially for a wide range of other laparoscopic and robotic soft tissue interventions. This is enabled by the three components of robust real-time elastography, fast 3D-EI/CT registration, and intra-operative tracking. With high quality, robust strain imaging (through a combination of parallelized 2D-EI, optimal frame pair selection, and optimized palpation motions), kidney tumors that were previously unregistrable or sometimes even considered isoechoic with conventional B-mode ultrasound can now be imaged reliably in interventional settings. Furthermore, this allows the transformation of planning CT data of kidney ROIs to the intra-operative setting with a markerless mutual-information-based registration, using EM sensors for intraoperative motion tracking. Overall, we present a complete procedure and its development, including new phantom models - both ex vivo and synthetic - to validate image-guided technology and training, tracked elasticity imaging, real-time EI frame selection, registration of CT with EI, and finally a real-time, distributed software architecture. Together, the system allows the surgeon to concentrate

  16. MR elastography of hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Adam J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Perrinez, Phillip R.; Weaver, John B.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    Hydrocephalus occurs due to a blockage in the transmission of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in either the ventricles or subarachnoid space. Characteristics of this condition include increased intracranial pressure, which can result in neurologic deterioration [1]. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an imaging technique that estimates the mechanical properties of tissue in vivo. While some investigations of brain tissue have been performed using MRE [2,3,4,5], the effects due to changes in interstitial pressure and fluid content on the mechanical properties of the brain remain unknown. The purpose of this work is to assess the potential of MRE to differentiate between the reconstructed properties of normal and hydrocephalic brains. MRE data was acquired in 18 female feline subjects, 12 of which received kaolin injections resulting in an acute form of hydrocephalus. In each animal, four MRE scans were performed during the process including one pre-injection and three post-injection scans. The elastic parameters were obtained using a subzone-based reconstruction algorithm that solves Navier's equations for linearly elastic materials [6]. The remaining cats were used as controls, injected with saline instead of kaolin. To determine the state of hydrocephalus, ventricular volume was estimated from segmenting anatomical images. The mean ventricular volume of hydrocephalic cats significantly increased (P <~ 0.0001) between the first and second scans. The mean volume was not observed to increase (P >~ 0.5) for the control cats. Also, there was an observable increase in the recorded elastic shear modulus of brain tissue in the normal and hydrocephalic acquisitions. Results suggest that MRE is able to detect changes in the mechanical properties of brain tissue resulting from kaolin-induced hydrocephalus, indicating the need for further study.

  17. Elastography Evaluation of Benign Thyroid Nodules in Patients Affected by Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, Carlo; Pirola, Ilenia; Gandossi, Elena; Formenti, Annamaria; Agosti, Barbara; Castellano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate the predictive value of elastography in benign thyroid nodules of patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). From January 2011 to January 2012, 242 nodules in patients affected by HT were submitted to fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). All of the patients underwent sonography and elastography performed before FNAC. 230 (95%) nodules were benign, 8 papillary cancers, and 4 follicular lesions. Score 1 was found in 79.1% of benign lesions (sensitivity 79.1%; specificity 66.7%; PPV 97.8%; NPV 14.3%; accuracy 78.5%; p < 0.05). In order to evaluate the outcome of thyroid ultrasound echogenicity in relation to elastography features of nodule(s), all the patients with benign nodules were stratified according to their hypoechoic pattern of thyroid (mild-moderate and severe). Following stratification score 1 was found in 84.2% of benign nodules (sensitivity 75.0%; specificity 88.9%; PPV 27.3%; NPV 98.4%; accuracy 88.2%; p < 0.0001) of patients with a mild-moderate ultrasound thyroid hypoechogenicity, whereas it was found in 60% of benign nodules (p = 0.715) of patients with a marked thyroid hypoechogenicity. Elastography appears to have limited value in detecting thyroid cancer in patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis with severe hypoechoic thyroid tissue. PMID:26273296

  18. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  19. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  20. Angle-independent myocardial elastography: theoretical analysis and clinical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Lee, Wei-Ning; Fung-kee-Fung, Simon D.

    2007-03-01

    Several methods have been introduced in the past few years to quantify left-ventricular strain in order to detect myocardial ischemia and infarction. Myocardial Elastography is one of these methods, which is based on ultrasound Radio-Frequency (RF) signal processing at high frame rates for the highest precision and resolution of strain estimation. Myocardial elastography estimates displacement and strain during the natural contraction of the myocardium using cross-correlation techniques. We have previously shown that imaging of the myocardial strain at high precision allows the correct assessment of the contractility of the cardiac muscle and thus measurement of the extent of ischemia or infarct. In this paper, for the first time in echocardiography, we show how angle-independent techniques can be used to estimate and image the mechanics of normal and pathological myocardia, both in simulations and in vivo. First, the fundamental limits of 2D normal and principal strain component estimation are determined using an ultrasound image formation model and a 2D short-axis view of a 3D left-ventricular, finite-element model, in normal and ischemic configurations. Two-dimensional (i.e., lateral and axial) cumulative displacement and strain components were iteratively estimated and imaged using 1D cross-correlation and recorrelation techniques in a 2D search. Validation of these elastographic findings in one normal human subject was performed. Principal strains were also imaged for the characterization of normal myocardium. In conclusion, the feasibility of angle-independent, 2D myocardial elastography technique was shown through the calculation of the in-plane principal strains, which was proven essential in the reliable depiction of strains independent of the beam-tissue angle or the type of sonographic view used.

  1. Feasibility of monitoring HIFU prostate cancer therapy using elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, Remi; Chapelon, Jean Y.; Bertrand, Michel J.; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of elastographic monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. Since pathological tissues and HIFU-induced lesions exhibit different elastic properties than normal tissues, elastography is potentially able to achieve these goals. An ultrasound scanner was connected to a PC to acquire RF images. This setup is compatible with a HIFU device used for prostate cancer therapy by transrectal route. The therapy transducer and the biplane-imaging probe are covered with a balloon filled with a coupling liquid. Compression of the prostate is applied by inflating the balloon, while imaging sector scans of the prostate. In-vivo elastograms of the prostate were acquired before HIFU treatment. Problems inherent to in-vivo acquisitions are reported, such as undesired tangential displacements during the radial compression. This study shows the potential for in-vivo elastogram acquisition of HIFU-induced lesions in the human prostate.

  2. Diagnostic value of endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for accessible lung cancer lesions after non-diagnostic conventional techniques: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer diagnosis is usually achieved through a set of bronchoscopic techniques or computed tomography guided-transthoracic needle aspiration (CT-TTNA). However these procedures have a variable diagnostic yield and some patients remain without a definite diagnosis despite being submitted to an extensive workup. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cost of linear endobronchial (EBUS) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), performed with one echoendoscope, for the diagnosis of suspicious lung cancer lesions after failure of conventional procedures. Methods One hundred and twenty three patients with an undiagnosed but suspected malignant lung lesion (paratracheal, parabronchial, paraesophageal) or with a peripheral lesion and positron emission tomography positive mediastinal lymph nodes who had undergone at least one diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy or CT-TTNA attempt were submitted to EBUS and EUS-FNA. Patients with endobronchial lesions were excluded. Results Of the 123 patients, 88 had a pulmonary nodule/mass and 35 were selected based on mediastinal PET positive lymph nodes. Two patients were excluded because an endobronchial mass was detected at the time of the procedure. The target lesion could be visualized in 121 cases and FNA was performed in 118 cases. A definitive diagnosis was obtained in 106 cases (87.6%). Eighty-eight patients (72.7%) had non-small cell lung cancer, 15 (12.4%) had small cell lung cancer and metastatic disease was found in 3 patients (2.5%). The remaining 15 negative cases were subsequently diagnosed by surgical procedures. Twelve patients (9.9%) had a malignant tumor and in 3 (2.5%) a benign lesion was found. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of EBUS and EUS-FNA to diagnose malignancy were 89.8%, 100%, 100% and 20.0% respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was 90.1% in a population with 97.5% prevalence of cancer. The ultrasonographic

  3. Impact and safety of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration on patients with cirrhosis and pyrexia of unknown origin in India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Narendra; Bansal, Rinkesh Kumar; Puri, Rajesh; Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Nasa, Mukesh; Shah, Vinit; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Sud, Randhir; Soin, Arvinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Etiologic diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin is important in patients with cirrhosis for optimal management and to prevent flare up of infectious disease after liver transplantation. However, there is very limited literature available on this subject. The present study aimed to examine the safety and impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with cirrhosis. Methods: The study was conducted between January 2014 and January 2016 at a tertiary care center. A total of 50 (47 lymph nodes, 3 adrenal) EUS guided FNAs were performed in 46 patients. Data are presented as median (25 – 75 IQR). Results: The study included 46 patients (40 males) whose mean age was 47.9 ± 11.1 (SD) years; mean Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score and mean MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) score were 10 (8 – 11) and 18 (12 – 20), respectively. The Child Pugh class was A in 4, B in 14, and C in 28 (including three patients with adrenal FNAs). Indications for FNA were pyrexia of unknown origin and lymphadenopathy on CT imaging. The cytopathological diagnoses were metastatic disease in 1 (adrenal), granulomatous change in 10 (6 positive with acid fast bacilli stain), histoplasmosis in three (two adrenals, one lymph node), 32 lymph nodes were reactive and four lymph node FNAs showed inadequate cellularity. The pathologic nodes had significantly lower long-to-short axis ratio [1.25 (1.09 – 1.28) versus 1.46 (1.22 – 1.87), P = 0.020]; a higher proportion of hypoechoic echotexture (5 versus 3, P = 0.017), and sharply defined borders (4 versus 2, P = 0.029). Complications included mild hepatic encephalopathy related to sedation in two patients with Child’s C status. Conclusion: EUS guided FNA is safe in patients with cirrhosis and modified the management in 14/46 (30.4 %) patients.

  4. Impact and safety of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration on patients with cirrhosis and pyrexia of unknown origin in India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Narendra; Bansal, Rinkesh Kumar; Puri, Rajesh; Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Nasa, Mukesh; Shah, Vinit; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Sud, Randhir; Soin, Arvinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Etiologic diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin is important in patients with cirrhosis for optimal management and to prevent flare up of infectious disease after liver transplantation. However, there is very limited literature available on this subject. The present study aimed to examine the safety and impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with cirrhosis. Methods: The study was conducted between January 2014 and January 2016 at a tertiary care center. A total of 50 (47 lymph nodes, 3 adrenal) EUS guided FNAs were performed in 46 patients. Data are presented as median (25 – 75 IQR). Results: The study included 46 patients (40 males) whose mean age was 47.9 ± 11.1 (SD) years; mean Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score and mean MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) score were 10 (8 – 11) and 18 (12 – 20), respectively. The Child Pugh class was A in 4, B in 14, and C in 28 (including three patients with adrenal FNAs). Indications for FNA were pyrexia of unknown origin and lymphadenopathy on CT imaging. The cytopathological diagnoses were metastatic disease in 1 (adrenal), granulomatous change in 10 (6 positive with acid fast bacilli stain), histoplasmosis in three (two adrenals, one lymph node), 32 lymph nodes were reactive and four lymph node FNAs showed inadequate cellularity. The pathologic nodes had significantly lower long-to-short axis ratio [1.25 (1.09 – 1.28) versus 1.46 (1.22 – 1.87), P = 0.020]; a higher proportion of hypoechoic echotexture (5 versus 3, P = 0.017), and sharply defined borders (4 versus 2, P = 0.029). Complications included mild hepatic encephalopathy related to sedation in two patients with Child’s C status. Conclusion: EUS guided FNA is safe in patients with cirrhosis and modified the management in 14/46 (30.4 %) patients. PMID:27652300

  5. Slow-pull and different conventional suction techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid lesions using 22-gauge needles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ying; Ding, Qing-Yu; Lv, Yang; Guo, Wen; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and compare them with different suction techniques. METHODS From July 2010 to December 2015, 102 patients with pancreatic solid lesions who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with 22-gauge needles were retrospectively evaluated. EUS-FNA diagnosis was based on a cytological examination, and final diagnosis was based on a comprehensive standard of cytological diagnosis, surgical pathology and clinical or imaging follow-up. Cytological specimens were characterized for cellularity and blood contamination. The cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were analyzed. RESULTS Of all of the EUS-FNA procedures, the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were used in 31, 19, 34 and 18 procedures, respectively. There were significant differences between these four suction techniques in terms of cytological diagnostic accuracy (90.3% vs 63.2% vs 58.8% vs 55.6%, P = 0.019), sensitivity (88.2% vs 41.7% vs 40.0% vs 36.4%, P = 0.009) and blood contamination (score ≥ 2 for 29.0% vs 52.6% vs 70.6% vs 72.2%, P = 0.003). The accuracy and sensitivity of the slow-pull technique were significantly higher than those of the suction techniques using 5-mL (P = 0.03, P = 0.014), 10-mL (P = 0.005; P = 0.006) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.01, P = 0.01). Blood contamination was significantly lower in the slow-pull technique than in the suction techniques with 10-mL (P = 0.001) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION The slow-pull technique may increase the cytological diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity with slight blood contamination during EUS-FNA when using 22-gauge needles for solid pancreatic masses.

  6. Vascular ultrasound for atherosclerosis imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Korte, Chris L.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the Western world. Therefore, detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease is of paramount importance to monitor treatment and possible prevention of acute events. Vascular ultrasound is an excellent technique to assess the geometry of vessel walls and plaques. The high temporal as well as spatial resolution allows quantification of luminal area and plaque size and volume. While carotid arteries can be imaged non-invasively, scanning of coronary arteries requires invasive intravascular catheters. Both techniques have already demonstrated their clinical applicability. Using linear array technology, detection of disease as well as monitoring of pharmaceutical treatment in carotid arteries are feasible. Data acquired with intravascular ultrasound catheters have proved to be especially beneficial in understanding the development of atherosclerotic disease in coronary arteries. With the introduction of vascular elastography not only the geometry of plaques but also the risk for rupture of plaques might be identified. These so-called vulnerable plaques are frequently not flow-limiting and rupture of these plaques is responsible for the majority of cerebral and cardiac ischaemic events. Intravascular ultrasound elastography studies have demonstrated a high correlation between high strain and vulnerable plaque features, both ex vivo and in vivo. Additionally, pharmaceutical intervention could be monitored using this technique. Non-invasive vascular elastography has recently been developed for carotid applications by using compound scanning. Validation and initial clinical evaluation is currently being performed. Since abundance of vasa vasorum (VV) is correlated with vulnerable plaque development, quantification of VV might be a unique tool to even prevent this from happening. Using ultrasound contrast agents, it has been demonstrated that VV can be identified and quantified. Although far from routine

  7. Diagnostic Value of Elastography in the Diagnosis of Intermetatarsal Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Ormeci, Tugrul; Güler, Olcay; Malkoc, Melih; Keskinbora, Mert; Güngören, Fatma Zeynep; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the ultrasound and elastographic properties of intermetatarsal neuroma (interdigital neuroma) and their contribution to diagnosis. Eighteen patients with metatarsalgia, who had presented to an orthopedic clinic from April 2013 to February 2015, were diagnosed with 25 intermetatarsal neuromas (11 unilateral [61.11%], 7 bilateral [38.89%]). These patients underwent evaluation with ultrasonography and simultaneous ultrasound strain elastography to assess the elastographic properties of the tissues in the intermetatarsal space. The intermetatarsal neuroma diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic inspection. The lesion contours, localization, dimensions, and vascularization were evaluated before surgical excision. The elasticity and strain ratio values were compared between the neuroma and adjacent healthy intermetatarsal space. Of the 25 intermetatarsal neuromas, 1 (4%) was not detected by ultrasonography (incidence of detection of 96%). The mean neuroma width was 6.35 (range 3.7 to 13) mm in the coronal plane, and the mean elasticity and strain ratio values were 3.44 (range 1.1 to 5.1) and 9.47 (range 2.3 to 19.3), respectively. The elasticity and strain ratio values were significantly greater in the presence of an interdigital neuroma than in the adjacent healthy intermetatarsal spaces (Z = -3.964, p = .0001 and Z = -3.927, p = .0001, respectively). The diagnostic cutoff values were calculated as 2.52 for elasticity and 6.1 for the strain ratio. Four neuromas (16%) were not demarcated, and the elasticity and strain ratio values for these were lower than those for neuromas with demarcated contours but were greater than those for healthy intermetatarsal spaces (p < .006 and p < .005, respectively). Patients with clinically suspected intermetatarsal neuromas that do not show demarcation and with smaller lesions might benefit from the use of ultrasound elastography for diagnosis.

  8. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  9. The Avaibility of Strain Elastography in a Hydatid Cyst – Interobserver Study

    PubMed Central

    Duymuş, Mahmut; Menzilcioğlu, Mehmet Sait; Gök, Mustafa; Erdem, Ahmet; Avcu, Serhat; Kırış, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To differentiate the hydatid cyst (HC) types by ultrasound elastography using two different sizes (4 mm and 8 mm) of the region of interest (ROI) and asking two different radiologists (interobserver) for their opinion. Material/Methods Patients with HC were evaluated by USG elastography. The statistical anayses were performed using Strain index (SI) which is the unit of strain elastography. Results A total of 26 out of 33 patients were female, and 7 were male. The mean age was 38.85±17.62 (range from 10 to 72 years). Type I: 6, Type 2: 6, Type III: 6, Type IV: 11, Type V: 4. There was no significant difference in HC SI (regardless of types) between O1 and O2, and 4-mm and 8-mm ROI (p>0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between SI of HC types of interobservers (O1–O2) and ROI sizes (4–8 mm) (p>0.05 for all parameters). The highest correlation between HC types and ROI sizes was in ROI size of 4 mm. Conclusions The correlation between SI and types was reliable in standard-applied 4-mm ROI. There was no statistically significant difference between interobservers in SI values. Thus, elastography tecnhnique is objective for HC but not appropriate to differentiate the types. PMID:27429674

  10. A novel shape similarity based elastography system for prostate cancer assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haisu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Samani, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer among men worldwide and remains the second leading cancer-related cause of death in mature men. The disease can be cured if it is detected at early stage. This implies that prostate cancer detection at early stage is very critical for desirable treatment outcome. Conventional techniques of prostate cancer screening and detection, such as Digital Rectal Examination (DRE), Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) and Trans Rectal Ultra-Sonography (TRUS), are known to have low sensitivity and specificity. Elastography is an imaging technique that uses tissue stiffness as contrast mechanism. As the association between the degree of prostate tissue stiffness alteration and its pathology is well established, elastography can potentially detect prostate cancer with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a novel elastography technique which, unlike other elastography techniques, does not require displacement data acquisition system. This technique requires the prostate's pre-compression and postcompression transrectal ultrasound images. The conceptual foundation of reconstructing the prostate's normal and pathological tissues elastic moduli is to determine these moduli such that the similarity between calculated and observed shape features of the post compression prostate image is maximized. Results indicate that this technique is highly accurate and robust.

  11. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis.

  12. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; Placenta previa - ultrasound; Multiple ...

  13. Optical coherence elastography: current status and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2011-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has several advantages over other imaging modalities, such as angiography and ultrasound, due to its inherently high in vivo resolution, which allows for the identification of morphological tissue structures. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) benefits from the superior spatial resolution of OCT and has promising applications, including cancer diagnosis and the detailed characterization of arterial wall biomechanics, both of which are based on the elastic properties of the tissue under investigation. We present OCE principles based on techniques associated with static and dynamic tissue excitation, and their corresponding elastogram image-reconstruction algorithms are reviewed. OCE techniques, including the development of intravascular- or catheter-based OCE, are in their early stages of development but show great promise for surgical oncology or intravascular cardiology applications.

  14. Feasibility of a transient elastography technique for in vitro arterial elasticity assessment.

    PubMed

    Brum, J; Balay, G; Bia, D; Armentano, R L; Negreira, C

    2010-01-01

    The early detection of biomechanical modifications in the arterial wall could be used as a predictor factor for various diseases, for example hypertension or atherosclerosis. In this work a transient elastography technique is used for the in vitro evaluation of the arterial wall elasticity. The obtained Young modulus is compared with the one obtained by a more classical approach: pressure-diameter relationships. As a sample an arterial phantom made of PolyVinyl Alcohol (PVA) gel was used. Diameter variation due to pressure variation inside the phantom was recorded by means of ultrasound. Through both techniques similar Young modulus estimations are obtained showing in this way the feasibility of applying transient elastography for the arterial wall elasticity assessment.

  15. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  16. Swept-source anatomic optical coherence elastography of porcine trachea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Mitran, Sorin; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative endoscopic imaging is at the vanguard of novel techniques in the assessment upper airway obstruction. Anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) has the potential to provide the geometry of the airway lumen with high-resolution and in 4 dimensions. By coupling aOCT with measurements of pressure, optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be performed to characterize airway wall stiffness. This can aid in identifying regions of dynamic collapse as well as informing computational fluid dynamics modeling to aid in surgical decision-making. Toward this end, here we report on an anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system powered by a wavelength-swept laser source. The system employs a fiber-optic catheter with outer diameter of 0.82 mm deployed via the bore of a commercial, flexible bronchoscope. Helical scans are performed to measure the airway geometry and to quantify the cross-sectional-area (CSA) of the airway. We report on a preliminary validation of aOCT for elastography, in which aOCT-derived CSA was obtained as a function of pressure to estimate airway wall compliance. Experiments performed on a Latex rubber tube resulted in a compliance measurement of 0.68+/-0.02 mm2/cmH2O, with R2=0.98 over the pressure range from 10 to 40 cmH2O. Next, ex vivo porcine trachea was studied, resulting in a measured compliance from 1.06+/-0.12 to 3.34+/-0.44 mm2/cmH2O, (R2>0.81). The linearity of the data confirms the elastic nature of the airway. The compliance values are within the same order-of-magnitude as previous measurements of human upper airways, suggesting that this system is capable of assessing airway wall compliance in future human studies.

  17. Phase aberration effects in elastography.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Bilgen, M; Ophir, J

    2001-06-01

    In sonography, phase aberration plays a role in the corruption of sonograms. Phase aberration does not have a significant impact on elastography, if statistically similar phase errors are present in both the pre- and postcompression signals. However, if the phase errors are present in only one of the pre- or postcompression signal pairs, the precision of the strain estimation process will be reduced. In some cases, increased phase errors may occur only in the postcompression signal due to changes in the tissue structure with the applied compression. Phase-aberration effects increase with applied strain and may be viewed as an image quality derating factor, much like frequency-dependent attenuation or undesired lateral tissue motion. In this paper, we present a theoretical and simulation study of the effects of phase aberration on the elastographic strain-estimation process, using the strain filter approach.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  19. Quantitative photoacoustic elastography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    We report quantitative photoacoustic elastography (QPAE) capable of measuring Young's modulus of biological tissue in vivo in humans. By combining conventional PAE with a stress sensor having known stress-strain behavior, QPAE can simultaneously measure strain and stress, from which Young's modulus is calculated. We first demonstrate the feasibility of QPAE in agar phantoms with different concentrations. The measured Young's modulus values fit well with both the empirical expectation based on the agar concentrations and those measured in an independent standard compression test. Next, QPAE was applied to quantify the Young's modulus of skeletal muscle in vivo in humans, showing a linear relationship between muscle stiffness and loading. The results demonstrated the capability of QPAE to assess the absolute elasticity of biological tissue noninvasively in vivo in humans, indicating its potential for tissue biomechanics studies and clinical applications.

  20. A two-center comparative study of plastic and lumen-apposing large diameter self-expandable metallic stents in endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Orkoonsawat, Piyachai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of walled-off pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) (pseudocyst [PC]; walled-off necrosis [WON]) utilizes double pigtail plastic stents (PS) and the newer large diameter fully covered self-expandable stents (FCSEMS) customized for PFC drainage. This study examined the impact of type of stent on clinical outcomes and costs. Patients and Methods: Retrospective two-center study. Outcome variables were technical and clinical success, need for repeat procedures, need for direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN), and procedure-related costs. Results: A total of 49 (PC: 31, WON: 18) patients were analyzed. Initially, PS was used in 37 and FCSEMS in 12. Repeat transmural drainage was required in 14 (PS: 13 [9 treated with PS, 4 treated with FCSEMS]; FCSEMS: 1 [treated with PS]) due to stent migration (PS: 3; FCSEMS: 1) or inadequate drainage (PS: 10). Technical success was 100%. Initial clinical success was 64.9% (25/38) for PS versus 91.7% (11/12) for FCSEMS (P = 0.074). With repeat transmural stenting, final clinical success was achieved in 94.6% and 100%, respectively (P = 0.411). Compared to FCSEMS, PS was associated with greater need for repeat drainage (34.2% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.032). The need for and frequency of DEN was similar between both groups, but PS required more frequent balloon dilatation. PS was significantly cheaper for noninfected PC. Costs were similar for infected PC and WON. Conclusion: PS was associated with a higher need for a second drainage procedure to achieve clinical success. The use of FCSEMS did not increase procedural costs for infected PC and WON. PMID:27803905

  1. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  2. A hybrid CPU-GPGPU approach for real-time elastography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Deka, Sthiti; Righetti, Raffaella

    2011-12-01

    Ultrasound elastography is becoming a widely available clinical imaging tool. In recent years, several real- time elastography algorithms have been proposed; however, most of these algorithms achieve real-time frame rates through compromises in elastographic image quality. Cross-correlation- based elastographic techniques are known to provide high- quality elastographic estimates, but they are computationally intense and usually not suitable for real-time clinical applications. Recently, the use of massively parallel general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) for accelerating computationally intense operations in biomedical applications has received great interest. In this study, we investigate the use of the GPGPU to speed up generation of cross-correlation-based elastograms and achieve real-time frame rates while preserving elastographic image quality. We propose and statistically analyze performance of a new hybrid model of computation suitable for elastography applications in which sequential code is executed on the CPU and parallel code is executed on the GPGPU. Our results indicate that the proposed hybrid approach yields optimal results and adequately addresses the trade-off between speed and quality.

  3. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated. PMID:25726490

  4. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P < 0.05). Strain ratios between the two methods did not differ. Strain elastography was feasible for estimating thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability.

  5. Multimodal classification of prostate tissue: a feasibility study on combining multiparametric MRI and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Nir, Guy; Kozlowski, Piotr; Black, Peter; Jones, Edward C.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The common practice for biopsy guidance is through transrectal ultrasound, with the fusion of ultrasound and MRI-based targets when available. However, ultrasound is only used as a guidance modality in MR-targeted ultrasound-guided biopsy, even though previous work has shown the potential utility of ultrasound, particularly ultrasound vibro-elastography, as a tissue typing approach. We argue that multiparametric ultrasound, which includes B-mode and vibro-elastography images, could contain information that is not captured using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and therefore play a role in refining the biopsy and treatment strategies. In this work, we combine mpMRI with multiparametric ultrasound features from registered tissue areas to examine the potential improvement in cancer detection. All the images were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy and cancer detection was validated based on 36 whole mount histology slides. We calculated a set of 24 texture features from vibro-elastography and B-mode images, and five features from mpMRI. Then we used recursive feature elimination (RFE) and sparse regression through LASSO to find an optimal set of features to be used for tissue classification. We show that the set of these selected features increases the area under ROC curve from 0.87 with mpMRI alone to 0.94 with the selected mpMRI and multiparametric ultrasound features, when used with support vector machine classification on features extracted from peripheral zone. For features extracted from the whole-gland, the area under the curve was 0.75 and 0.82 for mpMRI and mpMRI along with ultrasound, respectively. These preliminary results provide evidence that ultrasound and ultrasound vibro-elastography could be used as modalities for improved cancer detection in combination with MRI.

  6. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  7. Developments in flexible endoscopic surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Hubertus; Becker, Valentin; Bauer, Margit; Kranzfelder, Michael; Schirren, Rebekka; Lüth, Tim; Meining, Alexander; Wilhelm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is increasingly developing into a therapeutic instead of a purely diagnostic discipline. Improved visualization makes early lesions easily detectable and allows us to decide ad hoc on the required treatment. Deep enteroscopy allows the exploration of even the small bowel – for long a “white spot” for gastrointestinal endoscopy – and to perform direct treatment. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a considerable step forward in oncologically correct endoscopic treatment of (early) malignant lesions. Though still technically challenging, it is increasingly facilitated by new manipulation techniques and tools that are being steadily optimized. Closure of wall defects and hemostasis could be improved significantly. Even the anatomy beyond the gastrointestinal wall is being explored by the therapeutic use of endoluminal ultrasound. Endosonographic-guided surgery is not only a suitable fallback solution if conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails, but even makes necrosectomy procedures, abscess drainage, and neurolysis feasible for the endoscopist. Newly developed endoscopic approaches aim at formerly distinctive surgical domains like gastroesophageal reflux disease, appendicitis, and cholecystitis. Combined endoscopic/laparoscopic interventional techniques could become the harbingers of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, whereas pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is currently still in its beginnings. PMID:25565878

  8. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  9. The integration of single fiber reflectance (SFR) spectroscopy during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) in pancreatic masses: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Amelink, Arjen; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2016-03-01

    EUS-FNA can be used for pathological confirmation of a suspicious pancreatic mass. However, performance depends on an on-site cytologist and time between punction and final pathology results can be long. SFR spectroscopy is capable of extracting biologically relevant parameters (e.g. oxygenation and blood volume) in real-time from a very small tissue volume at difficult locations. In this study we determined feasibility of the integration of SFR spectroscopy during EUSFNA procedures in pancreatic masses. Patients with benign and malignant pancreatic masses who were scheduled for an EUS-FNA were included. The working guide wire inside the 19 gauge endoscopic biopsy needle was removed and the sterile single fiber (300 μm core and 700 μm outer diameter, wide-angle beam, NA 0.22) inserted through the needle. Spectroscopy measurements in the visiblenear infrared wavelength region (400-900 nm) and autofluorescence measurements (excitation at 405 nm) were taken three times, and subsequently cytology was obtained. Wavelength dependent optical properties were compared to cytology results. We took measurements in 13 patients with corresponding cytology results (including mucinous tumor, ductal adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, and pancreatitis). In this paper we show the first analyzed results comparing normal pancreatic tissue with cancerous tissue in the same patient. We found a large difference in blood volume fraction, and blood oxygenation was higher in normal tissue. Integration of SFR spectroscopy is feasible in EUS-FNA procedures, the workflow hardly requires changes and it takes little time. The first results differentiating normal from tumor tissue are promising.

  10. Rapid On-Site Evaluation Does Not Improve Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Adequacy in Pancreatic Masses: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Deng, Xuan; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) during endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS–FNA) of pancreatic masses has been reported to be associated with improved adequacy and diagnostic yield. However, recent observational data on the impact of ROSE have reported conflicting results. A meta-analysis and systematic review was therefore conducted to evaluate the contribution of ROSE during EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses. Method A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE/Pubmed and EMBASE databases for studies comparing the efficacy of ROSE between patients in two cohorts. Outcomes considered included diagnostic adequate rate, diagnostic yield, number of needle passes, pooled sensitivity and specificity. Findings from a random-effects model were expressed as pooled risk difference (RD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 7 studies (1299 patients) was finally included and further analyzed in the current meta-analysis. EUS-FNA with ROSE could not improve diagnostic adequacy (RD = 0.05, 95% CI: -0.01–0.11) and diagnostic yield (RD = 0.04 95%CI: -0.05, 0.13). The number of needle passes showed no statistically significant difference with and without ROSE (RD = -0.68 95%CI: -2.35, 0.98). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of ROSE group were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.87, 0.94) and 1 (95%CI: 0.94, 1.00). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of non-ROSE group were 0.85 (95%CI: 0.80, 0.89) and 1 (95%CI: 0.95, 1.00). ROSE group and non-ROSE group showed comparable sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Compared to historical reports of its clinical efficacy in patients with pancreatic lesions, ROSE may be not associated with an improvement of diagnostic yield, adequate rate, pooled sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27657529

  11. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  12. Designing tissue phantoms for ultrasonography and elastography with TiO2 incorporated polyacrylamide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kishore; Mohanty, Maneesha Esther; Jayashankar, V.; Suresh, S.; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-07-01

    Research on ultrasonography and elastography instrumentation is crucially dependent on the quality of tissue-mimicking phantoms on which the instrumental parameters are tested. The phantoms should ideally possess values of various acoustic parameters corresponding to normal and abnormal tissues of different types and these properties should not change significantly with time. Designing such phantoms requires a molecular level understanding of the material to be used. In this context, polyacrylamide gels made from corresponding monomer, initiator and cross-linker were developed. An understanding of the network structure of these hydrogels at the molecular level was made possible using fluorescence spectroscopy with anilinonaphthylsulfonate as an extrinsic fluorescent probe. TiO2 was used to adjust the acoustic transparency so as to bring the ultrasound reflection parameters close to those of human tissues. It was found that the network structure of poly-acrylamide (PAM) hydrogels as well as their acoustic and viscoelastic properties could be conveniently varied by altering the composition of the components. This understanding at the molecular as well as the bulk level was then used to develop tissue phantoms appropriate for imaging in ultrasound-B and elastography modes.

  13. Investigation of the effects of myocardial anisotropy for shear wave elastography using impulsive force and harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Matthew W.; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (>200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart.

  14. Analysis of elastography methods using mathematical and ex vivo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byram, Brett C.; Wahl, Michael R.; Holmes, David R., III; Lerman, Amir; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) currently has a limited ability to characterize endovascular anatomic properties. IVUS elastography enhances the ability to characterize the biomechanical properties of arterial walls. A mathematical phantom generator was developed based on the characteristics of 30MHz, 64 element IVUS catheter images from excised canine femoral arteries. The difference between high and low-pressure intra-arterial images was modeled using phase shifts. The increase in phase shift occurred randomly, generally at every three pixels in our images. Using mathematical phantoms, different methods for calculating elastograms were quantitatively analyzed. Specifically, the effect of standard cross correlation versus cross correlation of the integral of the inflection characteristics for a given set of data, and the effect of an algorithm utilizing a non-constant kernel, were assessed. The specific methods found to be most accurate on the mathematical phantom data were then applied to ex vivo canine data of a scarred and a healthy artery. The algorithm detected significant differences between these two sets of arterial data. It will be necessary to obtain and analyze several more sets of canine arterial data in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the algorithm.

  15. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  16. Shearwave Elastography Increases Diagnostic Accuracy in Characterization of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wei Lin; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Mohd-Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of shearwave elastography (SWE) in differentiating between benign and malignant breast lesions. One hundred and fifty-nine lesions were assessed using B-mode ultrasound (US) and SWE parameters were recorded (Emax, Emean, Emin, Eratio, SD). SWE measurements were then correlated with histopathological diagnosis. The final sample contained 85 benign and 74 malignant lesions. The maximum stiffness (Emax) with a cutoff point of ≥ 56.0 kPa (based on ROC curves) provided sensitivity of 100.0%, specificity of 97.6%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 97.4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in detecting malignant lesions. A cutoff of ≥80 kPa managed to downgrade 95.5% of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4a lesions to BI-RADS 3, negating the need for biopsy. Using a combination of BI-RADS and SWE, the authors managed to improve the PPV from 2.3% to 50% in BI-RADS 4a lesions. SWE of the breast provides highly specific and sensitive quantitative values that are beneficial in the characterization of breast lesions. Our results showed that Emax is the most accurate value for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. PMID:27015196

  17. Associations Between Elastography Findings and Clinicopathological Factors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Sueta, Aiko; Tomiguchi, Mai; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Kawasoe, Teru; Hamada, Akinobu; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to explore the clinical significance of breast tumor tissue stiffness based on ultrasound elastographic evaluation in clinical breast cancer. Tumor tissue stiffness is mainly regulated by interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix and was recently regarded as a representative feature of tumor microenvironment. Basic research has already revealed that the tumor stiffness can lead to tumor progression; however, little is known about its clinical significance because thus far, no useful modality is available in the clinical setting. We investigated the tumor stiffness by strain elastography in 503 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer. Correlations between stiffness and clinicopathological factors, including tumor size, lymph node involvement, tumor subtypes, and stromal-related genes’ expressions in primary breast tumor, were statistically examined. We identified that clinical tumor stiffness significantly correlated with lymph node involvement and invasive tumor size but not with hormonal receptor expressions, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 status, and ki67 labeling index by analyses of both categorical and continuous variables of stiffness. On multivariate analyses, axillary lymph node metastasis was an independent factor that influenced the stiffness of primary breast tumor. In the gene expression analyses, relatively hard tumors had a significantly high gene expression of lysyl oxidase compared with soft tumors. Our study showed a close relationship between primary tumor stiffness by elastographic evaluation and lymph node involvement in clinical breast cancer. Further investigations on tumor-related tissue stiffness are required. PMID:26683963

  18. Modality-independent elastography: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Chad W.; Miga, Michael I.

    2004-05-01

    The correlation between the stiffness and health of tissue is an accepted form of organ disease assessment. As a result, there has been a significant amount of interest in developing methods to image elasticity parameters (i.e. elastography). This work presents a technique that frames the elastography imaging problem within a non-rigid iterative image registration approach. Through the use of finite element modeling and mutual information, material properties are varied in order to optimize the registration between a post-compressed image and a model-generated compressed image. The results shown here demonstrate the strong connection between image similarity and appropriate tissue parameters and the algorithm's ability to detect contrast in tissue stiffness. By casting elasticity image reconstruction within the context of image similarity, the method is generalized to all forms of medical imaging.

  19. Quantitative imaging of nonlinear shear modulus by combining static elastography and shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; De Brosses, Emilie; Tanter, Mickaël

    2012-04-01

    The study of new tissue mechanical properties such as shear nonlinearity could lead to better tissue characterization and clinical diagnosis. This work proposes a method combining static elastography and shear wave elastography to derive the nonlinear shear modulus by applying the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible soft solids. Results demonstrate that by applying a moderate static stress at the surface of the investigated medium, and by following the quantitative evolution of its shear modulus, it is possible to accurately and quantitatively recover the local Landau (A) coefficient characterizing the shear nonlinearity of soft tissues.

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection combined with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for early gastric cancer on gastric fundal varices.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Asano, Naoki; Yokosawa, Satoshi; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-08-01

    Currently, there is little report of treatment strategy for early gastric cancer (EGC) on gastric fundal varices (GFVs), because controlling GFVs was more challenging than controlling gastric cardiac varices associated with esophageal varices. We first report effective endoscopic treatment of EGC on GFVs of a 77-year-old man with Child-B cirrhosis. Endoscopic ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography studies revealed intramucosal EGC on variceal components, supplied from posterior gastric vein and drained to subphrenic vein without gastrorenal shunt. With informed consent, we performed endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) after eradication of GFVs by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Histologic assessment revealed curability of ESD and inflammation and fibrosis around EIS site. Thereafter, no recurrence and complication had occurred. To avoid life-threatening bleeding from GFVs, we achieved complete resection by ESD under direct visualization of submucosa after eradication of GFVs by EIS based on the examination of hemodynamics and local relationship between EGC and GFVs.

  1. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  2. Comparison of elastography methods in patients with pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Rustemovic, N.; Opacic, D.; Ostojic, Z.; Opacic, M.; Ledinsky, I.; Višijić, A.; Ravić, K. Grubelić; Iveković, H.; Markoš, P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) quantitative elastography methods are developed for non-invasive differentiation of pancreatic masses. Aims: First: To evaluate the diagnostic value of strain ratio (SR) and hue histogram (HH) in patients with pancreatic masses and to determine the cut-off value between pancreatic cancer and focal pancreatitis using a pancreatic tissue close to the mass as a reference area. Second: To calculate new variable HH ratio (HHR) in an attempt to improve sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the method. Methods: In a prospective single center study, 149 patients were examined: 105 with the pancreatic masses and 44 controls using Pentax EUS linear probes in combination with Hitachi platforms. SR and HH were automatically calculated by machine software. Finally, two groups were formed: Pancreatic cancer group (58 patients) and focal pancreatitis group (47 patients). All statistical analysis has been made in SPSS 14.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA). Conclusion: Statistical analysis in our study showed that SR with a cut-off value of 7.59 reaches 100% sensitivity and 95% specificity with overall accuracy of 97% (confidence intervals [CI]: 92-97%) in detection of pancreatic cancer. Statistical analysis also showed that HH with a cut-off value of ≥86 reaches 100% sensitivity and just 45% specificity with overall accuracy of 66% (CI: 61-66%) in detection of pancreatic cancer. New variable HHR with cut-off ≥1.153 was slightly better with 98% sensitivity and 50% specificity, with overall accuracy of 69% (CI: 63-70%). SR showed significantly higher specificity compared with HH and HHR. More HH studies on Hitachi platforms are needed. PMID:26425528

  3. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future.

  4. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  5. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future. PMID:27179143

  6. Shear wave elastography using amplitude-modulated acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Arnal, Bastien; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the elasticity of ocular tissue (cornea and intraocular lens) could help the understanding and management of pathologies related to biomechanical deficiency. In previous studies, we introduced a setup based on optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography (SWE) with high resolution and high sensitivity. SWE determines tissue stiffness from the propagation speed of shear waves launched within tissue. We proposed acoustic radiation force to remotely induce shear waves by focusing an ultrasound (US) beam in tissue, similar to several elastography techniques. Minimizing the maximum US pressure is essential in ophthalmology for safety reasons. For this purpose, we propose a pulse compression approach. It utilizes coded US emissions to generate shear waves where the energy is spread over a long emission, and then numerically compressed into a short, localized, and high-energy pulse. We used a 7.5-MHz single-element focused transducer driven by coded excitations where the amplitude is modulated by a linear frequency-swept square wave (1 to 7 kHz). An inverse filter approach was used for compression. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing shear wave elastography measurements in tissue-mimicking phantoms at low US pressures (mechanical index <0.6).

  7. Shear wave elastography using amplitude-modulated acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Arnal, Bastien; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Investigating the elasticity of ocular tissue (cornea and intraocular lens) could help the understanding and management of pathologies related to biomechanical deficiency. In previous studies, we introduced a setup based on optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography (SWE) with high resolution and high sensitivity. SWE determines tissue stiffness from the propagation speed of shear waves launched within tissue. We proposed acoustic radiation force to remotely induce shear waves by focusing an ultrasound (US) beam in tissue, similar to several elastography techniques. Minimizing the maximum US pressure is essential in ophthalmology for safety reasons. For this purpose, we propose a pulse compression approach. It utilizes coded US emissions to generate shear waves where the energy is spread over a long emission, and then numerically compressed into a short, localized, and high-energy pulse. We used a 7.5-MHz single-element focused transducer driven by coded excitations where the amplitude is modulated by a linear frequency-swept square wave (1 to 7 kHz). An inverse filter approach was used for compression. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing shear wave elastography measurements in tissue-mimicking phantoms at low US pressures (mechanical index <0.6). PMID:25554970

  8. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  9. Ultrafast Harmonic Coherent Compound (UHCC) imaging for high frame rate echocardiography and Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Chatelin, Simon; Villemain, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Transthoracic shear wave elastography of the myocardium remains very challenging due to the poor quality of transthoracic ultrafast imaging and the presence of clutter noise, jitter, phase aberration, and ultrasound reverberation. Several approaches, such as, e.g., diverging-wave coherent compounding or focused harmonic imaging have been proposed to improve the imaging quality. In this study, we introduce ultrafast harmonic coherent compounding (UHCC), in which pulse-inverted diverging-waves are emitted and coherently compounded, and show that such an approach can be used to enhance both Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) and high frame rate B-mode Imaging. UHCC SWE was first tested in phantoms containing an aberrating layer and was compared against pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and against ultrafast coherent compounding (UCC) imaging at the fundamental frequency. In-vivo feasibility of the technique was then evaluated in six healthy volunteers by measuring myocardial stiffness during diastole in transthoracic imaging. We also demonstrated that improvements in imaging quality could be achieved using UHCC B-mode imaging in healthy volunteers. The quality of transthoracic images of the heart was found to be improved with the number of pulse-inverted diverging waves with reduction of the imaging mean clutter level up to 13.8-dB when compared against UCC at the fundamental frequency. These results demonstrated that UHCC B-mode imaging is promising for imaging deep tissues exposed to aberration sources with a high frame-rate. PMID:26890730

  10. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  11. Multiresolution MR elastography using nonlinear inversion

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, M. D. J.; Van Houten, E. E. W.; Johnson, C. L.; Georgiadis, J. G.; Sutton, B. P.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Nonlinear inversion (NLI) in MR elastography requires discretization of the displacement field for a finite element (FE) solution of the “forward problem”, and discretization of the unknown mechanical property field for the iterative solution of the “inverse problem”. The resolution requirements for these two discretizations are different: the forward problem requires sufficient resolution of the displacement FE mesh to ensure convergence, whereas lowering the mechanical property resolution in the inverse problem stabilizes the mechanical property estimates in the presence of measurement noise. Previous NLI implementations use the same FE mesh to support the displacement and property fields, requiring a trade-off between the competing resolution requirements. Methods: This work implements and evaluates multiresolution FE meshes for NLI elastography, allowing independent discretizations of the displacements and each mechanical property parameter to be estimated. The displacement resolution can then be selected to ensure mesh convergence, and the resolution of the property meshes can be independently manipulated to control the stability of the inversion. Results: Phantom experiments indicate that eight nodes per wavelength (NPW) are sufficient for accurate mechanical property recovery, whereas mechanical property estimation from 50 Hz in vivo brain data stabilizes once the displacement resolution reaches 1.7 mm (approximately 19 NPW). Viscoelastic mechanical property estimates of in vivo brain tissue show that subsampling the loss modulus while holding the storage modulus resolution constant does not substantially alter the storage modulus images. Controlling the ratio of the number of measurements to unknown mechanical properties by subsampling the mechanical property distributions (relative to the data resolution) improves the repeatability of the property estimates, at a cost of modestly decreased spatial resolution. Conclusions: Multiresolution

  12. Audio frequency in vivo optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Armstrong, Julian J.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Sampson, David D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a new approach to optical coherence elastography (OCE), which probes the local elastic properties of tissue by using optical coherence tomography to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the audio frequency range. We describe the approach, based on analysis of the Bessel frequency spectrum of the interferometric signal detected from scatterers undergoing periodic motion in response to an applied stimulus. We present quantitative results of sub-micron excitation at 820 Hz in a layered phantom and the first such measurements in human skin in vivo.

  13. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sabra, Karim G.; Conti, Stephane; Roux, Philippe; Kuperman, W. A.

    2007-05-07

    Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.

  14. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  15. Needle optical coherence elastography for the measurement of microscale mechanical contrast deep within human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Tien, Alan; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging imaging technique that probes microscale mechanical contrast in tissues with the potential to differentiate healthy and malignant tissues. However, conventional OCE techniques are limited to imaging the first 1 to 2 mm of tissue in depth. We demonstrate, for the first time, OCE measurements deep within human tissues using needle OCE, extending the potential of OCE as a surgical guidance tool. We use needle OCE to detect tissue interfaces based on mechanical contrast in both normal and malignant breast tissues in freshly excised human mastectomy samples, as validated against histopathology. Further, we demonstrate the feasibility of in situ measurements >4 cm from the tissue surface using ultrasound guidance of the OCE needle probe. With further refinement, our method may potentially aid in accurate detection of the boundary of the tumor to help ensure full removal of all malignant tissues, which is critical to the success of breast-conserving surgery.

  16. Feasibility of CEUS and strain elastography in one case of ileum Crohn stricture and literature review.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Andrea; Biscontri, Marco; Matergi, Marco; Stumpo, Michela; Minacci, Chiara

    2016-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and strain elastography (SE) are diagnostic imaging methods, which are still not routinely used in the clinical management of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, there are studies in the literature reporting on the use of both CEUS and SE in patients with bowel obstruction due to Crohn's disease, documenting the usefulness of these two methods in the differentiation between inflammation and fibrosis affecting the bowel wall. The aim of this case report is to evaluate the usefulness of CEUS and SE performed in a patient with Crohn's disease, who was admitted to hospital with bowel obstruction due to terminal ileal stricture and submitted to ileocecal resection. CEUS and SE identified and to some extent also characterized the inflammatory and fibrotic processes affecting the bowel wall. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the surgical specimen confirmed the presence of inflammatory phenomena (exudates, ulcers, and fistulas) and fibrosis as suggested by ultrasound (US) imaging methods. PMID:27635167

  17. Multifrequency inversion in magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-21

    Time-harmonic shear wave elastography is capable of measuring viscoelastic parameters in living tissue. However, finite tissue boundaries and waveguide effects give rise to wave interferences which are not accounted for by standard elasticity reconstruction methods. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of tissue causes dispersion of the complex shear modulus, rendering the recovered moduli frequency dependent. Therefore, we here propose the use of multifrequency wave data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for solving the inverse problem of viscoelasticity reconstruction by an algebraic least-squares solution based on the springpot model. Advantages of the method are twofold: (i) amplitude nulls appearing in single-frequency standing wave patterns are mitigated and (ii) the dispersion of storage and loss modulus with drive frequency is taken into account by the inversion procedure, thereby avoiding subsequent model fitting. As a result, multifrequency inversion produces fewer artifacts in the viscoelastic parameter map than standard single-frequency parameter recovery and may thus support image-based viscoelasticity measurement. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by simulated wave data and MRE experiments on a phantom and in vivo human brain. Implemented as a clinical method, multifrequency inversion may improve the diagnostic value of time-harmonic MRE in a large variety of applications.

  18. Multifrequency inversion in magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-01

    Time-harmonic shear wave elastography is capable of measuring viscoelastic parameters in living tissue. However, finite tissue boundaries and waveguide effects give rise to wave interferences which are not accounted for by standard elasticity reconstruction methods. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of tissue causes dispersion of the complex shear modulus, rendering the recovered moduli frequency dependent. Therefore, we here propose the use of multifrequency wave data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for solving the inverse problem of viscoelasticity reconstruction by an algebraic least-squares solution based on the springpot model. Advantages of the method are twofold: (i) amplitude nulls appearing in single-frequency standing wave patterns are mitigated and (ii) the dispersion of storage and loss modulus with drive frequency is taken into account by the inversion procedure, thereby avoiding subsequent model fitting. As a result, multifrequency inversion produces fewer artifacts in the viscoelastic parameter map than standard single-frequency parameter recovery and may thus support image-based viscoelasticity measurement. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by simulated wave data and MRE experiments on a phantom and in vivo human brain. Implemented as a clinical method, multifrequency inversion may improve the diagnostic value of time-harmonic MRE in a large variety of applications.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 21, 2012, San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gaidhane, Monica; Rondon, Carlos; Itoi, Takao; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the preferred procedure for biliary and pancreatic drainage. While ERCP is successful in about 95% of cases, a small subset of cases are unsuccessful due to altered anatomy, peri-ampullary pathology, or malignant obstruction. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a promising technique for biliary, pancreatic and recently gallbladder decompression, which provides multiple advantages over percutaneous or surgical biliary drainage. Multiple retrospective and some prospective studies have shown endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage to be safe and effective. Based on the currently reported literature, regardless of the approach, the cumulative success rate is 84%-93% with an overall complication rate of 16%-35%. endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage seems a viable therapeutic modality for failed conventional drainage when performed by highly skilled advanced endoscopists at tertiary centers with expertise in both echo-endoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy PMID:25624708

  20. FibroScan® and transient elastography.

    PubMed

    Kemp, William; Roberts, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    The use of non-invasive tests to stage the severity of liver disease (ie. scarring) is now well established in the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This is because assessment of liver scarring provides prognostic information and assists in establishing treatment priorities. One such technique, transient elastography (TE), is a simple, safe and efficient way to estimate liver scarring. FibroScan® (EchoSens, Paris) is the most popular non-invasive device used to assess liver 'hardness' (or stiffness) via TE in Australia. When performed in the appropriate clinical setting, TE provides a reliable method of detecting cirrhosis and excluding significant fibrosis, particularly when the results are supported by clinical and laboratory data.

  1. Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Najat; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Armstrong, Brandon D; Rosen, Matthew S; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a powerful technique to assess the mechanical properties of living tissue. However, it suffers from reduced sensitivity in regions with short T2 and T2 * such as in tissue with high concentrations of paramagnetic iron, or in regions surrounding implanted devices. In this work, we exploit the longer T2 * attainable at ultra-low magnetic fields in combination with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enable rapid MRE at 0.0065 T. A 3D balanced steady-state free precession based MRE sequence with undersampling and fractional encoding was implemented on a 0.0065 T MRI scanner. A custom-built RF coil for DNP and a programmable vibration system for elastography were developed. Displacement fields and stiffness maps were reconstructed from data recorded in a polyvinyl alcohol gel phantom loaded with stable nitroxide radicals. A DNP enhancement of 25 was achieved during the MRE sequence, allowing the acquisition of 3D Overhauser-enhanced MRE (OMRE) images with (1.5 × 2.7 × 9) mm(3) resolution over eight temporal steps and 11 slices in 6 minutes. In conclusion, OMRE at ultra-low magnetic field can be used to detect mechanical waves over short acquisition times. This new modality shows promise to broaden the scope of conventional MRE applications, and may extend the utility of low-cost, portable MRI systems to detect elasticity changes in patients with implanted devices or iron overload.

  2. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  3. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube. This tube is called a catheter. The catheter ...

  4. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... Deane CR, Goss DE. Peripheral arteries and veins. In: Allan PL, Baxter GM, Weston MJ, eds. Allan & Baxter: Clinical Ultrasound . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Fine Needle Elastography (FNE) device for biomechanically determining local variations of tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Wickramaratne, Dayan; Wilkinson, Paul; Rao, JianYu; Ragavendra, Nagesh; Sharma, Shivani; Gimzewski, James K

    2015-01-01

    Diseased tissues exhibit changes in mechanical properties and thus possess clinical diagnostic significance. We report the design and development of a Fine Needle Elastography (FNE) prototype device integrated with Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) needle that allows for quantitative and sensitive assessment of tissues and materials based on local variations in elastic, friction, and cutting forces on needle insertion. A piezoelectric force-sensor at the base of FNA needle measures the forces opposing needle penetration with micrometer scale resolution. Measurement precision (±5 μm) and axial resolution (~20 μm) of FNE device was tested using control mm size gelatin matrices and unripe pear in assessing needle penetration resistance, force heterogeneity and optimization of needle penetration velocity. Further, we demonstrated the usefulness of FNE in quantitative, biomechanical differentiation of simulated thyroid tumor nodules in an ultrasound neck phantom. Fluid or solid nodules were probed in the phantom study coupled with ultrasound guidance. Our data shows significantly higher force variations (1-D force heterogeneity; HF,a=6.5 mN, HF,q=8.25 mN and stiffness heterogeneity; HS,a=0.0274 kN/m, HS,q=0.0395 kN/m) in solid nodules compared either to fluid nodules or to regions corresponding to healthy thyroid tissue within the ultrasound phantom. The results suggest future applications of in vivo FNE biopsies based on force heterogeneity to diagnose thyroid tumors in areas where ultrasound instrumentation or access to a qualified pathologist for FNAC are unavailable, as well as an ancillary diagnostic tool in thyroid cancer management. PMID:25468668

  12. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  13. In vivo study of myocardial elastography under graded ischemia conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Provost, Jean; Fujikura, Kana; Wang, Jie; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-02-01

    The capability of currently available echocardiography-based strain estimation techniques to fully map myocardial abnormality at early stages of myocardial ischemia is yet to be investigated. In this study, myocardial elastography (ME), a radio-frequency (RF)-based strain imaging technique that maps the full 2D transmural angle-independent strain tensor in standard echocardiographic views at both high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The objectives were to (1) evaluate the performance of ME on mapping the onset, extent and progression of myocardial ischemia at graded coronary constriction levels (from partial to complete coronary flow reduction), and (2) validate the accuracy of the strain estimates against sonomicrometry (SM) measurements. A non-survival canine ischemic model (n = 5) was performed by gradually constricting the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary blood flow from 0% (baseline blood flow) to 100% (zero blood flow) at 20% increments. An open-architecture ultrasound system was used to acquire RF echocardiograms in a standard full short-axis view at the frame rate of 211 fps, at least twice higher than what is typically used in conventional echocardiographic systems, using a previously developed, fully automated composite technique. Myocardial deformation was estimated by ME and validated against sonomicrometry. ME estimates and maps transmural (1) 2D displacements using RF cross-correlation and recorrelation; and (2) 2D polar (radial and circumferential) strains, derived from 2D (i.e. both lateral and axial) displacement components, at high accuracy. Full-view strain images were shown and found to reliably depict decreased myocardial function in the region at risk at increased levels of coronary flow reduction. The ME radial strain was deemed to be a more sensitive, quantitative, regional measure of myocardial ischemia as a result of coronary flow reduction when compared to the conventional wall motion score index and ejection fraction

  14. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma co-exists with Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Is strain elastography still useful?

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wu, Qiong; Hu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    To study the performance of strain elastography in differentiating papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) combined with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), conventional ultrasound scan (US) and strain elastography (SE) were performed on 558 nodules smaller than 10 mm by one examiner before surgeries. Serum concentrations of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) (normal range: 0-60 U/ml) were measured. Continuous variables were analyzed by independent t test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was applied to calculate the cut-off values of strain ratio (SR) and elastography score (ES). The comparison of AUCs is performed by Z test. 482 nodules were diagnosed as PTMC and there were 181 nodules co-existed with HT. SR measurements were lower in PTMC co-existed with HT when comparing to those without HT. (7.292±6.581 vs 11.319±13.155, p<0.000). Taking the data from all of the 558 nodules, the best cut-off of diagnosing PTMC was SR>2.58. When taking the data from 181 PTMC with HT, the best cut-off was SR>2.10. The diagnostic value of SR>2.1 were higher than ES>3, conventional US and combining US and SE (z=3.595, 4.876, 4.420, p<0.001), but cut-off of SR>2.1 did not show significant enhancement of diagnostic value compared to SR>2.58 (z=0.439, p=0.8903>0.001) in PTMC with HT. There is a negative relation between SR and titer of TPO-Ab (r=-0.650, p<0.0001). PTMC with high TPO-Ab (>1000) titer presented lower SR (5.972±4.118 vs 8.379±9.172, p=0.009). Although SR measurements were lower in nodules co-existed with HT when comparing those without HT, using a regular ES and cut-off of SR measurement would not influence the diagnosing performance. SE is still very useful for diagnosing PTMC with HT. PTMC with high TPO-Ab titer might require a lower cut-off of SR. PMID:26945905

  15. Magnetic hyperthermia dosimetry by biomechanical properties revealed in magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in magnetic hyperthermia to treat solid tumors. Under an appropriate AC magnetic field, energy can be transferred to the MNPs to heat up the intended tissue target while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of MNP thermal therapy is desirable in order to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. Typical hyperthermia dosimetry often relies on changes in imaging properties or temperature measurements based on the thermal distribution. Alternative dosimetric indicators can include the biomechanical properties of the tissue, reflecting the changes due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration during hyperthermia treatments. Tissue stiffness can be probed by elastography modalities including MRI, ultrasound imaging, and optical coherence elastography (OCE), with OCE showing the highest displacement sensitivity (tens of nanometers). Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) is one type of OCE that utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the tissue stiffness. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of evaluating the hyperthermia dose based on the elasticity changes revealed by MM-OCE. Superparamagnetic MNPs were applied to ex vivo tissue specimens for both magnetic hyperthermia and MM-OCE experiments, where temperature and elastic modulus were obtained. A correlation between temperature rise and measured stiffness was observed. In addition, we found that with repetitive sequential treatments, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results potentially suggest that MM-OCE could indicate the irreversible changes the tissue undergoes during thermal therapy, which supports the idea for MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosage control in future applications.

  16. Multifrequency time-harmonic elastography for the measurement of liver viscoelasticity in large tissue windows.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Trong, Manh Nguyen; Guo, Jing; Eggers, Jonathan; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    Elastography of the liver for the non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis is an established method. However, investigations of obese patients or patients with ascites are often limited by small and superficial elastographic windows. Therefore, multifrequency time-harmonic elastography (THE) based on time-resolved A-line ultrasound has recently been developed for measuring liver viscoelasticity in wide soft tissue windows and at greater depths. In this study, THE was integrated into a clinical B-mode scanner connected to a dedicated actuator bed driven by superimposed vibrations of 30- to 60-Hz frequencies. The resulting shear waves in the liver were captured along multiple profiles 7 to 14 cm in width and automatically processed for reconstruction of mean efficient shear wave speed and shear wave dispersion slope. This new modality was tested in healthy volunteers and 22 patients with clinically proven cirrhosis. Patients could be separated from controls by higher shear wave speeds (3.11 ± 0.64 m/s, 2.14-4.81 m/s, vs. 1.74 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.60-1.91 m/s) without significant degradation of data by high body mass index or ascites. Furthermore, the wave speed dispersion slope was significantly (p = 0.0025) lower in controls (5.2 ± 1.8 m/s/kHz) than in patients (39.1 ± 32.2 m/s/kHz). In conclusion, THE is useful for the diagnosis of cirrhosis in large tissue windows.

  17. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  18. Quantitative micro-elastography: imaging of tissue elasticity using compression optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Chin, Lixin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-01-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of tissue on the microscale could aid in the identification of diseased tissues that are inadequately detected using palpation or current clinical imaging modalities, with potential to guide medical procedures such as the excision of breast tumours. Compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) maps tissue strain with microscale spatial resolution and can delineate microstructural features within breast tissues. However, without a measure of the locally applied stress, strain provides only a qualitative indication of mechanical properties. To overcome this limitation, we present quantitative micro-elastography, which combines compression OCE with a compliant stress sensor to image tissue elasticity. The sensor consists of a layer of translucent silicone with well-characterized stress-strain behaviour. The measured strain in the sensor is used to estimate the two-dimensional stress distribution applied to the sample surface. Elasticity is determined by dividing the stress by the strain in the sample. We show that quantification of elasticity can improve the ability of compression OCE to distinguish between tissues, thereby extending the potential for inter-sample comparison and longitudinal studies of tissue elasticity. We validate the technique using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate the ability to map elasticity of freshly excised malignant and benign human breast tissues. PMID:26503225

  19. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  20. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described.

  1. Measuring anisotropic muscle stiffness properties using elastography.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Geng, G; Qin, E; Sinkus, R; Gandevia, S C; Bilston, L E

    2013-11-01

    Physiological and pathological changes to the anisotropic mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are still largely unknown, with only a few studies quantifying changes in vivo. This study used the noninvasive MR elastography (MRE) technique, in combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to measure shear modulus anisotropy in the human skeletal muscle in the lower leg. Shear modulus measurements parallel and perpendicular to the fibre direction were made in 10 healthy subjects in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles. The results showed significant differences in the medial gastrocnemius (μ‖ = 0.86 ± 0.15 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.19 kPa, P < 0.001), soleus (μ‖ = 0.83 ± 0.22 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.65 ± 0.13 kPa, P < 0.001) and the tibialis anterior (μ‖ = 0.78 ± 0.24 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.16 kPa, P = 0.03) muscles, where the shear modulus measured in the direction parallel is greater than that measured in the direction perpendicular to the muscle fibres. No significant differences were measured across muscle groups. This study provides the first direct estimates of the anisotropic shear modulus in the triceps surae muscle group, and shows that the technique may be useful for the probing of mechanical anisotropy changes caused by disease, aging and injury.

  2. General review of magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing “virtual palpation”, MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  3. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  4. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2008-02-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  5. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  6. Scatter-based magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Xu, Chao; Hamhaber, Uwe; Siebert, Eberhard; Bohner, Georg; Klingebiel, Randolf; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2009-04-01

    Elasticity is a sensitive measure of the microstructural constitution of soft biological tissues and increasingly used in diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) uniquely allows in vivo measurement of the shear elasticity of brain tissue. However, the spatial resolution of MRE is inherently limited as the transformation of shear wave patterns into elasticity maps requires the solution of inverse problems. Therefore, an MRE method is introduced that avoids inversion and instead exploits shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces between anatomical regions of different shear compliance. This compliance-weighted imaging (CWI) method can be used to evaluate the mechanical consistency of cerebral lesions or to measure relative stiffness differences between anatomical subregions of the brain. It is demonstrated that CWI-MRE is sensitive enough to reveal significant elasticity variations within inner brain parenchyma: the caudate nucleus (head) was stiffer than the lentiform nucleus and the thalamus by factors of 1.3 ± 0.1 and 1.7 ± 0.2, respectively (P < 0.001). CWI-MRE provides a unique method for characterizing brain tissue by identifying local stiffness variations.

  7. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  8. Virtual touch tissue imaging on acoustic radiation force impulse elastography: a new technique for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; He, Yong; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Jun-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Objectives- Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography is a newly developed ultrasound elasticity imaging technique that included both Virtual Touch tissue quantification and Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI; Siemens Medical Solutions, Mountain View, CA). This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of VTI in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules. Methods- This study included 192 consecutive patients with thyroid nodules (n = 219) who underwent surgery for compressive symptoms or suspicion of malignancy. Tissue stiffness on VTI elastography was scored from 1 (soft) to 6 (hard). The VTI scores between malignant and benign thyroid nodules were compared. The intraobserver and interobserver agreement for VTI elastography was also assessed. Results- On VTI elastography: score 1 was found in 84 nodules (all benign); score 2 in 37 nodules (3 papillary carcinomas and 34 benign nodules); score 3 in 25 nodules (1 medullary carcinoma, 6 papillary carcinomas, and 18 benign nodules); score 4 in 53 nodules (50 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); score 5 in 17 nodules (14 papillary carcinomas and 3 benign nodules); and score 6 in 3 nodules (all papillary carcinomas). A VTI elasticity score of 4 or greater was highly predictive of malignancy (P< .01), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 87.0% (67 of 77), 95.8% (136 of 142), 91.8% (67 of 73), 93.1% (136 of 146), and 92.7% (203 of 219), respectively. The κ values were 0.69 for intraobserver agreement and 0.85 for interobserver agreement. Conclusions- Virtual Touch tissue elasticity imaging has great potential as an adjunctive tool combined with conventional sonography for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

  9. Errors and mistakes in breast ultrasound diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Migda, Bartosz

    2012-09-01

    Sonomammography is often the first additional examination performed in the diagnostics of breast diseases. The development of ultrasound imaging techniques, particularly the introduction of high frequency transducers, matrix transducers, harmonic imaging and finally, elastography, influenced the improvement of breast disease diagnostics. Nevertheless, as in each imaging method, there are errors and mistakes resulting from the technical limitations of the method, breast anatomy (fibrous remodeling), insufficient sensitivity and, in particular, specificity. Errors in breast ultrasound diagnostics can be divided into impossible to be avoided and potentially possible to be reduced. In this article the most frequently made errors in ultrasound have been presented, including the ones caused by the presence of artifacts resulting from volumetric averaging in the near and far field, artifacts in cysts or in dilated lactiferous ducts (reverberations, comet tail artifacts, lateral beam artifacts), improper setting of general enhancement or time gain curve or range. Errors dependent on the examiner, resulting in the wrong BIRADS-usg classification, are divided into negative and positive errors. The sources of these errors have been listed. The methods of minimization of the number of errors made have been discussed, including the ones related to the appropriate examination technique, taking into account data from case history and the use of the greatest possible number of additional options such as: harmonic imaging, color and power Doppler and elastography. In the article examples of errors resulting from the technical conditions of the method have been presented, and those dependent on the examiner which are related to the great diversity and variation of ultrasound images of pathological breast lesions.

  10. Gallstone disease: Symptoms, diagnosis and endoscopic management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Caddy, Grant R; Tham, Tony C K

    2006-01-01

    Bile duct stones (BDS) are often suspected on history and clinical examination alone but symptoms may be variable ranging from asymptomatic to complications such as biliary colic, pancreatitis, jaundice or cholangitis. The majority of BDS can be diagnosed by transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance cholangiography prior to endoscopic or laparoscopic removal. Approximately 90% of BDS can be removed following endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC)+sphincterotomy. Most of the remaining stones can be removed using mechanical lithotripsy. Patients with uncorrected coagulopathies may be treated with ERC+pneumatic dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi. Shockwave lithotripsy (intraductal and extracorporeal) and laser lithotripsy have also been used to fragment large bile duct stones prior to endoscopic removal. The role of medical therapy in treatment of BDS is currently uncertain. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, investigation and current management of BDS.

  11. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  12. Hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in gastric subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastric subepithelial tumor (SET) has shown a rapid increase worldwide. Although, until now, endoscopic ultrasound guided procedures such as fine needle aspiration have shown relatively high accuracy in diagnosis of SET, the most important modality for diagnosis and treatment of SETs is complete resection such as endoscopic or surgical resection. However, endoscopic resection or laparoscopic wedge resection alone also has some limitations. Endoscopic resection is difficult to perform in cases of gastric SET located within deep portion of the gastric layer or a relatively large (larger than 25 mm diameter). On the other hand, gastric SET in a difficult location, such as the gastroesophageal junction or pyloric ring is challenging for laparoscopic surgical resection. The hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) technique is a combined method, including the advantages of both laparoscopic resection and endoscopic resection for gastric SETs. This method may be performed safely with reasonable operation times, less bleeding, and adequate resection margin and regardless of tumor size. In particular, in the case of a difficult location for resection, such as the esophagogastric junction or pyloric ring, hybrid NOTES is currently believed to be an ideal treatment method. PMID:24044041

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF ELASTOGRAPHY – AN EMERGING BRANCH OF MEDICAL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Hall, Timothy J.; Urban, Matthew W.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Garra, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    From times immemorial manual palpation served as a source of information on the state of soft tissues and allowed detection of various diseases accompanied by changes in tissue elasticity. During the last two decades, the ancient art of palpation gained new life due to numerous emerging elasticity imaging (EI) methods. Areas of applications of EI in medical diagnostics and treatment monitoring are steadily expanding. Elasticity imaging methods are emerging as commercial applications, a true testament to the progress and importance of the field. In this paper we present a brief history and theoretical basis of EI, describe various techniques of EI and, analyze their advantages and limitations, and overview main clinical applications. We present a classification of elasticity measurement and imaging techniques based on the methods used for generating a stress in the tissue (external mechanical force, internal ultrasound radiation force, or an internal endogenous force), and measurement of the tissue response. The measurement method can be performed using differing physical principles including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, X-ray imaging, optical and acoustic signals. Until recently, EI was largely a research method used by a few select institutions having the special equipment needed to perform the studies. Since 2005 however, increasing numbers of mainstream manufacturers have added EI to their ultrasound systems so that today the majority of manufacturers offer some sort of Elastography or tissue stiffness imaging on their clinical systems. Now it is safe to say that some sort of elasticity imaging may be performed on virtually all types of focal and diffuse disease. Most of the new applications are still in the early stages of research, but a few are becoming common applications in clinical practice. PMID:22308105

  14. Comparison of windowing effects on elastography images: Simulation, phantom and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rifat; Arfin, Rishad; Rubel, Monir Hossan; Islam, Kazi Khairul; Jia, Congxian; Metaxas, Dimitris; Garra, Brian S; Alam, S Kaisar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have evaluated the use of smooth windows for ultrasound elastography. In ultrasound elastography, local tissue strain is estimated using operations such as cross-correlation on local segments of RF data. In this process, local data segments are selected by multiplying the RF data by a rectangular window. Such data truncation causes non-ideal spectral behavior, which can be mitigated by using smooth windows. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of smooth windows may improve the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) of strain images. The effects of using smooth windows have not been fully characterized for time-domain strain estimators. Thus, we have compared the elastographic performance of rectangular, Hanning, Gaussian, and Chebyshev windows used in conjunction with cross-correlation based algorithm and adaptive stretching algorithm using finite element method (FEM) simulation, experimental phantom, and in vivo data. Smooth windows are found to improve the SNRe by up to 3.94 for FEM data and by up to 1.76 for phantom data which represent 76% and 60.52% improvements, respectively. CNRe improves by up to 12.23 for FEM simulated data and by up to 4.28 for phantom data which represent 213.07% and 248.2% improvements, respectively. Mean structural similarity (MSSIM) was used for assessing the image perceptual quality and smooth windows improved it by up to 0.22 (85.98% improvement) for simulated data. We have evaluated these parameters at 1-6% applied strains for the experimental phantom and at 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and 12% applied strains for FEM simulation. We observed a maximum deterioration in axial resolution of 0.375 mm (which is on the order of the wavelength, 0.3mm) due to smooth windows. "Salt-and-pepper" noise from false-peak errors has also been reduced. Smooth windows increased the lesion-to-background contrast (by increasing the CNRe by 213.07%) of a low contrast lesion (10-dB). For the in vivo

  15. Comparison of windowing effects on elastography images: Simulation, phantom and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rifat; Arfin, Rishad; Rubel, Monir Hossan; Islam, Kazi Khairul; Jia, Congxian; Metaxas, Dimitris; Garra, Brian S; Alam, S Kaisar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have evaluated the use of smooth windows for ultrasound elastography. In ultrasound elastography, local tissue strain is estimated using operations such as cross-correlation on local segments of RF data. In this process, local data segments are selected by multiplying the RF data by a rectangular window. Such data truncation causes non-ideal spectral behavior, which can be mitigated by using smooth windows. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of smooth windows may improve the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) of strain images. The effects of using smooth windows have not been fully characterized for time-domain strain estimators. Thus, we have compared the elastographic performance of rectangular, Hanning, Gaussian, and Chebyshev windows used in conjunction with cross-correlation based algorithm and adaptive stretching algorithm using finite element method (FEM) simulation, experimental phantom, and in vivo data. Smooth windows are found to improve the SNRe by up to 3.94 for FEM data and by up to 1.76 for phantom data which represent 76% and 60.52% improvements, respectively. CNRe improves by up to 12.23 for FEM simulated data and by up to 4.28 for phantom data which represent 213.07% and 248.2% improvements, respectively. Mean structural similarity (MSSIM) was used for assessing the image perceptual quality and smooth windows improved it by up to 0.22 (85.98% improvement) for simulated data. We have evaluated these parameters at 1-6% applied strains for the experimental phantom and at 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and 12% applied strains for FEM simulation. We observed a maximum deterioration in axial resolution of 0.375 mm (which is on the order of the wavelength, 0.3mm) due to smooth windows. "Salt-and-pepper" noise from false-peak errors has also been reduced. Smooth windows increased the lesion-to-background contrast (by increasing the CNRe by 213.07%) of a low contrast lesion (10-dB). For the in vivo

  16. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  17. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  18. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  19. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-06-14

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis.

  20. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  1. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Słapa, Rafał Z; Jakubowski, Wiesław S; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society.

  2. Ultrasound imaging of the liver and bile ducts – expectations of a clinician

    PubMed Central

    Pawełas, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Since diseases of the liver and bile ducts are common, a clinician is faced by the need to implement an appropriate diagnostic process. It is necessary to apply diagnostic methods that enable appropriate assessment of the most common pathologies of the liver, i.e. fibrosis, steatosis and focal lesions, as well as initial assessment of the bile ducts. These goals can be achieved using ultrasound methods based on conventional sonography, contrast-enhanced sonography and elastography. The assessment of fatty liver and bile duct dilatation using ultrasound reaches satisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity. The usage of contrast agents enables unambiguous differentiation between benign and malignant focal lesions, frequently allowing them to be identified accurately without the assistance of other imaging modalities. Elastography has enabled reliable assessment of liver fibrosis. Its results are comparable to those of the standard method, i.e. liver biopsy. PMID:26673784

  3. Ultrasound imaging of the liver and bile ducts - expectations of a clinician.

    PubMed

    Skoczylas, Krzysztof; Pawełas, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Since diseases of the liver and bile ducts are common, a clinician is faced by the need to implement an appropriate diagnostic process. It is necessary to apply diagnostic methods that enable appropriate assessment of the most common pathologies of the liver, i.e. fibrosis, steatosis and focal lesions, as well as initial assessment of the bile ducts. These goals can be achieved using ultrasound methods based on conventional sonography, contrast-enhanced sonography and elastography. The assessment of fatty liver and bile duct dilatation using ultrasound reaches satisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity. The usage of contrast agents enables unambiguous differentiation between benign and malignant focal lesions, frequently allowing them to be identified accurately without the assistance of other imaging modalities. Elastography has enabled reliable assessment of liver fibrosis. Its results are comparable to those of the standard method, i.e. liver biopsy.

  4. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  5. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  6. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  7. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  8. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  9. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  10. Synergistic advances in diagnostic and therapeutic medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2003-04-01

    Significant advances are more fully exploiting ultrasound's potential for noninvasive diagnosis and treatment. Therapeutic systems employ intense focused beams to thermally kill cancer cells in, e.g., prostate; to stop bleeding; and to treat specific diseases (e.g., glaucoma). Diagnostic ultrasound techniques can quantitatively image an increasingly broad spectrum of physical tissue attributes. An exciting aspect of this progress is the emerging synergy between these modalities. Advanced diagnostic techniques may contribute at several stages in therapy. For example, treatment planning for small ocular tumors uses 50-MHz, 3-D ultrasonic images with 0.05-mm resolution. Thermal simulations employ these images to evaluate desired and undesired effects using exposure stategies with specially designed treatment beams. Therapy beam positioning can use diagnostic elastography to sense tissue motion induced by radiation pressure from high-intensity treatment beams. Therapy monitoring can sense lesion formation using elastography motion sensing (to detect the increased stiffness in lesions); harmonic imaging (to sense altered nonlinear properties); and spectrum analysis images (depicting changes in the sizes, concentration, and configuration of sub-resolution structures.) Experience from these applications will greatly expand the knowledge of acoustic phenomena in living tissues and should lead to further advances in medical ultrasound.

  11. High resolution three-dimensional prostate ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Patil, Abhay; Hossack, John A.

    2006-03-01

    This work reports on the application of ultrasound elastography to prostate cancer detection using a high resolution three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging system. The imaging was performed at a relatively high frequency (14 MHz), yielding very fine resolution that is optimal for prostate ultrasound imaging. The fine resolution achieved aids in locating smaller lesions than are normally detectable. Elasticity was measured with a quantitative and automatically controlled "Synthetic Digital Rectal Examination (SDRE)" wherein a smoothly increasing force was applied by injecting water, controlled by an electronic syringe pump, into a latex cover over the transrectal transducer. The lesion identified as stiffened tissue was visually enhanced by colorizing and superimposing it over the conventional B-mode image. Experimental results using a tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrated that the reconstruction accuracy of the I-Beam transducer resulted in less than 15% volumetric error. Thus, this high resolution 3D prostate elastography is possible and may provide reliable and accurate determination of the size and the location of cancers, which may result in improved specificity and sensitivity of cancer detection.

  12. Shear wave elastography plaque characterization with mechanical testing validation: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widman, E.; Maksuti, E.; Larsson, D.; Urban, M. W.; Bjällmark, A.; Larsson, M.

    2015-04-01

    Determining plaque vulnerability is critical when selecting the most suitable treatment for patients with atherosclerotic plaque. Currently, clinical non-invasive ultrasound-based methods for plaque characterization are limited to visual assessment of plaque morphology and new quantitative methods are needed. In this study, shear wave elastography (SWE) was used to characterize hard and soft plaque mimicking inclusions in six common carotid artery phantoms by using phase velocity analysis in static and dynamic environments. The results were validated with mechanical tensile testing. In the static environment, SWE measured a mean shear modulus of 5.8  ±  0.3 kPa and 106.2  ±  17.2 kPa versus 3.3  ±  0.5 kPa and 98.3  ±  3.4 kPa measured by mechanical testing in the soft and hard plaques respectively. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the plaques’ shear moduli throughout a simulated cardiac cycle. The results show good agreement between SWE and mechanical testing and indicate the possibility for in vivo arterial plaque characterization using SWE.

  13. Lymphangiogenesis in Breast Cancer Correlates with Matrix Stiffness on Shear-Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Baek Gil; Jung, Woo Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To correlate tumor stiffness and lymphangiogenesis in breast cancer and to find its clinical implications. Materials and Methods A total of 140 breast cancer patients were evaluated. Tumor stiffness was quantitatively measured by shear-wave elastography in preoperative ultrasound examination, calculated as mean elasticity value (kPa). Slides of resected breast cancer specimens were reviewed for most fibrotic area associated with tumor. D2-40 immunohistochemical staining was applied for fibrotic areas to detect the lymphatic spaces. Microlymphatic density, tumor stiffness, and clinicopathologic data were analyzed. Results Higher elasticity value was associated with invasive size of tumor, microlymphatic density, histologic grade 3, absence of extensive intraductal component, presence of axillary lymph node metastasis, and Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in univariate regression analysis, and associated with Ki-67 LI and axillary lymph node metastasis in multivariate regression analysis. Microlymphatic density was associated histologic grade 3, mean elasticity value, and Ki-67 LI in univariate regression analysis. In multivariate regression analysis, microlymphatic density was correlated with mean elasticity value. Conclusion In breast cancer, tumor stiffness correlates with lymphangiogenesis and poor prognostic factors. PMID:26996557

  14. Shear wave elastography diagnosis of the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Nianyu; Xu, Youfeng; Huang, Pintong; Zhang, Shengmin; Wang, Hongwei; Yu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to report the shear wave elastography (SWE) findings in a patient with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSVPTC). Since patients with DSVPTC may present with typical clinicopathological features and initially appear to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a thorough clinical evaluation and an early diagnosis are important. A 20-year-old female patient presented with a 1-month history of a neck mass and sore throat. Conventional ultrasound and SWE were performed using an AIXPLORER system with 14-5 MHz linear transducer. The patient had undergone total thyroidectomy and bilateral neck lymph node dissection, and an intraoperative pathology consultation to confirm the malignancy of lymph node metastasis. Pathological diagnosis was DSVPTC in both lobes, with lymph node metastases in the bilateral neck. The clinical presentation and serological findings were all indicative of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thyroid ultrasonography revealed diffuse enlargement of the both lobes, heterogenous echogenicity without mass formation, diffuse scattered microcalcifications and poor vascularization. SWE revealed stiff values of the thyroid: The mean stiffness was 99.7 kpa, the minimum stiffness was 59.1 kpa and the maximum stiffness was 180.1 kpa. The maximum stiffness of the DSVPTC (180.1 kpa) was higher compared with the diagnostic criteria of malignant thyroid nodules (65 kPa). SWE may be considered as a novel and valuable method to diagnose DSVPC. PMID:27446574

  15. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist’s role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed. PMID:25901217

  16. Optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V

    2015-04-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) represents the frontier of optical elasticity imaging techniques and focuses on the micro-scale assessment of tissue biomechanics in 3D that is hard to achieve with traditional elastographic methods. Benefit from the advancement of optical coherence tomography, and driven by the increasing requirements in nondestructive biomechanical characterization, this emerging technique recently has experienced a rapid development. In this paper, we start with the description of the mechanical contrast that has been employed by OCE and review the state-of-the-art techniques based on the reported applications and discuss the current technical challenges, emphasizing the unique role of OCE in tissue mechanical characterization. The position of OCE among other elastography techniques.

  17. Optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) represents the frontier of optical elasticity imaging techniques and focuses on the micro-scale assessment of tissue biomechanics in 3D that is hard to achieve with traditional elastographic methods. Benefit from the advancement of optical coherence tomography, and driven by the increasing requirements in nondestructive biomechanical characterization, this emerging technique recently has experienced a rapid development. In this paper, we start with the description of the mechanical contrast that has been employed by OCE and review the state-of-the-art techniques based on the reported applications and discuss the current technical challenges, emphasizing the unique role of OCE in tissue mechanical characterization. The position of OCE among other elastography techniques. PMID:25412100

  18. Shear wave induced resonance elastography of venous thrombi: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Cédric; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Henni, Anis Hadj; Qi, Shijie; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) is proposed for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) elasticity assessment. This new imaging technique takes advantage of properly polarized shear waves to induce resonance of a confined mechanical heterogeneity. Realistic phantoms (n = 9) of DVT total and partial clot occlusions with elasticities from 406 to 3561 Pa were built for in vitro experiments. An ex vivo study was also performed to evaluate the elasticity of two fresh porcine venous thrombi in a pig model. Transient shear waves at 45-205 Hz were generated by the vibration of a rigid plate (plane wavefront) or by a needle to simulate a radiation pressure on a line segment (cylindrical wavefront). Induced propagation of shear waves was imaged with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a finite element method was developed to simulate tested experimental conditions. An inverse problem was then formulated considering the first resonance frequency of the DVT inclusion. Elasticity agreements between SWIRE and a reference spectroscopy instrument (RheoSpectris) were found in vitro for total clots either in plane (r(2) = 0.989) or cylindrical (r(2) = 0.986) wavefront configurations. For total and partial clots, elasticity estimation errors were 9.0 ±4.6% and 9.3 ±11.3%, respectively. Ex vivo, the blood clot elasticity was 498 ±58 Pa within the inferior vena cava and 436 ±45 Pa in the right common iliac vein (p = 0.22). To conclude, the SWIRE technique seems feasible to quantitatively assess blood clot elasticity in the context of DVT ultrasound imaging.

  19. Preliminary Validation of Angle-Independent Myocardial Elastography Using MR Tagging in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Qian, Zhen; Tosti, Christina L.; Brown, Truman R.; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial Elastography (ME), a radio-frequency (RF) based speckle tracking technique, was employed in order to image the entire two-dimensional (2D) transmural deformation field in full view, and validated against tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tMRI) in normal as well as reperfused (i.e., treated myocardial infarction (MI)) human left ventricles. RF ultrasound and tMRI frames were acquired at the papillary muscle level in 2D short-axis (SA) views at nominal frame rates of 136 (fps; real time) and 33 fps (electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated), respectively. In ultrasound, in-plane, 2D (lateral and axial) incremental displacements were iteratively estimated using one-dimensional (1D) cross-correlation and recorrelation techniques in a 2D search with a 1D matching kernel. In tMRI, cardiac motion was estimated by a template-matching algorithm on a 2D grid-shaped mesh. In both ME and tMRI, cumulative 2D displacements were estimated and then used to estimate 2D Lagrangian finite systolic strains, from which polar (i.e., radial and circumferential) strains, namely angle-independent measures, were further obtained through coordinate transformation. Principal strains, which are angle-independent and less centroid-dependent than polar strains, were also computed and imaged based on the 2D finite strains with a previously established strategy. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, angle-independent ME is shown to be capable of 1) estimating myocardial deformation in good agreement with tMRI estimates in a clinical setting and of 2) differentiating abnormal from normal myocardium in a full left-ventricular view. Finally, the principal strains are suggested to be an alternative diagnostic tool of detecting cardiac disease with the characteristics of their reduced centroid dependence. PMID:18952364

  20. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in cancer: Technique, analysis, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Kay M.; Ehman, Richard L.; McGee, Kiaran P.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties are significantly altered with the development of cancer. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique capable of quantifying tissue mechanical properties in vivo. This review describes the basic principles of MRE and introduces some of the many promising MRE methods that have been developed for the detection and characterization of cancer, evaluation of response to therapy, and investigation of the underlying mechanical mechanisms associated with malignancy. PMID:26592944

  1. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in cancer: Technique, analysis, and applications.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Kay M; Ehman, Richard L; McGee, Kiaran P

    2015-11-01

    Tissue mechanical properties are significantly altered with the development of cancer. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique capable of quantifying tissue mechanical properties in vivo. This review describes the basic principles of MRE and introduces some of the many promising MRE methods that have been developed for the detection and characterization of cancer, evaluation of response to therapy, and investigation of the underlying mechanical mechanisms associated with malignancy. PMID:26592944

  2. Olecranon extrabursal endoscopic bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chen G; McGuire, Duncan T; Morse, Levi P; Bain, Gregory I

    2013-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis is a common clinical problem. It is often managed conservatively because of the high rates of wound complications with the conventional open surgical technique. Conventional olecranon bursoscopy utilizes an arthroscope and an arthroscopic shaver, removing the bursa from inside-out. We describe an extrabursal endoscopic technique where the bursa is not entered but excised in its entirety under endoscopic vision. A satisfactory view is obtained with less morbidity than the open method, while still avoiding a wound over the sensitive point of the olecranon. PMID:23970201

  3. [Can breast elastography change our strategies? Technology, impact and limitations].

    PubMed

    Balu-Maestro, C; Caramella, T

    2015-01-01

    Compression or static elastography is based on images deformation (induced by slight manual compression/decompression to the breast) and tissue movement is color-encoded in color map and classified into five scores of increasing malignancy (score of 1 to 3: benign and 4 to 5: malignant). The elasticity shear wave is measured from the propagation velocity of shear waves in the lesions and is expressed in kPa or m/s and in color map. Reproducibility is satisfactory for the two technologies even if the static elastography is only semi-quantitative. Elastography is helpful for lesions classified BI-RADS 3 and 4 and especially when the PPV of these lesions in B mode is low<10% (BI-RADS 3 and 4a). For these two technologies, cancer and biopsy rates are reduced by at least 30% (with threshold values for the shear wave technology of 30kPa and 3m/s depending on the manufacturer). False positives are found with the fibrotic lesions and false negatives by colloid tumors and DCIS. Correlation with prognostic factors is discussed.

  4. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  5. Prospective Comparison of Liver Stiffness Measurements between Two Point Shear Wave Elastography Methods: Virtual Touch Quantification and Elastography Point Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hyunsuk; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Dong Ho; Chang, Won; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To prospectively compare technical success rate and reliable measurements of virtual touch quantification (VTQ) elastography and elastography point quantification (ElastPQ), and to correlate liver stiffness (LS) measurements obtained by the two elastography techniques. Materials and Methods Our study included 85 patients, 80 of whom were previously diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The technical success rate and reliable measurements of the two kinds of point shear wave elastography (pSWE) techniques were compared by χ2 analysis. LS values measured using the two techniques were compared and correlated via Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Spearman correlation coefficient, and 95% Bland-Altman limit of agreement. The intraobserver reproducibility of ElastPQ was determined by 95% Bland-Altman limit of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results The two pSWE techniques showed similar technical success rate (98.8% for VTQ vs. 95.3% for ElastPQ, p = 0.823) and reliable LS measurements (95.3% for VTQ vs. 90.6% for ElastPQ, p = 0.509). The mean LS measurements obtained by VTQ (1.71 ± 0.47 m/s) and ElastPQ (1.66 ± 0.41 m/s) were not significantly different (p = 0.209). The LS measurements obtained by the two techniques showed strong correlation (r = 0.820); in addition, the 95% limit of agreement of the two methods was 27.5% of the mean. Finally, the ICC of repeat ElastPQ measurements was 0.991. Conclusion Virtual touch quantification and ElastPQ showed similar technical success rate and reliable measurements, with strongly correlated LS measurements. However, the two methods are not interchangeable due to the large limit of agreement. PMID:27587964

  6. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  8. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques.

  9. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  10. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  11. Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Won-Ju; Park, Chang-Hwan; Chung, Kyoung-Myeun; Park, Seon-Young; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Ki, Ho-seok; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.

  12. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part 2: mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques, clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography.

    PubMed

    Jenssen, Christian; Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin-Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Dietrich, Christoph Frank

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node (MLN) staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [endobronchial ultrasound combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all MLNs can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review in two integrative parts is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part 1 deals with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, MLN anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part 2 with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography.

  13. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  14. Transient Elastography in Clinical Detection of Liver Cirrhosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Ren-Gang; Lin, Jian-Mei; Jiang, Nan; Yang, Xing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Transient elastography is a noninvasive method for measuring liver fibrosis. This meta-analysis assesses the diagnostic performance of transient elastography of detecting liver cirrhosis in patients with liver disease. Patients and Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE databases until Jan 31, 2015, using the following search terms: elastography and liver cirrhosis. Included studies assessed patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, with an index test of transient elastography, and with the reference standard being a histopathological exam by liver biopsy. Sensitivity analysis and assessment of risk of bias and publication bias were performed. Results: Fifty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis with a total of 10,504 patients. The pooled estimate for the sensitivity of transient elastography for detecting liver fibrosis was 81% and the specificity was 88%. The imputed diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 26.08 and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was 0.931. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that transient elastography shows good sensitivity, specificity and a high accuracy for detecting liver cirrhosis. Transient elastography can be used as an additional method for the clinical diagnosis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27488324

  15. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Saclarides, Theodore John

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer. PMID:26491409

  16. Ex vivo and in vivo assessment of the non-linearity of elasticity properties of breast tissues for quantitative strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Takeshi; Ueno, Ei; Matsumura, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Bando, Hiroko; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the background to the image variations in strain elastography (strain imaging [SI]) depending on the manner of manipulation (compression magnitude) during elasticity image (EI) acquisition. Thirty patients with 33 breast lesions who had undergone surgery followed by SI assessment in vivo were analyzed. An analytical approach to tissue elasticity based on the stress-elastic modulus (Young's modulus) relationship was adopted. Young's moduli were directly measured ex vivo in surgical specimens ranging from 2.60 kPa (fat) to 16.08 kPa (invasive carcinoma) under the weak-stress condition (<0.2-0.4 kPa, which corresponds to the appropriate "light touch" technique in SI investigation. The contrast (ratio) of lesion to fat in elasticity ex vivo gradually decreased as the stress applied increased (around 1.0 kPa) on the background of significant non-linearity of the breast tissue. Our results indicate that the differences in non-linearity in elasticity between the different tissues within the breast under minimal stress conditions are closely related to the variation in EI quality. The significance of the "pre-load compression" concept in tissue elasticity evaluation is recognized. Non-linearity of elasticity is an essential attribute of living subjects and could provide useful information having a considerable impact on clinical diagnosis in quantitative ultrasound elastography.

  17. Acute effects of static stretching on muscle hardness of the medial gastrocnemius muscle belly in humans: an ultrasonic shear-wave elastography study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ikezoe, Tome; Kobayashi, Takuya; Umegaki, Hiroki; Takeno, Yohei; Nishishita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of static stretching (SS) on shear elastic modulus as an index of muscle hardness and muscle stiffness and the relationship between change in shear elastic modulus and change in muscle stiffness after SS. The patients were 17 healthy young males. Muscle stiffness was measured during passive ankle dorsiflexion using a dynamometer and ultrasonography before (pre) and immediately after (post) 2 min of SS. In addition, shear elastic modulus was measured by a new ultrasound technique called ultrasonic shear wave elastography. The post-SS values for muscle stiffness and shear elastic modulus were significantly lower than the pre-SS values. In addition, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated a significant correlation between rate of change in shear elastic modulus and rate of change in muscle stiffness. These results suggest that SS is an effective method for decreasing shear elastic modulus as well as muscle stiffness and that shear elastic modulus measurement using the shear wave elastography technique is useful in determining the effects of SS.

  18. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure.

  19. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  20. Laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) is a newly developed concept for tumor dissection of the gastrointestinal tract that was first investigated for local resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The first reported version of LECS for GIST has been named 'classical LECS' to distinguish it from other modified LECS procedures, such as inverted LECS, a combination of laparoscopic and endoscopic approaches to neoplasia with a non-exposure technique (CLEAN-NET), and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). These modified LECS procedures were developed for dissection of malignant tumors which may seed tumor cells into the abdominal cavity. While these LECS-related procedures might prevent tumor seeding, their application is limited by several factors, such as tumor size, location and technical difficulty. Currently, classical LECS is a safe and useful procedure for gastric submucosal tumors without mucosal defects, independent of tumor location, such as proximity to the esophagogastric junction or pyloric ring. For future applications of LECS-related procedures for other malignant diseases with mucosal lesions such as GIST with mucosal defects and gastric cancer, some improvements in the techniques are needed.

  1. Real-time two-dimensional temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2009-01-01

    We present a system for real-time 2D imaging of temperature change in tissue media using pulse-echo ultrasound. The frontend of the system is a SonixRP ultrasound scanner with a research interface giving us the capability of controlling the beam sequence and accessing radio frequency (RF) data in real-time. The beamformed RF data is streamlined to the backend of the system, where the data is processed using a two-dimensional temperature estimation algorithm running in the graphics processing unit (GPU). The estimated temperature is displayed in real-time providing feedback that can be used for real-time control of the heating source. Currently we have verified our system with elastography tissue mimicking phantom and in vitro porcine heart tissue, excellent repeatability and sensitivity were demonstrated.

  2. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  3. Preliminary study of digital image correlation based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties mapping of soft tissue, which is important for morphological and pathological studies of the tissue. An OCE technique is developed based on digital image correlation. System calibration and measurement error evaluation are performed. The displacement measurement of 0.6 μm to over 100 μm was obtained through a phantom experiment. The capability of this OCE technique for differentiation of stiffness was evaluated by imaging a two-components phantom. OCE imaging of an aneurysm sample shows promising results for characterization of composites of aneurismal wall in the future.

  4. A magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) approach for liver investigation.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Milot, L; Peng, X; Pilleul, F; Beuf, O

    2007-01-01

    Due to its key role in carbohydrate metabolisation, blood detoxification, filtering and substance storing, liver is prone to a wide variety of diseases: hepatitis, cirrhosis, cancer. As such, liver investigation is a major field of interest. We describe here a non invasive way to obtain important information on liver elasticity properties. In vitro Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) experiments are realized using a normalized substance (Agar gel in different concentrations) and this technique is also demonstrated in the context of an in vivo investigation of the elastic properties of a normal control liver. PMID:18002529

  5. Endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Evins, Alexander I; Banu, Matei A; Njoku, Innocent; Elowitz, Eric H; Härtl, Roger; Bernado, Antonio; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2015-04-01

    Foraminal stenosis frequently causes radiculopathy in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. Endoscopic transforaminal techniques allow for foraminal access with minimal tissue disruption. However, the effectiveness of foraminal decompression by endoscopic techniques has yet to be studied. We evaluate radiographic outcome of endoscopic transforaminal foraminotomies performed at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 on cadaveric specimens. Before and after the procedures, three dimensional CT scans were obtained to measure foraminal height and area. Following the foraminotomies, complete laminectomies and facetectomies were performed to assess for dural tears or nerve root damage. L3-L4 preoperative foraminal height increased by 8.9%, from 2.12±0.13cm to 2.27±0.14cm (p<0.01), and foraminal area increased by 24.8% from 2.21±0.18cm(2) to 2.72±0.19cm(2) (p<0.01). At L4-L5, preoperative foraminal height was 1.87±0.17cm and area was 1.78±0.18cm(2). Endoscopic foraminotomies resulted in a 15.3% increase of foraminal height (2.11±0.15cm, p<0.05) and 44.8% increase in area of (2.51±0.21cm(2), p<0.01). At L5-S1, spondylitic changes caused diminished foraminal height (1.26±0.14cm) and foraminal area (1.17±0.18cm(2)). Postoperatively, foraminal height increased by 41.6% (1.74±0.09cm, p<0.05) and area increased by 98.7% (2.08±0.17cm(2), p<0.01). Subsequent inspection via a standard midline approach revealed one dural tear of an S1 nerve root. Endoscopic foraminotomies allow for effective foraminal decompression, though clinical studies are necessary to further evaluate complications and efficacy.

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  7. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  8. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  9. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  10. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  11. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  12. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  13. Endoscopic ultrasonography for evaluating patients with recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-02-21

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) is still a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. In up to 30% of cases of ARP, it is not possible to establish the etiology of the disease. In the other 70%, many factors play an etiological role in ARP: microlithiasis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreas divisum, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, a choledochocele, annular pancreas, an anomalous pancreatobiliary junction, pancreatic tumors or chronic pancreatitis are diagnosed. EUS should be useful in ARP as it is sensitive for diagnosing bile duct stones, gallbladder sludge, pancreatic lesions, ductal abnormalities and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) appears to be diagnostic in the majority of patients with previously unexplained pancreatitis, and offers an alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as the initial diagnostic test in patients with ARP.

  14. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  15. Quantitative assessment of rotator cuff muscle elasticity: Reliability and feasibility of shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Uehara, Kosuke; Okamoto, Seiji; Chen, Shigao; Sperling, John W; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been used to evaluate various shoulder pathologies, whereas, quantification of the rotator cuff muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography (SWE) has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SWE measurements for the quantification of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle elasticity. Thirty cadaveric shoulders (18 intact and 12 with torn rotator cuff) were used. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated on an established SWE technique for measuring the SSP muscle elasticity. To assess the effect of overlying soft tissues above the SSP muscle, SWE values were measured with the transducer placed on the skin, on the subcutaneous fat after removing the skin, on the trapezius muscle after removing the subcutaneous fat, and directly on the SSP muscle. In addition, SWE measurements on 4 shoulder positions (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction) were compared in those with/without rotator cuff tears. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements were excellent for all regions in SSP muscle. Also, removing the overlying soft tissue showed no significant difference on SWE values measured in the SSP muscle. The SSP muscle with 0° abduction showed large SWE values, whereas, shoulders with large-massive tear showed smaller variation throughout the adduction-abduction positions. SWE is a reliable and feasible tool for quantitatively assessing the SSP muscle elasticity. This study also presented SWE measurements on the SSP muscle under various shoulder abduction positions which might help characterize patterns in accordance to the size of rotator cuff tears. PMID:26472309

  16. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is reliable method for testicular spermatogenesis evaluation after torsion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Lv, Faqing; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate effect of torsion on testicular stiffness alteration in affected and concomitant testis using improved ultrasound method of shear wave elastography (SWE). We compared the morphology of the testicular spermatogenesis assessed with Johansen’s scale on histology specimens with a mean stiffness measured by SWE. A total of 18 New Zealand white male rabbits were divided into two groups (group A and group B), animals from group A were subjected to operation of right testicle torsion while left testicle remained intact. In group B both testicles were normal and right testicle was subjected to sham operation. The protocol of measurement for mean stiffness value was calculated from three elastographic images obtained from each testicle. Significant difference in mean stiffness value and Johnsen’ scaling was observed in both groups (A and B), as well as for normal and torted testicle in group A. The mean stiffness positively correlated with histologic grade on both sided testicles in group B, and left sided testicles in group A (P=0.045, r=0.43; group B; P=0.001, r=0.98), while histologic grade negatively correlated with mean stiffness in the group A, torted testicle (torsion P=0.012, r=-0.76). In this study testicular torsion, with consequently higher mean stiffness value determined by SWE, has qualitatively and quantitatively decreased spermatogenesis. Gradual morphology change in testicle unaffected by torsion has not been previously reported. This study confirmed that quantitative change in testicular tissue stiffness as well as change in testicular spermatogenesis can be reliably evaluated with SWE. PMID:26221246

  17. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  18. Endoscopic Management of Dieulafoy's Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hye Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a vascular abnormality consisting of a large caliber-persistent tortuous submucosal artery. A small mucosal defect with the eruption of this protruding vessel can cause bleeding. In fact, a Dieulafoy's lesion is a relatively rare but potentially life-threatening condition. It accounts for 1% to 2% of cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Although there is no consensus on the treatment of Dieulafoy's lesions; treatment options depend on the mode of presentation, site of the lesion, and available expertise. Endoscopic therapy is usually successful in achieving primary hemostasis, with hemostasis success rates reaching 75% to 100%. Although various therapeutic endoscopic methods are used to control bleeding in Dieulafoy's lesions, the best method for endoscopic intervention is not clear. Combination endoscopic therapy is known to be superior to monotherapy because of a lower rate of recurrent bleeding. In addition, mechanical therapies including hemostatic clipping and endoscopic band ligation are more effective and successful in controlling bleeding than other endoscopic methods. Advances in endoscopic techniques have reduced mortality in patients with Dieulafoy's lesion-from 80% to 8%-and consequently, the need for surgical intervention has been reduced. Currently, surgical intervention is used for cases that fail therapeutic endoscopic or angiographic interventions. PMID:25844338

  19. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  20. Shear wave elastography using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high spatial resolution and sensitivity that are ideal for imaging the cornea and lens. Quantifying the biomechanical properties of these tissues could add clinically valuable information. Thus, we propose a dynamic elastography method combining OCT detection and a mechanical actuator to map the shear modulus of soft tissues. We used a piezoelectric actuator driven in the kHz range and we used phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) to track the resulting shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We mapped the shear wave speed of anesthetized mice cornea using monochromatic excitations. We found a significant difference between a group of knock-out (3.92 +/- 0.35 m/s, N=4) and wild-type mice (5.04 +/- 0.51 m/s, N=3). These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using PhS-OCT to perform in vivo shear wave elastography of the cornea. We then implemented a shear pulse compression approach on ex vivo human cornea. For that purpose, frequency- modulated excitations were used and the resulting displacement field was digitally compressed in a short broadband pulse with a 7 dB gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  1. Cardiac elastography: detecting pathological changes in myocardium tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Harrigan, Timothy; Solomon, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Estimation of the mechanical properties of the cardiac muscle has been shown to play a crucial role in the detection of cardiovascular disease. Elastography was recently shown feasible on RF cardiac data in vivo. In this paper, the role of elastography in the detection of ischemia/infarct is explored with simulations and in vivo experiments. In finite-element simulations of a portion of the cardiac muscle containing an infarcted region, the cardiac cycle was simulated with successive compressive and tensile strains ranging between -30% and 20%. The incremental elastic modulus was also mapped uisng adaptive methods. We then demonstrated this technique utilizing envelope-detected sonographic data (Hewlett-Packard Sonos 5500) in a patient with a known myocardial infarction. In cine-loop and M-Mode elastograms from both normal and infarcted regions in simulations and experiments, the infarcted region was identifed by the up to one order of magnitude lower incremental axial displacements and strains, and higher modulus. Information on motion, deformation and mechanical property should constitute a unique tool for noninvasive cardiac diagnosis.

  2. The feasibility of endorectal MR elastography for prostate cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Arani, Arvin; Plewes, Donald; Krieger, Axel; Chopra, Rajiv

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a rigid radio-frequency receiver endorectal coil for intracavitary prostate magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and to demonstrate the capability of this technique for generating stiffness maps over a typical prostate volume. An endorectal coil is currently used to help improve the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. We propose that this same coil could also serve to generate shear waves in the prostate gland during imaging, opening up the possibility of incorporating prostate stiffness characterization into multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. Prostate cancer has been shown to change the elasticity of tissue, suggesting that stiffness imaging (elastography) may provide supplementary diagnostic information. A rigid endorectal coil was mechanically coupled to a piezoceramic actuator and used to investigate full volume (27 slices, 2-mm thick) endorectal MRE in a prostate mimicking phantom. The low-amplitude vibrations (± 8-38 μm displacements) necessary to perform endorectal MRE did not affect the signal-to noise ratio of the coil and endorectal MRE was capable of resolving 0.1 cc (0.6 cm diameter) spherical inclusion volumes. Therefore, the results of this study, in combination with current clinical practice, motivate clinical evaluation of endorectal MRE in patients. PMID:21574182

  3. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  4. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  5. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  6. Endoscopic extraperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hourlay, P; Vangertruyden, G; Verduyckt, F; Trimpeneers, F; Hendrickx, J

    1995-05-01

    From June 24, 1993, until November 9, 1993, eight sympathectomies were performed by extraperitoneal endoscopy for treatment of Sudeck atrophy. Seventy-five percent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the intervention. A follow-up after 4 months shows that four patients are free of pain. Two are satisfied, but some pain remains. In two cases, the intensity of the pain remains unchanged but the character of the pain has changed. This new technique is safe and offers the well-known advantages of minimal invasive surgery. Moreover, this endoscopic approach opens perspectives for the exploration of the entire retroperitoneum. PMID:7545831

  7. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  8. A first demonstration of audio-frequency optical coherence elastography of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Armstrong, Julian J.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Sampson, David D.

    2008-12-01

    Optical elastography is aimed at using the visco-elastic properties of soft tissue as a contrast mechanism, and could be particularly suitable for high-resolution differentiation of tumour from surrounding normal tissue. We present a new approach to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the kilohertz frequency range that is based on optical coherence tomography. We describe the approach and present the first in vivo optical coherence elastography measurements in human skin at audio excitation frequencies.

  9. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Woo, Hyun Sik; Yu, Mi Hye; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Eun Sun; Sohn, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Boon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. Materials and Methods We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). Results The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). Conclusion MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver. PMID:23483022

  10. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in Differentiation Malignant From Benign Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wuguo; Hao, Shuai; Gao, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Shu; Guo, Lingji; Gu, Lingji; Luo, Donglin

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid nodules are relatively more prevalent in iodine-deficiency area, and the incidence increased sharply in the past decade in these areas. Workup of malignant from benign nodules in clinic was the main problem for managing thyroid nodules.An overall search for the articles about the diagnostic performance of real-time elastography (RTE) and shear wave elastography (SWE) before April 2015 in the databases of PubMed, Embase, and Google scholar. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were obtained from individual studies with a random-effects model. Subgroup and meta-regression analysis were also performed.Fifty-six studies involved in 2621 malignant nodules and 7380 benign nodules were contained in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of RTE was 83.0% and 81.2%, which is higher than SWE (sensitivity: 78.7%, specificity: 80.5%). The areas under the SROC curve of RTE and SWE were 0.885 and 0.842 respectively. RTE had higher diagnostic value for Caucasians than Asians. Stran ratio (SR) assessment had higher diagnostic performance than elasticity score (ES) system. Similarly, it had higher diagnostic value when malignant nodules were more than 50.In summary, the results revealed that RTE had higher diagnostic performance than SWE in differentiating malignant from benign nodules. However, future international multicenter studies in the region of thyroid risk need to further assess the diagnostic performance of RTE. PMID:26717367

  11. Video. Pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Bessler, Marc; Gumbs, Andrew A; Milone, Luca; Evanko, John C; Stevens, Peter; Fowler, Dennis

    2010-09-01

    Enthusiasm for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has been partly tempered by the reality that most NOTES procedures to date have been laparoscopically assisted. After safely performing transvaginal cholecystectomy in an IACUC-approved porcine model, the authors embarked on an institution review board (IRB)-approved protocol for ultimate performance of pure NOTES cholecystectomy in humans. They describe their experience performing a true NOTES transvaginal cholecystectomy after safely accomplishing three laparoscopically assisted or hybrid procedures in humans. One of the patients was a 35-year-old woman presenting with symptoms of biliary colic. Ultrasound confirmed gallstones, and her liver enzymes were normal. Pneumoperitoneum to 15 mmHg was obtained via a transvaginal trocar placed through a colpotomy made under direct vision. A double-channel endoscope then was advanced into the abdomen. To overcome the retracting limitations of currently available endoscopes, the authors used an extra-long 5-mm articulating retractor placed into the abdomen via a separate colpotomy made under direct vision using the flexible endoscope in a retroflexed position. Endoscopically placed clips were used for control of both the cystic duct and the artery. These techniques obviated the need for any transabdominally placed instruments or needles. This patient was the first to undergo a completely NOTES cholecystectomy at the authors' institution, and to their knowledge, in the United States. She was discharged on the day of surgery and at this writing has not experienced any complication after 1 month of follow-up evaluation. Performance of NOTES transvaginal cholecystectomy without aid of laparoscopic or needleoscopic instruments is feasible and safe for humans. Additional experience with this technique are required before studies comparing it with standard laparoscopy and hybrid techniques are appropriate.

  12. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem

    PubMed Central

    Doyley, M M

    2012-01-01

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This article reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas — quasi-static, harmonic, and transient — and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include: first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials; and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper’s objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic, and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the transient behavior of soft tissue; and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms. PMID:22222839

  13. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  14. Problems in Endoscopic Sphincteropapillotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeong Cheol; Myeong, Jae II; Yeo, Hyang Soon; Park, Hong Bae

    1987-01-01

    Since 1976, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography(ERCP) has been done in 2,185 cases at Kwangju Christian Hospital in Kwangju, Korea, Between November 1981 and September 1986, endoscopic sphincteropapillotomy(EST) was performed on 194 patients. The results are as follows: 1) Common bile duct stones were found in 171 patients, ascaris in the common bile ducts of 12 patients, ascaris and stones in the common bile duct of 1 patient, clonorchis in the bile ducts of 4 patients, fibrotic stenosis of the periampullary choledochoduodenal fistula in 1 patient, stenosis of the common bile duct in 1 patient and stones in the pancreatic ducts of 4 patients.2) In five cases the stones were extracted under direct vision, in 61 cases the stones were passed in the stool, while in 66 cases stone elimination was confirmed by repeated ERCP or T-tube cholangiography. In 46 cases the stones were not removed, but symptoms and laboratory findings showed marked improvement.3) Complications following EST included 5 cases of bleeding, 1 case of acute pancreatitis with a pancreatic pseudocyst, one death due to sepsis following cholangitis, 5 cases of recurrent cholangitis and 2 cases of recurrent pancreatitis.4) The conditions under which EST became difficult or did not succeed included periampullary diverticula, fibrotic stenosis of ampulla of Vater and stones in the intrahepatic ducts or a gallbladder.5) With improved EST technical maneuverability, we could prevent bleeding and acute pancreatitis with a pancreatic pseudocyst and perform EST successfully in cases with periampullary diverticula. PMID:3154824

  15. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  16. A reconfigurable and programmable FPGA-based system for nonstandard ultrasound methods.

    PubMed

    Boni, Enrico; Bassi, Luca; Dallai, Alessandro; Guidi, Francesco; Ramalli, Alessandro; Ricci, Stefano; Housden, James; Tortoli, Piero

    2012-07-01

    The availability of programmable and reconfigurable ultrasound (US) research platforms may have a considerable impact on the advancement of ultrasound systems technology; indeed, they allow novel transmission strategies or challenging processing methods to be tested and experimentally refined. In this paper, the ULtrasound Advanced Open Platform (ULA-OP), recently developed in our University laboratory, is shown to be a flexible tool that can be easily adapted to a wide range of applications. Five nonstandard working modalities are illustrated. Vector Doppler and quasi-static elastography applications emphasize the real-time potential and versatility of the system. Flow-mediated dilation, pulse compression, and high-frame-rate imaging highlight the flexibility of data access at different points in the reception chain. For each modality, the role played by the onboard programmable devices is discussed. Experimental results are reported, indicating the relative performance of the system for each application.

  17. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  18. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  19. Anterior endoscopic correction of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Picetti, George D; Ertl, Janos P; Bueff, H Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Our technique of anterior endoscopic scoliosis correction demonstrates the ability to perform an anterior approach through a minimally invasive technique with minimal disruption of the local biology. The initial results appear to equal curve correction and fusion rates to those of a formal open anterior approach. Additional benefits are: 1) shortened operative time, 2) lower blood loss, 3) shortened rehabilitation time, 4) less pain, and 5) shortened hospital stays. Endoscopic technique shows great promise in the management of scoliosis curves; however, this is a technically demanding procedure that requires cross-training in endoscopic discectomy and scoliosis management as well as familiarity with the anterior approach anatomy. PMID:12389288

  20. Powered functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Krouse, H J; Parker, C M; Purcell, R; Krouse, J H; Christmas, D A

    1997-09-01

    The use of powered instrumentation in functional endoscopic sinus surgery has been a revolutionary development in the surgical treatment of chronic sinusitis. Several studies have demonstrated the safety, efficacy, and ease of use of this new technique. To provide support and coordinate the surgical process in powered functional endoscopic sinus surgery procedures, perioperative nurses must have an appreciation for its specific equipment handling and for appropriate patient care. This article describes a specific protocol that perioperative nurses can use to facilitate efficient and safe surgical environments for patients who undergo powered endoscopic sinus surgery procedures.

  1. WE-E-9A-01: Ultrasound Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Emelianov, S; Hall, T; Bouchard, R

    2014-06-15

    Principles and techniques of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging will be presented, including quasistatic strain imaging, shear wave elasticity imaging, and their implementations in available systems. Deeper exploration of quasistatic methods, including elastic relaxation, and their applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations will be discussed. Transient elastography based on progressive and standing shear waves will be explained in more depth, along with applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations, as will measurement of complex elastic moduli. Comparisons will be made between ultrasound radiation force techniques, MR elastography, and the simple A mode plus mechanical plunger technique. Progress in efforts, such as that by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance, to reduce the differences in the elastic modulus reported by different commercial systems will be explained. Dr. Hall is on an Advisory Board for Siemens Ultrasound and has a research collaboration with them, including joint funding by R01CA140271 for nonlinear elasticity imaging. Learning Objectives: Be reminded of the long history of palpation of tissue elasticity for critical medical diagnosis and the relatively recent advances to be able to image tissue strain in response to an applied force. Understand the differences between shear wave speed elasticity measurement and imaging and understand the factors affecting measurement and image frame repletion rates. Understand shear wave propagation effects that can affect measurements, such as essentially lack of propagation in fluids and boundary effects, so important in thin layers. Know characteristics of available elasticity imaging phantoms, their uses and limitations. Understand thermal and cavitational limitations affecting radiation force-based shear wave imaging. Have learning and references adequate to for you to use in teaching elasticity imaging to residents and technologists. Be able to explain how elasticity measurement

  2. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed. PMID:27277901

  3. Quantitative Elastography for Cervical Stiffness Assessment during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fruscalzo, A.; Londero, A. P.; Fröhlich, C.; Möllmann, U.; Schmitz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Feasibility and reliability of tissue Doppler imaging-(TDI-) based elastography for cervical quantitative stiffness assessment during all three trimesters of pregnancy were evaluated. Materials and Methods. Prospective case-control study including seventy-four patients collected between the 12th and 42nd weeks of gestation. The tissue strain (TS) was measured by two independent operators as natural strain. Intra- and interoperator intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) agreements were evaluated. Results. TS measurement was always feasible and exhibited a high performance in terms of reliability (intraoperator ICC-agreement = 0.93; interoperator ICC agreement = 0.89 and 0.93 for a single measurement and for the average of two measurements, resp.). Cervical TS showed also a significant correlation with gestational age, cervical length, and parity. Conclusions. TS measurement during pregnancy demonstrated high feasibility and reliability. Furthermore, TS significantly correlated with gestational age, cervical length, and parity. PMID:24734246

  4. Parametric imaging of viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Philip; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-03-21

    We demonstrate imaging of soft tissue viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography. Viscoelastic creep deformation is induced in tissue using step-like compressive loading and the resulting time-varying deformation is measured using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. From a series of co-located B-scans, we estimate the local strain rate as a function of time, and parameterize it using a four-parameter Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic creep. The estimated viscoelastic strain and time constant are used to visualize viscoelastic creep in 2D, dual-parameter viscoelastograms. We demonstrate our technique on six silicone tissue-simulating phantoms spanning a range of viscoelastic parameters. As an example in soft tissue, we report viscoelastic contrast between muscle and connective tissue in fresh, ex vivo rat gastrocnemius muscle and mouse abdominal transection. Imaging viscoelastic creep deformation has the potential to provide complementary contrast to existing imaging modalities, and may provide greater insight into disease pathology.

  5. Dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xing; Adie, Steven G; John, Renu; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-06-21

    A dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography (OCE) imaging technique is reported. In this technique, audio-frequency compressive vibrations are generated by a piezoelectric stack as external excitation, and strain rates in the sample are calculated and mapped quantitatively using phase-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. At different driving frequencies, this technique provides contrast between sample regions with different mechanical properties, and thus is used to mechanically characterize tissue. We present images of a three-layer silicone tissue phantom and rat tumor tissue ex vivo, based on quantitative strain rate. Both acquisition speed and processing speed are improved dramatically compared with previous OCE imaging techniques. With high resolution, high acquisition speed, and the ability to characterize the mechanical properties of tissue, this OCE technique has potential use in non-destructive volumetric imaging and clinical applications. PMID:20588552

  6. Single shot line-field optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Schill, Alexander; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Kazemi, Tina; Nair, Achuth; Hsu, Thomas; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Elastic wave imaging optical coherence elastography (EWI-OCE) is an emerging technique that can quantify local biomechanical properties of tissues. However, long acquisition times make this technique unfeasible for clinical use. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact single shot line-field OCE technique using a line-field interferometer and an air-pulse delivery system. The spatial-temporal elastic wave propagation profile was acquired in a single shot and used to quantify the elastic wave group velocity in tissue. Results on tissue-mimicking phantoms and chicken breast muscle agreed well with mechanical compression testing, demonstrating that the presented method can effectively reduce the OCE acquisition time to a few milliseconds in biological application.

  7. Detection and characterisation of biopsy tissue using quantitative optical coherence elastography (OCE) in men with suspected prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Hsu, Ying-Ting; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-02-01

    We present first quantitative three-dimensional (3D) data sets recorded using optical coherence elastography (OCE) for the diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer (PCa). 120 transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy specimens from 10 men suspected with prostate cancer were imaged using OCE. 3D quantitative mechanical assessment of biopsy specimens obtained in kilopascals (kPa) at an interval of 40 µm was compared with histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE in comparison to histopathology. The results show OCE imaging could reliably differentiate between benign prostate tissue, acinar atypical hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and malignant PCa. The sensitivity and specificity of OCE for the detection of prostate cancer was 0.98 and 0.91 with AUC > 0.99. Quantitative 3D OCE based on the assessment of mechanical properties of tissues can reliably differentiate prostate tissue specimen in an ex-vivo setting. This is a promising imaging modality for characterising different grades of cancers.

  8. Comparison of four different techniques to evaluate the elastic properties of phantom in elastography: is there a gold standard?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudry, Jennifer; Lynch, Ted; Vappou, Jonathan; Sandrin, Laurent; Miette, Véronique

    2014-10-01

    Elastographic techniques used in addition to imaging techniques (ultrasound, resonance magnetic or optical) provide new clinical information on the pathological state of soft tissues. However, system-dependent variation in elastographic measurements may limit the clinical utility of these measurements by introducing uncertainty into the measurement. This work is aimed at showing differences in the evaluation of the elastic properties of phantoms performed by four different techniques: quasi-static compression, dynamic mechanical analysis, vibration-controlled transient elastography and hyper-frequency viscoelastic spectroscopy. Four Zerdine® gel materials were tested and formulated to yield a Young’s modulus over the range of normal and cirrhotic liver stiffnesses. The Young’s modulus and the shear wave speed obtained with each technique were compared. Results suggest a bias in elastic property measurement which varies with systems and highlight the difficulty in finding a reference method to determine and assess the elastic properties of tissue-mimicking materials. Additional studies are needed to determine the source of this variation, and control for them so that accurate, reproducible reference standards can be made for the absolute measurement of soft tissue elasticity.

  9. Transient displacement induced in shear wave elastography: comparison between analytical results and ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Elkateb Hachemi, M; Callé, S; Remenieras, J P

    2006-12-22

    It is now accepted that an effective way to investigate the elastic properties of soft tissues is to generate a localized transient acoustic radiation force and to follow the associated displacements in the time/space domain. Shear waves induced by this stress field are particularly interesting in this kind of medium because they are governed by the shear elastic modulus mu, which is directly linked to the Young modulus, and spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the transient motion induced must therefore be obtained in detail. We report here a model based on the elastodynamic Green's function formalism to describe these displacements. 3D simulation of radiation force in homogenous elastic media was performed and the displacement curves computed at different radial distances for different temporal force profiles. Amplitude and duration of displacement were found to be reliable parameters to characterize the elastic properties of the medium. Experimental measurements were performed in a homogeneous agar-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom, and two transducers were used to generate the radiation force and follow the induced displacements. Displacements obtained from different lateral locations around the applied force axis were then used to reconstruct the shear-wave propagation in a scan plane as a function of time. The experimental displacements/curves agreed with the theoretical profiles obtained by the elastodynamic Green's function formalism.

  10. Noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale corneal elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive high-resolution depth-resolved measurement of corneal biomechanics is of great clinical significance for improving the diagnosis and optimizing the treatment of various degenerated ocular diseases. Here, we report a micro-scale optical coherence elastography (OCE) method that enables noncontact assessment of the depthwise elasticity distribution in the cornea. The OCE system combines a focused air-puff device with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Low-pressure short-duration air stream is used to load the cornea with the localized displacement at micron level. The phase-resolved OCT detection with nano-scale sensitivity probes the induced corneal deformation at various locations within a scanning line, providing the ultra-fast imaging of the corneal lamb wave propagation. With spectral analysis, the amplitude spectra and the phase spectra are available for the estimation of the frequency range of the lamb wave and the quantification of the wave propagation, respectively. Curved propagation paths following the top and bottom corneal boundaries are selected inside the cornea for measuring the phase velocity of the lamb wave at the major frequency components over the whole depths. Our pilot experiments on ex vivo rabbit eyes indicate the distinct stiffness of different layers in the cornea, including the epithelium, the anterior stroma, the posterior stroma, and the innermost region, which demonstrates the feasibility of this micro-scale OCE method for noncontact depth-resolved corneal elastography. Also, the quantification of the lamb wave dispersion in the cornea could lead to the measurement of the elastic modulus, suggesting the potential of this method for quantitative monitoring of the corneal biomechanics.

  11. Ultrasonic elastography using sector scan imaging and a radial compression.

    PubMed

    Souchon, Rémi; Soualmi, Lahbib; Bertrand, Michel; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2002-05-01

    Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. The stress is usually created by a compression plate, and the target is imaged by an ultrasonic linear array. This configuration is used for breast elastography, and has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Phenomena such as strain decay with tissue depth and strain concentrations have been reported. However in some in vivo situations, like prostate or blood vessels imaging, this set-up cannot be used. We propose a device to acquire in vivo elastograms of the prostate. The compression is applied by inflating a balloon that covers a transrectal sector probe. The 1D algorithm used to calculate the radial strain fails if the center of the imaging probe does not correspond to the center of the compressor. Therefore, experimental elastograms are calculated with a 2D algorithm that accounts for tangential displacements of the tissue. In this article, in order to gain a better understanding of the image formation process, the use of ultrasonic sector scans to image the radial compression of a target is investigated. Elastograms of homogeneous phantoms are presented, and compared with simulated images. Both show a strain decay with tissue depth. Then experimental and simulated elastograms of a phantom that contains a hard inclusion are presented, showing that strain concentrations occur as well. A method to compensate for strain decay and therefore to increase the contrast of the strain elastograms is proposed. It is expected that such information will help to interpret and possibly improve the elastograms obtained via radial compression.

  12. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  13. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Kelly A.; Lee, Sang W.

    2015-01-01

    Benign colon polyps are best treated endoscopically. Colon polyps that are not amenable for endoscopic removals either because they are too large or situated in anatomically difficult locations can pose a clinical dilemma. Traditionally the most common recommendation for these patients has been to offer a colon resection. Although the laparoscopic approach has improved short-term outcomes, morbidities associated with bowel resection are still significant. We may be over treating majority of these patients because of the remote possibility that these polyps may be harboring a cancer. A combined approach using both laparoscopy and colonoscopy (combined endoscopic and laparoscopic surgery) has been described as an alternative to bowel resection in select patients with polyps that cannot be removed endoscopically. Polyp removal using this combined approach may be an effective alternative in select patients. PMID:26491405

  14. Endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Liu, Hongguang; Liao, Joseph C.; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate feasibility of endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov light originated when charged nuclear particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a biological tissue of living subjects at superluminal velocity. The endoscopy imaging system consists of conventional optical fiber bundle/ clinical endoscopes, an optical imaging lens system, and a sensitive low-noise charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Our systematic studies using phantom samples show that Cerenkov light from as low as 1 µCi of radioactivity emitted from 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be coupled and transmitted through conventional optical fibers and endoscopes. In vivo imaging experiments with tumor bearing mice, intravenously administered with 18F-FDG, further demonstrated that Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy is a promising new tool in the field of endoscopic molecular imaging. PMID:22741069

  15. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  16. Endoscopic approach to achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J; Wehrmann, Till

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The etiology is still unknown and therefore all treatment options are strictly palliative with the intention to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Current established endoscopic therapeutic options include pneumatic dilation (PD) or botulinum toxin injection. Both treatment approaches have an excellent symptomatic short term effect, and lead to a reduction of LES pressure. However, the long term success of botulinum toxin (BT) injection is poor with symptom recurrence in more than 50% of the patients after 12 mo and in nearly 100% of the patients after 24 mo, which commonly requires repeat injections. In contrast, after a single PD 40%-60% of the patients remain asymptomatic for ≥ 10 years. Repeated on demand PD might become necessary and long term remission can be achieved with this approach in up to 90% of these patients. The main positive predictors for a symptomatic response to PD are an age > 40 years, a LES-pressure reduction to < 15 mmHg and/or an improved radiological esophageal clearance post-PD. However PD has a significant risk for esophageal perforation, which occurs in about 2%-3% of cases. In randomized, controlled studies BT injection was inferior to PD and surgical cardiomyotomy, whereas the efficacy of PD, in patients > 40 years, was nearly equivalent to surgery. A new promising technique might be peroral endoscopic myotomy, although long term results are needed and practicability as well as safety issues must be considered. Treatment with a temporary self expanding stent has been reported with favorable outcomes, but the data are all from one study group and must be confirmed by others before definite recommendations can be made. In addition to its use as a therapeutic tool, endoscopy also plays an important role in the diagnosis and surveillance of patients with achalasia. PMID:23951393

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