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Sample records for endosome fusion regulation

  1. Cbl controls EGFR fate by regulating early endosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Visser Smit, Gina D; Place, Trenton L; Cole, Sara L; Clausen, Kathryn A; Vemuganti, Soumya; Zhang, Guojuan; Koland, John G; Lill, Nancy L

    2009-12-22

    Amino acid residues 1 to 434 of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl control signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by enhancing its ubiquitination, down-regulation, and lysosomal degradation. This region of Cbl comprises a tyrosine kinase-binding domain, a linker region, a really interesting new gene finger (RF), and a subset of the residues of the RF tail. In experiments with full-length alanine substitution mutants, we demonstrated that the RF tail of Cbl regulated biochemically distinct checkpoints in the endocytosis of EGFR. The Cbl- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the regulator of internalization hSprouty2 was compromised by the Val(431)--> Ala mutation, whereas the Cbl- and EGFR-dependent dephosphorylation or degradation of the endosomal trafficking regulator Hrs was compromised by the Phe(434)--> Ala mutation. Deregulated phosphorylation of Hrs correlated with inhibition of the fusion of early endosomes and of the degradation of EGFR. This study provides the first evidence that Cbl regulates receptor fate by controlling the fusion of sorting endosomes. We postulate that it does so by modulating the abundance of tyrosine-phosphorylated Hrs.

  2. CBL CONTROLS EGF RECEPTOR FATE BY REGULATING EARLY ENDOSOME FUSION#

    PubMed Central

    Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Cole, Sara L.; Clausen, Kathryn A.; Vemuganti, Soumya; Zhang, Guojuan; Koland, John G.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Residues 1-434 of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl control epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signaling by enhancing receptor ubiquitination, downregulation, and lysosomal degradation. Cbl 1-434 comprises a tyrosine kinase-binding domain, linker region, RING finger (RF), and a subset of the RF tail amino acids 420-436. Using full-length alanine substitution mutants, we demonstrate that the Cbl RF tail regulates biochemically distinct EGF-R endocytosis checkpoints: 1) Cbl- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of hSprouty2 upstream of EGF-R ubiquitination (compromised by Cbl V431A); and 2) Cbl- and EGF-R-dependent dephosphorylation or degradation of the endosomal trafficking regulator Hrs (compromised by Cbl F434A). Deregulated Hrs phosphorylation correlates with the inhibition of both early endosome fusion and EGF-R degradation. This is the first evidence that Cbl can regulate receptor fate by controlling the fusion of sorting endosomes. We postulate that it does so by modulating the generation and loss of tyrosine phosphorylated Hrs. PMID:20029031

  3. pH regulation in early endosomes and interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins control avian retrovirus fusion.

    PubMed

    Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Mason, Caleb; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2017-05-12

    Enveloped viruses infect host cells by fusing their membranes with those of the host cell, a process mediated by viral glycoproteins upon binding to cognate host receptors or entering into acidic intracellular compartments. Whereas the effect of receptor density on viral infection has been well studied, the role of cell type-specific factors/processes, such as pH regulation, has not been characterized in sufficient detail. Here, we examined the effects of cell-extrinsic factors (buffer environment) and cell-intrinsic factors (interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins, IFITMs), on the pH regulation in early endosomes and on the efficiency of acid-dependent fusion of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV), with endosomes. First, we found that a modest elevation of external pH can raise the pH in early endosomes in a cell type-dependent manner and thereby delay the acid-induced fusion of endocytosed ASLV. Second, we observed a cell type-dependent delay between the low pH-dependent and temperature-dependent steps of viral fusion, consistent with the delayed enlargement of the fusion pore. Third, ectopic expression of IFITMs, known to potently block influenza virus fusion with late compartments, was found to only partially inhibit ASLV fusion with early endosomes. Interestingly, IFITM expression promoted virus uptake and the acidification of endosomal compartments, resulting in an accelerated fusion rate when driven by the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored, but not by the transmembrane isoform of the ASLV receptor. Collectively, these results highlight the role of cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic factors in regulating the efficiency and kinetics of virus entry and fusion with target cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Aballay, A; Sarrouf, M N; Colombo, M I; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1995-01-01

    Fusion among endosomes is an important step for transport and sorting of internalized macromolecules. Working in a cell-free system, we previously reported that endosome fusion requires cytosol and ATP, and is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Fusion is regulated by monomeric and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. We now report that fusion can proceed at very low Ca2+ concentrations, i.e. < 30 nM. Moreover, fusion is not affected when intravesicular Ca2+ is depleted by preincubation of vesicles with calcium ionophores (5 microM ionomycin or A23187) in the presence of calcium chelators (5 mM EGTA or 60 mM EDTA). The results indicate that fusion can proceed at extremely low concentrations of intravesicular and extravesicular Ca2+. However, BAPTA [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid], a relatively specific Ca2+ chelator, inhibits fusion. BAPTA binds other metals besides Ca2+. We present evidence that BAPTA inhibition is due not to Ca2+ chelation but to Zn2+ depletion. TPEN [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine], another metal-ion chelator with low affinity for Ca2+, also inhibited fusion. TPEN- and BAPTA-inhibited fusions were restored by addition of Zn2+. Zn(2+)-dependent fusion presents the same characteristics as control fusion. In intact cells, TPEN inhibited transport along the endocytic pathway. The results indicate that Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion, suggesting that this ion is necessary for the function of one or more factors involved in the fusion process. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554539

  5. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes.

    PubMed

    White, Judith M; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-06-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years, a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion-triggering mechanisms. A key take-home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith M.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH, and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion triggering mechanisms. A key take home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors, and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion. PMID:26935856

  7. A Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Regulates Lysosomal Fusion with Endosomes and Autophagosomes and Is Required for Neuronal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongping; Shang, Weina; Nagarkar Jaiswal, Sonal; di Ronza, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Sardiello, Marco; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Fan, Hengyu; Bellen, Hugo J.; Tong, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy helps deliver sequestered intracellular cargo to lysosomes for proteolytic degradation and thereby maintains cellular homeostasis by preventing accumulation of toxic substances in cells. In a forward mosaic screen in Drosophila designed to identify genes required for neuronal function and maintenance, we identified multiple cacophony (cac) mutant alleles. They exhibit an age-dependent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in photoreceptor terminals and eventually a degeneration of the terminals and surrounding glia. cac encodes an α1 subunit of a Drosophila voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) that is required for synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane and neurotransmitter release. Here, we show that cac mutant photoreceptor terminals accumulate AV-lysosomal fusion intermediates, suggesting that Cac is necessary for the fusion of AVs with lysosomes, a poorly defined process. Loss of another subunit of the VGCC, α2δ or straightjacket (stj), causes phenotypes very similar to those caused by the loss of cac, indicating that the VGCC is required for AV-lysosomal fusion. The role of VGCC in AV-lysosomal fusion is evolutionarily conserved, as the loss of the mouse homologues, Cacna1a and Cacna2d2, also leads to autophagic defects in mice. Moreover, we find that CACNA1A is localized to the lysosomes and that loss of lysosomal Cacna1a in cerebellar cultured neurons leads to a failure of lysosomes to fuse with endosomes and autophagosomes. Finally, we show that the lysosomal CACNA1A but not the plasma-membrane resident CACNA1A is required for lysosomal fusion. In summary, we present a model in which the VGCC plays a role in autophagy by regulating the fusion of AVs with lysosomes through its calcium channel activity and hence functions in maintaining neuronal homeostasis. PMID:25811491

  8. Fusion of Endosomes Involved in Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Holroyd, Claudia; Kistner, Ute; Annaert, Wim; Jahn, Reinhard

    1999-01-01

    Recycling of vesicles of the regulated secretory pathway presumably involves passage through an early endosomal compartment as an intermediate step. To learn more about the involvement of endosomes in the recycling of synaptic and secretory vesicles we studied in vitro fusion of early endosomes derived from pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Fusion was not affected by cleavage of the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins synaptobrevin and syntaxin 1 that operate at the exocytotic limb of the pathway. Furthermore, fusion was inhibited by the fast Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid but not by the slow Ca2+ chelator EGTA. Endosome fusion was restored by the addition of Ca2+ with an optimum at a free Ca2+ concentration of 0.3 × 10−6 M. Other divalent cations did not substitute for Ca2+. A membrane-permeant EGTA derivative caused inhibition of fusion, which was reversed by addition of Ca2+. We conclude that the fusion of early endosomes participating in the recycling of synaptic and neurosecretory vesicles is mediated by a set of SNAREs distinct from those involved in exocytosis and requires the local release of Ca2+ from the endosomal interior. PMID:10473644

  9. Substance P dependence of endosomal fusion during bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hammond, T G; Saban, R; Bost, K L; Harris, H W; Kaysen, J H; Goda, F O; Wang, X C; Lewis, F C; Navar, G L; Campbell, W C; Bjorling, D E; Saban, M; Zeidel, M L

    2000-03-01

    Urinary bladder instillation of ovalbumin into presensitized guinea pigs stimulates rapid development of local bladder inflammation. Substance P is an important mediator of this inflammatory response, as substance P antagonists largely reverse the process. Vacuolization of the subapical endosomal compartment of the transitional epithelial cells lining the bladder suggests that changes in endosomal trafficking and fusion are also part of the inflammatory response. To test directly for substance P mediation of changes in endosomal fusion, we reconstituted fusion of transitional cell endosomes in vitro using both cuvette-based and flow cytometry energy transfer assays. Bladders were loaded with fluorescent dyes by a hypotonic withdrawal protocol before endosomal isolation by gradient centrifugation. Endosomal fusion assayed by energy transfer during in vitro reconstitution was both cytosol and ATP dependent. Fusion was confirmed by the increase in vesicle size on electron micrographs of fused endosomal preparations compared with controls. In inflamed bladders, dye uptake was inhibited 20% and endosomal fusion was inhibited 50%. These changes are partly mediated by the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor (NK1R), as 4 mg/kg of CP-96,345, a highly selective NK1 antagonist, increased fusion in inflamed bladders but had no effect on control bladders. The receptor-mediated nature of this effect was demonstrated by the expression of substance P receptor mRNA in rat bladder lumen scrapings and by the detection of the NK1R message in guinea pig subapical endosomes by Western blot analysis. The NK1Rs were significantly upregulated following induction of an inflammatory response in the bladder. These results demonstrate that 1) in ovalbumin-induced inflammation in the guinea pig bladder, in vitro fusion of apical endosomes is inhibited, showing endocytotic processes are altered in inflammation; 2) pretreatment in vivo with an NK1R antagonist blocks this inhibition of in vitro fusion

  10. Harnessing the power of the endosome to regulate neural development

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis and endosomal trafficking play a multitude of roles in cellular function beyond regulating entry of essential nutrients. In this review, we discuss the cell biological principles of endosomal trafficking, the neuronal adaptations to endosomal organization, and the role of endosomal trafficking in neural development. In particular, we consider how cell fate decisions, polarity, migration, and axon outgrowth and guidance are influenced by five endosomal tricks: dynamic modulation of receptor levels by endocytosis and recycling, cargo-specific responses via cargo-specific endocytic regulators, cell type-specific endocytic regulation, ligand-specific endocytic regulation, and endosomal regulation of ligand processing and trafficking. PMID:22578496

  11. The R-SNARE Endobrevin/VAMP-8 Mediates Homotypic Fusion of Early Endosomes and Late Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Antonin, Wolfram; Holroyd, Claudia; Tikkanen, Ritva; Höning, Stefan; Jahn, Reinhard

    2000-01-01

    Endobrevin/VAMP-8 is an R-SNARE localized to endosomes, but it is unknown in which intracellular fusion step it operates. Using subcellular fractionation and quantitative immunogold electron microscopy, we found that endobrevin/VAMP-8 is present on all membranes known to communicate with early endosomes, including the plasma membrane, clathrin-coated pits, late endosomes, and membranes of the trans-Golgi network. Affinity-purified antibodies that block the ability of endobrevin/VAMP-8 to form SNARE core complexes potently inhibit homotypic fusion of both early and late endosomes in vitro. Fab fragments were as active as intact immunoglobulin Gs. Recombinant endobrevin/VAMP-8 inhibited both fusion reactions with similar potency. We conclude that endobrevin/VAMP-8 operates as an R-SNARE in the homotypic fusion of early and late endosomes. PMID:11029036

  12. PIKfyve Regulation of Endosome-Linked Pathways

    PubMed Central

    de Lartigue, Jane; Polson, Hannah; Feldman, Morri; Shokat, Kevan; Tooze, Sharon A; Urbé, Sylvie; Clague, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 5-kinase (PIKfyve) is a critical enzyme for the synthesis of PtdIns(3,5)P2, that has been implicated in various trafficking events associated with the endocytic pathway. We have now directly compared the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of PIKfyve in HeLa cells with a specific pharmacological inhibitor of enzyme activity. Both approaches induce changes in the distribution of CI-M6PR and trans-Golgi network (TGN)-46 proteins, which cycles between endosomes and TGN, leading to their accumulation in dispersed punctae, whilst the TGN marker golgin-245 retains a perinuclear disposition. Trafficking of CD8-CI-M6PR (retromer-dependent) and CD8-Furin (retromer-independent) chimeras from the cell surface to the TGN is delayed following drug administration, as is the transport of the Shiga toxin B-subunit. siRNA knockdown of PIKfyve produced no defect in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation, unless combined with knockdown of its activator molecule Vac14, suggesting that a low threshold of PtdIns(3,5)P2 is necessary and sufficient for this pathway. Accordingly pharmacological inhibition of PIKfyve results in a profound block to the lysosomal degradation of activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Met receptors. Immunofluorescence revealed EGF receptors to be trapped in the interior of a swollen endosomal compartment. In cells starved of amino acids, PIKfyve inhibition leads to the accumulation of the lipidated form of GFP-LC3, a marker of autophagosomal structures, which can be visualized as fluorescent punctae. We suggest that PIKfyve inhibition may render the late endosome/lysosome compartment refractory to fusion with both autophagosomes and with EGFR-containing multivesicular bodies. PMID:19582903

  13. Negative regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels in early-to-late endosome conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Jian, Youli; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengkui; Gao, Zhiyang; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Xuezhao; Li, Yang; Xu, Jing; Jing, Yudong; Mitani, Shohei; He, Sudan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) plays a central role in endosome fusion, recycling, sorting, and early-to-late endosome conversion, but the mechanisms that determine how the correct endosomal PtdIns3P level is achieved remain largely elusive. Here we identify two new factors, SORF-1 and SORF-2, as essential PtdIns3P regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of sorf-1 or sorf-2 leads to greatly elevated endosomal PtdIns3P, which drives excessive fusion of early endosomes. sorf-1 and sorf-2 function coordinately with Rab switching genes to inhibit synthesis of PtdIns3P, allowing its turnover for endosome conversion. SORF-1 and SORF-2 act in a complex with BEC-1/Beclin1, and their loss causes elevated activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. In mammalian cells, inactivation of WDR91 and WDR81, the homologs of SORF-1 and SORF-2, induces Beclin1-dependent enlargement of PtdIns3P-enriched endosomes and defective degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. WDR91 and WDR81 interact with Beclin1 and inhibit PI3K complex activity. These findings reveal a conserved mechanism that controls appropriate PtdIns3P levels in early-to-late endosome conversion. PMID:26783301

  14. The phosphoinositide-associated protein Rush hour regulates endosomal trafficking in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gailite, Ieva; Egger-Adam, Diane; Wodarz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis regulates multiple cellular processes, including the protein composition of the plasma membrane, intercellular signaling, and cell polarity. We have identified the highly conserved protein Rush hour (Rush) and show that it participates in the regulation of endocytosis. Rush localizes to endosomes via direct binding of its FYVE (Fab1p, YOTB, Vac1p, EEA1) domain to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Rush also directly binds to Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (Gdi), which is involved in the activation of Rab proteins. Homozygous rush mutant flies are viable but show genetic interactions with mutations in Gdi, Rab5, hrs, and carnation, the fly homologue of Vps33. Overexpression of Rush disrupts progression of endocytosed cargo and increases late endosome size. Lysosomal marker staining is decreased in Rush-overexpressing cells, pointing to a defect in the transition between late endosomes and lysosomes. Rush also causes formation of endosome clusters, possibly by affecting fusion of endosomes via an interaction with the class C Vps/homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex. These results indicate that Rush controls trafficking from early to late endosomes and from late endosomes to lysosomes by modulating the activity of Rab proteins. PMID:22160599

  15. Goliath family E3 ligases regulate the recycling endosome pathway via VAMP3 ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Schönherr, Christina; Varshney, Gaurav K; Dogru, Murat; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H

    2013-02-20

    Diverse cellular processes depend on endocytosis, intracellular vesicle trafficking, sorting and exocytosis, processes regulated post-transcriptionally by modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In addition to sorting to the lysosome, cargo is recycled to the plasma membrane via recycling endosomes. Here, we describe a role of the goliath gene family of protease-associated (PA) domain E3 ligases in regulating recycling endosome trafficking. The two Drosophila members of this family--Goliath and Godzilla(CG10277)--are located on endosomes, and both ectopic expression and loss-of-function lead to the accumulation of Rab5-positive giant endosomes. Furthermore, the human homologue RNF167 exhibits similar behaviour. We show that the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein VAMP3 is a target of these ubiquitin ligases, and that recycling endosome trafficking is abrogated in response to their activity. Furthermore, mutation of the Godzilla ubiquitylation target lysines on VAMP3 abrogates the formation of enlarged endosomes induced by either Godzilla or RNF167. Thus, Goliath ubiquitin ligases play a novel role in regulating recycling endosome trafficking via ubiquitylation of the VAMP3 SNARE protein.

  16. ESCRTs and associated proteins in lysosomal fusion with endosomes and autophagosomes.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Priyanka; Chakrabarti, Oishee

    2016-07-22

    Endolysosomal and autophagosomal degradation pathways are highly connected at various levels, sharing multiple molecular effectors that modulate them individually or simultaneously. These two lysosomal degradative pathways are primarily involved in the disposal of cargo internalized from the cell surface or long-lived proteins or aggregates and aged organelles present in the cytosol. Both of these pathways involve a number of carefully regulated vesicular fusion events that are dependent on ESCRT proteins. The ESCRT proteins especially ESCRT-I and III participate in the regulation of fusion events between autophagosome/amphisome and lysosome. Along with these, a number of functionally diverse ESCRT associated and regulatory proteins such as, endosomal PtdIns (3) P 5-kinase Fab1, ALIX, mahogunin ring finger 1, atrogin 1, syntaxin 17, ATG12-ATG3 complex, and protein kinase CK2α are involved in fusion events in either or both the lysosomal degradative pathways.

  17. Munc13-4 interacts with syntaxin 7 and regulates late endosomal maturation, endosomal signaling, and TLR9-initiated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Monfregola, Jlenia; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Napolitano, Gennaro; Zhang, Jinzhong; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate late endosomal maturation and function are not completely elucidated, and direct evidence of a calcium sensor is lacking. Here we identify a novel mechanism of late endosomal maturation that involves a new molecular interaction between the tethering factor Munc13-4, syntaxin 7, and VAMP8. Munc13-4 binding to syntaxin 7 was significantly increased by calcium. Colocalization of Munc13-4 and syntaxin 7 at late endosomes was demonstrated by high-resolution and live-cell microscopy. Munc13-4–deficient cells show increased numbers of significantly enlarged late endosomes, a phenotype that was mimicked by the fusion inhibitor chloroquine in wild-type cells and rescued by expression of Munc13-4 but not by a syntaxin 7–binding–deficient mutant. Late endosomes from Munc13-4-KO neutrophils show decreased degradative capacity. Munc13-4–knockout neutrophils show impaired endosomal-initiated, TLR9-dependent signaling and deficient TLR9-specific CD11b up-regulation. Thus we present a novel mechanism of late endosomal maturation and propose that Munc13-4 regulates the late endocytic machinery and late endosomal–associated innate immune cellular functions. PMID:26680738

  18. In vitro fusion of endocytic vesicles: effects of reagents that alter endosomal pH.

    PubMed

    Pless, D D; Wellner, R B

    1996-07-01

    Ricin, a plant toxin that binds to galactose-terminated glycoproteins and glycolipids on the cell surface, is internalized into endosomes before reaching the cytosol where it exerts its toxic activity. Fusion of early endosomes containing ricin or transferrin was demonstrated by using postnuclear supernatant fractions from K-562 cells. For both ligands, fusion depended on time, temperature, and ATP and was blocked by preincubation with N-ethylmaleimide. Some reagents that increase endosomal pH, the ionophores monensin and nigericin and the weak base chloroquine, stimulated the rate of fusion. However, bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases, did not alter the rate of fusion. Moreover, it reduced or eliminated stimulation caused by monensin, nigericin, or chloroquine. Thus, the increased rate of fusion did not correlate with the higher lumenal pH of the endosome. The results suggest instead that fusion was stimulated by reagents that promoted accumulation of cations within the vesicles.

  19. Dengue Virus Ensures Its Fusion in Late Endosomes Using Compartment-Specific Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Melikov, Kamran; Pourmal, Sergei; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2010-01-01

    Many enveloped viruses invade cells via endocytosis and use different environmental factors as triggers for virus-endosome fusion that delivers viral genome into cytosol. Intriguingly, dengue virus (DEN), the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus that infects up to 100 million people each year, fuses only in late endosomes, while activation of DEN protein fusogen glycoprotein E is triggered already at pH characteristic for early endosomes. Are there any cofactors that time DEN fusion to virion entry into late endosomes? Here we show that DEN utilizes bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, a lipid specific to late endosomes, as a co-factor for its endosomal acidification-dependent fusion machinery. Effective virus fusion to plasma- and intracellular- membranes, as well as to protein-free liposomes, requires the target membrane to contain anionic lipids such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylserine. Anionic lipids act downstream of low-pH-dependent fusion stages and promote the advance from the earliest hemifusion intermediates to the fusion pore opening. To reach anionic lipid-enriched late endosomes, DEN travels through acidified early endosomes, but we found that low pH-dependent loss of fusogenic properties of DEN is relatively slow in the presence of anionic lipid-free target membranes. We propose that anionic lipid-dependence of DEN fusion machinery protects it against premature irreversible restructuring and inactivation and ensures viral fusion in late endosomes, where the virus encounters anionic lipids for the first time during entry. Currently there are neither vaccines nor effective therapies for DEN, and the essential role of the newly identified DEN-bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate interactions in viral genome escape from the endosome suggests a novel target for drug design. PMID:20949067

  20. STX13 regulates cargo delivery from recycling endosomes during melanosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Riddhi Atul; Purushothaman, Latha Kallur; Rani, Shikha; Bergam, Ptissam; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2015-09-01

    Melanosomes are a class of lysosome-related organelles produced by melanocytes. Biogenesis of melanosomes requires the transport of melanin-synthesizing enzymes from tubular recycling endosomes to maturing melanosomes. The SNARE proteins involved in these transport or fusion steps have been poorly studied. We found that depletion of syntaxin 13 (STX13, also known as STX12), a recycling endosomal Qa-SNARE, inhibits pigment granule maturation in melanocytes by rerouting the melanosomal proteins such as TYR and TYRP1 to lysosomes. Furthermore, live-cell imaging and electron microscopy studies showed that STX13 co-distributed with melanosomal cargo in the tubular-vesicular endosomes that are closely associated with the maturing melanosomes. STX family proteins contain an N-terminal regulatory domain, and deletion of this domain in STX13 increases both the SNARE activity in vivo and melanosome cargo transport and pigmentation, suggesting that STX13 acts as a fusion SNARE in melanosomal trafficking pathways. In addition, STX13-dependent cargo transport requires the melanosomal R-SNARE VAMP7, and its silencing blocks the melanosome maturation, reflecting a defect in endosome-melanosome fusion. Moreover, we show mutual dependency between STX13 and VAMP7 in regulating their localization for efficient cargo delivery to melanosomes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. VAMP8-dependent fusion of recycling endosomes with the plasma membrane facilitates T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Misty R.; Pattu, Varsha; Halimani, Mahantappa; Maier-Peuschel, Monika; Müller, Martha-Lena; Becherer, Ute; Hong, Wanjin; Hoth, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate infected and neoplastic cells through directed release of cytotoxic granule contents. Although multiple SNARE proteins have been implicated in cytotoxic granule exocytosis, the role of vesicular SNARE proteins, i.e., vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), remains enigmatic. VAMP8 was posited to represent the cytotoxic granule vesicular SNARE protein mediating exocytosis in mice. In primary human CTLs, however, VAMP8 colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes. Upon stimulation, these endosomes rapidly trafficked to and fused with the plasma membrane, preceding fusion of cytotoxic granules. Knockdown of VAMP8 blocked both recycling endosome and cytotoxic granule fusion at immune synapses, without affecting activating signaling. Mechanistically, VAMP8-dependent recycling endosomes deposited syntaxin-11 at immune synapses, facilitating assembly of plasma membrane SNARE complexes for cytotoxic granule fusion. Hence, cytotoxic granule exocytosis is a sequential, multivesicle fusion process requiring VAMP8-mediated recycling endosome fusion before cytotoxic granule fusion. Our findings imply that secretory granule exocytosis pathways in other cell types may also be more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26124288

  2. Live Salmonella Recruits N-Ethylmaleimide–Sensitive Fusion Protein on Phagosomal Membrane and Promotes Fusion with Early Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Konark; Siddiqi, Shadab A.; Hashim, Shehla; Raje, Manoj; Basu, Sandip K.; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2000-01-01

    To understand intracellular trafficking modulations by live Salmonella, we investigated the characteristics of in vitro fusion between endosomes and phagosomes containing live (LSP) or dead Salmonella (DSP). We observed that fusion of both DSP and LSP were time, temperature and cytosol dependent. GTPγS and treatment of the phagosomes with Rab-GDI inhibited fusion, indicating involvement of Rab-GTPases. LSP were rich in rab5, α-SNAP, and NSF, while DSP mainly contained rab7. Fusion of endosomes with DSP was inhibited by ATP depletion, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) treatment, and in NEM-sensitive factor (NSF)–depleted cytosol. In contrast, fusion of endosomes with LSP was not inhibited by ATP depletion or NEM treatment, and occurred in NSF-depleted cytosol. However, ATPγS inhibited both fusion events. Fusion of NEM-treated LSP with endosomes was abrogated in NSF- depleted cytosol and was restored by adding purified NSF, whereas no fusion occurred with NEM-treated DSP, indicating that NSF recruitment is dependent on continuous signals from live Salmonella. Binding of NSF with LSP required prior presence of rab5 on the phagosome. We have also shown that rab5 specifically binds with Sop E, a protein from Salmonella. Our results indicate that live Salmonella help binding of rab5 on the phagosomes, possibly activate the SNARE which leads to further recruitment of α-SNAP for subsequent binding with NSF to promote fusion of the LSP with early endosomes and inhibition of their transport to lysosomes. PMID:10684255

  3. Imaging Single Retrovirus Entry through Alternative Receptor Isoforms and Intermediates of Virus-Endosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Naveen K.; Latinovic, Olga; Martin, Erik; Novitskiy, Gennadiy; Marin, Mariana; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Naughton, John; Young, John A. T.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    A large group of viruses rely on low pH to activate their fusion proteins that merge the viral envelope with an endosomal membrane, releasing the viral nucleocapsid. A critical barrier to understanding these events has been the lack of approaches to study virus-cell membrane fusion within acidic endosomes, the natural sites of virus nucleocapsid capsid entry into the cytosol. Here we have investigated these events using the highly tractable subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein (EnvA)-TVA receptor system. Through labeling EnvA pseudotyped viruses with a pH-sensitive fluorescent marker, we imaged their entry into mildly acidic compartments. We found that cells expressing the transmembrane receptor (TVA950) internalized the virus much faster than those expressing the GPI-anchored receptor isoform (TVA800). Surprisingly, TVA800 did not accelerate virus uptake compared to cells lacking the receptor. Subsequent steps of virus entry were visualized by incorporating a small viral content marker that was released into the cytosol as a result of fusion. EnvA-dependent fusion with TVA800-expressing cells occurred shortly after endocytosis and delivery into acidic endosomes, whereas fusion of viruses internalized through TVA950 was delayed. In the latter case, a relatively stable hemifusion-like intermediate preceded the fusion pore opening. The apparent size and stability of nascent fusion pores depended on the TVA isoforms and their expression levels, with TVA950 supporting more robust pores and a higher efficiency of infection compared to TVA800. These results demonstrate that surface receptor density and the intracellular trafficking pathway used are important determinants of efficient EnvA-mediated membrane fusion, and suggest that early fusion intermediates play a critical role in establishing low pH-dependent virus entry from within acidic endosomes. PMID:21283788

  4. Formation of Tubulovesicular Carriers from Endosomes and Their Fusion to the trans-Golgi Network.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Gershlick, David C; Rojas, Adriana L; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2015-01-01

    Endosomes undergo extensive spatiotemporal rearrangements as proteins and lipids flux through them in a series of fusion and fission events. These controlled changes enable the concentration of cargo for eventual degradation while ensuring the proper recycling of other components. A growing body of studies has now defined multiple recycling pathways from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) which differ in their molecular machineries. The recycling process requires specific sets of lipids, coats, adaptors, and accessory proteins that coordinate cargo selection with membrane deformation and its association with the cytoskeleton. Specific tethering factors and SNARE (SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor) complexes are then required for the docking and fusion with the acceptor membrane. Herein, we summarize some of the current knowledge of the machineries that govern the retrograde transport from endosomes to the TGN.

  5. ARF1 and ARF4 regulate recycling endosomal morphology and retrograde transport from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Waka; Kondo, Yumika; Saitoh, Akina; Naito, Tomoki; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Shin, Hye-Won

    2013-08-01

    Small GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family, except for ARF6, mainly localize to the Golgi apparatus, where they trigger formation of coated carrier vesicles. We recently showed that class I ARFs (ARF1 and ARF3) localize to recycling endosomes, as well as to the Golgi, and are redundantly required for recycling of endocytosed transferrin. On the other hand, the roles of class II ARFs (ARF4 and ARF5) are not yet fully understood, and the complementary or overlapping functions of class I and class II ARFs have been poorly characterized. In this study, we find that simultaneous depletion of ARF1 and ARF4 induces extensive tubulation of recycling endosomes. Moreover, the depletion of ARF1 and ARF4 inhibits retrograde transport of TGN38 and mannose-6-phosphate receptor from early/recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but does not affect the endocytic/recycling pathway of transferrin receptor or inhibit retrograde transport of CD4-furin from late endosomes to the TGN. These observations indicate that the ARF1+ARF4 and ARF1+ARF3 pairs are both required for integrity of recycling endosomes but are involved in distinct transport pathways: the former pair regulates retrograde transport from endosomes to the TGN, whereas the latter is required for the transferrin recycling pathway from endosomes to the plasma membrane.

  6. Endosome-ER Contacts Control Actin Nucleation and Retromer Function through VAP-Dependent Regulation of PI4P.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rui; Saheki, Yasunori; Swarup, Sharan; Lucast, Louise; Harper, J Wade; De Camilli, Pietro

    2016-07-14

    VAP (VAPA and VAPB) is an evolutionarily conserved endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored protein that helps generate tethers between the ER and other membranes through which lipids are exchanged across adjacent bilayers. Here, we report that by regulating PI4P levels on endosomes, VAP affects WASH-dependent actin nucleation on these organelles and the function of the retromer, a protein coat responsible for endosome-to-Golgi traffic. VAP is recruited to retromer budding sites on endosomes via an interaction with the retromer SNX2 subunit. Cells lacking VAP accumulate high levels of PI4P, actin comets, and trans-Golgi proteins on endosomes. Such defects are mimicked by downregulation of OSBP, a VAP interactor and PI4P transporter that participates in VAP-dependent ER-endosomes tethers. These results reveal a role of PI4P in retromer-/WASH-dependent budding from endosomes. Collectively, our data show how the ER can control budding dynamics and association with the cytoskeleton of another membrane by direct contacts leading to bilayer lipid modifications.

  7. mTORC1 phosphorylates UVRAG to negatively regulate autophagosome and endosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mi; Jung, Chang Hwa; Seo, Minchul; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Park, Ji-Man; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2015-01-22

    mTORC1 plays a key role in autophagy as a negative regulator. The currently known targets of mTORC1 in the autophagy pathway mainly function at early stages of autophagosome formation. Here, we identify that mTORC1 inhibits later stages of autophagy by phosphorylating UVRAG. Under nutrient-enriched conditions, mTORC1 binds and phosphorylates UVRAG. The phosphorylation positively regulates the association of UVRAG with RUBICON, thereby enhancing the antagonizing effect of RUBICON on UVRAG-mediated autophagosome maturation. Upon dephosphorylation, UVRAG is released from RUBICON to interact with the HOPS complex, a component for the late endosome and lysosome fusion machinery, and enhances autophagosome and endosome maturation. Consequently, the dephosphorylation of UVRAG facilitates the lysosomal degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), reduces EGFR signaling, and suppresses cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. These results demonstrate that mTORC1 engages in late stages of autophagy and endosome maturation, defining a broader range of mTORC1 functions in the membrane-associated processes.

  8. Vanadate from Air Pollutant Inhibits Hrs-Dependent Endosome Fusion and Augments Responsiveness to Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zelnikar, Mojca; Benčina, Mojca; Jerala, Roman; Manček-Keber, Mateja

    2014-01-01

    There is a well-established association between exposure to air pollutants and pulmonary injuries. For example, metals found in ROFA (residual oil fly ash) increase susceptibility of mice as well as humans to microbial infections. In our research, we have found that vanadate substantially increased the response of several Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to stimulation with their ligands. Although vanadate caused generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the addition of ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) had no effect on augmented lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We further showed that vanadate inhibits endosome fusion. This effect was determined by measuring the size of endosomes, NF-κB activity and TLR4 degradation in Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) overexpressed cells. Moreover, we identified the role of Hrs phosphorylation in these processes. Based on our findings, we can conclude that vanadate potentiates TLR4 activity by increasing Hrs phosphorylation status, reducing the size of Hrs/TLR4-positive endosomes and impacting TLR4 degradation, thus contributing to the detrimental effects of air pollutants on human health. PMID:24901993

  9. Interferon-γ-inducible Rab20 regulates endosomal morphology and EGFR degradation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pei, Gang; Schnettger, Laura; Bronietzki, Marc; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular players that regulate changes in the endocytic pathway during immune activation. Here we investigate the role of Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during activation of macrophages. Rab20 is associated with endocytic structures, but the function of this Rab GTPase in the endocytic pathway remains poorly characterized. We find that in macrophages, Rab20 expression and endosomal association significantly increase after interferon-γ (IFN-γ) treatment. Moreover, IFN-γ and Rab20 expression induce a dramatic enlargement of endosomes. These enlarged endosomes are the result of homotypic fusion promoted by Rab20 expression. The expression of Rab20 or the dominant-negative mutant Rab20T19N does not affect transferrin or dextran 70 kDa uptake. However, knockdown of Rab20 accelerates epidermal growth factor (EGF) trafficking to LAMP-2-positive compartments and EGF receptor degradation. Thus this work defines a function for Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during immune activation of macrophages.

  10. ARHGAP22 Localizes at Endosomes and Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mamiko; Saito, Koji; Ohta, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    Rho small GTPases control cell morphology and motility through the rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton. We have previously shown that FilGAP, a Rac-specific GAP, binds to the actin-cross-linking protein Filamin A (FLNa) and suppresses Rac-dependent lamellae formation and cell spreading. ARHGAP22 is a member of FilGAP family, and implicated in the regulation of tumor cell motility. However, little is known concerning the cellular localization and mechanism of regulation at the molecular level. Whereas FilGAP binds to FLNa and localizes to lamellae, we found that ARHGAP22 did not bind to FLNa. Forced expression of ARHGAP22 induced enlarged vesicular structures containing the endocytic markers EEA1, Rab5, and Rab11. Moreover, endogenous ARHGAP22 is co-localized with EEA1- and Rab11-positive endosomes but not with trans-Golgi marker TNG46. When constitutively activated Rac Q61L mutant was expressed, ARHGAP22 is co-localized with Rac Q61L at membrane ruffles, suggesting that ARHGAP22 is translocated from endosomes to membrane ruffles to inactivate Rac. Forced expression of ARHGAP22 suppressed lamellae formation and cell spreading. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous ARHGAP22 stimulated cell spreading. Thus, our findings suggest that ARHGAP22 controls cell morphology by inactivating Rac but its localization is not mediated by its interaction with FLNa. PMID:24933155

  11. The conserved SNARE SEC-22 localizes to late endosomes and negatively regulates RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yani; Holmgren, Benjamin T.

    2017-01-01

    Small RNA pathways, including RNA interference (RNAi), play crucial roles in regulation of gene expression. Initially considered to be cytoplasmic, these processes have later been demonstrated to associate with membranes. For example, maturation of late endosomes/multivesicular bodies (MVBs) is required for efficient RNAi, whereas fusion of MVBs to lysosomes appears to reduce silencing efficiency. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) mediate membrane fusion and are thus at the core of membrane trafficking. In spite of this, no SNARE has previously been reported to affect RNAi. Here, we demonstrate that in Caenorhabditis elegans, loss of the conserved SNARE SEC-22 results in enhanced RNAi upon ingestion of double-stranded RNA. Furthermore, SEC-22 overexpression inhibits RNAi in wild-type animals. We find that overexpression of SEC-22 in the target tissue (body wall muscle) strongly suppresses the sec-22(−) enhanced RNAi phenotype, supporting a primary role for SEC-22 in import of RNAi silencing signals or cell autonomous RNAi. A functional mCherry::SEC-22 protein localizes primarily to late endosomes/MVBs and these compartments are enlarged in animals lacking sec-22. SEC-22 interacts with late endosome-associated RNA transport protein SID-5 in a yeast two-hybrid assay and functions in a sid-5-dependent manner. Taken together, our data indicate that SEC-22 reduces RNAi efficiency by affecting late endosome/MVB function, for example, by promoting fusion between late endosomes/MVBs and lysosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a SNARE with a function in small RNA-mediated gene silencing. PMID:27974622

  12. The conserved SNARE SEC-22 localizes to late endosomes and negatively regulates RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yani; Holmgren, Benjamin T; Hinas, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Small RNA pathways, including RNA interference (RNAi), play crucial roles in regulation of gene expression. Initially considered to be cytoplasmic, these processes have later been demonstrated to associate with membranes. For example, maturation of late endosomes/multivesicular bodies (MVBs) is required for efficient RNAi, whereas fusion of MVBs to lysosomes appears to reduce silencing efficiency. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) mediate membrane fusion and are thus at the core of membrane trafficking. In spite of this, no SNARE has previously been reported to affect RNAi. Here, we demonstrate that in Caenorhabditis elegans, loss of the conserved SNARE SEC-22 results in enhanced RNAi upon ingestion of double-stranded RNA. Furthermore, SEC-22 overexpression inhibits RNAi in wild-type animals. We find that overexpression of SEC-22 in the target tissue (body wall muscle) strongly suppresses the sec-22(-) enhanced RNAi phenotype, supporting a primary role for SEC-22 in import of RNAi silencing signals or cell autonomous RNAi. A functional mCherry::SEC-22 protein localizes primarily to late endosomes/MVBs and these compartments are enlarged in animals lacking sec-22 SEC-22 interacts with late endosome-associated RNA transport protein SID-5 in a yeast two-hybrid assay and functions in a sid-5-dependent manner. Taken together, our data indicate that SEC-22 reduces RNAi efficiency by affecting late endosome/MVB function, for example, by promoting fusion between late endosomes/MVBs and lysosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a SNARE with a function in small RNA-mediated gene silencing.

  13. IFITM3 Restricts Influenza A Virus Entry by Blocking the Formation of Fusion Pores following Virus-Endosome Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Christopher R.; Savidis, George; Brass, Abraham L.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit infection of diverse enveloped viruses, including the influenza A virus (IAV) which is thought to enter from late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that IFITMs block virus hemifusion (lipid mixing in the absence of viral content release) by altering the properties of cell membranes. Consistent with this mechanism, excess cholesterol in late endosomes of IFITM-expressing cells has been reported to inhibit IAV entry. Here, we examined IAV restriction by IFITM3 protein using direct virus-cell fusion assay and single virus imaging in live cells. IFITM3 over-expression did not inhibit lipid mixing, but abrogated the release of viral content into the cytoplasm. Although late endosomes of IFITM3-expressing cells accumulated cholesterol, other interventions leading to aberrantly high levels of this lipid did not inhibit virus fusion. These results imply that excess cholesterol in late endosomes is not the mechanism by which IFITM3 inhibits the transition from hemifusion to full fusion. The IFITM3's ability to block fusion pore formation at a post-hemifusion stage shows that this protein stabilizes the cytoplasmic leaflet of endosomal membranes without adversely affecting the lumenal leaflet. We propose that IFITM3 interferes with pore formation either directly, through partitioning into the cytoplasmic leaflet of a hemifusion intermediate, or indirectly, by modulating the lipid/protein composition of this leaflet. Alternatively, IFITM3 may redirect IAV fusion to a non-productive pathway, perhaps by promoting fusion with intralumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies/late endosomes. PMID:24699674

  14. Endosomal sorting of VAMP3 is regulated by PI4K2A.

    PubMed

    Jović, Marko; Kean, Michelle J; Dubankova, Anna; Boura, Evzen; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Brill, Julie A; Balla, Tamas

    2014-09-01

    Specificity of membrane fusion in vesicular trafficking is dependent on proper subcellular distribution of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). Although SNARE complexes are fairly promiscuous in vitro, substantial specificity is achieved in cells owing to the spatial segregation and shielding of SNARE motifs prior to association with cognate Q-SNAREs. In this study, we identified phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIα (PI4K2A) as a binding partner of vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3), a small R-SNARE involved in recycling and retrograde transport, and found that the two proteins co-reside on tubulo-vesicular endosomes. PI4K2A knockdown inhibited VAMP3 trafficking to perinuclear membranes and impaired the rate of VAMP3-mediated recycling of the transferrin receptor. Moreover, depletion of PI4K2A significantly decreased association of VAMP3 with its cognate Q-SNARE Vti1a. Although binding of VAMP3 to PI4K2A did not require kinase activity, acute depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) on endosomes significantly delayed VAMP3 trafficking. Modulation of SNARE function by phospholipids had previously been proposed based on in vitro studies, and our study provides mechanistic evidence in support of these claims by identifying PI4K2A and PtdIns4P as regulators of an R-SNARE in intact cells.

  15. Inhibition of endosomal fusion activity of influenza virus by Rheum tanguticum (da-huang)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ta-Jen; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ming-Chung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Rhubarb (Rheum tanguticum; da-huang in Chinese medicine) is a herbal medicine that has been used widely for managing fever and removing toxicity. In this study, we investigated how rhubarb inhibits influenza virus during the early stage of the infectious cycle using different functional assays. A non-toxic ethanolic extract of rhubarb (Rex) inhibited several H1N1 subtypes of influenza A viruses in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells, including strains that are clinically resistant to oseltamivir. Time course analysis of Rex addition showed that viral entry was one of the steps that was inhibited by Rex. We also confirmed that Rex effectively inhibited viral attachment and penetration into the host cells. The inhibition of red blood cell haemolysis and cell–cell fusion by Rex suggests that Rex may block haemagglutinin-mediated fusion (virus–endosome fusion) during the fusion/uncoating step. Rex has the capacity to inhibit influenza viruses by blocking viral endocytosis. Thus, rhubarb might provide an alternative therapeutic approach when resistant viruses become more prevalent. PMID:27302738

  16. FIP1/RCP Binding to Golgin-97 Regulates Retrograde Transport from Recycling Endosomes to the trans-Golgi Network

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Junutula, Jagath R.; Wu, Christine; Burden, Jemima; Matern, Hugo; Peden, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins are retrieved to the trans-Golgi Network (TGN) from the endosomal system through several retrograde transport pathways to maintain the composition and function of the TGN. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in these distinct retrograde pathways remain to be fully understood. Here we have used fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as various functional transport assays to show that Rab11a/b and its binding protein FIP1/RCP are both required for the retrograde delivery of TGN38 and Shiga toxin from early/recycling endosomes to the TGN, but not for the retrieval of mannose-6-phosphate receptor from late endosomes. Furthermore, by proteomic analysis we identified Golgin-97 as a FIP1/RCP-binding protein. The FIP1/RCP-binding domain maps to the C-terminus of Golgin-97, adjacent to its GRIP domain. Binding of FIP1/RCP to Golgin-97 does not affect Golgin-97 recruitment to the TGN, but appears to regulate the targeting of retrograde transport vesicles to the TGN. Thus, we propose that FIP1/RCP binding to Golgin-97 is required for tethering and fusion of recycling endosome-derived retrograde transport vesicles to the TGN. PMID:20610657

  17. FIP1/RCP binding to Golgin-97 regulates retrograde transport from recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian; Junutula, Jagath R; Wu, Christine; Burden, Jemima; Matern, Hugo; Peden, Andrew A; Prekeris, Rytis

    2010-09-01

    Many proteins are retrieved to the trans-Golgi Network (TGN) from the endosomal system through several retrograde transport pathways to maintain the composition and function of the TGN. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in these distinct retrograde pathways remain to be fully understood. Here we have used fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as various functional transport assays to show that Rab11a/b and its binding protein FIP1/RCP are both required for the retrograde delivery of TGN38 and Shiga toxin from early/recycling endosomes to the TGN, but not for the retrieval of mannose-6-phosphate receptor from late endosomes. Furthermore, by proteomic analysis we identified Golgin-97 as a FIP1/RCP-binding protein. The FIP1/RCP-binding domain maps to the C-terminus of Golgin-97, adjacent to its GRIP domain. Binding of FIP1/RCP to Golgin-97 does not affect Golgin-97 recruitment to the TGN, but appears to regulate the targeting of retrograde transport vesicles to the TGN. Thus, we propose that FIP1/RCP binding to Golgin-97 is required for tethering and fusion of recycling endosome-derived retrograde transport vesicles to the TGN.

  18. LMTK1 regulates dendritic formation by regulating movement of Rab11A-positive endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Tetsuya; Urushibara, Tomoki; Yoshioka, Nozomu; Saito, Taro; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tomomura, Mineko; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Neurons extend two types of neurites—axons and dendrites—that differ in structure and function. Although it is well understood that the cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in neurite differentiation and extension, the mechanisms by which membrane components are supplied to growing axons or dendrites is largely unknown. We previously reported that the membrane supply to axons is regulated by lemur kinase 1 (LMTK1) through Rab11A-positive endosomes. Here we investigate the role of LMTK1 in dendrite formation. Down-regulation of LMTK1 increases dendrite growth and branching of cerebral cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. LMTK1 knockout significantly enhances the prevalence, velocity, and run length of anterograde movement of Rab11A-positive endosomes to levels similar to those expressing constitutively active Rab11A-Q70L. Rab11A-positive endosome dynamics also increases in the cell body and growth cone of LMTK1-deficient neurons. Moreover, a nonphosphorylatable LMTK1 mutant (Ser34Ala, a Cdk5 phosphorylation site) dramatically promotes dendrite growth. Thus LMTK1 negatively controls dendritic formation by regulating Rab11A-positive endosomal trafficking in a Cdk5-dependent manner, indicating the Cdk5-LMTK1-Rab11A pathway as a regulatory mechanism of dendrite development as well as axon outgrowth. PMID:24672056

  19. Intra-endosomal membrane traffic.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, F Gisou; Gruenberg, Jean

    2006-10-01

    Following endocytosis, ubiquitinated signaling receptors are incorporated within intraluminal vesicles of forming multivesicular endosomes. These vesicles then follow the pathway from early to late endosomes, remaining within the endosomal lumen, and are eventually delivered to lysosomes, where they are degraded together with their protein cargo. However, intraluminal vesicles do not always end up in lysosomes for degradation; they can also fuse back with the limiting membrane of late endosomes. This route, which might be regulated by lyso-bisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix, can be hijacked by the anthrax toxin and vesicular stomatitis virus and is presumably exploited by proteins and lipids that transit through intraluminal vesicles. Alternatively, these vesicles can be released extracellularly, like HIV in macrophages, upon fusion of endosomes or lysosomes with the plasma membrane.

  20. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome-lysosome retrograde fusion events.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A M; Goldman, S D B; Krise, J P

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome-lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders-Niemann-Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff's disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D.

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation. PMID:23392104

  2. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation.

  3. Heterotypic endosomal fusion as an initial trigger for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-08-15

    Comprehensive imaging analyses of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) behaviour in mouse skeletal muscle was conducted. Quantum dot-based single molecule nanometry revealed that GLUT4 molecules in skeletal myofibres are governed by regulatory systems involving 'static retention' and 'stimulus-dependent liberation'. Vital imaging analyses and super-resolution microscopy-based morphometry demonstrated that insulin liberates the GLUT4 molecule from its static state by triggering acute heterotypic endomembrane fusion arising from the very small GLUT4-containing vesicles in skeletal myofibres. Prior exposure to exercise-mimetic stimuli potentiated this insulin-responsive endomembrane fusion event involving GLUT4-containing vesicles, suggesting that this endomembranous regulation process is a potential site related to the effects of exercise. Skeletal muscle is the major systemic glucose disposal site. Both insulin and exercise facilitate translocation of the glucose transporter glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) via distinct signalling pathways and exercise also enhances insulin sensitivity. However, the trafficking mechanisms controlling GLUT4 mobilization in skeletal muscle remain poorly understood as a resuly of technical limitations. In the present study, which employs various imaging techniques on isolated skeletal myofibres, we show that one of the initial triggers of insulin-induced GLUT4 translocation is heterotypic endomembrane fusion arising from very small static GLUT4-containing vesicles with a subset of transferrin receptor-containing endosomes. Importantly, pretreatment with exercise-mimetic stimuli potentiated the susceptibility to insulin responsiveness, as indicated by these acute endomembranous activities. We also found that AS160 exhibited stripe-like localization close to sarcomeric α-actinin and that insulin induced a reduction of the stripe-like localization accompanying changes in its detergent solubility. The results of the present study thus provide a

  4. Regulation of EGFR signal transduction by analogue-to-digital conversion in endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Nonaka, Hidenori; Del Conte-Zerial, Perla; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding question is how receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) determine different cell-fate decisions despite sharing the same signalling cascades. Here, we uncovered an unexpected mechanism of RTK trafficking in this process. By quantitative high-resolution FRET microscopy, we found that phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR) is not randomly distributed but packaged at constant mean amounts in endosomes. Cells respond to higher EGF concentrations by increasing the number of endosomes but keeping the mean p-EGFR content per endosome almost constant. By mathematical modelling, we found that this mechanism confers both robustness and regulation to signalling output. Different growth factors caused specific changes in endosome number and size in various cell systems and changing the distribution of p-EGFR between endosomes was sufficient to reprogram cell-fate decision upon EGF stimulation. We propose that the packaging of p-RTKs in endosomes is a general mechanism to ensure the fidelity and specificity of the signalling response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06156.001 PMID:25650738

  5. Sorting nexin (MoVps17) is required for fungal development and plant infection by regulating endosome dynamics in the rice blast fungus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huawei; Guo, Zhongkun; Xi, Yang; Yuan, Mingyue; Lin, Yahong; Wu, Congxian; Abubakar, Yakubu Saddeeq; Dou, Xianying; Li, Guangpu; Wang, Zonghua; Zheng, Wenhui; Zhou, Jie

    2017-08-24

    Vps17 is a sorting nexin (SNX) and a component of the retromer, a protein complex mediating retrograde vesicle transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. However, its role in the development and pathogenicity of filamentous fungi such as the rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae) remains unclear. We investigate the functional relationship between the SNX and the cargo-selective complex (CSC) of the fungal retromer by genetic analysis, live cell imaging and immunological assay. Our data show that the MoVps17 null mutation causes defects in growth, development and pathogenicity in M. oryzae. MoVps17 is localized to endosomes depending on the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), a key enzyme for fungal development and infection. Both PX and BAR domains of MoVps17 are essential for its endosomal localization and function. Furthermore, our yeast two-hybrid assays show that MoVps17 and MoVps5 can interact. Lastly, live cell imaging suggests that MoVps17 can regulate early endosome fusion and budding as well as endocytosis. Taken together, our results suggest that MoVps17 specifically functions as a retromer component with CSC and also plays a distinct role in the regulation of endosome dynamics during fungal development and plant infection. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In Vitro Budding of Intralumenal Vesicles into Late Endosomes Is Regulated by Alix and Tsg101

    PubMed Central

    Falguières, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Bissig, Christin; Scott, Cameron C.; Velluz, Marie-Claire

    2008-01-01

    Endosomes along the degradation pathway leading to lysosomes accumulate membranes in their lumen and thus exhibit a characteristic multivesicular appearance. These lumenal membranes typically incorporate down-regulated EGF receptor destined for degradation, but the mechanisms that control their formation remain poorly characterized. Here, we describe a novel quantitative biochemical assay that reconstitutes the formation of lumenal vesicles within late endosomes in vitro. Vesicle budding into the endosome lumen was time-, temperature-, pH-, and energy-dependent and required cytosolic factors and endosome membrane components. Our light and electron microscopy analysis showed that the compartment supporting the budding process was accessible to endocytosed bulk tracers and EGF receptor. We also found that the EGF receptor became protected against trypsin in our assay, indicating that it was sorted into the intraendosomal vesicles that were formed in vitro. Our data show that the formation of intralumenal vesicles is ESCRT-dependent, because the process was inhibited by the K173Q dominant negative mutant of hVps4. Moreover, we find that the ESCRT-I subunit Tsg101 and its partner Alix control intralumenal vesicle formation, by acting as positive and negative regulators, respectively. We conclude that budding of the limiting membrane toward the late endosome lumen, which leads to the formation of intraendosomal vesicles, is controlled by the positive and negative functions of Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. PMID:18768755

  7. Rab family proteins regulate the endosomal trafficking and function of RGS4.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Guillaume; Heximer, Scott P

    2013-07-26

    RGS4, a heterotrimeric G-protein inhibitor, localizes to plasma membrane (PM) and endosomal compartments. Here, we examined Rab-mediated control of RGS4 internalization and recycling. Wild type and constitutively active Rab5 decreased RGS4 PM levels while increasing its endosomal targeting. Rab5, however, did not appreciably affect the PM localization or function of the M1 muscarinic receptor (M1R)/Gq signaling cascade. RGS4-containing endosomes co-localized with subsets of Rab5-, transferrin receptor-, and Lamp1/Lysotracker-marked compartments suggesting RGS4 traffics through PM recycling or acidified endosome pathways. Rab7 activity promoted TGN association, whereas Rab7(dominant negative) trapped RGS4 in late endosomes. Furthermore, RGS4 was found to co-localize with an endosomal pool marked by Rab11, the protein that mediates recycling/sorting of proteins to the PM. The Cys-12 residue in RGS4 appeared important for its Rab11-mediated trafficking to the PM. Rab11(dominant negative) decreased RGS4 PM levels and increased the number of RGS4-containing endosomes. Inhibition of Rab11 activity decreased RGS4 function as an inhibitor of M1R activity without affecting localization and function of the M1R/Gq signaling complex. Thus, both Rab5 activation and Rab11 inhibition decreased RGS4 function in a manner that is independent from their effects on the localization and function of the M1R/Gq signaling complex. This is the first study to implicate Rab GTPases in the intracellular trafficking of an RGS protein. Thus, Rab GTPases may be novel molecular targets for the selective regulation of M1R-mediated signaling via their specific effects on RGS4 trafficking and function.

  8. Rab Family Proteins Regulate the Endosomal Trafficking and Function of RGS4*

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, Guillaume; Heximer, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    RGS4, a heterotrimeric G-protein inhibitor, localizes to plasma membrane (PM) and endosomal compartments. Here, we examined Rab-mediated control of RGS4 internalization and recycling. Wild type and constitutively active Rab5 decreased RGS4 PM levels while increasing its endosomal targeting. Rab5, however, did not appreciably affect the PM localization or function of the M1 muscarinic receptor (M1R)/Gq signaling cascade. RGS4-containing endosomes co-localized with subsets of Rab5-, transferrin receptor-, and Lamp1/Lysotracker-marked compartments suggesting RGS4 traffics through PM recycling or acidified endosome pathways. Rab7 activity promoted TGN association, whereas Rab7(dominant negative) trapped RGS4 in late endosomes. Furthermore, RGS4 was found to co-localize with an endosomal pool marked by Rab11, the protein that mediates recycling/sorting of proteins to the PM. The Cys-12 residue in RGS4 appeared important for its Rab11-mediated trafficking to the PM. Rab11(dominant negative) decreased RGS4 PM levels and increased the number of RGS4-containing endosomes. Inhibition of Rab11 activity decreased RGS4 function as an inhibitor of M1R activity without affecting localization and function of the M1R/Gq signaling complex. Thus, both Rab5 activation and Rab11 inhibition decreased RGS4 function in a manner that is independent from their effects on the localization and function of the M1R/Gq signaling complex. This is the first study to implicate Rab GTPases in the intracellular trafficking of an RGS protein. Thus, Rab GTPases may be novel molecular targets for the selective regulation of M1R-mediated signaling via their specific effects on RGS4 trafficking and function. PMID:23733193

  9. African Swine Fever Virus Undergoes Outer Envelope Disruption, Capsid Disassembly and Inner Envelope Fusion before Core Release from Multivesicular Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, Bruno; Guerra, Milagros; Salas, María L.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) that causes a highly lethal disease in domestic pigs. As other NCLDVs, the extracellular form of ASFV possesses a multilayered structure consisting of a genome-containing nucleoid successively wrapped by a thick protein core shell, an inner lipid membrane, an icosahedral protein capsid and an outer lipid envelope. This structural complexity suggests an intricate mechanism of internalization in order to deliver the virus genome into the cytoplasm. By using flow cytometry in combination with pharmacological entry inhibitors, as well as fluorescence and electron microscopy approaches, we have dissected the entry and uncoating pathway used by ASFV to infect the macrophage, its natural host cell. We found that purified extracellular ASFV is internalized by both constitutive macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Once inside the cell, ASFV particles move from early endosomes or macropinosomes to late, multivesicular endosomes where they become uncoated. Virus uncoating requires acidic pH and involves the disruption of the outer membrane as well as of the protein capsid. As a consequence, the inner viral membrane becomes exposed and fuses with the limiting endosomal membrane to release the viral core into the cytosol. Interestingly, virus fusion is dependent on virus protein pE248R, a transmembrane polypeptide of the inner envelope that shares sequence similarity with some members of the poxviral entry/fusion complex. Collective evidence supports an entry model for ASFV that might also explain the uncoating of other multienveloped icosahedral NCLDVs. PMID:27110717

  10. African Swine Fever Virus Undergoes Outer Envelope Disruption, Capsid Disassembly and Inner Envelope Fusion before Core Release from Multivesicular Endosomes.

    PubMed

    Hernáez, Bruno; Guerra, Milagros; Salas, María L; Andrés, Germán

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) that causes a highly lethal disease in domestic pigs. As other NCLDVs, the extracellular form of ASFV possesses a multilayered structure consisting of a genome-containing nucleoid successively wrapped by a thick protein core shell, an inner lipid membrane, an icosahedral protein capsid and an outer lipid envelope. This structural complexity suggests an intricate mechanism of internalization in order to deliver the virus genome into the cytoplasm. By using flow cytometry in combination with pharmacological entry inhibitors, as well as fluorescence and electron microscopy approaches, we have dissected the entry and uncoating pathway used by ASFV to infect the macrophage, its natural host cell. We found that purified extracellular ASFV is internalized by both constitutive macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Once inside the cell, ASFV particles move from early endosomes or macropinosomes to late, multivesicular endosomes where they become uncoated. Virus uncoating requires acidic pH and involves the disruption of the outer membrane as well as of the protein capsid. As a consequence, the inner viral membrane becomes exposed and fuses with the limiting endosomal membrane to release the viral core into the cytosol. Interestingly, virus fusion is dependent on virus protein pE248R, a transmembrane polypeptide of the inner envelope that shares sequence similarity with some members of the poxviral entry/fusion complex. Collective evidence supports an entry model for ASFV that might also explain the uncoating of other multienveloped icosahedral NCLDVs.

  11. Neuropilin-2 Regulates Endosome Maturation and EGFR trafficking to Support Cancer Cell Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samikshan; Roy, Sohini; Polavaram, Navatha Shree; Stanton, Marissa J.; Zhang, Heyu; Bhola, Tanvi; Hönscheid, Pia; Donohue, Terrence M.; Band, Hamid; Batra, Surinder K.; Muders, Michael H.; Datta, Kaustubh

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-2 (NRP2) is a non-tyrosine kinase receptor frequently overexpressed in various malignancies where it has been implicated in promoting many protumorigenic behaviors, such as imparting therapeutic resistance to metastatic cancer cells. Here, we report a novel function of NRP2 as a regulator of endocytosis, which is enhanced in cancer cells and is often associated with increased metastatic potential and drug resistance. We found that NRP2 depletion in human prostate and pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the accumulation of EEA1/Rab5-positive early endosomes concomitant with a decrease in Rab7-positive late endosomes, suggesting a delay in early-to-late endosome maturation. NRP2 depletion also impaired the endocytic transport of cell surface epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), arresting functionally active EGFR in endocytic vesicles that consequently led to aberrant ERK activation and cell death. Mechanistic investigations revealed that WD-repeat and FYVE-domain-containing protein 1 (WDFY1) functioned downstream of NRP2 to promote endosome maturation, thereby influencing the endosomal trafficking of EGFR and the formation of autolysosomes responsible for the degradation of internalized cargo. Overall, our results indicate that the NRP2/WDFY1 axis is required for maintaining endocytic activity in cancer cells, which supports their oncogenic activities and confers drug resistance. Therefore, therapeutically targeting endocytosis may represent an attractive strategy to selectively target cancer cells in multiple malignancies. PMID:26560516

  12. Neuropilin-2 Regulates Endosome Maturation and EGFR Trafficking to Support Cancer Cell Pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samikshan; Roy, Sohini; Polavaram, Navatha S; Stanton, Marissa J; Zhang, Heyu; Bhola, Tanvi; Hönscheid, Pia; Donohue, Terrence M; Band, Hamid; Batra, Surinder K; Muders, Michael H; Datta, Kaustubh

    2016-01-15

    Neuropilin-2 (NRP2) is a non-tyrosine kinase receptor frequently overexpressed in various malignancies, where it has been implicated in promoting many protumorigenic behaviors, such as imparting therapeutic resistance to metastatic cancer cells. Here, we report a novel function of NRP2 as a regulator of endocytosis, which is enhanced in cancer cells and is often associated with increased metastatic potential and drug resistance. We found that NRP2 depletion in human prostate and pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the accumulation of EEA1/Rab5-positive early endosomes concomitant with a decrease in Rab7-positive late endosomes, suggesting a delay in early-to-late endosome maturation. NRP2 depletion also impaired the endocytic transport of cell surface EGFR, arresting functionally active EGFR in endocytic vesicles that consequently led to aberrant ERK activation and cell death. Mechanistic investigations revealed that WD-repeat- and FYVE-domain-containing protein 1 (WDFY1) functioned downstream of NRP2 to promote endosome maturation, thereby influencing the endosomal trafficking of EGFR and the formation of autolysosomes responsible for the degradation of internalized cargo. Overall, our results indicate that the NRP2/WDFY1 axis is required for maintaining endocytic activity in cancer cells, which supports their oncogenic activities and confers drug resistance. Therefore, therapeutically targeting endocytosis may represent an attractive strategy to selectively target cancer cells in multiple malignancies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. AGAP2 regulates retrograde transport between early endosomes and the TGN

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Yoko; Römer, Winfried; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Lamaze, Christophe; Johannes, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    The retrograde transport route links early endosomes and the TGN. Several endogenous and exogenous cargo proteins use this pathway, one of which is the well-explored bacterial Shiga toxin. ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) are ~20 kDa GTP-binding proteins that are required for protein traffic at the level of the Golgi complex and early endosomes. In this study, we expressed mutants and protein fragments that bind to Arf-GTP to show that Arf1, but not Arf6 is required for transport of Shiga toxin from early endosomes to the TGN. We depleted six Arf1-specific ARF-GTPase-activating proteins and identified AGAP2 as a crucial regulator of retrograde transport for Shiga toxin, cholera toxin and the endogenous proteins TGN46 and mannose 6-phosphate receptor. In AGAP2-depleted cells, Shiga toxin accumulates in transferrin-receptor-positive early endosomes, suggesting that AGAP2 functions in the very early steps of retrograde sorting. A number of other intracellular trafficking pathways are not affected under these conditions. These results establish that Arf1 and AGAP2 have key trafficking functions at the interface between early endosomes and the TGN. PMID:20551179

  14. Multi-layered nanoparticles for penetrating the endosome and nuclear membrane via a step-wise membrane fusion process.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hidetaka; Kudo, Asako; Minoura, Arisa; Yamaguti, Masaya; Khalil, Ikramy A; Moriguchi, Rumiko; Masuda, Tomoya; Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Efficient targeting of DNA to the nucleus is a prerequisite for effective gene therapy. The gene-delivery vehicle must penetrate through the plasma membrane, and the DNA-impermeable double-membraned nuclear envelope, and deposit its DNA cargo in a form ready for transcription. Here we introduce a concept for overcoming intracellular membrane barriers that involves step-wise membrane fusion. To achieve this, a nanotechnology was developed that creates a multi-layered nanoparticle, which we refer to as a Tetra-lamellar Multi-functional Envelope-type Nano Device (T-MEND). The critical structural elements of the T-MEND are a DNA-polycation condensed core coated with two nuclear membrane-fusogenic inner envelopes and two endosome-fusogenic outer envelopes, which are shed in stepwise fashion. A double-lamellar membrane structure is required for nuclear delivery via the stepwise fusion of double layered nuclear membrane structure. Intracellular membrane fusions to endosomes and nuclear membranes were verified by spectral imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor fluorophores that had been dually labeled on the liposome surface. Coating the core with the minimum number of nucleus-fusogenic lipid envelopes (i.e., 2) is essential to facilitate transcription. As a result, the T-MEND achieves dramatic levels of transgene expression in non-dividing cells.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy). Methodology development and application to studies of endosome fusion in single cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oida, T; Sako, Y; Kusumi, A

    1993-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence microscopy for cell imaging has been developed that takes advantage of the spatial variations of fluorescence lifetimes in single cells as a source of image contrast, and thus it is named "fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy)". Since time-resolved fluorescence measurements are sensitive to molecular dynamics and interactions, flimscopy allows the molecular information to be visualized in single cells. In flimscopy measurements, several (nanosecond) time-resolved fluorescence images of a sample are obtained at various delay times after pulsed laser excitation of the microscope's entire field of view. Lifetimes are calculated pixel-by-pixel from these time-resolved images, and the spatial variations of the lifetimes are then displayed in a pseudocolor format (flimscopy image). The total data acquisition time needed to obtain a flimscopy image with the diffraction-limited spatial resolution (approximately 250 nm) is decreased to just approximately 30 s for approximately 300 fluorescent molecules/micron2. This was achieved by developing a high-frequency (400 kHz) nanosecond-gating (9 ns full width at half height)-signal accumulation system. This technique allows the extent of resonance energy transfer to be visualized in single living cells, and is free from the errors due to variations in path length, light scattering, and the number of fluorophores that necessitate complex corrections in steady-state microfluorometry and fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. Flimscopy was applied here to observe the extent of fusion of individual endosomes in single cells. Results revealed the occurrence of extensive fusion between primary endocytic vesicles and/or sorting endosomes, thereby raising the possibility that the biogenesis of sorting endosomes involves multiple fusions of primary endocytic vesicles. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 4 PMID:8471720

  16. Numb regulates the balance between Notch recycling and late-endosome targeting in Drosophila neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Seth A.; Zitserman, Diana; Roegiers, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays essential roles in both animal development and human disease. Regulation of Notch receptor levels in membrane compartments has been shown to affect signaling in a variety of contexts. Here we used steady-state and pulse-labeling techniques to follow Notch receptors in sensory organ precursor cells in Drosophila. We find that the endosomal adaptor protein Numb regulates levels of Notch receptor trafficking to Rab7-labeled late endosomes but not early endosomes. Using an assay we developed that labels different pools of Notch receptors as they move through the endocytic system, we show that Numb specifically suppresses a recycled Notch receptor subpopulation and that excess Notch signaling in numb mutants requires the recycling endosome GTPase Rab11 activity. Our data therefore suggest that Numb controls the balance between Notch receptor recycling and receptor targeting to late endosomes to regulate signaling output after asymmetric cell division in Drosophila neural progenitors. PMID:27466320

  17. Rab24 interacts with the Rab7/Rab interacting lysosomal protein complex to regulate endosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Celina; Militello, Rodrigo D; Calligaris, Sebastián D; Colombo, María I

    2016-11-01

    Endocytosis is a multistep process engaged in extracellular molecules internalization. Several proteins including the Rab GTPases family coordinate the endocytic pathway. The small GTPase Rab7 is present in late endosome (LE) compartments being a marker of endosome maturation. The Rab interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) is a downstream effector of Rab7 that recruits the functional dynein/dynactin motor complex to late compartments. In the present study, we have found Rab24 as a component of the endosome-lysosome degradative pathway. Rab24 is an atypical protein of the Rab GTPase family, which has been attributed a function in vesicle trafficking and autophagosome maturation. Using a model of transiently expressed proteins in K562 cells, we found that Rab24 co-localizes in vesicular structures labeled with Rab7 and LAMP1. Moreover, using a dominant negative mutant of Rab24 or a siRNA-Rab24 we showed that the distribution of Rab7 in vesicles depends on a functional Rab24 to allow DQ-BSA protein degradation. Additionally, by immunoprecipitation and pull down assays, we have demonstrated that Rab24 interacts with Rab7 and RILP. Interestingly, overexpression of the Vps41 subunit from the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting (HOPS) complex hampered the co-localization of Rab24 with RILP or with the lysosomal GTPase Arl8b, suggesting that Vps41 would affect the Rab24/RILP association. In summary, our data strongly support the hypothesis that Rab24 forms a complex with Rab7 and RILP on the membranes of late compartments. Our work provides new insights into the molecular function of Rab24 in the last steps of the endosomal degradative pathway.

  18. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  19. Calsyntenin-1 Regulates Axon Branching and Endosomal Trafficking during Sensory Neuron Development In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ponomareva, Olga Y.; Holmen, Ian C.; Sperry, Aiden J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Precise regulation of axon branching is crucial for neuronal circuit formation, yet the mechanisms that control branch formation are not well understood. Moreover, the highly complex morphology of neurons makes them critically dependent on protein/membrane trafficking and transport systems, although the functions for membrane trafficking in neuronal morphogenesis are largely undefined. Here we identify a kinesin adaptor, Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1), as an essential regulator of axon branching and neuronal compartmentalization in vivo. We use morpholino knockdown and a Clstn-1 mutant to show that Clstn-1 is required for formation of peripheral but not central sensory axons, and for peripheral axon branching in zebrafish. We used live imaging of endosomal trafficking in vivo to show that Clstn-1 regulates transport of Rab5-containing endosomes from the cell body to specific locations of developing axons. Our results suggest a model in which Clstn-1 patterns separate axonal compartments and define their ability to branch by directing trafficking of specific endosomes. PMID:25009257

  20. OCRL controls trafficking through early endosomes via PtdIns4,5P2-dependent regulation of endosomal actin

    PubMed Central

    Vicinanza, Mariella; Di Campli, Antonella; Polishchuk, Elena; Santoro, Michele; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Godi, Anna; Levtchenko, Elena; De Leo, Maria Giovanna; Polishchuk, Roman; Sandoval, Lisette; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns4,5P2) 5-phosphatase OCRL cause Lowe syndrome, which is characterised by congenital cataracts, central hypotonia, and renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Previous studies have shown that OCRL interacts with components of the endosomal machinery; however, its role in endocytosis, and thus the pathogenic mechanisms of Lowe syndrome, have remained elusive. Here, we show that via its 5-phosphatase activity, OCRL controls early endosome (EE) function. OCRL depletion impairs the recycling of multiple classes of receptors, including megalin (which mediates protein reabsorption in the kidney) that are retained in engorged EEs. These trafficking defects are caused by ectopic accumulation of PtdIns4,5P2 in EEs, which in turn induces an N-WASP-dependent increase in endosomal F-actin. Our data provide a molecular explanation for renal proximal tubular dysfunction in Lowe syndrome and highlight that tight control of PtdIns4,5P2 and F-actin at the EEs is essential for exporting cargoes that transit this compartment. PMID:21971085

  1. NDRG1 functions in LDL receptor trafficking by regulating endosomal recycling and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pietiäinen, Vilja; Vassilev, Boris; Blom, Tomas; Wang, Wei; Nelson, Jessica; Bittman, Robert; Bäck, Nils; Zelcer, Noam; Ikonen, Elina

    2013-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutations cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D). However, the cellular function of NDRG1 and how it causes CMT4D are poorly understood. We report that NDRG1 silencing in epithelial cells results in decreased uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) due to reduced LDL receptor (LDLR) abundance at the plasma membrane. This is accompanied by the accumulation of LDLR in enlarged EEA1-positive endosomes that contain numerous intraluminal vesicles and sequester ceramide. Concomitantly, LDLR ubiquitylation is increased but its degradation is reduced and ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins are downregulated. Co-depletion of IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDLR), which ubiquitylates the LDLR and promotes its degradation, rescues plasma membrane LDLR levels and LDL uptake. In murine oligodendrocytes, Ndrg1 silencing not only results in reduced LDL uptake but also in downregulation of the oligodendrocyte differentiation factor Olig2. Both phenotypes are rescued by co-silencing of Idol, suggesting that ligand uptake through LDLR family members controls oligodendrocyte differentiation. These findings identify NDRG1 as a novel regulator of multivesicular body formation and endosomal LDLR trafficking. The deficiency of functional NDRG1 in CMT4D might impair lipid processing and differentiation of myelinating cells.

  2. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. PMID:27302062

  3. The Arabidopsis AAA ATPase SKD1 is involved in multivesicular endosome function and interacts with its positive regulator LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5.

    PubMed

    Haas, Thomas J; Sliwinski, Marek K; Martínez, Dana E; Preuss, Mary; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Nielsen, Erik; Odorizzi, Greg; Otegui, Marisa S

    2007-04-01

    In yeast and mammals, the AAA ATPase Vps4p/SKD1 (for Vacuolar protein sorting 4/SUPPRESSOR OF K(+) TRANSPORT GROWTH DEFECT1) is required for the endosomal sorting of secretory and endocytic cargo. We identified a VPS4/SKD1 homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana, which localizes to the cytoplasm and to multivesicular endosomes. In addition, green fluorescent protein-SKD1 colocalizes on multivesicular bodies with fluorescent fusion protein endosomal Rab GTPases, such as ARA6/RabF1, RHA1/RabF2a, and ARA7/RabF2b, and with the endocytic marker FM4-64. The expression of SKD1(E232Q), an ATPase-deficient version of SKD1, induces alterations in the endosomal system of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow 2 cells and ultimately leads to cell death. The inducible expression of SKD1(E232Q) in Arabidopsis resulted in enlarged endosomes with a reduced number of internal vesicles. In a yeast two-hybrid screen using Arabidopsis SKD1 as bait, we isolated a putative homolog of mammalian LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5 (LIP5)/SKD1 BINDING PROTEIN1 and yeast Vta1p (for Vps twenty associated 1 protein). Arabidopsis LIP5 acts as a positive regulator of SKD1 by increasing fourfold to fivefold its in vitro ATPase activity. We isolated a knockout homozygous Arabidopsis mutant line with a T-DNA insertion in LIP5. lip5 plants are viable and show no phenotypic alterations under normal growth conditions, suggesting that basal SKD1 ATPase activity is sufficient for plant development and growth.

  4. Tug-of-war between dissimilar teams of microtubule motors regulates transport and fission of endosomes.

    PubMed

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Rai, Arpan Kumar; Ramaiya, Avin Jayesh; Barak, Pradeep; Mallik, Roop

    2009-11-17

    Intracellular transport is interspersed with frequent reversals in direction due to the presence of opposing kinesin and dynein motors on organelles that are carried as cargo. The cause and the mechanism of reversals are unknown, but are a key to understanding how cargos are delivered in a regulated manner to specific cellular locations. Unlike established single-motor biophysical assays, this problem requires understanding of the cooperative behavior of multiple interacting motors. Here we present measurements inside live Dictyostelium cells, in a cell extract and with purified motors to quantify such an ensemble function of motors. We show through precise motion analysis that reversals during endosome motion are caused by a tug-of-war between kinesin and dynein. Further, we use a combination of optical trap-based force measurements and Monte Carlo simulations to make the surprising discovery that endosome transport uses many (approximately four to eight) weak and detachment-prone dyneins in a tug-of-war against a single strong and tenacious kinesin. We elucidate how this clever choice of dissimilar motors and motor teams achieves net transport together with endosome fission, both of which are important in controlling the balance of endocytic sorting. To the best of our knowledge, this is a unique demonstration that dynein and kinesin function differently at the molecular level inside cells and of how this difference is used in a specific cellular process, namely endosome biogenesis. Our work may provide a platform to understand intracellular transport of a variety of organelles in terms of measurable quantities.

  5. Tug-of-war between dissimilar teams of microtubule motors regulates transport and fission of endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Rai, Arpan Kumar; Ramaiya, Avin Jayesh; Barak, Pradeep; Mallik, Roop

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular transport is interspersed with frequent reversals in direction due to the presence of opposing kinesin and dynein motors on organelles that are carried as cargo. The cause and the mechanism of reversals are unknown, but are a key to understanding how cargos are delivered in a regulated manner to specific cellular locations. Unlike established single-motor biophysical assays, this problem requires understanding of the cooperative behavior of multiple interacting motors. Here we present measurements inside live Dictyostelium cells, in a cell extract and with purified motors to quantify such an ensemble function of motors. We show through precise motion analysis that reversals during endosome motion are caused by a tug-of-war between kinesin and dynein. Further, we use a combination of optical trap-based force measurements and Monte Carlo simulations to make the surprising discovery that endosome transport uses many (approximately four to eight) weak and detachment-prone dyneins in a tug-of-war against a single strong and tenacious kinesin. We elucidate how this clever choice of dissimilar motors and motor teams achieves net transport together with endosome fission, both of which are important in controlling the balance of endocytic sorting. To the best of our knowledge, this is a unique demonstration that dynein and kinesin function differently at the molecular level inside cells and of how this difference is used in a specific cellular process, namely endosome biogenesis. Our work may provide a platform to understand intracellular transport of a variety of organelles in terms of measurable quantities. PMID:19864630

  6. The role of intraorganellar Ca(2+) in late endosome-lysosome heterotypic fusion and in the reformation of lysosomes from hybrid organelles.

    PubMed

    Pryor, P R; Mullock, B M; Bright, N A; Gray, S R; Luzio, J P

    2000-05-29

    We have investigated the requirement for Ca(2+) in the fusion and content mixing of rat hepatocyte late endosomes and lysosomes in a cell-free system. Fusion to form hybrid organelles was inhibited by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), but not by EGTA, and this inhibition was reversed by adding additional Ca(2+). Fusion was also inhibited by methyl ester of EGTA (EGTA-AM), a membrane permeable, hydrolyzable ester of EGTA, and pretreatment of organelles with EGTA-AM showed that the chelation of lumenal Ca(2+) reduced the amount of fusion. The requirement for Ca(2+) for fusion was a later event than the requirement for a rab protein since the system became resistant to inhibition by GDP dissociation inhibitor at earlier times than it became resistant to BAPTA. We have developed a cell-free assay to study the reformation of lysosomes from late endosome-lysosome hybrid organelles that were isolated from the rat liver. The recovery of electron dense lysosomes was shown to require ATP and was inhibited by bafilomycin and EGTA-AM. The data support a model in which endocytosed Ca(2+) plays a role in the fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes, the reformation of lysosomes, and the dynamic equilibrium of organelles in the late endocytic pathway.

  7. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 regulates trafficking and signalling of the neurokinin 1 receptor in endosomes of myenteric neurones

    PubMed Central

    Pelayo, Juan-Carlos; Poole, Daniel P; Steinhoff, Martin; Cottrell, Graeme S; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Neuropeptide signalling at the plasma membrane is terminated by neuropeptide degradation by cell-surface peptidases, and by β-arrestin-dependent receptor desensitization and endocytosis. However, receptors continue to signal from endosomes by β-arrestin-dependent processes, and endosomal sorting mediates recycling and resensitization of plasma membrane signalling. The mechanisms that control signalling and trafficking of receptors in endosomes are poorly defined. We report a major role for endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) in controlling substance P (SP) and the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) in endosomes of myenteric neurones. ECE-1 mRNA and protein were expressed by myenteric neurones of rat and mouse intestine. SP (10 nm, 10 min) induced interaction of NK1R and β-arrestin at the plasma membrane, and the SP–NK1R–β-arrestin signalosome complex trafficked by a dynamin-mediated mechanism to ECE-1-containing early endosomes, where ECE-1 can degrade SP. After 120 min, NK1R recycled from endosomes to the plasma membrane. ECE-1 inhibitors (SM-19712, PD-069185) and the vacuolar H+ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1, which prevent endosomal SP degradation, suppressed NK1R recycling by >50%. Preincubation of neurones with SP (10 nm, 5 min) desensitized Ca2+ transients to a second SP challenge after 10 min, and SP signals resensitized after 60 min. SM-19712 inhibited NK1R resensitization by >90%. ECE-1 inhibitors also caused sustained SP-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, consistent with stabilization of the SP–NK1R–β-arrestin signalosome. By degrading SP and destabilizing endosomal signalosomes, ECE-1 has a dual role in controlling endocytic signalling and trafficking of the NK1R: promoting resensitization of G protein-mediated plasma membrane signalling, and terminating β-arrestin-mediated endosomal signalling. PMID:21878523

  8. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase regulates early endosomal dynamics during clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytic turnover is essential for the regulation of the protein composition and function of the plasma membrane, and thus affects the plasma membrane levels of many receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, photon absorption by the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin 1 (Rh1; also known as NinaE) triggers its endocytosis through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). We find that CME of Rh1 is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5 phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4K). Flies lacking PIP4K show mislocalization of Rh1 on expanded endomembranes within the cell body. This mislocalization of Rh1 was dependent on the formation of an expanded Rab5-positive compartment. The Rh1-trafficking defect in PIP4K-depleted cells could be suppressed by downregulating Rab5 function or by selectively reconstituting PIP4K in the PI3P-enriched early endosomal compartment of photoreceptors. We also found that loss of PIP4K was associated with increased CME and an enlarged Rab5-positive compartment in cultured Drosophila cells. Collectively, our findings define PIP4K as a novel regulator of early endosomal homeostasis during CME. PMID:28507272

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase regulates early endosomal dynamics during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kamalesh, Kumari; Trivedi, Deepti; Toscano, Sarah; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kolay, Sourav; Raghu, Padinjat

    2017-07-01

    Endocytic turnover is essential for the regulation of the protein composition and function of the plasma membrane, and thus affects the plasma membrane levels of many receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, photon absorption by the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin 1 (Rh1; also known as NinaE) triggers its endocytosis through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). We find that CME of Rh1 is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5 phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4K). Flies lacking PIP4K show mislocalization of Rh1 on expanded endomembranes within the cell body. This mislocalization of Rh1 was dependent on the formation of an expanded Rab5-positive compartment. The Rh1-trafficking defect in PIP4K-depleted cells could be suppressed by downregulating Rab5 function or by selectively reconstituting PIP4K in the PI3P-enriched early endosomal compartment of photoreceptors. We also found that loss of PIP4K was associated with increased CME and an enlarged Rab5-positive compartment in cultured Drosophila cells. Collectively, our findings define PIP4K as a novel regulator of early endosomal homeostasis during CME. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Regulation of late endosomal/lysosomal maturation and trafficking by cortactin affects Golgi morphology

    PubMed Central

    Kirkbride, Kellye C.; Hong, Nan Hyung; French, Christi L.; Clark, Emily S.; Jerome, W. Gray; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Cortactin is a branched actin regulator and tumor-overexpressed protein that promotes vesicular trafficking at a variety of cellular sites, including endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. To better understand its role in secretory trafficking, we investigated its function in Golgi homeostasis. Here, we report that knockdown (KD) of cortactin leads to a dramatic change in Golgi morphology by light microscopy, dependent on binding the Arp2/3 actin-nucleating complex. Surprisingly, there was little effect of cortactin-KD on anterograde trafficking of the constitutive cargo VSV-G, Golgi assembly from ER membranes upon Brefeldin A washout, or Golgi ultrastructure. Instead, electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that cortactin-KD cells contained a large number of immature-appearing late endosomal/lysosomal (LE/Lys) hybrid organelles, similar to those found in lysosomal storage diseases. Consistent with a defect in LE/Lys trafficking, cortactin-KD cells also exhibited accumulation of free cholesterol and retention of the retrograde Golgi cargo M6PR in LE. Inhibition of LE maturation by treatment of control cells with Rab7 siRNA or chloroquine led to a compact Golgi morphology similar to that observed in cortactin-KD cells. Furthermore, the Golgi morphology defects of cortactin-KD cells could be rescued by removal of cholesterol-containing lipids from the media, suggesting that buildup of cholesterol-rich membranes in immature LE/Lys induced disturbances in retrograde trafficking. Taken together, these data reveal that LE/Lys maturation and trafficking is highly sensitive to cortactin-regulated branched actin assembly and suggests that cytoskeletal-induced Golgi morphology changes can be a consequence of altered trafficking at late endosomes. PMID:22991200

  11. Regulation of notch endosomal sorting and signaling by Drosophila Nedd4 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Marian B; Carbery, Ann-Marie; Fostier, Maggy; Aslam, Hanna; Mazaleyrat, Sabine L; Higgs, Jenny; Myat, Anna; Evans, Dana A P; Cornell, Michael; Baron, Martin

    2004-12-29

    The Notch receptor mediates a short-range signal that regulates many cell fate decisions. The misregulation of Notch has been linked to cancer and to developmental disorders. Upon binding to its ligands, Delta (Dl) or Serrate (Ser), the Notch ectodomain is shed by the action of an ADAM protease. The Notch intracellular domain is subsequently released proteolytically from the membrane by Presenilin and translocates to the nucleus to activate the transcription factor, Suppressor of Hairless. We show in Drosophila that Notch signaling is limited by the activity of two Nedd4 family HECT domain proteins, Suppressor of deltex [Su(dx)] and DNedd4. We rule out models by which Su(dx) downregulates Notch through modulating Deltex or by limiting the adherens junction accumulation of Notch. Instead, we show that Su(dx) regulates the postendocytic sorting of Notch within the early endosome to an Hrs- and ubiquitin-enriched subdomain en route to the late endosome. We propose a model in which endocytic sorting of Notch mediates a decision between its activation and downregulation. Such intersections between trafficking routes may provide key points at which other signals can modulate Notch activity in both normal development and in the pathological misactivation of Notch.

  12. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.—Patel, C., Douard, V., Yu, S., Gao, N., Ferraris, R. P. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption. PMID:26071406

  13. Endosome-to-Plasma Membrane Recycling of VEGFR2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Endothelial Function and Blood Vessel Formation.

    PubMed

    Jopling, Helen M; Odell, Adam F; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Latham, Antony M; Frankel, Paul; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Walker, John H; Zachary, Ian C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2014-04-29

    Rab GTPases are implicated in endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling, but how such membrane traffic regulators control vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR) dynamics and function are not well understood. Here, we evaluated two different recycling Rab GTPases, Rab4a and Rab11a, in regulating endothelial VEGFR2 trafficking and signalling with implications for endothelial cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. In primary endothelial cells, VEGFR2 displays co-localisation with Rab4a, but not Rab11a GTPase, on early endosomes. Expression of a guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab4a S22N mutant caused increased VEGFR2 accumulation in endosomes. TfR and VEGFR2 exhibited differences in endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling in the presence of chloroquine. Depletion of Rab4a, but not Rab11a, levels stimulated VEGF-A-dependent intracellular signalling. However, depletion of either Rab4a or Rab11a levels inhibited VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration. Interestingly, depletion of Rab4a levels stimulated VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell proliferation. Rab4a and Rab11a were also both required for endothelial tubulogenesis. Evaluation of a transgenic zebrafish model showed that both Rab4 and Rab11a are functionally required for blood vessel formation and animal viability. Rab-dependent endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of VEGFR2 is important for intracellular signalling, cell migration and proliferation during angiogenesis.

  14. The tetraspanin CD63 regulates ESCRT-independent and dependent endosomal sorting during melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Niel, Guillaume; Charrin, Stéphanie; Simoes, Sabrina; Romao, Maryse; Rochin, Leila; Saftig, Paul; Marks, Michael S.; Rubinstein, Eric; Raposo, Graça

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cargo sorting to intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular endosomes is required for numerous physiological processes including lysosome-related organelle (LRO) biogenesis. PMEL – a component of melanocyte LROs (melanosomes) – is sorted to ILVs in an ESCRT-independent manner, where it is proteolytically processed and assembled into functional amyloid fibrils during melanosome maturation. Here we show that the tetraspanin CD63 directly participates in ESCRT-independent sorting of the PMEL luminal domain, but not of traditional ESCRT-dependent cargoes, to ILVs. Inactivating CD63 in cell culture or in mice impairs amyloidogenesis and downstream melanosome morphogenesis. Whereas CD63 is required for normal PMEL luminal domain sorting, the disposal of the remaining PMEL transmembrane fragment requires functional ESCRTs but not CD63. In the absence of CD63, the PMEL luminal domain follows this fragment and is targeted for ESCRT-dependent degradation. Our data thus reveal a tight interplay regulated by CD63 between two distinct endosomal ILV sorting processes for a single cargo during LRO biogenesis. PMID:21962903

  15. Rab8b Regulates Transport of West Nile Virus Particles from Recycling Endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Phongphaew, Wallaya; Yoshii, Kentaro; Iwano, Tomohiko; Harada, Akihiro; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) particles assemble at and bud into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted from infected cells through the secretory pathway. However, the host factor related to these steps is not fully understood. Rab proteins, belonging to the Ras superfamily, play essential roles in regulating many aspects of vesicular trafficking. In this study, we sought to determine which Rab proteins are involved in intracellular trafficking of nascent WNV particles. RNAi analysis revealed that Rab8b plays a role in WNV particle release. We found that Rab8 and WNV antigen were colocalized in WNV-infected human neuroblastoma cells, and that WNV infection enhanced Rab8 expression in the cells. In addition, the amount of WNV particles in the supernatant of Rab8b-deficient cells was significantly decreased compared with that of wild-type cells. We also demonstrated that WNV particles accumulated in the recycling endosomes in WNV-infected cells. In summary, these results suggest that Rab8b is involved in trafficking of WNV particles from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Rab8b Regulates Transport of West Nile Virus Particles from Recycling Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Phongphaew, Wallaya; Yoshii, Kentaro; Iwano, Tomohiko; Harada, Akihiro; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) particles assemble at and bud into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted from infected cells through the secretory pathway. However, the host factor related to these steps is not fully understood. Rab proteins, belonging to the Ras superfamily, play essential roles in regulating many aspects of vesicular trafficking. In this study, we sought to determine which Rab proteins are involved in intracellular trafficking of nascent WNV particles. RNAi analysis revealed that Rab8b plays a role in WNV particle release. We found that Rab8 and WNV antigen were colocalized in WNV-infected human neuroblastoma cells, and that WNV infection enhanced Rab8 expression in the cells. In addition, the amount of WNV particles in the supernatant of Rab8b-deficient cells was significantly decreased compared with that of wild-type cells. We also demonstrated that WNV particles accumulated in the recycling endosomes in WNV-infected cells. In summary, these results suggest that Rab8b is involved in trafficking of WNV particles from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane. PMID:26817838

  17. Glucose regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Graves, Lee M.; Duncan, Mara C.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is a rich source of energy and the raw material for biomass increase. Many eukaryotic cells remodel their physiology in the presence and absence of glucose. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes changes in transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell polarity in response to glucose availability. Upon glucose starvation, translation initiation and cell polarity are immediately inhibited, and then gradually recover. In this paper, we provide evidence that, as in cell polarity and translation, traffic at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes is regulated by glucose via an unknown mechanism that depends on protein kinase A (PKA). Upon glucose withdrawal, clathrin adaptors exhibit a biphasic change in localization: they initially delocalize from the membrane within minutes and later partially recover onto membranes. Additionally, the removal of glucose induces changes in posttranslational modifications of adaptors. Ras and Gpr1 signaling pathways, which converge on PKA, are required for changes in adaptor localization and changes in posttranslational modifications. Acute inhibition of PKA demonstrates that inhibition of PKA prior to glucose withdrawal prevents several adaptor responses to starvation. This study demonstrates that PKA activity prior to glucose starvation primes membrane traffic at the TGN and endosomes in response to glucose starvation. PMID:21832155

  18. A SPOPL/Cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking by targeting EPS15 at endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gschweitl, Michaela; Ulbricht, Anna; Barnes, Christopher A; Enchev, Radoslav I; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie; Huotari, Jatta; Yamauchi, Yohei; Greber, Urs F; Helenius, Ari; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-3 (CUL3)-based ubiquitin ligases regulate endosome maturation and trafficking of endocytic cargo to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Here, we report that these functions depend on SPOPL, a substrate-specific CUL3 adaptor. We find that SPOPL associates with endosomes and is required for both the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the endocytic host cell entry of influenza A virus. In SPOPL-depleted cells, endosomes are enlarged and fail to acquire intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). We identify a critical substrate ubiquitinated by CUL3-SPOPL as EPS15, an endocytic adaptor that also associates with the ESCRT-0 complex members HRS and STAM on endosomes. Indeed, EPS15 is ubiquitinated in a SPOPL-dependent manner, and accumulates with HRS in cells lacking SPOPL. Together, our data indicates that a CUL3-SPOPL E3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking and MVB formation by ubiquitinating and degrading EPS15 at endosomes, thereby influencing influenza A virus infection as well as degradation of EGFR and other EPS15 targets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13841.001 PMID:27008177

  19. Beclin 1 Is Required for Neuron Viability and Regulates Endosome Pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Mitchell S.; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R.; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis. PMID:25275521

  20. Beclin 1 is required for neuron viability and regulates endosome pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 complex.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Nicole C; Zhong, Yun; Wold, Mitchell S; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-10-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis.

  1. Fusion safety regulations in the United States: Progress and trends

    SciTech Connect

    DeLooper, J.

    1994-07-01

    This paper explores the issue of regulations as they apply to current and future fusion experimental machines. It addresses fusion regulatory issues, current regulations used for fusion, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experience with regulations, and future regulations to achieve fusion`s safety and environmental potential.

  2. Presenilin 1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor turnover and signaling in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Emanuela; Yoon, Il-Sang; Zheng, Hui; Kang, David E

    2007-10-26

    Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin 1 (PS1) cause the most aggressive form of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease. In addition to its well established role in Abeta production and Notch proteolysis, PS1 has been shown to mediate other physiological activities, such as regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling, and trafficking of select membrane proteins and/or intracellular vesicles. In this study, we present evidence that PS1 is a critical regulator of a key signaling receptor tyrosine kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specifically, EGFR levels were robustly increased in fibroblasts deficient in both PS1 and PS2 (PS(-/-)) due to delayed turnover of EGFR protein. Stable transfection of wild-type PS1 but not PS2 corrected EGFR to levels comparable to PS(+/+) cells, while FAD PS1 mutations showed partial loss of activity. The C-terminal fragment of PS1 was sufficient to fully reduce EGFR levels. In addition, the rapid ligand-induced degradation of EGFR was markedly delayed in PS(-/-) cells, resulting in prolonged signal activation. Despite the defective turnover of EGFR, ligand-induced autophosphorylation, ubiquitination, and endocytosis of EGFR were not affected by the lack of PS1. Instead, the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to lysosomes was severely delayed by PS1 deficiency. Elevation of EGFR was also seen in brains of adult mice conditionally ablated in PS1 and in skin tumors associated with the loss of PS1. These findings demonstrate a critical role of PS1 in the trafficking and turnover of EGFR and suggest potential pathogenic effects of elevated EGFR as well as perturbed endosomal-lysosomal trafficking in cell cycle control and Alzheimer disease.

  3. MYO6 Regulates Spatial Organization of Signaling Endosomes Driving AKT Activation and Actin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Tumbarello, David A; Chibalina, Margarita V; Buss, Folma

    2017-06-06

    APPL1- and RAB5-positive signaling endosomes play a crucial role in the activation of AKT in response to extracellular stimuli. Myosin VI (MYO6) and two of its cargo adaptor proteins, GIPC and TOM1/TOM1L2, localize to these peripheral endosomes and mediate endosome association with cortical actin filaments. Loss of MYO6 leads to the displacement of these endosomes from the cell cortex and accumulation in the perinuclear space. Depletion of this myosin not only affects endosome positioning, but also induces actin and lipid remodeling consistent with endosome maturation, including accumulation of F-actin and the endosomal lipid PI(3)P. These processes acutely perturb endosome function, as both AKT phosphorylation and RAC-dependent membrane ruffling were markedly reduced by depletion of either APPL1 or MYO6. These results place MYO6 and its binding partners at a central nexus in cellular signaling linking actin dynamics at the cell surface and endosomal signaling in the cell cortex. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neovascularization in the pulmonary endothelium is regulated by the endosome: Rab4-mediated trafficking and p18-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Stark, Myranda; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2015-01-01

    Neovascularization, the formation of new blood vessels, requires multiple processes including vascular leak, migration, and adhesion. Endosomal proteins, such as Rabs, regulate trafficking of key signaling proteins involved in neovascularization. The novel endosome protein, p18, enhances vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin recycling from early endosome to cell junction to improve pulmonary endothelial barrier function. Since endothelial barrier integrity is vital in neovascularization, we sought to elucidate the role for endosome proteins p18 and Rab4, Rab7, and Rab9 in the process of vessel formation within the pulmonary vasculature. Overexpression of wild-type p18 (p18wt), but not the nonendosomal-binding mutant (p18N39), significantly increased lung microvascular endothelial cell migration, adhesion, and both in vitro and in vivo tube formation. Chemical inhibition of mTOR or p38 attenuated the proneovascularization role of p18wt. Similar to the effect of p18wt, overexpression of prorecycling wild-type (Rab4WT) and endosome-anchored (Rab4Q67L) Rab4 enhanced neovascularization processes, whereas molecular inhibition of Rab4, by using the nonendosomal-binding mutant (Rab4S22N) attenuated VEGF-induced neovascularization. Unlike p18, Rab4-induced neovascularization was independent of mTOR or p38 inhibition but was dependent on p18 expression. This study shows for the first time that neovascularization within the pulmonary vasculature is dependent on the prorecycling endocytic proteins Rab4 and p18. PMID:26254426

  5. AP-1/σ1B-Dependent SV Protein Recycling Is Regulated in Early Endosomes and Is Coupled to AP-2 Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kratzke, Manuel; Candiello, Ermes; Schmidt, Bernhard; Jahn, Olaf; Schu, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Adaptor protein (AP)-1/σ1B(-/-) mice have reduced synaptic-vesicle (SV) recycling and increased endosomes. Mutant mice have impaired spatial memory, and σ1B-deficient humans have a severe mental retardation. In order to define these σ1B(-/-) 'bulk' endosomes and to determine their functions in SV recycling, we developed a protocol to separate them from the majority of the neuronal endosomes. The σ1B(-/-) 'bulk' endosomes proved to be classic early endosomes with an increase in the phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI-3-P), which recruits proteins mediating protein sorting out of early endosomes into different routes. σ1B deficiency induced alterations in the endosomal proteome reveals two major functions: SV protein storage and sorting into endolysosomes. Alternative endosomal recycling pathways are not up-regulated, but certain SV proteins are misrouted. Tetraspanins are enriched in σ1B(-/-) synaptosomes, but not in their endosomes or in their clathrin-coated-vesicles (CCVs), indicating AP-1/σ1B-dependent sorting. Synapses contain also more AP-2 CCV, although it is expected that they contain less due to reduced SV recycling. Coat composition of these AP-2 CCVs is altered, and thus, they represent a subpopulation of AP-2 CCVs. Association of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)-IIα, -δ and casein kinase (CK)-IIα with the endosome/SV pool is altered, as well as 14-3-3η, indicating changes in specific signalling pathways regulating synaptic plasticity. The accumulation of early endosomes and endocytotic AP-2 CCV indicates the regulation of SV recycling via early endosomes by the interdependent regulation of AP-2-mediated endocytosis and AP-1/σ1B-mediated SV reformation.

  6. Role of endosomal trafficking dynamics on the regulation of hepatic insulin receptor activity: models for Fao cells.

    PubMed

    Hori, Sharon S; Kurland, Irwin J; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2006-05-01

    Evidence indicates that endosomal insulin receptor (IR) trafficking plays a role in regulating insulin signal transduction. To evaluate its importance, we developed a series of biokinetic models for quantifying activated surface and endosomal IR dynamics from published experimental data. Starting with a published two-compartment Fao hepatoma model, a four-pool model was formulated that depicts IR autophosphorylation after receptor binding, IR endosomal internalization/trafficking, insulin dissociation from and dephosphorylation of internalized IR, and recycling of unliganded, dephosphorylated IR to the plasma membrane. Quantification required three additional data sets, two measured, but unmodeled by the same group. A five-pool model created to include endosomal trafficking of the nonphosphorylated insulin-IR complex was fitted using the same data sets, augmented with another published data set. Creation of a six-pool model added the physiologically relevant dissociation of insulin ligand from the activated endosomal IR. More importantly, all three models, validated against additional data not used in model fitting, predict that, mechanistically, internalization of activated IR is a rate-limiting step, at least under the receptor saturating conditions of the fitting data. This rate includes the transit time to a site where insulin dissociation from and/or dephosphorylation of the IR occurs by docking with protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), or where a sufficient conformational change occurs in the IR, perhaps due to insulin-IR dissociation, where associated PTPases may complete IR dephosphorylation. Our new models indicate that key events in endosomal IR trafficking have significance in mediating IR activity, possibly serving to regulate insulin signal transduction.

  7. deep-orange and carnation define distinct stages in late endosomal biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sriram, V; Krishnan, K S; Mayor, Satyajit

    2003-05-12

    Endosomal degradation is severely impaired in primary hemocytes from larvae of eye color mutants of Drosophila. Using high resolution imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy in these cells, products of eye color genes, deep-orange (dor) and carnation (car), are localized to large multivesicular Rab7-positive late endosomes containing Golgi-derived enzymes. These structures mature into small sized Dor-negative, Car-positive structures, which subsequently fuse to form tubular lysosomes. Defective endosomal degradation in mutant alleles of dor results from a failure of Golgi-derived vesicles to fuse with morphologically arrested Rab7-positive large sized endosomes, which are, however, normally acidified and mature with wild-type kinetics. This locates the site of Dor function to fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the large Rab7-positive endocytic compartments. In contrast, endosomal degradation is not considerably affected in car1 mutant; fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles and maturation of large sized endosomes is normal. However, removal of Dor from small sized Car-positive endosomes is slowed, and subsequent fusion with tubular lysosomes is abolished. Overexpression of Dor in car1 mutant aggravates this defect, implicating Car in the removal of Dor from endosomes. This suggests that, in addition to an independent role in fusion with tubular lysosomes, the Sec1p homologue, Car, regulates Dor function.

  8. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2015-09-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane. © FASEB.

  9. COMMD1 is linked to the WASH complex and regulates endosomal trafficking of the copper transporter ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Krawczak, Christine A.; Singla, Amika; Starokadomskyy, Petro; Deng, Zhihui; Osborne, Douglas G.; Li, Haiying; Dick, Christopher J.; Gomez, Timothy S.; Koenecke, Megan; Zhang, Jin-San; Dai, Haiming; Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis F.; Geng, Linda N.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Hein, Marco Y.; Wallis, Mathew; McGaughran, Julie; Gecz, Jozef; van de Sluis, Bart; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Burstein, Ezra

    2015-01-01

    COMMD1 deficiency results in defective copper homeostasis, but the mechanism for this has remained elusive. Here we report that COMMD1 is directly linked to early endosomes through its interaction with a protein complex containing CCDC22, CCDC93, and C16orf62. This COMMD/CCDC22/CCDC93 (CCC) complex interacts with the multisubunit WASH complex, an evolutionarily conserved system, which is required for endosomal deposition of F-actin and cargo trafficking in conjunction with the retromer. Interactions between the WASH complex subunit FAM21, and the carboxyl-terminal ends of CCDC22 and CCDC93 are responsible for CCC complex recruitment to endosomes. We show that depletion of CCC complex components leads to lack of copper-dependent movement of the copper transporter ATP7A from endosomes, resulting in intracellular copper accumulation and modest alterations in copper homeostasis in humans with CCDC22 mutations. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for the role of COMMD1 in copper homeostasis and uncovers additional genes involved in the regulation of copper transporter recycling. PMID:25355947

  10. COMMD1 is linked to the WASH complex and regulates endosomal trafficking of the copper transporter ATP7A.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Krawczak, Christine A; Singla, Amika; Starokadomskyy, Petro; Deng, Zhihui; Osborne, Douglas G; Li, Haiying; Dick, Christopher J; Gomez, Timothy S; Koenecke, Megan; Zhang, Jin-San; Dai, Haiming; Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis F; Geng, Linda N; Kaufmann, Scott H; Hein, Marco Y; Wallis, Mathew; McGaughran, Julie; Gecz, Jozef; Sluis, Bart van de; Billadeau, Daniel D; Burstein, Ezra

    2015-01-01

    COMMD1 deficiency results in defective copper homeostasis, but the mechanism for this has remained elusive. Here we report that COMMD1 is directly linked to early endosomes through its interaction with a protein complex containing CCDC22, CCDC93, and C16orf62. This COMMD/CCDC22/CCDC93 (CCC) complex interacts with the multisubunit WASH complex, an evolutionarily conserved system, which is required for endosomal deposition of F-actin and cargo trafficking in conjunction with the retromer. Interactions between the WASH complex subunit FAM21, and the carboxyl-terminal ends of CCDC22 and CCDC93 are responsible for CCC complex recruitment to endosomes. We show that depletion of CCC complex components leads to lack of copper-dependent movement of the copper transporter ATP7A from endosomes, resulting in intracellular copper accumulation and modest alterations in copper homeostasis in humans with CCDC22 mutations. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for the role of COMMD1 in copper homeostasis and uncovers additional genes involved in the regulation of copper transporter recycling.

  11. Opposing Activities of the Snx3-Retromer Complex and ESCRT Proteins Mediate Regulated Cargo Sorting at a Common Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Strochlic, Todd I.; Schmiedekamp, Briana C.; Lee, Jacqueline; Katzmann, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Endocytosed proteins are either delivered to the lysosome to be degraded or are exported from the endosomal system and delivered to other organelles. Sorting of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reductive iron transporter, composed of the Fet3 and Ftr1 proteins, in the endosomal system is regulated by available iron; in iron-starved cells, Fet3-Ftr1 is sorted by Snx3/Grd19 and retromer into a recycling pathway that delivers it back to the plasma membrane, but when starved cells are exposed to iron, Fet3-Ftr1 is targeted to the lysosome-like vacuole and is degraded. We report that iron-induced endocytosis of Fet3-Ftr1 is independent of Fet3-Ftr1 ubiquitylation, and after endocytosis, degradation of Fet3-Ftr1 is mediated by the multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway. In mutant cells lacking any component of the ESCRT protein-dependent MVB sorting machinery, the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase, or in wild-type cells expressing Fet3-Ftr1 lacking cytosolic lysyl ubiquitin acceptor sites, Fet3-Ftr1 is constitutively sorted into the recycling pathway independent of iron status. In the presence and absence of iron, Fet3-Ftr1 transits an endosomal compartment where a subunit of the MVB sorting receptor (Vps27), Snx3/Grd19, and retromer proteins colocalize. We propose that this endosome is where Rsp5 ubiquitylates Fet3-Ftr1 and where the recycling and degradative pathways diverge. PMID:18768754

  12. The ubiquitin ligase deltex-3l regulates endosomal sorting of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Holleman, Justine; Marchese, Adriano

    2014-06-15

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sorting into the degradative pathway is important for limiting the duration and magnitude of signaling. Agonist activation of the GPCR CXCR4 induces its rapid ubiquitination and sorting to lysosomes via the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway. We recently reported that ESCRT-0 ubiquitination is linked to the efficiency with which CXCR4 is sorted for lysosomal degradation; however mechanistic insight is lacking. Here we define a novel role for the really interesting new gene-domain E3 ubiquitin ligase deltex-3-like (DTX3L) in regulating CXCR4 sorting from endosomes to lysosomes. We show that DTX3L localizes to early endosomes upon CXCR4 activation and interacts directly with and inhibits the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase atrophin-1 interacting protein 4. This serves to limit the extent to which ESCRT-0 is ubiquitinated and is able to sort CXCR4 for lysosomal degradation. Therefore we define a novel role for DTX3L in GPCR endosomal sorting and reveal an unprecedented link between two distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases to control the activity of the ESCRT machinery.

  13. Diacylglycerol kinase α regulates tubular recycling endosome biogenesis and major histocompatibility complex class I recycling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-11-14

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presents intracellular-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and its subcellular itinerary is important in regulating the immune response. While a number of diacylglycerol kinase isoforms have been implicated in clathrin-dependent internalization, MHC I lacks the typical motifs known to mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that depletion of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), a kinase devoid of a clathrin-dependent adaptor protein complex 2 binding site, caused a delay in MHC I recycling to the plasma membrane without affecting the rate of MHC I internalization. We demonstrate that DGKα knock-down causes accumulation of intracellular and surface MHC I, resulting from decreased degradation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DGKα is required for the generation of phosphatidic acid required for tubular recycling endosome (TRE) biogenesis. Moreover, we show that DGKα forms a complex with the TRE hub protein, MICAL-L1. Given that MICAL-L1 and the F-BAR-containing membrane-tubulating protein Syndapin2 associate selectively with phosphatidic acid, we propose a positive feedback loop in which DGKα generates phosphatidic acid to drive its own recruitment to TRE via its interaction with MICAL-L1. Our data support a novel role for the involvement of DGKα in TRE biogenesis and MHC I recycling.

  14. Diacylglycerol Kinase α Regulates Tubular Recycling Endosome Biogenesis and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presents intracellular-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and its subcellular itinerary is important in regulating the immune response. While a number of diacylglycerol kinase isoforms have been implicated in clathrin-dependent internalization, MHC I lacks the typical motifs known to mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that depletion of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), a kinase devoid of a clathrin-dependent adaptor protein complex 2 binding site, caused a delay in MHC I recycling to the plasma membrane without affecting the rate of MHC I internalization. We demonstrate that DGKα knock-down causes accumulation of intracellular and surface MHC I, resulting from decreased degradation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DGKα is required for the generation of phosphatidic acid required for tubular recycling endosome (TRE) biogenesis. Moreover, we show that DGKα forms a complex with the TRE hub protein, MICAL-L1. Given that MICAL-L1 and the F-BAR-containing membrane-tubulating protein Syndapin2 associate selectively with phosphatidic acid, we propose a positive feedback loop in which DGKα generates phosphatidic acid to drive its own recruitment to TRE via its interaction with MICAL-L1. Our data support a novel role for the involvement of DGKα in TRE biogenesis and MHC I recycling. PMID:25248744

  15. An Endosomal NAADP-Sensitive Two-Pore Ca(2+) Channel Regulates ER-Endosome Membrane Contact Sites to Control Growth Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Bethan S; Eden, Emily R; Hockey, Leanne N; Yates, Elizabeth; Futter, Clare E; Patel, Sandip

    2017-02-14

    Membrane contact sites are regions of close apposition between organelles that facilitate information transfer. Here, we reveal an essential role for Ca(2+) derived from the endo-lysosomal system in maintaining contact between endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Antagonizing action of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing messenger NAADP, inhibiting its target endo-lysosomal ion channel, TPC1, and buffering local Ca(2+) fluxes all clustered and enlarged late endosomes/lysosomes. We show that TPC1 localizes to ER-endosome contact sites and is required for their formation. Reducing NAADP-dependent contacts delayed EGF receptor de-phosphorylation consistent with close apposition of endocytosed receptors with the ER-localized phosphatase PTP1B. In accord, downstream MAP kinase activation and mobilization of ER Ca(2+) stores by EGF were exaggerated upon NAADP blockade. Membrane contact sites between endosomes and the ER thus emerge as Ca(2+)-dependent hubs for signaling.

  16. Rab14 limits the sorting of Glut4 from endosomes into insulin-sensitive regulated secretory compartments in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Romenskaia, Irina; Coster, Adelle C F; Mastick, Cynthia Corley

    2016-05-15

    Insulin increases glucose uptake by increasing the rate of exocytosis of the facilitative glucose transporter isoform 4 (Glut4) relative to its endocytosis. Insulin also releases Glut4 from highly insulin-regulated secretory compartments (GSVs or Glut4 storage vesicles) into constitutively cycling endosomes. Previously it was shown that both overexpression and knockdown of the small GTP-binding protein Rab14 decreased Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane (PM). To determine the mechanism of this perturbation, we measured the effects of Rab14 knockdown on the trafficking kinetics of Glut4 relative to two proteins that partially co-localize with Glut4, the transferrin (Tf) receptor and low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Our data support the hypothesis that Rab14 limits sorting of proteins from sorting (or 'early') endosomes into the specialized GSV pathway, possibly through regulation of endosomal maturation. This hypothesis is consistent with known Rab14 effectors. Interestingly, the insulin-sensitive Rab GTPase-activating protein Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) affects both sorting into and exocytosis from GSVs. It has previously been shown that exocytosis of GSVs is rate-limited by Rab10, and both Rab10 and Rab14 are in vitro substrates of AS160. Regulation of both entry into and exit from GSVs by AS160 through sequential Rab substrates would provide a mechanism for the finely tuned 'quantal' increases in cycling Glut4 observed in response to increasing concentrations of insulin.

  17. Rab11-FIP1A regulates early trafficking into the recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Jenny C.; McRae, Rebecca E.; Manning, Elizabeth H.; Lapierre, Lynne A.; Goldenring, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Rab11 family of small GTPases, along with the Rab11-family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs), are critical regulators of intracellular vesicle trafficking and recycling. We have identified a point mutation of Threonine-197 site to an Alanine in Rab11-FIP1A, which causes a dramatic dominant negative phenotype when expressed in HeLa cells. The normally perinuclear distribution of GFP-Rab11-FIP1A was condensed into a membranous cisternum with almost no GFP-Rab11-FIP1A(T197A) remaining outside of this central locus. Also, this condensed GFP-FIP1A(T197A) altered the distribution of proteins in the Rab11a recycling pathway including endogenous Rab11a, Rab11-FIP1C, and transferrin receptor (CD71). Furthermore, this condensed GFP-FIP1A(T197A)-containing structure exhibited little movement in live HeLa cells. Expression of GFP-FIP1A(T197A) caused a strong blockade of transferrin recycling. Treatment of cells expressing GFP-FIP1A(T197A) with nocodazole did not disperse the Rab11a-containing recycling system. We also found that Rab5 and EEA1 were accumulated in membranes by GFP-Rab11-FIP1A but Rab4 was unaffected, suggesting that a direct pathway may exist from early endosomes into the Rab11a-containing recycling system. Our study of a potent inhibitory trafficking mutation in Rab11-FIP1A shows that Rab11-FIP1A associates with and regulates trafficking at an early step in the process of membrane recycling. PMID:26790954

  18. Rab11-FIP1A regulates early trafficking into the recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Jenny C; McRae, Rebecca E; Manning, Elizabeth H; Lapierre, Lynne A; Goldenring, James R

    2016-01-15

    The Rab11 family of small GTPases, along with the Rab11-family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs), are critical regulators of intracellular vesicle trafficking and recycling. We have identified a point mutation of Threonine-197 site to an Alanine in Rab11-FIP1A, which causes a dramatic dominant negative phenotype when expressed in HeLa cells. The normally perinuclear distribution of GFP-Rab11-FIP1A was condensed into a membranous cisternum with almost no GFP-Rab11-FIP1A(T197A) remaining outside of this central locus. Also, this condensed GFP-FIP1A(T197A) altered the distribution of proteins in the Rab11a recycling pathway including endogenous Rab11a, Rab11-FIP1C, and transferrin receptor (CD71). Furthermore, this condensed GFP-FIP1A(T197A)-containing structure exhibited little movement in live HeLa cells. Expression of GFP-FIP1A(T197A) caused a strong blockade of transferrin recycling. Treatment of cells expressing GFP-FIP1A(T197A) with nocodazole did not disperse the Rab11a-containing recycling system. We also found that Rab5 and EEA1 were accumulated in membranes by GFP-Rab11-FIP1A but Rab4 was unaffected, suggesting that a direct pathway may exist from early endosomes into the Rab11a-containing recycling system. Our study of a potent inhibitory trafficking mutation in Rab11-FIP1A shows that Rab11-FIP1A associates with and regulates trafficking at an early step in the process of membrane recycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EGF and amphiregulin differentially regulate Cbl recruitment to endosomes and EGF receptor fate

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Kathryn A.; Place, Trenton L.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    EGF-R [EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor] ligands can promote or inhibit cell growth. The biological outcome of receptor activation is dictated, at least in part, by ligand-specified patterns of endocytic trafficking. EGF-R trafficking downstream of the ligands EGF and TGF-α (transforming growth factor-α) has been investigated extensively. However, less is known about EGF-R fates induced by the ligands BTC (betacellulin) and AR (amphiregulin). We undertook comparative analyses to identify ligand-specific molecular events that regulate EGF-R trafficking and degradation. EGF (17 nM) and BTC (8.5 nM) induced significant EGF-R degradation, with or without ectopic expression of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl. Human recombinant AR (17 nM) failed to affect receptor degradation in either case. Notably, levels of ligand-induced EGF-R ubiquitination did not correlate strictly with receptor degradation. Dose–response experiments revealed that AR at a saturating concentration was a partial agonist at the EGF-R, with approx. 40 % efficacy (relative to EGF) at inducing receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, ubiquitination and association with Cbl. EGF-R down-regulation and degradation also were compromised upon cell stimulation with AR (136 nM). These outcomes correlated with decreased degradation of the Cbl substrate and internalization inhibitor hSprouty2. Downstream of the hSprouty2 checkpoint in AR-stimulated cells, Cbl-free EGF-R was incorporated into endosomes from which Cbl–EGF-R complexes were excluded. Our results suggest that the AR-specific EGF-R fate results from decreased hSprouty2 degradation and reduced Cbl recruitment to underphosphorylated EGF-R, two effects that impair EGF-R trafficking to lysosomes. PMID:18045238

  20. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5GTP-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation. PMID:27411398

  1. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway.

    PubMed

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-07-14

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5(GTP)-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation.

  2. Annexin A2 binds to endosomes and negatively regulates TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses via the TRAM-TRIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Min; Guo, Qiang; Li, Rongpeng; Li, Guobo; Tan, Shirui; Li, Xuefeng; Wei, Yuquan; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Gram-negative bacteria activates plasma membrane signaling via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cells and triggers innate inflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we reveal a role for annexin A2 (AnxA2) in host defense against infection as anxa2−/− mice were highly susceptible to Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis with enhanced inflammatory responses. Computing analysis and biochemical experiments identified that constitutive AnxA2 expression facilitated TLR4 internalization and its subsequent translocation into early endosomal membranes. It activated the TRAM-dependent endosomal signaling, leading to the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, AnxA2 deficiency prolonged TLR4-mediated signaling from the plasma membrane, which was attributable to pro-inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, TNFα and IL-1β). Thus, AnxA2 directly exerted negative regulation of inflammatory responses through TLR4-initiated TRAM-TRIF pathway occurring on endosomes. This study reveals AnxA2 as a critical regulator in infection-initiated inflammation, which protects the host from excessive inflammatory damage. PMID:26527544

  3. On the entry of an emerging arbovirus into host cells: Mayaro virus takes the highway to the cytoplasm through fusion with early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Carlos A.M.; Silva, Jerson L.; Oliveira, Andréa C.

    2017-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emergent sylvatic alphavirus in South America, related to sporadic outbreaks of a chikungunya-like human febrile illness accompanied by severe arthralgia. Despite its high potential for urban emergence, MAYV is still an obscure virus with scarce information about its infection cycle, including the corresponding early events. Even for prototypical alphaviruses, the cell entry mechanism still has some rough edges to trim: although clathrin-mediated endocytosis is quoted as the putative route, alternative paths as distinct as direct virus genome injection through the cell plasma membrane seems to be possible. Our aim was to clarify crucial details on the entry route exploited by MAYV to gain access into the host cell. Tracking the virus since its first contact with the surface of Vero cells by fluorescence microscopy, we show that its entry occurs by a fast endocytic process and relies on fusion with acidic endosomal compartments. Moreover, blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis or depleting cholesterol from the cell membrane leads to a strong inhibition of viral infection, as assessed by plaque assays. Following this clue, we found that early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles are both implicated as target membranes for MAYV fusion. Our findings unravel the very first events that culminate in a productive infection by MAYV and shed light on potential targets for a rational antiviral therapy, besides providing a better comprehension of the entry routes exploited by alphaviruses to get into the cell. PMID:28462045

  4. On the entry of an emerging arbovirus into host cells: Mayaro virus takes the highway to the cytoplasm through fusion with early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos A M; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Gomes, Andre M O

    2017-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emergent sylvatic alphavirus in South America, related to sporadic outbreaks of a chikungunya-like human febrile illness accompanied by severe arthralgia. Despite its high potential for urban emergence, MAYV is still an obscure virus with scarce information about its infection cycle, including the corresponding early events. Even for prototypical alphaviruses, the cell entry mechanism still has some rough edges to trim: although clathrin-mediated endocytosis is quoted as the putative route, alternative paths as distinct as direct virus genome injection through the cell plasma membrane seems to be possible. Our aim was to clarify crucial details on the entry route exploited by MAYV to gain access into the host cell. Tracking the virus since its first contact with the surface of Vero cells by fluorescence microscopy, we show that its entry occurs by a fast endocytic process and relies on fusion with acidic endosomal compartments. Moreover, blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis or depleting cholesterol from the cell membrane leads to a strong inhibition of viral infection, as assessed by plaque assays. Following this clue, we found that early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles are both implicated as target membranes for MAYV fusion. Our findings unravel the very first events that culminate in a productive infection by MAYV and shed light on potential targets for a rational antiviral therapy, besides providing a better comprehension of the entry routes exploited by alphaviruses to get into the cell.

  5. Adenovirus RIDα regulates endosome maturation by mimicking GTP-Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankur H.; Cianciola, Nicholas L.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Carlin, Cathleen

    2007-01-01

    The small guanosine triphosphatase Rab7 regulates late endocytic trafficking. Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) and oxysterol-binding protein–related protein 1L (ORP1L) are guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–Rab7 effectors that instigate minus end–directed microtubule transport. We demonstrate that RILP and ORP1L both interact with the group C adenovirus protein known as receptor internalization and degradation α (RIDα), which was previously shown to clear the cell surface of several membrane proteins, including the epidermal growth factor receptor and Fas (Carlin, C.R., A.E. Tollefson, H.A. Brady, B.L. Hoffman, and W.S. Wold. 1989. Cell. 57:135–144; Shisler, J., C. Yang, B. Walter, C.F. Ware, and L.R. Gooding. 1997. J. Virol. 71:8299–8306). RIDα localizes to endocytic vesicles but is not homologous to Rab7 and is not catalytically active. We show that RIDα compensates for reduced Rab7 or dominant-negative (DN) Rab7(T22N) expression. In vitro, Cu2+ binding to RIDα residues His75 and His76 facilitates the RILP interaction. Site-directed mutagenesis of these His residues results in the loss of RIDα–RILP interaction and RIDα activity in cells. Additionally, expression of the RILP DN C-terminal region hinders RIDα activity during an acute adenovirus infection. We conclude that RIDα coordinates recruitment of these GTP-Rab7 effectors to compartments that would ordinarily be perceived as early endosomes, thereby promoting the degradation of selected cargo. PMID:18039930

  6. C9ORF72, implicated in amytrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, regulates endosomal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Farg, Manal A.; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Sultana, Jessica M.; Yang, Shu; Atkinson, Rachel A.K.; Levina, Vita; Halloran, Mark A.; Gleeson, Paul A.; Blair, Ian P.; Soo, Kai Y.; King, Anna E.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2014-01-01

    Intronic expansion of a hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene is the major cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. However, the cellular function of the C9ORF72 protein remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that C9ORF72 regulates endosomal trafficking. C9ORF72 colocalized with Rab proteins implicated in autophagy and endocytic transport: Rab1, Rab5, Rab7 and Rab11 in neuronal cell lines, primary cortical neurons and human spinal cord motor neurons, consistent with previous predictions that C9ORF72 bears Rab guanine exchange factor activity. Consistent with this notion, C9ORF72 was present in the extracellular space and as cytoplasmic vesicles. Depletion of C9ORF72 using siRNA inhibited transport of Shiga toxin from the plasma membrane to Golgi apparatus, internalization of TrkB receptor and altered the ratio of autophagosome marker light chain 3 (LC3) II:LC3I, indicating that C9ORF72 regulates endocytosis and autophagy. C9ORF72 also colocalized with ubiquilin-2 and LC3-positive vesicles, and co-migrated with lysosome-stained vesicles in neuronal cell lines, providing further evidence that C9ORF72 regulates autophagy. Investigation of proteins interacting with C9ORF72 using mass spectrometry identified other proteins implicated in ALS; ubiquilin-2 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, hnRNPA2/B1 and hnRNPA1, and actin. Treatment of cells overexpressing C9ORF72 with proteasome inhibitors induced the formation of stress granules positive for hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1. Immunohistochemistry of C9ORF72 ALS patient motor neurons revealed increased colocalization between C9ORF72 and Rab7 and Rab11 compared with controls, suggesting possible dysregulation of trafficking in patients bearing the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. Hence, this study identifies a role for C9ORF72 in Rab-mediated cellular trafficking. PMID:24549040

  7. Role of SKD1 Regulators LIP5 and IST1-LIKE1 in Endosomal Sorting and Plant Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Valencia, Julio; Miller, Nathan D.; Goodman, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    SKD1 is a core component of the mechanism that degrades plasma membrane proteins via the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) pathway. Its ATPase activity and endosomal recruitment are regulated by the ESCRT components LIP5 and IST1. How LIP5 and IST1 affect ESCRT-mediated endosomal trafficking and development in plants is not known. Here we use Arabidopsis mutants to demonstrate that LIP5 controls the constitutive degradation of plasma membrane proteins and the formation of endosomal intraluminal vesicles. Although lip5 mutants were able to polarize the auxin efflux facilitators PIN2 and PIN3, both proteins were mis-sorted to the tonoplast in lip5 root cells. In addition, lip5 root cells over-accumulated PIN2 at the plasma membrane. Consistently with the trafficking defects of PIN proteins, the lip5 roots showed abnormal gravitropism with an enhanced response within the first 4 h after gravistimulation. LIP5 physically interacts with IST1-LIKE1 (ISTL1), a protein predicted to be the Arabidopsis homolog of yeast IST1. However, we found that Arabidopsis contains 12 genes coding for predicted IST1-domain containing proteins (ISTL1–12). Within the ISTL1–6 group, ISTL1 showed the strongest interaction with LIP5, SKD1, and the ESCRT-III-related proteins CHMP1A in yeast two hybrid assays. Through the analysis of single and double mutants, we found that the synthetic interaction of LIP5 with ISTL1, but not with ISTL2, 3, or 6, is essential for normal plant growth, repression of spontaneous cell death, and post-embryonic lethality. PMID:26983994

  8. Soi3p/Rav1p functions at the early endosome to regulate endocytic trafficking to the vacuole and localization of trans-Golgi network transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Sipos, György; Brickner, Jason H; Brace, E J; Chen, Linyi; Rambourg, Alain; Kepes, Francois; Fuller, Robert S

    2004-07-01

    SOI3 was identified by a mutation, soi3-1, that suppressed a mutant trans-Golgi network (TGN) localization signal in the Kex2p cytosolic tail. SOI3, identical to RAV1, encodes a protein important for regulated assembly of vacuolar ATPase. Here, we show that Soi3/Rav1p is required for transport between the early endosome and the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC). By electron microscopy, soi3-1 mutants massively accumulated structures that resembled early endosomes. soi3Delta mutants exhibited a kinetic delay in transfer of the endocytic tracer dye FM4-64, from the 14 degrees C endocytic intermediate to the vacuole. The soi3Delta mutation delayed vacuolar degradation but not internalization of the a-factor receptor Ste3p. By density gradient fractionation, Soi3/Rav1p associated as a peripheral protein with membranes of a density characteristic of early endosomes. The soi3 null mutation markedly reduced the rate of Kex2p transport from the TGN to the PVC but had no effect on vacuolar protein sorting or cycling of Vps10p. These results suggest that assembly of vacuolar ATPase at the early endosome is required for transport of both Ste3p and Kex2p from the early endosome to the PVC and support a model in which cycling through the early endosome is part of the normal itinerary of Kex2p and other TGN-resident proteins.

  9. GRASP1 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning through Endosomal Recycling of AMPA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shu-Ling; Diering, Graham Hugh; Ye, Bing; Takamiya, Kogo; Chen, Chih-Ming; Jiang, Yuwu; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao; Huganir, Richard L

    2017-03-22

    Learning depends on experience-dependent modification of synaptic efficacy and neuronal connectivity in the brain. We provide direct evidence for physiological roles of the recycling endosome protein GRASP1 in glutamatergic synapse function and animal behavior. Mice lacking GRASP1 showed abnormal excitatory synapse number, synaptic plasticity, and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory due to a failure in learning-induced synaptic AMPAR incorporation. We identified two GRASP1 point mutations from intellectual disability (ID) patients that showed convergent disruptive effects on AMPAR recycling and glutamate uncaging-induced structural and functional plasticity. Wild-type GRASP1, but not ID mutants, rescued spine loss in hippocampal CA1 neurons in Grasp1 knockout mice. Together, these results demonstrate a requirement for normal recycling endosome function in AMPAR-dependent synaptic function and neuronal connectivity in vivo, and suggest a potential role for GRASP1 in the pathophysiology of human cognitive disorders.

  10. EHD3-Dependent Endosome Pathway Regulates Cardiac Membrane Excitability and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Musa, Hassan; Liu, Bin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Alecusan, Joe; Wright, Patrick; Li, Jingdong; Billman, George E.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Band, Hamid; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac function is dependent on the coordinate activities of membrane ion channels, transporters, pumps, and hormone receptors to dynamically tune the membrane electrochemical gradient in response to acute and chronic stress. While our knowledge of membrane proteins has rapidly advanced over the past decade, our understanding of the subcellular pathways governing the trafficking and localization of integral membrane proteins is limited, and essentially unstudied in vivo. In heart, to our knowledge, there are no in vivo mechanistic studies that directly link endosome-based machinery with cardiac physiology. Objective Define the in vivo roles of endosome-based cellular machinery for cardiac membrane protein trafficking, myocyte excitability, and cardiac physiology. Methods and Results We identify the endosome-based EHD3 pathway as essential for cardiac physiology. EHD3−/− hearts display structural and functional defects including bradycardia and rate variability, conduction block, and blunted response to adrenergic stimulation. Mechanistically, EHD3 is critical for membrane protein trafficking, as EHD3−/− myocytes display reduced expression/localization of Na/Ca exchanger and Cav1.2 with a parallel reduction in INCX and ICa,L. Functionally, EHD3−/− myocytes show increased sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca], increased spark frequency, and reduced expression/localization of ankyrin-B, a binding partner for EHD3 and Na/Ca exchanger. Finally, we show that in vivo EHD3−/− defects are due to cardiac-specific roles of EHD3 as mice with cardiac-selective EHD3 deficiency demonstrate both structural and electrical phenotypes. Conclusions These data provide new insight into the critical role of endosome-based pathways in membrane protein targeting and cardiac physiology. EHD3 is a critical component of protein trafficking in heart and is essential for the proper membrane targeting of select cellular proteins that maintain excitability. PMID:24759929

  11. TSSC1 is novel component of the endosomal retrieval machinery

    PubMed Central

    Gershlick, David C.; Schindler, Christina; Chen, Yu; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2016-01-01

    Endosomes function as a hub for multiple protein-sorting events, including retrograde transport to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling to the plasma membrane. These processes are mediated by tubular-vesicular carriers that bud from early endosomes and fuse with a corresponding acceptor compartment. Two tethering complexes named GARP (composed of ANG2, VPS52, VPS53, and VPS54 subunits) and EARP (composed of ANG2, VPS52, VPS53, and Syndetin subunits) were previously shown to participate in SNARE-dependent fusion of endosome-derived carriers with the TGN and recycling endosomes, respectively. Little is known, however, about other proteins that function with GARP and EARP in these processes. Here we identify a protein named TSSC1 as a specific interactor of both GARP and EARP and as a novel component of the endosomal retrieval machinery. TSSC1 is a predicted WD40/β-propeller protein that coisolates with both GARP and EARP in affinity purification, immunoprecipitation, and gel filtration analyses. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows colocalization of TSSC1 with both GARP and EARP. Silencing of TSSC1 impairs transport of internalized Shiga toxin B subunit to the TGN, as well as recycling of internalized transferrin to the plasma membrane. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching shows that TSSC1 is required for efficient recruitment of GARP to the TGN. These studies thus demonstrate that TSSC1 plays a critical role in endosomal retrieval pathways as a regulator of both GARP and EARP function. PMID:27440922

  12. Endosomal recycling regulates Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8-dependent cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jingsheng; Faundez, Victor; Werner, Erica

    2010-07-15

    Mechanisms for receptor-mediated anthrax toxin internalization and delivery to the cytosol are well understood. However, far less is known about the fate followed by anthrax toxin receptors prior and after cell exposure to the toxin. We report that Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8) localized at steady state in Rab11a-positive and transferrin receptor-containing recycling endosomes. TEM8 followed a slow constitutive recycling route of approximately 30min as determined by pulsed surface biotinylation and chase experiments. A Rab11a dominant negative mutant and Myosin Vb tail expression impaired TEM8 recycling by sequestering TEM8 in intracellular compartments. Sequestration of TEM8 in intracellular compartments with monensin coincided with increased TEM8 association with a multi-protein complex isolated with antibodies against transferrin receptor. Addition of the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen, reduced TEM8 half-life from 7 to 3 hours, without preventing receptor recycling. Pharmacological and molecular perturbation of recycling endosome function using monensin, dominant negative Rab11a, or myosin Vb tail, reduced PA binding efficiency and TEM8-dependent cell spreading on PA-coated surfaces without affecting toxin delivery to the cytosol. These results indicate that the intracellular fate of TEM8 differentially affect its cell adhesion and cell intoxication functions.

  13. Tri-membrane nanoparticles produced by combining liposome fusion and a novel patchwork of bicelles to overcome endosomal and nuclear membrane barriers to cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Asako; Mitsueda, Asako; Hasan, Mahadi; Ueda, Miho; Hama, Susumu; Warashina, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-03-01

    Membrane fusion is a rational strategy for crossing intracellular membranes that present barriers to liposomal nanocarrier-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA into the nucleus of non-dividing cells, such as dendritic cells. Based on this strategy, we previously developed nanocarriers consisting of a nucleic acid core particle coated with four lipid membranes [Akita, et al., Biomaterials, 2009, 30, 2940-2949]. However, including the endosomal membrane and two nuclear membranes, cells possess three intracellular membranous barriers. Thus, after entering the nucleus, nanoparticles coated with four membranes would still have one lipid membrane remaining, and could impede cargo delivery. Until now, coating a core particle with an odd number of lipid membranes was challenging. To produce nanocarriers with an odd number of lipid membranes, we developed a novel coating method involving lipid nano-discs, also known as bicelles, as a material for packaging DNA in a carrier with an odd number of lipid membranes. In this procedure, bicelles fuse to form an outer coating that resembles a patchwork quilt, which allows the preparation of nanoparticles coated with only three lipid membranes. Moreover, the transfection activity of dendritic cells with these three-membrane nanoparticles was higher than that for nanoparticles coated with four lipid membranes. In summary, we developed novel nanoparticles coated with an odd number of lipid membranes using the novel "patchwork-packaging method" to deliver plasmid DNA into the nucleus via membrane fusion.

  14. Recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal membrane recycling system represents a dynamic conduit for sorting and re-exporting internalized membrane constituents. The recycling system is composed of multiple tubulovesicular recycling pathways that likely confer distinct trafficking pathways for individual cargoes. In addition, elements of the recycling system are responsible for assembly and maintenance of apical membrane specializations including primary cilia and apical microvilli. The existence of multiple intersecting and diverging recycling tracks likely accounts for specificity in plasma membrane recycling trafficking. PMID:26022676

  15. The Vps13p–Cdc31p complex is directly required for TGN late endosome transport and TGN homotypic fusion

    PubMed Central

    De, Mithu; Oleskie, Austin N.; Ayyash, Mariam; Dutta, Somnath; Mancour, Liliya; Brace, Eddy J.; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Yeast VPS13 is the founding member of a eukaryotic gene family of growing interest in cell biology and medicine. Mutations in three of four human VPS13 genes cause autosomal recessive neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disease, making yeast Vps13p an important structural and functional model. Using cell-free reconstitution with purified Vps13p, we show that Vps13p is directly required both for transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC) and for TGN homotypic fusion. Vps13p must be in complex with the small calcium-binding protein Cdc31p to be active. Single-particle electron microscopic analysis of negatively stained Vps13p indicates that this 358-kD protein is folded into a compact rod-shaped density (20 × 4 nm) with a loop structure at one end with a circular opening ∼6 nm in diameter. Vps13p exhibits ATP-stimulated binding to yeast membranes and specific interactions with phosphatidic acid and phosphorylated forms of phosphatidyl inositol at least in part through the binding affinities of conserved N- and C-terminal domains. PMID:28122955

  16. Membrane Tethering Complexes in the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Spang, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET) complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex. Recycling through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the Golgi associated retrograde protein (GARP) and endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, proteins that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus, it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:27243003

  17. Starvation-induced MTMR13 and RAB21 activity regulates VAMP8 to promote autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Jean, Steve; Cox, Sarah; Nassari, Sonya; Kiger, Amy A

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy, the process for recycling cytoplasm in the lysosome, depends on membrane trafficking. We previously identified Drosophila Sbf as a Rab21 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that acts with Rab21 in endosomal trafficking. Here, we show that Sbf/MTMR13 and Rab21 have conserved functions required for starvation-induced autophagy. Depletion of Sbf/MTMR13 or Rab21 blocked endolysosomal trafficking of VAMP8, a SNARE required for autophagosome-lysosome fusion. We show that starvation induces Sbf/MTMR13 GEF and RAB21 activity, as well as their induced binding to VAMP8 (or closest Drosophila homolog, Vamp7). MTMR13 is required for RAB21 activation, VAMP8 interaction and VAMP8 endolysosomal trafficking, defining a novel GEF-Rab-effector pathway. These results identify starvation-responsive endosomal regulators and trafficking that tunes membrane demands with changing autophagy status.

  18. Btn3 is a negative regulator of Btn2-mediated endosomal protein trafficking and prion curing in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kanneganti, Vydehi; Kama, Rachel; Gerst, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast Btn2 facilitates the retrieval of specific proteins from late endosomes (LEs) to the Golgi, a process that may be adversely affected in Batten disease patients. We isolated the putative yeast orthologue of a human complex I deficiency gene, designated here as BTN3, as encoding a Btn2-interacting protein and negative regulator. First, yeast overexpressing BTN3 phenocopy the deletion of BTN2 and mislocalize certain trans-Golgi proteins, like Kex2 and Yif1, to the LE and vacuole, respectively. In contrast, the deletion of BTN3 results in a tighter pattern of protein localization to the Golgi. Second, BTN3 overexpression alters Btn2 localization from the IPOD compartment, which correlates with a sharp reduction in Btn2-mediated [URE3] prion curing. Third, Btn3 and the Snc1 v-SNARE compete for the same binding domain on Btn2, and this competition controls Btn2 localization and function. The inhibitory effects upon protein retrieval and prion curing suggest that Btn3 sequesters Btn2 away from its substrates, thus down-regulating protein trafficking and aggregation. Therefore Btn3 is a novel negative regulator of intracellular protein sorting, which may be of importance in the onset of complex I deficiency and Batten disease in humans. PMID:21441304

  19. Endosomal Interactions during Root Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Rosero, Amparo; Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Voigt, Boris; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic localization of endosomal compartments labeled with targeted fluorescent protein tags is routinely followed by time lapse fluorescence microscopy approaches and single particle tracking algorithms. In this way trajectories of individual endosomes can be mapped and linked to physiological processes as cell growth. However, other aspects of dynamic behavior including endosomal interactions are difficult to follow in this manner. Therefore, we characterized the localization and dynamic properties of early and late endosomes throughout the entire course of root hair formation by means of spinning disc time lapse imaging and post-acquisition automated multitracking and quantitative analysis. Our results show differential motile behavior of early and late endosomes and interactions of late endosomes that may be specified to particular root hair domains. Detailed data analysis revealed a particular transient interaction between late endosomes—termed herein as dancing-endosomes—which is not concluding to vesicular fusion. Endosomes preferentially located in the root hair tip interacted as dancing-endosomes and traveled short distances during this interaction. Finally, sizes of early and late endosomes were addressed by means of super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to corroborate measurements on the spinning disc. This is a first study providing quantitative microscopic data on dynamic spatio-temporal interactions of endosomes during root hair tip growth. PMID:26858728

  20. Ferlins Show Tissue-Specific Expression and Segregate as Plasma Membrane/Late Endosomal or Trans-Golgi/Recycling Ferlins.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Gregory M I; Sophocleous, Reece A; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-03-01

    Ferlins are a family of transmembrane-anchored vesicle fusion proteins uniquely characterized by 5-7 tandem cytoplasmic C2 domains, Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding domains that regulate vesicle fusion in the synaptotagmin family. In humans, dysferlin mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) due to defective Ca(2+)-dependent, vesicle-mediated membrane repair and otoferlin mutations cause non-syndromic deafness due to defective Ca(2+)-triggered auditory neurotransmission. In this study, we describe the tissue-specific expression, subcellular localization and endocytic trafficking of the ferlin family. Studies of endosomal transit together with 3D-structured illumination microscopy reveals dysferlin and myoferlin are abundantly expressed at the PM and cycle to Rab7-positive late endosomes, supporting potential roles in the late-endosomal pathway. In contrast, Fer1L6 shows concentrated localization to a specific compartment of the trans-Golgi/recycling endosome, cycling rapidly between this compartment and the PM via Rab11 recycling endosomes. Otoferlin also shows trans-Golgi to PM cycling, with very low levels of PM otoferlin suggesting either brief PM residence, or rare incorporation of otoferlin molecules into the PM. Thus, type-I and type-II ferlins segregate as PM/late-endosomal or trans-Golgi/recycling ferlins, consistent with different ferlins mediating vesicle fusion events in specific subcellular locations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Characterization of the Mammalian CORVET and HOPS Complexes and Their Modular Restructuring for Endosome Specificity.

    PubMed

    van der Kant, Rik; Jonker, Caspar T H; Wijdeven, Ruud H; Bakker, Jeroen; Janssen, Lennert; Klumperman, Judith; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-12-18

    Trafficking of cargo through the endosomal system depends on endosomal fusion events mediated by SNARE proteins, Rab-GTPases, and multisubunit tethering complexes. The CORVET and HOPS tethering complexes, respectively, regulate early and late endosomal tethering and have been characterized in detail in yeast where their sequential membrane targeting and assembly is well understood. Mammalian CORVET and HOPS subunits significantly differ from their yeast homologues, and novel proteins with high homology to CORVET/HOPS subunits have evolved. However, an analysis of the molecular interactions between these subunits in mammals is lacking. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of interactions within the mammalian CORVET and HOPS as well as an additional endosomal-targeting complex (VIPAS39-VPS33B) that does not exist in yeast. We show that core interactions within CORVET and HOPS are largely conserved but that the membrane-targeting module in HOPS has significantly changed to accommodate binding to mammalian-specific RAB7 interacting lysosomal protein (RILP). Arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome-associated mutations in VPS33B selectively disrupt recruitment to late endosomes by RILP or binding to its partner VIPAS39. Within the shared core of CORVET/HOPS, we find that VPS11 acts as a molecular switch that binds either CORVET-specific TGFBRAP1 or HOPS-specific VPS39/RILP thereby allowing selective targeting of these tethering complexes to early or late endosomes to time fusion events in the endo/lysosomal pathway.

  2. Kinetic timing: a novel mechanism that improves the accuracy of GTPase timers in endosome fusion and other biological processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangpu; Qian, Hong

    2002-04-01

    The GTPase superfamily contains a large number of proteins that function as molecular switches by binding and hydrolyzing GTP molecules. They are localized at various intracellular organelles and control diverse cellular processes. For many GTPases, the lifetime of the activated, GTP-bound state is believed to serve as a timer in determining the activation time of a biological event such as membrane fusion and signal transduction. However, such a timer is intrinsically stochastic due to thermal noise at the level of single GTPase molecules. Here, we describe a mathematical model that shows how a directional GTPase cycle, in a nonequilibrium steady-state driven by GTP hydrolysis, can significantly reduce the variance in the lifetime of an activated GTPase molecule and thereby increase the accuracy and efficiency of the timer. This mechanism, termed kinetic timing, articulates a clear function for the energy consumption in GTPase-controlled biological processes. It provides a rationale for why biological timers utilize a GTP hydrolysis cycle rather than a simple GTP binding-dissociation equilibrium, and why the GTP-bound state is a better timer than the GDP-bound state. It also explains the necessity for the existence of multiple GTP-bound intermediates identified by fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

  3. GIPC Is Recruited by APPL to Peripheral TrkA Endosomes and Regulates TrkA Trafficking and Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Varsano, Tal; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Niesman, Ingrid; Gacula, Hyacynth; Lou, Xiaojing; Ma, Tianlin; Testa, Joseph R.; Yates, John R.; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2006-01-01

    GIPC is a PDZ protein located on peripheral endosomes that binds to the juxtamembrane region of the TrkA nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor and has been implicated in NGF signaling. We establish here that endogenous GIPC binds to the C terminus of APPL, a Rab5 binding protein, which is a marker for signaling endosomes. When PC12(615) cells are treated with either NGF or antibody agonists to activate TrkA, GIPC and APPL translocate from the cytoplasm and bind to incoming, endocytic vesicles carrying TrkA concentrated at the tips of the cell processes. GIPC, but not APPL, dissociates from these peripheral endosomes prior to or during their trafficking from the cell periphery to the juxtanuclear region, where they acquire EEA1. GIPC's interaction with APPL is essential for recruitment of GIPC to peripheral endosomes and for TrkA signaling, because a GIPC PDZ domain mutant that cannot bind APPL or APPL knockdown with small interfering RNA inhibits NGF-induced GIPC recruitment, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and neurite outgrowth. GIPC is also required for efficient endocytosis and trafficking of TrkA because depletion of GIPC slows down endocytosis and trafficking of TrkA and APPL to the early EEA1 endosomes in the juxtanuclear region. We conclude that GIPC, following its recruitment to TrkA by APPL, plays a key role in TrkA trafficking and signaling from endosomes. PMID:17015470

  4. GIPC is recruited by APPL to peripheral TrkA endosomes and regulates TrkA trafficking and signaling.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Tal; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Niesman, Ingrid; Gacula, Hyacynth; Lou, Xiaojing; Ma, Tianlin; Testa, Joseph R; Yates, John R; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2006-12-01

    GIPC is a PDZ protein located on peripheral endosomes that binds to the juxtamembrane region of the TrkA nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor and has been implicated in NGF signaling. We establish here that endogenous GIPC binds to the C terminus of APPL, a Rab5 binding protein, which is a marker for signaling endosomes. When PC12(615) cells are treated with either NGF or antibody agonists to activate TrkA, GIPC and APPL translocate from the cytoplasm and bind to incoming, endocytic vesicles carrying TrkA concentrated at the tips of the cell processes. GIPC, but not APPL, dissociates from these peripheral endosomes prior to or during their trafficking from the cell periphery to the juxtanuclear region, where they acquire EEA1. GIPC's interaction with APPL is essential for recruitment of GIPC to peripheral endosomes and for TrkA signaling, because a GIPC PDZ domain mutant that cannot bind APPL or APPL knockdown with small interfering RNA inhibits NGF-induced GIPC recruitment, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and neurite outgrowth. GIPC is also required for efficient endocytosis and trafficking of TrkA because depletion of GIPC slows down endocytosis and trafficking of TrkA and APPL to the early EEA1 endosomes in the juxtanuclear region. We conclude that GIPC, following its recruitment to TrkA by APPL, plays a key role in TrkA trafficking and signaling from endosomes.

  5. Vicenistatin induces early endosome-derived vacuole formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yuko; Ohmichi, Tomohiro; Kazami, Sayaka; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Mano, Kousuke; Nagumo, Yoko; Kudo, Fumitaka; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Kanoh, Naoki; Eguchi, Tadashi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Usui, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Homotypic fusion of early endosomes is important for efficient protein trafficking and sorting. The key controller of this process is Rab5 which regulates several effectors and PtdInsPs levels, but whose mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that vicenistatin, a natural product, enhanced homotypic fusion of early endosomes and induced the formation of large vacuole-like structures in mammalian cells. Unlike YM201636, another early endosome vacuolating compound, vicenistatin did not inhibit PIKfyve activity in vitro but activated Rab5-PAS pathway in cells. Furthermore, vicenistatin increased the membrane surface fluidity of cholesterol-containing liposomes in vitro, and cholesterol deprivation from the plasma membrane stimulated vicenistatin-induced vacuolation in cells. These results suggest that vicenistatin is a novel compound that induces the formation of vacuole-like structures by activating Rab5-PAS pathway and increasing membrane fluidity.

  6. Regulation of cell-cell fusion by nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Augelli, Michael J.; Cheung, Bettina; Kinser, Emily R.; Cleary, Barnett; Kumar, Priyanka; Wang, Renhao; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Li, Rui; Schwarz, Udo D.; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion is fundamental to a multitude of biological processes ranging from cell differentiation and embryogenesis to cancer metastasis and biomaterial-tissue interactions. Fusogenic cells are exposed to biochemical and biophysical factors, which could potentially alter cell behavior. While biochemical inducers of fusion such as cytokines and kinases have been identified, little is known about the biophysical regulation of cell-cell fusion. Here, we designed experiments to examine cell-cell fusion using bulk metallic glass (BMG) nanorod arrays with varying biophysical cues, i.e. nanotopography and stiffness. Through independent variation of stiffness and topography, we found that nanotopography constitutes the primary biophysical cue that can override biochemical signals to attenuate fusion. Specifically, nanotopography restricts cytoskeletal remodeling-associated signaling, which leads to reduced fusion. This finding expands our fundamental understanding of the nanoscale biophysical regulation of cell fusion and can be exploited in biomaterials design to induce desirable biomaterial-tissue interactions. PMID:27615159

  7. Regulation of cell-cell fusion by nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Augelli, Michael J.; Cheung, Bettina; Kinser, Emily R.; Cleary, Barnett; Kumar, Priyanka; Wang, Renhao; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Li, Rui; Schwarz, Udo D.; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-09-01

    Cell-cell fusion is fundamental to a multitude of biological processes ranging from cell differentiation and embryogenesis to cancer metastasis and biomaterial-tissue interactions. Fusogenic cells are exposed to biochemical and biophysical factors, which could potentially alter cell behavior. While biochemical inducers of fusion such as cytokines and kinases have been identified, little is known about the biophysical regulation of cell-cell fusion. Here, we designed experiments to examine cell-cell fusion using bulk metallic glass (BMG) nanorod arrays with varying biophysical cues, i.e. nanotopography and stiffness. Through independent variation of stiffness and topography, we found that nanotopography constitutes the primary biophysical cue that can override biochemical signals to attenuate fusion. Specifically, nanotopography restricts cytoskeletal remodeling-associated signaling, which leads to reduced fusion. This finding expands our fundamental understanding of the nanoscale biophysical regulation of cell fusion and can be exploited in biomaterials design to induce desirable biomaterial-tissue interactions.

  8. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration.

  9. Novel Regulation of Ski Protein Stability and Endosomal Sorting by Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R.; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A.; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration. PMID:25561741

  10. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs) transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localises with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage-independence and metastasis. Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors functioning as integrators of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) driven cues, the cellular cytoskeleton and the cellular signalling apparatus 1.Upon adhesion, integrins trigger the formation of plasma-membrane proximal large mechanosensing and signal-transmitting protein clusters depicted as “adhesomes” 2, 3. In addition, integrins undergo constant endocytic traffic to facilitate focal adhesion turnover, cell migration, invasion and cytokinesis 4. For other receptor systems it is well established that endocytic membrane traffic regulates bioavailability of cell-surface molecules and therefore the intensity and/or specificity of receptor-initiated signals 5, 6. Although active integrins and their ligands have been detected in endosomes 7–9 and increased integrin recycling to the plasma membrane contributes

  11. Protein Kinase Cδ and Calmodulin Regulate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Recycling from Early Endosomes through Arp2/3 Complex and Cortactin

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Anna; Timpson, Paul; Vilà de Muga, Sandra; Moretó, Jemina; Pol, Albert; Grewal, Thomas; Daly, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The intracellular trafficking of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is regulated by a cross-talk between calmodulin (CaM) and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ). On inhibition of CaM, PKCδ promotes the formation of enlarged early endosomes and blocks EGFR recycling and degradation. Here, we show that PKCδ impairs EGFR trafficking due to the formation of an F-actin coat surrounding early endosomes. The PKCδ-induced polymerization of actin is orchestrated by the Arp2/3 complex and requires the interaction of cortactin with PKCδ. Accordingly, inhibition of actin polymerization by using cytochalasin D or by overexpression of active cofilin, restored the normal morphology of the organelle and the recycling of EGFR. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation of cortactin and the sequestration of the Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore we demonstrate an interaction of cortactin with CaM and PKCδ, the latter being dependent on CaM inhibition. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that CaM and PKCδ organize actin dynamics in the early endosomal compartment, thereby regulating the intracellular trafficking of EGFR. PMID:17959830

  12. PI(4,5)P2 regulates myoblast fusion through Arp2/3 regulator localization at the fusion site

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Ingo; Deng, Su; Baylies, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion is a regulated process that requires merging of the opposing membranes and underlying cytoskeletons. However, the integration between membrane and cytoskeleton signaling during fusion is not known. Using Drosophila, we demonstrate that the membrane phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2 is a crucial regulator of F-actin dynamics during myoblast fusion. PI(4,5)P2 is locally enriched and colocalizes spatially and temporally with the F-actin focus that defines the fusion site. PI(4,5)P2 enrichment depends on receptor engagement but is upstream or parallel to actin remodeling. Regulators of actin branching via Arp2/3 colocalize with PI(4,5)P2 in vivo and bind PI(4,5)P2 in vitro. Manipulation of PI(4,5)P2 availability leads to impaired fusion, with a reduction in the F-actin focus size and altered focus morphology. Mechanistically, the changes in the actin focus are due to a failure in the enrichment of actin regulators at the fusion site. Moreover, improper localization of these regulators hinders expansion of the fusion interface. Thus, PI(4,5)P2 enrichment at the fusion site encodes spatial and temporal information that regulates fusion progression through the localization of activators of actin polymerization. PMID:24821989

  13. Mitochondrial fusion and division: Regulation and role in cell viability.

    PubMed

    Benard, Giovanni; Karbowski, Mariusz

    2009-05-01

    Discovery of various molecular components regulating dynamics and organization of the mitochondria in cells, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and division in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, have provided some of the most exciting breakthroughs in the last decade of mitochondrial research. The focus of this review is on the regulation of mitochondrial fusion and division machineries. The newly identified factors associated with mitofusin/OPA1-dependent mitochondrial fusion, and Drp1-dependent mitochondrial division are discussed. Furthermore, the most recent findings on the role of mitochondrial fusion and division in the maintenance of cell function are also reviewed here in some detail.

  14. In AtT20 and HeLa cells brefeldin A induces the fusion of tubular endosomes and changes their distribution and some of their endocytic properties

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the effects of brefeldin A (BFA) on the tubular endosomes in AtT20 and HeLa cells (Tooze, J., and M. Hollinshead. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 115:635-653) by electron microscopy of cells labeled with three endocytic tracers, HRP, BSA-gold, and transferrin conjugated to HRP, and by immunofluorescence microscopy. For the latter we used antibodies specific for transferrin receptor, and, in the case of AtT20 cells, also antibodies specific for synaptophysin. In HeLa cells BFA at concentrations ranging from 1 micrograms to 10 micrograms/ml causes the dispersed patches of network of preexisting tubular early endosomes to be incorporated within 5 min into tubules approximately 50 nm in diameter but up to 40-50 microns long. These long, straight tubular endosomes are aligned along microtubules; they branch relatively infrequently to form an open network or reticulum extending from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC). As the incubation with BFA is prolonged beyond 5 min, a steady state is reached in which many tubules are located in a dense network enclosing the centrioles, with branches extending in a more open network to the periphery. This effect of BFA, which is fully reversed within 15-30 min of washing out, is inhibited by pre-incubating the cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In AtT20 cells BFA at 5 micrograms/ml or above causes the same sorts of changes, preexisting tubular endosomes are recruited into a more continuous endosomal network, and there is a massive accumulation of this network around the MTOC. Maintenance of the BFA-induced endosomal reticulum in both cell types is dependent upon the integrity of microtubules. In AtT20 cells BFA at 1 microgram/ml has no detectable effect on the early endosomal system but the Golgi stacks are converted to clusters of tubules and vesicles that remain in the region of the MTOC during prolonged incubations. Therefore, the Golgi apparatus in these cells is more sensitive to BFA

  15. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex through FIP3/Arfophilin-1-dependent Endosomal Trafficking of N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During neural development, endosomal trafficking controls cell shape and motility through the polarized transport of membrane proteins related to cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a critical small GTPase that regulates membrane trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomes. We herein demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Arf6 in mouse cerebral cortices led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin and syntaxin12 in migrating neurons. Rescue experiments with separation-of-function Arf6 mutants identified Rab11 family-interacting protein 3 (FIP3)/Arfophilin-1, a dual effector for Arf6 and Rab11, as a downstream effector of Arf6 in migrating neurons. The knockdown of FIP3 led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin in migrating neurons, similar to that of Arf6, which could be rescued by the coexpression of wild-type FIP3 but not FIP3 mutants lacking the binding site for Arf6 or Rab11. These results suggest that Arf6 regulates cortical neuronal migration in the intermediate zone through the FIP3-dependent endosomal trafficking. PMID:27622210

  16. Regulation of cargo transfer between ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I complexes by flotillin-1 during endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated cargo

    PubMed Central

    Meister, M; Bänfer, S; Gärtner, U; Koskimies, J; Amaddii, M; Jacob, R; Tikkanen, R

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent sorting of membrane proteins in endosomes directs them to lysosomal degradation. In the case of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), lysosomal degradation is important for the regulation of downstream signalling. Ubiquitinated proteins are recognised in endosomes by the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) complexes, which sequentially interact with the ubiquitinated cargo. Although the role of each ESCRT complex in sorting is well established, it is not clear how the cargo is passed on from one ESCRT to the next. We here show that flotillin-1 is required for EGFR degradation, and that it interacts with the subunits of ESCRT-0 and -I complexes (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) and Tsg101). Flotillin-1 is required for cargo recognition and sorting by ESCRT-0/Hrs and for its interaction with Tsg101. In addition, flotillin-1 is also required for the sorting of human immunodeficiency virus 1 Gag polyprotein, which mimics ESCRT-0 complex during viral assembly. We propose that flotillin-1 functions in cargo transfer between ESCRT-0 and -I complexes. PMID:28581508

  17. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Helm, Martin S.

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  18. SCARB2/LIMP-2 Regulates IFN Production of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by Mediating Endosomal Translocation of TLR9 and Nuclear Translocation of IRF7

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Jialong; Zhang, Xuyuan; Wang, Yanbing; Yu, Haisheng; Yin, Xiangyun; Li, Jingyun; Du, Peishuang; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Chen, Jianzhu; Su, Lishan; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) is essential for endosome biogenesis and reorganization and serves as a receptor for both β-glucocerebrosidase and enterovirus 71. However, little is known about its function in innate immune cells. In this study, we show that, among human peripheral blood cells, SCARB2 is most highly expressed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), and its expression is further upregulated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulation. Knockdown of SCARB2 in pDC cell line GEN2.2 dramatically reduces CpG-induced type I IFN production. Detailed studies reveal that SCARB2 localizes in late endosome/lysosome of pDCs, and knockdown of SCARB2 does not affect CpG oligodeoxynucleotide uptake but results in the retention of TLR9 in the endoplasmic reticulum and an impaired nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 7. The IFN-I production by TLR7 ligand stimulation is also impaired by SCARB2 knockdown. However, SCARB2 is not essential for influenza virus or HSV-induced IFN-I production. These findings suggest that SCARB2 regulates TLR9-dependent IFN-I production of pDCs by mediating endosomal translocation of TLR9 and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 7. PMID:25862818

  19. The Arf6 GTPase-activating Proteins ARAP2 and ACAP1 Define Distinct Endosomal Compartments That Regulate Integrin α5β1 Traffic*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Luo, Ruibai; Jian, Xiaoying; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Arf6 and the Arf6 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) ACAP1 are established regulators of integrin traffic important to cell adhesion and migration. However, the function of Arf6 with ACAP1 cannot explain the range of Arf6 effects on integrin-based structures. We propose that Arf6 has different functions determined, in part, by the associated Arf GAP. We tested this idea by comparing the Arf6 GAPs ARAP2 and ACAP1. We found that ARAP2 and ACAP1 had opposing effects on apparent integrin β1 internalization. ARAP2 knockdown slowed, whereas ACAP1 knockdown accelerated, integrin β1 internalization. Integrin β1 association with adaptor protein containing a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and leucine zipper motif (APPL)-positive endosomes and EEA1-positive endosomes was affected by ARAP2 knockdown and depended on ARAP2 GAP activity. ARAP2 formed a complex with APPL1 and colocalized with Arf6 and APPL in a compartment distinct from the Arf6/ACAP1 tubular recycling endosome. In addition, although ACAP1 and ARAP2 each colocalized with Arf6, they did not colocalize with each other and had opposing effects on focal adhesions (FAs). ARAP2 overexpression promoted large FAs, but ACAP1 overexpression reduced FAs. Taken together, the data support a model in which Arf6 has at least two sites of opposing action defined by distinct Arf6 GAPs. PMID:25225293

  20. Spatial Regulation of Membrane Fusion Controlled by Modification of Phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Fabrice; Byrne, Richard D.; Vincent, Ben; Hobday, Tina M. C.; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2010-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in many cell processes from vesicular transport to nuclear envelope reconstitution at mitosis but the mechanisms that underlie fusion of natural membranes are not well understood. Studies with synthetic membranes and theoretical considerations indicate that accumulation of lipids characterised by negative curvature such as diacylglycerol (DAG) facilitate fusion. However, the specific role of lipids in membrane fusion of natural membranes is not well established. Nuclear envelope (NE) assembly was used as a model for membrane fusion. A natural membrane population highly enriched in the enzyme and substrate needed to produce DAG has been isolated and is required for fusions leading to nuclear envelope formation, although it contributes only a small amount of the membrane eventually incorporated into the NE. It was postulated to initiate and regulate membrane fusion. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach including subcellular membrane purification, fluorescence spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to demonstrate that initiation of vesicle fusion arises from two unique sites where these vesicles bind to chromatin. Fusion is subsequently propagated to the endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranes that make up the bulk of the NE to ultimately enclose the chromatin. We show how initiation of multiple vesicle fusions can be controlled by localised production of DAG and propagated bidirectionally. Phospholipase C (PLCγ), GTP hydrolysis and (phosphatidylinsositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) are required for the latter process. We discuss the general implications of membrane fusion regulation and spatial control utilising such a mechanism. PMID:20808914

  1. Late Endosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Leads to Impaired Intra-Endosomal Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sobo, Komla; Le Blanc, Isabelle; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Fivaz, Marc; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G.; Gruenberg, Jean; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2007-01-01

    Background Pathological accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes is observed in lysosomal storage diseases such as Niemann-Pick type C. We here analyzed the effects of cholesterol accumulation in NPC cells, or as phenocopied by the drug U18666A, on late endosomes membrane organization and dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings Cholesterol accumulation did not lead to an increase in the raft to non-raft membrane ratio as anticipated. Strikingly, we observed a 2–3 fold increase in the size of the compartment. Most importantly, properties and dynamics of late endosomal intralumenal vesicles were altered as revealed by reduced late endosomal vacuolation induced by the mutant pore-forming toxin ASSP, reduced intoxication by the anthrax lethal toxin and inhibition of infection by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that back fusion of intralumenal vesicles with the limiting membrane of late endosomes is dramatically perturbed upon cholesterol accumulation. PMID:17786222

  2. Late endosomal cholesterol accumulation leads to impaired intra-endosomal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sobo, Komla; Le Blanc, Isabelle; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Fivaz, Marc; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2007-09-05

    Pathological accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes is observed in lysosomal storage diseases such as Niemann-Pick type C. We here analyzed the effects of cholesterol accumulation in NPC cells, or as phenocopied by the drug U18666A, on late endosomes membrane organization and dynamics. Cholesterol accumulation did not lead to an increase in the raft to non-raft membrane ratio as anticipated. Strikingly, we observed a 2-3 fold increase in the size of the compartment. Most importantly, properties and dynamics of late endosomal intralumenal vesicles were altered as revealed by reduced late endosomal vacuolation induced by the mutant pore-forming toxin ASSP, reduced intoxication by the anthrax lethal toxin and inhibition of infection by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. These results suggest that back fusion of intralumenal vesicles with the limiting membrane of late endosomes is dramatically perturbed upon cholesterol accumulation.

  3. ESCRT-0 complex modulates Rbf-mutant cell survival by regulating Rhomboid endosomal trafficking and EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhentao; Yu, Lijia; Zhang, Tianyi; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Zhihua; Du, Wei

    2016-05-15

    The Rb tumor suppressor is conserved in Drosophila, and its inactivation can lead to cell proliferation or death depending on the specific cellular context. Therefore, identifying genes that affect the survival of Rb-mutant cells can potentially identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. From a genetic screen in Drosophila, we identified synthetic lethal interactions between mutations of fly Rb (rbf) and the ESCRT-0 components stam and hrs We show that inactivation of ESCRT-0 sensitizes rbf-mutant cells to undergo apoptosis through inhibition of EGFR signaling and accumulation of Hid protein. Mutation of stam inhibits EGFR signaling upstream of secreted Spi and downstream of Rhomboid expression, and causes Rhomboid protein to accumulate in the abnormal endosomes labeled with both the early and late endosomal markers Rab5 and Rab7. These results reveal that ESCRT-0 mutants inhibit EGFR signaling by disrupting Rhomboid endosomal trafficking in the ligand-producing cells. Because ESCRT-0 also plays crucial roles in EGFR downregulation after ligand binding, this study provides new insights into how loss of ESCRT-0 function can either increase or decrease EGFR signaling.

  4. Rab Proteins and the Compartmentalization of the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Zerial, Marino

    2014-01-01

    Of the approximately 70 human Rab GTPases, nearly three-quarters are involved in endocytic trafficking. Significant plasticity in endosomal membrane transport pathways is closely coupled to receptor signaling and Rab GTPase-regulated scaffolds. Here we review current literature pertaining to endocytic Rab GTPase localizations, functions, and coordination with regulatory proteins and effectors. The roles of Rab GTPases in (1) compartmentalization of the endocytic pathway into early, recycling, late, and lysosomal routes; (2) coordination of individual transport steps from vesicle budding to fusion; (3) effector interactomes; and (4) integration of GTPase and signaling cascades are discussed. PMID:25341920

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum–endosome contact increases as endosomes traffic and mature

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; DiBenedetto, Jared R.; West, Matthew; Rowland, Ashley A.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2013-01-01

    The endosomal pathway is responsible for plasma membrane cargo uptake, sorting, and, in many cases, lysosome targeting. Endosome maturation is complex, requiring proper spatiotemporal recruitment of factors that regulate the size, maturity, and positioning of endosomal compartments. In animal cells, it also requires trafficking of endosomes on microtubules. Recent work has revealed the presence of contact sites between some endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although these contact sites are believed to have multiple functions, the frequency, dynamics, and physical attributes of these contacts are poorly understood. Here we use high-resolution three-dimensional electron microscopy to reveal that ER tubules wrap around endosomes and find that both organelles contact microtubules at or near membrane contact sites. As endosomes traffic, they remain bound to the ER, which causes the tubular ER to rearrange its structure around dynamic endosomes at contact sites. Finally, as endosomes transition through steps of maturation, they become more tightly associated with the ER. The major implication of these results is that endosomes mature and traffic while coupled to the ER membrane rather than in isolation. PMID:23389631

  6. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  7. Clathrin assembly protein CALM plays a critical role in KIT signaling by regulating its cellular transport from early to late endosomes in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shinya; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Mai; Ogoh, Honami; Taniguchi, Yasuhiro; Morita, Yasuyoshi; Shimada, Takahiro; Tanimura, Akira; Matsui, Keiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Oritani, Kenji; Tanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Matsumura, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    CALM is implicated in the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles, which mediate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of growth factor receptors and nutrients. We previously found that CALM-deficient mice suffer from severe anemia due to the impaired clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor in immature erythroblast. However, CALM has been supposed to regulate the growth and survival of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. So, in this study, we focused on the function of CALM in these cells. We here show that the number of Linage-Sca-1+KIT+ (LSK) cells decreased in the fetal liver of CALM-/- mice. Also, colony forming activity was impaired in CALM-/- LSK cells. In addition, SCF, FLT3, and TPO-dependent growth was severely impaired in CALM-/- LSK cells, while they can normally proliferate in response to IL-3 and IL-6. We also examined the intracellular trafficking of KIT using CALM-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) engineered to express KIT. At first, we confirmed that endocytosis of SCF-bound KIT was not impaired in CALM-/- MEFs by the internalization assay. However, SCF-induced KIT trafficking from early to late endosome was severely impaired in CALM-/- MEFs. As a result, although intracellular KIT disappeared 30 min after SCF stimulation in wild-type (WT) MEFs, it was retained in CALM-/- MEFs. Furthermore, SCF-induced phosphorylation of cytosolic KIT was enhanced and prolonged in CALM-/- MEFs compared with that in WT MEFs, leading to the excessive activation of Akt. Similar hyperactivation of Akt was observed in CALM-/- KIT+ cells. These results indicate that CALM is essential for the intracellular trafficking of KIT and its normal functions. Also, our data demonstrate that KIT located in the early endosome can activate downstream molecules as a signaling endosome. Because KIT activation is involved in the pathogenesis of some malignancies, the manipulation of CALM function would be an attractive therapeutic strategy.

  8. Conformational Changes in the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for the Transport III Subunit Ist1 Lead to Distinct Modes of ATPase Vps4 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jason; Davies, Brian A; Payne, Johanna A; Benson, Linda M; Katzmann, David J

    2015-12-11

    Intralumenal vesicle formation of the multivesicular body is a critical step in the delivery of endocytic cargoes to the lysosome for degradation. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) subunits polymerize on endosomal membranes to facilitate membrane budding away from the cytoplasm to generate these intralumenal vesicles. The ATPase Vps4 remodels and disassembles ESCRT-III, but the manner in which Vps4 activity is coordinated with ESCRT-III function remains unclear. Ist1 is structurally homologous to ESCRT-III subunits and has been reported to inhibit Vps4 function despite the presence of a microtubule-interacting and trafficking domain-interacting motif (MIM) capable of stimulating Vps4 in the context of other ESCRT-III subunits. Here we report that Ist1 inhibition of Vps4 ATPase activity involves two elements in Ist1: the MIM itself and a surface containing a conserved ELYC sequence. In contrast, the MIM interaction, in concert with a more open conformation of the Ist1 core, resulted in stimulation of Vps4. Addition of the ESCRT-III subunit binding partner of Ist1, Did2, also converted Ist1 from an inhibitor to a stimulator of Vps4 ATPase activity. Finally, distinct regulation of Vps4 by Ist1 corresponded with altered ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro. Together, these data support a model in which Ist1-Did2 interactions during ESCRT-III polymerization coordinate Vps4 activity with the timing of ESCRT-III disassembly.

  9. Modulation of Endosomal Escape of IRQ-PEGylated Nano-carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudhakir, Diky; Akita, Hidetaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2011-12-01

    The novel IRQ peptide is one of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) that has ability to induce endosomal escape. It has been demonstrated that IRQ ligand had ability to facilitate an escape of liposomes encapsulating siRNA from the endosomes presumably by fusion-independent mechanism [1,2]. In the present study, we attempted to modulate the intracellular trafficking of IRQ-modified nano-carrier in term of escaping process by changing the lipid composition. The peptide was attached to the terminal end of maleimide group of polyethylene glycol-modified liposomes (IRQ-PEG-Lip). The liposomes were composed of DOTAP, DOPE and cholesterol and it was labeled by water soluble sulpho-rhodamine B (Sr-B). The escape of PEG-coated liposomes was then observed by confocal laser scanning microscope after the endosomes were stained with Lysosensor. The results exhibited that IRQ-PEG-Lip was escaped from endosomal compartment after 1 h transfection when 40% of DOPE was incorporated into the nanostructure comparing to that of PEG-Lip. These results are consistent with the previous results that the IRQ facilitates endosomal escape via independent-mechanism. However, IRQ-PEG-Lip were then completely co-localized in the acidic compartment when density of DOPE was reduced approximately 20%. These results indicated that the utilizing of DOPE is important for the escape process even in the presence of hydrophilic PEG polymer. In conclusion, the regulation of endosomal escape ability of the PEGylated-IRQ nano-carrier was induced by fusion-independent manner as well as fusogenic lipid.

  10. Redistribution of Endosomal Membranes to the African Swine Fever Virus Replication Site.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Galindo, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection causes endosomal reorganization. Here, we show that the virus causes endosomal congregation close to the nucleus as the infection progresses, which is necessary to build a compact viral replication organelle. ASFV enters the cell by the endosomal pathway and reaches multivesicular late endosomes. Upon uncoating and fusion, the virus should exit to the cytosol to start replication. ASFV remodels endosomal traffic and redistributes endosomal membranes to the viral replication site. Virus replication also depends on endosomal membrane phosphoinositides (PtdIns) synthesized by PIKfyve. Endosomes could act as platforms providing membranes and PtdIns, necessary for ASFV replication. Our study has revealed that ASFV reorganizes endosome dynamics, in order to ensure a productive infection.

  11. Redistribution of Endosomal Membranes to the African Swine Fever Virus Replication Site

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Galindo, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection causes endosomal reorganization. Here, we show that the virus causes endosomal congregation close to the nucleus as the infection progresses, which is necessary to build a compact viral replication organelle. ASFV enters the cell by the endosomal pathway and reaches multivesicular late endosomes. Upon uncoating and fusion, the virus should exit to the cytosol to start replication. ASFV remodels endosomal traffic and redistributes endosomal membranes to the viral replication site. Virus replication also depends on endosomal membrane phosphoinositides (PtdIns) synthesized by PIKfyve. Endosomes could act as platforms providing membranes and PtdIns, necessary for ASFV replication. Our study has revealed that ASFV reorganizes endosome dynamics, in order to ensure a productive infection. PMID:28587154

  12. Role of TSPAN9 in Alphavirus Entry and Early Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Katie M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alphaviruses are small enveloped RNA viruses that infect cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and low-pH-triggered fusion in the early endosome. Using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in human cells, we previously identified TSPAN9 as a host factor that promotes infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus (SINV), Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Depletion of TSPAN9 specifically decreases SFV membrane fusion in endosomes. TSPAN9 is a member of the tetraspanin family of multipass membrane proteins, but its cellular function is currently unknown. Here we used U-2 OS cells stably overexpressing TSPAN9 to show that TSPAN9 is localized at the plasma membrane and in early and late endosomes. Internalized SFV particles colocalized with TSPAN9 in vesicles early during infection. Depletion of TSPAN9 led to reductions in the amounts of the late endosomal proteins LAMP1 and CD63 and an increase in the amount of LAMP2. However, TSPAN9 depletion did not alter the delivery of SFV to early endosomes or change their pH or protease activity. Comparative studies showed that TSPAN9 depletion strongly inhibited infection by several viruses that fuse in early endosomes (SFV, SINV, CHIKV, and vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]), while viruses that fuse in the late endosome (recombinant VSV-Lassa and VSV-Junin), including an SFV point mutant with a lower pH threshold for fusion (SFV E2 T12I), were relatively resistant. Our data suggest that TSPAN9 modulates the early endosome compartment to make it more permissive for membrane fusion of early-penetrating viruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses are spread by mosquitoes and can cause serious human diseases such as arthritis and encephalitis. Recent outbreaks of CHIKV infection are responsible for millions of cases of acute illness and long-term complications. There are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for these important human pathogens. Alphaviruses infect host cells by utilizing the endocytic

  13. Cytoplasmic dynein and early endosome transport

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xin; Qiu, Rongde; Yao, Xuanli; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule-based distribution of organelles/vesicles is crucial for the function of many types of eukaryotic cells and the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein is required for transporting a variety of cellular cargos toward the microtubule minus ends. Early endosomes represent a major cargo of dynein in filamentous fungi, and dynein regulators such as LIS1 and the dynactin complex are both required for early endosome movement. In fungal hyphae, kinesin-3 and dynein drive bi-directional movements of early endosomes. Dynein accumulates at microtubule plus ends; this accumulation depends on kinesin-1 and dynactin, and it is important for early endosome movements towards the microtubule minus ends. The physical interaction between dynein and early endosome requires the dynactin complex, and in particular, its p25 component. The FTS-Hook-FHIP (FHF) complex links dynein-dynactin to early endosomes, and within the FHF complex, Hook interacts with dynein-dynactin, and Hook-early endosome interaction depends on FHIP and FTS. PMID:26001903

  14. MiR-153 Regulates Amelogenesis by Targeting Endocytotic and Endosomal/lysosomal Pathways–Novel Insight into the Origins of Enamel Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lin, Wenting; Guo, Jing; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Snead, Malcolm L.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Paine, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is group of inherited disorders resulting in enamel pathologies. The involvement of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of AI is yet to be clarified due to a lack of knowledge about amelogenesis. Our previous genome-wide microRNA and mRNA transcriptome analyses suggest a key role for miR-153 in endosome/lysosome-related pathways during amelogenesis. Here we show that miR-153 is significantly downregulated in maturation ameloblasts compared with secretory ameloblasts. Within ameloblast-like cells, upregulation of miR-153 results in the downregulation of its predicted targets including Cltc, Lamp1, Clcn4 and Slc4a4, and a number of miRNAs implicated in endocytotic pathways. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the predicted interactions between miR-153 and the 3′-UTRs of Cltc, Lamp1 (in a prior study), Clcn4 and Slc4a4. In an enamel protein intake assay, enamel cells transfected with miR-153 show a decreased ability to endocytose enamel proteins. Finally, microinjection of miR-153 in the region of mouse first mandibular molar at postnatal day 8 (PN8) induced AI-like pathologies when the enamel development reached maturity (PN12). In conclusion, miR-153 regulates maturation-stage amelogenesis by targeting key genes involved in the endocytotic and endosomal/lysosomal pathways, and disruption of miR-153 expression is a potential candidate etiologic factor contributing to the occurrence of AI. PMID:28287144

  15. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  16. Clathrin Assembly Protein CALM Plays a Critical Role in KIT Signaling by Regulating Its Cellular Transport from Early to Late Endosomes in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shinya; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Mai; Ogoh, Honami; Taniguchi, Yasuhiro; Morita, Yasuyoshi; Shimada, Takahiro; Tanimura, Akira; Matsui, Keiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Oritani, Kenji; Tanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Matsumura, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    CALM is implicated in the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles, which mediate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of growth factor receptors and nutrients. We previously found that CALM-deficient mice suffer from severe anemia due to the impaired clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor in immature erythroblast. However, CALM has been supposed to regulate the growth and survival of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. So, in this study, we focused on the function of CALM in these cells. We here show that the number of Linage−Sca-1+KIT+ (LSK) cells decreased in the fetal liver of CALM−/− mice. Also, colony forming activity was impaired in CALM−/− LSK cells. In addition, SCF, FLT3, and TPO-dependent growth was severely impaired in CALM−/− LSK cells, while they can normally proliferate in response to IL-3 and IL-6. We also examined the intracellular trafficking of KIT using CALM−/− murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) engineered to express KIT. At first, we confirmed that endocytosis of SCF-bound KIT was not impaired in CALM−/− MEFs by the internalization assay. However, SCF-induced KIT trafficking from early to late endosome was severely impaired in CALM−/− MEFs. As a result, although intracellular KIT disappeared 30 min after SCF stimulation in wild-type (WT) MEFs, it was retained in CALM−/− MEFs. Furthermore, SCF-induced phosphorylation of cytosolic KIT was enhanced and prolonged in CALM−/− MEFs compared with that in WT MEFs, leading to the excessive activation of Akt. Similar hyperactivation of Akt was observed in CALM−/− KIT+ cells. These results indicate that CALM is essential for the intracellular trafficking of KIT and its normal functions. Also, our data demonstrate that KIT located in the early endosome can activate downstream molecules as a signaling endosome. Because KIT activation is involved in the pathogenesis of some malignancies, the manipulation of CALM function would be an attractive

  17. Arf6 and Rab22 mediate T cell conjugate formation by regulating clathrin-independent endosomal membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Debra L; Wayt, Jessica; Wilson, Jean M; Donaldson, Julie G

    2017-07-15

    Endosomal trafficking can influence the composition of the plasma membrane and the ability of cells to polarize their membranes. Here, we examined whether trafficking through clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) affects the ability of T cells to form a cell-cell conjugate with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We show that CIE occurs in both the Jurkat T cell line and primary human T cells. In Jurkat cells, the activities of two guanine nucleotide binding proteins, Arf6 and Rab22 (also known as Rab22a), influence CIE and conjugate formation. Expression of the constitutively active form of Arf6, Arf6Q67L, inhibits CIE and conjugate formation, and results in the accumulation of vacuoles containing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and CD4, molecules important for T cell interaction with the APC. Moreover, expression of the GTP-binding defective mutant of Rab22, Rab22S19N, inhibits CIE and conjugate formation, suggesting that Rab22 function is required for these activities. Furthermore, Jurkat cells expressing Rab22S19N were impaired in spreading onto coverslips coated with T cell receptor-activating antibodies. These observations support a role for CIE, Arf6 and Rab22 in conjugate formation between T cells and APCs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Clathrin regenerates synaptic vesicles from endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Rost, Benjamin R.; Brokowski, Bettina; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Felies, Annegret; Davis, M. Wayne; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ultrafast endocytosis can retrieve a single large endocytic vesicle as fast as 50-100 ms after synaptic vesicle fusion. However, the fate of the large endocytic vesicles is not known. Here we demonstrate that these vesicles transition to a synaptic endosome about one second after stimulation. The endosome is resolved into coated vesicles after 3 seconds, which in turn become small-diameter synaptic vesicles 5-6 seconds after stimulation. We disrupted clathrin function using RNAi and found that clathrin is not required for ultrafast endocytosis but is required to generate synaptic vesicles from the endosome. Ultrafast endocytosis fails when actin polymerization is disrupted, or when neurons are stimulated at room temperature instead of physiological temperature. In the absence of ultrafast endocytosis, synaptic vesicles are retrieved directly from the plasma membrane by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results explain in large part discrepancies among published experiments concerning the role of clathrin in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. PMID:25296249

  19. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease. PMID:26295716

  20. Human CHMP6, a myristoylated ESCRT-III protein, interacts directly with an ESCRT-II component EAP20 and regulates endosomal cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yorikawa, Chiharu; Shibata, Hideki; Waguri, Satoshi; Hatta, Kazumi; Horii, Mio; Katoh, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maki, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    CHMP6 (charged multivesicular body protein 6) is a human orthologue of yeast Vps (vacuolar protein sorting) 20, a component of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III. Various CHMP6 orthologues in organisms ranging from yeast to humans contain the N-myristoylation consensus sequence at each N-terminus. Metabolic labelling of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells showed the incorporation of [3H]myristate into CHMP6 fused C-terminally to GFP (green fluorescent protein) (CHMP6–GFP). Interactions of CHMP6 with another ESCRT-III component CHMP4b/Shax [Snf7 (sucrose non-fermenting 7) homologue associated with Alix] 1, one of three paralogues of human Vps32/Snf7, and with EAP20 (ELL-associated protein 20), a human counterpart of yeast Vps25 and component of ESCRT-II, were observed by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins expressed in HEK-293 cells. The in vitro pull-down assays using their recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli demonstrated direct physical interactions which were mediated by the N-terminal basic half of CHMP6. Overexpressed CHMP6-GFP in HeLa cells exhibited a punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm especially in the perinuclear area, as revealed by fluorescence microscopic analysis. Accumulation of LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), a major phospholipid in internal vesicles of an MVB (multivesicular body), was observed in the CHMP6–GFP-localizing area. FLAG-tagged EAP20 distributed diffusely, but exhibited a punctate distribution on co-expression with CHMP6–GFP. Overexpression of CHMP6–GFP caused reduction of transferrin receptors on the plasma membrane surface, but caused their accumulation in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitinated proteins and endocytosed EGF continuously accumulated in CHMP6–GFP-expressing cells. These results suggest that CHMP6 acts as an acceptor for ESCRT-II on endosomal membranes and regulates cargo sorting. PMID:15511219

  1. The novel endosomal membrane protein Ema interacts with the class C Vps-HOPS complex to promote endosomal maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungsu; Wairkar, Yogesh P; Daniels, Richard W; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2010-03-08

    Endosomal maturation is critical for accurate and efficient cargo transport through endosomal compartments. Here we identify a mutation of the novel Drosophila gene, ema (endosomal maturation defective) in a screen for abnormal synaptic overgrowth and defective protein trafficking. Ema is an endosomal membrane protein required for trafficking of fluid-phase and receptor-mediated endocytic cargos. In the ema mutant, enlarged endosomal compartments accumulate as endosomal maturation fails, with early and late endosomes unable to progress into mature degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Defective endosomal down-regulation of BMP signaling is responsible for the abnormal synaptic overgrowth. Ema binds to and genetically interacts with Vps16A, a component of the class C Vps-HOPS complex that promotes endosomal maturation. The human orthologue of ema, Clec16A, is a candidate susceptibility locus for autoimmune disorders, and its expression rescues the Drosophila mutant demonstrating conserved function. Characterizing this novel gene family identifies a new component of the endosomal pathway and provides insights into class C Vps-HOPS complex function.

  2. Phosphatidylserine directly and positively regulates fusion of myoblasts into myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Irina M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} PS broadly and persistently trans-locates to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane during myoblast fusion into myotubes. {yields} Robust myotubes are formed when PS liposomes are added exogenously. {yields} PS increases the width of de novo myotubes and the numbers of myonuclei, but not the myotube length. {yields} Annexin V or PS antibody inhibits myotube formation by masking exposed PS. -- Abstract: Cell membrane consists of various lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Among them, PS is a molecular marker of apoptosis, because it is located to the inner leaflet of plasma membrane generally but it is moved to the outer leaflet during programmed cell death. The process of apoptosis has been implicated in the fusion of muscle progenitor cells, myoblasts, into myotubes. However, it remained unclear whether PS regulates muscle cell differentiation directly. In this paper, localization of PS to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in proliferating primary myoblasts and during fusion of these myoblasts into myotubes is validated using Annexin V. Moreover, we show the presence of PS clusters at the cell-cell contact points, suggesting the importance of membrane ruffling and PS exposure for the myogenic cell fusion. Confirming this conclusion, experimentally constructed PS, but not PC liposomes dramatically enhance the formation of myotubes from myoblasts, thus demonstrating a direct positive effect of PS on the muscle cell fusion. In contrast, myoblasts exposed to PC liposomes produce long myotubes with low numbers of myonuclei. Moreover, pharmacological masking of PS on the myoblast surface inhibits fusion of these cells into myotubes in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. ER contact sites direct late endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques; Berlin, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes shuttle select cargoes between cellular compartments and, in doing so, maintain intracellular homeostasis and enable interactions with the extracellular space. Directionality of endosomal transport critically impinges on cargo fate, as retrograde (microtubule minus-end directed) traffic delivers vesicle contents to the lysosome for proteolysis, while the opposing anterograde (plus-end directed) movement promotes recycling and secretion. Intriguingly, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a key player in spatiotemporal control of late endosome and lysosome transport, through the establishment of physical contacts with these organelles. Earlier studies have described how minus-end-directed motor proteins become discharged from vesicles engaged at such contact sites. Now, Raiborg et al. implicate ER-mediated interactions, induced by protrudin, in loading plus-end-directed motor kinesin-1 onto endosomes, thereby stimulating their transport toward the cell's periphery. In this review, we recast the prevailing concepts on bidirectional late endosome transport and discuss the emerging paradigm of inter-compartmental regulation from the ER-endosome interface viewpoint. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A novel mechanism of regulating the ATPase VPS4 by its cofactor LIP5 and the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III protein CHMP5.

    PubMed

    Vild, Cody J; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-03-13

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr(182)) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Mutation of Tyr(182) partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.

  5. Regulation of cell death by recycling endosomes and golgi membrane dynamics via a pathway involving Src-family kinases, Cdc42 and Rab11a.

    PubMed

    Landry, Marie-Claude; Sicotte, Andréane; Champagne, Claudia; Lavoie, Josée N

    2009-09-01

    Actin dynamics and membrane trafficking influence cell commitment to programmed cell death through largely undefined mechanisms. To investigate how actin and recycling endosome (RE) trafficking can engage death signaling, we studied the death program induced by the adenovirus early region 4 open reading frame 4 (E4orf4) protein as a model. We found that in the early stages of E4orf4 expression, Src-family kinases (SFKs), Cdc42, and actin perturbed the organization of the endocytic recycling compartment and promoted the transport of REs to the Golgi apparatus, while inhibiting recycling of protein cargos to the plasma membrane. The resulting changes in Golgi membrane dynamics that relied on actin-regulated Rab11a membrane trafficking triggered scattering of Golgi membranes and contributed to the progression of cell death. A similar mobilization of RE traffic mediated by SFKs, Cdc42 and Rab11a also contributed to Golgi fragmentation and to cell death progression in response to staurosporine, in a caspase-independent manner. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that diversion of RE trafficking to the Golgi complex through a pathway involving SFKs, Cdc42, and Rab11a plays a general role in death signaling by mediating regulated changes in Golgi dynamics.

  6. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5

    DOE PAGES

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; ...

    2015-01-30

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. In this paper, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct frommore » what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Finally, mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.« less

  7. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5

    SciTech Connect

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-30

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. In this paper, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Finally, mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.

  8. Recycling and Endosomal Sorting of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Is Distinctly Regulated by Rab11A and Rab11B Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that undergoes proteolytic irreversible activation by coagulant and anti-coagulant proteases. Given the irreversible activation of PAR1, signaling by the receptor is tightly regulated through desensitization and intracellular trafficking. PAR1 displays both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of PAR1 is important for generating an internal pool of naïve receptors that replenish the cell surface and facilitate resensitization, whereas agonist-induced internalization of PAR1 is critical for terminating G protein signaling. We showed that PAR1 constitutive internalization is mediated by the adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), whereas AP-2 and epsin control agonist-induced PAR1 internalization. However, the mechanisms that regulate PAR1 recycling are not known. In the present study we screened a siRNA library of 140 different membrane trafficking proteins to identify key regulators of PAR1 intracellular trafficking. In addition to known mediators of PAR1 endocytosis, we identified Rab11B as a critical regulator of PAR1 trafficking. We found that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rab11B and not Rab11A blocks PAR1 recycling, which enhanced receptor lysosomal degradation. Although Rab11A is not required for PAR1 recycling, depletion of Rab11A resulted in intracellular accumulation of PAR1 through disruption of basal lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Moreover, enhanced degradation of PAR1 observed in Rab11B-deficient cells is blocked by depletion of Rab11A and the autophagy related-5 protein, suggesting that PAR1 is shuttled to an autophagic degradation pathway in the absence of Rab11B recycling. Together these findings suggest that Rab11A and Rab11B differentially regulate intracellular trafficking of PAR1 through distinct endosomal sorting mechanisms. PMID:26635365

  9. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1.

    PubMed

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion.

  10. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M.; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion. PMID:24743596

  11. Internalization of the TGF-β type I receptor into caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes.

    PubMed

    He, Kangmin; Yan, Xiaohua; Li, Nan; Dang, Song; Xu, Li; Zhao, Bing; Li, Zijian; Lv, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Youyi; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular sorting of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors play an important regulatory role in TGF-β signaling. Two major endocytic pathways, clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, have been reported to independently mediate the internalization of TGF-β receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that the clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways can converge during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking. By tracking the intracellular dynamics of fluorescently-labeled TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI), we found that after mediating TβRI internalization, certain clathrin-coated vesicles and caveolar vesicles are fused underneath the plasma membrane, forming a novel type of caveolin-1 and clathrin double-positive vesicles. Under the regulation of Rab5, the fused vesicles are targeted to early endosomes and thus deliver the internalized TβRI to the caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes (caveolin-1-positive early endosomes). We further showed that the caveolin-1-positive early endosomes are positive for Smad3/SARA, Rab11 and Smad7/Smurf2, and may act as a multifunctional device for TGF-β signaling and TGF-β receptor recycling and degradation. Therefore, these findings uncover a novel scenario of endocytosis, the direct fusion of clathrin-coated and caveolae vesicles during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking, which leads to the formation of the multifunctional sorting device, caveolin-1-positive early endosomes, for TGF-β receptors.

  12. Internalization of the TGF-β type I receptor into caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes

    PubMed Central

    He, Kangmin; Yan, Xiaohua; Li, Nan; Dang, Song; Xu, Li; Zhao, Bing; Li, Zijian; Lv, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Youyi; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular sorting of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors play an important regulatory role in TGF-β signaling. Two major endocytic pathways, clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, have been reported to independently mediate the internalization of TGF-β receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that the clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways can converge during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking. By tracking the intracellular dynamics of fluorescently-labeled TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI), we found that after mediating TβRI internalization, certain clathrin-coated vesicles and caveolar vesicles are fused underneath the plasma membrane, forming a novel type of caveolin-1 and clathrin double-positive vesicles. Under the regulation of Rab5, the fused vesicles are targeted to early endosomes and thus deliver the internalized TβRI to the caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes (caveolin-1-positive early endosomes). We further showed that the caveolin-1-positive early endosomes are positive for Smad3/SARA, Rab11 and Smad7/Smurf2, and may act as a multifunctional device for TGF-β signaling and TGF-β receptor recycling and degradation. Therefore, these findings uncover a novel scenario of endocytosis, the direct fusion of clathrin-coated and caveolae vesicles during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking, which leads to the formation of the multifunctional sorting device, caveolin-1-positive early endosomes, for TGF-β receptors. PMID:25998683

  13. GPCR sorting at multivesicular endosomes.

    PubMed

    Dores, Michael Robert; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    The lysosomal degradation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for receptor signaling and down regulation. Once internalized, GPCRs are sorted within the endocytic pathway and packaged into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that bud inward to form the multivesicular endosome (MVE). The mechanisms that control GPCR sorting and ILV formation are poorly understood. Quantitative strategies are important for evaluating the function of adaptor and scaffold proteins that regulate sorting of GPCRs at MVEs. In this chapter, we outline two strategies for the quantification and visualization of GPCR sorting into the lumen of MVEs. The first protocol utilizes a biochemical approach to assay the sorting of GPCRs in a population of cells, whereas the second strategy examines GPCR sorting in individual cells using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Combined, these assays can be used to establish the kinetics of activated GPCR lysosomal trafficking in response to specific ligands, as well as evaluate the contribution of endosomal adaptors to GPCR sorting at MVEs. The protocols presented in this chapter can be adapted to analyze GPCR sorting in a myriad of cell types and tissues, and expanded to analyze the mechanisms that regulate MVE sorting of other cargoes.

  14. Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 regulates osteoclast fusion in a cell heterotypic manner.

    PubMed

    Guterman-Ram, Gali; Pesic, Milena; Orenbuch, Ayelet; Czeiger, Tal; Aflalo, Anastasia; Levaot, Noam

    2018-01-01

    Monocyte fusion into osteoclasts, bone resorbing cells, plays a key role in bone remodeling and homeostasis; therefore, aberrant cell fusion may be involved in a variety of debilitating bone diseases. Research in the last decade has led to the discovery of genes that regulate osteoclast fusion, but the basic molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms underlying the fusion process are not completely understood. Here, we reveal a role for Dyrk2 in osteoclast fusion. We demonstrate that Dyrk2 down regulation promotes osteoclast fusion, whereas its overexpression inhibits fusion. Moreover, Dyrk2 also promotes the fusion of foreign-body giant cells, indicating that Dyrk2 plays a more general role in cell fusion. In an earlier study, we showed that fusion is a cell heterotypic process initiated by fusion-founder cells that fuse to fusion-follower cells, the latter of which are unable to initiate fusion. Here, we show that Dyrk2 limits the expansion of multinucleated founder cells through the suppression of the fusion competency of follower cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Analysis of vesicle subpopulations carrying early endosomal autoantigen EEA1].

    PubMed

    Zlobina, M V; Kamentseva, R S; Kornilova, E S; Kharchenko, M V

    2014-01-01

    Confocal immunofluorescent analysis of interphase HeLa cells has demonstrated that involved in regulation of homotypic fusions early endosomal autoantigene EEA1 is associated with vesicles represented by two populations differing in apparent size, localization and the level of bound EEA1. Before analysis the cells have been preincubated in serum-deprived medium for 12 h to minimize ligand-dependent endocytosis of serum growth factors. The first subpopulation is mainly represented by large vesicles strongly decorated with EEA1. These vesicles are localized presumably in juxtanuclear region. Microtubule depolimerization experiments have shown that this localization is maintained by tubulin cytoskeleton. The second subpopulation consists of numerous small vesicles slightly stained by EEA1 antibody and localized more peripherally. Double indirect immunofluorescent ananlysis of fixed cell images has revealed that juxtanuclear vesicles enriched in EEA1 are fully colocalized with key protein of early endosomes small GTPase Rab5, whereas about 50% of slightly decorated peripheral vesicles are Rab5-negative. It is found that the number of Rab5-positive vesicles per cell is higher than that of EEA1-positive vesicles. Thus, in serum-deprivated HeLa cells with low endocytic activity two subpopulations of EEA1-vesicles are revealed: the first one carries the both EEA1 at high level and Rab5 (EEA1+++/Rab5+), and the second subpopulation oconsists of weakly decorated EEA1-vesicles, that can be both Rab5-positive and -negative (EEA1+/Rab5- and EEA1+/Rab5+). Besides, there are vesicles carrying Rab5 only (EEA1-/Rab5+). The data obtained favor different functional role of all these subpopulations, which are associated with proteins widely considered as equivalent markers of early endosomes.

  16. Molecular Interactions and Cellular Itinerary of the Yeast RAVE (Regulator of the H+-ATPase of Vacuolar and Endosomal Membranes) Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Smardon, Anne M.; Nasab, Negin Dehdar; Tarsio, Maureen; Diakov, Theodore T.; Kane, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    The RAVE complex (regulator of the H+-ATPase of vacuolar and endosomal membranes) is required for biosynthetic assembly and glucose-stimulated reassembly of the yeast vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Yeast RAVE contains three subunits: Rav1, Rav2, and Skp1. Rav1 is the largest subunit, and it binds Rav2 and Skp1 of RAVE; the E, G, and C subunits of the V-ATPase peripheral V1 sector; and Vph1 of the membrane Vo sector. We identified Rav1 regions required for interaction with its binding partners through deletion analysis, co-immunoprecipitation, two-hybrid assay, and pulldown assays with expressed proteins. We find that Skp1 binding requires sequences near the C terminus of Rav1, V1 subunits E and C bind to a conserved region in the C-terminal half of Rav1, and the cytosolic domain of Vph1 binds near the junction of the Rav1 N- and C-terminal halves. In contrast, Rav2 binds to the N-terminal domain of Rav1, which can be modeled as a double β-propeller. Only the V1 C subunit binds to both Rav1 and Rav2. Using GFP-tagged RAVE subunits in vivo, we demonstrate glucose-dependent association of RAVE with the vacuolar membrane, consistent with its role in glucose-dependent V-ATPase assembly. It is known that V1 subunit C localizes to the V1-Vo interface in assembled V-ATPase complexes and is important in regulated disassembly of V-ATPases. We propose that RAVE cycles between cytosol and vacuolar membrane in a glucose-dependent manner, positioning V1 and V0 subcomplexes and orienting the V1 C subunit to promote assembly. PMID:26405040

  17. An Automated Image Analysis System to Quantify Endosomal Tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Recycling of cargos from early endosomes requires regulation of endosomal tubule formation and fission. This regulation is disrupted in cells depleted of the microtubule severing enzyme spastin, causing elongation of endosomal tubules and mis-trafficking of recycling endosomal cargos such as the transferrin receptor. Spastin is encoded by SPAST, mutations in which are the most frequent cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia, a condition characterised by a progressive loss of lower limb function resulting from upper motor neuron axonopathy. Investigation of molecular factors involved in endosomal tubule regulation is hindered by the need for manual counting of endosomal tubules. We report here the development of an open source automated system for the quantification of endosomal tubules, using ImageJ and R. We validate the method in cells depleted of spastin and its binding partner IST1. The additional speed and reproducibility of this system compared with manual counting makes feasible screens of candidates to further understand the mechanisms of endosomal tubule formation and fission. PMID:28006827

  18. The PDZ Protein GIPC Regulates Trafficking of the LPA1 Receptor from APPL Signaling Endosomes and Attenuates the Cell’s Response to LPA

    PubMed Central

    Varsano, Tal; Taupin, Vanessa; Guo, Lixia; Baterina, Oscar Y.; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse cellular responses through the activation of at least six LPA receptors – LPA1–6, but the interacting proteins and signaling pathways that mediate the specificity of these receptors are largely unknown. We noticed that LPA1 contains a PDZ binding motif (SVV) identical to that present in two other proteins that interact with the PDZ protein GIPC. GIPC is involved in endocytic trafficking of several receptors including TrkA, VEGFR2, lutropin and dopamine D2 receptors. Here we show that GIPC binds directly to the PDZ binding motif of LPA1 but not that of other LPA receptors. LPA1 colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with GIPC and its binding partner APPL, an activator of Akt signaling found on APPL signaling endosomes. GIPC depletion by siRNA disturbed trafficking of LPA1 to EEA1 early endosomes and promoted LPA1 mediated Akt signaling, cell proliferation, and cell motility. We propose that GIPC binds LPA1 and promotes its trafficking from APPL-containing signaling endosomes to EEA1 early endosomes and thus attenuates LPA-mediated Akt signaling from APPL endosomes. PMID:23145131

  19. The PDZ protein GIPC regulates trafficking of the LPA1 receptor from APPL signaling endosomes and attenuates the cell's response to LPA.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Tal; Taupin, Vanessa; Guo, Lixia; Baterina, Oscar Y; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse cellular responses through the activation of at least six LPA receptors--LPA(1-6,) but the interacting proteins and signaling pathways that mediate the specificity of these receptors are largely unknown. We noticed that LPA(1) contains a PDZ binding motif (SVV) identical to that present in two other proteins that interact with the PDZ protein GIPC. GIPC is involved in endocytic trafficking of several receptors including TrkA, VEGFR2, lutropin and dopamine D2 receptors. Here we show that GIPC binds directly to the PDZ binding motif of LPA(1) but not that of other LPA receptors. LPA(1) colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with GIPC and its binding partner APPL, an activator of Akt signaling found on APPL signaling endosomes. GIPC depletion by siRNA disturbed trafficking of LPA(1) to EEA1 early endosomes and promoted LPA(1) mediated Akt signaling, cell proliferation, and cell motility. We propose that GIPC binds LPA(1) and promotes its trafficking from APPL-containing signaling endosomes to EEA1 early endosomes and thus attenuates LPA-mediated Akt signaling from APPL endosomes.

  20. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion Sites in Central Synapses.

    PubMed

    Maschi, Dario; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2017-04-05

    The number and availability of vesicle release sites at the synaptic active zone (AZ) are critical factors governing neurotransmitter release; yet, these fundamental synaptic parameters have remained undetermined. Moreover, how neural activity regulates the spatiotemporal properties of the release sites within individual central synapses is unknown. Here, we combined a nanoscale imaging approach with advanced image analysis to detect individual vesicle fusion events with ∼27 nm localization precision at single hippocampal synapses under physiological conditions. Our results revealed the presence of multiple distinct release sites within individual hippocampal synapses. Release sites were distributed throughout the AZ and underwent repeated reuse. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal properties of the release sites were activity dependent with a reduction in reuse frequency and a shift in location toward the AZ periphery during high-frequency stimulation. These findings have revealed fundamental spatiotemporal properties of individual release sites in small central synapses and their activity-dependent modulation.

  1. Proximity Labeling Reveals Molecular Determinants of FGFR4 Endosomal Transport.

    PubMed

    Haugsten, Ellen Margrethe; Sørensen, Vigdis; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; de Souza, Gustavo Antonio; Krejci, Pavel; Wiedlocha, Antoni; Wesche, Jørgen

    2016-10-07

    The fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are important oncogenes promoting tumor progression in many types of cancer, such as breast, bladder, and lung cancer as well as multiple myeloma and rhabdomyosarcoma. However, little is known about how these receptors are internalized and down-regulated in cells. We have here applied proximity biotin labeling to identify proteins involved in FGFR4 signaling and trafficking. For this purpose we fused a mutated biotin ligase, BirA*, to the C-terminal tail of FGFR4 (FGFR4-BirA*) and the fusion protein was stably expressed in U2OS cells. Upon addition of biotin to these cells, proteins in proximity to the FGFR4-BirA* fusion protein became biotinylated and could be isolated and identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified in total 291 proteins, including 80 proteins that were enriched in samples where the receptor was activated by the ligand (FGF1), among them several proteins previously found to be involved in FGFR signaling (e.g., FRS2, PLCγ, RSK2 and NCK2). Interestingly, many of the identified proteins were implicated in endosomal transport, and by precise annotation we were able to trace the intracellular pathways of activated FGFR4. Validating the data by confocal and three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy analysis, we concluded that FGFR4 uses clathrin-mediated endocytosis for internalization and is further sorted from early endosomes to the recycling compartment and the trans-Golgi network. Depletion of cells for clathrin heavy chain led to accumulation of FGFR4 at the cell surface and increased levels of active FGFR4 and PLCγ, while AKT and ERK signaling was diminished, demonstrating that functional clathrin-mediated endocytosis is required for proper FGFR4 signaling. Thus, this study reveals proteins and pathways involved in FGFR4 transport and signaling that provide possible targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention in FGFR4 aberrant cancer.

  2. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  3. Two barcodes encoded by the type-1 PDZ and by phospho-Ser(312) regulate retromer/WASH-mediated sorting of the ß1-adrenergic receptor from endosomes to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Nooh, Mohammed M; Bahouth, Suleiman W

    2017-01-01

    Recycling of the majority of agonist-internalized GPCR is dependent on a type I-PDZ "barcode" in their C-tail. The recycling of wild-type (WT) ß1-AR is also dependent on its default "type-1 PDZ barcode", but trafficking of the ß1-AR is inhibited when PKA or its substrate serine at position 312 (Ser(312)) are inactivated. We tested the hypothesis that phospho-Ser(312) provided a second barcode for ß1-AR sorting from endosomes to the plasma membrane by determining the role of retromer/WASH complexes in ß1-AR trafficking. Recycling of WT ß1-AR or WT ß2-AR was dependent on targeting the retromer to endosomal membranes via SNX3 and rab7a, and on complexing the retromer to the WASH pentamer via the C-tail of FAM21 (FAM21C). These maneuvers however, did not inhibit the recycling of a phospho-Ser(312) ß1-AR mimic ((S312D) ß1-AR). Knockdown of the trans-acting PDZ protein sorting nexin27 (SNX27) inhibited the recycling of WT ß1-AR and WT ß2-AR, but had no effect on (S312D) ß1-AR∆PDZ or on phosphorylation of WT ß1-AR by PKA at Ser(312). However, depletion of FKBP15, a FAM21C-binding endosomal protein, selectively inhibited WT ß1-AR but not ß2-AR recycling, suggesting divergence might exist in GPCR trafficking roadmaps. These results indicate that two barcodes are involved in sorting WT ß1-AR out of early endosomes. The first and antecedent "barcode" was the "type-1 PDZ", followed by a second reversible "phospho-Ser(312)" verification "barcode". This organization allows tight regulation of ß1-AR density to signaling intensity in conditions associated with aberrant ß1-AR signaling such as in hypertension and heart failure.

  4. The retromer complex - endosomal protein recycling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Matthew N J

    2012-10-15

    The retromer complex is a vital element of the endosomal protein sorting machinery that is conserved across all eukaryotes. Retromer is most closely associated with the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval pathway and is necessary to maintain an active pool of hydrolase receptors in the trans-Golgi network. Recent progress in studies of retromer have identified new retromer-interacting proteins, including the WASH complex and cargo such as the Wntless/MIG-14 protein, which now extends the role of retromer beyond the endosome-to-Golgi pathway and has revealed that retromer is required for aspects of endosome-to-plasma membrane sorting and regulation of signalling events. The interactions between the retromer complex and other macromolecular protein complexes now show how endosomal protein sorting is coordinated with actin assembly and movement along microtubules, and place retromer squarely at the centre of a complex set of protein machinery that governs endosomal protein sorting. Dysregulation of retromer-mediated endosomal protein sorting leads to various pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease and spastic paraplegia and the mechanisms underlying these pathologies are starting to be understood. In this Commentary, I will highlight recent advances in the understanding of retromer-mediated endosomal protein sorting and discuss how retromer contributes to a diverse set of physiological processes.

  5. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  6. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J

    2015-03-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction.

  7. Diverse Autophagosome Membrane Sources Coalesce in Recycling Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Claudia; Renna, Maurizio; Bento, Carla F.; Moreau, Kevin; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Autophagic protein degradation is mediated by autophagosomes that fuse with lysosomes, where their contents are degraded. The membrane origins of autophagosomes may involve multiple sources. However, it is unclear if and where distinct membrane sources fuse during autophagosome biogenesis. Vesicles containing mATG9, the only transmembrane autophagy protein, are seen in many sites, and fusions with other autophagic compartments have not been visualized in mammalian cells. We observed that mATG9 traffics from the plasma membrane to recycling endosomes in carriers that appear to be routed differently from ATG16L1-containing vesicles, another source of autophagosome membrane. mATG9- and ATG16L1-containing vesicles traffic to recycling endosomes, where VAMP3-dependent heterotypic fusions occur. These fusions correlate with autophagosome formation, and both processes are enhanced by perturbing membrane egress from recycling endosomes. Starvation, a primordial autophagy activator, reduces membrane recycling from recycling endosomes and enhances mATG9-ATG16L1 vesicle fusion. Thus, this mechanism may fine-tune physiological autophagic responses. PMID:24034251

  8. IL4/PGE{sub 2} induction of an enlarged early endosomal compartment in mouse macrophages is Rab5-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Wainszelbaum, Marisa J.; Proctor, Brandon M.; Pontow, Suzanne E.; Stahl, Philip D. . E-mail: pstahl@cellbiology.wustl.edu; Barbieri, M. Alejandro

    2006-07-15

    The endosomal compartment and the plasma membrane form a complex partnership that controls signal transduction and trafficking of different molecules. The specificity and functionality of the early endocytic pathway are regulated by a growing number of Rab GTPases, particularly Rab5. In this study, we demonstrate that IL4 (a Th-2 cytokine) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) synergistically induce Rab5 and several Rab effector proteins, including Rin1 and EEA1, and promote the formation of an enlarged early endocytic (EEE) compartment. Endosome enlargement is linked to a substantial induction of the mannose receptor (MR), a well-characterized macrophage endocytic receptor. Both MR levels and MR-mediated endocytosis are enhanced approximately 7-fold. Fluid-phase endocytosis is also elevated in treated cells. Light microscopy and fractionation studies reveal that MR colocalizes predominantly with Rab5a and partially with Rab11, an endosomal recycling pathway marker. Using retroviral expression of Rab5a:S34N, a dominant negative mutant, and siRNA Rab5a silencing, we demonstrate that Rab5a is essential for the large endosome phenotype and for localization of MR in these structures. We speculate that the EEE is maintained by activated Rab5, and that the EEE phenotype is part of some macrophage developmental program such as cell fusion, a characteristic of IL4-stimulated cells.

  9. A coat of filamentous actin prevents clustering of late-endosomal vacuoles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Drengk, Anja; Fritsch, Jürgen; Schmauch, Christian; Rühling, Harald; Maniak, Markus

    2003-10-14

    The endocytic pathway depends on the actin cytoskeleton. Actin contributes to internalization at the plasma membrane and to subsequent trafficking steps like propulsion through the cytoplasm, fusion of phagosomes with early endosomes, and transport from early to late endosomes. In vitro studies with mammalian endosomes and yeast vacuoles implicate actin in membrane fusion. Here, we investigate the function of the actin coat that surrounds late endosomes in Dictyostelium. Latrunculin treatment leads to aggregation of these endosomes into grape-like clusters and completely blocks progression of endocytic marker. In addition, the cells round up and stop moving. Because this drug treatment perturbs all actin assemblies in the cell simultaneously, we used a novel targeting approach to specifically study the function of the cytoskeleton in one subcellular location. To this end, we constructed a hybrid protein targeting cofilin, an actin depolymerizing protein, to late endosomes. As a consequence, the endosomal compartments lost their actin coats and aggregated, but these cells remained morphologically normal, and the kinetics of endocytic marker trafficking were unaltered. Therefore, the actin coat prevents the clustering of endosomes, which could be one safeguard mechanism precluding their docking and fusion.

  10. Ubiquitination of the N-terminal Region of Caveolin-1 Regulates Endosomal Sorting by the VCP/p97 AAA-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Philipp; Bug, Monika; Meyer, Hemmo

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is the defining constituent of caveolae at the plasma membrane of many mammalian cells. For turnover, CAV1 is ubiquitinated and sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes. Sorting of CAV1 requires the AAA+-type ATPase VCP and its cofactor UBXD1. However, it is unclear in which region CAV1 is ubiquitinated and how ubiquitination is linked to sorting of CAV1 by VCP-UBXD1. Here, we show through site-directed mutagenesis that ubiquitination of CAV1 occurs at any of the six lysine residues, 5, 26, 30, 39, 47, and 57, that are clustered in the N-terminal region but not at lysines in the oligomerization, intramembrane, or C-terminal domains. Mutation of Lys-5–57 to arginines prevented binding of the VCP-UBXD1 complex and, importantly, strongly reduced recruitment of VCP-UBXD1 to endocytic compartments. Moreover, the Lys-5–57Arg mutation specifically interfered with trafficking of CAV1 from early to late endosomes. Conversely and consistently, depletion of VCP or UBXD1 led to accumulation of ubiquitinated CAV1, suggesting that VCP acts downstream of ubiquitination and is required for transport of the ubiquitinated form of CAV1 to late endosomes. These results define the N-terminal region of CAV1 as the critical ubiquitin conjugation site and, together with previous data, demonstrate the significance of this ubiquitination for binding to the VCP-UBXD1 complex and for sorting into lysosomes. PMID:23335559

  11. Melanosomes – dark organelles enlighten endosomal membrane transport

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Melanosomes are tissue-specific “lysosome-related” organelles of pigment cells in which melanins are synthesized and stored. Analyses of the trafficking and fate of melanosomal components are beginning to reveal how melanosomes are formed through novel pathways from early endosomal intermediates. These studies unveil generalized structural and functional modifications of the endosomal system in specialized cells, and provide unexpected insights into the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies and how compartmentalization regulates protein refolding. Moreover, genetic disorders that affect the biogenesis of melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles have shed light into the molecular machinery that controls specialized endosomal sorting events. PMID:17878918

  12. Conserved leucine residue in the head region of morbillivirus fusion protein regulates the large conformational change during fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Zipperle, Ljerka; Vandevelde, Marc; Orvell, Claes; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2009-09-29

    Paramyxovirus cell entry is controlled by the concerted action of two viral envelope glycoproteins, the fusion (F) and the receptor-binding (H) proteins, which together with a cell surface receptor mediate plasma membrane fusion activity. The paramyxovirus F protein belongs to class I viral fusion proteins which typically contain two heptad repeat regions (HR). Particular to paramyxovirus F proteins is a long intervening sequence (IS) located between both HR domains. To investigate the role of the IS domain in regulating fusogenicity, we mutated in the canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein IS domain a highly conserved leucine residue (L372) previously reported to cause a hyperfusogenic phenotype. Beside one F mutant, which elicited significant defects in processing, transport competence, and fusogenicity, all remaining mutants were characterized by enhanced fusion activity despite normal or slightly impaired processing and cell surface targeting. Using anti-CDV-F monoclonal antibodies, modified conformational F states were detected in F mutants compared to the parental protein. Despite these structural differences, coimmunoprecipitation assays did not reveal any drastic modulation in F/H avidity of interaction. However, we found that F mutants had significantly enhanced fusogenicity at low temperature only, suggesting that they folded into conformations requiring less energy to activate fusion. Together, these data provide strong biochemical and functional evidence that the conserved leucine 372 at the base of the HRA coiled-coil of F(wt) controls the stabilization of the prefusogenic state, restraining the conformational switch and thereby preventing extensive cell-cell fusion activity.

  13. An Ion Switch Regulates Fusion of Charged Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Evgenios; Lutz, Silke; Meyer, Sylke; Panzner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify the recruitment of solvent ions to lipid membranes as the dominant regulator of lipid phase behavior. Our data demonstrate that binding of counterions to charged lipids promotes the formation of lamellar membranes, whereas their absence can induce fusion. The mechanism applies to anionic and cationic liposomes, as well as the recently introduced amphoteric liposomes. In the latter, an additional pH-dependent lipid salt formation between anionic and cationic lipids must occur, as indicated by the depletion of membrane-bound ions in a zone around pH 5. Amphoteric liposomes fuse under these conditions but form lamellar structures at both lower and higher pH values. The integration of these observations into the classic lipid shape theory yielded a quantitative link between lipid and solvent composition and the physical state of the lipid assembly. The key parameter of the new model, κ(pH), describes the membrane phase behavior of charged membranes in response to their ion loading in a quantitative way. PMID:21575575

  14. MxA Is a Novel Regulator of Endosome-Associated Transcriptional Signaling by Bone Morphogenetic Proteins 4 and 9 (BMP4 and BMP9)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Huijuan; Sehgal, Pravin B.

    2016-01-01

    There is confusion about the role that IFN-α plays in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) with different investigators reporting a causative or a protective role. There is now clear evidence in PAH pathogenesis for the involvement of BMP4 and BMP9 signaling, and its disruption by mutations in BMPR2. In the present study, we investigated MxA, an IFN-α-inducible cytoplasmic dynamin-family GTPase for effects on BMP4/9 signaling, including in the presence of PAH-disease-associated mutants of BMPR2. In human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAECs), IFN-α-induced endogenous as well as exogenously expressed MxA was associated with endosomes that aligned alongside microtubules and tubules of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, IFN-α and MxA stimulated basal and BMP4/9 signaling to a Smad1/5/8-responsive pBRE-Luc reporter. In HEK293T cells, immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the association of MxA with endosomes, and immunofluorescence methods showed these to be positive for early endosome markers (early endosomal antigen 1, clathrin light chain and Rab5) and RSmad1/5/8. Functionally, using different genetic and inhibitor approaches, we observed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis enhanced and caveolin-mediated endocytosis inhibited the transcriptional response to BMP4 and BMP9. MxA produced a further 3-4-fold enhancement of the BMP-induced response in a clathrin-endocytosis dependent manner. The microtubule inhibitor nocodazole and stabilizer paclitaxel respectively attenuated and enhanced the effect of MxA, implicating microtubule integrity in this process. MxA enhanced BMP-induced signaling in the presence of wild-type BMPR2, and partially rescued signaling from some PAH-disease-associated BMPR2 mutants. Taken together, the data identify MxA as a novel stimulator of BMP4 and BMP9 transcriptional signaling, and suggest it to be a candidate IFN-α-inducible mechanism that might have a protective role against development of PAH and

  15. Misdirection of endosomal trafficking mediated by herpes simplex virus-encoded glycoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Niazy, Naima; Temme, Sebastian; Bocuk, Derya; Giesen, Carmen; König, Angelika; Temme, Nadine; Ziegfeld, Angelique; Gregers, Tone F; Bakke, Oddmund; Lang, Thorsten; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Koch, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-encoded glycoprotein B (gB) is the most abundant protein in the viral envelope and promotes fusion of the virus with the cellular membrane. In the present study, we found that gB impacts on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II pathway of antigen presentation by fostering homotypic fusion of early endosomes and trapping MHC-II molecules in these altered endosomes. By using an overexpression approach, we demonstrated that transient expression of gB induces giant vesicles of early endosomal origin, which contained Rab5, early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), and large amounts of MHC-II molecules [human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and HLA-DM], but no CD63. In HSV-1-infected and stably transfected cell lines that expressed lower amounts of gB, giant endosomes were not observed, but strongly increased amounts of HLA-DR and HLA-DM were found in EEA1(+) early endosomes. We used these giant vesicles as a model system and revealed that gB interacts with Rab5 and EEA1, and that gB-induced homotypic fusion of early endosomes to giant endosomes requires phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors, and the cytosolic gB sequence (889)YTQVPN(894) We conclude that gB expression alters trafficking of molecules of the HLA-II processing pathway, which leads to increased retention of MHC-II molecules in early endosomal compartments, thereby intercepting antigen presentation.-Niazy, N., Temme, S., Bocuk, D., Giesen, C., König, A., Temme, N., Ziegfeld, A., Gregers, T. F., Bakke, O., Lang, T., Eis-Hübinger, A. M., Koch, N. Misdirection of endosomal trafficking mediated by herpes simplex virus-encoded glycoprotein B. © FASEB.

  16. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  17. Rab5 activity regulates GLUT4 sorting into insulin-responsive and non-insulin-responsive endosomal compartments: a potential mechanism for development of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tessneer, Kandice L; Jackson, Robert M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2014-09-01

    Glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter mediating glucose uptake in adipose and skeletal muscle. Reduced GLUT4 translocation from intracellular storage compartments to the plasma membrane is a cause of peripheral insulin resistance. Using a chronic hyperinsulinemia (CHI)-induced cell model of insulin resistance and Rab5 mutant overexpression, we determined these manipulations altered endosomal sorting of GLUT4, thus contributing to the development of insulin resistance. We found that CHI induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by retaining GLUT4 in a Rab5-activity-dependent compartment that is unable to equilibrate with the cell surface in response to insulin. Furthermore, CHI-mediated retention of GLUT4 in this non-insulin-responsive compartment impaired filling of the transferrin receptor (TfR)-positive and TfR-negative insulin-responsive storage compartments. Our data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may inhibit GLUT4 by chronically maintaining GLUT4 in the Rab5 activity-dependent endosomal pathway and impairing formation of the TfR-negative and TfR-positive insulin-responsive GLUT4 pools. This model suggests that an early event in the development of insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose tissue is to alter the intracellular localization of GLUT4 to a compartment that does not efficiently equilibrate with the cell surface when insulin levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time.

  18. Aggregation of endosomal-vacuolar compartments in the Aovps24-deleted strain in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Akinori; Shoji, Jun-ya; Kikuma, Takashi; Arioka, Manabu; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2007-10-19

    Previously, we found that deletion of Aovps24, an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS24, that encodes an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III component required for late endosomal function results in fragmented and aggregated vacuoles. Although defective late endosomal function is likely responsible for this phenotype, critical lack of our knowledge on late endosomes in filamentous fungi prevented us from further characterization. In this study, we identified late endosomes of Aspergillus oryzae, by expressing a series of fusion proteins of fluorescent proteins with orthologs of late endosomal proteins. Using these fusion proteins as markers, we observed late endosomes in the wild type strain and the Aovps24 disruptant and demonstrated that late endosomes are aberrantly aggregated in the Aovps24 disruptant. Moreover, we revealed that the aggregated late endosomes have features of vacuoles as well. As deletion of another ESCRT-III component-encoding gene, Aovps2, resulted in similar phenotypes to that in the Aovps24 disruptant, phenotypes of the Aovps24 disruptant are probably due to defective late endosomal function.

  19. Resveratrol Regulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Fission/Fusion to Attenuate Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kaige; Tao, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Cai, Ying; Zhao, Jiqing; Wu, Qiang; Zou, Zhongmin; Cao, Jia; Sai, Yan

    2016-01-01

    It has been confirmed that mitochondrial impairment may underlie both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis are key processes in regulating mitochondrial homeostasis. Therefore, we explored whether the protective effect of resveratrol in rotenone-induced neurotoxicity was associated with mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis. The results showed that resveratrol could not only promote mitochondrial mass and DNA copy number but also improve mitochondrial homeostasis and neuron function in rats and PC12 cells damaged by rotenone. We also observed effects with alterations in proteins known to regulate mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis in rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, our findings suggest that resveratrol may prevent rotenone-induced neurotoxicity through regulating mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis. PMID:26770656

  20. The ARL2 GTPase regulates mitochondrial fusion from the intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Newman, Laura E; Schiavon, Cara R; Turn, Rachel E; Kahn, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential, dynamic organelles that regularly undergo both fusion and fission in response to cellular conditions, though mechanisms of the regulation of their dynamics are incompletely understood. We provide evidence that increased activity of the small GTPase ARL2 is strongly correlated with an increase in fusion, while loss of ARL2 activity results in a decreased rate of mitochondrial fusion. Strikingly, expression of activated ARL2 can partially restore the loss of fusion resulting from deletion of either mitofusin 1 (MFN1) or mitofusin 2 (MFN2), but not deletion of both. We only observe the full effects of ARL2 on mitochondrial fusion when it is present in the intermembrane space (IMS), as constructs driven to the matrix or prevented from entering mitochondria are essentially inactive in promoting fusion. Thus, ARL2 is the first regulatory (small) GTPase shown to act inside mitochondria or in the fusion pathway. Finally, using high-resolution, structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we find that ARL2 and mitofusin immunoreactivities present as punctate staining along mitochondria that share a spatial convergence in fluorescence signals. Thus, we propose that ARL2 plays a regulatory role in mitochondrial fusion, acting from the IMS and requiring at least one of the mitofusins in their canonical role in fusion of the outer membranes.

  1. Regulation of HSV glycoprotein induced cascade of events governing cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H

    2016-09-14

    Receptor dependent HSV-induced fusion requires glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. Our current model posits that during fusion receptor-activated conformational changes in gD activate gH/gL, which subsequently triggers transformation of the pre-fusion form of gB into a fusogenic state. To examine the role of each glycoprotein in receptor dependent cell-cell fusion we took advantage of our discovery that fusion by wild type HSV-2 glycoproteins occurs twice as fast as that achieved by HSV-1 glycoproteins. By sequentially swapping each glycoprotein between the two serotypes, we established that fusion speed was governed by gH/gL, with gH being the main contributor. While the mutant forms of gB fuse at distinct rates that are dictated by their molecular structure, these restrictions can be overcome by gH2/gL2, thereby enhancing their activity. We also found that deregulated forms of gD1 and gH2/gL2 can alter the fusogenic potential of gB, promoting cell fusion in the absence of a cellular receptor and that deregulated forms of gB can drive the fusion machinery to even higher levels. Low pH enhanced fusion by affecting the structure of both gB and gH/gL mutants. Together, our data highlight the complexity of the fusion machinery, the impact of the activation state of each glycoprotein on the fusion process and the critical role of gH/gL in regulating HSV induced fusion.

  2. Kinetics of endosome acidification detected by mutant and wild-type Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, M C; Marsh, M; Helenius, A

    1986-01-01

    The fusogenic properties of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and its mutants were used to follow the kinetics of acidification during the endocytic uptake of virus by BHK-21 cells. It has previously been shown that the low pH of endocytic vacuoles triggers a conformational change in the SFV spike glycoprotein, activating membrane fusion and initiating virus infection. This conformational alteration was here shown to occur in endosomes and to follow the same time course as the intracellular fusion reaction, demonstrating that fusion occurs rapidly after virus exposure to endosome acidity. The kinetics of endosome acidification were monitored using wild type (wt) SFV and fus-1, an SFV mutant with a lower fusion pH threshold. The results presented here demonstrated that wt and mutant virus were internalized with a t1/2 of 10 min, and that endosomes were acidified to the wt threshold of pH 6.2 with a t1/2 of 15 min. In contrast, endosome pH reached the fus-1 threshold of 5.3 with a much longer t1/2 of 45 min. The subsequent degradation of SFV in lysosomes had a t1/2 of 90 min. It was found that after the initial uptake of virus from the plasma membrane, its transit through the endocytic pathway, exposure to endosome acidity and eventual delivery to lysosomes were markedly asynchronous. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3816755

  3. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  4. Lysosomes can fuse with a late endosomal compartment in a cell-free system from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The passage of pulse doses of asialoglycoproteins through the endosomal compartments of rat liver hepatocytes was studied by subcellular fractionation and EM. The kinetics of disappearance of radiolabeled asialofetuin from light endosomes prepared on Ficoll gradients were the same as the kinetics of disappearance of asialoorosomucoid-horse radish peroxidase reaction products from intracellular membrane-bound structures in the blood sinusoidal regions of hepatocytes. The light endosomes were therefore identifiable as being derived from the peripheral early endosome compartment. In contrast, the labeling of dense endosomes from the middle of the Ficoll gradient correlated with EM showing large numbers of reaction product-containing structures in the nonsinusoidal parts of the hepatocyte. In cell-free, postmitochondrial supernatants, we have previously observed that dense endosomes, but not light endosomes, interact with lysosomes. Cell-free interaction between isolated dense endosomes and lysosomes has now been reconstituted and analyzed in three ways: by transfer of radiolabeled ligand from endosomal to lysosomal densities, by a fluorescence dequenching assay which can indicate membrane fusion, and by measurement of content mixing. Maximum transfer of radiolabel to lysosomal densities required ATP and GTP plus cytosolic components, including N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor(s). Dense endosomes incubated in the absence of added lysosomes did not mature into vesicles of lysosomal density. Content mixing, and hence fusion, between endosomes and lysosomes was maximal in the presence of cytosol and ATP and also showed inhibition by N-ethyl-maleimide. Thus, we have demonstrated that a fusion step is involved in the transfer of radiolabeled ligand from an isolated endosome fraction derived from the nonsinusoidal regions of the hepatocyte to preexisting lysosomes in a cell-free system. PMID:7520447

  5. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  6. Signaling Components of Redox Active Endosomes: The Redoxosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Fredrick D.; Abbott, Duane; Li, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Subcellular compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in transmitting cell signals in response to environmental stimuli. In this regard, signals at the plasma membrane have been shown to trigger NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production within the endosomal compartment and this step can be required for redox-dependent signal transduction. Unique features of redox-active signaling endosomes can include NADPH oxidase complex components (Nox1, Noxo1, Noxa1, Nox2, p47phox, p67phox, and/or Rac1), ROS processing enzymes (SOD1 and/or peroxiredoxins), chloride channels capable of mediating superoxide transport and/or membrane gradients required for Nox activity, and novel redox-dependent sensors that control Nox activity. This review will discuss the cytokine and growth factor receptors that likely mediate signaling through redox-active endosomes, and the common mechanisms whereby they act. Additionally, the review will cover ligand-independent environmental injuries, such as hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, that also appear to facilitate cell signaling through NADPH oxidase at the level of the endosome. We suggest that redox-active endosomes encompass a subset of signaling endosomes that we have termed redoxosomes. Redoxosomes are uniquely equipped with redox-processing proteins capable of transmitting ROS signals from the endosome interior to redox-sensitive effectors on the endosomal surface. In this manner, redoxosomes can control redox-dependent effector functions through the spatial and temporal regulation of ROS as second messengers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1313–1333. PMID:19072143

  7. Endosome-mitochondria interactions are modulated by iron release from transferrin.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Nag, Sagarika; Mason, Anne B; Barroso, Margarida M

    2016-09-26

    Transient "kiss and run" interactions between endosomes containing iron-bound transferrin (Tf) and mitochondria have been shown to facilitate direct iron transfer in erythroid cells. In this study, we used superresolution three-dimensional (3D) direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to show that Tf-containing endosomes directly interact with mitochondria in epithelial cells. We used live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, followed by 3D rendering, object tracking, and a distance transformation algorithm, to track Tf-endosomes and characterize the dynamics of their interactions with mitochondria. Quenching of iron sensor RDA-labeled mitochondria confirmed functional iron transfer by an interacting Tf-endosome. The motility of Tf-endosomes is significantly reduced upon interaction with mitochondria. To further assess the functional role of iron in the ability of Tf-endosomes to interact with mitochondria, we blocked endosomal iron release by using a Tf K206E/K534A mutant. Blocking intraendosomal iron release led to significantly increased motility of Tf-endosomes and increased duration of endosome-mitochondria interactions. Thus, intraendosomal iron regulates the kinetics of the interactions between Tf-containing endosomes and mitochondria in epithelial cells. © 2016 Das et al.

  8. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  9. Mitochondrial fusion and ERK activity regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein localization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR.

  10. Neuronal early endosomes require EHD1 for L1/NgCAM trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Lasiecka, Z. M.; Yap, C. C.; Caplan, S.; Winckler, B.

    2010-01-01

    In neurons, the endosomal system is essential for membrane receptor trafficking to dendrites and axons, and thereby participates in various neuronal functions, such as neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity. A multitude of regulators coordinates trafficking through endosomes, but most of them have not been studied in detail in neurons. In non-neuronal cells, EHD1 (Eps15 homology-domain containing protein 1) functions in the recycling endosome and is required for endosome-to-plasma membrane transport of multiple cargos. In this study, we analyze the role of EHD1 in neurons. In particular, we investigate whether EHD1 is required for polarized trafficking of the dendritically-targeted transferrin and the axonal adhesion molecule L1/NgCAM, and if so, in what compartment it is required. We find that endosomal recycling of both L1/NgCAM and transferrin is impaired when EHD1 is downregulated. We show that EHD1 co-localizes with L1/NgCAM and transferrin mostly in EEA1 (early endosome antigen 1)-positive early endosomes and less extensively with recycling endosomes. Using live imaging, we observe that EHD1 is stably associated with endosomal membranes during their maturation into EEA1-positive compartments and often persists on them longer than EEA1. Finally we show that downregulation of EHD1 causes a delay of L1/NgCAM in exiting EEA1-positive endosomes, resulting in impaired targeting of L1/NgCAM to the axonal membrane. We conclude that in neurons EHD1 functions in early endosomes rather than (or possibly in addition to) recycling endosomes. These findings point to the existence of neuronal adaptations of the endosomal system. PMID:21147988

  11. Pep7p provides a novel protein that functions in vesicle-mediated transport between the yeast Golgi and endosome.

    PubMed

    Webb, G C; Zhang, J; Garlow, S J; Wesp, A; Riezman, H; Jones, E W

    1997-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep7 mutants are defective in transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolases to the lysosome-like vacuole. PEP7 is a nonessential gene that encodes a hydrophilic protein of 515 amino acids. A cysteine-rich tripartite motif in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide shows striking similarity to sequences found in many other eukaryotic proteins. Several of these proteins are thought to function in the vacuolar/lysosomal pathway. Mutations that change highly conserved cysteine residues in this motif lead to a loss of Pep7p function. Kinetic studies demonstrate that Pep7p function is required for the transport of the Golgi-precursors of the soluble hydrolases carboxypeptidase Y, proteinase A, and proteinase B to the endosome. Integral membrane hydrolase alkaline phosphatase is transported to the vacuole by a parallel intracellular pathway that does not require Pep7p function. pep7 mutants accumulate a 40-60-nm vesicle population, suggesting that Pep7p functions in a vesicle consumption step in vesicle-mediated transport of soluble hydrolases to the endosome. Whereas pep7 mutants demonstrate no defects in endocytic uptake at the plasma membrane, the mutants demonstrate defects in transport of receptor-mediated macromolecules through the endocytic pathway. Localization studies indicate that Pep7p is found both as a soluble cytoplasmic protein and associated with particulate fractions. We conclude that Pep7p functions as a novel regulator of vesicle docking and/or fusion at the endosome.

  12. Pep7p provides a novel protein that functions in vesicle-mediated transport between the yeast Golgi and endosome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, G C; Zhang, J; Garlow, S J; Wesp, A; Riezman, H; Jones, E W

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep7 mutants are defective in transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolases to the lysosome-like vacuole. PEP7 is a nonessential gene that encodes a hydrophilic protein of 515 amino acids. A cysteine-rich tripartite motif in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide shows striking similarity to sequences found in many other eukaryotic proteins. Several of these proteins are thought to function in the vacuolar/lysosomal pathway. Mutations that change highly conserved cysteine residues in this motif lead to a loss of Pep7p function. Kinetic studies demonstrate that Pep7p function is required for the transport of the Golgi-precursors of the soluble hydrolases carboxypeptidase Y, proteinase A, and proteinase B to the endosome. Integral membrane hydrolase alkaline phosphatase is transported to the vacuole by a parallel intracellular pathway that does not require Pep7p function. pep7 mutants accumulate a 40-60-nm vesicle population, suggesting that Pep7p functions in a vesicle consumption step in vesicle-mediated transport of soluble hydrolases to the endosome. Whereas pep7 mutants demonstrate no defects in endocytic uptake at the plasma membrane, the mutants demonstrate defects in transport of receptor-mediated macromolecules through the endocytic pathway. Localization studies indicate that Pep7p is found both as a soluble cytoplasmic protein and associated with particulate fractions. We conclude that Pep7p functions as a novel regulator of vesicle docking and/or fusion at the endosome. Images PMID:9168472

  13. Mammalian Mon2/Ysl2 regulates endosome-to-Golgi trafficking but possesses no guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Arl1 GTPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Divyanshu; Boh, Boon Kim; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Li; Cornvik, Tobias Carl; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Arl1 is a member of Arf family small GTPases that is essential for the organization and function of Golgi complex. Mon2/Ysl2, which shares significant homology with Sec7 family Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, was poorly characterized in mammalian cells. Here, we report the first in depth characterization of mammalian Mon2. We found that Mon2 localized to trans-Golgi network which was dependent on both its N and C termini. The depletion of Mon2 did not affect the Golgi localized or cellular active form of Arl1. Furthermore, our in vitro assay demonstrated that recombinant Mon2 did not promote guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. Therefore, our results suggest that Mon2 could be neither necessary nor sufficient for the guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. We demonstrated that Mon2 was involved in endosome-to-Golgi trafficking as its depletion accelerated the delivery of furin and CI-M6PR to Golgi after endocytosis.

  14. Adhesion energy can regulate vesicle fusion and stabilize partially fused states.

    PubMed

    Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand; Bykhovskaia, Maria

    2012-07-07

    Release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals occurs by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, and this process is highly regulated. Although major molecular components that control docking and fusion of vesicles to the synaptic membrane have been identified, the detailed mechanics of this process is not yet understood. We have developed a mathematical model that predicts how adhesion forces imposed by docking and fusion molecular machinery would affect the fusion process. We have computed the membrane stress that is produced by adhesion-driven vesicle bending and find that it is compressive. Further, our computations of the membrane curvature predict that strong adhesion can create a metastable state with a partially opened pore that would correspond to the 'kiss and run' release mode. Our model predicts that the larger the vesicle size, the more likely the metastable state with a transiently opened pore. These results contribute to understanding the mechanics of the fusion process, including possible clamping of the fusion by increasing molecular adhesion, and a balance between 'kiss and run' and full collapse fusion modes.

  15. Adhesion energy can regulate vesicle fusion and stabilize partially fused states

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand; Bykhovskaia, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals occurs by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, and this process is highly regulated. Although major molecular components that control docking and fusion of vesicles to the synaptic membrane have been identified, the detailed mechanics of this process is not yet understood. We have developed a mathematical model that predicts how adhesion forces imposed by docking and fusion molecular machinery would affect the fusion process. We have computed the membrane stress that is produced by adhesion-driven vesicle bending and find that it is compressive. Further, our computations of the membrane curvature predict that strong adhesion can create a metastable state with a partially opened pore that would correspond to the ‘kiss and run’ release mode. Our model predicts that the larger the vesicle size, the more likely the metastable state with a transiently opened pore. These results contribute to understanding the mechanics of the fusion process, including possible clamping of the fusion by increasing molecular adhesion, and a balance between ‘kiss and run’ and full collapse fusion modes. PMID:22258550

  16. Regulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein-Induced Cascade of Events Governing Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Wan Ting; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Receptor-dependent herpes simplex virus (HSV)-induced cell-cell fusion requires glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. Our current model posits that during fusion, receptor-activated conformational changes in gD activate gH/gL, which subsequently triggers the transformation of the prefusion form of gB into a fusogenic state. To examine the role of each glycoprotein in receptor-dependent cell-cell fusion, we took advantage of our discovery that fusion by wild-type herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins occurs twice as fast as that achieved by HSV-1 glycoproteins. By sequentially swapping each glycoprotein between the two serotypes, we established that fusion speed was governed by gH/gL, with gH being the main contributor. While the mutant forms of gB fuse at distinct rates that are dictated by their molecular structure, these restrictions can be overcome by gH/gL of HSV-2 (gH2/gL2), thereby enhancing their activity. We also found that deregulated forms of gD of HSV-1 (gD1) and gH2/gL2 can alter the fusogenic potential of gB, promoting cell fusion in the absence of a cellular receptor, and that deregulated forms of gB can drive the fusion machinery to even higher levels. Low pH enhanced fusion by affecting the structure of both gB and gH/gL mutants. Together, our data highlight the complexity of the fusion machinery, the impact of the activation state of each glycoprotein on the fusion process, and the critical role of gH/gL in regulating HSV-induced fusion. IMPORTANCE Cell-cell fusion mediated by HSV glycoproteins requires gD, gH/gL, gB, and a gD receptor. Here, we show that fusion by wild-type HSV-2 glycoproteins occurs twice as fast as that achieved by HSV-1 glycoproteins. By sequentially swapping each glycoprotein between the two serotypes, we found that the fusion process was controlled by gH/gL. Restrictions imposed on the gB structure by mutations could be overcome by gH2/gL2, enhancing the activity of the mutants. Under low-pH conditions or when

  17. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan; Xiao, Jian; Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo; Zhang, Rongbo

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  18. Close encounter of the third kind: the ER meets endosomes at fission sites.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, F Gisou; Gruenberg, Jean

    2014-12-22

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms functional contacts with several cellular organelles and regulates processes such as mitochondrial fission. In a recent issue of Cell, Rowland et al. (2014) extend these findings to endosomes, showing that the ER contacts endosomes at sites containing the WASH subunit FAM21, where it forecasts fission events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pink1 regulates mitochondrial dynamics through interaction with the fission/fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufeng; Ouyang, Yingshi; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M Flint; McQuibban, Angus; Vogel, Hannes; Lu, Bingwei

    2008-05-13

    Mitochondria form dynamic tubular networks that undergo frequent morphological changes through fission and fusion, the imbalance of which can affect cell survival in general and impact synaptic transmission and plasticity in neurons in particular. Some core components of the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery, including the dynamin-like GTPases Drp1, Mitofusin, Opa1, and the Drp1-interacting protein Fis1, have been identified. How the fission and fusion processes are regulated under normal conditions and the extent to which defects in mitochondrial fission/fusion are involved in various disease conditions are poorly understood. Mitochondrial malfunction tends to cause diseases with brain and skeletal muscle manifestations and has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether abnormal mitochondrial fission or fusion plays a role in PD pathogenesis has not been shown. Here, we show that Pink1, a mitochondria-targeted Ser/Thr kinase linked to familial PD, genetically interacts with the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery and modulates mitochondrial dynamics. Genetic manipulations that promote mitochondrial fission suppress Drosophila Pink1 mutant phenotypes in indirect flight muscle and dopamine neurons, whereas decreased fission has opposite effects. In Drosophila and mammalian cells, overexpression of Pink1 promotes mitochondrial fission, whereas inhibition of Pink1 leads to excessive fusion. Our genetic interaction results suggest that Fis1 may act in-between Pink1 and Drp1 in controlling mitochondrial fission. These results reveal a cell biological role for Pink1 and establish mitochondrial fission/fusion as a paradigm for PD research. Compounds that modulate mitochondrial fission/fusion could have therapeutic value in PD intervention.

  20. The brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) regulates myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development (myogenesis) is a complex but precisely orchestrated process involving spatiotemporal regulation of the proliferation, differentiation and fusion of myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts). Here we identify brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) as a transient, developmentally regulated gene involved in myoblast fusion. Bex1 expression is undetectable in adult muscles or in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells). During embryonic myogenesis, however, Bex1 is robustly expressed by myogenin+ differentiating myoblasts, but not by Pax7+ proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, Bex1 is initially localized in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. During adult muscle regeneration, Bex1 is highly expressed in newly regenerated myofibers and the expression is rapidly downregulated during maturation. Consistently, in cultured myoblasts, Bex1 is not expressed at the proliferation stage but transiently expressed upon induction of myogenic differentiation, following a similar cytoplasm to nucleus translocation pattern as seen in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we found that overexpression of Bex1 promotes the fusion of primary myoblasts without affecting myogenic differentiation and myogenin expression. Conversely, Bex1 knockout myoblasts exhibit obvious fusion defects, even though they express normal levels of myogenin and differentiate normally. These results elucidate a novel role of Bex1 in myogenesis through regulating myoblast fusion. PMID:26586200

  1. SHP2 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting preosteoclast fusion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genes that regulate osteoclast development and function under physiological and disease conditions remain incompletely understood. Shp2, a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, was implicated in regulating M-CSF and RANKL-evoked signaling, its role in osteoclastogenesis an...

  2. Regulation of cell protrusions by small GTPases during fusion of the neural folds.

    PubMed

    Rolo, Ana; Savery, Dawn; Escuin, Sarah; de Castro, Sandra C; Armer, Hannah E J; Munro, Peter M G; Molè, Matteo A; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-04-26

    Epithelial fusion is a crucial process in embryonic development, and its failure underlies several clinically important birth defects. For example, failure of neural fold fusion during neurulation leads to open neural tube defects including spina bifida. Using mouse embryos, we show that cell protrusions emanating from the apposed neural fold tips, at the interface between the neuroepithelium and the surface ectoderm, are required for completion of neural tube closure. By genetically ablating the cytoskeletal regulators Rac1 or Cdc42 in the dorsal neuroepithelium, or in the surface ectoderm, we show that these protrusions originate from surface ectodermal cells and that Rac1 is necessary for the formation of membrane ruffles which typify late closure stages, whereas Cdc42 is required for the predominance of filopodia in early neurulation. This study provides evidence for the essential role and molecular regulation of membrane protrusions prior to fusion of a key organ primordium in mammalian development.

  3. Dynamic actin cycling through mitochondrial subpopulations locally regulates the fission-fusion balance within mitochondrial networks.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew S; Wong, Yvette C; Simpson, Cory L; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2016-09-30

    Mitochondria form interconnected networks that dynamically remodel in response to cellular needs. Using live-cell imaging, we investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion. We identify cycling of actin filaments onto and off of subsets of cellular mitochondria. The association of actin filaments with mitochondrial subpopulations is transient; actin quickly disassembles, then reassembles around a distinct subpopulation, efficiently cycling through all cellular mitochondria within 14 min. The focal assembly of actin induces local, Drp1-dependent fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. On actin disassembly, fragmented mitochondria undergo rapid fusion, leading to regional recovery of the tubular mitochondrial network. Cycling requires dynamic actin polymerization and is blocked by inhibitors of both Arp2/3 and formins. We propose that cyclic assembly of actin onto mitochondria modulates the fission/fusion balance, promotes network remodelling and content mixing, and thus may serve as an essential mechanism regulating mitochondrial network homeostasis.

  4. Dynamic actin cycling through mitochondrial subpopulations locally regulates the fission–fusion balance within mitochondrial networks

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew S.; Wong, Yvette C.; Simpson, Cory L.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria form interconnected networks that dynamically remodel in response to cellular needs. Using live-cell imaging, we investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion. We identify cycling of actin filaments onto and off of subsets of cellular mitochondria. The association of actin filaments with mitochondrial subpopulations is transient; actin quickly disassembles, then reassembles around a distinct subpopulation, efficiently cycling through all cellular mitochondria within 14 min. The focal assembly of actin induces local, Drp1-dependent fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. On actin disassembly, fragmented mitochondria undergo rapid fusion, leading to regional recovery of the tubular mitochondrial network. Cycling requires dynamic actin polymerization and is blocked by inhibitors of both Arp2/3 and formins. We propose that cyclic assembly of actin onto mitochondria modulates the fission/fusion balance, promotes network remodelling and content mixing, and thus may serve as an essential mechanism regulating mitochondrial network homeostasis. PMID:27686185

  5. Disrupting vesicular trafficking at the endosome attenuates transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Gaur, Naseem A; Hasek, Jiri; Kim, Soon-ja; Qiu, Hongfang; Swanson, Mark J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2008-11-01

    The late endosome (MVB) plays a key role in coordinating vesicular transport of proteins between the Golgi complex, vacuole/lysosome, and plasma membrane. We found that deleting multiple genes involved in vesicle fusion at the MVB (class C/D vps mutations) impairs transcriptional activation by Gcn4, a global regulator of amino acid biosynthetic genes, by decreasing the ability of chromatin-bound Gcn4 to stimulate preinitiation complex assembly at the promoter. The functions of hybrid activators with Gal4 or VP16 activation domains are diminished in class D mutants as well, suggesting a broader defect in activation. Class E vps mutations, which impair protein sorting at the MVB, also decrease activation by Gcn4, provided they elicit rapid proteolysis of MVB cargo proteins in the aberrant late endosome. By contrast, specifically impairing endocytic trafficking from the plasma membrane, or vesicular transport to the vacuole, has a smaller effect on Gcn4 function. Thus, it appears that decreasing cargo proteins in the MVB through impaired delivery or enhanced degradation, and not merely the failure to transport cargo properly to the vacuole or downregulate plasma membrane proteins by endocytosis, is required to attenuate substantially transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

  6. Local cytoskeletal and organelle interactions impact molecular motor-driven early endosomal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Allison L.; Goldman, Yale E.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In the intracellular environment, motor-driven cargo must navigate a dense cytoskeletal network among abundant organelles. Results We investigated the effects of the crowded intracellular environment on early endosomal trafficking. Live-cell imaging of an endosomal cargo (endocytosed epidermal growth factor-conjugated quantum dots) combined with high-resolution tracking was used to analyze the heterogeneous motion of individual endosomes. The motile population of endosomes moved towards the perinuclear region in directed bursts of microtubule-based, dynein-dependent transport interrupted by longer periods of diffusive motion. Actin network density did not affect motile endosomes during directed runs or diffusive interruptions. Simultaneous two-color imaging was used to correlate changes in endosomal movement with potential obstacles to directed runs. Termination of directed runs spatially correlated with microtubule-dense regions, encounters with other endosomes, and interactions with the endoplasmic reticulum. During a subset of run terminations, we also observed merging and splitting of endosomes, deformation of the endoplasmic reticulum, and directional reversals at speeds up to ten-fold greater than characteristic in vitro motor velocities. These observations suggest endosomal membrane tension is high during directed run termination. Conclusions Our results indicate that the crowded cellular environment significantly impacts the motor-driven motility of organelles. Rather than simply acting as impediments to movement, interactions of trafficking cargos with intracellular obstacles may facilitate communication between membrane-bound compartments or contribute to the generation of membrane tension necessary for fusion and fission of endosomal membranes or remodeling of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23770188

  7. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  8. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-02-24

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer.

  9. Rubicon controls endosome maturation as a Rab7 effector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiming; Westphal, Wiebke; Wong, Kwun Ngok; Tan, Irena; Zhong, Qing

    2010-11-09

    The activation and recruitment of the small GTPase Rab7 to early endosome is a critical step for early to late endosome maturation, a process that requires the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KC3) and GTPase regulators. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Rab7 activation and endosome maturation is still poorly defined. Here we report that Rubicon, a component of the PI3KC3 complex, prevents endosome maturation through differential interactions with Rab7 and UVRAG. UVRAG activates PI3KC3 and C-VPS/HOPS, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that catalyzes the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab7. We demonstrate that Rubicon sequesters UVRAG from C-VPS/HOPS. Active GTP-bound Rab7 competes for Rubicon binding and releases UVRAG to associate with C-VPS/HOPS, which in turn promotes further loading of Rab7 with GTP. This feed-forward loop ensures rapid amplification of GTP-bound Rab7 and consequent stimulation of endosome maturation. Hence, Rubicon serves as a previously unknown Rab7 effector to ensure the proper progression of the endocytic pathway.

  10. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  11. Regulation of Exocytosis and Fusion Pores by Synaptotagmin-Effector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Hui, Enfu; Chapman, Edwin R.

    2010-01-01

    Synaptotagmin (syt) serves as a Ca2+ sensor in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones. This function depends on the ability of syt to interact with other molecules. Syt binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing lipid bilayers as well as to soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor receptors (SNAREs) and promotes SNARE assembly. All these interactions are regulated by Ca2+, but their specific roles in distinct kinetic steps of exocytosis are not well understood. To explore these questions we used amperometry recording from PC12 cells to investigate the kinetics of exocytosis. Syt isoforms and syt I mutants were overexpressed to perturb syt-PS and syt-SNARE interactions to varying degrees and evaluate the effects on fusion event frequency and the rates of fusion pore transitions. Syt I produced more rapid dilation of fusion pores than syt VII or syt IX, consistent with its role in synchronous synaptic release. Stronger syt-PS interactions were accompanied by a higher frequency of fusion events and more stable fusion pores. By contrast, syt-SNARE interactions and syt-induced SNARE assembly were uncorrelated with rates of exocytosis. This associates the syt-PS interaction with two distinct kinetic steps in Ca2+ triggered exocytosis and supports a role for the syt-PS interaction in stabilizing open fusion pores. PMID:20573977

  12. Regulation of Fusion Pore Closure and Compound Exocytosis in Neuroendocrine PC12 Cells by SCAMP1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Castle, David

    2011-01-01

    During exocytosis, neuroendocrine cells can achieve partial release of stored secretory products from dense core vesicles (DCVs) by coupling endocytosis directly at fusion sites and without full discharge. The physiological role of partial secretion is of substantial interest. Much is known about SNARE-mediated initiation of exocytosis and dynamin-mediated completion of endocytosis, but little is known about coupling events. We have used real-time microscopy to examine the role of secretory carrier membrane protein SCAMP1 in exo-endocytic coupling in PC12 cells. While reduced SCAMP1 expression is known to impede dilation of newly opened fusion pores during onset of DCV exocytosis, we now show that SCAMP1 deficiency also inhibits closure of fusion pores after they have opened. Inhibition causes accumulation of fusion figures at the plasma membrane. Closure is recovered by restoring expression and accelerated slightly by overexpression. Interestingly, inhibited pore closure resulting from loss of SCAMP1 appears to increase secondary fusion of DCVs to already-fused DCVs (compound exocytosis). Unexpectedly, reinternalization of expanded DCV membranes following compound exocytosis appears to proceed normally in SCAMP1-deficient cells. SCAMP1’s apparent dual role in facilitating dilation and closure of fusion pores implicates its function in exo-endocytic coupling and in the regulation of partial secretion. Secondarily, SCAMP1 may serve to limit the extent of compound exocytosis. PMID:21272170

  13. Retromer-mediated endosomal protein sorting: The role of unstructured domains.

    PubMed

    Mukadam, Aamir S; Seaman, Matthew N J

    2015-09-14

    The retromer complex is a key element of the endosomal protein sorting machinery that is conserved through evolution and has been shown to play a role in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Through sorting various membrane proteins (cargo), the function of retromer complex has been linked to physiological processes such as lysosome biogenesis, autophagy, down regulation of signalling receptors and cell spreading. The cargo-selective trimer of retromer recognises membrane proteins and sorts them into two distinct pathways; endosome-to-Golgi retrieval and endosome-to-cell surface recycling and additionally the cargo-selective trimer functions as a hub to recruit accessory proteins to endosomes where they may regulate and/or facilitate retromer-mediated endosomal proteins sorting. Unstructured domains present in cargo proteins or accessory factors play key roles in both these aspects of retromer function and will be discussed in this review.

  14. Sara endosomes and the asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Chrystelle; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    Tissue homeostasis is maintained by adult stem cells, which self-renew and give rise to differentiating cells. The generation of daughter cells with different fates is mediated by signalling molecules coming from an external niche or being asymmetrically dispatched between the two daughters upon stem cell mitosis. In the adult Drosophila midgut, the intestinal stem cell (ISC) divides to generate a new ISC and an enteroblast (EB) differentiating daughter. Notch signalling activity restricted to the EB regulates intestinal cell fate decision. Here, we show that ISCs divide asymmetrically, and Sara endosomes in ISCs are specifically dispatched to the presumptive EB. During ISC mitosis, Notch and Delta traffic through Sara endosomes, thereby contributing to Notch signalling bias, as revealed in Sara mutants: Sara itself contributes to the control of the ISC asymmetric division. Our data uncover an intrinsic endosomal mechanism during ISC mitosis, which participates in the maintenance of the adult intestinal lineage.

  15. Otoferlin is a calcium sensor that directly regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Colin P.

    2010-01-01

    Otoferlin is a large multi–C2 domain protein proposed to act as a calcium sensor that regulates synaptic vesicle exocytosis in cochlear hair cells. Although mutations in otoferlin have been associated with deafness, its contribution to neurotransmitter release is unresolved. Using recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin sense calcium with apparent dissociation constants that ranged from 13–25 µM; in the presence of membranes, these apparent affinities increase by up to sevenfold. Using a reconstituted membrane fusion assay, we found that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin stimulate membrane fusion in a calcium-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that a calcium binding–deficient form of the C2C domain is incapable of stimulating membrane fusion, further underscoring the importance of calcium for the protein’s function. These results demonstrate for the first time that otoferlin is a calcium sensor that can directly regulate soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor–mediated membrane fusion reactions. PMID:20921140

  16. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  17. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E.; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1K38A, partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  18. A WASp-binding type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase required for actin polymerization-driven endosome motility

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fanny S.; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2005-01-01

    Endosomes in yeast have been hypothesized to move through the cytoplasm by the momentum gained after actin polymerization has driven endosome abscision from the plasma membrane. Alternatively, after abscission, ongoing actin polymerization on endosomes could power transport. Here, we tested these hypotheses by showing that the Arp2/3 complex activation domain (WCA) of Las17 (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein [WASp] homologue) fused to an endocytic cargo protein (Ste2) rescued endosome motility in las17ΔWCA mutants, and that capping actin filament barbed ends inhibited endosome motility but not endocytic internalization. Motility therefore requires continual actin polymerization on endosomes. We also explored how Las17 is regulated. Endosome motility required the Las17-binding protein Lsb6, a type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. Catalytically inactive Lsb6 interacted with Las17 and promoted endosome motility. Lsb6 therefore is a novel regulator of Las17 that mediates endosome motility independent of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis. Mammalian type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases may regulate WASp proteins and endosome motility. PMID:16216926

  19. A WASp-binding type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase required for actin polymerization-driven endosome motility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fanny S; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M; Blumer, Kendall J

    2005-10-10

    Endosomes in yeast have been hypothesized to move through the cytoplasm by the momentum gained after actin polymerization has driven endosome abscision from the plasma membrane. Alternatively, after abscission, ongoing actin polymerization on endosomes could power transport. Here, we tested these hypotheses by showing that the Arp2/3 complex activation domain (WCA) of Las17 (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein [WASp] homologue) fused to an endocytic cargo protein (Ste2) rescued endosome motility in las17DeltaWCA mutants, and that capping actin filament barbed ends inhibited endosome motility but not endocytic internalization. Motility therefore requires continual actin polymerization on endosomes. We also explored how Las17 is regulated. Endosome motility required the Las17-binding protein Lsb6, a type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. Catalytically inactive Lsb6 interacted with Las17 and promoted endosome motility. Lsb6 therefore is a novel regulator of Las17 that mediates endosome motility independent of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis. Mammalian type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases may regulate WASp proteins and endosome motility.

  20. Biogenesis of endosome-derived transport carriers.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard J; Harrison, Megan S; Burd, Christopher G

    2015-09-01

    Sorting of macromolecules within the endosomal system is vital for physiological control of nutrient homeostasis, cell motility, and proteostasis. Trafficking routes that export macromolecules from the endosome via vesicle and tubule transport carriers constitute plasma membrane recycling and retrograde endosome-to-Golgi pathways. Proteins of the sorting nexin family have been discovered to function at nearly every step of endosomal transport carrier biogenesis and it is becoming increasingly clear that they form the core machineries of cargo-specific transport pathways that are closely integrated with cellular physiology. Here, we summarize recent progress in elucidating the pathways that mediate the biogenesis of endosome-derived transport carriers.

  1. An endosomal tether undergoes an entropic collapse to bring vesicles together.

    PubMed

    Murray, David H; Jahnel, Marcus; Lauer, Janelle; Avellaneda, Mario J; Brouilly, Nicolas; Cezanne, Alice; Morales-Navarrete, Hernán; Perini, Enrico D; Ferguson, Charles; Lupas, Andrei N; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Parton, Robert G; Grill, Stephan W; Zerial, Marino

    2016-09-01

    An early step in intracellular transport is the selective recognition of a vesicle by its appropriate target membrane, a process regulated by Rab GTPases via the recruitment of tethering effectors. Membrane tethering confers higher selectivity and efficiency to membrane fusion than the pairing of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) alone. Here we address the mechanism whereby a tethered vesicle comes closer towards its target membrane for fusion by reconstituting an endosomal asymmetric tethering machinery consisting of the dimeric coiled-coil protein EEA1 (refs 6, 7) recruited to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate membranes and binding vesicles harbouring Rab5. Surprisingly, structural analysis reveals that Rab5:GTP induces an allosteric conformational change in EEA1, from extended to flexible and collapsed. Through dynamic analysis by optical tweezers, we confirm that EEA1 captures a vesicle at a distance corresponding to its extended conformation, and directly measure its flexibility and the forces induced during the tethering reaction. Expression of engineered EEA1 variants defective in the conformational change induce prominent clusters of tethered vesicles in vivo. Our results suggest a new mechanism in which Rab5 induces a change in flexibility of EEA1, generating an entropic collapse force that pulls the captured vesicle towards the target membrane to initiate docking and fusion.

  2. An endosomal tether undergoes an entropic collapse to bring vesicles together

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Janelle; Avellaneda, Mario J.; Brouilly, Nicolas; Cezanne, Alice; Morales-Navarrete, Hernán; Perini, Enrico D.; Ferguson, Charles; Lupas, Andrei N.; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Parton, Robert G.; Grill, Stephan W.; Zerial, Marino

    2016-01-01

    An early step in intracellular transport is the selective recognition of a vesicle by its appropriate target membrane, a process regulated by Rab GTPases via the recruitment of tethering effectors1–4. Membrane tethering confers higher selectivity and efficiency to membrane fusion than the pairing of SNAREs alone5,6,7. Here, we addressed the mechanism whereby a tethered vesicle comes closer towards its target membrane for fusion by reconstituting an endosomal asymmetric tethering machinery consisting of the dimeric coiled-coil protein EEA16,7 recruited to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate membranes and binding vesicles harboring Rab5. Surprisingly, structural analysis revealed that Rab5:GTP induces an allosteric conformational change in EEA1, from extended to flexible and collapsed. Through dynamic analysis by optical tweezers we confirmed that EEA1 captures a vesicle at a distance corresponding to its extended conformation, and directly measured its flexibility and the forces induced during the tethering reaction. Expression of engineered EEA1 variants defective in the conformational change induced prominent clusters of tethered vesicles in vivo. Our results suggest a new mechanism in which Rab5 induces a change in flexibility of EEA1, generating an entropic collapse force that pulls the captured vesicle toward the target membrane to initiate docking and fusion. PMID:27556945

  3. The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brittany C.; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Sun, Yan; Ji, Ping; Li, Xia; Gumin, Joy; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Yli-Harja, Olli; Haapasalo, Hannu; Visakorpi, Tapio; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Chen, Kexin; Lang, Frederick F.; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:23298836

  4. Exosomes and HIV Gag bud from endosome-like domains of the T cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Amy M.; Fang, Yi; Fallon, Jonathan K.; Yang, Jr-Ming; Hildreth, James E.K.; Gould, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted, single membrane organelles of ∼100 nm diameter. Their biogenesis is typically thought to occur in a two-step process involving (1) outward vesicle budding at limiting membranes of endosomes (outward = away from the cytoplasm), which generates intralumenal vesicles, followed by (2) endosome–plasma membrane fusion, which releases these internal vesicles into the extracellular milieu as exosomes. In this study, we present evidence that certain cells, including Jurkat T cells, possess discrete domains of plasma membrane that are enriched for exosomal and endosomal proteins, retain the endosomal property of outward vesicle budding, and serve as sites of immediate exosome biogenesis. It has been hypothesized that retroviruses utilize the exosome biogenesis pathway for the formation of infectious particles. In support of this, we find that Jurkat T cells direct the key budding factor of HIV, HIV Gag, to these endosome-like domains of plasma membrane and secrete HIV Gag from the cell in exosomes. PMID:16533950

  5. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E5 Oncoprotein Inhibits Epidermal Growth Factor Trafficking Independently of Endosome Acidification ▿

    PubMed Central

    Suprynowicz, Frank A.; Krawczyk, Ewa; Hebert, Jess D.; Sudarshan, Sawali R.; Simic, Vera; Kamonjoh, Christopher M.; Schlegel, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E5 oncoprotein (16E5) enhances acute, ligand-dependent activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and concomitantly alkalinizes endosomes, presumably by binding to the 16-kDa “c” subunit of the V-ATPase proton pump (16K) and inhibiting V-ATPase function. However, the relationship between 16K binding, endosome alkalinization, and altered EGFR signaling remains unclear. Using an antibody that we generated against 16K, we found that 16E5 associated with only a small fraction of endogenous 16K in keratinocytes, suggesting that it was unlikely that E5 could significantly affect V-ATPase function by direct inhibition. Nevertheless, E5 inhibited the acidification of endosomes, as determined by a new assay using a biologically active, pH-sensitive fluorescent EGF conjugate. Since we also found that 16E5 did not alter cell surface EGF binding, the number of EGFRs on the cell surface, or the endocytosis of prebound EGF, we postulated that it might be blocking the fusion of early endosomes with acidified vesicles. Our studies with pH-sensitive and -insensitive fluorescent EGF conjugates and fluorescent dextran confirmed that E5 prevented endosome maturation (acidification and enlargement) by inhibiting endosome fusion. The E5-dependent defect in vesicle fusion was not due to detectable disruption of actin, tubulin, vimentin, or cytokeratin filaments, suggesting that membrane fusion was being directly affected rather than vesicle transport. Perhaps most importantly, while bafilomycin A1 (like E5) binds to 16K and inhibits endosome acidification, it did not mimic the ability of E5 to inhibit endosome enlargement or the trafficking of EGF. Thus, 16E5 alters EGF endocytic trafficking via a pH-independent inhibition of vesicle fusion. PMID:20686024

  6. Endosomal system genetics and autism spectrum disorders: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Patak, Jameson; Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of debilitating neurodevelopmental disorders thought to have genetic etiology, due to their high heritability. The endosomal system has become increasingly implicated in ASD pathophysiology. In an attempt to summarize the association between endosomal system genes and ASDs we performed a systematic review of the literature. We searched PubMed for relevant articles. Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) gene database was used to exclude articles regarding genes with less than minimal evidence for association with ASDs. Our search retained 55 articles reviewed in two categories: genes that regulate and genes that are regulated by the endosomal system. Our review shows that the endosomal system is a novel pathway implicated in ASDs as well as other neuropsychiatric disorders. It plays a central role in aspects of cellular physiology on which neurons and glial cells are particularly reliant, due to their unique metabolic and functional demands. The system shows potential for biomarkers and pharmacological intervention and thus more research into this pathway is warranted.

  7. Endosomal Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Is Essential for Canonical GPCR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasunori; Rutaganira, Florentine U; Jullié, Damien; Shokat, Kevan M; von Zastrow, Mark

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of signaling receptors, are critically regulated by endosomal trafficking, suggesting that endosomes might provide new strategies for manipulating GPCR signaling. Here we test this hypothesis by focusing on class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (Vps34), which is an essential regulator of endosomal trafficking. We verify that Vps34 is required for recycling of the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR), a prototypical GPCR, and then investigate the effects of Vps34 inhibition on the canonical cAMP response elicited by β2AR activation. Vps34 inhibition impairs the ability of cells to recover this response after prolonged activation, which is in accord with the established role of recycling in GPCR resensitization. In addition, Vps34 inhibition also attenuates the short-term cAMP response, and its effect begins several minutes after initial agonist application. These results establish Vps34 as an essential determinant of both short-term and long-term canonical GPCR signaling, and support the potential utility of the endosomal system as a druggable target for signaling.

  8. An ESCRT–spastin interaction promotes fission of recycling tubules from the endosome

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Rachel; Lumb, Jennifer H.; Fassier, Coralie; Connell, James W.; Ten Martin, Daniel; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Hazan, Jamilé

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms coordinating endosomal degradation and recycling are poorly understood, as are the cellular roles of microtubule (MT) severing. We show that cells lacking the MT-severing protein spastin had increased tubulation of and defective receptor sorting through endosomal tubular recycling compartments. Spastin required the ability to sever MTs and to interact with ESCRT-III (a complex controlling cargo degradation) proteins to regulate endosomal tubulation. Cells lacking IST1 (increased sodium tolerance 1), an endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) component to which spastin binds, also had increased endosomal tubulation. Our results suggest that inclusion of IST1 into the ESCRT complex allows recruitment of spastin to promote fission of recycling tubules from the endosome. Thus, we reveal a novel cellular role for MT severing and identify a mechanism by which endosomal recycling can be coordinated with the degradative machinery. Spastin is mutated in the axonopathy hereditary spastic paraplegia. Zebrafish spinal motor axons depleted of spastin or IST1 also had abnormal endosomal tubulation, so we propose this phenotype is important for axonal degeneration. PMID:23897888

  9. Cell-free mitochondrial fusion assay detected by specific protease reaction revealed Ca2+ as regulator of mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Naotada; Maeda, Maki; Ban, Tadato; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2017-04-27

    Mitochondrial dynamic by frequent fusion and fission have important roles in various cellular signaling processes and pathophysiology in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial fusion, especially in mammalian cells, are not well understood. Accordingly, we developed a novel biochemical cell-free mitochondrial fusion assay system using isolated human mitochondria. We used a protease and its specific substrate that are essential for yeast autophagy; Atg4 protease is required for maturation and the de-conjugation of the ubiquitin-like modifier Atg8. Atg4-FLAG and Atg8-GFP were separately expressed in the mitochondrial matrix of HeLa cells. Isolated mitochondria were then mixed and packed in the presence of energy regeneration mix. Immunoblotting with an anti-GFP antibody revealed Atg8 processing, suggesting that the double membranes of isolated mitochondria were indeed fused. The mitochondrial fusion reaction required GTP hydrolysis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and intact outer membrane proteins containing two mitofusin isoforms. Using this assay, we searched for stimulators of mitochondrial fusion and found that rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Ca2+ chelator EGTA stimulate mitochondrial fusion. This novel cell-free assay system using isolated human mitochondria is simple, sensitive, and reproducible; thus, it is useful for screening proteins and molecules that modulate mitochondrial fusion. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of RAB5A early endosome trafficking in response to KRas mediated macropinocytic fluxes in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Teske, Christian; Schweitzer, Christine; Palamidessi, Andrea; Aust, Daniela E; Scita, Giorgio; Weitz, Jürgen; Welsch, Thilo

    2017-09-01

    KRAS is the key mutated gene in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Emerging evidence indicates that KRas modulates endocytic uptake. The present study aimed to explore the fate of early endosomal trafficking under the control of KRas expression in PDAC. Surprisingly, PANC-1 cells lacking KRas exhibited significantly enlarged early and late endosomes containing internalized dextran and epidermal growth factor. Endosome enlargement was accompanied by reduced endosomal degradation. Both KRas silencing and lysosomal blockade caused an upregulation of the master regulator of early endosome biogenesis, RAB5A, which is likely responsible for the expansion of the early endosomal compartment, because simultaneous KRAS/RAB5A knockdown abolished endosome enlargement. In contrast, early endosome shrinkage was seen in MIA PaCa-2 cells despite RAB5A upregulation, indicating that distinct KRas-modulated responses operate in different metabolic subtypes of PDAC. In conclusion, mutant KRAS promotes endosomal degradation in PDAC cell lines, which is impaired by KRAS silencing. Moreover, KRAS silencing activates RAB5A upregulation and drives PDAC subtype-dependent modulation of endosome trafficking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA (SUF4) Supports Gamete Fusion via Regulating Arabidopsis EC1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Resentini, Francesca; Cyprys, Philipp; Steffen, Joshua G; Alter, Svenja; Morandini, Piero; Mizzotti, Chiara; Lloyd, Alan; Drews, Gary N; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Colombo, Lucia; Sprunck, Stefanie; Masiero, Simona

    2017-01-01

    The EGG CELL1 (EC1) gene family of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprises five members that are specifically expressed in the egg cell and redundantly control gamete fusion during double fertilization. We investigated the activity of all five EC1 promoters in promoter-deletion studies and identified SUF4 (SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA4), a C2H2 transcription factor, as a direct regulator of the EC1 gene expression. In particular, we demonstrated that SUF4 binds to all five Arabidopsis EC1 promoters, thus regulating their expression. The down-regulation of SUF4 in homozygous suf4-1 ovules results in reduced EC1 expression and delayed sperm fusion, which can be rescued by expressing SUF4-β-glucuronidase under the control of the SUF4 promoter. To identify more gene products able to regulate EC1 expression together with SUF4, we performed coexpression studies that led to the identification of MOM1 (MORPHEUS' MOLECULE1), a component of a silencing mechanism that is independent of DNA methylation marks. In mom1-3 ovules, both SUF4 and EC1 genes are down-regulated, and EC1 genes show higher levels of histone 3 lysine-9 acetylation, suggesting that MOM1 contributes to the regulation of SUF4 and EC1 gene expression.

  12. A residue located at the junction of the head and stalk regions of measles virus fusion protein regulates membrane fusion by controlling conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuto; Yonemori, Saeka; Hirose, Mitsuhiro; Shogaki, Hiroko; Wakimoto, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Gotoh, Bin; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Masae

    2017-02-01

    The fusion (F) protein of measles virus performs refolding from the thermodynamically metastable prefusion form to the highly stable postfusion form via an activated unstable intermediate stage, to induce membrane fusion. Some amino acids involved in the fusion regulation cluster in the heptad repeat B (HR-B) domain of the stalk region, among which substitution of residue 465 by various amino acids revealed that fusion activity correlates well with its side chain length from the Cα (P<0.01) and van der Waals volume (P<0.001), except for Phe, Tyr, Trp, Pro and His carrying ring structures. Directed towards the head region, longer side chains of the non-ring-type 465 residues penetrate more deeply into the head region and may disturb the hydrophobic interaction between the stalk and head regions and cause destabilization of the molecule by lowering the energy barrier for refolding, which conferred the F protein enhanced fusion activity. Contrarily, the side chain of ring-type 465 residues turned away from the head region, resulting in not only no contact with the head region but also extensive coverage of the HR-B surface, which may prevent the dissociation of the HR-B bundle for initiation of membrane fusion and suppress fusion activity. Located in the HR-B domain just at the junction between the head and stalk regions, amino acid 465 is endowed with a possible ability to either destabilize or stabilize the F protein depending on its molecular volume and the direction of the side chain, regulating fusion activity of measles virus F protein.

  13. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  14. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Cell Fusion and Heterokaryon Formation in Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Heller, Jens; Herzog, Stephanie; Fleißner, André; Glass, N Louise

    2017-03-01

    For the majority of fungal species, the somatic body of an individual is a network of interconnected cells sharing a common cytoplasm and organelles. This syncytial organization contributes to an efficient distribution of resources, energy, and biochemical signals. Cell fusion is a fundamental process for fungal development, colony establishment, and habitat exploitation and can occur between hyphal cells of an individual colony or between colonies of genetically distinct individuals. One outcome of cell fusion is the establishment of a stable heterokaryon, culminating in benefits for each individual via shared resources or being of critical importance for the sexual or parasexual cycle of many fungal species. However, a second outcome of cell fusion between genetically distinct strains is formation of unstable heterokaryons and the induction of a programmed cell death reaction in the heterokaryotic cells. This reaction of nonself rejection, which is termed heterokaryon (or vegetative) incompatibility, is widespread in the fungal kingdom and acts as a defense mechanism against genome exploitation and mycoparasitism. Here, we review the currently identified molecular players involved in the process of somatic cell fusion and its regulation in filamentous fungi. Thereafter, we summarize the knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanism of heterokaryon incompatibility and place this phenomenon in the broader context of biotropic interactions and immunity.

  16. A proteomic approach to identify endosomal cargoes controlling cancer invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Vera, Jesica; Palmer, Sarah; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; Dornier, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Louise E.; Macpherson, Iain; Edwards, Joanne; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously shown that Rab17, a small GTPase associated with epithelial polarity, is specifically suppressed by ERK2 (also known as MAPK1) signalling to promote an invasive phenotype. However, the mechanisms through which Rab17 loss permits invasiveness, and the endosomal cargoes that are responsible for mediating this, are unknown. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we have found that knockdown of Rab17 leads to a highly selective reduction in the cellular levels of a v-SNARE (Vamp8). Moreover, proteomics and immunofluorescence indicate that Vamp8 is associated with Rab17 at late endosomes. Reduced levels of Vamp8 promote transition between ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and a more invasive phenotype. We developed an unbiased proteomic approach to elucidate the complement of receptors that redistributes between endosomes and the plasma membrane, and have pin-pointed neuropilin-2 (NRP2) as a key pro-invasive cargo of Rab17- and Vamp8-regulated trafficking. Indeed, reduced Rab17 or Vamp8 levels lead to increased mobilisation of NRP2-containing late endosomes and upregulated cell surface expression of NRP2. Finally, we show that NRP2 is required for the basement membrane disruption that accompanies the transition between DCIS and a more invasive phenotype. PMID:28062852

  17. Selective endosomal microautophagy is starvation-inducible in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anindita; Patel, Bindi; Koga, Hiroshi; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Jenny, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy delivers cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation and is thus essential for cellular homeostasis and to cope with different stressors. As such, autophagy counteracts various human diseases and its reduction leads to aging-like phenotypes. Macroautophagy (MA) can selectively degrade organelles or aggregated proteins, whereas selective degradation of single proteins has only been described for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and endosomal microautophagy (eMI). These 2 autophagic pathways are specific for proteins containing KFERQ-related targeting motifs. Using a KFERQ-tagged fluorescent biosensor, we have identified an eMI-like pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that this biosensor localizes to late endosomes and lysosomes upon prolonged starvation in a KFERQ- and Hsc70-4- dependent manner. Furthermore, fly eMI requires endosomal multivesicular body formation mediated by ESCRT complex components. Importantly, induction of Drosophila eMI requires longer starvation than the induction of MA and is independent of the critical MA genes atg5, atg7, and atg12. Furthermore, inhibition of Tor signaling induces eMI in flies under nutrient rich conditions, and, as eMI in Drosophila also requires atg1 and atg13, our data suggest that these genes may have a novel, additional role in regulating eMI in flies. Overall, our data provide the first evidence for a novel, starvation-inducible, catabolic process resembling endosomal microautophagy in the Drosophila fat body. PMID:27487474

  18. Selective endosomal microautophagy is starvation-inducible in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anindita; Patel, Bindi; Koga, Hiroshi; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Jenny, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Autophagy delivers cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation and is thus essential for cellular homeostasis and to cope with different stressors. As such, autophagy counteracts various human diseases and its reduction leads to aging-like phenotypes. Macroautophagy (MA) can selectively degrade organelles or aggregated proteins, whereas selective degradation of single proteins has only been described for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and endosomal microautophagy (eMI). These 2 autophagic pathways are specific for proteins containing KFERQ-related targeting motifs. Using a KFERQ-tagged fluorescent biosensor, we have identified an eMI-like pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that this biosensor localizes to late endosomes and lysosomes upon prolonged starvation in a KFERQ- and Hsc70-4- dependent manner. Furthermore, fly eMI requires endosomal multivesicular body formation mediated by ESCRT complex components. Importantly, induction of Drosophila eMI requires longer starvation than the induction of MA and is independent of the critical MA genes atg5, atg7, and atg12. Furthermore, inhibition of Tor signaling induces eMI in flies under nutrient rich conditions, and, as eMI in Drosophila also requires atg1 and atg13, our data suggest that these genes may have a novel, additional role in regulating eMI in flies. Overall, our data provide the first evidence for a novel, starvation-inducible, catabolic process resembling endosomal microautophagy in the Drosophila fat body.

  19. Overexpression of Rab22a hampers the transport between endosomes and the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mesa, Rosana; Magadan, Javier; Barbieri, Alejandro; Lopez, Cecilia; Stahl, Philip D.; Mayorga, Luis S. . E-mail: lmayorga@fcm.uncu.edu.ar

    2005-04-01

    The transport and sorting of soluble and membrane-associated macromolecules arriving at endosomal compartments require a complex set of Rab proteins. Rab22a has been localized to the endocytic compartment; however, very little is known about the function of Rab22a and inconsistent results have been reported in studies performed in different cell lines. To characterize the function of Rab22a in endocytic transport, the wild-type protein (Rab22a WT), a hydrolysis-deficient mutant (Rab22a Q64L), and a mutant with reduced affinity for GTP (Rab22a S19N) were expressed in CHO cells. None of the three Rab22a constructs affected the transport of rhodamine-dextran to lysosomes, the digestion of internalized proteins, or the lysosomal localization of cathepsin D. In contrast with the mild effect of Rab22a on the endosome-lysosome route, cells expressing Rab22a WT and Rab22a Q64L presented a strong delay in the retrograde transport of cholera toxin from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. Moreover, these cells accumulated the cation independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor in endosomes. These observations indicate that Rab22a can affect the trafficking from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus probably by promoting fusion among endosomes and impairing the proper segregation of membrane domains required for targeting to the trans-Golgi network (TGN)

  20. Role of LBPA and Alix in multivesicular liposome formation and endosome organization.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotami; Chevallier, Julien; Mayran, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Isabelle; Ferguson, Charles; Fauré, Julien; Blanc, Nathalie Sartori; Matile, Stefan; Dubochet, Jacques; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert G; Vilbois, Francis; Gruenberg, Jean

    2004-01-23

    What are the components that control the assembly of subcellular organelles in eukaryotic cells? Although membranes can clearly be distorted by cytosolic factors, very little is known about the intrinsic mechanisms that control the biogenesis, shape, and organization of organellar membranes. Here, we found that the unconventional phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) could induce the formation of multivesicular liposomes that resembled the multivesicular endosomes that exist where this lipid is found in vivo. This process depended on the same pH gradient that exists across endosome membranes in vivo and was selectively controlled by Alix. In turn, Alix regulated the organization of LBPA-containing endosomes in vivo.

  1. Regulation of cell protrusions by small GTPases during fusion of the neural folds

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Ana; Savery, Dawn; Escuin, Sarah; de Castro, Sandra C; Armer, Hannah EJ; Munro, Peter MG; Molè, Matteo A; Greene, Nicholas DE; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial fusion is a crucial process in embryonic development, and its failure underlies several clinically important birth defects. For example, failure of neural fold fusion during neurulation leads to open neural tube defects including spina bifida. Using mouse embryos, we show that cell protrusions emanating from the apposed neural fold tips, at the interface between the neuroepithelium and the surface ectoderm, are required for completion of neural tube closure. By genetically ablating the cytoskeletal regulators Rac1 or Cdc42 in the dorsal neuroepithelium, or in the surface ectoderm, we show that these protrusions originate from surface ectodermal cells and that Rac1 is necessary for the formation of membrane ruffles which typify late closure stages, whereas Cdc42 is required for the predominance of filopodia in early neurulation. This study provides evidence for the essential role and molecular regulation of membrane protrusions prior to fusion of a key organ primordium in mammalian development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13273.001 PMID:27114066

  2. Dynamics of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in the contractile vacuole complex and the endosomal pathway of Dictyostelium cells.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Margaret; Köhler, Jana; Arana, Quyen; Liu, Tongyao; Heuser, John; Gerisch, Günther

    2002-07-15

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a multi-subunit enzyme that plays important roles in eukaryotic cells. In Dictyostelium, it is found primarily in membranes of the contractile vacuole complex, where it energizes fluid accumulation by this osmoregulatory organelle and also in membranes of endolysosomes, where it serves to acidify the endosomal lumen. In the present study, a fusion was created between vatM, the gene encoding the 100 kDa transmembrane subunit of the V-ATPase, and the gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). When expressed in Dictyostelium cells, this fusion protein, VatM-GFP, was correctly targeted to contractile vacuole and endolysosomal membranes and was competent to direct assembly of the V-ATPase enzyme complex. Protease treatment of isolated endosomes indicated that the GFP moiety, located on the C-terminus of VatM, was exposed to the cytoplasmic side of the endosomal membrane rather than to the lumenal side. VatM-GFP labeling of the contractile vacuole complex revealed clearly the dynamics of this pleiomorphic vesiculotubular organelle. VatM-GFP labeling of endosomes allowed direct visualization of the trafficking of vacuolar proton pumps in this pathway, which appeared to be entirely independent from the contractile vacuole membrane system. In cells whose endosomes were pre-labeled with TRITC-dextran and then fed yeast particles, VatM-GFP was delivered to newly formed yeast phagosomes with the same time course as TRITC-dextran, consistent with transfer via a direct fusion of endosomes with phagosomes. Several minutes were required before the intensity of the VatM-GFP labeling of new phagosomes reached the level observed in older phagosomes, suggesting that this fusion process was progressive and continuous. VatM-GFP was retrieved from the phagosome membrane prior to exocytosis of the indigestible remnants of the yeast particle. These data suggest that vacuolar proton pumps are recycled by fusion of advanced with newly formed

  3. A Membrane-bound eIF2 Alpha Kinase Located in Endosomes Is Regulated by Heme and Controls Differentiation and ROS Levels in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Augusto, Leonardo; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; de Jesus, Teresa Cristina Leandro; Zhang, Min; Castilho, Beatriz A.; Schenkman, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation has been described as a key step for the control of growth and differentiation of several protozoan parasites in response to environmental changes. This occurs by the activation of protein kinases that phosphorylate the alpha subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which decreases translation, and in higher eukaryotes favors the expression of stress remedial response genes. However, very little is known about the signals that activate eIF2α kinases in protozoan parasites. Here, we characterized an eIF2α kinase of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcK2), the agent of Chagas’ disease, as a transmembrane protein located in organelles that accumulate nutrients in proliferating parasite forms. We found that heme binds specifically to the catalytic domain of the kinase, inhibiting its activity. In the absence of heme, TcK2 is activated, arresting cell growth and inducing differentiation of proliferative into infective and non-proliferative forms. Parasites lacking TcK2 lose this differentiation capacity and heme is not stored in reserve organelles, remaining in the cytosol. TcK2 null cells display growth deficiencies, accumulating hydrogen peroxide that drives the generation of reactive oxygen species. The augmented level of hydrogen peroxide occurs as a consequence of increased superoxide dismutase activity and decreased peroxide activity. These phenotypes could be reverted by the re-expression of the wild type but not of a TcK2 dead mutant. These findings indicate that heme is a key factor for the growth control and differentiation through regulation of an unusual type of eIF2α kinase in T. cruzi. PMID:25658109

  4. Fatty acid trafficking in starved cells: regulation by lipid droplet lipolysis, autophagy, and mitochondrial fusion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Angelika S; Cohen, Sarah; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-03-23

    Fatty acids (FAs) provide cellular energy under starvation, yet how they mobilize and move into mitochondria in starved cells, driving oxidative respiration, is unclear. Here, we clarify this process by visualizing FA trafficking with a fluorescent FA probe. The labeled FA accumulated in lipid droplets (LDs) in well-fed cells but moved from LDs into mitochondria when cells were starved. Autophagy in starved cells replenished LDs with FAs, increasing LD number over time. Cytoplasmic lipases removed FAs from LDs, enabling their transfer into mitochondria. This required mitochondria to be highly fused and localized near LDs. When mitochondrial fusion was prevented in starved cells, FAs neither homogeneously distributed within mitochondria nor became efficiently metabolized. Instead, FAs reassociated with LDs and fluxed into neighboring cells. Thus, FAs engage in complex trafficking itineraries regulated by cytoplasmic lipases, autophagy, and mitochondrial fusion dynamics, ensuring maximum oxidative metabolism and avoidance of FA toxicity in starved cells.

  5. Rab32 subfamily small GTPases: pleiotropic Rabs in endosomal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2017-08-01

    Rab small GTPases, well-known regulators of membrane trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, comprise approximately 60 different members in mammals. During the past decade, our understanding of the functions of mammalian Rab32 subfamily members (Rab32 and Rab38) have deepened, especially on the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, such as melanosomes, and the protection mechanisms against several pathogenic microbial infections. Endosome-mediated membrane trafficking by Rab32 subfamily members plays pivotal roles in these events. In this review, we provide an overview of the regulatory mechanisms of mammalian Rab32-family members in endosomal trafficking, especially focusing on their GEF, GAP and effector molecules, and describe the latest findings on physiological and pathological functions regulated by these molecules. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Trisomy for Synaptojanin1 in Down syndrome is functionally linked to the enlargement of early endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cossec, Jack-Christophe; Lavaur, Jérémie; Berman, Diego E.; Rivals, Isabelle; Hoischen, Alexander; Stora, Samantha; Ripoll, Clémentine; Mircher, Clotilde; Grattau, Yann; OlivoMarin, Jean-Christophe; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Lecourtois, Magalie; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Veltman, Joris A.; Delabar, Jean M.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Enlarged early endosomes have been observed in neurons and fibroblasts in Down syndrome (DS). These endosome abnormalities have been implicated in the early development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in these subjects. Here, we show the presence of enlarged endosomes in blood mononuclear cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals with DS using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Genotype–phenotype correlations in LCLs carrying partial trisomies 21 revealed that triplication of a 2.56 Mb locus in 21q22.11 is associated with the endosomal abnormalities. This locus contains the gene encoding the phosphoinositide phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (SYNJ1), a key regulator of the signalling phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate that has been shown to regulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We found that SYNJ1 transcripts are increased in LCLs from individuals with DS and that overexpression of SYNJ1 in a neuroblastoma cell line as well as in transgenic mice leads to enlarged endosomes. Moreover, the proportion of enlarged endosomes in fibroblasts from an individual with DS was reduced after silencing SYNJ1 expression with RNA interference. In LCLs carrying amyloid precursor protein (APP) microduplications causing autosomal dominant early-onset AD, enlarged endosomes were absent, suggesting that APP overexpression alone is not involved in the modification of early endosomes in this cell type. These findings provide new insights into the contribution of SYNJ1 overexpression to the endosomal changes observed in DS and suggest an attractive new target for rescuing endocytic dysfunction and lipid metabolism in DS and in AD. PMID:22511594

  7. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  8. Engagement of the Small GTPase Rab31 Protein and Its Effector, Early Endosome Antigen 1, Is Important for Trafficking of the Ligand-bound Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor from the Early to the Late Endosome*

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2014-01-01

    Rab31 is a member of the Rab5 subfamily of Rab GTPases. Although localized largely to the trans-Golgi network, it shares common guanine nucleotide exchange factors and effectors with other Rab5 subfamily members that have been implicated in endocytic membrane traffic. We investigated whether Rab31 also has a role in the trafficking of the ligand-bound EGF receptor (EGFR) internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis. We found that loss of Rab31 inhibits, but overexpression enhances, EGFR trafficking to the late endosomes and that the effect of Rab31 silencing could be specifically rescued by overexpression of a silencing-resistant form of Rab31. Rab31 was found to interact with the EGFR by coimmunoprecipitation and affinity pulldown analyses, and the primarily trans-Golgi network-localized Rab31 has increased colocalization with the EGFR in A431 cells 30 min after pulsing with EGF. A glycerol gradient sedimentation assay suggested that Rab31 is sequestered into a high molecular weight complex after stimulation with EGF, as was early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1), a factor responsible for endosomal tethering and fusion events. We found that loss of EEA1 reduced the interaction between Rab31 and the EGFR and abrogated the effect of Rab31 overexpression on the trafficking of the EGFR. Likewise, loss of GAPex5, a Rab31 guanine nucleotide exchange factor that has a role in ubiquitination and degradation of the EGFR, reduced the interaction of Rab31 with the EGFR and its effect on EGFR trafficking. Taken together, our results suggest that Rab31 is an important regulator of endocytic trafficking of the EGFR and functions in an EGFR trafficking complex that includes EEA1 and GAPex5. PMID:24644286

  9. A Rab5 endosomal pathway mediates Parkin-dependent mitochondrial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Hammerling, Babette C.; Najor, Rita H.; Cortez, Melissa Q.; Shires, Sarah E.; Leon, Leonardo J.; Gonzalez, Eileen R.; Boassa, Daniela; Phan, Sébastien; Thor, Andrea; Jimenez, Rebecca E.; Li, Hong; Kitsis, Richard N.; Dorn II, Gerald W.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Ellisman, Mark H.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2017-01-01

    Damaged mitochondria pose a lethal threat to cells that necessitates their prompt removal. The currently recognized mechanism for disposal of mitochondria is autophagy, where damaged organelles are marked for disposal via ubiquitylation by Parkin. Here we report a novel pathway for mitochondrial elimination, in which these organelles undergo Parkin-dependent sequestration into Rab5-positive early endosomes via the ESCRT machinery. Following maturation, these endosomes deliver mitochondria to lysosomes for degradation. Although this endosomal pathway is activated by stressors that also activate mitochondrial autophagy, endosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance is initiated before autophagy. The autophagy protein Beclin1 regulates activation of Rab5 and endosomal-mediated degradation of mitochondria, suggesting cross-talk between these two pathways. Abrogation of Rab5 function and the endosomal pathway results in the accumulation of stressed mitochondria and increases susceptibility to cell death in embryonic fibroblasts and cardiac myocytes. These data reveal a new mechanism for mitochondrial quality control mediated by Rab5 and early endosomes. PMID:28134239

  10. ER network homeostasis is critical for plant endosome streaming and endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Lai, YaShiuan; Slabaugh, Erin; Mannino, Nicole; Buono, Rafael A; Otegui, Marisa S; Brandizzi, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells internalize cargo at the plasma membrane via endocytosis, a vital process that is accomplished through a complex network of endosomal organelles. In mammalian cells, the ER is in close association with endosomes and regulates their fission. Nonetheless, the physiological role of such interaction on endocytosis is yet unexplored. Here, we probed the existence of ER–endosome association in plant cells and assayed its physiological role in endocytosis. Through live-cell imaging and electron microscopy studies, we established that endosomes are extensively associated with the plant ER, supporting conservation of interaction between heterotypic organelles in evolutionarily distant kingdoms. Furthermore, by analyzing ER–endosome dynamics in genetic backgrounds with defects in ER structure and movement, we also established that the ER network integrity is necessary for homeostasis of the distribution and streaming of various endosome populations as well as for efficient endocytosis. These results support a novel model that endocytosis homeostasis depends on a spatiotemporal control of the endosome dynamics dictated by the ER membrane network. PMID:27462431

  11. ER network homeostasis is critical for plant endosome streaming and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Lai, YaShiuan; Slabaugh, Erin; Mannino, Nicole; Buono, Rafael A; Otegui, Marisa S; Brandizzi, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells internalize cargo at the plasma membrane via endocytosis, a vital process that is accomplished through a complex network of endosomal organelles. In mammalian cells, the ER is in close association with endosomes and regulates their fission. Nonetheless, the physiological role of such interaction on endocytosis is yet unexplored. Here, we probed the existence of ER-endosome association in plant cells and assayed its physiological role in endocytosis. Through live-cell imaging and electron microscopy studies, we established that endosomes are extensively associated with the plant ER, supporting conservation of interaction between heterotypic organelles in evolutionarily distant kingdoms. Furthermore, by analyzing ER-endosome dynamics in genetic backgrounds with defects in ER structure and movement, we also established that the ER network integrity is necessary for homeostasis of the distribution and streaming of various endosome populations as well as for efficient endocytosis. These results support a novel model that endocytosis homeostasis depends on a spatiotemporal control of the endosome dynamics dictated by the ER membrane network.

  12. Imaging and Quantitation Techniques for Tracking Cargo along Endosome-to-Golgi Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of light microscopy, coupled with the development of a range of fluorescent-based probes, have provided new approaches to dissecting membrane domains and the regulation of membrane trafficking. Here, we review these advances, as well as highlight developments in quantitative image analysis and novel unbiased analytical approaches to quantitate protein localization. The application of these approaches to endosomal sorting and endosome-to-Golgi transport is discussed. PMID:24709647

  13. Endosome-lysosomes and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Arnold, J; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1994-01-01

    A number of the major human and animal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins. Although our knowledge concerning these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focussed on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of acid compartments called endosome-lysosomes. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials. These subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  14. Regulators of Lysosome Function and Dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Kevin; Zamora, Danniel; Horm, Teresa; George, Laeth; Upchurch, Cameron; Randall, Justin; Weaver, Colby; Sanford, Caitlin; Miller, Austin; Hernandez, Sebastian; Dang, Hope; Fares, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes, the major membrane-bound degradative organelles, have a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes are the terminal compartments in the endocytic pathway, though they display highly dynamic behaviors, fusing with each other and with late endosomes in the endocytic pathway, and with the plasma membrane during regulated exocytosis and for wound repair. After fusing with late endosomes, lysosomes are reformed from the resulting hybrid organelles through a process that involves budding of a nascent lysosome, extension of the nascent lysosome from the hybrid organelle, while remaining connected by a membrane bridge, and scission of the membrane bridge to release the newly formed lysosome. The newly formed lysosomes undergo cycles of homotypic fusion and fission reactions to form mature lysosomes. In this study, we used a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify six regulators of lysosome biology. We show that these proteins function in different steps of lysosome biology, regulating lysosome formation, lysosome fusion, and lysosome degradation. PMID:28122949

  15. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  16. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  17. Specific regulation of thermosensitive lipid droplet fusion by a nuclear hormone receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiwei; Li, Qi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shuang; Cui, Qingpo; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating fat metabolism and energy production in humans. The regulatory functions and endogenous ligands of many nuclear receptors are still unidentified, however. Here, we report that CYP-37A1 (ortholog of human cytochrome P450 CYP4V2), EMB-8 (ortholog of human P450 oxidoreductase POR), and DAF-12 (homolog of human nuclear receptors VDR/LXR) constitute a hormone synthesis and nuclear receptor pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans This pathway specifically regulates the thermosensitive fusion of fat-storing lipid droplets. CYP-37A1, together with EMB-8, synthesizes a lipophilic hormone not identical to Δ7-dafachronic acid, which represses the fusion-promoting function of DAF-12. CYP-37A1 also negatively regulates thermotolerance and lifespan at high temperature in a DAF-12-dependent manner. Human CYP4V2 can substitute for CYP-37A1 in C. elegans This finding suggests the existence of a conserved CYP4V2-POR-nuclear receptor pathway that functions in converting multilocular lipid droplets to unilocular ones in human cells; misregulation of this pathway may lead to pathogenic fat storage.

  18. HACD1, a regulator of membrane composition and fluidity, promotes myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Blondelle, Jordan; Ohno, Yusuke; Gache, Vincent; Guyot, Stéphane; Storck, Sébastien; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Barthélémy, Inès; Walmsley, Gemma; Rahier, Anaëlle; Gadin, Stéphanie; Maurer, Marie; Guillaud, Laurent; Prola, Alexandre; Ferry, Arnaud; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Demarquoy, Jean; Relaix, Frédéric; Piercy, Richard J.; Blot, Stéphane; Kihara, Akio; Tiret, Laurent; Pilot-Storck, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    The reduced diameter of skeletal myofibres is a hallmark of several congenital myopathies, yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of HACD1/PTPLA, which is involved in the elongation of the very long chain fatty acids, in muscle fibre formation. In humans and dogs, HACD1 deficiency leads to a congenital myopathy with fibre size disproportion associated with a generalized muscle weakness. Through analysis of HACD1-deficient Labradors, Hacd1-knockout mice, and Hacd1-deficient myoblasts, we provide evidence that HACD1 promotes myoblast fusion during muscle development and regeneration. We further demonstrate that in normal differentiating myoblasts, expression of the catalytically active HACD1 isoform, which is encoded by a muscle-enriched splice variant, yields decreased lysophosphatidylcholine content, a potent inhibitor of myoblast fusion, and increased concentrations of ≥C18 and monounsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids. These lipid modifications correlate with a reduction in plasma membrane rigidity. In conclusion, we propose that fusion impairment constitutes a novel, non-exclusive pathological mechanism operating in congenital myopathies and reveal that HACD1 is a key regulator of a lipid-dependent muscle fibre growth mechanism. PMID:26160855

  19. Spatial Geometries of Self-Assembled Chitohexaose Monolayers Regulate Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Poosala, Pornthida; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion into functionally-distinct myotubes to form in vitro skeletal muscle constructs under differentiation serum-free conditions still remains a challenge. Herein, we report that our microtopographical carbohydrate substrates composed of bioactive hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6) modulated the efficiency of myoblast fusion without requiring horse serum or any differentiation medium during cell culture. Promotion of the differentiation of dissociated mononucleated skeletal myoblasts (C2C12; a mouse myoblast cell line) into robust myotubes was found only on GlcNAc6 micropatterns, whereas the myoblasts on control, non-patterned GlcNAc6 substrates or GlcNAc6-free patterns exhibited an undifferentiated form. We also examined the possible role of GlcNAc6 micropatterns with various widths in the behavior of C2C12 cells in early and late stages of myogenesis through mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The spontaneous contraction of myotubes was investigated via the regulation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), which is involved in stimulating glucose uptake during cellular contraction. Narrow patterns demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake rate and generated a fast-twitch muscle fiber type, whereas the slow-twitch muscle fiber type was dominant on wider patterns. Our findings indicated that GlcNAc6-mediated integrin interactions are responsible for guiding myoblast fusion forward along with myotube formation. PMID:27164094

  20. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule’s volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed ‘unit granules’, forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule’s volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak–Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak–Higashi syndrome and in ‘beige’ (Lystbg/Lystbg) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule–granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules

  1. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule's volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed 'unit granules', forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule's volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak-Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome and in 'beige' (Lyst(bg)/Lyst(bg)) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule-granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules permit the cells to store

  2. Synaptotagmin C2B domain regulates Ca2+-triggered fusion in vitro: critical residues revealed by scanning alanine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Dunning, F Mark; Wang, Zhao; Hui, Enfu; Chapman, Edwin R

    2008-11-14

    Synaptotagmin (syt) 1 is localized to synaptic vesicles, binds Ca2+, and regulates neuronal exocytosis. Syt 1 harbors two Ca2+-binding motifs referred to as C2A and C2B. In this study we examine the function of the isolated C2 domains of Syt 1 using a reconstituted, SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor)-mediated, fusion assay. We report that inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine into reconstituted SNARE vesicles enabled isolated C2B, but not C2A, to regulate Ca2+-triggered fusion. The isolated C2B domain had a 6-fold lower EC50 for Ca2+-activated fusion than the intact cytosolic domain of Syt 1 (C2AB). Phosphatidylethanolamine increased both the rate and efficiency of C2AB- and C2B-regulated fusion without affecting their abilities to bind membrane-embedded syntaxin-SNAP-25 (t-SNARE) complexes. At equimolar concentrations, the isolated C2A domain was an effective inhibitor of C2B-, but not C2AB-regulated fusion; hence, C2A has markedly different effects in the fusion assay depending on whether it is tethered to C2B. Finally, scanning alanine mutagenesis of C2AB revealed four distinct groups of mutations within the C2B domain that play roles in the regulation of SNARE-mediated fusion. Surprisingly, substitution of Arg-398 with alanine, which lies on the opposite end of C2B from the Ca2+/membrane-binding loops, decreases C2AB t-SNARE binding and Ca2+-triggered fusion in vitro without affecting Ca2+-triggered interactions with phosphatidylserine or vesicle aggregation. In addition, some mutations uncouple the clamping and stimulatory functions of syt 1, suggesting that these two activities are mediated by distinct structural determinants in C2B.

  3. Counting molecules in single organelles with superresolution microscopy allows tracking of the endosome maturation trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Puchner, Elias M.; Walter, Jessica M.; Kasper, Robert; Huang, Bo; Lim, Wendell A.

    2013-01-01

    Cells tightly regulate trafficking of intracellular organelles, but a deeper understanding of this process is technically limited by our inability to track the molecular composition of individual organelles below the diffraction limit in size. Here we develop a technique for intracellularly calibrated superresolution microscopy that can measure the size of individual organelles as well as accurately count absolute numbers of molecules, by correcting for undercounting owing to immature fluorescent proteins and overcounting owing to fluorophore blinking. Using this technique, we characterized the size of individual vesicles in the yeast endocytic pathway and the number of accessible phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding sites they contain. This analysis reveals a characteristic vesicle maturation trajectory of composition and size with both stochastic and regulated components. The trajectory displays some cell-to-cell variability, with smaller variation between organelles within the same cell. This approach also reveals mechanistic information on the order of events in this trajectory: Colocalization analysis with known markers of different vesicle maturation stages shows that phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate production precedes fusion into larger endosomes. This single-organelle analysis can potentially be applied to a range of small organelles to shed light on their precise composition/structure relationships, the dynamics of their regulation, and the noise in these processes. PMID:24043832

  4. Counting molecules in single organelles with superresolution microscopy allows tracking of the endosome maturation trajectory.

    PubMed

    Puchner, Elias M; Walter, Jessica M; Kasper, Robert; Huang, Bo; Lim, Wendell A

    2013-10-01

    Cells tightly regulate trafficking of intracellular organelles, but a deeper understanding of this process is technically limited by our inability to track the molecular composition of individual organelles below the diffraction limit in size. Here we develop a technique for intracellularly calibrated superresolution microscopy that can measure the size of individual organelles as well as accurately count absolute numbers of molecules, by correcting for undercounting owing to immature fluorescent proteins and overcounting owing to fluorophore blinking. Using this technique, we characterized the size of individual vesicles in the yeast endocytic pathway and the number of accessible phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding sites they contain. This analysis reveals a characteristic vesicle maturation trajectory of composition and size with both stochastic and regulated components. The trajectory displays some cell-to-cell variability, with smaller variation between organelles within the same cell. This approach also reveals mechanistic information on the order of events in this trajectory: Colocalization analysis with known markers of different vesicle maturation stages shows that phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate production precedes fusion into larger endosomes. This single-organelle analysis can potentially be applied to a range of small organelles to shed light on their precise composition/structure relationships, the dynamics of their regulation, and the noise in these processes.

  5. Drosophila Erect wing (Ewg) controls mitochondrial fusion during muscle growth and maintenance by regulation of the Opa1-like gene.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mamta; Katti, Prasanna; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and morphological changes are associated with tissue-specific functional demand, but the factors and pathways that regulate these processes have not been completely identified. A lack of mitochondrial fusion has been implicated in various developmental and pathological defects. The spatiotemporal regulation of mitochondrial fusion in a tissue such as muscle is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) that the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane fusion gene, Opa1-like, is regulated in a spatiotemporal fashion by the transcription factor/co-activator Erect wing (Ewg). In IFMs null for Ewg, mitochondria undergo mitophagy and/or autophagy accompanied by reduced mitochondrial functioning and muscle degeneration. By following the dynamics of mitochondrial growth and shape in IFMs, we found that mitochondria grow extensively and fuse during late pupal development to form the large tubular mitochondria. Our evidence shows that Ewg expression during early IFM development is sufficient to upregulate Opa1-like, which itself is a requisite for both late pupal mitochondrial fusion and muscle maintenance. Concomitantly, by knocking down Opa1-like during early muscle development, we show that it is important for mitochondrial fusion, muscle differentiation and muscle organization. However, knocking down Opa1-like, after the expression window of Ewg did not cause mitochondrial or muscle defects. This study identifies a mechanism by which mitochondrial fusion is regulated spatiotemporally by Ewg through Opa1-like during IFM differentiation and growth.

  6. Fusion pore expansion is a slow, discontinuous, and Ca2+-dependent process regulating secretion from alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Thomas; Dietl, Paul; Pfaller, Kristian; Frick, Manfred; Mair, Norbert; Paulmichl, Markus; Hess, Michael W.; Fürst, Johannes; Maly, Karl

    2001-01-01

    In alveolar type II cells, the release of surfactant is considerably delayed after the formation of exocytotic fusion pores, suggesting that content dispersal may be limited by fusion pore diameter and subject to regulation at a postfusion level. To address this issue, we used confocal FRAP and N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-[dibutylamino]styryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43), a dye yielding intense localized fluorescence of surfactant when entering the vesicle lumen through the fusion pore (Haller, T., J. Ortmayr, F. Friedrich, H. Volkl, and P. Dietl. 1998. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 95:1579–1584). Thus, we have been able to monitor the dynamics of individual fusion pores up to hours in intact cells, and to calculate pore diameters using a diffusion model derived from Fick's law. After formation, fusion pores were arrested in a state impeding the release of vesicle contents, and expanded at irregular times thereafter. The expansion rate of initial pores and the probability of late expansions were increased by elevation of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration. Consistently, content release correlated with the occurrence of Ca2+ oscillations in ATP-treated cells, and expanded fusion pores were detectable by EM. This study supports a new concept in exocytosis, implicating fusion pores in the regulation of content release for extended periods after initial formation. PMID:11604423

  7. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  8. Facilitation of Endosomal Recycling by an IRG Protein Homolog Maintains Apical Tubule Structure in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grussendorf, Kelly A.; Trezza, Christopher J.; Salem, Alexander T.; Al-Hashimi, Hikmat; Mattingly, Brendan C.; Kampmeyer, Drew E.; Khan, Liakot A.; Hall, David H.; Göbel, Verena; Ackley, Brian D.; Buechner, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Determination of luminal diameter is critical to the function of small single-celled tubes. A series of EXC proteins, including EXC-1, prevent swelling of the tubular excretory canals in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, cloning of exc-1 reveals it to encode a homolog of mammalian IRG proteins, which play roles in immune response and autophagy and are associated with Crohn’s disease. Mutants in exc-1 accumulate early endosomes, lack recycling endosomes, and exhibit abnormal apical cytoskeletal structure in regions of enlarged tubules. EXC-1 interacts genetically with two other EXC proteins that also affect endosomal trafficking. In yeast two-hybrid assays, wild-type and putative constitutively active EXC-1 binds to the LIM-domain protein EXC-9, whose homolog, cysteine-rich intestinal protein, is enriched in mammalian intestine. These results suggest a model for IRG function in forming and maintaining apical tubule structure via regulation of endosomal recycling. PMID:27334269

  9. Loss of the Sec1/Munc18-family proteins VPS-33.2 and VPS-33.1 bypasses a block in endosome maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Solinger, Jachen A.; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The end of the life of a transport vesicle requires a complex series of tethering, docking, and fusion events. Tethering complexes play a crucial role in the recognition of membrane entities and bringing them into close opposition, thereby coordinating and controlling cellular trafficking events. Here we provide a comprehensive RNA interference analysis of the CORVET and HOPS tethering complexes in metazoans. Knockdown of CORVET components promoted RAB-7 recruitment to subapical membranes, whereas in HOPS knockdowns, RAB-5 was found also on membrane structures close to the cell center, indicating the RAB conversion might be impaired in the absence of these tethering complexes. Unlike in yeast, metazoans have two VPS33 homologues, which are Sec1/Munc18 (SM)-family proteins involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. We assume that in wild type, each tethering complex contains a specific SM protein but that they may be able to substitute for each other in case of absence of the other. Of importance, knockdown of both SM proteins allowed bypass of the endosome maturation block in sand-1 mutants. We propose a model in which the SM proteins in tethering complexes are required for coordinated flux of material through the endosomal system. PMID:25273556

  10. Regulation of Osteoclast Growth and Fusion by mTOR/raptor and mTOR/rictor/Akt.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Kerstin; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Fong, Jenna E; Hussein, Osama; Barralet, Jake E; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts are giant bone cells formed by fusion from monocytes and uniquely capable of a complete destruction of mineralized tissues. Previously, we have demonstrated that in energy-rich environment not only osteoclast fusion index (the number of nuclei each osteoclast contains), but also cytoplasm volume per single nucleus was increased. The goal of this study was to investigate the regulation of metabolic sensor mTOR during osteoclast differentiation in energy-rich environment simulated by addition of pyruvate. We have found that in the presence of pyruvate, the proportion of mTOR associated with raptor increased, while mTOR-rictor-mediated Akt phosphorylation decreased. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin (10 nM) significantly interfered with all aspects of osteoclastogenesis. However, rapamycin at 1 nM, which preferentially targets mTOR-raptor complex, was only effective in control cultures, while in the presence of pyruvate osteoclast fusion index was successfully increased. Inhibition of Akt drastically reduced osteoclast fusion, however in energy-rich environment, osteoclasts of comparable size were formed through increased cytoplasm growth. These data suggest that mTOR-rictor mediated Akt signaling regulates osteoclast fusion, while mTOR-raptor regulation of protein translation contributes to fusion-independent cytoplasm growth. We demonstrate that depending on the bioenergetics microenvironment osteoclastogenesis can adjust to occur through preferential multinucleation or through cell growth, implying that attaining large cell size is part of the osteoclast differentiation program.

  11. The Interaction of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Fission/Fusion Mediated by PGC-1α Regulates Rotenone-Induced Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaige; Yang, Likui; Wang, Jian; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Cai, Ying; Cui, Zhihong; Ao, Lin; Liu, Jinyi; Zou, Zhongmin; Sai, Yan; Cao, Jia

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly, and mitochondrial defects underlie the pathogenesis of PD. Impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis results in reactive oxygen species formation, which in turn can potentiate the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, forming a vicious cycle in the neuron. Mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis play important roles in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. It has been reported that PGC-1α is a powerful transcription factor that is widely involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative stress, and other processes. Therefore, we explored mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial fission/fusion, and especially PGC-1α as the key point in the signaling mechanism of their interaction in rotenone-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. The results showed that mitochondrial number and mass were reduced significantly, accompanied by alterations in proteins known to regulate mitochondrial fission/fusion (MFN2, OPA1, Drp1, and Fis1) and mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and mtTFA). Further experiments proved that inhibition of mitochondrial fission or promotion of mitochondrial fusion has protective effects in rotenone-induced neurotoxicity and also promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. By establishing cell models of PGC-1α overexpression and reduced expression, we found that PGC-1α can regulate MFN2 and Drp1 protein expression and phosphorylation to influence mitochondrial fission/fusion. In summary, it can be concluded that PGC-1α-mediated cross talk between mitochondrial biogenesis and fission/fusion contributes to rotenone-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  12. Resolvin E1 regulates osteoclast fusion via DC-STAMP and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Gyurko, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between the immune and skeletal systems in inflammatory bone diseases are well appreciated, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate the resolution phase of inflammation and bone turnover have not been unveiled. Here we investigated the direct actions of the proresolution mediator resolvin E1 (RvE1) on bone-marrow-cell-derived osteoclasts in an in vitro murine model of osteoclast maturation and inflammatory bone resorption. Investigation of the actions of RvE1 treatment on the specific stages of osteoclast maturation revealed that RvE1 targeted late stages of osteoclast maturation to decrease osteoclast formation by 32.8%. Time-lapse vital microscopy and migration assays confirmed that membrane fusion of osteoclast precursors was inhibited. The osteoclast fusion protein DC-STAMP was specifically targeted by RvE1 receptor binding and was down-regulated by 65.4%. RvE1 did not affect the induction of the essential osteoclast transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) or its nuclear translocation; however, NFATc1 binding to the DC-STAMP promoter was significantly inhibited by 60.9% with RvE1 treatment as shown in electrophoresis mobility shift assay. Our findings suggest that proresolution mediators act directly on osteoclasts, in addition to down-regulation of inflammation, providing a novel mechanism for modulating osteoclast signaling in osteolytic inflammatory disease.

  13. Kinetic barriers to SNAREpin assembly in the regulation of membrane docking/priming and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Tiwari, Neeraj; Rothman, James E.; Pincet, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmission is achieved by soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-driven fusion of readily releasable vesicles that are docked and primed at the presynaptic plasma membrane. After neurotransmission, the readily releasable pool of vesicles must be refilled in less than 100 ms for subsequent release. Here we show that the initial association of SNARE complexes, SNAREpins, is far too slow to support this rapid refilling owing to an inherently high activation energy barrier. Our data suggest that acceleration of this process, i.e., lowering of the barrier, is physiologically necessary and can be achieved by molecular factors. Furthermore, under zero force, a low second energy barrier transiently traps SNAREpins in a half-zippered state similar to the partial assembly that engages calcium-sensitive regulatory machinery. This result suggests that the barrier must be actively raised in vivo to generate a sufficient pause in the zippering process for the regulators to set in place. We show that the heights of the activation energy barriers can be selectively changed by molecular factors. Thus, it is possible to modify, both in vitro and in vivo, the lifespan of each metastable state. This controllability provides a simple model in which vesicle docking/priming, an intrinsically slow process, can be substantially accelerated. It also explains how the machinery that regulates vesicle fusion can be set in place while SNAREpins are trapped in a half-zippered state. PMID:27601655

  14. Kinetic barriers to SNAREpin assembly in the regulation of membrane docking/priming and fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Tiwari, Neeraj; Rothman, James E; Pincet, Frederic

    2016-09-20

    Neurotransmission is achieved by soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-driven fusion of readily releasable vesicles that are docked and primed at the presynaptic plasma membrane. After neurotransmission, the readily releasable pool of vesicles must be refilled in less than 100 ms for subsequent release. Here we show that the initial association of SNARE complexes, SNAREpins, is far too slow to support this rapid refilling owing to an inherently high activation energy barrier. Our data suggest that acceleration of this process, i.e., lowering of the barrier, is physiologically necessary and can be achieved by molecular factors. Furthermore, under zero force, a low second energy barrier transiently traps SNAREpins in a half-zippered state similar to the partial assembly that engages calcium-sensitive regulatory machinery. This result suggests that the barrier must be actively raised in vivo to generate a sufficient pause in the zippering process for the regulators to set in place. We show that the heights of the activation energy barriers can be selectively changed by molecular factors. Thus, it is possible to modify, both in vitro and in vivo, the lifespan of each metastable state. This controllability provides a simple model in which vesicle docking/priming, an intrinsically slow process, can be substantially accelerated. It also explains how the machinery that regulates vesicle fusion can be set in place while SNAREpins are trapped in a half-zippered state.

  15. Analysis of Signaling Endosome Composition and Dynamics Using SILAC in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Debaisieux, Solène; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons require efficient transport mechanisms such as fast axonal transport to ensure neuronal homeostasis and survival. Neurotrophins and their receptors are conveyed via fast axonal retrograde transport of signaling endosomes to the soma, where they elicit transcriptional responses. Despite the essential roles of signaling endosomes in neuronal differentiation and survival, little is known about their molecular identity, dynamics, and regulation. Gaining a better mechanistic understanding of these organelles and their kinetics is crucial, given the growing evidence linking vesicular trafficking deficits to neurodegeneration. Here, we exploited an affinity purification strategy using the binding fragment of tetanus neurotoxin (HCT) conjugated to monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs), which in motor neurons, is transported in the same carriers as neurotrophins and their receptors. To quantitatively assess the molecular composition of HCT-containing signaling endosomes, we have developed a protocol for triple Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons. After HCT internalization, retrograde carriers were magnetically isolated at different time points and subjected to mass-spectrometry and Gene Ontology analyses. This purification strategy is highly specific, as confirmed by the presence of essential regulators of fast axonal transport in the make-up of these organelles. Our results indicate that signaling endosomes undergo a rapid maturation with the acquisition of late endosome markers following a specific time-dependent kinetics. Strikingly, signaling endosomes are specifically enriched in proteins known to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinfection. Moreover, we highlighted the presence of novel components, whose precise temporal recruitment on signaling endosomes might be essential for proper sorting and/or transport of these organelles. This study provides the first

  16. Regulation of adenylate cyclase synthesis in Escherichia coli: studies with cya-lac operon and protein fusion strains.

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1982-01-01

    We have isolated cya-lac operon and protein fusions in Escherichia coli K-12, and we used these to study the regulation of cya, the structural gene for adenylate cyclase. Data obtained from these fusion strains suggest that neither cyclic AMP (cAMP) nor the cAMP receptor protein plays a major role in transcriptional or translational regulation of cya expression. Modulation of intracellular cAMP concentrations elicited only weak repression of cya-lac fusion activity under conditions of high intracellular cAMP, relative to fusion activity under conditions of low intracellular cAMP. The functional cAMP receptor protein was required for this effect. Incorporation of delta crp into cya-lac fusion strains did not affect fusion expression in glucose-grown cells as compared with similarly cultured isogenic crp+ strains. Furthermore, 20 independently obtained mutants derived from a cya-lacZ protein fusion strain exhibiting a weak Lac+ phenotype were isolated, and it was determined that the mutants had beta-galactosidase activities ranging from 2- to 77-fold greater than those of the parental strain. None of the mutations responsible for this increase in fusion activity map in the crp locus. We used these mutants to aid in the identification of a 160,000-dalton cya-lacZ hybrid protein. Finally, chromosome mobilization experiments, using cya-lac fusion strains, allowed us to infer a clockwise direction of transcription for the cya gene relative to the standard E. coli genetic map. Images PMID:6286596

  17. Myomaker, Regulated by MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p, Promotes Chicken Myoblast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Li, Erxin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of myoblasts is an important step during skeletal muscle differentiation. A recent study in mice found that a transmembrane protein called Myomaker, which is specifically expressed in muscle, is critical for myoblast fusion. However, the cellular mechanism of its roles and the regulatory mechanism of its expression remain unclear. Chicken not only plays an important role in meat production but is also an ideal model organism for muscle development research. Here, we report that Myomaker is also essential for chicken myoblast fusion. Forced expression of Myomaker in chicken primary myoblasts promotes myoblast fusion, whereas knockdown of Myomaker by siRNA inhibits myoblast fusion. MYOD and MYOG, which belong to the family of myogenic regulatory factors, can bind to a conserved E-box located proximal to the Myomaker transcription start site and induce Myomaker transcription. Additionally, miR-140-3p can inhibit Myomaker expression and myoblast fusion, at least in part, by binding to the 3ʹ UTR of Myomaker in vitro. These findings confirm the essential roles of Myomaker in avian myoblast fusion and show that MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p can regulate Myomaker expression. PMID:26540045

  18. Myomaker, Regulated by MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p, Promotes Chicken Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Li, Erxin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-11-02

    The fusion of myoblasts is an important step during skeletal muscle differentiation. A recent study in mice found that a transmembrane protein called Myomaker, which is specifically expressed in muscle, is critical for myoblast fusion. However, the cellular mechanism of its roles and the regulatory mechanism of its expression remain unclear. Chicken not only plays an important role in meat production but is also an ideal model organism for muscle development research. Here, we report that Myomaker is also essential for chicken myoblast fusion. Forced expression of Myomaker in chicken primary myoblasts promotes myoblast fusion, whereas knockdown of Myomaker by siRNA inhibits myoblast fusion. MYOD and MYOG, which belong to the family of myogenic regulatory factors, can bind to a conserved E-box located proximal to the Myomaker transcription start site and induce Myomaker transcription. Additionally, miR-140-3p can inhibit Myomaker expression and myoblast fusion, at least in part, by binding to the 3' UTR of Myomaker in vitro. These findings confirm the essential roles of Myomaker in avian myoblast fusion and show that MYOD, MYOG and miR-140-3p can regulate Myomaker expression.

  19. Proteus mirabilis urease: operon fusion and linker insertion analysis of ure gene organization, regulation, and function.

    PubMed Central

    Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1995-01-01

    Urease is an inducible virulence factor of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Although eight contiguous genes necessary for urease activity have been cloned and sequenced, the transcriptional organization and regulation of specific genes within the Proteus gene cluster has not been investigated in detail. The first gene, ureR, is located 400 bp upstream and is oriented in the direction opposite the other seven genes, ureDABCEFG. The structural subunits of urease are encoded by ureABC. Previously, UreR was shown to contain a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif 30 residues upstream of a consensus sequence which is a signature for the AraC family of positive regulators; this polypeptide is homologous to other DNA-binding regulatory proteins. Nested deletions of ureR linked to either ureD-lacZ or ureA-lacZ operon fusions demonstrated that an intact ureR is required for urea-induced synthesis of LacZ from either ureA or ureD and identified a urea-regulated promoter in the ureR-ureD intergenic region. However, lacZ operon fusions to fragments encompassing putative promoter regions upstream of ureA and ureF demonstrated that no urea-regulated promoters occur upstream of these open reading frames; regions upstream of ureR, ureE, and ureG were not tested. These data suggest that UreR acts as a positive regulator in the presence of urea, activating transcription of urease structural and accessory genes via sequences upstream of ureD. To address the role of the nonstructural regulatory and accessory genes, we constructed deletion, cassette, and linker insertion mutations throughout the ure gene cluster and determined the effect of these mutations on production and regulation of urease activity in Escherichia coli. Mutations were obtained, with locations determine by DNA sequencing, in all genes except ureA and ureE. In each case, the mutation resulted in a urease-negative phenotype. PMID:7559355

  20. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  1. The small GTP-binding protein rab4 is associated with early endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    van der Sluijs, P.; Hull, M.; Mellman, I. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. ); Goud, B. )

    1991-07-15

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the rab family have been implicated as playing important roles in controlling membrane traffic on the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways. The authors demonstrate that a distinct rab protein, rab4p, is associated with the population of early endosomes involved in transferrin-receptor recycling. An antibody to human rab4p was found to detect a doublet of {approx} 24-kDa proteins on immunoblots from various cell types. Seventy-five percent of these proteins were tightly membrane bound and could be released only by detergent treatment. Upon isolation of early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, by free-flow electrophoresis and Percoll density-gradient centrifugation, most (70%) of the rab4p was found to cofractionate with early endosomes and endocytic vesicles containing {sup 125}-labeled transferrin. The rab proteins previously localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus were not found in these fractions. They also localized rab4p to tansferrin-receptor-containing early endosomes by immunofluorescence after expression of rab4p cDNA. The association of rab4p with early endosomes and other vesicles involved in the intracellular tansport of transferrin receptor suggests that rab4p may play a role in regulating the pathway of receptor recycling.

  2. Distinct types of protease systems are involved in homeostasis regulation of mitochondrial morphology via balanced fusion and fission.

    PubMed

    Saita, Shotaro; Ishihara, Takaya; Maeda, Maki; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is dynamically regulated by fusion and fission. Several GTPase proteins control fusion and fission, and posttranslational modifications of these proteins are important for the regulation. However, it has not been clarified how the fusion and fission is balanced. Here, we report the molecular mechanism to regulate mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission, by repression of Drp1 or Mff, or by over-expression of MiD49 or MiD51, results in a reduction in the fusion GTPase mitofusins (Mfn1 and Mfn2) in outer membrane and long form of OPA1 (L-OPA1) in inner membrane. RNAi- or CRISPR-induced ablation of Drp1 in HeLa cells enhanced the degradation of Mfns via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We further found that UPS-related protein BAT3/BAG6, here we identified as Mfn2-interacting protein, was implicated in the turnover of Mfns in the absence of mitochondrial fission. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission also enhanced the proteolytic cleavage of L-OPA1 to soluble S-OPA1, and the OPA1 processing was reversed by inhibition of the inner membrane protease OMA1 independent on the mitochondrial membrane potential. Our findings showed that the distinct degradation systems of the mitochondrial fusion proteins in different locations are enhanced in response to the mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    PubMed

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  4. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  5. The Myopic-Ubpy-Hrs nexus enables endosomal recycling of Frizzled

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M.

    2015-01-01

    Endosomal trafficking of signaling proteins plays an essential role in cellular homeostasis. The seven-pass transmembrane protein Frizzled (Fz) is a critical component of Wnt signaling. Although Wnt signaling is proposed to be regulated by endosomal trafficking of Fz, the molecular events that enable this regulation are not completely understood. Here we show that the endosomal protein Myopic (Mop) regulates Fz trafficking in the Drosophila wing disk by inhibiting the ubiquitination and degradation of Hrs. Deletion of Mop or Hrs results in endosomal accumulation of Fz and therefore reduced Wnt signaling. The in situ proximity ligation assay revealed a strong association between Mop and Hrs in the Drosophila wing disk. Overexpression of Hrs rescues the trafficking defect caused by mop knockdown. Mop aids in the maintenance of Ubpy, which deubiquitinates (and thus stabilizes) Hrs. In the absence of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, Mop is dispensable. These findings support a previously unknown role for Mop in endosomal trafficking of Fz in Wnt-receiving cells. PMID:26224310

  6. Membrane Requirement for Folding of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 gB Cytodomain Suggests a Unique Mechanism of Fusion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jessica L.; Greene, Neil G.; King, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters cells by fusion of its envelope with a host cell membrane, which requires four viral glycoproteins and a cellular receptor. Viral fusion glycoprotein B (gB) mediates membrane fusion through the action of its ectodomain, while its cytoplasmic domain (cytodomain) regulates fusion from the opposite face of the membrane by an unknown mechanism. The gB cytodomain appears to restrict fusion, because point or truncation mutations within it increase the extent of fusion (syn mutations). Previously, we showed that the hyperfusion phenotype correlated with reduced membrane binding in gB syn truncation mutants and proposed that membrane binding was important in regulating fusion. Here, we extended our analysis to three syn point mutants: A855V, R858H, and A874P. These mutations produce local conformational changes, with some affecting membrane interaction, which suggests that while syn mutants may deregulate fusion by somewhat different mechanisms, maintaining the wild-type (WT) conformation is critical for fusion regulation. We further show that the presence of a membrane is necessary for the cytodomain to achieve its fully folded conformation and propose that the membrane-bound form of the cytodomain represents its native conformation. Taken together, our data suggest that the cytodomain of gB regulates fusion by a novel mechanism in which membrane interaction plays a key role. PMID:22623783

  7. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  8. Basolateral Endocytic Recycling Requires RAB-10 and AMPH-1 Mediated Recruitment of RAB-5 GAP TBC-2 to Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ou; Grant, Barth D.

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAB-5/Rab5 is a master regulator of the early endosome, required for a myriad of coordinated activities, including the degradation and recycling of internalized cargo. Here we focused on the recycling function of the early endosome and the regulation of RAB-5 by GAP protein TBC-2 in the basolateral C. elegans intestine. We demonstrate that downstream basolateral recycling regulators, GTPase RAB-10/Rab10 and BAR domain protein AMPH-1/Amphiphysin, bind to TBC-2 and help to recruit it to endosomes. In the absence of RAB-10 or AMPH-1 binding to TBC-2, RAB-5 membrane association is abnormally high and recycling cargo is trapped in early endosomes. Furthermore, the loss of TBC-2 or AMPH-1 leads to abnormally high spatial overlap of RAB-5 and RAB-10. Taken together our results indicate that RAB-10 and AMPH-1 mediated down-regulation of RAB-5 is an important step in recycling, required for cargo exit from early endosomes and regulation of early endosome–recycling endosome interactions. PMID:26393361

  9. Recycling Endosomes Supply AMPA Receptors for LTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mikyoung; Penick, Esther C.; Edwards, Jeffrey G.; Kauer, Julie A.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2004-09-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength, the most established cellular model of information storage in the brain, is expressed by an increase in the number of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. However, the source of AMPA receptors mobilized during LTP is unknown. We report that AMPA receptors are transported from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane for LTP. Stimuli that triggered LTP promoted not only AMPA receptor insertion but also generalized recycling of cargo and membrane from endocytic compartments. Thus, recycling endosomes supply AMPA receptors for LTP and provide a mechanistic link between synaptic potentiation and membrane remodeling during synapse modification.

  10. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  11. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Mammalian Myoblast Fusion through Phospholipase D1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Enjalbert, Sandrine; Comunale, Franck; Bodin, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Charrasse, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an essential step during myoblast differentiation that remains poorly understood. M-cadherin–dependent pathways that signal through Rac1 GTPase activation via the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Trio are important for myoblast fusion. The ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)6 GTPase has been shown to bind to Trio and to regulate Rac1 activity. Moreover, Loner/GEP100/BRAG2, a GEF of ARF6, has been involved in mammalian and Drosophila myoblast fusion, but the specific role of ARF6 has been not fully analyzed. Here, we show that ARF6 activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and is required for its implementation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Specifically, at the onset of myoblast fusion, ARF6 is associated with the multiproteic complex that contains M-cadherin, Trio, and Rac1 and accumulates at sites of myoblast fusion. ARF6 silencing inhibits the association of Trio and Rac1 with M-cadherin. Moreover, we demonstrate that ARF6 regulates myoblast fusion through phospholipase D (PLD) activation and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate production. Together, these data indicate that ARF6 is a critical regulator of C2C12 myoblast fusion and participates in the regulation of PLD activities that trigger both phospholipids production and actin cytoskeleton reorganization at fusion sites. PMID:20505075

  12. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  13. Endosome-based protein trafficking and Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to dynamically regulate, traffic, retain, and recycle proteins within the cell membrane is fundamental to life and central to the normal function of the heart. In the cardiomyocyte, these pathways are essential for the regulation of Ca2+, both at the level of the plasma membrane, but also in local cellular domains. One intracellular pathway often overlooked in relation to cardiovascular Ca2+ regulation and signaling is the endosome-based trafficking pathway. Highlighting its importance, this system and its molecular components are evolutionarily conserved across all metazoans. However, remarkably little is known of how endosome-based protein trafficking and recycling functions within mammalian cells systems, especially in the heart. As the endosomal system acts to regulate the expression and localization of membrane proteins central for cardiac Ca2+ regulation, understanding the in vivo function of this system in the heart is critical. This review will focus on endosome-based protein trafficking in the heart in both health and disease with special emphasis for the role of endocytic regulatory proteins, C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs). PMID:25709583

  14. Push-and-pull regulation of the fusion pore by synaptotagmin-7.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Margarita; Alés, Eva; Montes, María Angeles; Bonifas, Imelda; Jemal, Imane; Lindau, Manfred; Maximov, Anton; Südhof, Thomas C; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2010-11-02

    In chromaffin cells, Ca(2+) binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7 triggers exocytosis by promoting fusion pore opening and fusion pore expansion. Synaptotagmins contain two C2 domains that both bind Ca(2+) and contribute to exocytosis; however, it remains unknown whether the C2 domains act similarly or differentially to promote opening and expansion of fusion pores. Here, we use patch amperometry measurements in WT and synaptotagmin-7-mutant chromaffin cells to analyze the role of Ca(2+) binding to the two synaptotagmin-7 C2 domains in exocytosis. We show that, surprisingly, Ca(2+) binding to the C2A domain suffices to trigger fusion pore opening but that the resulting fusion pores are unstable and collapse, causing a dramatic increase in kiss-and-run fusion events. Thus, synaptotagmin-7 controls fusion pore dynamics during exocytosis via a push-and-pull mechanism in which Ca(2+) binding to both C2 domains promotes fusion pore opening, but the C2B domain is selectively essential for continuous expansion of an otherwise unstable fusion pore.

  15. Push-and-pull regulation of the fusion pore by synaptotagmin-7

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Margarita; Alés, Eva; Montes, María Angeles; Bonifas, Imelda; Jemal, Imane; Lindau, Manfred; Maximov, Anton; Südhof, Thomas C.; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    In chromaffin cells, Ca2+ binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7 triggers exocytosis by promoting fusion pore opening and fusion pore expansion. Synaptotagmins contain two C2 domains that both bind Ca2+ and contribute to exocytosis; however, it remains unknown whether the C2 domains act similarly or differentially to promote opening and expansion of fusion pores. Here, we use patch amperometry measurements in WT and synaptotagmin-7–mutant chromaffin cells to analyze the role of Ca2+ binding to the two synaptotagmin-7 C2 domains in exocytosis. We show that, surprisingly, Ca2+ binding to the C2A domain suffices to trigger fusion pore opening but that the resulting fusion pores are unstable and collapse, causing a dramatic increase in kiss-and-run fusion events. Thus, synaptotagmin-7 controls fusion pore dynamics during exocytosis via a push-and-pull mechanism in which Ca2+ binding to both C2 domains promotes fusion pore opening, but the C2B domain is selectively essential for continuous expansion of an otherwise unstable fusion pore. PMID:20956309

  16. Clinical Isolates of Human Coronavirus 229E Bypass the Endosome for Cell Entry.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Kazuya; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Kawase, Miyuki; Matsuyama, Shutoku

    2017-01-01

    Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E), a causative agent of the common cold, enters host cells via two distinct pathways: one is mediated by cell surface proteases, particularly transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), and the other by endosomal cathepsin L. Thus, specific inhibitors of these proteases block virus infection. However, it is unclear which of these pathways is actually utilized by HCoV-229E in the human respiratory tract. Here, we examined the mechanism of cell entry used by a pseudotyped virus bearing the HCoV-229E spike (S) protein in the presence or absence of protease inhibitors. We found that, compared with a laboratory strain isolated in 1966 and passaged for a half century, clinical isolates of HCoV-229E were less likely to utilize cathepsin L; rather, they showed a preference for TMPRSS2. Two amino acid substitutions (R642M and N714K) in the S protein of HCoV-229E clinical isolates altered their sensitivity to a cathepsin L inhibitor, suggesting that these amino acids were responsible for cathepsin L use. After 20 passages in HeLa cells, the ability of the isolate to use cathepsin increased so that it was equal to that of the laboratory strain; this increase was caused by an amino acid substitution (I577S) in the S protein. The passaged virus showed a reduced ability to replicate in differentiated airway epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface. These results suggest that the endosomal pathway is disadvantageous for HCoV-229E infection of human airway epithelial cells; therefore, clinical isolates are less able to use cathepsin. Many enveloped viruses enter cells through endocytosis. Viral spike proteins drive the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes to facilitate insertion of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) utilizes endosomal cathepsin L to activate the spike protein after receptor binding. Here, we found that clinical isolates of HCoV-229E preferentially utilize the cell surface protease

  17. Distinct effects of endosomal escape and inhibition of endosomal trafficking on gene delivery via electrotransfection.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Lisa D; Chang, Chun-Chi; Wang, Liangli; Yuan, Fan

    2017-01-01

    A recent theory suggests that endocytosis is involved in uptake and intracellular transport of electrotransfected plasmid DNA (pDNA). The goal of the current study was to understand if approaches used previously to improve endocytosis of gene delivery vectors could be applied to enhancing electrotransfection efficiency (eTE). Results from the study showed that photochemically induced endosomal escape, which could increase poly-L-lysine (PLL)-mediated gene delivery, decreased eTE. The decrease could not be blocked by treatment of cells with endonuclease inhibitors (aurintricarboxylic acid and zinc ion) or antioxidants (L-glutamine and ascorbic acid). Chemical treatment of cells with an endosomal trafficking inhibitor that blocks endosome progression, bafilomycin A1, resulted in a significant decrease in eTE. However, treatment of cells with lysosomotropic agents (chloroquine and ammonium chloride) had little effects on eTE. These data suggested that endosomes played important roles in protecting and intracellular trafficking of electrotransfected pDNA.

  18. Fusion protein analysis reveals the precise regulation between Hsp70 and Hsp100 during protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Sayaka; Nakazaki, Yosuke; Kagii, Kei; Imamura, Hiromi; Watanabe, Yo-Hei

    2017-08-17

    ClpB, a bacterial Hsp100, is a ring-shaped AAA+ chaperone that can reactivate aggregated proteins in cooperation with DnaK, a bacterial Hsp70, and its co-factors. ClpB subunits comprise two AAA+ modules with an interstitial rod-shaped M-domain. The M-domain regulates ClpB ATPase activity and interacts directly with the DnaK nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Here, to clarify how these functions contribute to the disaggregation process, we constructed ClpB, DnaK, and aggregated YFP fusion proteins in various combinations. Notably, i) DnaK activates ClpB only when the DnaK substrate-binding domain (SBD) is in the closed conformation, affording high DnaK-peptide affinity; ii) although NBD alone can activate ClpB, SBD is required for disaggregation; and iii) tethering aggregated proteins to the activated ClpB obviates SBD requirements. These results indicate that DnaK activates ClpB only when the SBD tightly holds aggregated proteins adjacent to ClpB for effective disaggregation.

  19. Regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 rrnA-reporter gene fusions in response to cold shock.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Ann M; O'Connell, Kevin P; Thomashow, Michael F

    2002-09-01

    We previously reported that mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 carrying luxAB insertions in each of the three 16S rRNA genes exhibited a dramatic (> or = 28-fold) increase in luminescence following a temperature downshift from 30 to 15 degrees C. These results raised the possibility that the rRNA operons (rrn) of S. meliloti were cold shock loci. In testing this possibility, we found that fusion of the S. meliloti 1021 rrnA promoter to two different reporter genes, luxAB and uidA, resulted in hybrid genes that were transiently upregulated (as measured by transcript accumulation) about four- to sixfold in response to a temperature downshift. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the rrn promoters are transiently upregulated in response to cold shock. However, much of the apparent cold shock regulation of the initial luxAB insertions was due to an unexpected mechanism: an apparent temperature-dependent inhibition of translation. Specifically, the rrnA sequences from +1 to +172 (relative to the start of transcription) were found to greatly decrease the ability of S. meliloti to translate hybrid rrn-luxAB transcripts into active protein at 30 degrees C. This effect, however, was largely eliminated at 15 degrees C. Possible mechanisms for the apparent transient increase in rrnA promoter activity and temperature-dependent inhibition of translation are discussed.

  20. Importance of neonatal FcR in regulating the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins containing the Fc domain of human IgG1: a comparative study of the affinity of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins to human neonatal FcR.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuo; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Kanayasu-Toyoda, Toshie; Kawanishi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-15

    The neonatal FcR (FcRn) binds to the Fc domain of IgG at acidic pH in the endosome and protects IgG from degradation, thereby contributing to the long serum half-life of IgG. To date, more than 20 mAb products and 5 Fc-fusion protein products have received marketing authorization approval in the United States, the European Union, or Japan. Many of these therapeutic proteins have the Fc domain of human IgG1; however, the serum half-lives differ in each protein. To elucidate the role of FcRn in the pharmacokinetics of Fc domain-containing therapeutic proteins, we evaluated the affinity of the clinically used human, humanized, chimeric, or mouse mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins to recombinant human FcRn by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The affinities of these therapeutic proteins to FcRn were found to be closely correlated with the serum half-lives reported from clinical studies, suggesting the important role of FcRn in regulating their serum half-lives. The relatively short serum half-life of Fc-fusion proteins was thought to arise from the low affinity to FcRn. The existence of some mAbs having high affinity to FcRn and a short serum half-life, however, suggested the involvement of other critical factor(s) in determining the serum half-life of such Abs. We further investigated the reason for the relatively low affinity of Fc-fusion proteins to FcRn and suggested the possibility that the receptor domain of Fc-fusion protein influences the structural environment of the FcRn binding region but not of the FcgammaRI binding region of the Fc domain.

  1. Recombinant TAT-Gelonin Fusion Toxin: Synthesis and Characterization of Heparin/Protamine-Regulated Cell Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yongzhuo; He, Huining; Wang, Mei; Min, Kyoung Ah; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins, such as gelonin, are highly desirable anti-cancer drug candidates due to their unparalleled potency and repetitive reaction mechanism in inhibiting protein translation. However, for its potential application in cancer therapy, there remains the cell membrane barrier that allows permeation of only small molecules, which must be overcome. To address this challenge, we conjugated gelonin with a protein transduction domain (PTD), the TAT peptide, via genetic recombination. The chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein (TAT-Gel) retained equipotent N-glycosidase activity yet displayed greater cell uptake than unmodified recombinant gelonin (rGel), thereby yielding a significantly augmented cytotoxic activity. Remarkably, TATGel displayed up to 177-fold lower IC50 (avg. 54.3 nM) than rGel (avg. IC50: 3640 nM) in tested cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxicity, however, also raised potential toxicity concerns due to the non-selectivity of PTD in its mediated cell transduction. To solve this problem, we investigated the plausibility of regulating the cell transduction of TAT-Gel via a reversible masking using heparin and protamine. Here, we demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that the cell transduction of TAT-Gel can be completely curbed with heparin and yet this heparin block can be efficiently reversed by the addition of protamine. This reversible tight regulation of the cell transduction of TAT-Gel by heparin and protamine sheds light of possible application of TATGel in achieving a highly effective yet safe drug therapy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:24733757

  2. RACK-1 Directs Dynactin-dependent RAB-11 Endosomal Recycling during Mitosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Erkang; Poole, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane trafficking pathways are necessary for the addition and removal of membrane during cytokinesis. In animal cells, recycling endosomes act as a major source of the additional membranes during furrow progression and abscission. However, the mechanisms and factors that regulate recycling endosomes during the cell cycle remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans Receptor of Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK-1) is required for cytokinesis, germline membrane organization, and the recruitment of RAB-11–labeled recycling endosomes to the pericentrosomal region and spindle. RACK-1 is also required for proper chromosome separation and astral microtubule length. RACK-1 localizes to the centrosomes, kinetochores, the midbody, and nuclear envelopes during the cell cycle. We found that RACK-1 directly binds to DNC-2, the C. elegans p50/dynamitin subunit of the dynactin complex. Last, RACK-1 may facilitate the sequestration of recycling endosomes by targeting DNC-2 to centrosomes and the spindle. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which RACK-1 directs the dynactin-dependent redistribution of recycling endosomes during the cell cycle, thus ensuring proper membrane trafficking events during cytokinesis. PMID:19158384

  3. RAB-10 Promotes EHBP-1 Bridging of Filamentous Actin and Tubular Recycling Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Ou; Zhang, Jing; Gleason, Adenrele; Yang, Zhenrong; Wang, Hui; Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D.

    2016-01-01

    EHBP-1 (Ehbp1) is a conserved regulator of endocytic recycling, acting as an effector of small GTPases including RAB-10 (Rab10). Here we present evidence that EHBP-1 associates with tubular endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] enriched membranes through an N-terminal C2-like (NT-C2) domain, and define residues within the NT-C2 domain that mediate membrane interaction. Furthermore, our results indicate that the EHBP-1 central calponin homology (CH) domain binds to actin microfilaments in a reaction that is stimulated by RAB-10(GTP). Loss of any aspect of this RAB-10/EHBP-1 system in the C. elegans intestinal epithelium leads to retention of basolateral recycling cargo in endosomes that have lost their normal tubular endosomal network (TEN) organization. We propose a mechanism whereby RAB-10 promotes the ability of endosome-bound EHBP-1 to also bind to the actin cytoskeleton, thereby promoting endosomal tubulation. PMID:27272733

  4. Endosomal type Iγ PIP 5-kinase controls EGF receptor lysosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Hedman, Andrew C; Tan, Xiaojun; Schill, Nicholas J; Anderson, Richard A

    2013-04-29

    Endosomal trafficking and degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) play an essential role in the control of its signaling. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns4,5P(2)) is an established regulator of endocytosis, whereas PtdIns3P modulates endosomal trafficking. However, we demonstrate here that type I gamma phosphatidylinositol phosphate 5-kinase i5 (PIPKIγi5), an enzyme that synthesizes PtdIns4,5P(2), controls endosome-to-lysosome sorting of EGFR. In this pathway, PIPKIγi5 interacts with sorting nexin 5 (SNX5), a protein that binds PtdIns4,5P(2) and other phosphoinositides. PIPKIγi5 and SNX5 localize to endosomes, and loss of either protein blocks EGFR sorting into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of the multivesicular body. Loss of ILV sorting greatly enhances and prolongs EGFR signaling. PIPKIγi5 and SNX5 prevent Hrs ubiquitination, and this facilitates the Hrs association with EGFR that is required for ILV sorting. These findings reveal that PIPKIγi5 and SNX5 form a signaling nexus that controls EGFR endosomal sorting, degradation, and signaling.

  5. Protein trafficking through the endosomal system prepares intracellular parasites for a home invasion.

    PubMed

    Tomavo, Stanislas; Slomianny, Christian; Meissner, Markus; Carruthers, Vern B

    2013-10-01

    Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis) and Plasmodium (malaria) use unique secretory organelles for migration, cell invasion, manipulation of host cell functions, and cell egress. In particular, the apical secretory micronemes and rhoptries of apicomplexan parasites are essential for successful host infection. New findings reveal that the contents of these organelles, which are transported through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi, also require the parasite endosome-like system to access their respective organelles. In this review, we discuss recent findings that demonstrate that these parasites reduced their endosomal system and modified classical regulators of this pathway for the biogenesis of apical organelles.

  6. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  7. Phagosome maturation during endosome interaction revealed by partial rhodopsin processing in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Meschede, Ingrid P.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Futter, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in phagocytosis and degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are associated with aging and retinal disease. The daily burst of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE provides a unique opportunity to analyse phagosome processing in vivo. In mouse retinae, phagosomes containing stacked rhodopsin-rich discs were identified by immuno-electron microscopy. Early apical phagosomes stained with antibodies against both cytoplasmic and intradiscal domains of rhodopsin. During phagosome maturation, a remarkably synchronised loss of the cytoplasmic epitope coincided with movement to the cell body and preceded phagosome–lysosome fusion and disc degradation. Loss of the intradiscal rhodopsin epitope and disc digestion occurred upon fusion with cathepsin-D-positive lysosomes. The same sequential stages of phagosome maturation were identified in cultured RPE and macrophages challenged with isolated POS. Loss of the cytoplasmic rhodopsin epitope was insensitive to pH but sensitive to protease inhibition and coincided with the interaction of phagosomes with endosomes. Thus, during pre-lysosomal maturation of ROS-containing phagosomes, limited rhodopsin processing occurs upon interaction with endosomes. This potentially provides a sensitive readout of phagosome–endosome interactions that is applicable to multiple phagocytes. PMID:25074813

  8. Interference in autophagosome fusion by rare earth nanoparticles disrupts autophagic flux and regulation of an interleukin-1β producing inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Qin, Hongqiang; Kang, Xuedong; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Meiying; Chang, Chong Hyun; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; Zou, Hanfa; Nel, Andre E; Xia, Tian

    2014-10-28

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) including multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles, which are capable of activating the NLRP3 inflammasome and inducing IL-1β production, have the potential to cause chronic lung toxicity. Although it is known that lysosome damage is an upstream trigger in initiating this pro-inflammatory response, the same organelle is also an important homeostatic regulator of activated NLRP3 inflammasome complexes, which are engulfed by autophagosomes and then destroyed in lysosomes after fusion. Although a number of ENMs have been shown to induce autophagy, no definitive research has been done on the homeostatic regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome during autophagic flux. We used a myeloid cell line (THP-1) and bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) to compare the role of autophagy in regulating inflammasome activation and IL-1β production by MWCNTs and REO nanoparticles. THP-1 cells express a constitutively active autophagy pathway and are also known to mimic NLRP3 activation in pulmonary macrophages. We demonstrate that, while activated NLRP3 complexes could be effectively removed by autophagosome fusion in cells exposed to MWCNTs, REO nanoparticles interfered in autophagosome fusion with lysosomes. This leads to the accumulation of the REO-activated inflammasomes, resulting in robust and sustained IL-1β production. The mechanism of REO nanoparticle interference in autophagic flux was clarified by showing that they disrupt lysosomal phosphoprotein function and interfere in the acidification that is necessary for lysosome fusion with autophagosomes. Binding of LaPO4 to the REO nanoparticle surfaces leads to urchin-shaped nanoparticles collecting in the lysosomes. All considered, these data demonstrate that in contradistinction to autophagy induction by some ENMs, specific materials such as REOs interfere in autophagic flux, thereby disrupting homeostatic regulation of activated NLRP3 complexes.

  9. Increased translocation of antigens to endosomes and TLR4 mediated endosomal recruitment of TAP contribute to nicotine augmented cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yan; Hu, Chun Fang; Li, Juan; You, Xiang; Gao, Feng Guang

    2016-06-21

    Cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) requires surface molecules such as lectin, CD40, langerin, heat shock protein, mannose receptor, mediated endocytosis, the endosomal translocation of internalized antigen, and the relocation of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Although the activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) up-regulate surface molecule expression, augment endocytosis, and enhance cross-presentation, the molecular mechanism of α7 nAchR activation-increased cross-presentation is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mannose receptor in nicotine-increased cross-presentation and the mechanism that endotoxins orchestrating the recruitment of TAP toward endosomes. We demonstrated that nicotine increase the expressiones of mannose receptor and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) via PI3K-Akt-mTOR-p70S6 pathway. Both endosomal translocation of mannose receptor-internalized antigens and TLR4 sig- naling are necessary for nicotine-augmented cross-presentation and cross-priming. Importantly, the recruitment of TAP toward endosomes via TLR4-MyD88-IRAK4 signaling contributes to nicotine-increased cross-presentation and cross-activation of T cells. Thus, these data suggest that increased recruitment of TAP to Ag-containing vesicles contributes to the superior cross-presentation efficacy of α7 nAchR activated DCs.

  10. Deficient Peptide Loading and MHC Class II Endosomal Sorting in a Human Genetic Immunodeficiency Disease: the Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Faigle, Wolfgang; Raposo, Graça; Tenza, Daniele; Pinet, Valérie; Vogt, Anne B.; Kropshofer, Harald; Fischer, Alain; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Amigorena, Sebastian

    1998-01-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a human recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in a single gene encoding a protein of unknown function, called lysosomal-trafficking regulator. All cells in CHS patients bear enlarged lysosomes. In addition, T- and natural killer cell cytotoxicity is defective in these patients, causing severe immunodeficiencies. We have analyzed major histocompatibility complex class II functions and intracellular transport in Epstein Barr Virus–transformed B cells from CHS patients. Peptide loading onto major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and antigen presentation are strongly delayed these cells. A detailed electron microscopy analysis of endocytic compartments revealed that only lysosomal multilaminar compartments are enlarged (reaching 1–2 μm), whereas late multivesicular endosomes have normal size and morphology. In contrast to giant multilaminar compartments that bear most of the usual lysosomal markers in these cells (HLA-DR, HLA-DM, Lamp-1, CD63, etc.), multivesicular late endosomes displayed reduced levels of all these molecules, suggesting a defect in transport from the trans-Golgi network and/or early endosomes into late multivesicular endosomes. Further insight into a possible mechanism of this transport defect came from immunolocalizing the lysosomal trafficking regulator protein, as antibodies directed to a peptide from its COOH terminal domain decorated punctated structures partially aligned along microtubules. These results suggest that the product of the Lyst gene is required for sorting endosomal resident proteins into late multivesicular endosomes by a mechanism involving microtubules. PMID:9606205

  11. Deficient peptide loading and MHC class II endosomal sorting in a human genetic immunodeficiency disease: the Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faigle, W; Raposo, G; Tenza, D; Pinet, V; Vogt, A B; Kropshofer, H; Fischer, A; de Saint-Basile, G; Amigorena, S

    1998-06-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a human recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in a single gene encoding a protein of unknown function, called lysosomal-trafficking regulator. All cells in CHS patients bear enlarged lysosomes. In addition, T- and natural killer cell cytotoxicity is defective in these patients, causing severe immunodeficiencies. We have analyzed major histocompatibility complex class II functions and intracellular transport in Epstein Barr Virus-transformed B cells from CHS patients. Peptide loading onto major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and antigen presentation are strongly delayed these cells. A detailed electron microscopy analysis of endocytic compartments revealed that only lysosomal multilaminar compartments are enlarged (reaching 1-2 micron), whereas late multivesicular endosomes have normal size and morphology. In contrast to giant multilaminar compartments that bear most of the usual lysosomal markers in these cells (HLA-DR, HLA-DM, Lamp-1, CD63, etc.), multivesicular late endosomes displayed reduced levels of all these molecules, suggesting a defect in transport from the trans-Golgi network and/or early endosomes into late multivesicular endosomes. Further insight into a possible mechanism of this transport defect came from immunolocalizing the lysosomal trafficking regulator protein, as antibodies directed to a peptide from its COOH terminal domain decorated punctated structures partially aligned along microtubules. These results suggest that the product of the Lyst gene is required for sorting endosomal resident proteins into late multivesicular endosomes by a mechanism involving microtubules.

  12. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel choline cotransporter sequestration compartment in cholinergic neurons revealed by selective endosomal ablation.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Michael T; Newkirk, Robert F; Wang, Yilun; Townsel, James G

    2010-03-01

    The sodium-dependent, high affinity choline transporter - choline cotransporter - (ChCoT, aka: cho-1, CHT1, CHT) undergoes constitutive and regulated trafficking between the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments. The pathways and regulatory mechanisms of this trafficking are not well understood. We report herein studies involving selective endosomal ablation to further our understanding of the trafficking of the ChCoT. Selective ablation of early sorting and recycling endosomes resulted in a decrease of approximately 75% of [3H]choline uptake and approximately 70% of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding. Western blot analysis showed that ablation produced a similar decrease in ChCoTs in the plasma membrane subcellular fraction. The time frame for this loss was approximately 2 h which has been shown to be the constitutive cycling time for ChCoTs in this tissue. Ablation appears to be dependent on the intracellular cycling of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase and the selective deposition of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase in early endosomes, both sorting and recycling. Ablated brain slices retained their capacity to recruit via regulated trafficking ChCoTs to the plasma membrane. This recruitment of ChCoTs suggests that the recruitable compartment is distinct from the early endosomes. It will be necessary to do further studies to identify the novel sequestration compartment supportive of the ChCoT regulated trafficking.

  14. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  15. Structure of the ESCRT-II endosomal trafficking complex.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Sun, Ji; Rusnak, Alexander S; Kim, Jaewon; Prag, Gali; Emr, Scott D; Hurley, James H

    2004-09-09

    The multivesicular-body (MVB) pathway delivers transmembrane proteins and lipids to the lumen of the endosome. The multivesicular-body sorting pathway has crucial roles in growth-factor-receptor downregulation, developmental signalling, regulation of the immune response and the budding of certain enveloped viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus. Ubiquitination is a signal for sorting into the MVB pathway, which also requires the functions of three protein complexes, termed ESCRT-I, -II and -III (endosomal sorting complex required for transport). Here we report the crystal structure of the core of the yeast ESCRT-II complex, which contains one molecule of the Vps protein Vps22, the carboxy-terminal domain of Vps36 and two molecules of Vps25, and has the shape of a capital letter 'Y'. The amino-terminal coiled coil of Vps22 and the flexible linker leading to the ubiquitin-binding NZF domain of Vps36 both protrude from the tip of one branch of the 'Y'. Vps22 and Vps36 form nearly equivalent interactions with the two Vps25 molecules at the centre of the 'Y'. The structure suggests how ubiquitinated cargo could be passed between ESCRT components of the MVB pathway through the sequential transfer of ubiquitinated cargo from one complex to the next.

  16. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Sorting to Endosomes and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Adriano; Paing, May M.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2010-01-01

    The heptahelical G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) belong to the largest family of cell surface signaling receptors encoded in the human genome. GPCRs signal to diverse extracellular stimuli and control a vast number of physiological responses, making this receptor class the target of nearly half the drugs currently in use. In addition to rapid desensitization, receptor trafficking is crucial for the temporal and spatial control of GPCR signaling. Sorting signals present in the intracytosolic domains of GPCRs regulate trafficking through the endosomal-lysosomal system. GPCR internalization is mediated by serine and threonine phosphorylation and arrestin binding. Short, linear peptide sequences including tyrosine- and dileucine-based motifs, and PDZ ligands that are recognized by distinct endocytic adaptor proteins also mediate internalization and endosomal sorting of GPCRs. We present new data from bioinformatic searches that reveal the presence of these types of sorting signals in the cytoplasmic tails of many known GPCRs. Several recent studies also indicate that the covalent modification of GPCRs with ubiquitin serves as a signal for internalization and lysosomal sorting, expanding the diversity of mechanisms that control trafficking of mammalian GPCRs. PMID:17995450

  17. Insulin-regulated Glut4 Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N.; Romenskaia, Irina; Mastick, Cynthia Corley; Coster, Adelle C. F.

    2014-01-01

    The trafficking kinetics of Glut4, the transferrin (Tf) receptor, and LRP1 were quantified in adipocytes and undifferentiated fibroblasts. Six steps were identified that determine steady state cell surface Glut4: (i) endocytosis, (ii) degradation, (iii) sorting, (iv) sequestration, (v) release, and (vi) tethering/docking/fusion. Endocytosis of Glut4 is 3 times slower than the Tf receptor in fibroblasts (ken = 0.2 min−1 versus 0.6 min−1). Differentiation decreases Glut4 ken 40% (ken = 0.12 min−1). Differentiation also decreases Glut4 degradation, increasing total and cell surface Glut4 3-fold. In fibroblasts, Glut4 is recycled from endosomes through a slow constitutive pathway (kex = 0.025–0.038 min−1), not through the fast Tf receptor pathway (kex = 0.2 min−1). The kex measured in adipocytes after insulin stimulation is similar (kex = 0.027 min−1). Differentiation decreases the rate constant for sorting into the Glut4 recycling pathway (ksort) 3-fold. In adipocytes, Glut4 is also sorted from endosomes into a second exocytic pathway through Glut4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Surprisingly, transfer from endosomes into GSVs is highly regulated; insulin increases the rate constant for sequestration (kseq) 8-fold. Release from sequestration in GSVs is rate-limiting for Glut4 exocytosis in basal adipocytes. AS160 regulates this step. Tethering/docking/fusion of GSVs to the plasma membrane is regulated through an AS160-independent process. Insulin increases the rate of release and fusion of GSVs (kfuseG) 40-fold. LRP1 cycles with the Tf receptor and Glut4 in fibroblasts but predominantly with Glut4 after differentiation. Surprisingly, AS160 knockdown accelerated LRP1 exocytosis in basal and insulin-stimulated adipocytes. These data indicate that AS160 may regulate trafficking into as well as release from GSVs. PMID:24778187

  18. Conformational biosensors reveal GPCR signalling from endosomes.

    PubMed

    Irannejad, Roshanak; Tomshine, Jin C; Tomshine, Jon R; Chevalier, Michael; Mahoney, Jacob P; Steyaert, Jan; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Sunahara, Roger K; El-Samad, Hana; Huang, Bo; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-03-28

    A long-held tenet of molecular pharmacology is that canonical signal transduction mediated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins is confined to the plasma membrane. Evidence supporting this traditional view is based on analytical methods that provide limited or no subcellular resolution. It has been subsequently proposed that signalling by internalized GPCRs is restricted to G-protein-independent mechanisms such as scaffolding by arrestins, or GPCR activation elicits a discrete form of persistent G protein signalling, or that internalized GPCRs can indeed contribute to the acute G-protein-mediated response. Evidence supporting these various latter hypotheses is indirect or subject to alternative interpretation, and it remains unknown if endosome-localized GPCRs are even present in an active form. Here we describe the application of conformation-specific single-domain antibodies (nanobodies) to directly probe activation of the β2-adrenoceptor, a prototypical GPCR, and its cognate G protein, Gs (ref. 12), in living mammalian cells. We show that the adrenergic agonist isoprenaline promotes receptor and G protein activation in the plasma membrane as expected, but also in the early endosome membrane, and that internalized receptors contribute to the overall cellular cyclic AMP response within several minutes after agonist application. These findings provide direct support for the hypothesis that canonical GPCR signalling occurs from endosomes as well as the plasma membrane, and suggest a versatile strategy for probing dynamic conformational change in vivo.

  19. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin−/− neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin−/− phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca2+ sensor, we demonstrate that snapin–dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting. PMID:26108535

  20. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-08-04

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin(-/-) neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin(-/-) phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca(2+) sensor, we demonstrate that snapin-dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. A dynamic Shh expression pattern, regulated by SHH and BMP signaling, coordinates fusion of primordia in the amniote face.

    PubMed

    Hu, Diane; Young, Nathan M; Li, Xin; Xu, Yanhua; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms of morphogenesis are not well understood, yet shaping structures during development is essential for establishing correct organismal form and function. Here, we examine mechanisms that help to shape the developing face during the crucial period of facial primordia fusion. This period of development is a time when the faces of amniote embryos exhibit the greatest degree of similarity, and it probably results from the necessity for fusion to occur to establish the primary palate. Our results show that hierarchical induction mechanisms, consisting of iterative signaling by Sonic hedgehog (SHH) followed by Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), regulate a dynamic expression pattern of Shh in the ectoderm covering the frontonasal (FNP) and maxillary (MxP) processes. Furthermore, this Shh expression domain contributes to the morphogenetic processes that drive the directional growth of the globular process of the FNP toward the lateral nasal process and MxP, in part by regulating cell proliferation in the facial mesenchyme. The nature of the induction mechanism that we discovered suggests that the process of fusion of the facial primordia is intrinsically buffered against producing maladaptive morphologies, such as clefts of the primary palate, because there appears to be little opportunity for variation to occur during expansion of the Shh expression domain in the ectoderm of the facial primordia. Ultimately, these results might explain why this period of development constitutes a phylotypic stage of facial development among amniotes.

  2. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 dependent endosomal trapping and recycling of apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles.

  3. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 Dependent Endosomal Trapping and Recycling of Apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Principal Findings Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. Conclusion We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles. PMID:22238606

  4. Up-regulation of syncytin-1 contributes to TNF-α-enhanced fusion between OSCC and HUVECs partly via Wnt/β-catenin-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting-Lin; Wang, Meng; Xu, Zhi; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhou, Xiao-Cheng; Jiang, Er-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Song, Yong; Song, Kai; Shao, Zhe; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that cell fusion is one of the driving forces of cancer invasion and metastasis. However, considerably less is still known about the triggering factors and underlying mechanisms associated with cancer-host cell fusion, particularly in inflammatory tumor microenvironment. In this study, we confirmed that inflammatory factor TNF-α could enhance fusion between squamous cell carcinoma cells 9 (SCC-9) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Further study revealed that TNF-α could promote up-regulation of syncytin-1 in SCC-9 and its receptor neutral amino acid transporter type 2 (ASCT-2) in HUVEC. Syncytin-1 acted as an important downstream effector in TNF-α-enhanced cancer-endothelial cell fusion. TNF-α treatment also led to the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway in SCC-9. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway was closely associated with the up-regulation of syncytin-1 in SCC-9 and increased fusion between SCC-9 and HUVEC while blocking of Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway resulted in the corresponding down-regulation of syncytin-1 accompanied by sharp decrease of cancer-endothelial cell fusion. Taking together, our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway activation-dependent up-regulation of syncytin-1 contributes to the pro-inflammatory factor TNF-α-enhanced fusion between oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and endothelial cells. PMID:28112190

  5. RAB-5- and DYNAMIN-1-Mediated Endocytosis of EFF-1 Fusogen Controls Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell-cell fusion plays essential roles during fertilization and organogenesis. Previous studies in C. elegans led to the identification of the eukaryotic fusion protein (EFF-1 fusogen), which has structural homology to class II viral fusogens. Transcriptional repression of EFF-1 ensures correct fusion fates, and overexpression of EFF-1 results in embryonic lethality. EFF-1 must be expressed on the surface of both fusing cells; however, little is known regarding how cells regulate EFF-1 surface exposure. Here, we report that EFF-1 is actively removed from the plasma membrane of epidermal cells by dynamin- and RAB-5-dependent endocytosis and accumulates in early endosomes. EFF-1 was transiently localized to apical domains of fusion-competent cells. Effective cell-cell fusion occurred only between pairs of cell membranes in which EFF-1 localized. Downregulation of dynamin or RAB-5 caused EFF-1 mislocalization to all apical membrane domains and excessive fusion. Thus, internalization of EFF-1 is a safety mechanism preventing excessive cell fusion. PMID:26854231

  6. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Butler, Lisa M; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was evaluated in prostate cancer and non-malignant cells and a significant increase in gene and protein expression was found for early, but not late endosomal proteins. There was also a differential distribution of early endosomes, and altered endosomal traffic and signalling of the transferrin receptors (TFRC and TFR2) in prostate cancer cells. These findings support the concept that endosome biogenesis and function is altered in prostate cancer. Microarray analysis of a clinical cohort confirmed the altered endosomal gene expression observed in cultured prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, in prostate cancer patient tissue specimens, the early endosomal marker and adaptor protein APPL1 showed consistently altered basement membrane histology in the vicinity of tumours and concentrated staining within tumour masses. These novel observations on altered early endosome biogenesis provide a new avenue for prostate cancer biomarker investigation and suggest new methods for the early diagnosis and accurate prognosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25080433

  7. Effects of Endosomal Photodamage on Membrane Recycling and Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, David; Santiago, Ann Marie; Andrzejak, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The flux of receptor-independent endocytosis can be estimated by addition of wortmannin to cell cultures. Membrane influx is unaffected but traffic out of late endosomes is impaired, resulting in a substantial enlargement of these organelles. Using the 1c1c7 murine hepatoma, we investigated the effect of endosomal photodamage on this endocytic pathway. We previously reported that photodamage catalyzed by the lysosomal photosensitizer NPe6 prevented wortmannin-induced endosomal swelling, indicating an earlier block in the process. In this study, we show that endosomal photodamage, initiated by photodamage from an asymmetrically-substituted porphine or a phthalocyanine, also prevents wortmannin-induced endosomal swelling, even when the PDT dose is insufficient to cause endosomal disruption. As the PDT dose is increased, endosomal breakage occurs, as does apoptosis and cell death. Very high PDT doses result in necrosis. We propose that photodamage to endosomes results in alterations in the endosomal structure such that influx of new material is inhibited and receptor-independent endocytosis is prevented. In an additional series of studies, we found that the swollen late endosomes induced by wortmannin are unable to retain previously accumulated fluorescent probes or photosensitizers. PMID:21208213

  8. IQGAP1 promotes CXCR4 chemokine receptor function and trafficking via EEA-1+ endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bamidele, Adebowale O.; Kremer, Kimberly N.; Hirsova, Petra; Clift, Ian C.; Gores, Gregory J.; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    IQ motif–containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) is a cytoskeleton-interacting scaffold protein. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that binds stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1; also known as CXCL12). Both IQGAP1 and CXCR4 are overexpressed in cancer cell types, yet it was unclear whether these molecules functionally interact. Here, we show that depleting IQGAP1 in Jurkat T leukemic cells reduced CXCR4 expression, disrupted trafficking of endocytosed CXCR4 via EEA-1+ endosomes, and decreased efficiency of CXCR4 recycling. SDF-1–induced cell migration and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) MAPK were strongly inhibited, even when forced overexpression restored CXCR4 levels. Similar results were seen in KMBC and HEK293 cells. Exploring the mechanism, we found that SDF-1 treatment induced IQGAP1 binding to α-tubulin and localization to CXCR4-containing endosomes and that CXCR4-containing EEA-1+ endosomes were abnormally located distal from the microtubule (MT)-organizing center (MTOC) in IQGAP1-deficient cells. Thus, IQGAP1 critically mediates CXCR4 cell surface expression and signaling, evidently by regulating EEA-1+ endosome interactions with MTs during CXCR4 trafficking and recycling. IQGAP1 may similarly promote CXCR4 functions in other cancer cell types. PMID:26195666

  9. Mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2 coordinately regulate mitochondrial fusion and are essential for embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiuchen; Detmer, Scott A.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Griffin, Erik E.; Fraser, Scott E.; Chan, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is determined by a dynamic equilibrium between organelle fusion and fission, but the significance of these processes in vertebrates is unknown. The mitofusins, Mfn1 and Mfn2, have been shown to affect mitochondrial morphology when overexpressed. We find that mice deficient in either Mfn1 or Mfn2 die in midgestation. However, whereas Mfn2 mutant embryos have a specific and severe disruption of the placental trophoblast giant cell layer, Mfn1-deficient giant cells are normal. Embryonic fibroblasts lacking Mfn1 or Mfn2 display distinct types of fragmented mitochondria, a phenotype we determine to be due to a severe reduction in mitochondrial fusion. Moreover, we find that Mfn1 and Mfn2 form homotypic and heterotypic complexes and show, by rescue of mutant cells, that the homotypic complexes are functional for fusion. We conclude that Mfn1 and Mfn2 have both redundant and distinct functions and act in three separate molecular complexes to promote mitochondrial fusion. Strikingly, a subset of mitochondria in mutant cells lose membrane potential. Therefore, mitochondrial fusion is essential for embryonic development, and by enabling cooperation between mitochondria, has protective effects on the mitochondrial population. PMID:12527753

  10. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Miranda; Cross, Rebecca; Singleton, Kaela S.; Zlatic, Stephanie; Chapleau, Christopher; Mullin, Ariana P.; Rolle, Isaiah; Moore, Carlene C.; Theibert, Anne; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Faundez, Victor; Larimore, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3) and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1). Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ); yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse ortholog of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function. PMID:27713690

  11. Hook1, microtubules, and Rab22: mediators of selective sorting of clathrin-independent endocytic cargo proteins on endosomes.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Donaldson, Julie G

    2013-01-01

    Clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) mediates the internalization of many plasma membrane (PM) proteins involved in homeostasis, immune response, and signaling. CIE cargo molecules are internalized independent of clathrin, and dynamin, and modulated by the small G protein Arf6. After internalization the CIE cargo proteins either follow a default pathway of trafficking to lysosomes for degradation or follow a pathway where they are routed directly to the recycling endosomes for return to the PM. The selective endosomal sorting of molecules like CD44, CD98, and CD147, which are involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular interactions, indicates that sorting mechanisms dictate the post-endocytic fate of CIE cargo proteins. In a recent study, we identified sorting signals that specify the endosomal trafficking of CIE cargo proteins and uncover a role for Hook1 as an endosomal cargo adaptor that routes CIE cargo to the recycling endosomes. Furthermore, we found that Hook1, microtubules, and Rab22a work in coordination to directly recycle the cargo and facilitate cell spreading. Here, we discuss our current view on the endosomal sorting of CIE cargo proteins and their molecular regulators.

  12. Regulation of a cya-lac fusion by cyclic AMP in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jovanovich, S B

    1985-02-01

    cya-lac and crp-lac operon fusions were isolated in Salmonella typhimurium by using the phage Mu d1(lac cts Apr). Both transduction and reversion analyses have indicated that lac expression is controlled by the appropriate promoter, e.g., either crpp or cyap. By using chromosomal mobilization techniques, we found that cya had a clockwise direction of transcription on the standard S. typhimurium map. The cya-lac fusions could be complemented by Escherichia coli F'133, which covers cya, with a resultant 17 to 38% decrease in cya expression. Cyclic AMP was found to be able to repress the expression of the cya-lac fusion ninefold when present at 25 mM. This repression was not seen in crp backgrounds, and hence is mediated by the cAMP receptor protein. Repression of cya was also found upon growth on carbon sources known to elicit high cyclic AMP levels.

  13. Regulation of a cya-lac fusion by cyclic AMP in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovich, S B

    1985-01-01

    cya-lac and crp-lac operon fusions were isolated in Salmonella typhimurium by using the phage Mu d1(lac cts Apr). Both transduction and reversion analyses have indicated that lac expression is controlled by the appropriate promoter, e.g., either crpp or cyap. By using chromosomal mobilization techniques, we found that cya had a clockwise direction of transcription on the standard S. typhimurium map. The cya-lac fusions could be complemented by Escherichia coli F'133, which covers cya, with a resultant 17 to 38% decrease in cya expression. Cyclic AMP was found to be able to repress the expression of the cya-lac fusion ninefold when present at 25 mM. This repression was not seen in crp backgrounds, and hence is mediated by the cAMP receptor protein. Repression of cya was also found upon growth on carbon sources known to elicit high cyclic AMP levels. PMID:2981819

  14. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures {sup 125}I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins.

  15. Cathepsin W Is Required for Escape of Influenza A Virus from Late Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Thomas O.; Pohl, Marie O.; Yángüez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cathepsin W (CtsW) is a cysteine protease, which was identified in a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen to be required for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. In this study, we show that reducing the levels of expression of CtsW reduces viral titers for different subtypes of IAV, and we map the target step of CtsW requirement to viral entry. Using a set of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting CtsW, we demonstrate that knockdown of CtsW results in a decrease of IAV nucleoprotein accumulation in the nuclei of infected cells at 3 h postinfection. Assays specific for the individual stages of IAV entry further show that attachment, internalization, and early endosomal trafficking are not affected by CtsW knockdown. However, we detected impaired escape of viral particles from late endosomes in CtsW knockdown cells. Moreover, fusion analysis with a dual-labeled influenza virus revealed a significant reduction in fusion events, with no detectable impact on endosomal pH, suggesting that CtsW is required at the stage of viral fusion. The defect in IAV entry upon CtsW knockdown could be rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CtsW but not by the expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of CtsW, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of CtsW is required for successful entry of IAV. Our results establish CtsW as an important host factor for entry of IAV into target cells and suggest that CtsW could be a promising target for the development of future antiviral drugs. PMID:26060270

  16. Suppressor of fusion, a Fusarium oxysporum homolog of Ndt80, is required for nutrient-dependent regulation of anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shermineh; Fokkens, Like; Houterman, Petra M; Rep, Martijn

    2016-10-01

    Heterokaryon formation is an essential step in asexual recombination in Fusarium oxysporum. Filamentous fungi have an elaborate nonself recognition machinery to prevent formation and proliferation of heterokaryotic cells, called heterokaryon incompatibility (HI). In F. oxysporum the regulation of this machinery is not well understood. In Neurospora crassa, Vib-1, a putative transcription factor of the p53-like Ndt80 family of transcription factors, has been identified as global regulator of HI. In this study we investigated the role of the F. oxysporum homolog of Vib-1, called Suf, in vegetative hyphal and conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) fusion and HI. We identified a novel function for an Ndt80 homolog as a nutrient-dependent regulator of anastomosis. Strains carrying the SUF deletion mutation display a hyper-fusion phenotype during vegetative growth as well as germling development. In addition, conidial paring of incompatible SUF deletion strains led to more heterokaryon formation, which is independent of suppression of HI. Our data provides further proof for the divergence in the functions of different members Ndt80 family. We propose that Ndt80 homologs mediate responses to nutrient quality and quantity, with specific responses varying between species.

  17. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  18. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic C-Terminal Tail Domain Regulates the Energy Requirement for EBV-Induced Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. IMPORTANCE Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV

  19. Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8Δ mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8Δ mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8Δ strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8Δ mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8Δ mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum.

  20. Analysis of articulation between clathrin and retromer in retrograde sorting on early endosomes.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Vincent; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Bai, Siau-Kun; Chambon, Valérie; Tenza, Danièle; Burgos, Patricia V; Shi, Anbing; Benaroch, Philippe; Urbé, Sylvie; Lamaze, Christophe; Grant, Barth D; Raposo, Graça; Johannes, Ludger

    2009-12-01

    Clathrin and retromer have key functions for retrograde trafficking between early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies on Shiga toxin suggested that these two coat complexes operate in a sequential manner. Here, we show that the curvature recognition subunit component sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) of retromer interacts with receptor-mediated endocytosis-8 (RME-8) protein, and that RME-8 and SNX1 colocalize on early endosomes together with a model cargo of the retrograde route, the receptor-binding B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB). RME-8 has previously been found to bind to the clathrin uncoating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) Hsc70, and we now report that depletion of RME-8 or Hsc70 affects retrograde trafficking at the early endosomes-TGN interface of STxB and the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, an endogenous retrograde cargo protein. We also provide evidence that retromer interacts with the clathrin-binding protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) not only via SNX1, as previously published (Chin Raynor MC, Wei X, Chen HQ, Li L. Hrs interacts with sorting nexin 1 and regulates degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. J Biol Chem 2001;276:7069-7078), but also via the core complex component Vps35. Hrs codistributes at the ultrastructural level with STxB on early endosomes, and interfering with Hrs function using antibodies or mild overexpression inhibits retrograde transport. Our combined data suggest a model according to which the functions in retrograde sorting on early endosomes of SNX1/retromer and clathrin are articulated by RME-8, and possibly also by Hrs.

  1. Distinct effects of endosomal escape and inhibition of endosomal trafficking on gene delivery via electrotransfection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chi; Wang, Liangli; Yuan, Fan

    2017-01-01

    A recent theory suggests that endocytosis is involved in uptake and intracellular transport of electrotransfected plasmid DNA (pDNA). The goal of the current study was to understand if approaches used previously to improve endocytosis of gene delivery vectors could be applied to enhancing electrotransfection efficiency (eTE). Results from the study showed that photochemically induced endosomal escape, which could increase poly-L-lysine (PLL)-mediated gene delivery, decreased eTE. The decrease could not be blocked by treatment of cells with endonuclease inhibitors (aurintricarboxylic acid and zinc ion) or antioxidants (L-glutamine and ascorbic acid). Chemical treatment of cells with an endosomal trafficking inhibitor that blocks endosome progression, bafilomycin A1, resulted in a significant decrease in eTE. However, treatment of cells with lysosomotropic agents (chloroquine and ammonium chloride) had little effects on eTE. These data suggested that endosomes played important roles in protecting and intracellular trafficking of electrotransfected pDNA. PMID:28182739

  2. Involvement of complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine in endosomal trafficking in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2012-12-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we found that csg2Δ mutant cells defective in the synthesis of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide exhibited abnormal intracellular accumulation of an exocytic v-SNARE, Snc1, under phosphatidylserine synthase gene (PSS1)-repressive conditions, although in wild-type cells, Snc1 was known to cycle between plasma membranes and the late Golgi via post-Golgi endosomes. The mislocalized Snc1 was co-localized with an endocytic marker dye, FM4-64, upon labelling for a short time. The abnormal distribution of Snc1 was suppressed by deletion of GYP2 encoding a GTPase-activating protein that negatively regulates endosomal vesicular trafficking, or expression of GTP-restricted form of Ypt32 GTPase. Furthermore, an endocytosis-deficient mutant of Snc1 was localized to plasma membranes in PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells as well as wild-type cells. Thus, the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells were indicated to be defective in the trafficking of Snc1 from post-Golgi endosomes to the late Golgi. In contrast, the vesicular trafficking pathways via pre-vacuolar endosomes in the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells seemed to be normal. These results suggested that specific complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine are co-ordinately involved in specific vesicular trafficking pathway. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Association of cortactin with dynamic actin in lamellipodia and on endosomal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kaksonen, M; Peng, H B; Rauvala, H

    2000-12-01

    We have used fluorescent protein tagging to study the localization and dynamics of the actin-binding protein cortactin in living NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. Cortactin was localized to active lamellipodia and to small cytoplasmic spots. Time-lapse imaging revealed that these cortactin labeled structures were very dynamic. In the lamellipodia, cortactin labeled structures formed at the leading edge and then moved toward the cell center. Experiments with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin showed that cortactin movement was coincident with the actin retrograde flow in the lamellipodia. Cytoplasmic cortactin spots also contained F-actin and were propelled by actin polymerization. Arp3, a component of the arp2/3 complex which is a key regulator of actin polymerization, co-localized with cortactin. Cytoplasmic cortactin-labeled spots were found to be associated with endosomal vesicles. Association was asymmetric and approximately half of the endosomes were associated with cortactin spots. Time-lapse imaging suggested that these cortactin and F-actin-containing spots propelled endosomes. Actin polymerization based propulsion may be a common mechanism for endomembrane trafficking in the same manner as used in the plasma membrane protrusions. As cortactin is known to interact with membrane-associated signaling proteins it could have a role in linking signaling complexes with dynamic actin on endosomes and in lamellipodia.

  4. Crystal structure of subunit VPS25 of the endosomal trafficking complex ESCRT-II

    PubMed Central

    Wernimont, Amy K; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2004-01-01

    Background Down-regulation of plasma membrane receptors via the endocytic pathway involves their monoubiquitylation, transport to endosomal membranes and eventual sorting into multi vesicular bodies (MVB) destined for lysosomal degradation. Successive assemblies of Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT-I, -II and III) largely mediate sorting of plasma membrane receptors at endosomal membranes, the formation of multivesicular bodies and their release into the endosomal lumen. In addition, the human ESCRT-II has been shown to form a complex with RNA polymerase II elongation factor ELL in order to exert transcriptional control activity. Results Here we report the crystal structure of Vps25 at 3.1 Å resolution. Vps25 crystallizes in a dimeric form and each monomer is composed of two winged helix domains arranged in tandem. Structural comparisons detect no conformational changes between unliganded Vps25 and Vps25 within the ESCRT-II complex composed of two Vps25 copies and one copy each of Vps22 and Vps36 [1,2]. Conclusions Our structural analyses present a framework for studying Vps25 interactions with ESCRT-I and ESCRT-III partners. Winged helix domain containing proteins have been implicated in nucleic acid binding and it remains to be determined whether Vps25 has a similar activity which might play a role in the proposed transcriptional control exerted by Vps25 and/or the whole ESCRT-II complex. PMID:15579210

  5. Cholesterol Flux Is Required for Endosomal Progression of African Swine Fever Virions during the Initial Establishment of Infection.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Chiappi, Michele; Galindo, Inmaculada; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Carrascosa, José L; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-11-25

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a major threat for porcine production that has been slowly spreading in Eastern Europe since its first appearance in the Caucasus in 2007. ASFV enters the cell by endocytosis and gains access to the cytosol to start replication from late endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Cholesterol associated with low-density lipoproteins entering the cell by endocytosis also follows a trafficking pathway similar to that of ASFV. Here we show that cholesterol plays an essential role in the establishment of infection as the virus traffics through the endocytic pathway. In contrast to the case for other DNA viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus 5, cholesterol efflux from endosomes is required for ASFV release/entry to the cytosol. Accumulation of cholesterol in endosomes impairs fusion, resulting in retention of virions inside endosomes. ASFV also remodels intracellular cholesterol by increasing its cellular uptake and redistributes free cholesterol to viral replication sites. Our analysis reveals that ASFV manipulates cholesterol dynamics to ensure an appropriate lipid flux to establish productive infection. Since its appearance in the Caucasus in 2007, African swine fever (ASF) has been spreading westwards to neighboring European countries, threatening porcine production. Due to the lack of an effective vaccine, ASF control relies on early diagnosis and widespread culling of infected animals. We investigated early stages of ASFV infection to identify potential cellular targets for therapeutic intervention against ASF. The virus enters the cell by endocytosis, and soon thereafter, viral decapsidation occurs in the acid pH of late endosomes. We found that ASFV infection requires and reorganizes the cellular lipid cholesterol. ASFV requires cholesterol to exit the endosome to gain access to the cytoplasm to establish productive replication. Our results indicate that there is a differential requirement for cholesterol efflux for vaccinia

  6. ELT-5 and ELT-6 are required continuously to regulate epidermal seam cell differentiation and cell fusion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Koh, K; Rothman, J H

    2001-08-01

    The C. elegans epidermis is a simple epithelium comprised of three major cell types, the seam, syncytial and P cells. While specification of all major epidermal cells is known to require the ELT-1 GATA transcription factor, little is known about how the individual epidermal cell types are specified. We report that elt-5 and -6, adjacent genes encoding GATA factors, are essential for the development of the lateral epidermal cells, the seam cells. Inhibition of elt-5 and -6 function by RNA-mediated interference results in penetrant late embryonic and early larval lethality. Seam cells in affected animals do not differentiate properly: the alae, seam-specific cuticular structures, are generally absent and expression of several seam-specific markers is blocked. In addition, elt-3, which encodes another GATA factor normally expressed in non-seam epidermis, is often ectopically expressed in the seam cells of affected animals, demonstrating that ELT-5 and -6 repress elt-3 expression in wild-type seam cells. Seam cells in affected animals often undergo inappropriate fusion with the epidermal syncytia. Interference of elt-5 and -6 function during larval development can cause fusion of all seam cells with the surrounding syncytia and pronounced defects in molting. elt-5 and -6 are both expressed in seam cells and many other cells, and are apparently functionally interchangeable. Their expression is controlled by separable tissue-specific regulatory elements and the apportionment of monocistronic versus dicistronic transcription of both genes appears to be subject to cell-type-specific regulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that elt-5 and -6 function continuously throughout C. elegans development to regulate seam cell differentiation and cell fusion.

  7. Mitochondrial fusion but not fission regulates larval growth and synaptic development through steroid hormone production.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Hector; Yao, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Kuchuan; Jaiswal, Manish; Donti, Taraka; Lin, Yong Qi; Bayat, Vafa; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Ke; David, Gabriela; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yamamoto, Shinya; Duraine, Lita; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J

    2014-10-14

    Mitochondrial fusion and fission affect the distribution and quality control of mitochondria. We show that Marf (Mitochondrial associated regulatory factor), is required for mitochondrial fusion and transport in long axons. Moreover, loss of Marf leads to a severe depletion of mitochondria in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Marf mutants also fail to maintain proper synaptic transmission at NMJs upon repetitive stimulation, similar to Drp1 fission mutants. However, unlike Drp1, loss of Marf leads to NMJ morphology defects and extended larval lifespan. Marf is required to form contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum and/or lipid droplets (LDs) and for proper storage of cholesterol and ecdysone synthesis in ring glands. Interestingly, human Mitofusin-2 rescues the loss of LD but both Mitofusin-1 and Mitofusin-2 are required for steroid-hormone synthesis. Our data show that Marf and Mitofusins share an evolutionarily conserved role in mitochondrial transport, cholesterol ester storage and steroid-hormone synthesis.

  8. Oncogenic Gene Fusion FGFR3-TACC3 Is Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Katelyn N; Meyer, April N; Siari, Asma; Campos, Alexandre R; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Donoghue, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. Mutation and/or translocation of FGFRs lead to aberrant signaling that often results in developmental syndromes or cancer growth. As sequencing of human tumors becomes more frequent, so does the detection of FGFR translocations and fusion proteins. The research conducted in this article examines a frequently identified fusion protein between FGFR3 and transforming acidic coiled-coil containing protein 3 (TACC3), frequently identified in glioblastoma, lung cancer, bladder cancer, oral cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and cervical cancer. Using titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment (TiO2)-liquid chromatography (LC)-high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), it was demonstrated that the fused coiled-coil TACC3 domain results in constitutive phosphorylation of key activating FGFR3 tyrosine residues. The presence of the TACC coiled-coil domain leads to increased and altered levels of FGFR3 activation, fusion protein phosphorylation, MAPK pathway activation, nuclear localization, cellular transformation, and IL3-independent proliferation. Introduction of K508R FGFR3 kinase-dead mutation abrogates these effects, except for nuclear localization which is due solely to the TACC3 domain. These results demonstrate that FGFR3 kinase activity is essential for the oncogenic effects of the FGFR3-TACC3 fusion protein and could serve as a therapeutic target, but that phosphorylated tyrosine residues within the TACC3-derived portion are not critical for activity. Mol Cancer Res; 14(5); 458-69. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Regulation of fusion activity by the cytoplasmic domain of a paramyxovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tong, S; Li, M; Vincent, A; Compans, R W; Fritsch, E; Beier, R; Klenk, C; Ohuchi, M; Klenk, H-D

    2002-09-30

    SER virus is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Rubulavirus, which has been isolated from pigs. It is very closely related to SV5 virus serologically, in protein profile, and in nucleotide sequence. However, unlike SV5, SER induces minimal syncytium formation in infected CV-1 or BHK cells. Fluorescence transfer experiments between labeled erythrocytes and infected MDBK cells revealed that SER also induces hemifusion and pore formation with reduced efficiency. The virion polypeptide profiles of SER and SV5 are very similar, except that the SER F1 subunit shows an apparent molecular weight that is about 2 kDa higher than that of SV5. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed the SER F (551 aa) to be longer than SV5 F (529 aa) by 22 residues in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) domain. The HN and M gene sequences of the viruses were found to be very similar. The SER F showed minimal fusion activity when coexpressed with either SV5 or SER HN. In contrast, SV5 F was highly fusogenic when coexpressed with either HN protein, indicating that the restricted fusion capacity of SER virus is a property of its F protein. Truncation in the CT of SER F by 22 residues completely rescued its ability to cause syncytium formation, whereas other truncations rescued syncytium formation partially. These results demonstrate that an elongated CT of a paramyxovirus F protein suppresses its membrane fusion activity.

  10. Crystal structure of the conserved herpes virus fusion regulator complex gH-gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K; Cairns, Tina M; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2010-09-13

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  12. Crystal structure of the conserved herpesvirus fusion regulator complex gH—gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Cairns, Tina M.; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2015-02-09

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH–gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH–gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH–gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB–gH–gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB–gH–gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  13. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking in astrocytes: Relevance to MLC disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brignone, Maria S.; Lanciotti, Angela; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Molinari, Paola; Camerini, Serena; Diociaiuti, Marco; Petrini, Stefania; Minnone, Gaetana; Crescenzi, Marco; Laudiero, Luisa Bracci; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Ambrosini, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding MLC1, a membrane protein mainly expressed in astrocytes in the central nervous system. Although MLC1 function is unknown, evidence is emerging that it may regulate ion fluxes. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches to identify MLC1 interactors and elucidate MLC1 function we found that MLC1 interacts with the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), the proton pump that regulates endosomal acidity. Because we previously showed that in intracellular organelles MLC1 directly binds Na, K-ATPase, which controls endosomal pH, we studied MLC1 endosomal localization and trafficking and MLC1 effects on endosomal acidity and function using human astrocytoma cells overexpressing wild-type (WT) MLC1 or MLC1 carrying pathological mutations. We found that WT MLC1 is abundantly expressed in early (EEA1+, Rab5+) and recycling (Rab11+) endosomes and uses the latter compartment to traffic to the plasma membrane during hyposmotic stress. We also showed that WT MLC1 limits early endosomal acidification and influences protein trafficking in astrocytoma cells by stimulating protein recycling, as revealed by FITC-dextran measurement of endosomal pH and transferrin protein recycling assay, respectively. WT MLC1 also favors recycling to the plasma-membrane of the TRPV4 cation channel which cooperates with MLC1 to activate calcium influx in astrocytes during hyposmotic stress. Although MLC disease-causing mutations differentially affect MLC1 localization and trafficking, all the mutated proteins fail to influence endosomal pH and protein recycling. This study demonstrates that MLC1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking suggesting that alteration of these processes contributes to MLC pathogenesis. PMID:24561067

  14. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking in astrocytes: relevance to MLC disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brignone, Maria S; Lanciotti, Angela; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Molinari, Paola; Camerini, Serena; Diociaiuti, Marco; Petrini, Stefania; Minnone, Gaetana; Crescenzi, Marco; Laudiero, Luisa Bracci; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C; Ambrosini, Elena

    2014-06-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding MLC1, a membrane protein mainly expressed in astrocytes in the central nervous system. Although MLC1 function is unknown, evidence is emerging that it may regulate ion fluxes. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches to identify MLC1 interactors and elucidate MLC1 function we found that MLC1 interacts with the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), the proton pump that regulates endosomal acidity. Because we previously showed that in intracellular organelles MLC1 directly binds Na, K-ATPase, which controls endosomal pH, we studied MLC1 endosomal localization and trafficking and MLC1 effects on endosomal acidity and function using human astrocytoma cells overexpressing wild-type (WT) MLC1 or MLC1 carrying pathological mutations. We found that WT MLC1 is abundantly expressed in early (EEA1(+), Rab5(+)) and recycling (Rab11(+)) endosomes and uses the latter compartment to traffic to the plasma membrane during hyposmotic stress. We also showed that WT MLC1 limits early endosomal acidification and influences protein trafficking in astrocytoma cells by stimulating protein recycling, as revealed by FITC-dextran measurement of endosomal pH and transferrin protein recycling assay, respectively. WT MLC1 also favors recycling to the plasma-membrane of the TRPV4 cation channel which cooperates with MLC1 to activate calcium influx in astrocytes during hyposmotic stress. Although MLC disease-causing mutations differentially affect MLC1 localization and trafficking, all the mutated proteins fail to influence endosomal pH and protein recycling. This study demonstrates that MLC1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking suggesting that alteration of these processes contributes to MLC pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Microtubule motors mediate endosomal sorting by maintaining functional domain organization.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sylvie D; Townley, Anna K; Danson, Chris M; Cullen, Peter J; Stephens, David J

    2013-06-01

    Many microtubule motors have been shown to couple to endosomal membranes. These motors include dynein in addition to many different kinesin family members. Sorting nexins (SNXs) are central to the organization and function of endosomes. These proteins can actively shape endosomal membranes and couple directly or indirectly to the minus-end microtubule motor dynein. Motor proteins acting on endosomes drive their motility, dictate their morphology and affect cargo segregation. We have used well-characterized members of the SNX family to elucidate motor coupling using high-resolution light microscopy coupled with depletion of specific microtubule motors. Endosomal domains labelled with SNX1, SNX4 and SNX8 couple to discrete combinations of dynein and kinesin motors. These specific combinations govern the structure and motility of each SNX-coated membrane in addition to the segregation of distinct functional endosomal subdomains. Taken together, our data show that these key features of endosome dynamics are governed by the same set of opposing microtubule motors. Thus, microtubule motors help to define the mosaic layout of endosomes that underpins cargo sorting.

  16. A Novel Type III Endosome Transmembrane Protein, TEMP

    PubMed Central

    Aturaliya, Rajith N.; Kerr, Markus C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a high-throughput subcellular localisation project, the protein encoded by the RIKEN mouse cDNA 2610528J11 was expressed and identified to be associated with both endosomes and the plasma membrane. Based on this, we have assigned the name TEMP for Type III Endosome Membrane Protein. TEMP encodes a short protein of 111 amino acids with a single, alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Experimental analysis of its membrane topology demonstrated it is a Type III membrane protein with the amino-terminus in the lumenal, or extracellular region, and the carboxy-terminus in the cytoplasm. In addition to the plasma membrane TEMP was localized to Rab5 positive early endosomes, Rab5/Rab11 positive recycling endosomes but not Rab7 positive late endosomes. Video microscopy in living cells confirmed TEMP’s plasma membrane localization and identified the intracellular endosome compartments to be tubulovesicular. Overexpression of TEMP resulted in the early/recycling endosomes clustering at the cell periphery that was dependent on the presence of intact microtubules. The cellular function of TEMP cannot be inferred based on bioinformatics comparison, but its cellular distribution between early/recycling endosomes and the plasma membrane suggests a role in membrane transport. PMID:24710541

  17. Moesin and cortactin control actin-dependent multivesicular endosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Muriel, Olivia; Tomas, Alejandra; Scott, Cameron C.; Gruenberg, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We used in vivo and in vitro strategies to study the mechanisms of multivesicular endosome biogenesis. We found that, whereas annexinA2 and ARP2/3 mediate F-actin nucleation and branching, respectively, the ERM protein moesin supports the formation of F-actin networks on early endosomes. We also found that moesin plays no role during endocytosis and recycling to the plasma membrane but is absolutely required, much like actin, for early-to-late-endosome transport and multivesicular endosome formation. Both actin network formation in vitro and early-to-late endosome transport in vivo also depend on the F-actin–binding protein cortactin. Our data thus show that moesin and cortactin are necessary for formation of F-actin networks that mediate endosome biogenesis or maturation and transport through the degradative pathway. We propose that the primary function of endosomal F-actin is to control the membrane remodeling that accompanies endosome biogenesis. We also speculate that this mechanism helps segregate tubular and multivesicular membranes along the recycling and degradation pathways, respectively. PMID:27605702

  18. Filopodia formation and endosome clustering induced by mutant plus-end-directed myosin VI.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Buss, Folma

    2017-02-14

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is the only myosin known to move toward the minus end of actin filaments. It has roles in numerous cellular processes, including maintenance of stereocilia structure, endocytosis, and autophagosome maturation. However, the functional necessity of minus-end-directed movement along actin is unclear as the underlying architecture of the local actin network is often unknown. To address this question, we engineered a mutant of MYO6, MYO6+, which undergoes plus-end-directed movement while retaining physiological cargo interactions in the tail. Expression of this mutant motor in HeLa cells led to a dramatic reorganization of cortical actin filaments and the formation of actin-rich filopodia. MYO6 is present on peripheral adaptor protein, phosphotyrosine interacting with PH domain and leucine zipper 1 (APPL1) signaling endosomes and MYO6+ expression causes a dramatic relocalization and clustering of this endocytic compartment in the cell cortex. MYO6+ and its adaptor GAIP interacting protein, C terminus (GIPC) accumulate at the tips of these filopodia, while APPL1 endosomes accumulate at the base. A combination of MYO6+ mutagenesis and siRNA-mediated depletion of MYO6 binding partners demonstrates that motor activity and binding to endosomal membranes mediated by GIPC and PI(4,5)P2 are crucial for filopodia formation. A similar reorganization of actin is induced by a constitutive dimer of MYO6+, indicating that multimerization of MYO6 on endosomes through binding to GIPC is required for this cellular activity and regulation of actin network structure. This unique engineered MYO6+ offers insights into both filopodia formation and MYO6 motor function at endosomes and at the plasma membrane.

  19. Filopodia formation and endosome clustering induced by mutant plus-end–directed myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Thomas A.; Buss, Folma

    2017-01-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is the only myosin known to move toward the minus end of actin filaments. It has roles in numerous cellular processes, including maintenance of stereocilia structure, endocytosis, and autophagosome maturation. However, the functional necessity of minus-end–directed movement along actin is unclear as the underlying architecture of the local actin network is often unknown. To address this question, we engineered a mutant of MYO6, MYO6+, which undergoes plus-end–directed movement while retaining physiological cargo interactions in the tail. Expression of this mutant motor in HeLa cells led to a dramatic reorganization of cortical actin filaments and the formation of actin-rich filopodia. MYO6 is present on peripheral adaptor protein, phosphotyrosine interacting with PH domain and leucine zipper 1 (APPL1) signaling endosomes and MYO6+ expression causes a dramatic relocalization and clustering of this endocytic compartment in the cell cortex. MYO6+ and its adaptor GAIP interacting protein, C terminus (GIPC) accumulate at the tips of these filopodia, while APPL1 endosomes accumulate at the base. A combination of MYO6+ mutagenesis and siRNA-mediated depletion of MYO6 binding partners demonstrates that motor activity and binding to endosomal membranes mediated by GIPC and PI(4,5)P2 are crucial for filopodia formation. A similar reorganization of actin is induced by a constitutive dimer of MYO6+, indicating that multimerization of MYO6 on endosomes through binding to GIPC is required for this cellular activity and regulation of actin network structure. This unique engineered MYO6+ offers insights into both filopodia formation and MYO6 motor function at endosomes and at the plasma membrane. PMID:28143933

  20. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  1. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  2. R-spondin1 Controls Muscle Cell Fusion through Dual Regulation of Antagonistic Wnt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Floriane; Vezin, Elsa; Bentzinger, C Florian; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Giordani, Lorenzo; Ferry, Arnaud; Mitchell, Robert; Patel, Ketan; Rudnicki, Michael A; Chaboissier, Marie-Christine; Chassot, Anne-Amandine; Le Grand, Fabien

    2017-03-07

    Wnt-mediated signals are involved in many important steps in mammalian regeneration. In multiple cell types, the R-spondin (Rspo) family of secreted proteins potently activates the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here, we identify Rspo1 as a mediator of skeletal muscle tissue repair. First, we show that deletion of Rspo1 results in global alteration of muscle regeneration kinetics following acute injury. We find that muscle progenitor cells lacking Rspo1 show delayed differentiation due to reduced activation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Furthermore, muscle cells lacking Rspo1 have a fusion phenotype leading to larger myotubes containing supernumerary nuclei both in vitro and in vivo. The increase in muscle fusion was dependent on downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and upregulation of non-canonical Wnt7a/Fzd7/Rac1 signaling. We conclude that reciprocal control of antagonistic Wnt signaling pathways by Rspo1 in muscle stem cell progeny is a key step ensuring normal tissue architecture restoration following acute damage.

  3. Vaccinia Mature Virus Fusion Regulator A26 Protein Binds to A16 and G9 Proteins of the Viral Entry Fusion Complex and Dissociates from Mature Virions at Low pH

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422–8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive. PMID:22278246

  4. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  5. The leukemogenic CALM/AF10 fusion protein alters the subcellular localization of the lymphoid regulator Ikaros.

    PubMed

    Greif, P A; Tizazu, B; Krause, A; Kremmer, E; Bohlander, S K

    2008-05-01

    The t(10;11)(p13;q14) translocation leads to the fusion of the CALM and AF10 genes. This translocation can be found as the sole cytogenetic abnormality in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and in malignant lymphomas. The expression of CALM/AF10 in primary murine bone marrow cells results in the development of an aggressive leukemia in a murine bone marrow transplantation model. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the lymphoid regulator Ikaros as an AF10 interacting protein. Interestingly, Ikaros is required for normal development of lymphocytes, and aberrant expression of Ikaros has been found in leukemia. In a murine model, the expression of a dominant negative isoform of Ikaros causes leukemias and lymphomas. The Ikaros interaction domain of AF10 was mapped to the leucine zipper domain of AF10, which is required for malignant transformation both by the CALM/AF10 and the MLL/AF10 fusion proteins. The interaction between AF10 and Ikaros was confirmed by GST pull down and co-immunoprecipitation. Coexpression of CALM/AF10 but not of AF10 alters the subcellular localization of Ikaros in murine fibroblasts. The transcriptional repressor activity of Ikaros is reduced by AF10. These results suggest that CALM/AF10 might interfere with normal Ikaros function, and thereby block lymphoid differentiation in CALM/AF10 positive leukemias.

  6. Alteration of Lysosome Fusion and Low-grade Inflammation Mediated by Super-low-dose Endotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bianca; Geng, Shuo; Chen, Keqiang; Diao, Na; Yuan, Ruoxi; Xu, Xiguang; Dougherty, Sean; Stephenson, Caroline; Xiong, Huabao; Chu, Hong Wei; Li, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical super-low-dose endotoxin LPS is a risk factor for the establishment of low-grade inflammation during the pathogenesis and progression of chronic diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. At the cellular level, a disruption of lysosome fusion with endosomes or autophagosomes may contribute to the potentiation of low-grade inflammation. In this study, we identified that subclinical super-low-dose endotoxin LPS can potently inhibit the process of endosome acidification and lysosome fusion with endosomes or autophagosomes in primary macrophages. Super-low-dose LPS induced the inhibitory phosphorylation of VPS34, thus leading to the disruption of endosome-lysosome fusion. This effect may depend upon the clearance and relocation of Tollip in macrophages by super-low-dose LPS. Consistent with this notion, Tollip-deficient macrophages had constitutively elevated levels of VPS34 inhibitory phosphorylation and constitutive disruption of endosome-lysosome fusion. By employing a skin excision wound-healing model, we observed that Tollip-deficient mice had significantly elevated levels of cell stress and reduced wound repair. This study reveals a novel mechanism responsible for the modulation of endosome-lysosome fusion and low-grade inflammation in innate macrophages. PMID:25586187

  7. Separation of endosomes by aqueous two-phase partition and free-flow electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Morré, D J; Morré, D M; Van Alstine, J M

    1998-06-26

    We have developed two endosome models to evaluate the separation of endosome populations by aqueous two-phase partition. In the first model, bovine kidney endosomes were used. In the second model. HeLa endosomes were identified in homogenates by means of a latent drug-(capsaicin-)inhibited NADH oxidase (NOX). Endosomes were first isolated by aqueous two-phase partition. To separate early and late endosomes, the endosomes were incubated with ATP to acidify the endosome interiors by activating a proton-translocating ATPase. Thus far, we have been able to resolve the early and late endosomes from any source only by preparative free-flow electrophoresis and not by phase-partition. Previous studies have shown that gravitational forces may be important for separation of endosomes by phase partition. Low-speed centrifugation (< or =12.5 g) during phase resolution altered the activity of the latent NADH oxidase used as a marker for HeLa cell endosomes.

  8. Down-regulation of alpha v/beta 3 integrin via misrouting to lysosomes by overexpression of a beta 3Lamp1 fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Conesa, Magali; Prat, Annik; Mort, John S; Marvaldi, Jacques; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Seidah, Nabil G

    2003-01-01

    We present a general strategy for the dominant negative reduction in the levels of type-1 membrane-bound heterodimeric proteins within the secretory pathway through fusion of the soluble ectodomain of one of the partners to the transmembrane-cytosolic tail of the lysosomal protein Lamp1. Thus, in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, overexpression of an integrin beta 3Lamp1 chimera resulted in a drastic reduction of its endogenous partner, the integrin alpha v subunit. The mechanism involves the formation in the endoplasmic reticulum of a alpha v/beta 3Lamp1 complex that is subsequently sorted towards a lysosomal/endosomal degradation pathway. The specificity of this approach is afforded by the invariance in the levels of the endogenous integrins alpha 5 and beta1 as compared with control cells. Conversely overexpression of integrin beta 3 in HEK-293 cells led to an increased level of alpha v beta 3 at the cell surface. Functionally beta 3Lamp1 and beta 3 overexpressors exhibit decreased and increased adhesion to vitronectin, respectively, as well as diminished cellular aggregation. The application of this technology should enable the analysis of the functional importance of homodimers or heterodimers in the cell types of choice and the identification of novel partner proteins by proteomic approaches. PMID:12444923

  9. FRIENDLY Regulates Mitochondrial Distribution, Fusion, and Quality Control in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    El Zawily, Amr M.; Schwarzländer, Markus; Finkemeier, Iris; Johnston, Iain G.; Benamar, Abdelilah; Cao, Yongguo; Gissot, Clémence; Meyer, Andreas J.; Wilson, Ken; Datla, Raju; Macherel, David; Jones, Nick S.; Logan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are defining components of most eukaryotes. However, higher plant mitochondria differ biochemically, morphologically, and dynamically from those in other eukaryotes. FRIENDLY, a member of the CLUSTERED MITOCHONDRIA superfamily, is conserved among eukaryotes and is required for correct distribution of mitochondria within the cell. We sought to understand how disruption of FRIENDLY function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to mitochondrial clustering and the effects of this aberrant chondriome on cell and whole-plant physiology. We present evidence for a role of FRIENDLY in mediating intermitochondrial association, which is a necessary prelude to mitochondrial fusion. We demonstrate that disruption of mitochondrial association, motility, and chondriome structure in friendly affects mitochondrial quality control and leads to mitochondrial stress, cell death, and strong growth phenotypes. PMID:25165398

  10. Securin and separase modulate membrane traffic by affecting endosomal acidification.

    PubMed

    Bacac, Marina; Fusco, Carlo; Planche, Anne; Santodomingo, Jaime; Demaurex, Nicolas; Leemann-Zakaryan, Ruzanna; Provero, Paolo; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2011-05-01

    Securin and separase play a key role in sister chromatid separation during anaphase. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that in addition to regulating chromosome segregation, securin and separase display functions implicated in membrane traffic in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila. Here we show that in mammalian cells both securin and separase associate with membranes and that depletion of either protein causes robust swelling of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) along with the appearance of large endocytic vesicles in the perinuclear region. These changes are accompanied by diminished constitutive protein secretion as well as impaired receptor recycling and degradation. Unexpectedly, cells depleted of securin or separase display defective acidification of early endosomes and increased membrane recruitment of vacuolar (V-) ATPase complexes, mimicking the effect of the specific V-ATPase inhibitor Bafilomycin A1. Taken together, our findings identify a new functional role of securin and separase in the modulation of membrane traffic and protein secretion that implicates regulation of V-ATPase assembly and function.

  11. Selective degradation of insulin within rat liver endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, J.J. II; Kay, D.G.; Lai, W.H.; Posner, B.I.; Bergeron, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the role of the endosome in the degradation of insulin in liver, we employed a cell-free system in which the degradation of internalized 125I-insulin within isolated intact endosomes was evaluated. Incubation of endosomes containing internalized 125I-insulin in the cell-free system resulted in a rapid generation of TCA soluble radiolabeled products (t1/2, 6 min). Sephadex G-50 chromatography of radioactivity extracted from endosomes during the incubation showed a time dependent increase in material eluting as radioiodotyrosine. The apparent Vmax of the insulin degrading activity was 4 ng insulin degraded.min-1.mg cell fraction protein-1 and the apparent Km was 60 ng insulin.mg cell fraction protein-1. The endosomal protease(s) was insulin-specific since neither internalized 125I-epidermal growth factor (EGF) nor 125I-prolactin was degraded within isolated endosomes as assessed by TCA precipitation and Sephadex G-50 chromatography. Significant inhibition of degradation was observed after inclusion of p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), 1,10-phenanthroline, bacitracin, or 0.1% Triton X-100 into the system. Maximal insulin degradation required the addition of ATP to the cell-free system that resulted in acidification as measured by acridine orange accumulation. Endosomal insulin degradation was inhibited markedly in the presence of pH dissipating agents such as nigericin, monensin, and chloroquine or the proton translocase inhibitors N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation of insulin-receptor complexes revealed that endosomal degradation augmented the dissociation of insulin from its receptor and that dissociated insulin was serving as substrate to the endosomal protease(s). The results suggest that as insulin is internalized it rapidly but incompletely dissociates from its receptor.

  12. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain.

    PubMed

    González-Jamett, Arlek M; Guerra, María J; Olivares, María J; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca(2+) signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca(2+)-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca(2+)-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

  13. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Guerra, María J.; Olivares, María J.; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca2+ signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca2+-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca2+-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. PMID:28522963

  14. Retromer guides STxB and CD8-M6PR from early to recycling endosomes, EHD1 guides STxB from recycling endosome to Golgi

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Jenna E.; Raisley, Brent; Zhou, Xin; Naslavsky, Naava; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Caplan, Steve; Sheff, David

    2012-01-01

    Retrograde trafficking transports proteins, lipids and toxins from the plasma membrane to the Golgi and ER. To reach the Golgi, these cargos must transit the endosomal system, consisting of early endosomes, recycling endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes. All cargos pass through early endosomes, but may take different routes to the Golgi. Retromer dependent cargos bypass the late endosomes to reach the Golgi. We compared how two very different retromer dependent cargos negotiate the endosomal sorting system. Shiga toxin B, bound to the external layer of the plasma membrane, and chimeric CD8-Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor, which is anchored via a transmembrane domain. Both appear to pass through the recycling endosome. Ablation of the recycling endosome diverted both of these cargos to an aberrant compartment and prevented them from reaching the Golgi. Once in the recycling endosome, Shiga toxin required EHD1 to traffic to the TGN, while the CD8-Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor was not significantly dependent on EHD1. Knockdown of retromer components left cargo in the early endosomes, suggesting that it is required for retrograde exit from this compartment. This work establishes the recycling endosome as a required step in retrograde traffic of at least these two retromer dependent cargos. Along this pathway, retromer is associated with EE to recycling endosome traffic, while EHD1 is associated with recycling endosome to TGN traffic of STxB. PMID:22540229

  15. Rab9A is required for delivery of cargo from recycling endosomes to melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Mahanty, Sarmistha; Ravichandran, Keerthana; Chitirala, Praneeth; Prabha, Jyothi; Jani, Riddhi Atul; Setty, Subba Rao gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanosomes are a type of lysosome-related organelle that is commonly defective in Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome. Biogenesis of melanosomes is regulated by BLOC-1, -2, -3, or AP-1, -3 complexes, which mediate cargo transport from recycling endosomes to melanosomes. Although several Rab GTPases have been shown to regulate these trafficking steps, the precise role of Rab9A remains unknown. Here, we found that a cohort of Rab9A associates with the melanosomes and its knockdown in melanocytes results in hypopigmented melanosomes due to mistargeting of melanosomal proteins to lysosomes. In addition, the Rab9A-depletion phenotype resembles Rab38/32-inactivated or BLOC-3-deficient melanocytes, suggesting that Rab9A works in line with BLOC-3 and Rab38/32 during melanosome cargo transport. Furthermore, silencing of Rab9A, Rab38/32 or its effector VARP, or BLOC-3-deficiency in melanocytes decreased the length of STX13-positive recycling endosomal tubules and targeted the SNARE to lysosomes. This result indicates a defect in directing recycling endosomal tubules to melanosomes. Thus, Rab9A and its co-regulatory GTPases control STX13-mediated cargo delivery to maturing melanosomes. PMID:26527546

  16. SNX4 in Complex with Clathrin and Dynein: Implications for Endosome Movement

    PubMed Central

    Skånland, Sigrid S.; Wälchli, Sébastien; Brech, Andreas; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Sorting nexins (SNXs) constitute a family of proteins classified by their phosphatidylinositol (PI) binding Phox homology (PX) domain. Some members regulate intracellular trafficking. We have here investigated mechanisms underlying SNX4 mediated endosome to Golgi transport. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that SNX4 forms complexes with clathrin and dynein. The interactions were inhibited by wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, suggesting that they form when SNX4 is associated with PI(3)P on endosomes. We further localized the clathrin interacting site on SNX4 to a clathrin box variant. A short peptide containing this motif was sufficient to pull down both clathrin and dynein. Knockdown studies demonstrated that clathrin is not required for the SNX4/dynein interaction. Moreover, clathrin knockdown led to increased Golgi transport of the toxin ricin, as well as redistribution of endosomes. Conclusions/Significance We discuss the possibility of clathrin serving as a regulator of SNX4-dependent transport. Upon clathrin release, dynein may bind SNX4 and mediate retrograde movement. PMID:19529763

  17. Endosomal Na+/H+ exchanger NHE5 influences MET recycling and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Steven Hung-Yi; Numata, Yuka; Numata, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased recycling and elevated cell surface expression of receptors serve as a mechanism for persistent receptor-mediated signaling. We show that the neuron-enriched Na+/H+ exchanger NHE5 is abundantly expressed in C6 glioma cells and plays an important part in regulating cell surface expression of the receptor tyrosine kinases MET and EGF receptor. NHE5 is associated with transferrin receptor (TfR)- and Rab11-positive recycling endosomal membranes, and NHE5 knockdown by short hairpin RNA significantly elevates pH of TfR-positive recycling endosomes. We present evidence that NHE5 facilitates MET recycling to the plasma membrane, protects MET from degradation, and modulates HGF-induced phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Moreover, NHE5 depletion abrogates Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. We further show that NHE5 knockdown impairs directed cell migration and causes loss of cell polarity. Our study highlights a possible role of recycling endosomal pH in regulating receptor-mediated signaling through vesicular trafficking. PMID:26700318

  18. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endocytosis regulates membrane localization and function of the fusogen EFF-1.

    PubMed

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2016-07-28

    Cell fusion is essential for sexual reproduction and formation of muscles, bones, and placenta. Two families of cell fusion proteins (Syncytins and FFs) have been identified in eukaryotes. Syncytins have been shown to form the giant syncytial trophoblasts in the placenta. The FFs are essential to fuse cells in the skin, reproductive, excretory, digestive and nervous systems in nematodes. EFF-1 (Epithelial Fusion Failure 1), a member of the FF family, is a type I membrane glycoprotein that is essential for most cell fusions in C. elegans. The crystal structure of EFF-1 ectodomain reveals striking structural similarity to class II fusion glycoproteins from enveloped viruses (e.g. dengue and rubella) that mediate virus to cell fusion. We found EFF-1 to be present on the plasma membrane and in RAB-5-positive early endosomes, with EFF-1 recycling between these 2 cell compartments. Only when EFF-1 proteins transiently arrive to the surfaces of 2 adjacent cells do they dynamically interact in trans and mediate membrane fusion. EFF-1 is continuously internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis via the activity of 2 small GTPases: RAB-5 and Dynamin. Here we propose a model that explains how EFF-1 endocytosis together with interactions in trans can control cell-cell fusion. Kontani et al. showed that vacuolar ATPase (vATPase) mutations result in EFF-1-dependent hyperfusion. (1) We propose that vATPase is required for normal degradation of EFF-1. Failure to degrade EFF-1 results in delayed hyperfusion and mislocalization to organelles that appear to be recycling endosomes. EFF-1 is also required to fuse neurons as part of the repair mechanism following injury and to prune dendrites. We speculate that EFF-1 may regulate neuronal tree like structures via endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis of cell-cell fusion proteins functions to prevent merging of cells and to sculpt organs and neurons.

  20. Differential requirement of Rab22a for the recruitment of ER-derived proteins to phagosomes and endosomes in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Croce, Cristina; Mayorga, Luis S; Cebrian, Ignacio

    2017-09-29

    The recruitment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) components to dendritic cell (DC) phagosomes and endosomes is a crucial event to achieve efficient cross-presentation of exogenous antigens. We have previously identified the small GTPase Rab22a as a key regulator of MHC-I trafficking and antigen cross-presentation by DCs. In this study we show that low expression of Rab22a does not prevent the normal delivery of ER-derived proteins to DC phagosomes. In contrast, the presence of these proteins was diminished in endosomes labelled with a fluid phase marker. These observations were confirmed by a functional assay that assesses the translocation of a soluble protein to the cytosol. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that early endosomal maturation is altered in Rab22a deficient DCs. Our results indicate that Rab22a plays a major role in endosomal function and highlight the importance of studying the endocytic and phagocytic pathways separately in DCs.

  1. Importance of the N-terminal domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for different membrane transport steps in the yeast endosomal system.

    PubMed

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called H(abc) domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 H(abc) domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the H(abc) domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p H(abc) domain for transport.

  2. Acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2) is required for membrane fusion during influenza virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Jinhee; Son, Kidong; d’Alexandry d’Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham Humg; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses exploit host factors to successfully replicate in infected cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we identified six human genes required for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. Here we focused on the role of acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2), as its knockdown showed the greatest inhibition of IAV replication. In IAV-infected cells, depletion of ACP2 resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of viral proteins and mRNA, and led to the attenuation of virus multi-cycle growth. ACP2 knockdown also decreased replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses and avian IAVs of the H7 subtype. Interestingly, ACP2 depletion had no effect on the replication of Ebola or hepatitis C virus. Because ACP2 is known to be a lysosomal acid phosphatase, we assessed the role of ACP2 in influenza virus entry. While neither binding of the viral particle to the cell surface nor endosomal acidification was affected in ACP2-depleted cells, fusion of the endosomal and viral membranes was impaired. As a result, downstream steps in viral entry were blocked, including nucleocapsid uncoating and nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins. Our results established ACP2 as a necessary host factor for regulating the fusion step of influenza virus entry. PMID:28272419

  3. Molecular basis of endosomal-membrane association for the dengue virus envelope protein

    DOE PAGES

    Rogers, David M.; Kent, Michael S.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2015-01-02

    Dengue virus is coated by an icosahedral shell of 90 envelope protein dimers that convert to trimers at low pH and promote fusion of its membrane with the membrane of the host endosome. We provide the first estimates for the free energy barrier and minimum for two key steps in this process: host membrane bending and protein–membrane binding. Both are studied using complementary membrane elastic, continuum electrostatics and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted host membrane bending required to form an initial fusion stalk presents a 22–30 kcal/mol free energy barrier according to a constrained membrane elastic model. Combined continuummore » and molecular dynamics results predict a 15 kcal/mol free energy decrease on binding of each trimer of dengue envelope protein to a membrane with 30% anionic phosphatidylglycerol lipid. The bending cost depends on the preferred curvature of the lipids composing the host membrane leaflets, while the free energy gained for protein binding depends on the surface charge density of the host membrane. The fusion loop of the envelope protein inserts exactly at the level of the interface between the membrane's hydrophobic and head-group regions. As a result, the methods used in this work provide a means for further characterization of the structures and free energies of protein-assisted membrane fusion.« less

  4. Live cell imaging of endosomal trafficking in fungi.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Sebastian; Takeshita, Norio; Grün, Nathalie; Fischer, Reinhard; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Endosomes are multipurpose membranous carriers important for endocytosis and secretion. During membrane trafficking, endosomes transport lipids, proteins, and even RNAs. In highly polarized cells such as fungal hyphae, they shuttle bidirectionally along microtubules mediated by molecular motors like kinesins and dynein. For in vivo studies of these highly dynamic protein/membrane complexes, advanced fluorescence microscopy is instrumental. In this chapter, we describe live cell imaging of endosomes in two distantly related fungal model systems, the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis and the ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans. We provide insights into live cell imaging of dynamic endosomal proteins and RNA, dual-color detection for colocalization studies, as well as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) for quantification and photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) for super-resolution. These methods described in two well-studied fungal model systems are applicable to a broad range of other organisms.

  5. Diversity of raft-like domains in late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Sobo, Komla; Chevallier, Julien; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2007-04-25

    Late endosomes, the last sorting station in the endocytic pathway before lysosomes, are pleiomorphic organelles composed of tubular elements as well as vesicular regions with a characteristic multivesicular appearance, which play a crucial role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we have investigated whether, in addition to these morphologically distinguishable regions, late endosomal membranes are additionally sub-compartmentalized into membrane microdomains. Using sub-organellar fractionation techniques, both with and without detergents, combined with electron microscopy, we found that both the limiting membrane of the organel and the intraluminal vesicles contain raft-type membrane domains. Interestingly, these differentially localized domains vary in protein composition and physico-chemical properties. In addition to the multivesicular organization, we find that late endosomes contain cholesterol rich microdomains both on their limiting membrane and their intraluminal vesicles that differ in composition and properties. Implications of these findings for late endosomal functions are discussed.

  6. Diversity of Raft-Like Domains in Late Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sobo, Komla; Chevallier, Julien; Parton, Robert G.; Gruenberg, Jean; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2007-01-01

    Background Late endosomes, the last sorting station in the endocytic pathway before lysosomes, are pleiomorphic organelles composed of tubular elements as well as vesicular regions with a characteristic multivesicular appearance, which play a crucial role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we have investigated whether, in addition to these morphologically distinguishable regions, late endosomal membranes are additionally sub-compartmentalized into membrane microdomains. Methodology/Principal Findings Using sub-organellar fractionation techniques, both with and without detergents, combined with electron microscopy, we found that both the limiting membrane of the organel and the intraluminal vesicles contain raft-type membrane domains. Interestingly, these differentially localized domains vary in protein composition and physico-chemical properties. Conclusions/Significance In addition to the multivesicular organization, we find that late endosomes contain cholesterol rich microdomains both on their limiting membrane and their intraluminal vesicles that differ in composition and properties. Implications of these findings for late endosomal functions are discussed. PMID:17460758

  7. Decoupling Internalization, Acidification and Phagosmal-Endosomal/Iysosomal Phagocytosis of Internalin A coated Beads in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchette, C D; Woo, Y; Thomas, C; Shen, N; Sulchek, T A; Hiddessen, A L

    2008-12-22

    Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established, and in several cases, it was treated as a one-step process. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple and novel method to decouple and accurately measure particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA), a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated internalization. We achieved independent measurements of the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads) with antibody quenching, pH sensitive dyes and endosomal/lysosomal dyes, as follows: the rate of InlA bead internalization was measured via antibody quenching of a pH independent dye (Alexa488) conjugated to InlA-beads, the rate at which phagosomes containing internalized InlA beads became acidified was measured using a pH dependent dye (FITC) conjugated to the beads and the rate of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was measured using a combination of unlabeled InlA-beads and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we also exploited the phagosomal acidification process to demonstrate

  8. Endosome-lysosomes, ubiquitin and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Arnold, J; Laszlo, L; Al-Khedhairy, A; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1996-01-01

    Before the advent of ubiquitin immunochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy, there was no known intracellular molecular commonality between neurodegenerative diseases. The application of antibodies which primarily detect ubiquitin protein conjugates has shown that all of the human and animal idiopathic and transmissible chronic neurodegenerative diseases, (including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie) are related by some form of intraneuronal inclusion which contains ubiquitin protein conjugates. In addition, disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, CJD and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins which may be associated with cytoskeletal reorganisation. Although our knowledge about these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focused on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of the endosome-lysosome system, organelles which are immuno-positive for ubiquitin protein conjugates. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials or their precursors which subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Such common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  9. Vps1 in the late endosome-to-vacuole traffic.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Jacob; Williams, Michelle; Granich, Ann; Ahn, Hyoeun; Tenay, Brandon; Lukehart, Joshua; Highfill, Chad; Dobard, Sarah; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2013-03-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 1 (Vps1), the yeast homolog to human dynamin, is a GTP hydrolyzing protein, which plays an important role in protein sorting and targeting between the Golgi and late endosomal compartments. In this study, we assessed the functional significance of Vps1 in the membrane traffic towards the vacuole. We show here that vps1 delta cells accumulated FM4-64 to a greater extent than wild-type (WT))cells, suggesting slower endocytic degradation traffic toward the vacuole. In addition, we observed that two endosome-to-vacuole traffic markers, DsRed-FYVE and Ste2-GFP, were highly accumulated in Vps1-deficient cells, further supporting Vps1's implication in efficient trafficking of endocytosed materials to the vacuole. Noteworthy, a simultaneous imaging analysis in conjunction with FM4-64 pulse-chase experiment further revealed that Vps1 plays a role in late endosome to the vacuole transport. Consistently, our subcellular localization analysis showed that Vps1 is present at the late endosome. The hyperaccumulation of endosomal intermediates in the vps1 mutant cells appears to be caused by the disruption of integrity of HOPS tethering complexes, manifested by mislocalization of Vps39 to the cytoplasm. Finally, we postulate that Vps1 functions together with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) complex at the late endosomal compartments, based on the observation that the double mutants, in which VPS1 along with singular ESCRT I, II and III genes have been disrupted, exhibited synthetic lethality. Together, we propose that Vps1 is required for correct and efficient trafficking from the late endosomal compartments to the vacuole.

  10. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B.; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge—a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry. PMID:26730950

  11. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger.

    PubMed

    Markosyan, Ruben M; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge-a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry.

  12. Direct regulation of E-cadherin by targeted histone methylation of TALE-SET fusion protein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Soo; Kang, Jeong Gu; Lee, Jae-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Jeon, Seong Kook; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Kun-Hyang; Kim, Yong-Sam; Kim, Nam-Soon

    2015-09-15

    TALE-nuclease chimeras (TALENs) can bind to and cleave specific genomic loci and, are used to engineer gene knockouts and additions. Recently, instead of using the FokI domain, epigenetically active domains, such as TET1 and LSD1, have been combined with TAL effector domains to regulate targeted gene expression via DNA and histone demethylation. However, studies of histone methylation in the TALE system have not been performed. Therefore, in this study, we established a novel targeted regulation system with a TAL effector domain and a histone methylation domain. To construct a TALE-methylation fusion protein, we combined a TAL effector domain containing an E-Box region to act as a Snail binding site and the SET domain of EHMT 2 to allow for histone methylation. The constructed TALE-SET module (TSET) repressed the expression of E-cadherin via by increasing H3K9 dimethylation. Moreover, the cells that overexpressed TSET showed increased cell migration and invasion. This is the first phenotype-based study of targeted histone methylation by the TALE module, and this new system can be applied in new cancer therapies to reduce side effects.

  13. HAWAIIAN SKIRT: An F-Box Gene That Regulates Organ Fusion and Growth in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    González-Carranza, Zinnia H.; Rompa, Unchalee; Peters, Janny L.; Bhatt, Anuj M.; Wagstaff, Carol; Stead, Anthony D.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2007-01-01

    A fast neutron-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0 wild-type plants was screened for floral phenotypes and a novel mutant, termed hawaiian skirt (hws), was identified that failed to shed its reproductive organs. The mutation is the consequence of a 28 bp deletion that introduces a premature amber termination codon into the open reading frame of a putative F-box protein (At3g61590). The most striking anatomical characteristic of hws plants is seen in flowers where individual sepals are fused along the lower part of their margins. Crossing of the abscission marker, ProPGAZAT:β-glucuronidase, into the mutant reveals that while floral organs are retained it is not the consequence of a failure of abscission zone cells to differentiate. Anatomical analysis indicates that the fusion of sepal margins precludes shedding even though abscission, albeit delayed, does occur. Spatial and temporal characterization, using ProHWS:β-glucuronidase or ProHWS:green fluorescent protein fusions, has identified HWS expression to be restricted to the stele and lateral root cap, cotyledonary margins, tip of the stigma, pollen, abscission zones, and developing seeds. Comparative phenotypic analyses performed on the hws mutant, Columbia-0 wild type, and Pro35S:HWS ectopically expressing lines has revealed that loss of HWS results in greater growth of both aerial and below-ground organs while overexpressing the gene brings about a converse effect. These observations are consistent with HWS playing an important role in regulating plant growth and development. PMID:17496113

  14. The longitudinal effects of emotion regulation on physical and psychological health: A latent growth analysis exploring the role of cognitive fusion in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Inês A; Ferreira, Cláudia; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-10-04

    This study thus aims to test differences between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regarding IBD symptomatology, cognitive fusion, and psychological and physical health, as well as to explore whether the maladaptive emotion regulation process of cognitive fusion longitudinally impacts on the baseline and evolution of these outcomes over a period of 18 months. Participants include 116 IBD patients with a mean age of 36.76 (SD = 11.39) of both genders (69.83% females) that completed the self-report measures of interest in three different times, equally spaced 9 months apart, over a period of 18 months. Latent growth curve models were conducted using structural equation modelling to estimate the growth trajectory of the variables in study. Inflammatory bowel disease symptomatology and cognitive fusion's levels were negatively associated with psychological health and physical health's baseline levels. Furthermore, IBD symptomatology did not influence the growth of psychological health, while cognitive fusion did (β = .30, p = .007). The same result was found for physical health (β = .26, p = .024). These findings indicate that individuals with higher levels of cognitive fusion present lower levels of psychological health and physical health that tend to further decrease over the time through the effects of this maladaptive emotion regulation process. This study implies that it is of crucial importance to include psychotherapeutic interventions in the health care of patients with IBD. If successful, these interventions could represent decreases in the cost of IBD treatment and in the use of drugs with adverse side effects, in addition to improving patients' mental health and quality of life. Further implications for clinical and research work are discussed. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Research has demonstrated the impact of emotion regulation on both physical and mental health. Nevertheless, the

  15. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Adenovirus Membrane Rupture and Endosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oana; Marvin, Shauna A.; Wodrich, Harald; Campbell, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    A key step in adenovirus cell entry is viral penetration of cellular membranes to gain access to the cytoplasm and deliver the genome to the nucleus. Yet little is known about this important event in the adenoviral life cycle. Using the cytosolic protein galectin-3 (gal3) as a marker of membrane rupture with both live- and fixed-cell imaging, we demonstrate that in the majority of instances, exposure of pVI and recruitment of gal3 to ruptured membranes occur early at or near the cell surface and occur minimally in EEA-1-positive (EEA-1+) early endosomes or LAMP-1+ late endosomes/lysosomes. Live-cell imaging of Ad5 egress from gal3+ endosomes occurs most frequently from perinuclear locations. While the Ad5 capsid is observed escaping from gal3+ endosomes, pVI appears to remain associated with the gal3+ ruptured endosomes. Thus, Ad5 membrane rupture and endosomal escape appear to be both spatially and temporally distinct events. PMID:22855481

  16. Transport to Late Endosomes Is Required for Efficient Reovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mainou, Bernardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Rab GTPases play an essential role in vesicular transport by coordinating the movement of various types of cargo from one cellular compartment to another. Individual Rab GTPases are distributed to specific organelles and thus serve as markers for discrete types of endocytic vesicles. Mammalian reovirus binds to cell surface glycans and junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) and enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis in a process dependent on β1 integrin. Within organelles of the endocytic compartment, reovirus undergoes stepwise disassembly catalyzed by cathepsin proteases, which allows the disassembly intermediate to penetrate endosomal membranes and release the transcriptionally active viral core into the cytoplasm. The pathway used by reovirus to traverse the endocytic compartment is largely unknown. In this study, we found that reovirus particles traffic through early, late, and recycling endosomes during cell entry. After attachment to the cell surface, reovirus particles and JAM-A codistribute into each of these compartments. Transfection of cells with constitutively active and dominant-negative Rab GTPases that affect early and late endosome biogenesis and maturation influenced reovirus infectivity. In contrast, reovirus infectivity was not altered in cells expressing mutant Rab GTPases that affect recycling endosomes. Thus, reovirus virions localize to early, late, and recycling endosomes during entry into host cells, but only those that traverse early and late endosomes yield a productive infection. PMID:22674975

  17. Evolutionary conservation of the WASH complex, an actin polymerization machine involved in endosomal fission.

    PubMed

    Derivery, Emmanuel; Gautreau, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    WASH is the Arp2/3 activating protein that is localized at the surface of endosomes, where it induces the formation of branched actin networks. This activity of WASH favors, in collaboration with dynamin, the fission of transport intermediates from endosomes, and hence regulates endosomal trafficking of several cargos. We have purified a novel stable multiprotein complex containing WASH, the WASH complex, and we examine here the evolutionary conservation of its seven subunits across diverse eukaryotic phyla. This analysis supports the idea that the invention of the WASH complex has involved the incorporation of an independent complex, the CapZ alpha/beta heterodimer, forming the so-called Capping Protein (CP), as illustrated by the yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe, which possess the CP heterodimer but no other subunits of the WASH complex. The alignements of the orthologous genes that we have generated give a view on the conservation of the different subunits and on their organization into domains. Moreover, we propose here a unique nomenclature for the different subunits to prevent future confusions in the field.

  18. Measuring interactions of FERM domain-containing sorting Nexin proteins with endosomal lipids and cargo molecules.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rajesh; Mobli, Mehdi; Collins, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Endosomal recycling pathways regulate cellular homeostasis via the transport of internalized material back to the plasma membrane. Phox homology (PX) and band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM) domain-containing proteins are a recently identified subfamily of PX proteins that are critical for the recycling of numerous transmembrane cargo molecules. The PX-FERM subfamily includes three endosome-associated proteins called sorting nexin (SNX) 17, SNX27, and SNX31. These are modular peripheral membrane proteins that act as central scaffolds mediating protein-lipid interactions, cargo binding, and regulatory protein recruitment. This chapter outlines the methodology employed to classify the PX-FERM family using combined bioinformatics and structure prediction tools. It further details the application of isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to understand the mechanisms that underpin their endosomal membrane recruitment and subsequent recognition of NPxY/NxxY peptide sorting motifs, present in many cargo receptors and required for their trafficking. It is now increasingly recognized that the formation of a stable trafficking complex is dictated by a multitude of coordinated protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions, and the approaches highlighted here will be useful for future studies aimed at understanding these biomolecular interactions in greater detail.

  19. The endocytic recycling compartment maintains cargo segregation acquired upon exit from the sorting endosome

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Bahl, Kriti; Reinecke, James B.; Hammond, Gerald R. V.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) is a series of perinuclear tubular and vesicular membranes that regulates recycling to the plasma membrane. Despite evidence that cargo is sorted at the early/sorting endosome (SE), whether cargo mixes downstream at the ERC or remains segregated is an unanswered question. Here we use three-dimensional (3D) structured illumination microscopy and dual-channel and 3D direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to obtain new information about ERC morphology and cargo segregation. We show that cargo internalized either via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) or independently of clathrin (CIE) remains segregated in the ERC, likely on distinct carriers. This suggests that no further sorting occurs upon cargo exit from SE. Moreover, 3D dSTORM data support a model in which some but not all ERC vesicles are tethered by contiguous “membrane bridges.” Furthermore, tubular recycling endosomes preferentially traffic CIE cargo and may originate from SE membranes. These findings support a significantly altered model for endocytic recycling in mammalian cells in which sorting occurs in peripheral endosomes and segregation is maintained at the ERC. PMID:26510502

  20. Characterization of purified endosomes containing the antidiuretic hormone-sensitive water channel from rat renal papilla.

    PubMed

    Harris, H W; Zeidel, M L; Jo, I; Hammond, T G

    1994-04-22

    Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) stimulation of renal epithelial cells elicits a large increase in apical membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf) produced by the fusion of water channel containing vesicles with the apical membrane. Removal of ADH stimulation results in retrieval of apical water channels into a specialized non-acidic endosomal compartment. Previous studies (Sabolic, I., Wuarin, F., and Shi, L. B. (1992) J. Cell Biol. 119, 111-122) have shown that water channel containing papillary endosomes labeled with fluorescein-dextran can be isolated from rat renal papilla. We have utilized small particle flow sorting methodology to both monitor and improve upon the purification of these water channel containing endosomes (WCV). Flow cytometry analysis on a vesicle-by-vesicle basis demonstrates that WCV are homogeneous with respect to entrapped fluorescein-dextran, the apical membrane enzyme marker leucine amino peptidase and ultrastructural morphology. WCV do not acidify their luminal contents after addition of Mg-ATP but contain abundant functional water channels (Pf0.28 cm/s at 23 degrees C) as determined by stopped flow fluorimetry. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis shows that purified WCV are composed of 20 major protein bands. To determine the identity of WCV water channels, WCV proteins were probed with affinity purified antisera recognizing two renal water channel proteins. These include Aquaporin-CHIP found in the proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle and the candidate ADH water channel protein WCH-1 or Aquaporin- (AQP) CD present in the ADH-responsive epithelial cells of the collecting duct. These data reveal that WCV contained little or no AQP-CHIP protein. In contrast, WCV are highly enriched for AQP-CD protein. Together, these data define the protein composition of the papillary WCV and link directly the presence of functional apical membrane water channels with the presence of the AQP-CD protein.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of CXCR4 in prostate tumor cells: Significance of TMPRSS2-ERG fusions

    PubMed Central

    Singareddy, Rajareddy; Semaan, Louie; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; St. John, Jason; Powell, Katelyn; Iyer, Matthew; Smith, Daryn; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Shi, Dongping; Sakr, Wael; Cher, Michael L.; Chinni, Sreenivasa R.

    2013-01-01

    CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that mediates invasion and metastasis. CXCR4 expression is transcriptionally regulated in cancer cells and is associated with aggressive phenotypes of prostate cancer. Previously, we and others have shown that the ERG transcription factor regulates CXCR4 expression in prostate cancer cells. We further showed that androgens regulate CXCR4 expression via increasing ERG transcription factor expression. Herein, we investigated molecular mechanisms of ERG-mediated CXCR4 promoter activation, phosphorylation of ERG by intracellular kinases and subsequent CXCR4 expression, as well as expression of ERG and CXCR4 in human prostate tumor tissues. Using multiple molecular strategies, we demonstrate that: (a) ERG expressed in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion positive VCaP cells selectively binds with specific ERG/Ets bindings sites in the CXCR4 promoter; (b) distal binding sites mediate promoter activation; (c) exogenously expressed ERG promotes CXCR4 expression; (d) ERG is phosphorylated at Serine 81 and 215, both IKK and Akt kinases induce serine phosphorylation, and Akt mediates CXCR4 expression; (e) ERG-induced CXCR4 drives CXCL12-dependent adhesion to fibronectin; (f) ERG and CXCR4 were co-expressed in human prostate tumor tissues, consistent with ERG-mediated transcriptional activation of CXCR4. These data demonstrates that ERG factor activates CXCR4 expression by binding to the specific ERG/Ets responsive elements and intracellular kinases phosphorylate at ERG at serine residues to induce CXCR4 expression. These findings may provide a mechanistic link between TMPRSS2-ERG translocations and intracellular kinase mediated phosphorylation of ERG on enhanced metastasis of tumor cells via CXCR4 expression and function in prostate cancer cells. PMID:23918819

  2. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6 modulates endosomal pH to control processing of amyloid precursor protein in a cell culture model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Hari; Rao, Rajini

    2015-02-27

    Early intervention may be key to safe and effective therapies in patients with Alzheimer disease. Endosomal dysfunction is an early step in neurodegeneration. Endosomes are a major site of production of Aβ peptide from the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by clipping enzymes (β- and γ-secretases). The β-secretase enzyme BACE1 requires acidic lumen pH for optimum function, and acid pH promotes Aβ aggregation. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6 provides a leak pathway for protons, limiting luminal acidification by proton pumps. Like APP, NHE6 expression was induced upon differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and localized to an endosomal compartment. Therefore, we investigated whether NHE6 expression altered APP localization and processing in a stably transfected cell culture model of human APP expression. We show that co-expression with NHE6 or treatment with the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin shifted APP away from the trans-Golgi network into early and recycling endosomes in HEK293 cells. NHE6 alkalinized the endosomal lumen, similar to monensin, and significantly attenuated APP processing and Aβ secretion. In contrast, Aβ production was elevated upon NHE6 knockdown. We show that NHE6 transcript and protein levels are lowered in Alzheimer brains relative to control. These findings, taken together with emerging genetic evidence linking endosomal Na(+)/H(+) exchangers with Alzheimer disease, suggest that proton leak pathways may regulate Aβ generation and contribute to disease etiology.

  3. The Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE6 Modulates Endosomal pH to Control Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein in a Cell Culture Model of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Hari; Rao, Rajini

    2015-01-01

    Early intervention may be key to safe and effective therapies in patients with Alzheimer disease. Endosomal dysfunction is an early step in neurodegeneration. Endosomes are a major site of production of Aβ peptide from the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by clipping enzymes (β- and γ-secretases). The β-secretase enzyme BACE1 requires acidic lumen pH for optimum function, and acid pH promotes Aβ aggregation. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6 provides a leak pathway for protons, limiting luminal acidification by proton pumps. Like APP, NHE6 expression was induced upon differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and localized to an endosomal compartment. Therefore, we investigated whether NHE6 expression altered APP localization and processing in a stably transfected cell culture model of human APP expression. We show that co-expression with NHE6 or treatment with the Na+/H+ ionophore monensin shifted APP away from the trans-Golgi network into early and recycling endosomes in HEK293 cells. NHE6 alkalinized the endosomal lumen, similar to monensin, and significantly attenuated APP processing and Aβ secretion. In contrast, Aβ production was elevated upon NHE6 knockdown. We show that NHE6 transcript and protein levels are lowered in Alzheimer brains relative to control. These findings, taken together with emerging genetic evidence linking endosomal Na+/H+ exchangers with Alzheimer disease, suggest that proton leak pathways may regulate Aβ generation and contribute to disease etiology. PMID:25561733

  4. Lipids as modulators of membrane fusion mediated by viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Teissier, Elodie; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2007-11-01

    Enveloped viruses infect host cells by fusion of viral and target membranes. This fusion event is triggered by specific glycoproteins in the viral envelope. Fusion glycoproteins belong to either class I, class II or the newly described third class, depending upon their arrangement at the surface of the virion, their tri-dimensional structure and the location within the protein of a short stretch of hydrophobic amino acids called the fusion peptide, which is able to induce the initial lipid destabilization at the onset of fusion. Viral fusion occurs either with the plasma membrane for pH-independent viruses, or with the endosomal membranes for pH-dependent viruses. Although, viral fusion proteins are parted in three classes and the subcellular localization of fusion might vary, these proteins have to act, in common, on lipid assemblies. Lipids contribute to fusion through their physical, mechanical and/or chemical properties. Lipids can thus play a role as chemically defined entities, or through their preferential partitioning into membrane microdomains called "rafts", or by modulating the curvature of the membranes involved in the fusion process. The purpose of this review is to make a state of the art on recent findings on the contribution of cholesterol, sphingolipids and glycolipids in cell entry and membrane fusion of a number of viral families, whose members bear either class I or class II fusion proteins, or fusion proteins of the recently discovered third class.

  5. Insulin-regulated Glut4 translocation: membrane protein trafficking with six distinctive steps.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Romenskaia, Irina; Mastick, Cynthia Corley; Coster, Adelle C F

    2014-06-20

    The trafficking kinetics of Glut4, the transferrin (Tf) receptor, and LRP1 were quantified in adipocytes and undifferentiated fibroblasts. Six steps were identified that determine steady state cell surface Glut4: (i) endocytosis, (ii) degradation, (iii) sorting, (iv) sequestration, (v) release, and (vi) tethering/docking/fusion. Endocytosis of Glut4 is 3 times slower than the Tf receptor in fibroblasts (ken = 0.2 min(-1) versus 0.6 min(-1)). Differentiation decreases Glut4 ken 40% (ken = 0.12 min(-1)). Differentiation also decreases Glut4 degradation, increasing total and cell surface Glut4 3-fold. In fibroblasts, Glut4 is recycled from endosomes through a slow constitutive pathway (kex = 0.025-0.038 min(-1)), not through the fast Tf receptor pathway (kex = 0.2 min(-1)). The kex measured in adipocytes after insulin stimulation is similar (kex = 0.027 min(-1)). Differentiation decreases the rate constant for sorting into the Glut4 recycling pathway (ksort) 3-fold. In adipocytes, Glut4 is also sorted from endosomes into a second exocytic pathway through Glut4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Surprisingly, transfer from endosomes into GSVs is highly regulated; insulin increases the rate constant for sequestration (kseq) 8-fold. Release from sequestration in GSVs is rate-limiting for Glut4 exocytosis in basal adipocytes. AS160 regulates this step. Tethering/docking/fusion of GSVs to the plasma membrane is regulated through an AS160-independent process. Insulin increases the rate of release and fusion of GSVs (kfuseG) 40-fold. LRP1 cycles with the Tf receptor and Glut4 in fibroblasts but predominantly with Glut4 after differentiation. Surprisingly, AS160 knockdown accelerated LRP1 exocytosis in basal and insulin-stimulated adipocytes. These data indicate that AS160 may regulate trafficking into as well as release from GSVs.

  6. Multivesicular Bodies Mature from the Trans-Golgi Network/Early Endosome in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Scheuring, David; Viotti, Corrado; Krüger, Falco; Künzl, Fabian; Sturm, Silke; Bubeck, Julia; Hillmer, Stefan; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Robinson, David G.; Pimpl, Peter; Schumacher, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The plant trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE) is a major hub for secretory and endocytic trafficking with complex molecular mechanisms controlling sorting and transport of cargo. Vacuolar transport from the TGN/EE to multivesicular bodies/late endosomes (MVBs/LEs) is assumed to occur via clathrin-coated vesicles, although direct proof for their participation is missing. Here, we present evidence that post-TGN transport toward lytic vacuoles occurs independently of clathrin and that MVBs/LEs are derived from the TGN/EE through maturation. We show that the V-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin A significantly reduces the number of MVBs and causes TGN and MVB markers to colocalize in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Ultrastructural analysis reveals the formation of MVBs from the TGN/EE and their fusion with the vacuole. The localization of the ESCRT components VPS28, VPS22, and VPS2 at the TGN/EE and MVBs/LEs indicates that the formation of intraluminal vesicles starts already at the TGN/EE. Accordingly, a dominant-negative mutant of VPS2 causes TGN and MVB markers to colocalize and blocks vacuolar transport. RNA interference–mediated knockdown of the annexin ANNAT3 also yields the same phenotype. Together, these data indicate that MVBs originate from the TGN/EE in a process that requires the action of ESCRT for the formation of intraluminal vesicles and annexins for the final step of releasing MVBs as a transport carrier to the vacuole. PMID:21934143

  7. Multivesicular endosomes containing internalized EGF-EGF receptor complexes mature and then fuse directly with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have followed the transfer of EGF-EGF receptor (EGFR) complexes from endosomal vacuoles that contain transferrin receptors (TfR) to lysosome vacuoles identified by their content of HRP loaded as a 15-min pulse 4 h previously. We show that the HRP-loaded lysosomes are lysosomal- associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) positive, mannose-6-phosphate receptor (M6PR) negative. and contain active acid hydrolase. EGF-EGFR complexes are delivered to these lysosomes intact and are then rapidly degraded. Preactivating the HRP contained within the preloaded lysosomes inhibits the delivery of EGFR and degradation of EGF, and results in the accumulation of EGFR-containing multivesicular bodies (MVB). With time these accumulating MVB undergo a series of maturation changes that include the loss of TfR, the continued recruitment of EGFR, and the accumulation of internal vesicles, but they remain LAMP-1 and M6PR negative. The mature MVB are often seen to make direct contact with lysosomes containing preactivated HRP, but their perimeter membranes remain intact. Together our observations suggest that the transfer of EGF-EGFR complexes from the TfR-containing endosome compartment to the lysosomes that degrade them employs a single vacuolar intermediate, the maturing MVB, and can be achieved by a single heterotypic fusion step. PMID:8601581

  8. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  9. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Selvanathan, Saravana P; Graham, Garrett T; Erkizan, Hayriye V; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats E; Wu, Cathy H; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron-exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4-279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4-279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code.

  10. Dynamin-2 Regulates Fusion Pore Expansion and Quantal Release through a Mechanism that Involves Actin Dynamics in Neuroendocrine Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Momboisse, Fanny; Guerra, María José; Ory, Stéphane; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Barraza, Natalia; Calco, Valerie; Houy, Sébastien; Couve, Eduardo; Neely, Alan; Martínez, Agustín D.; Gasman, Stéphane; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, dynamin has been implicated in tuning the amount and nature of transmitter released during exocytosis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we investigated whether this mechanism rely on dynamin’s ability to remodel actin cytoskeleton. According to this idea, inhibition of dynamin GTPase activity suppressed the calcium-dependent de novo cortical actin and altered the cortical actin network. Similarly, expression of a small interfering RNA directed against dynamin-2, an isoform highly expressed in chromaffin cells, changed the cortical actin network pattern. Disruption of dynamin-2 function, as well as the pharmacological inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasine-D, slowed down fusion pore expansion and increased the quantal size of individual exocytotic events. The effects of cytochalasine-D and dynamin-2 disruption were not additive indicating that dynamin-2 and F-actin regulate the late steps of exocytosis by a common mechanism. Together our data support a model in which dynamin-2 directs actin polymerization at the exocytosis site where both, in concert, adjust the hormone quantal release to efficiently respond to physiological demands. PMID:23940613

  11. SNX-1 and RME-8 oppose the assembly of HGRS-1/ESCRT-0 degradative microdomains on endosomes.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne; Tammineni, Prasad; Wang, Simon; Gerdes, Julianne; Murr, Alexandra; Kwan, Kelvin Y; Cai, Qian; Grant, Barth D

    2017-01-17

    After endocytosis, transmembrane cargo reaches endosomes, where