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Sample records for endospore biogenesis factor

  1. Factors Governing the Germination of Sulfate-Reducing Desulfotomaculum Endospores Involved in Oil Reservoir Souring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, A.; Bell, E.; Cueto, G.; Suarez-Suarez, A.; Pilloni, G.; Hubert, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir souring is caused by the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in subsurface oil reservoirs, and is often induced by seawater injection during secondary oil recovery. Souring can potentially contribute to corrosion of infrastructure, health and safety hazards to the workforce, and reduction in value by increasing refining costs associated with producing the oil resource. Souring causes annual losses in the billions of dollars to the oil industry. Endospore-forming SRM, such as Desulfotomaculum spp., are often suspected culprits in reservoir souring. Endospores can survive unfavourable conditions for long periods, yet remain poised to germinate and become active if conditions become more favourable. Factors governing endospore germination are poorly understood, but are thought to include availability of nutrients, possibly metabolic by products of other anaerobic bioprocesses, and/or variations in temperature. Most research has focused on aerobic Bacillus spp., with very few studies dedicated to spore germination among anaerobes (order Clostridiales) including the sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum found in anoxic subsurface petroleum reservoirs. For Desulfotomaculum spores in deep hot oil reservoirs, cold seawater introduction during secondary oil recovery may create thermal viability zones for sulfate reduction near the injection wellbore. To evaluate these processes, sulfate-containing microcosms were prepared with different marine sediments as a source of spores, and amended with organic substrates in the presence or absence of oil. Incubation at 80°C for six days was followed by a down-shift in temperature to 60°C to mimic cold seawater injection into a hot reservoir. Souring did not occur at 80°C, but commenced within hours at 60°C. Microcosms were monitored for sulfate reduction and organic acids in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes (Ion Torrent, Illumina MiSeq). Through a combination of high

  2. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    PubMed Central

    Espinar-Marchena, Francisco J.; Babiano, Reyes; Cruz, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as "placeholders". Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway. PMID:28685141

  3. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  4. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  5. Studying Factors Involved in Biogenesis of Lysobacter sp. XL1 Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, I V; Suzina, N E; Vinokurova, N G; Shishkova, N A; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 produces outer membrane vesicles that are heterogeneous in size, density, and protein composition. One of the subpopulations is secretory vesicles for lytic protease L5 of Lysobacter sp. XL1 (Kudryakova et al. (2015) FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 362, fnv137). Protein L5 was assumed to influence biogenesis of these secretory vesicles that contain it. Using a Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87/B expression system, it was shown that the recombinant L5 protein may act as a factor of vesicle biogenesis. This points to a possible involvement of L5 protein in Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicle biogenesis. Furthermore, it was established that the main phospholipid of Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicles is cardiolipin, and vesicles are formed predominantly of outer membrane regions enriched with this phospholipid. This indicates that cardiolipin participates in biogenesis of all vesicle subpopulations in Lysobacter sp. XL1.

  6. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  7. Analysis of ribosome biogenesis factor-modules in yeast cells depleted from pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Merl, Juliane; Jakob, Steffen; Ridinger, Katrin; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Formation of eukaryotic ribosomes requires more than 150 biogenesis factors which transiently interact with the nascent ribosomal subunits. Previously, many pre-ribosomal intermediates could be distinguished by their protein composition and rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA) content. We purified complexes of ribosome biogenesis factors from yeast cells in which de novo synthesis of rRNA precursors was down-regulated by genetic means. We compared the protein composition of these largely pre-rRNA free assemblies with the one of analogous pre-ribosomal preparations by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The experimental setup minimizes the possibility that the analysed pre-rRNA free protein modules were derived from (partially) disrupted pre-ribosomal particles and provides thereby strong evidence for their pre-ribosome independent existence. In support of the validity of this approach (i) the predicted composition of the analysed protein modules was in agreement with previously described rRNA-free complexes and (ii) in most of the cases we could identify new candidate members of reported protein modules. An unexpected outcome of these analyses was that free large ribosomal subunits are associated with a specific set of ribosome biogenesis factors in cells where neo-production of nascent ribosomes was blocked. The data presented strengthen the idea that assembly of eukaryotic pre-ribosomal particles can result from transient association of distinct building blocks. PMID:20100801

  8. Biogenesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pheromone a-Factor, from Yeast Mating to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The mating pheromone a-factor secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a farnesylated and carboxylmethylated peptide and is unusually hydrophobic compared to other extracellular signaling molecules. Mature a-factor is derived from a precursor with a C-terminal CAAX motif that directs a series of posttranslational reactions, including prenylation, endoproteolysis, and carboxylmethylation. Historically, a-factor has served as a valuable model for the discovery and functional analysis of CAAX-processing enzymes. In this review, we discuss the three modules comprising the a-factor biogenesis pathway: (i) the C-terminal CAAX-processing steps carried out by Ram1/Ram2, Ste24 or Rce1, and Ste14; (ii) two sequential N-terminal cleavage steps, mediated by Ste24 and Axl1; and (iii) export by a nonclassical mechanism, mediated by the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ste6. The small size and hydrophobicity of a-factor present both challenges and advantages for biochemical analysis, as discussed here. The enzymes involved in a-factor biogenesis are conserved from yeasts to mammals. Notably, studies of the zinc metalloprotease Ste24 in S. cerevisiae led to the discovery of its mammalian homolog ZMPSTE24, which cleaves the prenylated C-terminal tail of the nuclear scaffold protein lamin A. Mutations that alter ZMPSTE24 processing of lamin A in humans cause the premature-aging disease progeria and related progeroid disorders. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that the entire a-factor pathway, including all three biogenesis modules, may be used to produce a prenylated, secreted signaling molecule involved in germ cell migration in Drosophila. Thus, additional prenylated signaling molecules resembling a-factor, with as-yet-unknown roles in metazoan biology, may await discovery. PMID:22933563

  9. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Caroline M.; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML. PMID:28103300

  10. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Virginie; Catez, Frédéric; Berger, Caroline M; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML.

  11. Identification and Expression Analysis of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Co-orthologs in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Paul, Puneet; Keller, Mario; Einloft, Jens; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis involves a large inventory of proteinaceous and RNA cofactors. More than 250 ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) have been described in yeast. These factors are involved in multiple aspects like rRNA processing, folding, and modification as well as in ribosomal protein (RP) assembly. Considering the importance of RBFs for particular developmental processes, we examined the complexity of RBF and RP (co-)orthologs by bioinformatic assignment in 14 different plant species and expression profiling in the model crop Solanum lycopersicum. Assigning (co-)orthologs to each RBF revealed that at least 25% of all predicted RBFs are encoded by more than one gene. At first we realized that the occurrence of multiple RBF co-orthologs is not globally correlated to the existence of multiple RP co-orthologs. The transcript abundance of genes coding for predicted RBFs and RPs in leaves and anthers of S. lycopersicum was determined by next generation sequencing (NGS). In combination with existing expression profiles, we can conclude that co-orthologs of RBFs by large account for a preferential function in different tissue or at distinct developmental stages. This notion is supported by the differential expression of selected RBFs during male gametophyte development. In addition, co-regulated clusters of RBF and RP coding genes have been observed. The relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:25698879

  12. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  13. Prp43p Is a DEAH-Box Spliceosome Disassembly Factor Essential for Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Combs, D. Joshua; Nagel, Roland J.; Ares, Manuel; Stevens, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    The known function of the DEXH/D-box protein Prp43p is the removal of the U2, U5, and U6 snRNPs from the postsplicing lariat-intron ribonucleoprotein complex. We demonstrate that affinity-purified Prp43p-associated material includes the expected spliceosomal components; however, we also identify several preribosomal complexes that are specifically purified with Prp43p. Conditional prp43 mutant alleles confer a 35S pre-rRNA processing defect, with subsequent depletion of 27S and 20S precursors. Upon a shift to a nonpermissive temperature, both large and small-ribosomal-subunit proteins accumulate in the nucleolus of prp43 mutants. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrates delayed kinetics of 35S, 27S, and 20S pre-rRNA processing with turnover of these intermediates. Microarray analysis of pre-mRNA splicing defects in prp43 mutants shows a very mild effect, similar to that of nonessential pre-mRNA splicing factors. Prp43p is the first DEXH/D-box protein shown to function in both RNA polymerase I and polymerase II transcript metabolism. Its essential function is in its newly characterized role in ribosome biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits, positioning Prp43p to regulate both pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:16382144

  14. Mitochondrial biogenesis-associated factors underlie the magnitude of response to aerobic endurance training in rats

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika; Takeda, Masaki; Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L.; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Trainability is important in elite sport and in recreational physical activity and the wide range for response to training is largely dependent on genotype. In this study, we compare a newly developed rat model system selectively bred for low and high gain in running distance from aerobic training to test whether genetic segregation for trainability associates with differences in factors associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. Low response trainer (LRT) and high response trainer (HRT) rats from generation 11 of artificial selection were trained five times a week, 30 min per day for three months at 70% VO2max to study the mitochondrial molecular background of trainability. As expected, we found significant differential for the gain in running distance between LRT and HRT groups as a result of training. However, the changes in VO2max, COX 4, redox homeostasis associated markers (ROS), silent mating-type information regulation 2 homolog (SIRT1), NAD+/NADH ratio, proteasome (R2 subunit), and mitochondrial network related proteins such as mitochondrial fission protein 1 (Fis1), and mitochondrial fusion protein (Mfn1) suggest that these markers are not strongly involved in the differences in trainability between LRT and HRT. On the other hand, according to our results, we discovered that differences in basal activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and differential changes in aerobic exercise-induced responses of citrate synthase, carbonylated protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC1-α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Lon protease limits trainability between these selected lines. From this we conclude that mitochondrial biogenesis associated factors adapt differently to aerobic exercise training in training sensitive and training resistant rats. PMID:24943897

  15. Abf1 and other general regulatory factors control ribosome biogenesis gene expression in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Maria Cristina; Fermi, Beatrice; Spagnoli, Gloria; Levati, Elisabetta; Rubbi, Ludmilla; Ferrari, Roberto; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2017-05-05

    Ribosome biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a regulon of >200 genes (Ribi genes) coordinately regulated in response to nutrient availability and cellular growth rate. Two cis-acting elements called PAC and RRPE are known to mediate Ribi gene repression in response to nutritional downshift. Here, we show that most Ribi gene promoters also contain binding sites for one or more General Regulatory Factors (GRFs), most frequently Abf1 and Reb1, and that these factors are enriched in vivo at Ribi promoters. Abf1/Reb1/Tbf1 promoter association was required for full Ribi gene expression in rich medium and for its modulation in response to glucose starvation, characterized by a rapid drop followed by slow recovery. Such a response did not entail changes in Abf1 occupancy, but it was paralleled by a quick increase, followed by slow decrease, in Rpd3L histone deacetylase occupancy. Remarkably, Abf1 site disruption also abolished Rpd3L complex recruitment in response to starvation. Extensive mutational analysis of the DBP7 promoter revealed a complex interplay of Tbf1 sites, PAC and RRPE in the transcriptional regulation of this Ribi gene. Our observations point to GRFs as new multifaceted players in Ribi gene regulation both during exponential growth and under repressive conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The Forkhead Transcription Factor Hcm1 Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Stress Resistance in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Colman, Maria José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Sorolla, M. Alba; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 is involved in chromosome segregation, spindle pole dynamics, and budding. We found that Hcm1 interacts with the histone deacetylase Sir2 and shifts from cytoplasm to the nucleus in the G1/S phase or in response to oxidative stress stimuli. The nuclear localization of Hcm1 depends on the activity of Sir2 as revealed by activators and inhibitors of the sirtuins and the Δsir2 mutant. Hcm1-overexpressing cells display more mitochondria that can be attributed to increased amounts of Abf2, a protein involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. These cells also show higher rates of oxygen consumption and improved resistance to oxidative stress that would be explained by increased catalase and Sod2 activities and molecular chaperones such as Hsp26, Hsp30, and members of Hsp70 family. Microarray analyses also reveal increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy pathways and those allowing the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase. Taken together, these results describe a new and relevant role of Hcm1 for mitochondrial functions, suggesting that this transcription factor would participate in the adaptation of cells from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. PMID:20847055

  17. The forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and stress resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Colman, Maria José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Sorolla, M Alba; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-11-19

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 is involved in chromosome segregation, spindle pole dynamics, and budding. We found that Hcm1 interacts with the histone deacetylase Sir2 and shifts from cytoplasm to the nucleus in the G(1)/S phase or in response to oxidative stress stimuli. The nuclear localization of Hcm1 depends on the activity of Sir2 as revealed by activators and inhibitors of the sirtuins and the Δsir2 mutant. Hcm1-overexpressing cells display more mitochondria that can be attributed to increased amounts of Abf2, a protein involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. These cells also show higher rates of oxygen consumption and improved resistance to oxidative stress that would be explained by increased catalase and Sod2 activities and molecular chaperones such as Hsp26, Hsp30, and members of Hsp70 family. Microarray analyses also reveal increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy pathways and those allowing the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase. Taken together, these results describe a new and relevant role of Hcm1 for mitochondrial functions, suggesting that this transcription factor would participate in the adaptation of cells from fermentative to respiratory metabolism.

  18. Giant peroxisomes in a moss (Physcomitrella patens) peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Mitsuya, Shiro; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Knight, Celia D; Cuming, Andrew C; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 (PEX11) proteins are found in yeasts, mammals and plants, and play a role in peroxisome morphology and regulation of peroxisome division. The moss Physcomitrella patens has six PEX11 isoforms which fall into two subfamilies, similar to those found in monocots and dicots. We carried out targeted gene disruption of the Phypa_PEX11-1 gene and compared the morphological and cellular phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains. The mutant grew more slowly and the development of gametophores was retarded. Mutant chloronemal filaments contained large cellular structures which excluded all other cellular organelles. Expression of fluorescent reporter proteins revealed that the mutant strain had greatly enlarged peroxisomes up to 10 μm in diameter. Expression of a vacuolar membrane marker confirmed that the enlarged structures were not vacuoles, or peroxisomes sequestered within vacuoles as a result of pexophagy. Phypa_PEX11 targeted to peroxisome membranes could rescue the knock out phenotype and interacted with Fission1 on the peroxisome membrane. Moss PEX11 functions in peroxisome division similar to PEX11 in other organisms but the mutant phenotype is more extreme and environmentally determined, making P. patens a powerful system in which to address mechanisms of peroxisome proliferation and division. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Assessing mitochondria biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Denis M

    2008-12-01

    Mitochondria have their own DNA (mtDNA) and hence biogenesis of mitochondria requires a coordination of nuclear and mtDNA, both of which encode for mitochondria proteins. Our understanding of the molecular control of mitochondria biogenesis has increased in recent years, providing key signatures of the process. To determine whether or not a tissue or an organ of human or animal origin is undergoing mitochondria biogenesis, multiple parameters should be analyzed. First and foremost is visualization and measurement of mitochondria mass/volume in histological sections using fluorescent mitochondria dyes and light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy to yield quantitative results. To confirm or extend these types of analysis, biochemical markers of mitochondria biogenesis should also be included, including assessment of mtDNA copy number, steady-state levels of biogenesis-related transcription factors (e.g. mitochondria transcription factor A, mitochondrial transcription specificity factors, nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha), mtDNA-encoded transcripts and proteins, and rates of mitochondria translation. These techniques are described in isolation and in the context of transgenic and dietary animal models that have been used as tools to study the regulation of mitochondria biogenesis and its role in disease pathology.

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  1. PID-1 is a novel factor that operates during 21U-RNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Bruno F.M.; Luteijn, Maartje J.; Cordeiro Rodrigues, Ricardo J.; van Bergeijk, Petra; Waaijers, Selma; Kaaij, Lucas J.T.; Klein, Holger; Boxem, Mike; Ketting, René F.

    2014-01-01

    The Piwi–piRNA pathway represents a small RNA-based mechanism responsible for the recognition and silencing of invading DNA. Biogenesis of piRNAs (21U-RNAs) is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the piRNA-binding Argonaute protein PRG-1 is the only known player acting downstream from precursor transcription. From a screen aimed at the isolation of piRNA-induced silencing-defective (Pid) mutations, we identified, among known Piwi pathway components, PID-1 as a novel player. PID-1 is a mostly cytoplasmic, germline-specific factor essential for 21U-RNA biogenesis, affecting an early step in the processing or transport of 21U precursor transcripts. We also show that maternal 21U-RNAs are essential to initiate silencing. PMID:24696453

  2. Tissue specific roles for the ribosome biogenesis factor Wdr43 in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Andreeva, Viktoria; Gibert, Yann; LaBonty, Melissa; Lattanzi, Victoria; Prabhudesai, Shubhangi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard; McCann, Kathleen L; Baserga, Susan; Yelick, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    During vertebrate craniofacial development, neural crest cells (NCCs) contribute to most of the craniofacial pharyngeal skeleton. Defects in NCC specification, migration and differentiation resulting in malformations in the craniofacial complex are associated with human craniofacial disorders including Treacher-Collins Syndrome, caused by mutations in TCOF1. It has been hypothesized that perturbed ribosome biogenesis and resulting p53 mediated neuroepithelial apoptosis results in NCC hypoplasia in mouse Tcof1 mutants. However, the underlying mechanisms linking ribosome biogenesis and NCC development remain poorly understood. Here we report a new zebrafish mutant, fantome (fan), which harbors a point mutation and predicted premature stop codon in zebrafish wdr43, the ortholog to yeast UTP5. Although wdr43 mRNA is widely expressed during early zebrafish development, and its deficiency triggers early neural, eye, heart and pharyngeal arch defects, later defects appear fairly restricted to NCC derived craniofacial cartilages. Here we show that the C-terminus of Wdr43, which is absent in fan mutant protein, is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its nucleolar localization and protein interactions in metazoans. We demonstrate that Wdr43 functions in ribosome biogenesis, and that defects observed in fan mutants are mediated by a p53 dependent pathway. Finally, we show that proper localization of a variety of nucleolar proteins, including TCOF1, is dependent on that of WDR43. Together, our findings provide new insight into roles for Wdr43 in development, ribosome biogenesis, and also ribosomopathy-induced craniofacial phenotypes including Treacher-Collins Syndrome.

  3. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  4. Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Gänzle, Michael G.; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of bacterial endospores by hydrostatic pressure requires the combined application of heat and pressure. We have determined the resistance of spores of 14 food isolates and 5 laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, and B. licheniformis to treatments with pressure and temperature (200 to 800 MPa and 60 to 80°C) in mashed carrots. A large variation in the pressure resistance of spores was observed, and their reduction by treatments with 800 MPa and 70°C for 4 min ranged from more than 6 log units to no reduction. The sporulation conditions further influenced their pressure resistance. The loss of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from spores that varied in their pressure resistance was determined, and spore sublethal injury was assessed by determination of the detection times for individual spores. Treatment of spores with pressure and temperature resulted in DPA-free, phase-bright spores. These spores were sensitive to moderate heat and exhibited strongly increased detection times as judged by the time required for single spores to grow to visible turbidity of the growth medium. The role of DPA in heat and pressure resistance was further substantiated by the use of the DPA-deficient mutant strain B. subtilis CIP 76.26. Taken together, these results indicate that inactivation of spores by combined pressure and temperature processing is achieved by a two-stage mechanism that does not involve germination. At a pressure between 600 and 800 MPa and a temperature greater than 60°C, DPA is released predominantly by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process, and the DPA-free spores are inactivated by moderate heat independent of the pressure level. Relevant target organisms for pressure and temperature treatment of foods are proposed, namely, strains of B. amyloliquefaciens, which form highly pressure-resistant spores. PMID:15574932

  5. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  6. Differential staining of bacteria: endospore stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Endospore production is a very important characteristic of some bacteria, allowing them to resist adverse environmental conditions such as desiccation, chemical exposure, extreme heat, radiation, etc. The identification of endospores is also very important for the clinical microbiologist who is analyzing a patient's body fluid or tissue-there are not that many spore-forming genera. In fact, there are two major pathogenic spore-forming genera, Bacillus and Clostridium, together causing a number of lethal diseases-botulism, gangrene, tetanus, and anthrax, to name a few.

  7. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer.

  8. Decreased Levels of Proapoptotic Factors and Increased Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Constitute New Potential Beneficial Features of Long-lived Growth Hormone Receptor Gene–Disrupted Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity—decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions—calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  9. Pasteuria endospore attachment to Pratylenchus species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasteuria spp. are endospore-forming bacteria, and most of them are obligate parasites of nematodes. A number of studies have demonstrated that Pasteuria can effectively suppress nematode populations in natural fields and have promising potential as biocontrol agents. However, parasitism of nematode...

  10. Laser measurements of bacterial endospore destruction from shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappas, Petros P.; McCartt, A. Daniel; Gates, Sean D.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of shock waves on bioaerosols containing endospores were measured by combined laser absorption and scattering. Experiments were conducted in the Stanford aerosol shock tube for post-shock temperatures ranging from 400 K to 1100 K. Laser intensity measurements through the test section of the shock tube at wavelengths of 266 and 665 nm provided real-time monitoring of the morphological changes (includes changes in shape, structure and optical properties) in the endospores. Scatter of the visible light measured the integrity of endospore structure, while absorption of the UV light provided a measure of biochemicals released when endospores ruptured. For post-shock temperatures above 750 K the structural breakdown of Bacillus atrophaeus (BA) endospores was observed. A simple theoretical model using laser extinction is presented for determining the fraction of endospores that are ruptured by the shock waves. In addition, mechanisms of endospore mortality preceding their disintegration due to shock waves are discussed.

  11. Differential expression of THOC1 and ALY mRNP biogenesis/export factors in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Sánchez, María S; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel A; Aguilera, Andrés; Luna, Rosa

    2011-02-17

    One key step in gene expression is the biogenesis of mRNA ribonucleoparticle complexes (mRNPs). Formation of the mRNP requires the participation of a number of conserved factors such as the THO complex. THO interacts physically and functionally with the Sub2/UAP56 RNA-dependent ATPase, and the Yra1/REF1/ALY RNA-binding protein linking transcription, mRNA export and genome integrity. Given the link between genome instability and cancer, we have performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns of THOC1, a THO complex subunit, and ALY in tumor samples. The mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and hybridization of a tumor tissue cDNA array; and the protein levels and distribution by immunostaining of a custom tissue array containing a set of paraffin-embedded samples of different tumor and normal tissues followed by statistical analysis. We show that the expression of two mRNP factors, THOC1 and ALY are altered in several tumor tissues. THOC1 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in ovarian and lung tumors and down-regulated in those of testis and skin, whereas ALY is altered in a wide variety of tumors. In contrast to THOC1, ALY protein is highly detected in normal proliferative cells, but poorly in high-grade cancers. These results suggest a differential connection between tumorogenesis and the expression levels of human THO and ALY. This study opens the possibility of defining mRNP biogenesis factors as putative players in cell proliferation that could contribute to tumor development.

  12. Differential expression of THOC1 and ALY mRNP biogenesis/export factors in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One key step in gene expression is the biogenesis of mRNA ribonucleoparticle complexes (mRNPs). Formation of the mRNP requires the participation of a number of conserved factors such as the THO complex. THO interacts physically and functionally with the Sub2/UAP56 RNA-dependent ATPase, and the Yra1/REF1/ALY RNA-binding protein linking transcription, mRNA export and genome integrity. Given the link between genome instability and cancer, we have performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns of THOC1, a THO complex subunit, and ALY in tumor samples. Methods The mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and hybridization of a tumor tissue cDNA array; and the protein levels and distribution by immunostaining of a custom tissue array containing a set of paraffin-embedded samples of different tumor and normal tissues followed by statistical analysis. Results We show that the expression of two mRNP factors, THOC1 and ALY are altered in several tumor tissues. THOC1 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in ovarian and lung tumors and down-regulated in those of testis and skin, whereas ALY is altered in a wide variety of tumors. In contrast to THOC1, ALY protein is highly detected in normal proliferative cells, but poorly in high-grade cancers. Conclusions These results suggest a differential connection between tumorogenesis and the expression levels of human THO and ALY. This study opens the possibility of defining mRNP biogenesis factors as putative players in cell proliferation that could contribute to tumor development. PMID:21329510

  13. Amyloid Histology Stain for Rapid Bacterial Endospore Imaging ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bing; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuñez, Vicente; Landsman, Pavel; Lam, Samuel; Malik, Harbani; Gupta, Sharad; Sarshar, Mohammad; Hu, Jingqiu; Anvari, Bahman; Jones, Guilford; Vullev, Valentine I.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial endospores are some of the most resilient forms of life known to us, with their persistent survival capability resulting from a complex and effective structural organization. The outer membrane of endospores is surrounded by the densely packed endospore coat and exosporium, containing amyloid or amyloid-like proteins. In fact, it is the impenetrable composition of the endospore coat and the exosporium that makes staining methodologies for endospore detection complex and challenging. Therefore, a plausible strategy for facile and expedient staining would be to target components of the protective surface layers of the endospores. Instead of targeting endogenous markers encapsulated in the spores, here we demonstrated staining of these dormant life entities that targets the amyloid domains, i.e., the very surface components that make the coats of these species impenetrable. Using an amyloid staining dye, thioflavin T (ThT), we examined this strategy. A short incubation of bacillus endospore suspensions with ThT, under ambient conditions, resulted in (i) an enhancement of the fluorescence of ThT and (ii) the accumulation of ThT in the endospores, affording fluorescence images with excellent contrast ratios. Fluorescence images revealed that ThT tends to accumulate in the surface regions of the endospores. The observed fluorescence enhancement and dye accumulation, coupled with the sensitivity of emission techniques, provide an effective and rapid means of staining endospores without the inconvenience of pre- or posttreatment of samples. PMID:21653779

  14. Rapid Determination of Endospore Viability by Hyperspectral Reflectance Following Surface Decontamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    metabolic activity of endospores makes determining their viability very difficult. Bacterial endospores have extreme tolerance to sterilization and...Alexandria, VA ABSTRACT Bacterial spores, or endospores, such as those of Bacillus anthracis, are an asymmetrical threat. Decontamination...differentiate live (viable) from dead (non-viable) bacterial endospores are lacking. Endospores have minimal metabolic activity and withstand many

  15. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  16. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1.

    PubMed

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem-loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3' splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing.

  17. Dynamic staining of Bacillus endospores with Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Lam, Samuel; Ha, Alice; Malik-Chaudhry, Harbani K; Vullev, Valentine I

    2012-01-01

    Rapid detection and identification of endospores presents a range of complex challenges. Dynamic staining approach, developed in our lab, utilizes the time-course fluorescence enhancement of an amyloid-staining dye, Thioflavin T (ThT), after mixing with intact endospores. We examined the kinetics of staining Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus thuringiensis endospores, and the rates of staining were different for the two bacilli when intact endospores were treated with ThT. This finding demonstrates an avenue for attaining information about the sporulated bacterial species without lysing, germinating or other pretreatment steps.

  18. NADPH Oxidase 4 (Nox4) Suppresses Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Bioenergetics in Lung Fibroblasts via a Nuclear Factor Erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2)-dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Karen; Logsdon, Naomi J; Miguel, Veronica; Benavides, Gloria A; Zhang, Jianhua; Carter, A Brent; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Thannickal, Victor J

    2017-02-17

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics are critical for cellular homeostasis and stress responses. The reactive oxygen species-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), regulates a number of physiological and pathological processes, including cellular differentiation, host defense, and tissue fibrosis. In this study we explored the role of constitutive Nox4 activity in regulating mitochondrial function. An increase in mitochondrial oxygen consumption and reserve capacity was observed in murine and human lung fibroblasts with genetic deficiency (or silencing) of Nox4. Inhibition of Nox4 expression/activity by genetic or pharmacological approaches resulted in stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, as evidenced by elevated mitochondrial-to-nuclear DNA ratio and increased expression of the mitochondrial markers transcription factor A (TFAM), citrate synthase, voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 (COX IV). Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis was dependent on TFAM up-regulation but was independent of the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α). The enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics as well as the increase in mitochondrial proteins in Nox4-deficient lung fibroblasts is inhibited by silencing of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2), supporting a key role for Nrf2 in control of mitochondrial biogenesis. Together, these results indicate a critical role for both Nox4 and Nrf2 in counter-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism.

  19. Analyzing the Role of Periplasmic Folding Factors in the Biogenesis of OMPs and Members of the Type V Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Marín, Elvira; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is highly packed with OM proteins (OMPs) and the trafficking and assembly of OMPs in gram-negative bacteria is a subject of intense research. Structurally, OMPs vary in the number of β-strands and in the size and complexity of extra-membrane domains, with extreme examples being the members of the type V protein secretion system (T5SS), such as the autotransporter (AT) and intimin/invasin families of secreted proteins, in which a large extracellular "passenger" domain is linked to a β-barrel that inserts in the OM. Despite their structural and functional diversity, OMPs interact in the periplasm with a relatively small set of protein chaperones that facilitate their transport from the inner membrane (IM) to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM complex), preventing aggregation and assisting their folding in various aspects including disulfide bond formation. This chapter is focused on the periplasmic folding factors involved in the biogenesis of integral OMPs and members of T5SS in E. coli, which are used as a model system in this field. Background information on these periplasmic folding factors is provided along with genetic methods to generate conditional mutants that deplete these factors from E. coli and biochemical methods to analyze the folding, surface display, disulfide formation and oligomerization state of OMPs/T5SS in these mutants.

  20. Sub-lethal oxidative stress induces lysosome biogenesis via a lysosomal membrane permeabilization-cathepsin-caspase 3-transcription factor EB-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Leow, San Min; Chua, Shu Xian Serene; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Shen, Liang; Luo, Le; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2016-12-18

    Here we provide evidence to link sub-lethal oxidative stress to lysosomal biogenesis. Exposure of cells to sub-lethal concentrations of exogenously added hydrogen peroxide resulted in cytosol to nuclear translocation of the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), the master controller of lysosome biogenesis and function. Nuclear translocation of TFEB was dependent upon the activation of a cathepsin-caspase 3 signaling pathway, downstream of a lysosomal membrane permeabilization and accompanied by a significant increase in lysosome numbers as well as induction of TFEB dependent lysosome-associated genes expression such as Ctsl, Lamp2 and its spliced variant Lamp2a, Neu1and Ctsb and Sqstm1 and Atg9b. The effects of sub-lethal oxidative stress on lysosomal gene expression and biogenesis were rescued upon gene silencing of caspase 3 and TFEB. Notably, caspase 3 activation was not associated with phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis, evidenced by the absence of caspase 3 substrate cleavage, such as PARP, Lamin A/C or gelsolin. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time an unexpected and non-canonical role of a cathepsin-caspase 3 axis in the nuclear translocation of TFEB leading to lysosomes biogenesis under conditions of sub-lethal oxidative stress.

  1. STA1, an Arabidopsis pre-mRNA processing factor 6 homolog, is a new player involved in miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Chaabane, Samir; Liu, Renyi; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kwon, Yerim; Park, Joo-hyuk; Kim, Seo Yeon; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Yang, Seong Wook; Lee, Byeong-ha

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that have important regulatory roles in numerous developmental and metabolic processes in most eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1, SERRATE, HUA ENHANCER1 and HASTY are involved in processing of primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) to yield precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) and eventually miRNAs. In addition to these components, mRNA cap-binding proteins, CBP80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1 and CBP20, also participate in miRNA biogenesis. Here, we show that STABILIZED1 (STA1), an Arabidopsis pre-mRNA processing factor 6 homolog, is also involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs. Similar to other miRNA biogenesis-defective mutants, sta1-1 accumulated significantly lower levels of mature miRNAs and concurrently higher levels of pri-miRNAs than wild type. The dramatic reductions of mature miRNAs were associated with the accumulation of their target gene transcripts and developmental defects. Furthermore, sta1-1 impaired splicing of intron containing pri-miRNAs and decreased transcript levels of DCL1. These results suggest that STA1 is involved in miRNA biogenesis directly by functioning in pri-miRNA splicing and indirectly by modulating the DCL1 transcript level. PMID:23268445

  2. Bacillus Endospores - an ideal exobiological Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, R.; Horneck, G.

    Exobiology investigations have one overall goal -- finding the answer to the question if Earth is the only possible place in our universe where life was created. For tackling this question a good approach is to use a simple and ubiquitous system like bacteria as used in BIOPAN and EXPOSE. Many of these microorganisms have the ability to form metabolic inactive continuous forms such as Bacillus endospores. These spores are highly resistant against a variety of environmental stresses, such as toxic chemical agents, desiccation, high and low pressure, high doses of ionising and UV radiation and temperature extremes such as heat or permafrost. They are ubiquitous, inhabit soils and rocks and are easily disseminated by wind and water. Therefore they are suitable test systems for studying several questions of astrobiology, such as the theory of Panspermia, planetary protection issues in connection with missions to Mars or Europa, or chances for life on past or present Mars. The strategies Bacillus sp. endospores have developed to survive harsh conditions include a desiccated spore core, an altered conformation of their DNA (A-form), high concentration of small acid-soluble proteins (SASPs) stabilising the DNA, dipicolinic acid (DPA) for stabilisation and protective spore coating layers. We have investigated the role of endogenous and exogenous pigments in the UV-resistance of Bacillus endospores by using spores of different degree and kind of pigmentation, i.e. white, grey or red spores (DSMZ culture collection). The spectral ranges of UV radiation represented those of the early or present UV radiation climate of Earth or Mars. It was found, that endogenous carotenoids, identified by spectrophotometrical analysis from a spore extract as well as in-situ by Raman spectroscopy, efficiently protect against UV-A radiation, whereas melanin was also protective against UV-C radiation. From these studied follows, that highly pigmented spores might survive even in an intense UV

  3. Direct microscopy of bacillus endospore germination in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Thrane, C; Olsson, S; Wolstrup, J; Sørensen, J

    2000-10-01

    Antagonistic endospore-forming Bacillus spp. offer a large potential as seed inoculants for control of soil-borne pathogens. In the soil, however, inoculated Bacillus endospores may remain dormant without germination, and plant protection can therefore be inefficient and unpredictable. A method based on direct fluorescence microscopy in soil microcosms was used to determine whether low-cost organic additives incorporated into seed coating material could stimulate endospore germination. Complex organic additives supported a high level of endospore germination of the fungal antagonist Paenibacillus polymyxa CM5-5. Skim milk is a low-cost additive that may be incorporated into seed coating material for efficient induction of Bacillus endospore germination in soil.

  4. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-05-15

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function.

  5. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J.; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J. Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  6. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a propagation method that utilizes a commercially available medium to produce UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores with a consistent UV sensitivity. It is further demonstrated that the endospores B. pumilus strain (ATCC 27142), produced using this protocol (half strength Columbia broth, 5 days incubation, with 0.1mM MnSO4), display a UV dose-response that is similar to that of HAdV. Endospore stocks could be stored in ethanol for up to two month at 4C without a significant change in UV sensitivity. Synergistic endospore damage by pre-pasteurization of water samples was observed, suggesting post-pasteurization only of UV treated water samples. UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores are a potential surrogate of HAdV for UV treatment performance tests in water utilities which do not have in-house research virology laboratories. This article describes the usefulness of Bacillus pumilus endspores as a viable surrogate for adeno virus in UV disinfection studies.

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  8. Effect of static magnetic field on endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen Jie; Liu, Si Li; Yung, Pun To

    2017-02-01

    This work investigated the effect of static magnetic field (SMF) on Bacillus atrophaeus endospore germination. Germination was triggered by L-alanine in 1.3-T SMF and characterized by ion release, Ca(2+) -dipicolinic acid release, and water influx. These events were monitored by electrical conductivity, Tb-DPA fluorescence, and optical density, respectively. Culturability of endospore germinated in SMF exposure was evaluated by CFU enumeration. Results indicated that 1.3-T SMF failed to significantly affect endospore germination and culturability, suggesting that the three aforementioned processes were not sensitive to SMF. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:121-127, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  10. THERMOPHILE ENDOSPORES HAVE RESPONSIVE EXOSPORIUM FOR ATTACHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.T.; WARREN,J.; SABATINI,R.

    1999-08-01

    Recently studies examining the colonization of Clostridial pathogens on agar and human tissue culture cells, demonstrated that (C. sporogenes ATCC 3584, C. difficile ATCC 43594 [patient isolate], C. difficile ATCC 9689 [non-clinical], C. clostridioforme [patient isolate]) bacterial spores (endospores) of the genus Clostridia have an outer membrane that becomes responsive at activation and exhibits extensions of the exosporial membrane that facilitate and maintain spore attachment to a nutritive substrate during germination and initial outgrowth of the newly developed bacterial cell. Therefore this attachment phenomenon plays an important role in insuring bacterial colonization of a surface and the initial stages of the infective process. To see if other non-clinical members of this genus also have this ability to attach to a substrate or food-source during spore germination, and how this attachment process in environmental thermophiles compares to the clinical paradigm (in relation to time sequence, exosporial membrane structure, type of attachment structures, composition of the membrane etc...), sediment samples were collected in sterile transport containers at 4 geothermal sites at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Because spore forming bacteria will produce spores when conditions are unfavorable for growth, the samples were sealed and stored at 4 C. After 8 months the samples were screened for the presence of spores by light microscope examination using malachite green/safranin, and traditional endospores were identified in significant quantities from the Terrace Spring site (a 46 C lake with bacterial mats and a rapidly moving run-off channel leading to a traditional hot spring). The highest spore population was found in the top sediment and benthic water of the run-off channel, pH 8.1.

  11. The Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Nol11 Is Required for Optimal rDNA Transcription and Craniofacial Development in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, John N.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  12. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Sondalle, Samuel B; Del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2015-03-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  13. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  14. Quantification of viable endospores from a Greenland ice core.

    PubMed

    Yung, Pun To; Shafaat, Hannah S; Connon, Stephanie A; Ponce, Adrian

    2007-02-01

    Endospores (i.e., bacterial spores) embedded in polar ices present an opportunity to investigate the most durable form of life in an ideal medium for maintaining long-term viability. However, little is known about the endospore distribution and viability in polar ices. We have determined germinable endospore concentrations of bacterial spores capable of germination in a Greenland ice core (GISP2 94 m, ID# G2-271) using two complementary endospore viability assays (EVA), recently developed in our laboratory. These assays are based on bulk spectroscopic analysis (i.e., spectroEVA), and direct microscopic enumeration (i.e., microEVA) of ice core concentrates. Both assays detect dipicolinic acid (DPA) release during l-alanine induced germination via terbium ion (Tb3+)-DPA luminescence. Using spectroEVA, the germinable and total bacterial spore concentrations were found to be 295+/-19 spores mL(-1) and 369+/-36 spores mL(-1), respectively, (i.e., 80% of the endospores were capable of germination). Using microEVA, the germinating endospore concentration was found to be 27+/-2 spores mL(-1). The total cell concentration, as determined by DAPI stain fluorescence microscopy, was 7.0 x 10(3)+/-6.7 x 10(2) cells mL(-1). Culturing attempts yielded 2 CFU mL(-1) (4 degrees C). We conclude that endospores capable of germination in the GISP2 ice cores are readily determined using novel endospore viability assays.

  15. Role of superoxide in the germination of Bacillus anthracis endospores.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Les; Hibbs, Stephen; Tsai, Pei; Cao, Guan-Liang; Rosen, Gerald M

    2005-04-01

    The spore forming Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has achieved notoriety due to its use as a bioterror agent. In the environment, B. anthracis exists as a dormant endospore. Germination of endospores during their internalization within the myeloid phagocyte, and the ability of those endospores to survive exposure to antibacterial killing mechanisms such as superoxide (O(2)*-, is a key initial event in the infective process. We report herein that endospores exposed to fluxes of O(2)*- typically found in stimulated phagocytes had no effect on viability. Further endospores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis were found to scavenge O(2)*-, which may enhance the ability of the bacterium to survive within the hostile environment of the phagolysosome. Most intriguing was the observation that endospore germination was stimulated by a flux of O(2)*- as low as 1 microM/min. Data presented herein suggest that B. anthracis may co-opt O(2)*- which is produced by stimulated myeloid phagocytes and is an essential element of host immunity, as a necessary step in productive infection of the host.

  16. Effect of sonic stimulation on Bacillus endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si Li; Wu, Wen Jie; Yung, Pun To

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of sonic stimulation on Bacillus endospore germination. Germinating endospores in a microtiter plate were exposed to audible sound wave generated by an array of piezoelectric transducers. In situ germination kinetics was measured by terbium-dipicolinate fluorescence assay, optical density measurement and phase contrast microscopy. Fluorescence results revealed that sonic stimulation (5 kHz at 90 dB) promoted the germination speed by 43.7% ± 11.3% and final germination level by 61.7% ± 11.9% of Bacillus atrophaeus. This acoustic energy absorbed by endospores is postulated to change membrane permeability and increase enzyme activities; thereby, expediting the germination process. This also raises the likelihood of dormant endospores undergoing germination because of a rapid release of unidentified chemical mediators for quorum sensing. On the other hand, acoustic effect was not observed in B. subtilis endospores. This may be attributed to the different spore aspect ratio, 1.43 ± 0.05 for B. atrophaeus and 2.02 ± 0.08 for B. subtilis, which results in a difference in specific absorption rates towards audible sound waves. Our results demonstrate the modulation of endospore germination by an external field to shed light on germination mechanism and cell-wave interaction.

  17. Endospores of thermophilic bacteria as tracers of microbial dispersal by ocean currents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Albert Leopold; de Rezende, Júlia Rosa; Hubert, Casey R J; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Berry, David; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Loy, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Microbial biogeography is influenced by the combined effects of passive dispersal and environmental selection, but the contribution of either factor can be difficult to discern. As thermophilic bacteria cannot grow in the cold seabed, their inactive spores are not subject to environmental selection. We therefore conducted a global experimental survey using thermophilic endospores that are passively deposited by sedimentation to the cold seafloor as tracers to study the effect of dispersal by ocean currents on the biogeography of marine microorganisms. Our analysis of 81 different marine sediments from around the world identified 146 species-level 16S rRNA phylotypes of endospore-forming, thermophilic Firmicutes. Phylotypes showed various patterns of spatial distribution in the world oceans and were dispersal-limited to different degrees. Co-occurrence of several phylotypes in locations separated by great distances (west of Svalbard, the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of California) demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution. In contrast, Arctic regions with water masses that are relatively isolated from global ocean circulation (Baffin Bay and east of Svalbard) were characterized by low phylotype richness and different compositions of phylotypes. The observed distribution pattern of thermophilic endospores in marine sediments suggests that the impact of passive dispersal on marine microbial biogeography is controlled by the connectivity of local water masses to ocean circulation.

  18. Endospores of thermophilic bacteria as tracers of microbial dispersal by ocean currents

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Albert Leopold; de Rezende, Júlia Rosa; Hubert, Casey R J; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Berry, David; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Loy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biogeography is influenced by the combined effects of passive dispersal and environmental selection, but the contribution of either factor can be difficult to discern. As thermophilic bacteria cannot grow in the cold seabed, their inactive spores are not subject to environmental selection. We therefore conducted a global experimental survey using thermophilic endospores that are passively deposited by sedimentation to the cold seafloor as tracers to study the effect of dispersal by ocean currents on the biogeography of marine microorganisms. Our analysis of 81 different marine sediments from around the world identified 146 species-level 16S rRNA phylotypes of endospore-forming, thermophilic Firmicutes. Phylotypes showed various patterns of spatial distribution in the world oceans and were dispersal-limited to different degrees. Co-occurrence of several phylotypes in locations separated by great distances (west of Svalbard, the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of California) demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution. In contrast, Arctic regions with water masses that are relatively isolated from global ocean circulation (Baffin Bay and east of Svalbard) were characterized by low phylotype richness and different compositions of phylotypes. The observed distribution pattern of thermophilic endospores in marine sediments suggests that the impact of passive dispersal on marine microbial biogeography is controlled by the connectivity of local water masses to ocean circulation. PMID:24351936

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac performance depends on a fine balance between the work the heart has to perform to satisfy the needs of the body and the energy that it is able to produce. Thus, energy production by oxidative metabolism, the main energy source of the cardiac muscle, has to be strictly regulated to adapt to cardiac work. Mitochondrial biogenesis is the mechanism responsible for mitochondrial component synthesis and assembly. This process controls mitochondrial content and thus correlates with energy production that, in turn, sustains cardiac contractility. Mitochondrial biogenesis should be finely controlled to match cardiac growth and cardiac work. When the heart is subjected to an increase in work in response to physiological and pathological challenges, it adapts by increasing its mass and expressing a new genetic program. In response to physiological stimuli such as endurance training, mitochondrial biogenesis seems to follow a program involving increased cardiac mass. But in the context of pathological hypertrophy, the modifications of this mechanism remain unclear. What appears clear is that mitochondrial biogenesis is altered in heart failure, and the imbalance between cardiac work demand and energy production represents a major factor in the development of heart failure.

  20. Detection of Bacillus endospores using total luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint B.; Anderson, John E.; Webb, Stanley R.

    2004-09-01

    Detection and analysis of bacteria from environmental samples (e.g. water, air, and food) are usually accomplished by standard culture techniques or by analyses that target specific DNA sequences, antigens or chemicals. For large cell numbers in aqueous suspensions, an alternative technique that has proven useful is total luminescence spectroscopy (TLS). TLS is the acquisition of fluorescence data that records the unique excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of compound fluorophores. Past work has shown that one type of bacterial endospore, Bacillus megaterium, possessed a distinct EEM pattern useful for differentiating it in complex biological fluids and suspensions. The work described here extends those observations to establish some limits on the sensitivity and specificity of TLS for the detection and analysis of bacterial endospores versus (bacterial) vegetative cells in aqueous culture. Our findings show Bacillus endospores exhibit a dramatic blue shift of 130 nm in excitation and a smaller shift of 50 nm in emission when compared to ancillary endospore and non-endospore forming bacterial cells.

  1. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease is a nuclear ribosome biogenesis factor involved in human 18S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Montellese, Christian; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Henras, Anthony K; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise

    2017-04-10

    The poly-A specific ribonuclease (PARN), initially characterized for its role in mRNA catabolism, supports the processing of different types of non-coding RNAs including telomerase RNA. Mutations in PARN are linked to dyskeratosis congenita and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we show that PARN is part of the enzymatic machinery that matures the human 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Consistent with its nucleolar steady-state localization, PARN is required for 40S ribosomal subunit production and co-purifies with 40S subunit precursors. Depletion of PARN or expression of a catalytically-compromised PARN mutant results in accumulation of 3΄ extended 18S rRNA precursors. Analysis of these processing intermediates reveals a defect in 3΄ to 5΄ trimming of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region, subsequent to endonucleolytic cleavage at site E. Consistent with a function of PARN in exonucleolytic trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA, recombinant PARN can process the corresponding ITS1 RNA fragment in vitro. Trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA by PARN occurs in the nucleus, upstream of the final endonucleolytic cleavage by the endonuclease NOB1 in the cytoplasm. These results identify PARN as a new component of the ribosome biogenesis machinery in human cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis could therefore underlie the pathologies linked to mutations in PARN. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease is a nuclear ribosome biogenesis factor involved in human 18S rRNA maturation

    PubMed Central

    Montellese, Christian; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Henras, Anthony K.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The poly-A specific ribonuclease (PARN), initially characterized for its role in mRNA catabolism, supports the processing of different types of non-coding RNAs including telomerase RNA. Mutations in PARN are linked to dyskeratosis congenita and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we show that PARN is part of the enzymatic machinery that matures the human 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Consistent with its nucleolar steady-state localization, PARN is required for 40S ribosomal subunit production and co-purifies with 40S subunit precursors. Depletion of PARN or expression of a catalytically-compromised PARN mutant results in accumulation of 3΄ extended 18S rRNA precursors. Analysis of these processing intermediates reveals a defect in 3΄ to 5΄ trimming of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region, subsequent to endonucleolytic cleavage at site E. Consistent with a function of PARN in exonucleolytic trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA, recombinant PARN can process the corresponding ITS1 RNA fragment in vitro. Trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA by PARN occurs in the nucleus, upstream of the final endonucleolytic cleavage by the endonuclease NOB1 in the cytoplasm. These results identify PARN as a new component of the ribosome biogenesis machinery in human cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis could therefore underlie the pathologies linked to mutations in PARN. PMID:28402503

  3. Crystal structure of the primary piRNA biogenesis factor Zucchini reveals similarity to the bacterial PLD endonuclease Nuc.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Franka; Reuter, Michael; Kasaruho, Anisa; Schulz, Eike C; Pillai, Ramesh S; Barabas, Orsolya

    2012-12-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a gonad-specific class of small RNAs that associate with the Piwi clade of Argonaute proteins and play a key role in transposon silencing in animals. Since biogenesis of piRNAs is independent of the double-stranded RNA-processing enzyme Dicer, an alternative nuclease that can process single-stranded RNA transcripts has been long sought. A Phospholipase D-like protein, Zucchini, that is essential for piRNA processing has been proposed to be a nuclease acting in piRNA biogenesis. Here we describe the crystal structure of Zucchini from Drosophila melanogaster and show that it is very similar to the bacterial endonuclease, Nuc. The structure also reveals that homodimerization induces major conformational changes assembling the active site. The active site is situated on the dimer interface at the bottom of a narrow groove that can likely accommodate single-stranded nucleic acid substrates. Furthermore, biophysical analysis identifies protein segments essential for dimerization and provides insights into regulation of Zucchini's activity.

  4. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  5. The Clostridium sporulation programs: diversity and preservation of endospore differentiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K)) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σ(K), the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Association of protein biogenesis factors at the yeast ribosomal tunnel exit is affected by the translational status and nascent polypeptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Raue, Uta; Oellerer, Stefan; Rospert, Sabine

    2007-03-16

    Ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors (RPBs) act during a short but critical period of protein biogenesis. The action of RPBs starts as soon as a nascent polypeptide becomes accessible from the outside of the ribosome and ends upon termination of translation. In yeast, RPBs include the chaperones Ssb1/2 and ribosome-associated complex, signal recognition particle, nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC), the aminopeptidases Map1 and Map2, and the Nalpha-terminal acetyltransferase NatA. Here, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of RPB binding at the yeast ribosomal tunnel exit as a function of translational status and polypeptide sequence. We measured the ratios of RPBs to ribosomes in yeast cells and determined RPB occupation of translating and non-translating ribosomes. The combined results imply a requirement for dynamic and coordinated interactions at the tunnel exit. Exclusively, NAC was associated with the majority of ribosomes regardless of their translational status. All other RPBs occupied only ribosomal subpopulations, binding with increased apparent affinity to randomly translating ribosomes as compared with non-translating ones. Analysis of RPB interaction with homogenous ribosome populations engaged in the translation of specific nascent polypeptides revealed that the affinities of Ssb1/2, NAC, and, as expected, signal recognition particle, were influenced by the amino acid sequence of the nascent polypeptide. Complementary cross-linking data suggest that not only affinity of RPBs to the ribosome but also positioning can be influenced in a nascent polypeptide-dependent manner.

  7. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis at a glance.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Hurt, Ed

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes play a pivotal role in the molecular life of every cell. Moreover, synthesis of ribosomes is one of the most energetically demanding of all cellular processes. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome biogenesis requires the coordinated activity of all three RNA polymerases and the orchestrated work of many (>200) transiently associated ribosome assembly factors. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a tightly regulated activity and it is inextricably linked to other fundamental cellular processes, including growth and cell division. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that defects in ribosome biogenesis are associated with several hereditary diseases. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we summarise the current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, with an emphasis on the yeast model system.

  8. Differentiation of live-viable versus dead bacterial endospores by calibrated hyperspectral reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Reynolds, C; Ringelberg, D; Edwards, J; Foley, K

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the use of hyperspectral imaging microscopy (HIM) for the characterization and differentiation of live viable versus dead/non-viable bacterial endospores for two species of Bacillus. To accomplish this, endospore-forming Bacillus were cultured and differentiated into endospores. Non-viable endospores were produced using sporicidal methods representing standard decontamination procedures incorporating chlorine and peroxide. Finally, endospore samples were lyophilized to prepare them for spectral analysis. Prior to HIM, baseline spectral reflectance characterizing the endospores was measured using an ASD (400-900 nm) reflectance spectrometer. These data were used to calibrate the resulting spectral image data. HIM data comprising 32 images ranging from 400 to 720 nm (visible to near infrared) were recorded using a C-mounted VariSpec hyperspectral camera attached to an epifluorescent microscope. The images produced by the system record the reflectance and absorption features of endospores based on the structure of the outer coat. Analysis of the HIM data was performed using accepted image and spectral processing routines. Where peroxide was the sporicide, changes in the outer endospore coat contributed to structurally significant visible and near infrared signature differences between live-viable versus dead, non-viable endospores. A statistical test for divergence, a method for scoring spectral structural diversity, also showed the difference between viable and non-viable peroxide killed endospores to be statistically significant. These findings may lead to an improved optical procedure to rapidly identify viable and non-viable endospores in situations of decontamination.

  9. The Stability of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor WBSCR22 Is Regulated by Interaction with TRMT112 via Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Õunap, Kadri; Leetsi, Lilian; Matsoo, Maarja; Kurg, Reet

    2015-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein is a 18S rRNA methyltransferase involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosome 40S subunit biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that the protein function in ribosome synthesis is independent of its enzymatic activity. In this work, we have studied the WBSCR22 protein interaction partners by SILAC-coupled co-immunoprecipitation assay and identified TRMT112 as the interaction partner of WBSCR22. Knock-down of TRMT112 expression decreased the WBSCR22 protein level in mammalian cells, suggesting that the stability of WBSCR22 is regulated through the interaction with TRMT112. The localization of the TRMT112 protein is determined by WBSCR22, and the WBSCR22-TRMT112 complex is localized in the cell nucleus. We provide evidence that the interaction between WBSCR22/Bud23 and TRMT112/Trm112 is conserved between mammals and yeast, suggesting that the function of TRMT112 as a co-activator of methyltransferases is evolutionarily conserved. Finally, we show that the transiently expressed WBSCR22 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome pathway, revealing the tight control of the WBSCR22 protein level in the cells. PMID:26214185

  10. Activation of the iron regulon by the yeast Aft1/Aft2 transcription factors depends on mitochondrial but not cytosolic iron-sulfur protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Julian C; Ojeda, Luis; Balk, Janneke; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Winge, Dennis R

    2005-03-18

    Two transcriptional activators, Aft1 and Aft2, regulate iron homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These factors induce the expression of iron regulon genes in iron-deficient yeast but are inactivated in iron-replete cells. Iron inhibition of Aft1/Aft2 is abrogated in cells defective for Fe-S cluster biogenesis within the mitochondrial matrix (Chen, O. S., Crisp, R. J., Valachovic, M., Bard, M., Winge, D. R., and Kaplan, J. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 29513-29518). To determine whether iron sensing by Aft1/Aft2 requires the function of the mitochondrial Fe-S export and cytosolic Fe-S protein assembly systems, we evaluated the expression of the iron regulon in cells depleted of glutathione and in cells depleted of Atm1, Nar1, Cfd1, and Nbp35. The iron regulon is induced in cells depleted of Atm1 with Aft1 largely responsible for the induced gene expression. Aft2 is activated at a later time in Atm1-depleted cells. Likewise, the iron regulon is induced in cells depleted of glutathione. In contrast, repression of NAR1, CFD1, or NBP35 fails to induce the iron regulon despite strong inhibition of cytosolic/nuclear Fe-S protein assembly. Thus, iron sensing by Aft1/Aft2 is not linked to the maturation of cytosolic/nuclear Fe-S proteins, but the mitochondrial inner membrane transporter Atm1 is important to transport the inhibitory signal. Although Aft1 and Aft2 sense a signal emanating from the Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathway, there is no indication that the proteins are inhibited by direct binding of an Fe-S cluster.

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of electrochemically activated solutions against nosocomial pathogens and bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Robinson, G M; Lee, S W-H; Greenman, J; Salisbury, V C; Reynolds, D M

    2010-03-01

    Electrochemically activated solutions (ECAS) are generated from halide salt solutions via specially designed electrolytic cells. The active solutions are known to possess high biocidal activity against a wide range of target microbial species, however, literature revealing the kill-kinetics of these solutions is limited. The aim of the study was to identify the kill-rate and extent of population kill for a range of target species (including endospores) using ECAS generated at the anode (anolyte). Standard suspensions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Clostridium difficile spores were treated with anolyte in a quantitative suspension assay. For vegetative cells, all concentrations of anolyte tested reduced the viable population to below the detection limit within 10 s. At a concentration of 99%, anolyte produced a log(10) reduction factor of greater than five in viable B. atrophaeus endospores within 90 s and reduced numbers of C. difficile endospores to below the experimental detection limit within 20 s at concentrations of 5% or greater. Anolyte was highly effective in killing test-bacteria and spores. The bactericidal efficacy was retained against vegetative cells at dilutions as low as 1% and against C. difficile spores as low as 5%. The results of this study demonstrate that ECAS are effective at lower concentrations and act more rapidly than previously reported. Potent bactericidal and sporicidal activity coupled with point-of-use generation, low production-costs and environmental compatibility suggest that acidic ECAS has the potential to be a useful addition to the current armoury of disinfectants.

  12. Suppression of Meloidogyne arenaria Race 1 by Soil Application of Endospores of Pasteuria penetrans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. X.; Dickson, D. W.; McSorley, R.; Mitchell, D. J.; Hewlett, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of Pasteuria penetrans for suppressing Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 on peanut (Arachis hypogaea) was tested over a 2-year period in a field microplot experiment. Endospores of P. penetrans were mass-produced on M. arenaria race 1 infecting tomato plants. Endospores were inoculated in the first year only at rates of 0, 1,000, 3,000, 10,000, and 100,000 endospores/g of soil, respectively, into the top 20 cm of microplots that were previously infested with M. arenaria race 1. One peanut seedling was planted in each microplot. In the first year, root gall indices and pod galls per microplot were significantly reduced by 60% and 95% for 100,000 endospores/g of soil, and 20% and 65% for 10,000 endospores/g of soil, respectively. Final densities of second-stage juveniles (J2) in soil were not significantly different among the treatments. The number of endospores attached to J2 and percentage of J2 with attached endospores significantly increased with increasing endospore inoculation levels. Pasteuria penetrans significantly reduced the densities of J2 that overwintered. In the second year, root and pod gall indices, respectively, were significantly reduced by 81% and 90% for 100,000 endospores/g of soil, and by 61% and 82% of 10,000 endospores/g of soil. Pod yields were significantly increased by 94% for 100,000 and by 57% for 10,000 endospores/g of soil, respectively. The effect of P. penetrans on final densities of J2 in soil was not significant. Regression analyses verified the role of P. penetrans in the suppression of M. arenaria. The minimum number of endospores required for significantly suppressing M. arenaria race 1 on peanut was 10,000 endospores/g of soil. PMID:19277131

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs adiponectin signalling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and myogenesis in primary human myotubes cultures.

    PubMed

    Sente, Tahnee; Van Berendoncks, An M; Fransen, Erik; Vrints, Christiaan J; Hoymans, Vicky Y

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolic changes are common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated a functional skeletal muscle adiponectin resistance in HF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF). We aimed to examine the impact of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) deficiency and TNF-α treatment on adiponectin signaling, proliferative capacity, myogenic differentiation, and mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human skeletal muscle cells. Primary cultures of myoblasts and myotubes were initiated from the musculus vastus lateralis of 10 HFrEF patients (left ventricular ejection fraction; 31.30 ± 2.89%) and 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Healthy control cultures were transfected with siAdipoR1 and/or exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/ml; 72 h). Primary cultures from HFrEF patients preserved the features of adiponectin resistance in vivo. AdipoR1 mRNA was negatively correlated with time to reach maximal cell index (r = -0.7319, P = 0.003). SiRNA-mediated AdipoR1 silencing reduced pAMPK (P < 0.01), AMPK activation (P = 0.046), and myoblast proliferation rate (xCELLigence Real-Time Cellular Analysis; P < 0.0001). Moreover, TNF-α decreased the mRNA expression of genes involved in glucose (APPL1, P = 0.0002; AMPK, P = 0.021), lipid (PPARα, P = 0.025; ACADM, P = 0.003), and mitochondrial (FOXO3, P = 0.018) metabolism, impaired myogenesis (MyoD1, P = 0.053; myogenin, P = 0.048) and polarized cytokine secretion toward a growth-promoting phenotype (IL-10, IL-1β, IFN-γ, P < 0.05 for all; Meso Scale Discovery Technology). Major features of adiponectin resistance are retained in primary cultures from the skeletal muscle of HFrEF patients. In addition, our results suggest that an increased inflammatory constitution contributes to adiponectin resistance and confers alterations in skeletal muscle differentiation, growth, and function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Biogenesis of telomerase ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Emily D.; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase adds simple-sequence repeats to the ends of linear chromosomes to counteract the loss of end sequence inherent in conventional DNA replication. Catalytic activity for repeat synthesis results from the cooperation of the telomerase reverse transcriptase protein (TERT) and the template-containing telomerase RNA (TER). TERs vary widely in sequence and structure but share a set of motifs required for TERT binding and catalytic activity. Species-specific TER motifs play essential roles in RNP biogenesis, stability, trafficking, and regulation. Remarkably, the biogenesis pathways that generate mature TER differ across eukaryotes. Furthermore, the cellular processes that direct the assembly of a biologically functional telomerase holoenzyme and its engagement with telomeres are evolutionarily varied and regulated. This review highlights the diversity of strategies for telomerase RNP biogenesis, RNP assembly, and telomere recruitment among ciliates, yeasts, and vertebrates and suggests common themes in these pathways and their regulation. PMID:22875809

  15. Resistance of Bacillus Endospores to Extreme Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Munakata, Nobuo; Horneck, Gerda; Melosh, Henry J.; Setlow, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Endospores of Bacillus spp., especially Bacillus subtilis, have served as experimental models for exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the incredible longevity of spores and their resistance to environmental insults. In this review we summarize the molecular laboratory model of spore resistance mechanisms and attempt to use the model as a basis for exploration of the resistance of spores to environmental extremes both on Earth and during postulated interplanetary transfer through space as a result of natural impact processes. PMID:10974126

  16. Detecting inactivated endospores in fluorescence microscopy using propidium monoazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Alexander; Mahnert, Alexander; Weber, Christina; Haberer, Klaus; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between living and dead bacterial endospores is crucial in many research areas of microbiology. The identification of inactivated, non-pathogenic Bacillus anthracis spores is one reason why improvement of decontamination protocols is so desirable. Another field interested in spore viability is planetary protection, a sub-discipline of astrobiology that estimates the bioburden of spacecraft prior to launch in order to avoid interplanetary cross-contamination. We developed a dedicated, rapid and cost-effective method for identifying bacterial endospores that have been inactivated and consequently show a compromised spore wall. This novel protocol is culture-independent and is based on fluorescence microscopy and propidium monoazide (PMA) as a fluorescent marker, which is suggested to bind to DNA of spores with compromised spore coat, cortex and membranes based on our results. Inactivated preparations (treated with wet heat, irradiation, ultracentrifugation) showed a significant increase in spores that were PMA stained in their core; moreover, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus seemed to be best suited for this technique, as the spore cores of all these endospores could be positively stained after inactivation. Lastly, we describe an additional counter-staining protocol and provide an example of the application of the coupled staining methods for planetary protection purposes. The introduction of this novel protocol is expected to provide an initial insight into the various possible future applications of PMA as a non-viability marker for spores in, for example, B. anthracis-related studies, food microbiology and astrobiology.

  17. The Peroxisome Biogenesis Factors Pex4p, Pex22p, Pex1p, and Pex6p Act in the Terminal Steps of Peroxisomal Matrix Protein Import

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Cynthia S.; Kalish, Jennifer E.; Morrell, James C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Gould, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisomes are independent organelles found in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Genetic studies have identified more than 20 PEX genes that are required for peroxisome biogenesis. The role of most PEX gene products, peroxins, remains to be determined, but a variety of studies have established that Pex5p binds the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal and is the import receptor for most newly synthesized peroxisomal matrix proteins. The steady-state abundance of Pex5p is unaffected in most pex mutants of the yeast Pichia pastoris but is severely reduced in pex4 and pex22 mutants and moderately reduced in pex1 and pex6 mutants. We used these subphenotypes to determine the epistatic relationships among several groups of pex mutants. Our results demonstrate that Pex4p acts after the peroxisome membrane synthesis factor Pex3p, the Pex5p docking factors Pex13p and Pex14p, the matrix protein import factors Pex8p, Pex10p, and Pex12p, and two other peroxins, Pex2p and Pex17p. Pex22p and the interacting AAA ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p were also found to act after Pex10p. Furthermore, Pex1p and Pex6p were found to act upstream of Pex4p and Pex22p. These results suggest that Pex1p, Pex4p, Pex6p, and Pex22p act late in peroxisomal matrix protein import, after matrix protein translocation. This hypothesis is supported by the phenotypes of the corresponding mutant strains. As has been shown previously for P. pastoris pex1, pex6, and pex22 mutant cells, we show here that pex4Δ mutant cells contain peroxisomal membrane protein-containing peroxisomes that import residual amounts of peroxisomal matrix proteins. PMID:11003648

  18. Photo-inactivation of Bacillus endospores: inter-specific variability of inactivation efficiency.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Raquel N; Tomé, Augusto C; Tomé, João P C; Neves, Maria G P M S; Faustino, Maria A F; Cavaleiro, José A S; Oliveira, Anabela; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this work were to (a) evaluate the susceptibility of endospores of Bacillus cereus, B. licheniformis, B. sphaericus and B. subtilis to photodynamic inactivation using a tricationic porphyrin as photosensitizer, (b) assess the efficiency of adsorption of the photosensitizer in endospore material as a determinant of the susceptibility of endospores of different Bacillus species to photo-inactivation, (c) determine the value of B. cereus as a model organism for studies of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores. The results of irradiation experiments with endospores of four species of Bacillus showed that B. cereus was the only species for which efficient endospore photo-inactivation (> 3 log reduction) could be achieved. Endospores of B. licheniformis, B. sphaericus and B. subtilis were virtually resistant to photo-inactivation with tricationic porphyrin. The amount of porphyrin bound to endospore material was not significantly different between species, regardless of the presence of an exosporium or exosporium-like outer layer. The sensitivity of endospores to photodynamic inactivation with a tricationic porphyrin is highly variable among different species of the genus Bacillus. The presence of an exosporium in endospores of B. cereus and B. sphaericus, or an exosporium-like glycoprotein layer in endospores of B. subtilis, did not affect the amount of bound photosensitizer and did not explain the inter-species variability in susceptibility to photodynamic inactivation. The results imply that the use of B. cereus as a more amenable surrogate of the exosporium-producing B. anthracis must be carefully considered when testing new photosensitizers for their antimicrobial photo-inactivation properties.

  19. Splicing factor 2-associated protein p32 participates in ribosome biogenesis by regulating the binding of Nop52 and fibrillarin to preribosome particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Harunori; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Miura, Yutaka; Homma, Keiichi; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis starts with transcription of the large ribosomal RNA precursor (47S pre-rRNA), which soon combines with numerous factors to form the 90S pre-ribosome in the nucleolus. Although the subsequent separation of the pre-90S particle into pre-40S and pre-60S particles is critical for the production process of mature small and large ribosomal subunits, its molecular mechanisms remain undetermined. Here, we present evidence that p32, fibrillarin (FBL), and Nop52 play key roles in this separation step. Mass-based analyses combined with immunoblotting showed that p32 associated with 155 proteins including 31 rRNA-processing factors (of which nine were components of small subunit processome, and six were those of RIX1 complex), 13 chromatin remodeling components, and six general transcription factors required for RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription. Of these, a late rRNA-processing factor Nop52 interacted directly with p32. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that p32 colocalized with an early rRNA-processing factor FBL or Nop52 in the nucleolus and Cajal bodies, but was excluded from the nucleolus after actinomycin D treatment. p32 was present in the pre-ribosomal fractions prepared by cell fractionation or separated by ultracentrifugation of the nuclear extract. p32 also associated with pre-rRNAs including 47S/45S and 32S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, knockdown of p32 with a small interfering RNA slowed the early processing from 47S/45S pre-rRNAs to 18S rRNA and 32S pre-rRNA. Finally, Nop52 was found to compete with FBL for binding to p32 probably in the nucleolus. Given the fact that FBL and Nop52 are associated with pre-ribosome particles distinctly different from each other, we suggest that p32 is a new rRNA maturation factor involved in the remodeling from pre-90S particles to pre-40S and pre-60S particles that requires the exchange of FBL for Nop52.

  20. Splicing Factor 2-Associated Protein p32 Participates in Ribosome Biogenesis by Regulating the Binding of Nop52 and Fibrillarin to Preribosome Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Harunori; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Miura, Yutaka; Homma, Keiichi; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis starts with transcription of the large ribosomal RNA precursor (47S pre-rRNA), which soon combines with numerous factors to form the 90S pre-ribosome in the nucleolus. Although the subsequent separation of the pre-90S particle into pre-40S and pre-60S particles is critical for the production process of mature small and large ribosomal subunits, its molecular mechanisms remain undetermined. Here, we present evidence that p32, fibrillarin (FBL), and Nop52 play key roles in this separation step. Mass-based analyses combined with immunoblotting showed that p32 associated with 155 proteins including 31 rRNA-processing factors (of which nine were components of small subunit processome, and six were those of RIX1 complex), 13 chromatin remodeling components, and six general transcription factors required for RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription. Of these, a late rRNA-processing factor Nop52 interacted directly with p32. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that p32 colocalized with an early rRNA-processing factor FBL or Nop52 in the nucleolus and Cajal bodies, but was excluded from the nucleolus after actinomycin D treatment. p32 was present in the pre-ribosomal fractions prepared by cell fractionation or separated by ultracentrifugation of the nuclear extract. p32 also associated with pre-rRNAs including 47S/45S and 32S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, knockdown of p32 with a small interfering RNA slowed the early processing from 47S/45S pre-rRNAs to 18S rRNA and 32S pre-rRNA. Finally, Nop52 was found to compete with FBL for binding to p32 probably in the nucleolus. Given the fact that FBL and Nop52 are associated with pre-ribosome particles distinctly different from each other, we suggest that p32 is a new rRNA maturation factor involved in the remodeling from pre-90S particles to pre-40S and pre-60S particles that requires the exchange of FBL for Nop52. PMID:21536856

  1. Comparison of in vitro methods for the production of Paenibacillus larvae endospores.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Israel; Elekonich, Michelle M; Abel-Santos, Ernesto; Wing, Helen J

    2015-09-01

    Paenibacillus larvae endospores are the infectious particles of the honey bee brood disease, American Foulbrood. We demonstrate that our previously published protocol (Alvarado et al., 2013) consistently yields higher numbers and purer preparations of P. larvae endospores, than previously described protocols, regardless of the strain tested (B-3650, B-3554 or B-3685).

  2. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  3. Concentrating pre-mRNA processing factors in the histone locus body facilitates efficient histone mRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Terzo, Esteban; Curry, Kaitlin P.; Salzler, Harmony; Sabath, Ivan; Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; McKay, Daniel J.; Dominski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The histone locus body (HLB) assembles at replication-dependent histone genes and concentrates factors required for histone messenger RNA (mRNA) biosynthesis. FLASH (Flice-associated huge protein) and U7 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) are HLB components that participate in 3′ processing of the nonpolyadenylated histone mRNAs by recruiting the endonuclease CPSF-73 to histone pre-mRNA. Using transgenes to complement a FLASH mutant, we show that distinct domains of FLASH involved in U7 snRNP binding, histone pre-mRNA cleavage, and HLB localization are all required for proper FLASH function in vivo. By genetically manipulating HLB composition using mutations in FLASH, mutations in the HLB assembly factor Mxc, or depletion of the variant histone H2aV, we find that failure to concentrate FLASH and/or U7 snRNP in the HLB impairs histone pre-mRNA processing. This failure results in accumulation of small amounts of polyadenylated histone mRNA and nascent read-through transcripts at the histone locus. Thus, the HLB concentrates FLASH and U7 snRNP, promoting efficient histone mRNA biosynthesis and coupling 3′ end processing with transcription termination. PMID:27241916

  4. The complexity of human ribosome biogenesis revealed by systematic nucleolar screening of Pre-rRNA processing factors.

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Zorbas, Christiane; Langhendries, Jean-Louis; Mullineux, Sahra-Taylor; Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Mullier, Romain; Wacheul, Ludivine; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2013-08-22

    Mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are produced from polycistronic precursors following complex processing. Precursor (pre)-rRNA processing has been extensively characterized in yeast and was assumed to be conserved in humans. We functionally characterized 625 nucleolar proteins in HeLa cells and identified 286 required for processing, including 74 without a yeast homolog. For selected candidates, we demonstrated that pre-rRNA processing defects are conserved in different cell types (including primary cells), defects are not due to activation of a p53-dependent nucleolar tumor surveillance pathway, and they precede cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. We also investigated the exosome's role in processing internal transcribed spacers (ITSs) and report that 3' end maturation of 18S rRNA involves EXOSC10/Rrp6, a yeast ITS2 processing factor. We conclude that human cells adopt unique strategies and recruit distinct trans-acting factors to carry out essential processing steps, posing fundamental implications for understanding ribosomopathies at the molecular level and developing effective therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ribosome-stalk biogenesis is coupled with recruitment of nuclear-export factor to the nascent 60S subunit.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anshuk; Pech, Markus; Thoms, Matthias; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear export of preribosomal subunits is a key step during eukaryotic ribosome formation. To efficiently pass through the FG-repeat meshwork of the nuclear pore complex, the large pre-60S subunit requires several export factors. Here we describe the mechanism of recruitment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA-export receptor Mex67-Mtr2 to the pre-60S subunit at the proper time. Mex67-Mtr2 binds at the premature ribosomal-stalk region, which later during translation serves as a binding platform for translational GTPases on the mature ribosome. The assembly factor Mrt4, a structural homolog of cytoplasmic-stalk protein P0, masks this site, thus preventing untimely recruitment of Mex67-Mtr2 to nuclear pre-60S particles. Subsequently, Yvh1 triggers Mrt4 release in the nucleus, thereby creating a narrow time window for Mex67-Mtr2 association at this site and facilitating nuclear export of the large subunit. Thus, a spatiotemporal mark on the ribosomal stalk controls the recruitment of an RNA-export receptor to the nascent 60S subunit.

  6. HlyF Produced by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Is a Virulence Factor That Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kazunori; Martin, Patricia; Porcheron, Gaëlle; Houle, Sébastien; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Pénary, Marie; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dozois, Charles M; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli can cause extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The hlyF gene is epidemiologically associated with virulent strains of avian pathogenic E. coli and human neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli. We demonstrated that culture supernatants of E. coli expressing HlyF induced autophagy in eukaryotic cells. This phenotype coincided with an enhanced production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by bacteria expressing HlyF. The HlyF protein displays a predicted catalytic domain of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. This conserved domain was involved the ability of HlyF to promote the production of OMVs. The increased production of OMVs was associated with the release of toxins. hlyF was shown to be expressed during extraintestinal infection and to play a role in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli in a chicken model of colibacillosis. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria produce a virulence factor directly involved in the production of OMVs.

  7. Enhancing lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic flux by activating the transcription factor EB protects against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Tian, Li; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, is a well-known inducer of neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism underlying cadmium-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we found that Cd inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion and impairs lysosomal function by reducing the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis and altering lysosomal pH, contributing to defects in autophagic clearance and subsequently leading to nerve cell death. In addition, Cd decreases transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Cd induces the nuclear translocation of TFEB and TFEB target-gene expression, associated with compromised lysosomal function or a compensatory effect after the impairment of the autophagic flux. Notably, restoration of the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane protein, lysosomal proteolysis, lysosomal pH and autophagic flux through Tfeb overexpression protects against Cd-induced neurotoxicity, and this protective effect is incompletely dependent on TFEB nuclear translocation. Moreover, gene transfer of the master autophagy regulator TFEB results in the clearance of toxic proteins and the correction of Cd-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Cd disrupts lysosomal function and autophagic flux and manipulation of TFEB signalling may be a therapeutic approach for antagonizing Cd-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:28240313

  8. Transcription factor AP-2γ is a core regulator of tight junction biogenesis and cavity formation during mouse early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inchul; Carey, Timothy S.; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    The trophectoderm epithelium is the first differentiated cell layer to arise during mammalian development. Blastocyst formation requires the proper expression and localization of tight junction, polarity, ion gradient and H2O channel proteins in the outer cell membranes. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that control their expression are largely unknown. Here, we report that transcription factor AP-2γ (Tcfap2c) is a core regulator of blastocyst formation in mice. Bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional analysis revealed that Tcfap2c binds and regulates a diverse group of genes expressed during blastocyst formation. RNA interference experiments demonstrated that Tcfap2c regulates genes important for tight junctions, cell polarity and fluid accumulation. Functional and ultrastructural studies revealed that Tcfap2c is necessary for tight junction assembly and paracellular sealing in trophectoderm epithelium. Aggregation of control eight-cell embryos with Tcfap2c knockdown embryos rescued blastocyst formation via direct contribution to the trophectoderm epithelium. Finally, we found that Tcfap2c promotes cellular proliferation via direct repression of p21 transcription during the morula-to-blastocyst transition. We propose a model in which Tcfap2c acts in a hierarchy to facilitate blastocyst formation through transcriptional regulation of core genes involved in tight junction assembly, fluid accumulation and cellular proliferation. PMID:23136388

  9. Inactivation of the endoplasmic reticulum protein translocation factor, Sec61p, or its homolog, Ssh1p, does not affect peroxisome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    South, Sarah T.; Baumgart, Eveline; Gould, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane-bound organelles present in virtually all eukaryotes. These organelles participate in several important metabolic processes, and defects in peroxisome function and biogenesis are a significant contributor to human disease. Several models propose that peroxisomes arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a process that involves the translocation of “group I” peroxisomal membrane proteins into the ER, the exit of these group I peroxisomal membrane proteins from the ER by vesicle budding, and the formation of nascent peroxisomes from vesicles containing the group I peroxisomal membrane proteins. A central prediction of these models is that the formation of nascent peroxisomes requires protein translocation into the ER. Sec61p is an essential component of the ER translocon, and we show here that loss of Sec61p activity has no effect on peroxisome biogenesis. In addition, loss of the SEC61-related gene, SSH1, also has no effect on peroxisome biogenesis. Although some proteins may enter the ER independently of Sec61p or Ssh1p, none are known, leading us to propose that peroxisome biogenesis may not require protein import into the ER, and by extension, transfer of proteins from the ER to the peroxisome. PMID:11593013

  10. Posttranslational modification of mitochondrial transcription factor A in impaired mitochondria biogenesis: implications in diabetic retinopathy and metabolic memory phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was assessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  12. Identification of FkpA as a key quality control factor for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins under heat shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xi; Lyu, Zhi-Xin; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Xin Sheng; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2014-02-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacterial cells, as well as the mitochondrion and chloroplast organelles, possess unique and highly stable β-barrel structures. Biogenesis of OMPs in Escherichia coli involves such periplasmic chaperones as SurA and Skp. In this study, we found that the ΔsurA Δskp double-deletion strain of E. coli, although lethal and defective in the biogenesis of OMPs at the normal growth temperature, is viable and effective at the heat shock temperature. We identified FkpA as the multicopy suppressor for the lethal phenotype of the ΔsurA Δskp strain. We also demonstrated that the deletion of fkpA from the ΔsurA cells resulted in only a mild decrease in the levels of folded OMPs at the normal temperature but a severe decrease as well as lethality at the heat shock temperature, whereas the deletion of fkpA from the Δskp cells had no detectable effect on OMP biogenesis at either temperature. These results strongly suggest a functional redundancy between FkpA and SurA for OMP biogenesis under heat shock stress conditions. Mechanistically, we found that FkpA becomes a more efficient chaperone for OMPs under the heat shock condition, with increases in both binding rate and affinity. In light of these observations and earlier reports, we propose a temperature-responsive OMP biogenesis mechanism in which the degrees of functional importance of the three chaperones are such that SurA > Skp > FkpA at the normal temperature but FkpA ≥ SurA > Skp at the heat shock temperature.

  13. Identification of FkpA as a Key Quality Control Factor for the Biogenesis of Outer Membrane Proteins under Heat Shock Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xi; Lyu, Zhi-Xin; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacterial cells, as well as the mitochondrion and chloroplast organelles, possess unique and highly stable β-barrel structures. Biogenesis of OMPs in Escherichia coli involves such periplasmic chaperones as SurA and Skp. In this study, we found that the ΔsurA Δskp double-deletion strain of E. coli, although lethal and defective in the biogenesis of OMPs at the normal growth temperature, is viable and effective at the heat shock temperature. We identified FkpA as the multicopy suppressor for the lethal phenotype of the ΔsurA Δskp strain. We also demonstrated that the deletion of fkpA from the ΔsurA cells resulted in only a mild decrease in the levels of folded OMPs at the normal temperature but a severe decrease as well as lethality at the heat shock temperature, whereas the deletion of fkpA from the Δskp cells had no detectable effect on OMP biogenesis at either temperature. These results strongly suggest a functional redundancy between FkpA and SurA for OMP biogenesis under heat shock stress conditions. Mechanistically, we found that FkpA becomes a more efficient chaperone for OMPs under the heat shock condition, with increases in both binding rate and affinity. In light of these observations and earlier reports, we propose a temperature-responsive OMP biogenesis mechanism in which the degrees of functional importance of the three chaperones are such that SurA > Skp > FkpA at the normal temperature but FkpA ≥ SurA > Skp at the heat shock temperature. PMID:24272780

  14. Identity, Abundance, and Reactivation Kinetics of Thermophilic Fermentative Endospores in Cold Marine Sediment and Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Marta; Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Sichert, Andreas; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.

    2017-01-01

    Cold marine sediments harbor endospores of fermentative and sulfate-reducing, thermophilic bacteria. These dormant populations of endospores are believed to accumulate in the seabed via passive dispersal by ocean currents followed by sedimentation from the water column. However, the magnitude of this process is poorly understood because the endospores present in seawater were so far not identified, and only the abundance of thermophilic sulfate-reducing endospores in the seabed has been quantified. We investigated the distribution of thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) in water column and sediment of Aarhus Bay, Denmark, to test the role of suspended dispersal and determine the rate of endospore deposition and the endospore abundance in the sediment. We furthermore aimed to determine the time course of reactivation of the germinating TFEs. TFEs were induced to germinate and grow by incubating pasteurized sediment and water samples anaerobically at 50°C. We observed a sudden release of the endospore component dipicolinic acid immediately upon incubation suggesting fast endospore reactivation in response to heating. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and H2 began to accumulate exponentially after 3.5 h of incubation showing that reactivation was followed by a short phase of outgrowth before germinated cells began to divide. Thermophilic fermenters were mainly present in the sediment as endospores because the rate of VFA accumulation was identical in pasteurized and non-pasteurized samples. Germinating TFEs were identified taxonomically by reverse transcription, PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA. The water column and sediment shared the same phylotypes, thereby confirming the potential for seawater dispersal. The abundance of TFEs was estimated by most probable number enumeration, rates of VFA production, and released amounts of dipicolinic acid during germination. The surface sediment contained ∼105–106 inducible TFEs cm-3. TFEs thus outnumber

  15. Identity, Abundance, and Reactivation Kinetics of Thermophilic Fermentative Endospores in Cold Marine Sediment and Seawater.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Marta; Lomstein, Bente Aa; Sichert, Andreas; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2017-01-01

    Cold marine sediments harbor endospores of fermentative and sulfate-reducing, thermophilic bacteria. These dormant populations of endospores are believed to accumulate in the seabed via passive dispersal by ocean currents followed by sedimentation from the water column. However, the magnitude of this process is poorly understood because the endospores present in seawater were so far not identified, and only the abundance of thermophilic sulfate-reducing endospores in the seabed has been quantified. We investigated the distribution of thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) in water column and sediment of Aarhus Bay, Denmark, to test the role of suspended dispersal and determine the rate of endospore deposition and the endospore abundance in the sediment. We furthermore aimed to determine the time course of reactivation of the germinating TFEs. TFEs were induced to germinate and grow by incubating pasteurized sediment and water samples anaerobically at 50°C. We observed a sudden release of the endospore component dipicolinic acid immediately upon incubation suggesting fast endospore reactivation in response to heating. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and H2 began to accumulate exponentially after 3.5 h of incubation showing that reactivation was followed by a short phase of outgrowth before germinated cells began to divide. Thermophilic fermenters were mainly present in the sediment as endospores because the rate of VFA accumulation was identical in pasteurized and non-pasteurized samples. Germinating TFEs were identified taxonomically by reverse transcription, PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA. The water column and sediment shared the same phylotypes, thereby confirming the potential for seawater dispersal. The abundance of TFEs was estimated by most probable number enumeration, rates of VFA production, and released amounts of dipicolinic acid during germination. The surface sediment contained ∼10(5)-10(6) inducible TFEs cm(-3). TFEs thus outnumber

  16. Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianping; Baker, Alison; Bartel, Bonnie; Linka, Nicole; Mullen, Robert T.; Reumann, Sigrun; Zolman, Bethany K.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles that are highly dynamic both in morphology and metabolism. Plant peroxisomes are involved in numerous processes, including primary and secondary metabolism, development, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Considerable progress has been made in the identification of factors involved in peroxisomal biogenesis, revealing mechanisms that are both shared with and diverged from non-plant systems. Furthermore, recent advances have begun to reveal an unexpectedly large plant peroxisomal proteome and have increased our understanding of metabolic pathways in peroxisomes. Coordination of the biosynthesis, import, biochemical activity, and degradation of peroxisomal proteins allows for highly dynamic responses of peroxisomal metabolism to meet the needs of a plant. Knowledge gained from plant peroxisomal research will be instrumental to fully understanding the organelle’s dynamic behavior and defining peroxisomal metabolic networks, thus allowing the development of molecular strategies for rational engineering of plant metabolism, biomass production, stress tolerance, and pathogen defense. PMID:22669882

  17. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  18. Effects of Bacillus cereus Endospores on Free-Living Protist Growth.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Winding, Anne

    2017-04-01

    We studied the predator-prey interactions between heterotrophic protists and endospores of Bacillus cereus group bacteria, in order to gain insight on survival and dispersal of B. cereus endospores in the environment. It has been hypothesised that the spore stage protects against digestion by predating protists. Therefore, experiments were carried out to investigate the impact of B. cereus endospores and vegetative cells, as the only food source, on individual amoeboid, flagellated and ciliated protists. The presence of fluorescent-labelled intracellular bacteria confirmed that B. cereus endospores as well as vegetative cells were ingested by protists and appeared intact in the food vacuoles when observed by epifluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, protist growth and bacterial predation were followed by qPCR. Protists were able to grow on vegetative cells as well as endospores of B. cereus, despite the lower cell division rates observed for some protists when feeding on bacterial endospores. Survival and proliferation of ingested bacteria inside protists cells was also observed. Finally, B. cereus spore germination and growth was observed within all protists with higher abundance in the amoeboid protist after antibiotic treatment of the protist surface. These observations support that protists can act as a potential breeding ground for B. cereus endospores.

  19. Antibodies from Chicken Eggs as Probes for Antigens from Pasteuria penetrans Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. Y.; Charnecki, J.; Preston, J. F.; Dickson, D. W.; Rice, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The bacteria Pasteuria spp. have been identified as among the most promising of several microbial organisms currently under investigation as biological control agents of plant-parasitic nematodes. As part of our goal to develop methods to discriminate isolates of Pasteuria penetrans with different host preferences, we investigated the potential of developing antibody probes to identify endospores of different isolates of P. penetrans. Polyclonal IgY antibodies were raised in chickens against endospores of P. penetrans isolates P20 and P100. Hens were injected with P20 or P100 endospore suspensions and boosted at 14 days. Anti-spore titers were determined with ELISA on yolk extracts of individual eggs as a function of time. The highest titers were found in eggs produced at 22 to 35 days after initial injections. Yolk extracts showing the highest titers were combined and processed to provide partially purified IgY preparations. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses identified protein antigens with Mr values of 23-24, 46, and 57-59 KDa common to both P20 and P100 endospores. One protein antigen with an Mr value of 62 KDa was unique to the PI00 endospores. The IgY antibodies reduced the attachment of Pasteuria endospores to their nematode hosts, indicating antibody interaction with antigens on the endospore surface that are involved in the recognition and attachment processes. PMID:19274158

  20. In vitro studies on the mechanisms of endospore release by Rhinosporidium seeberi.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, L; Herr, R A; Arseculeratne, S N; Ajello, L

    1999-01-01

    Studies of Rhinosporidium seeberi have demonstrated that this organism has a complex life cycle in infected tissues. Its in vivo life cycle is initiated with the release of endospores into a host's tissues from its spherical sporangia. However, little is known about the mechanisms of sporangium formation and endospore release since this pathogen is intractable to culture. We have studied the in vitro mechanisms of endospore release from viable R. seeberi's sporangia. It was found that watery substances visibly stimulates the mature sporangia of R. seeberi to the point of endospore discharge. The internal rearrangement of the endospores within the mature sporangia, the opening of an apical pore in R. seeberi's cell wall, and the active release of the endospores were the main features of this process. Only one pore per sporangium was observed. The finding of early stages of pore development in juvenile and intermediate sporangia suggested that its formation is genetically programmed and that it is not a random process. The stimulation of R. seeberi's sporangia by water supports the epidemiological studies that had linked this pathogen with wet environments. It also explains, in part, its affinities for mucous membranes in infected hosts. The microscopic features of endospore discharge suggest a connection with organisms classified in the Kingdom Protoctista. This study strongly supports a recent finding that placed R. seeberi with organisms in the protoctistan Mesomycetozoa clade.

  1. Internal Hydration Properties of Single Bacterial Endospores Probed by Electrostatic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, Marc; Fabregas, Rene; Millan-Solsona, Ruben; Juarez, Antonio; Fumagalli, Laura; Gomila, Gabriel

    2016-12-27

    We show that the internal hydration properties of single Bacillus cereus endospores in air under different relative humidity (RH) conditions can be determined through the measurement of its electric permittivity by means of quantitative electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We show that an increase in the RH from 0% to 80% induces a large increase in the equivalent homogeneous relative electric permittivity of the bacterial endospores, from ∼4 up to ∼17, accompanied only by a small increase in the endospore height, of just a few nanometers. These results correlate the increase of the moisture content of the endospore with the corresponding increase of environmental RH. Three-dimensional finite element numerical calculations, which include the internal structure of the endospores, indicate that the moisture is mainly accumulated in the external layers of the endospore, hence preserving the core of the endospore at low hydration levels. This mechanism is different from what we observe for vegetative bacterial cells of the same species, in which the cell wall at high humid atmospheric conditions is not able to preserve the cytoplasmic region at low hydration levels. These results show the potential of quantitative EFM under environmental humidity control to study the hygroscopic properties of small-scale biological (and nonbiological) entities and to determine its internal hydration state. A better understanding of nanohygroscopic properties can be of relevance in the study of essential biological processes and in the design of bionanotechnological applications.

  2. Curli Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Michelle M.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Curli are the major proteinaceous component of a complex extra-cellular matrix produced by many Enterobacteriaceae. Curli were first discovered in the late 1980s on Escherichia coli strains that caused bovine mastitis, and have since been implicated in many physiological and pathogenic processes of E. coli and Salmonella spp. Curli fibers are involved in adhesion to surfaces, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. Curli also mediate host cell adhesion and invasion, and they are potent inducers of the host inflammatory response. The structure and biogenesis of curli are unique among bacterial fibers that have been described to date. Structurally and biochemically, curli belong to a growing class of fibers known as amyloids. Amyloid fiber formation is responsible for several human diseases including Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, although the process of in vivo amyloid formation is not well understood. Curli provide a unique system to study macromolecular assembly in bacteria and in vivo amyloid fiber formation. Here, we review curli biogenesis, regulation, role in biofilm formation, and role in pathogenesis. PMID:16704339

  3. Applications of a rapid endospore viability assay for monitoring UV inactivation and characterizing arctic ice cores.

    PubMed

    Shafaat, Hannah S; Ponce, Adrian

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a rapid endospore viability assay (EVA) in which endospore germination serves as an indicator for viability and applied it to (i) monitor UV inactivation of endospores as a function of dose and (ii) determine the proportion of viable endospores in arctic ice cores (Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 [GISP2] cores; 94 m). EVA is based on the detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA), which is released from endospores during germination. DPA concentrations were determined using the terbium ion (Tb3+)-DPA luminescence assay, and germination was induced by L-alanine addition. The concentrations of germinable endospores were determined by comparison to a standard curve. Parallel EVA and phase-contrast microscopy experiments to determine the percentage of germinable spores yielded comparable results (54.3% +/- 3.8% and 48.9% +/- 4.5%, respectively), while only 27.8% +/- 7.6% of spores produced CFU. EVA was applied to monitor the inactivation of spore suspensions as a function of UV dose, yielding reproducible correlations between EVA and CFU inactivation data. The 90% inactivation doses were 2,773 J/m2, 3,947 J/m2, and 1,322 J/m2 for EVA, phase-contrast microscopy, and CFU reduction, respectively. Finally, EVA was applied to quantify germinable and total endospore concentrations in two GISP2 ice cores. The first ice core contained 295 +/- 19 germinable spores/ml and 369 +/- 36 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 79.9% +/- 9.3%), and the second core contained 131 +/- 4 germinable spores/ml and 162 +/- 17 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 80.9% +/- 8.8%), whereas only 2 CFU/ml were detected by culturing.

  4. PRDE-1 is a nuclear factor essential for the biogenesis of Ruby motif-dependent piRNAs in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Weick, Eva-Maria; Sarkies, Peter; Silva, Nicola; Chen, Ron A; Moss, Sylviane M M; Cording, Amy C; Ahringer, Julie; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Miska, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNA) are small regulatory RNAs with essential roles in maintaining genome integrity in animals and protists. Most Caenorhabditis elegans piRNAs are transcribed from two genomic clusters that likely contain thousands of individual transcription units; however, their biogenesis is not understood. Here we identify and characterize prde-1 (piRNA silencing-defective) as the first essential C. elegans piRNA biogenesis gene. Analysis of prde-1 provides the first direct evidence that piRNA precursors are 28- to 29-nucleotide (nt) RNAs initiating 2 nt upstream of mature piRNAs. PRDE-1 is a nuclear germline-expressed protein that localizes to chromosome IV. PRDE-1 is required specifically for the production of piRNA precursors from genomic loci containing an 8-nt upstream motif, the Ruby motif. The expression of a second class of motif-independent piRNAs is unaffected in prde-1 mutants. We exploited this finding to determine the targets of the motif-independent class of piRNAs. Together, our data provide new insights into both the biogenesis and function of piRNAs in gene regulation.

  5. Endospore degradation in an oligosporogenic, crystalliferous mutant of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Martínez, Pável; Ibarra, Jorge E; de la Torre, Mayra; Olmedo, Gabriela

    2004-02-01

    We isolated a new oligosporogenic mutant from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD73 that retains the ability to produce insecticidal crystal inclusions. Sporulation in this mutant initiates in a manner similar to the wild-type strain, and under the electron microscope endospores are seen, but these do not reach maturity (except for 0.2% of them). At a late stage, the coat surrounding the forespore seems to lack shape and to be empty. Most mutant cells exhibit a well-formed bipyramidal crystal but are completely devoid of the forespore. The mutant has a functional SigK holoenzyme, which is required for the expression of genes involved in the formation of spore coat and cortex and for cry1A transcription from the BtII promoter. Defective maturation of spores could be due to an inadequate forespore coat or cortex structure resulting in the arrest of sporulation at late stage III or early stage IV.

  6. Poxvirus membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane.

  7. A Combination of Extreme Environmental Conditions Favor the Prevalence of Endospore-Forming Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Wunderlin, Tina; Junier, Thomas; Jeanneret, Nicole; Dorador, Cristina; Molina, Veronica; Johnson, David R; Junier, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions unsuitable for microbial growth are the rule rather than the exception in most habitats. In response to this, microorganisms have developed various strategies to withstand environmental conditions that limit active growth. Endospore-forming Firmicutes (EFF) deploy a myriad of survival strategies in order to resist adverse conditions. Like many bacterial groups, they can form biofilms and detect nutrient scarcity through chemotaxis. Moreover, within this paraphyletic group of Firmicutes, ecophysiological optima are diverse. Nonetheless, a response to adversity that delimits this group is the formation of wet-heat resistant spores. These strategies are energetically demanding and therefore might affect the biological success of EFF. Therefore, we hypothesize that abundance and diversity of EFF should be maximized in those environments in which the benefits of these survival strategies offsets the energetic cost. In order to address this hypothesis, geothermal and mineral springs and drillings were selected because in these environments of steep physicochemical gradients, diversified survival strategies may become a successful strategy.We collected 71 samples from geothermal and mineral environments characterized by none (null), single or multiple limiting environmental factors (temperature, pH, UV radiation, and specific mineral composition). To measure success, we quantified EFF gene copy numbers (GCN; spo0A gene) in relation to total bacterial GCN (16S rRNA gene), as well as the contribution of EFF to community composition. The quantification showed that relative GCN for EFF reached up to 20% at sites characterized by multiple limiting environmental factors, whereas it corresponded to less than 1% at sites with one or no limiting environmental factor. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene supports a higher contribution of EFF at sites with multiple limiting factors. Community composition suggested a combination of phylotypes for which active

  8. A Combination of Extreme Environmental Conditions Favor the Prevalence of Endospore-Forming Firmicutes

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Wunderlin, Tina; Junier, Thomas; Jeanneret, Nicole; Dorador, Cristina; Molina, Veronica; Johnson, David R.; Junier, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions unsuitable for microbial growth are the rule rather than the exception in most habitats. In response to this, microorganisms have developed various strategies to withstand environmental conditions that limit active growth. Endospore-forming Firmicutes (EFF) deploy a myriad of survival strategies in order to resist adverse conditions. Like many bacterial groups, they can form biofilms and detect nutrient scarcity through chemotaxis. Moreover, within this paraphyletic group of Firmicutes, ecophysiological optima are diverse. Nonetheless, a response to adversity that delimits this group is the formation of wet-heat resistant spores. These strategies are energetically demanding and therefore might affect the biological success of EFF. Therefore, we hypothesize that abundance and diversity of EFF should be maximized in those environments in which the benefits of these survival strategies offsets the energetic cost. In order to address this hypothesis, geothermal and mineral springs and drillings were selected because in these environments of steep physicochemical gradients, diversified survival strategies may become a successful strategy.We collected 71 samples from geothermal and mineral environments characterized by none (null), single or multiple limiting environmental factors (temperature, pH, UV radiation, and specific mineral composition). To measure success, we quantified EFF gene copy numbers (GCN; spo0A gene) in relation to total bacterial GCN (16S rRNA gene), as well as the contribution of EFF to community composition. The quantification showed that relative GCN for EFF reached up to 20% at sites characterized by multiple limiting environmental factors, whereas it corresponded to less than 1% at sites with one or no limiting environmental factor. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene supports a higher contribution of EFF at sites with multiple limiting factors. Community composition suggested a combination of phylotypes for which active

  9. The Circadian Clock Coordinates Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Symul, Laura; Martin, Eva; Atger, Florian; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23300384

  10. Viable endospores of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris in lake sediments as indicators of agricultural history.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, M; Renberg, I

    1990-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Thermoactinomyces form endospores with an extreme longevity in natural habitats. We isolated Thermoactinomyces sacchari from 9,000-year-old varved (annually laminated) sediment; thus, T. sacchari is probably one of the oldest known living organisms. More importantly, we tested and verified the hypothesis that there is a relationship between concentrations of dormant, viable endospores of T. vulgaris in lake sediments and the extent of agriculture in the catchments of the lakes. In surface sediments, low concentrations were recorded in forest lakes and the concentrations increased with increasing areas of cultivated land around the lakes. In varved sediment cores from three lakes, we found a temporal relationship between records of T. vulgaris endospores and the pollen of plants indicating agriculture. Endospores were very rare in sediments deposited before agriculture, ca. 1100 A.D. From then to between 1300 and 1700 A.D., a period with restricted cultivation, low but more regular rates of accumulation of endospores were recorded. High endospore accumulation rates were found with the subsequent agricultural expansion. This investigation confirms suggestions that this bacterium could be used as a paleoindicator for agricultural activity and be complementary to pollen analyses. Viable bacteria in continuous records of lake sediments are also potential material for evolutionary studies. PMID:2202253

  11. The Neurogenic Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor NeuroD6 Enhances Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Bioenergetics to Confer Tolerance of Neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 Cells to the Mitochondrial Stressor Rotenone

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. PMID:22814253

  12. Mitochondrial biogenesis in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Joel M

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by normal metabolic adaptation or injury has been clarified over the past decade. Mitochondrial biogenesis and its attendant processes enhance metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation and increase antioxidant defense mechanisms that ameliorate injury from aging, tissue hypoxia, and glucose or fatty acid overload, all of which contribute to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic kidney disease. There has been considerable interest in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in the kidney, which affect multiple processes in addition to mitochondrial biogenesis. As yet there is relatively little information focused specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis and its regulation by PPARγ coactivators and their modulators such as SIRT1. The available data indicate that these pathways will be fruitful areas for study in the modification of renal disease.

  13. Translational regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hong

    2016-12-15

    Mitochondria are generated by the expression of genes on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial biogenesis is highly plastic in response to cellular energy demand, developmental signals and environmental stimuli. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates mitochondrial biogenesis to co-ordinate energy homeostasis with cell growth. The local translation of mitochondrial proteins on the outer membrane facilitates their efficient import and thereby allows prodigious mitochondrial biogenesis during rapid cell growth and proliferation. We postulate that the local translation may also allow cells to promote mitochondrial biogenesis selectively based on the fitness of individual organelle. MDI-Larp complex promotes the biogenesis of healthy mitochondria and thereby is essential for the selective transmission of healthy mitochondria. On the other hand, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)-Pakin activates protein synthesis on damaged mitochondria to maintain the organelle homeostasis and activity. We also summarize some recent progress on miRNAs' regulation on mitochondrial biogenesis. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Shawn M.; Plummer, Ashlee M.; Fleming, Patrick J.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed “Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model” (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  15. Evaluation of high-intensity ultrasonication for the inactivation of endospores of 3 bacillus species in nonfat milk.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Som Nath; Anand, Sanjeev; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2014-10-01

    Endospores of Bacillus licheniformis [American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 6634], Bacillus coagulans (ATCC 12245), and Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 15952) were spiked in sterile nonfat milk, and subjected to high intensity batch ultrasonication treatment at different amplitudes (80 or 100%) and durations (1 to 10 min). Increasing the amplitude from 80 to 100% did not result in enhanced inactivation of G. stearothermophilus endospores. However, an increase in the duration of ultrasonication from 1 to 10 min significantly increased the inactivation of endospores of all 3 species. About 48.96% of the G. stearothermophilus endospores were inactivated by ultrasonication alone, whereas ultrasonication and pasteurization combined increased the inactivation to 65.74%. Inactivation of endospores could be further enhanced to 75.32% by ultrasonication and higher heat (80 °C/1 min) combination. Endospores of B. licheniformis and B. coagulans were inactivated to a lesser extent compared with G. stearothermophilus spores. Ultrasonicated B. licheniformis endospores germinated in higher numbers when compared with untreated endospores resulting in their greater inactivation during the combined treatment. During microstructure imaging of ultrasonicated endospores, although no structural damage was noticed, they showed irregular shrinkage and wrinkles with surface coarseness. This may also have contributed to their reduced thermal resistance, in addition to sporulation.

  16. The effects of biocides (antiseptics and disinfectants) on the endospores of Rhinosporidium seeberi.

    PubMed

    Arseculeratne, S N; Atapattu, D N; Balasooriya, P; Fernando, R

    2006-04-01

    No data exists on the activity of biocides (antiseptics and disinfectants) on Rhinosporidium seeberi that causes rhinosporidiosis in humans and animals. On account of the inability to culture R. seeberi, in vitro, dyes were used to assess the morphological integrity and viability of biocide-treated endospores that are considered to be the infective stage of this pathogen. Evan's Blue (EvB) identifies the morphological integrity of the endospores while MTT (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) identifies metabolic activity through its reduction by cellular dehydrogenases to microscopically visible deposits of insoluble formazan. MTT-negativity has earlier been shown to correlate with absence of growth of yeast and mycelial fungi in culture and could thus indicate the loss of viability of MTT-negative rhinosporidial endospores. Hydrogen peroxide, glutaraldehyde, chloroxylenol, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, thimerosal, 70% ethanol, iodine in 70% ethanol, 10% formalin, povidone-iodine, sodium azide and silver nitrate were tested on freshly-harvested endospores and all biocides caused metabolic inactivation with or without altered structural integrity as shown by absence of MTT-staining after 3, 24 or 36 hour after exposure, while EvB stained only the endospores treated with sodium azide, ethanol, thimerosal, chloroxylenol, glutaraldehyde and hydrogen peroxide. With clinically useful biocides - chlorhexidine, cetrimide-chlorhexidine, 70% ethanol, povidone-iodine and silver nitrate, a total period of exposure of endospores to the biocide, for seven minutes, produced metabolic inactivation of the endospores. Anti-rhinosporidial antiseptics that could be used in surgery on rhinosporidial patients include povidone-iodine in nasal packs for nasal and naso-pharyngeal surgery, chlorhexidine and cetrimide-chlorhexidine on the skin, while povidone-iodine and silver nitrate could have application in ocular rhinosporidiosis.

  17. The microRNA biogenesis machinery: regulation by steroid hormones and alterations in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Duarte, Ramiro José; Cázares-Ordoñez, Verna; Ávila-Chávez, Euclides

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The major proteins of the canonical microRNA biogenesis pathway in human are: Drosha, DGCR8, DDX5, DDX17, Exportin 5, Dicer and Argonaute 2. Recent studies suggest that gene expression of some canonical microRNA biogenesis components could be regulated by steroid hormones. Furthermore, various alterations in microRNA biogenesis have been associated with diseases like cancer. Due to the importance of microRNAs in cell physiology, the study of the factors that regulate or affect their biogenesis is critical.

  18. Etoposide Induces ATM-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis through AMPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yi Lisa; Liu, Leroy F.; Qi, Haiyan

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA damage such as double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) has been reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The major player in response to DSBs is ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Upon sensing DSBs, ATM is activated through autophosphorylation and phosphorylates a number of substrates for DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. ATM has been reported to phosphorylate the α subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which senses AMP/ATP ratio in cells, and can be activated by upstream kinases. Here we provide evidence for a novel role of ATM in mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation in response to etoposide-induced DNA damage. Methodology/Principal Findings Three pairs of human ATM+ and ATM- cells were employed. Cells treated with etoposide exhibited an ATM-dependent increase in mitochondrial mass as measured by 10-N-Nonyl-Acridine Orange and MitoTracker Green FM staining, as well as an increase in mitochondrial DNA content. In addition, the expression of several known mitochondrial biogenesis regulators such as the major mitochondrial transcription factor NRF-1, PGC-1α and TFAM was also elevated in response to etoposide treatment as monitored by RT-PCR. Three pieces of evidence suggest that etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis is due to ATM-dependent activation of AMPK. First, etoposide induced ATM-dependent phosphorylation of AMPK α subunit at Thr172, indicative of AMPK activation. Second, inhibition of AMPK blocked etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Third, activation of AMPK by AICAR (an AMP analogue) stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in an ATM-dependent manner, suggesting that ATM may be an upstream kinase of AMPK in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that activation of ATM by etoposide can lead to mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation. We propose that ATM-dependent mitochondrial

  19. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf) regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Rebecca A; Martínez-Zaguilán, Raul; Dertien, Janet S; Fulford, Candra; Foreman, Oded; Peiris, Vasum; Chilton, Beverly S

    2013-01-01

    HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum) brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05) - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15)) of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2) and lysyl (Plod2) collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3) for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2) for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps) was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and fragmented. Thus

  20. MicroRNA biogenesis pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuibin; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression. Amplification and overexpression of individual ‘oncomiRs’ or genetic loss of tumour suppressor miRNAs are associated with human cancer and are sufficient to drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. Furthermore, global miRNA depletion caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery is oncogenic. This, together with the recent identification of novel miRNA regulatory factors and pathways, highlights the importance of miRNA dysregulation in cancer. PMID:25998712

  1. Isolation of endophytic endospore-forming bacteria from Theobroma cacao as potential biological control agents of cacao dieseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endospore-forming bacterial endophytes were isolated from Theobroma cacao to access the present and diversity of endospore-forming bacteria in cacao. Cacao leaves, pods, branches, and flower cushions were removed from cacao trees escaping disease on INIAP’s Tropical Research Station in Pichilingue, ...

  2. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.

  3. Dispersal of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum endospores into Baltic Sea sediments over thousands of years

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Júlia Rosa; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Hubert, Casey R J; Finster, Kai; Loy, Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of microbial biogeography result from a combination of dispersal, speciation and extinction, yet individual contributions exerted by each of these mechanisms are difficult to isolate and distinguish. The influx of endospores of thermophilic microorganisms to cold marine sediments offers a natural model for investigating passive dispersal in the ocean. We investigated the activity, diversity and abundance of thermophilic endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Aarhus Bay by incubating pasteurized sediment between 28 and 85 °C, and by subsequent molecular diversity analyses of 16S rRNA and of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes within the endospore-forming SRB genus Desulfotomaculum. The thermophilic Desulfotomaculum community in Aarhus Bay sediments consisted of at least 23 species-level 16S rRNA sequence phylotypes. In two cases, pairs of identical 16S rRNA and dsrAB sequences in Arctic surface sediment 3000 km away showed that the same phylotypes are present in both locations. Radiotracer-enhanced most probable number analysis revealed that the abundance of endospores of thermophilic SRB in Aarhus Bay sediment was ca. 104 per cm3 at the surface and decreased exponentially to 100 per cm3 at 6.5 m depth, corresponding to 4500 years of sediment age. Thus, a half-life of ca. 300 years was estimated for the thermophilic SRB endospores deposited in Aarhus Bay sediments. These endospores were similarly detected in the overlying water column, indicative of passive dispersal in water masses preceding sedimentation. The sources of these thermophiles remain enigmatic, but at least one source may be common to both Aarhus Bay and Arctic sediments. PMID:22832348

  4. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    SciTech Connect

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien -Chi; Li, Po -E; Chain, Patrick S.; Junier, Pilar

    2015-04-25

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.

  5. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    DOE PAGES

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; ...

    2015-04-25

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methodsmore » of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.« less

  6. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E; Chain, Patrick S.; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches. PMID:25973144

  7. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-05-19

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m(1)acp(3)Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  9. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-01

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  10. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  11. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  12. Mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercises.

    PubMed

    Freyssenet, D; Berthon, P; Denis, C

    1996-01-01

    Repeated bouts of endurance exercise stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The synthesis of mitochondrial proteins involves a coordinated expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. During this process, multiples sites of regulation have been identified at the transcriptional and translational levels. After their synthesis, mitochondrial proteins originating from the nuclear genome are imported into newly synthesized preexisting membranes and directed to one of the four mitochondrial subcompartments. The detailed mechanisms of the endurance training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis are still poorly understood. In particular, much work is needed to identify the molecular signals able to stimulate and coordinate the expression of mitochondrial proteins in response to endurance training. This will be a great help in the future to understand clearly the intimate mechanisms of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and the factors involved in endurance exercise performance.

  13. Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus geothermalis Strain GSsed3, a Novel Thermophilic Endospore-Forming Species

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Jeanneret, Nicole; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Regenspurg, Simona; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Paul; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Anoxybacillus geothermalis strain GSsed3 is an endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium isolated from filter deposits in a geothermal site. This novel species has a larger genome size (7.2 Mb) than that of any other Anoxybacillus species, and it possesses genes that support its phenotypic metabolic characterization and suggest an intriguing link to metals. PMID:26067952

  14. A Monoclonal Antibody That Tracks Endospore Formation in the Microsporidium Nosema bombycis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong; Tao, Meiling; Ma, Fuping; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang; Wu, Zhengli

    2015-01-01

    Nosema bombycis, the first identified microsporidium, is a destructive pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori and causes severe worldwide economic losses in sericulture. Major microsporidian structural proteins, such as the spore wall protein (SWP), are known to be involved in host invasion. In this study, the reactivity of the monoclonal antibody 2B10 was tested against an endospore protein of N. bombycis with a molecular weight size at 50-kDa, using Western blotting. The antigen was purified after immunoprecipitation and was further identified as EOB13320 according to MALDI-TOF MS assay. We found that EOB13320 locates to the surface of the different developmental stages of the parasite, mostly the sporoblast stage and the mature spore after immunoelectron microscopy examination. EOB13320 was also widely distributed in the developing endospore, especially at the sporoblast stage. This endospore protein also accumulated in the cytoplasm of both the merogony and sporoblast stages. These results imply that EOB13320 detected by monoclonal antibody 2B10 is expressed throughout the life cycle of the parasite, notably during the stage when the endospore is formed, and that this protein is important for spore-coat formation and parasite maintenance. Our study could be instrumental in the understanding of spore wall formation and will help to gain greater insight into the biology of this parasite. PMID:25811182

  15. A monoclonal antibody that tracks endospore formation in the microsporidium Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Tao, Meiling; Ma, Fuping; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang; Wu, Zhengli

    2015-01-01

    Nosema bombycis, the first identified microsporidium, is a destructive pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori and causes severe worldwide economic losses in sericulture. Major microsporidian structural proteins, such as the spore wall protein (SWP), are known to be involved in host invasion. In this study, the reactivity of the monoclonal antibody 2B10 was tested against an endospore protein of N. bombycis with a molecular weight size at 50-kDa, using Western blotting. The antigen was purified after immunoprecipitation and was further identified as EOB13320 according to MALDI-TOF MS assay. We found that EOB13320 locates to the surface of the different developmental stages of the parasite, mostly the sporoblast stage and the mature spore after immunoelectron microscopy examination. EOB13320 was also widely distributed in the developing endospore, especially at the sporoblast stage. This endospore protein also accumulated in the cytoplasm of both the merogony and sporoblast stages. These results imply that EOB13320 detected by monoclonal antibody 2B10 is expressed throughout the life cycle of the parasite, notably during the stage when the endospore is formed, and that this protein is important for spore-coat formation and parasite maintenance. Our study could be instrumental in the understanding of spore wall formation and will help to gain greater insight into the biology of this parasite.

  16. The Absence of the Transcription Factor Yrr1p, Identified from Comparative Genome Profiling, Increased Vanillin Tolerance Due to Enhancements of ABC Transporters Expressing, rRNA Processing and Ribosome Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Shen, Yu; Bao, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inhibitors derived from lignocellulose is conducive to producing biofuel and chemicals using abundant lignocellulosic materials. Vanillin is a major type of phenolic inhibitor in lignocellulose hydrolysates for S. cerevisiae. In the present work, the factors beneficial to vanillin resistance in yeast were identified from the vanillin-resistant strain EMV-8, which was derived from strain NAN-27 by adaptive evolution. We found 450 SNPs and 44 genes with InDels in the vanillin-tolerant strain EMV-8 by comparing the genome sequences of EMV-8 and NAN-27. To investigate the effects of InDels, InDels were deleted in BY4741, respectively. We demonstrated that the deletion of YRR1 improved vanillin tolerance of strain. In the presence of 6 mM vanillin, deleting YRR1 increase the maximum specific growth rate and the vanillin consumption rate by 142 and 51%, respectively. The subsequent transcriptome analysis revealed that deleting YRR1 resulted in changed expression of over 200 genes in the presence of 5 mM vanillin. The most marked changes were the significant up-regulation of the dehydrogenase ADH7, several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, and dozens of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and rRNA processing. Coincidently, the crude enzyme solution of BY4741(yrr1Δ) exhibited higher NADPH-dependent vanillin reduction activity than control. In addition, overexpressing the ABC transporter genes PDR5, YOR1, and SNQ2, as well as the RNA helicase gene DBP2, increased the vanillin tolerance of strain. Interestingly, unlike the marked changes we mentioned above, under vanillin-free conditions, there are only limited transcriptional differences between wildtype and yrr1Δ. This indicated that vanillin might act as an effector in Yrr1p-related regulatory processes. The new findings of the relationship between YRR1 and vanillin tolerance, as well as the contribution of rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis to

  17. Minotaur is critical for primary piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vagin, Vasily V; Yu, Yang; Jankowska, Anna; Luo, Yicheng; Wasik, Kaja A; Malone, Colin D; Harrison, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam; Wakimoto, Barbara T; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    Piwi proteins and their associated small RNAs are essential for fertility in animals. In part, this is due to their roles in guarding germ cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence transposon targets and, as such, form a molecular code that discriminates transposons from endogenous genes. Information ultimately carried by piRNAs is encoded within genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters. These give rise to long, single-stranded, primary transcripts that are processed into piRNAs. Despite the biological importance of this pathway, neither the characteristics that define a locus as a source of piRNAs nor the mechanisms that catalyze primary piRNA biogenesis are well understood. We searched an EMS-mutant collection annotated for fertility phenotypes for genes involved in the piRNA pathway. Twenty-seven homozygous sterile strains showed transposon-silencing defects. One of these, which strongly impacted primary piRNA biogenesis, harbored a causal mutation in CG5508, a member of the Drosophila glycerol-3-phosphate O-acetyltransferase (GPAT) family. These enzymes catalyze the first acylation step on the path to the production of phosphatidic acid (PA). Though this pointed strongly to a function for phospholipid signaling in the piRNA pathway, a mutant form of CG5508, which lacks the GPAT active site, still functions in piRNA biogenesis. We have named this new biogenesis factor Minotaur.

  18. Minotaur is critical for primary piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vagin, Vasily V.; Yu, Yang; Jankowska, Anna; Luo, Yicheng; Wasik, Kaja A.; Malone, Colin D.; Harrison, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam; Wakimoto, Barbara T.; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Piwi proteins and their associated small RNAs are essential for fertility in animals. In part, this is due to their roles in guarding germ cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence transposon targets and, as such, form a molecular code that discriminates transposons from endogenous genes. Information ultimately carried by piRNAs is encoded within genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters. These give rise to long, single-stranded, primary transcripts that are processed into piRNAs. Despite the biological importance of this pathway, neither the characteristics that define a locus as a source of piRNAs nor the mechanisms that catalyze primary piRNA biogenesis are well understood. We searched an EMS-mutant collection annotated for fertility phenotypes for genes involved in the piRNA pathway. Twenty-seven homozygous sterile strains showed transposon-silencing defects. One of these, which strongly impacted primary piRNA biogenesis, harbored a causal mutation in CG5508, a member of the Drosophila glycerol-3-phosphate O-acetyltransferase (GPAT) family. These enzymes catalyze the first acylation step on the path to the production of phosphatidic acid (PA). Though this pointed strongly to a function for phospholipid signaling in the piRNA pathway, a mutant form of CG5508, which lacks the GPAT active site, still functions in piRNA biogenesis. We have named this new biogenesis factor Minotaur. PMID:23788724

  19. Mechanisms of organelle biogenesis govern stochastic fluctuations in organelle abundance.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Shankar; O'Shea, Erin K

    2014-06-10

    Fluctuations in organelle abundance can profoundly limit the precision of cell biological processes from secretion to metabolism. We modeled the dynamics of organelle biogenesis and predicted that organelle abundance fluctuations depend strongly on the specific mechanisms that increase or decrease the number of a given organelle. Our model exactly predicts the size of experimentally measured Golgi apparatus and vacuole abundance fluctuations, suggesting that cells tolerate the maximum level of variability generated by the Golgi and vacuole biogenesis pathways. We observe large increases in peroxisome abundance fluctuations when cells are transferred from glucose-rich to fatty acid-rich environments. These increased fluctuations are significantly diminished in mutants lacking peroxisome fission factors, leading us to infer that peroxisome biogenesis switches from de novo synthesis to primarily fission. Our work provides a general framework for exploring stochastic organelle biogenesis and using fluctuations to quantitatively unravel the biophysical pathways that control the abundance of subcellular structures.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02678.001. Copyright © 2014, Mukherji and O'Shea.

  20. Mechanisms of organelle biogenesis govern stochastic fluctuations in organelle abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mukherji, Shankar; O'Shea, Erin K

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in organelle abundance can profoundly limit the precision of cell biological processes from secretion to metabolism. We modeled the dynamics of organelle biogenesis and predicted that organelle abundance fluctuations depend strongly on the specific mechanisms that increase or decrease the number of a given organelle. Our model exactly predicts the size of experimentally measured Golgi apparatus and vacuole abundance fluctuations, suggesting that cells tolerate the maximum level of variability generated by the Golgi and vacuole biogenesis pathways. We observe large increases in peroxisome abundance fluctuations when cells are transferred from glucose-rich to fatty acid-rich environments. These increased fluctuations are significantly diminished in mutants lacking peroxisome fission factors, leading us to infer that peroxisome biogenesis switches from de novo synthesis to primarily fission. Our work provides a general framework for exploring stochastic organelle biogenesis and using fluctuations to quantitatively unravel the biophysical pathways that control the abundance of subcellular structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02678.001 PMID:24916159

  1. Centenarians maintain miRNA biogenesis pathway while it is impaired in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Borrás, C; Serna, E; Gambini, J; Inglés, M; Vina, J

    2017-07-25

    Centenarians but not octogenarians up regulate the expression of miRNAs, as we previously reported. We have looked into miRNA biogenesis. We show that RNA POL II, DROSHA, EXPORTIN 5 and DICER, are up-regulated in centenarians compared with octogenarians. Furthermore, factors involved in the control of these miRNAs biogenesis genes are also up-regulated in centenarians. Therefore, the up-regulation of miRNA expression in centenarians can be explained in part because miRNA biogenesis pathway is depressed in octogenarians (ordinary aging) while it is maintained in centenarians (extraordinary aging). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Current topics in bioenergetics: Structure, biogenesis, and assembly of energy transducing enzyme systems. Volume 15

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. The chapter titles are: Structure of NADH-Ubiquinone Reductase (Complex I); Structure of the Succinate-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Complex II); Structure of Mitochondrial Ubiquinol-Cytochrome-c Redutase (Complex III); Structure of Cytochrome-c Oxidase; Evolution of a Regulatory Enzyme: Cytochrome-c Oxidase (Complex IV); The Assembly of F/sub 1/F/sub 0/-ATPase in Escherichia coli; Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Energy Transducing Complexes; Biogenesis of Mammalian Mitochondria; Structure and Biogenesis of Chloroplast Coupling Factor (CF/sub 0/CF/sub 1/)-ATPase; Mitochondrial Gene Products; and Overview: Bioenergetics between Chemistry, Genetics, and Physics.

  3. Temporal Formation and Immunolocalization of an Endospore Surface Epitope During Pasteuria penetrans Sporogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. A.; Preston, J. F.; Dickson, D. W.; Giblin-Davis, R. M.; Williams, D. S.; Aldrich, H. C.; Rice, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis and localization of an endospore surface epitope associated with the development of Pasteuria penetrans was determined using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) as a probe. Nematodes, uninfected or infected with P. penetrans, were harvested at 12, 16, 24, and 38 days after inoculation (DAI) and then examined to determine the developmental stage of the bacterium. Vegetative growth of P. penetrans was observed only in infected nematodes harvested at 12 and 16 DAI, whereas cells at different stages of sporulation and mature endospores were observed at 24 and 38 DAI. ELISA and immunoblot analysis revealed that the adhesin-associated epitope was first detected at 24 DAI, and increased in the later stages of sporogenesis. These results indicate that the synthesis of adhesin-related proteins occurred at a certain developmental stage relative to the sporulation process, and was associated with endospore maturation. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that the distribution of the epitope is nearly uniform on the periphery of each spore, as defined by parasporal fibers. Immunocytochemistry at the ultrastructural level indicated a distribution of the epitope over the parasporal fibers. The epitope also was detected over other structures such as sporangium and exosporium during the sporogenesis process, but it was not observed over the cortex, inner-spore coat, outer-spore coat, or protoplasm. The appearance of the adhesin epitope first at stage III of sporogenesis and its presence on the parasporal fibers are consistent with an adhesin-related role in the attachment of the mature endospore to the cuticle of the nematode host. PMID:19262762

  4. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  5. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  6. Endospore surface properties of commonly used Bacillus anthracis surrogates vary in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    White, Colin P; Popovici, Jonathan; Lytle, Darren A; Rice, Eugene W

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic character and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microorganisms are vital aspects of understanding their interactions with the environment. These properties are fundamental in fate-and-transport, physiological, and virulence studies, and thus integral in surrogate selection. Hydrophobic and electrostatic forces are significant contributors to particle and microorganism mobility in the environment. Herein, the surface properties of commonly used Bacillus anthracis surrogate endospores were tested under comparable conditions with respect to culture, endospore purification, buffer type and strength. Additionally, data is presented of endospores suspended in dechlorinated tap water to evaluate the surrogates in regard to a breach of water infrastructure security. The surface properties of B. anthracis were found to be the most hydrophobic and least electronegative among the six Bacillus species tested across buffer strength. The effect of EPM on hydrophobicity varies in a species-specific manner. This study demonstrates that surrogate surface properties differ and care must be taken when choosing the most suitable surrogate. Moreover, it is shown that Bacillus thuringensis best represents Bacillus anthracis-Sterne with respect to both EPM and hydrophobicity across all test buffers.

  7. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  8. GC/MS method for positive detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Truong, Tai V; Bills, Teri M; Holt, Brian C; VanDerwerken, Douglas N; Williams, John R; Acharya, Abhilasha; Robison, Richard A; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2012-02-07

    A simple method was developed for detection of Bacillus anthracis (BA) endospores and for differentiation of them from other species in the Bacillus cereus group. Chemical profiles that include lipids (i.e., fatty acids), carbohydrates (i.e., sugars), and the spore-specific biomarker, dipicolinic acid, were generated by one-step thermochemolysis (TCM) at 140 °C in 5 min to provide specific biomarker signatures. Anthrose, which is a biomarker characteristic of the B. cereus group of bacteria, was determined from a fragment produced by TCM. Surprisingly, several virulent BA strains contained very low levels of anthrose, which confounded their detection. A statistical discrimination algorithm was constructed using a combination of biomarkers, which was robust against different growth conditions (medium and temperature). Fifteen endospore-forming Bacillus species were confirmed in a statistically designed test (~90%) using the algorithm, including six BA strains (four virulent isolates), five B. thuringiensis (BT) isolates, and one isolate each for B. cereus (BC), B. mycoides (BM), B. atrophaeus (BG), and B. subtilis (BS). The detection limit for B. anthracis was found to be 50,000 endospores, on the basis of the GC/MS detection limits for 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester, which is the biomarker derived from TCM of anthrose.

  9. Optimization of sporicidal activity and environmental Bacillus endospores decontamination by biogenic silver nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Ponnusamy M; Dhanasekaran, Dharumadhurai; Ranjani, Anandan; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Akbarsha, Mohamad A; Velmurugan, Meganathan; Panneerselvam, Annamalai

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this study is to decontaminate Bacillus endospores and to determine the D-values using silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized from Streptomyces sp. cell filtrate. AgNPs synthesis was performed extracellularly followed by characterization using spectrophotometer, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and x-ray diffraction pattern analysis. Subsequently, the optimized conditions for the decontamination and D-value estimation of Bacillus endospores were determined using the response surface methodology. The environmental spore decontamination study was performed in mice model. AgNPs were visibly and spectroscopically identified which were spherical with the size range of less than 20 nm. The synthesized AgNPs destroyed 1log10 CFU Bacillus endospores at around 20 min. The adherence of AgNPs to the surface of spore coat, pit formation and its complete structural loss was detected under field emission scanning electron microscopy. All the mice exposed to AgNP-treated spores showed no sign of pathological lesions. The results of our study strongly suggest that the application of AgNPs as a sporicidal agent could be a new approach in consistently eliminating the hazardous Bacillus spores.

  10. Endospore abundance, microbial growth and necromass turnover in deep sub-seafloor sediment.

    PubMed

    Lomstein, Bente Aa; Langerhuus, Alice T; D'Hondt, Steven; Jørgensen, Bo B; Spivack, Arthur J

    2012-03-18

    Two decades of scientific ocean drilling have demonstrated widespread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high microbial-cell numbers. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes and the low energy fluxes in this vast buried ecosystem are not yet understood. It is not known whether organisms of the deep biosphere are specifically adapted to extremely low energy fluxes or whether most of the observed cells are in a dormant, spore-like state. Here we apply a new approach--the D:L-amino-acid model--to quantify the distributions and turnover times of living microbial biomass, endospores and microbial necromass, as well as to determine their role in the sub-seafloor carbon budget. The approach combines sensitive analyses of unique bacterial markers (muramic acid and D-amino acids) and the bacterial endospore marker, dipicolinic acid, with racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids. Endospores are as abundant as vegetative cells and microbial activity is extremely low, leading to microbial biomass turnover times of hundreds to thousands of years. We infer from model calculations that biomass production is sustained by organic carbon deposited from the surface photosynthetic world millions of years ago and that microbial necromass is recycled over timescales of hundreds of thousands of years.

  11. Quantitative X-ray phase contrast waveguide imaging of bacterial endospores1

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Hoppert, M.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative waveguide-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been carried out on the level of single, unstained, unsliced and freeze-dried bacterial cells of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis using hard X-rays of 7.9 keV photon energy. The cells have been prepared in the metabolically dormant state of an endospore. The quantitative phase maps obtained by iterative phase retrieval using a modified hybrid input–output algorithm allow for mass and mass density determinations on the level of single individual endospores but include also large field of view investigations. Additionally, a direct reconstruction based on the contrast transfer function is investigated, and the two approaches are compared. Depending on the field of view and method, a resolution down to 65 nm was achieved at a maximum applied dose of below 5 × 105 Gy. Masses in the range of about ∼110–190 (20) fg for isolated endospores have been obtained. PMID:25844079

  12. Chloroplast RNA polymerases: Role in chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Thomas; Aleynikova, Anastasia Yu; Zubo, Yan O; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerase in angiosperms: the bacterial type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and one (RPOTp in monocots) or two (RPOTp and RPOTmp in dicots) nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase(s) (NEP). PEP is a bacterial-type multisubunit enzyme composed of core subunits (coded for by the plastid rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1 and rpoC2 genes) and additional protein factors (sigma factors and polymerase associated protein, PAPs) encoded in the nuclear genome. Sigma factors are required by PEP for promoter recognition. Six different sigma factors are used by PEP in Arabidopsis plastids. NEP activity is represented by phage-type RNA polymerases. Only one NEP subunit has been identified, which bears the catalytic activity. NEP and PEP use different promoters. Many plastid genes have both PEP and NEP promoters. PEP dominates in the transcription of photosynthesis genes. Intriguingly, rpoB belongs to the few genes transcribed exclusively by NEP. Both NEP and PEP are active in non-green plastids and in chloroplasts at all stages of development. The transcriptional activity of NEP and PEP is affected by endogenous and exogenous factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 subunit 1 (BLOS1) interacts with sorting nexin 2 and the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-I (ESCRT-I) component TSG101 to mediate the sorting of epidermal growth factor receptor into endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; He, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Lin; Woodman, Philip; Li, Wei

    2014-10-17

    Biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1) is a component of the molecular machinery required for the biogenesis of specialized organelles and lysosomal targeting of cargoes via the endosomal to lysosomal trafficking pathway. BLOS1, one subunit of BLOC-1, is implicated in lysosomal trafficking of membrane proteins. We found that the degradation and trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were delayed in BLOS1 knockdown cells, which were rescued through BLOS1 overexpression. A key feature to the delayed EGFR degradation is the accumulation of endolysosomes in BLOS1 knockdown cells or BLOS1 knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts. BLOS1 interacted with SNX2 (a retromer subunit) and TSG101 (an endosomal sorting complex required for transport subunit-I) to mediate EGFR lysosomal trafficking. These results suggest that coordination of the endolysosomal trafficking proteins is important for proper targeting of EGFR to lysosomes.

  14. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Primary mineral dissolution products, such as silica (Si), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), play an important role in numerous biologic and geochemical cycles including microbial metabolism, plant growth and secondary mineral precipitation. The flux of these and other dissolution products into the environment is largely controlled by the rate of primary silicate mineral dissolution. Bacteria, a ubiquitous component in water-rock systems, are known to facilitate mineral dissolution and may play a substantial role in determining the overall flux of dissolution products into the environment. Bacterial cell walls are complex and highly reactive organic surfaces that can affect mineral dissolution rates directly through microbe-mineral adsorption or indirectly by complexing dissolution products. The effect of bacterial surface adsorption on chemical weathering rates may even outweigh the influence of active processes in environments where a high proportion of cells are metabolically dormant or cell metabolism is slow. Complications associated with eliminating or accounting for ongoing metabolic processes in long-term dissolution studies have made it challenging to isolate the influence of cell wall interactions on mineral dissolution rates. We utilized Bacillus subtilis endospores, a robust and metabolically dormant cell type, to isolate and quantify the effects of bacterial surface reactivity on forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dissolution rates. We measured the influence of both direct and indirect microbe-mineral interactions on forsterite dissolution. Indirect pathways were isolated using dialysis tubing to prevent mineral-microbe contact while allowing free exchange of dissolved mineral products and endospore-ion adsorption. Homogenous experimental assays allowed both direct microbe-mineral and indirect microbe-ion interactions to affect forsterite dissolution rates. Dissolution rates were calculated based on silica concentrations and zero-order dissolution kinetics

  15. The SSU Processome in Ribosome Biogenesis – Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Kathleen R.; Charette, J. Michael; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The small subunit (SSU) processome is a 2.2 MDa ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing, assembly and maturation of the SSU of eukaryotic ribosomes. The identities of many of the factors involved in SSU biogenesis have been elucidated over the past 40 years. However, as our understanding increases, so do the number of questions about the nature of this complicated process. Cataloguing the components is the first step towards understanding the molecular workings of a system. This review will focus on how identifying components of ribosome biogenesis has led to the knowledge of how these factors, protein and RNA alike, associate with one another into sub-complexes, with a concentration on the small ribosomal subunit. We will also explore how this knowledge of sub-complex assembly has informed our understanding of the workings of the ribosome synthesis system as a whole. PMID:21318072

  16. Effects of nisin and reutericyclin on resistance of endospores of Clostridium spp. to heat and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Simmon; Gebhardt, David; Ho, Linda; Gänzle, Michael; McMullen, Lynn M

    2013-05-01

    The effects of high pressure, temperature, and antimicrobial compounds on endospores of Clostridium spp. were examined. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nisin and reutericyclin were determined for vegetative cells and endospores of Clostridium sporogenes ATCC 7955, Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 8260, and Clostridium difficile 3195. Endospores of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 and C. beijerinckii ATCC 8260 were exposed to 90 °C and 90 °C/600 MPa in the presence of 16 mg L(-1) nisin or 6.4 mg L(-1) reutericyclin for 0-60 min in a 0.9% saline solution. Dipicolinic acid (DPA) release was measured using a terbium-DPA fluorescence assay, and endospore permeability was assessed using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorescence. Vegetative cells of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 exhibited higher sensitivity to nisin relative to endospores, with MIC values 0.23 ± 0.084 mg L(-1) and 1.11 ± 0.48 mg L(-1), respectively. Nisin increased DPA release when endospores were treated at 90 °C; however, only C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 exhibited higher inactivation, suggesting strain or species specific effects. Reutericyclin did not enhance spore inactivation or DPA release. Use of nisin in combination with high pressure, thermal treatments enhanced inactivation of endospores of Clostridium spp. and may have application in foods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coordination of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis during ageing in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Lionaki, Eirini; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-05-28

    Impaired mitochondrial maintenance in disparate cell types is a shared hallmark of many human pathologies and ageing. How mitochondrial biogenesis coordinates with the removal of damaged or superfluous mitochondria to maintain cellular homeostasis is not well understood. Here we show that mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy targeting mitochondria for degradation, interfaces with mitochondrial biogenesis to regulate mitochondrial content and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that DCT-1 is a key mediator of mitophagy and longevity assurance under conditions of stress in C. elegans. Impairment of mitophagy compromises stress resistance and triggers mitochondrial retrograde signalling through the SKN-1 transcription factor that regulates both mitochondrial biogenesis genes and mitophagy by enhancing DCT-1 expression. Our findings reveal a homeostatic feedback loop that integrates metabolic signals to coordinate the biogenesis and turnover of mitochondria. Uncoupling of these two processes during ageing contributes to overproliferation of damaged mitochondria and decline of cellular function.

  18. Validation of a Clostridium Endospore Viability Assay and Analysis of Greenland Ices and Atacama Desert Soils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan-Wan; Ponce, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A microscopy-based endospore viability assay (micro-EVA) capable of enumerating germinable Clostridium endospores (GCEs) in less than 30 min has been validated and employed to determine GCE concentrations in Greenland ices and Atacama Desert soils. Inoculation onto agarose doped with Tb3+ and d-alanine triggers Clostridium spore germination and the concomitant release of ∼108 molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) per endospore, which, under pulsed UV excitation, enables enumeration of resultant green Tb3+-DPA luminescent spots as GCEs with time-gated luminescence microscopy. The intensity time courses of the luminescent spots were characteristic of stage I Clostridium spore germination dynamics. Micro-EVA was validated against traditional CFU cultivation from 0 to 1,000 total endospores/ml (i.e., phase-bright bodies/ml), yielding 56.4% ± 1.5% GCEs and 43.0% ± 1.0% CFU. We also show that d-alanine serves as a Clostridium-specific germinant (three species tested) that inhibits Bacillus germination of spores (five species tested) in that endospore concentration regime. Finally, GCE concentrations in Greenland ice cores and Atacama Desert soils were determined with micro-EVA, yielding 1 to 2 GCEs/ml of Greenland ice (versus <1 CFU/ml after 6 months of incubation) and 66 to 157 GCEs/g of Atacama Desert soil (versus 40 CFU/g soil). PMID:21296951

  19. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-09-18

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15 °C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly.

  20. New Insights on Thylakoid Biogenesis in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Olivier; Botella, César; Chevalier, Florian; Block, Maryse A; Jouhet, Juliette; Breton, Christelle; Girard-Egrot, Agnès; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic membranes, or thylakoids, are the most extensive membrane system found in the biosphere. They form flattened membrane cisternae in the cytosol of cyanobacteria and in the stroma of chloroplasts. The efficiency of light energy capture and conversion, critical for primary production in ecosystems, relies on the rapid expansion of thylakoids and their versatile reorganization in response to light changes. Thylakoid biogenesis results from the assembly of a lipid matrix combined with the incorporation of protein components. Four lipid classes are conserved from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts: mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and phosphatidyldiacylglycerol. This review focuses on the production and biophysical properties of galactolipids, making them determinant factors for the nonvesicular/nonlamellar biogenesis and for the three-dimensional architecture of nascent thylakoids. The regulation of MGD1, the committing enzyme of galactolipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, via feedback regulatory loops and control of protein binding to membranes, is also detailed.

  1. Multiple orphan histidine kinases interact directly with Spo0A to control the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Dago, Angel E.; Young, Danielle I.; Heap, John T.; Minton, Nigel P.; Hoch, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorylated Spo0A transcription factor controls the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, but genes encoding key phosphorelay components, Spo0F and Spo0B, are missing in the genome. We hypothesized that the five orphan histidine kinases of C. acetobutylicum interact directly with Spo0A to control its phosphorylation state. Sequential targeted gene disruption and gene expression profiling provided evidence for two pathways for Spo0A activation, one dependent on a histidine kinase encoded by cac0323, the other on both histidine kinases encoded by cac0903 and cac3319. Purified Cac0903 and Cac3319 kinases autophosphorylated and transferred phosphoryl groups to Spo0A in vitro, confirming their role in Spo0A activation in vivo. A cac0437 mutant hyper-sporulated, suggesting that Cac0437 is a modulator that prevents sporulation and maintains cellular Spo0A~P homeostasis during growth. Accordingly, Cac0437 has apparently lost the ability to autophosphorylate in vitro; instead it catalyses the ATP-dependent dephosphorylation of Spo0A~P releasing inorganic phosphate. Direct phosphorylation of Spo0A by histidine kinases and dephosphorylation by kinase-like proteins may be a common feature of the clostridia that may represent the ancestral state before the great oxygen event some 2.4 billion years ago, after which additional phosphorelay proteins were recruited in the evolutionary lineage that led to the bacilli. PMID:21401736

  2. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  3. The ribosome biogenesis factor yUtp23/hUTP23 coordinates key interactions in the yeast and human pre-40S particle and hUTP23 contains an essential PIN domain.

    PubMed

    Wells, Graeme R; Weichmann, Franziska; Sloan, Katherine E; Colvin, David; Watkins, Nicholas J; Schneider, Claudia

    2017-05-05

    Two proteins with PIN endonuclease domains, yUtp24(Fcf1)/hUTP24 and yUtp23/hUTP23 are essential for early pre-ribosomal (r)RNA cleavages at sites A0, A1/1 and A2/2a in yeast and humans. The yUtp24/hUTP24 PIN endonuclease is proposed to cleave at sites A1/1 and A2/2a, but the enzyme cleaving at site A0 is not known. Yeast yUtp23 contains a degenerate, non-essential PIN domain and functions together with the snR30 snoRNA, while human hUTP23 is associated with U17, the human snR30 counterpart. Using in vivo RNA-protein crosslinking and gel shift experiments, we reveal that yUtp23/hUTP23 makes direct contacts with expansion sequence 6 (ES6) in the 18S rRNA sequence and that yUtp23 interacts with the 3΄ half of the snR30 snoRNA. Protein-protein interaction studies further demonstrated that yeast yUtp23 and human hUTP23 directly interact with the H/ACA snoRNP protein yNhp2/hNHP2, the RNA helicase yRok1/hROK1(DDX52), the ribosome biogenesis factor yRrp7/hRRP7 and yUtp24/hUTP24. yUtp23/hUTP23 could therefore be central to the coordinated integration and release of ES6 binding factors and likely plays a pivotal role in remodeling this pre-rRNA region in both yeast and humans. Finally, studies using RNAi-rescue systems in human cells revealed that intact PIN domain and Zinc finger motifs in human hUTP23 are essential for 18S rRNA maturation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The ribosome biogenesis factor yUtp23/hUTP23 coordinates key interactions in the yeast and human pre-40S particle and hUTP23 contains an essential PIN domain

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Graeme R.; Weichmann, Franziska; Sloan, Katherine E.; Colvin, David; Watkins, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Two proteins with PIN endonuclease domains, yUtp24(Fcf1)/hUTP24 and yUtp23/hUTP23 are essential for early pre-ribosomal (r)RNA cleavages at sites A0, A1/1 and A2/2a in yeast and humans. The yUtp24/hUTP24 PIN endonuclease is proposed to cleave at sites A1/1 and A2/2a, but the enzyme cleaving at site A0 is not known. Yeast yUtp23 contains a degenerate, non-essential PIN domain and functions together with the snR30 snoRNA, while human hUTP23 is associated with U17, the human snR30 counterpart. Using in vivo RNA–protein crosslinking and gel shift experiments, we reveal that yUtp23/hUTP23 makes direct contacts with expansion sequence 6 (ES6) in the 18S rRNA sequence and that yUtp23 interacts with the 3΄ half of the snR30 snoRNA. Protein–protein interaction studies further demonstrated that yeast yUtp23 and human hUTP23 directly interact with the H/ACA snoRNP protein yNhp2/hNHP2, the RNA helicase yRok1/hROK1(DDX52), the ribosome biogenesis factor yRrp7/hRRP7 and yUtp24/hUTP24. yUtp23/hUTP23 could therefore be central to the coordinated integration and release of ES6 binding factors and likely plays a pivotal role in remodeling this pre-rRNA region in both yeast and humans. Finally, studies using RNAi-rescue systems in human cells revealed that intact PIN domain and Zinc finger motifs in human hUTP23 are essential for 18S rRNA maturation. PMID:28082392

  5. Heliophilum fasciatum gen. nov. sp. nov. and Heliobacterium gestii sp. nov.: endospore-forming heliobacteria from rice field soils.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, J G; Kimble, L K; Nesbakken, T; Torgersen, Y A; Woese, C R; Madigan, M T

    1996-04-01

    Two new taxa of phototrophic heliobacteria are described: Heliobacterium gestii sp. nov. and Heliophilum fasciatum gen. nov. sp. nov. Both organisms were isolated from dry paddy soils. Cells of H. gestii were motile spirilla; cells of H. fasciatum formed cell bundles that were motile as units. Both organisms produced endospores; H. gestii endospores contained dipicolinic acid and elevated levels of calcium. As with other heliobacteria, bacteriochlorophyll g was produced in both organisms and no intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membranes were observed. Growth of H. gestii and H. fasciatum occurred under both photoheterotrophic and chemotrophic conditions; nitrogen fixation also occurred in both organisms. H. gestii and H. fasciatium showed a phylogenetic relationship to the "low GC" line of gram-positive Bacteria, but H. fasciatum was distinct from H. gestii and all other heliobacteria. The ability of H. gestii and H. fasciatum to form endospores might be a significant ecological advantage for survival in their rice soil habitat.

  6. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a pr...

  7. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a pr...

  8. NAMPT regulates mitochondria biogenesis via NAD metabolism and calcium binding proteins during skeletal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Seok; Yoon, Chung-Su; Park, Dae Ryoung

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect that muscle contraction induced NAD metabolism via NAMPT has on mitochondrial biogenesis. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated from the gastrocnemius in C57BL/6 mice. The muscle cells were stimulated by electrical current at 1Hz for 3 minutes in conditions of normal or NAD metabolism related inhibitor treatment. NAD/NADH level, Sirt1 and mitochondria biogenesis related signal factor's changes were examined in normal or NAD metabolism related inhibitor treated cells. Electrical stimulation (ES) induced muscle contractions significantly increased NAD/NADH levels, NAMPT inhibitor FK-866 inhibited ES-induced NAD formation, which caused SIRT1 expression and PGC-1α deacetylation to decrease. Moreover, NAMPT inhibition decreased mitochondrial biogenesis related mRNA, COX-1 and Tfam levels. Along with AMPK inhibitor, compound C decreases SIRT1 expression, PGC-1α deacetylation and muscle contraction induced mitochondrial biogenesis related mRNA increment. These results indicated that the AMPK-NAMPT signal is a key player for muscle contraction induced SIRT1 expression and PGC-1α deacetylation, which influences mitochondrial biogenesis. Inhibition of the AMPK upregulator, Camkkβ, STO-609 decreased AMPK phosphorylation and SIRT1 expression but did not decrease PGC-1α deacetylation. However, CAMKII inhibition via AIP decreased PGC-1α deacetylation. In conclusion, the results indicate that NAMPT plays an important role in NAD metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is also controlled by different calcium binding protein signals including Camkkβ and CAMKII. [Keyword] Muscle contraction, NAD metabolism, SIRT1, PGC-1 α, mitochondria biogenesis.

  9. Multiple crosstalks between mRNA biogenesis and SUMO.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Jérôme O; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Palancade, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    mRNA metabolism involves the orchestration of multiple nuclear events, including transcription, processing (e.g., capping, splicing, polyadenylation), and quality control. This leads to the accurate formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) that are finally exported to the cytoplasm for translation. The production of defined sets of mRNAs in given environmental or physiological situations relies on multiple regulatory mechanisms that target the mRNA biogenesis machineries. Among other regulations, post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO, whose prominence in several cellular processes has been largely demonstrated, also plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. Analysis of the multiple available SUMO proteomes and functional validations of an increasing number of sumoylated targets have revealed the key contribution of SUMO-dependent regulation in nuclear mRNA metabolism. While sumoylation of transcriptional activators and repressors is so far best documented, SUMO contribution to other stages of mRNA biogenesis is also emerging. Modification of mRNA metabolism factors by SUMO determine their subnuclear targeting and biological activity, notably by regulating their molecular interactions with nucleic acids or protein partners. In particular, sumoylation of DNA-bound transcriptional regulators interfere with their association to target sequences or chromatin modifiers. In addition, the recent identification of enzymes of the SUMO pathway within specialized mRNA biogenesis machineries may provide a further level of regulation to their specificity. These multiple crosstalks between mRNA metabolism and SUMO appear therefore as important players in cellular regulatory networks.

  10. Utility of transplantation in studying adipocyte biogenesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiying

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis and metabolism. Two features distinguish adipose tissue from other organs - the ability to greatly expand its mass, via increases in cell size and/or number, and the wide anatomical distribution. While adipose tissue function is greatly affected by adipocyte size and anatomic location, regulations of adipocyte size, number, and body fat distribution are poorly understood. Transplantation of either mature adipose tissue or adipocyte progenitor cells has been used in studying adipocyte function and biogenesis. In this review, we will attempt to summarize methodological considerations for transplantation, including selections of donor material, transplantation site and the length of transplantation study, as well as effects of these factors and vascularization and innervation on the function of transplants. Specific studies are also reviewed to illustrate the utility of adipose tissue transplants in studying adipose tissue function and biogenesis. The focus is on studies in three areas: 1) use of transplants in demonstrating adipose tissue function, such as effects of adipose tissue transplants on metabolism and energy homeostasis of the recipient animals and depot-specific differences in adipose tissue function; 2) use of transplantation to dissect direct or cell-autonomous from indirect or non cell-autonomous effects of leptin signaling and sex on adipocyte size; 3) use of transplantation in the identification of adipocyte progenitor cells and lineage analysis. Finally, future applications of transplantation in studying depot-specific adipocyte biogenesis, and genetic and hormonal effects of sex and age on adipocyte biogenesis and function are discussed. PMID:19733623

  11. How is mitochondrial biogenesis affected in mitochondrial disease?

    PubMed

    Chabi, Beatrice; Adhihetty, Peter J; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Hood, David A

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs when the tissue energy demand is chronically increased to stress the ATP producing capacity of the preexisting mitochondria. In muscle, endurance training is a metabolic stress that is capable of inducing mitochondrial biogenesis, the consequence of which is improved performance during exercise. Expansion of the mitochondrial volume requires the coordinated response of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. During acute exercise, the initial signaling events are the perturbations in ATP turnover and calcium (Ca) concentrations caused by the contractile process. These alterations activate signal transduction pathways which target transcription factors involved in gene expression. Nuclear gene products are then posttranslationally imported into mitochondria. One of these, Tfam, is important for the regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression. In muscle, a broad range of mitochondrial-specific diseases due to mutations in nuclear DNA or mtDNA exist, termed mitochondrial myopathies. These mutations result in dysfunctional mitochondrial assembly which ultimately leads to reduced ATP production. Mitochondrial myopathy patients exhibit a variety of compensatory responses which attempt to reconcile this energy deficiency, but the extent and the type of compensatory adaptations are disease-specific. Understanding the role of exercise in mediating these compensatory responses leading to mitochondrial biogenesis could help us in prescribing exercise designed to improve mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial myopathies. In addition, numerous other diseases (e.g., neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes, and cardiomyopathies), as well as the aging process, have etiologies or consequences attributed, in part, to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, insight gained by investigating the steps involved in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis may help us to understand the underlying basis of these other disease states.

  12. Regulation of ribosome biogenesis in maize embryonic axes during germination.

    PubMed

    Villa-Hernández, J M; Dinkova, T D; Aguilar-Caballero, R; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Sánchez de Jiménez, E; Pérez-Flores, L J

    2013-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a pre-requisite for cell growth and proliferation; it is however, a highly regulated process that consumes a great quantity of energy. It requires the coordinated production of rRNA, ribosomal proteins and non-ribosomal factors which participate in the processing and mobilization of the new ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis has been studied in yeast and animals; however, there is little information about this process in plants. The objective of the present work was to study ribosome biogenesis in maize seeds during germination, a stage characterized for its fast growth, and the effect of insulin in this process. Insulin has been reported to accelerate germination and to induce seedling growth. It was observed that among the first events reactivated just after 3 h of imbibition are the rDNA transcription and the pre-rRNA processing and that insulin stimulates both of them (40-230%). The transcript of nucleolin, a protein which regulates rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing, is among the messages stored in quiescent dry seeds and it is mobilized into the polysomal fraction during the first hours of imbibition (6 h). In contrast, de novo ribosomal protein synthesis was low during the first hours of imbibition (3 and 6 h) increasing by 60 times in later stages (24 h). Insulin increased this synthesis (75%) at 24 h of imbibition; however, not all ribosomal proteins were similarly regulated. In this regard, an increase in RPS6 and RPL7 protein levels was observed, whereas RPL3 protein levels did not change even though its transcription was induced. Results show that ribosome biogenesis in the first stages of imbibition is carried out with newly synthesized rRNA and ribosomal proteins translated from stored mRNA.

  13. Biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Christopher; Clancy, James; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-08-05

    The ability of cells to transmit bioactive molecules to recipient cells and the extracellular environment is a fundamental requirement for both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. It has traditionally been thought that soluble factors released from cells were responsible for this cellular signaling but recent research has revealed a fundamental role for microvesicles in this process. Microvesicles are heterogeneous membrane-bound sacs that are shed from the surface of cells into the extracellular environment in a highly regulated process. They are shed following the selective incorporation of a host of molecular cargo including multiple types of proteins and nucleic acids. In addition to providing new insight into the etiology of complex human diseases, microvesicles also show great promise as a tool for advanced diagnosis and therapy as we move forward into a new age of personalized medicine. Here we review current status of the rapidly evolving field of microvesicle biology, highlighting critical regulatory roles for several small GTPases in the biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

  14. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes.

  15. Ribosome Biogenesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, John L.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  16. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  17. Comparison of pressure and heat resistance of Clostridium botulinum and other endospores in mashed carrots.

    PubMed

    Margosch, Dirk; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Gänzle, Michael G; Vogel, Rudi F

    2004-11-01

    Inactivation of bacterial endospores in food requires a combination of pressure and moderate heat. Endospore resistance of seven Clostridium botulinum strains was compared with those of Bacillus spp. (B. cereus, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. smithii, B. amyloliquefaciens) and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum with respect to pressure (600 to 800 MPa) and temperature (80 to 116 degrees C) treatments in mashed carrots. A large variation was observed in the pressure resistance of C. botulinum spores. Their reduction after treatments with 600 MPa at 80 degrees C for 1 s ranged from more than 5.5 log units to no reduction. Spores of the proteolytic C. botulinum TMW 2.357 exhibited a greater resistance to pressure than spores from all other bacteria examined, with the exception of B. amyloliquefaciens. Heat resistance of spores did not correlate with pressure resistance, either within strains of C. botulinum or when C. botulinum spores were compared with spores of T. thermosaccharolyticum. A quantitative release of dipicolinic acid was observed from C. botulinum spores on combined pressure and temperature treatments only after inactivation of more than 99.999% of the spores. Thus, dipicolinic acid is released by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process. The resistance of spores to combined pressure and temperature treatments correlated with their ability to retain dipicolinic acid. B. amyloliquefaciens, a mesophilic organism that forms highly pressure-resistant spores is proposed as a nonpathogenic target organism for high-pressure process development.

  18. Efficacy of using harmless Bacillus endospores to estimate the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Clifford, Eoghan; O'Reilly, Edmond; Rowan, Neil J

    2013-06-01

    The need to use complex in vitro cell culture, expensive equipment, and highly-trained technicians that are available only to specialist laboratories has significantly limited studies assessing the potential of pulsed UV light (PUV) to inactivate the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum in drinking water. This constitutes the first study to report on the use of different non-pathogenic Bacillus endospores as potential surrogate organisms to indicate the PUV inactivation performance of a C. parvum oocyst suspended in water. Findings showed that PUV effectively inactivated approximately 5 log10 CFU/ml Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus pumilus endospores suspended in water at a UV dose of 9.72 μJ/cm(2) that also inactivated statistically similar levels of C. parvum oocysts (P < 0.05), as determined by combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture and quantitative PCR. Specifically, this study demonstrated that B. megaterium exhibited greater or similar PUV-inactivation kinetic data compared to that of similarly treated C. parvum over the UV dose range 6.4 to 12.9 μJ/cm(2). Therefore, the former may be used as an indicator organism for safely investigating the PUV-inactivation performance of this chlorine-resistant, waterborne parasite at the waste-water treatment plant level. Findings presented will impact positively on future water quality studies and on public health.

  19. High pressure inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores in model emulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Juliane; Lenz, Christian A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E is a cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore-forming organism, primarily associated with aquatic environments. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing presents a promising tool to enhance food safety and stability. The effect of fat on HPT inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores was investigated using an emulsion model system. The distribution of spores in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and their HPT (300-750 MPa, 45-75 °C, 10 min) inactivation was determined as a function of emulsion fat content (30-70% (v/v) soybean oil in buffer). Approximately 26% and 74% of the spores were located at the oil-buffer interface and the continuous phase, respectively. Spore inactivation in emulsion systems decreased with increasing oil contents, which suggests that the fat content of food plays an important role in the protection of C. botulinum type E endospores against HPT treatments. These results can be helpful for future safety considerations. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  20. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  1. Mitochondrial biogenesis in plants during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon R; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria occupy a central role in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to being major sources of cellular energy, mitochondria are also involved in a diverse range of functions including signalling, the synthesis of many essential organic compounds and a role in programmed cell death. The active proliferation and differentiation of mitochondria is termed mitochondrial biogenesis and necessitates the coordinated communication of mitochondrial status within an integrated cellular network. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis have been defined previously, the growth and division model and the maturation model. The former describes the growth and division of pre-existing mature organelles through a form of binary fission, while the latter describes the propagation of mitochondria from structurally and biochemically simple promitochondrial structures that upon appropriate stimuli, mature into fully functional mitochondria. In the last decade, a number of studies have utilised seed germination in plants as a platform for the examination of the processes occurring during mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies have revealed many new aspects of the tightly regulated procession of events that define mitochondrial biogenesis during this period of rapid development. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis that supports the maturation of mitochondria from promitochondrial structures has emerged, where mitochondrial signalling plays a crucial role in the early steps of seed germination.

  2. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  3. Isolation and identification of amylase-producing, endospore-forming bacteria from the alimentary tract of commercially processed broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cultures of crop and cecal contents of adult poultry contain beneficial bacteria that reduce colonization of young poultry by Salmonella. Since endospore-forming bacteria may play a role in competitive exclusion of Salmonella in poultry, 3 trials were conducted to isolate these bacteria fr...

  4. Endospore production allows using spray-drying as a possible formulation system of the biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis CPA-8.

    PubMed

    Yánez-Mendizabal, V; Viñas, I; Usall, J; Cañamás, T; Teixidó, N

    2012-04-01

    The role of endospore production by Bacillus subtilis CPA-8 on survival during spray-drying was investigated by comparison with a non-spore-forming biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2. Endospore formation promoted heat resistance in CPA-8 depending on growth time (72 h cultures were more resistant than 24 h ones). The survival of CPA-8 and CPA-2 after spray-drying was determined after being grown in optimised media for 24 and 72 h. Spray-dried 72 h CPA-8 had the best survival (32%), while CPA-2 viability was less than 2%. CPA-8 survival directly related with its ability to produce endospores. Spray-dried CPA-8 reduced Monilinia fructicola conidia germination similarly to fresh cells, demonstrating that spray-drying did not adversely affect biocontrol efficacy. Endospore production thus improves CPA-8 resistance to spray-drying. These results can provide a reliable basis for optimising of the spray-drying formulation process for CPA-8 and other microorganisms.

  5. CsfG, a sporulation-specific, small non-coding RNA highly conserved in endospore formers.

    PubMed

    Marchais, Antonin; Duperrier, Sandra; Durand, Sylvain; Gautheret, Daniel; Stragier, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Endospore formation is a characteristic shared by some Bacilli and Clostridia that involves the creation of two cell types, the forespore and the mother cell. Hundreds of protein-encoding genes have been shown to be transcribed in a cell-specific fashion during this developmental process in Bacillus subtilis. We have used a phylogenetic profiling procedure to identify clusters of B. subtilis coding and non-coding sequences that co-occur in other endospore formers. One such cluster shows a strong bias for sporulation-related genes (42 % among 156 genes) and is enriched in potential non-coding RNAs. We have studied one RNA candidate, encoded in the ylbG-ylbH interval. In vivo analysis using a transcriptional fusion to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene demonstrates that this region of the chromosome contains a gene, csfG, encoding a 147-nucleotide RNA that is transcribed only during sporulation, specifically in the forespore. csfG is present in many endospore formers, mostly Bacilli and some Clostridia, whereas it is absent from bacteria that do not produce endospores. All CsfG RNAs contain a strongly conserved, pyrimidine-rich, central motif that overlaps a potential stem-loop structure. The remarkable conservation of this sequence in widely divergent bacteria suggests that it plays a conserved physiological role, presumably by interacting with an unidentified target in the forespore, where it contributes to the acquisition of the spore properties. © 2011 Landes Bioscience

  6. CsfG, a sporulation-specific, small non-coding RNA highly conserved in endospore formers

    PubMed Central

    Marchais, Antonin; Duperrier, Sandra; Durand, Sylvain; Gautheret, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Endospore formation is a characteristic shared by some Bacilli and Clostridia that involves the creation of two cell types, the forespore and the mother cell. Hundreds of protein-encoding genes have been shown to be transcribed in a cell-specific fashion during this developmental process in Bacillus subtilis. We have used a phylogenetic profiling procedure to identify clusters of B. subtilis coding and non-coding sequences that co-occur in other endospore formers. One such cluster shows a strong bias for sporulation-related genes (42% among 156 genes) and is enriched in potential non-coding RNAs. We have studied one RNA candidate, encoded in the ylbG-ylbH interval. In vivo analysis using a transcriptional fusion to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene demonstrates that this region of the chromosome contains a gene, csfG, encoding a 147-nucleotide RNA that is transcribed only during sporulation, specifically in the forespore. csfG is present in many endospore formers, mostly Bacilli and some Clostridia, whereas it is absent from bacteria that do not produce endospores. All CsfG RNAs contain a strongly conserved, pyrimidine-rich, central motif that overlaps a potential stem-loop structure. The remarkable conservation of this sequence in widely divergent bacteria suggests that it plays a conserved physiological role, presumably by interacting with an unidentified target in the forespore, where it contributes to the acquisition of the spore properties. PMID:21532344

  7. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. PMID:26316637

  8. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  9. Laser induced fluorescence lifetime characterization of Bacillus endospore species using time correlated single photon counting analysis with the multi-exponential fit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint; Edwards, Jarrod; Fisher, Andmorgan

    2010-04-01

    Rapid detection of biological material is critical for determining presence/absence of bacterial endospores within various investigative programs. Even more critical is that if select material tests positive for bacillus endospores then tests should provide data at the species level. Optical detection of microbial endospore formers such as Bacillus sp. can be heavy, cumbersome, and may only identify at the genus level. Data provided from this study will aid in characterization needed by future detection systems for further rapid breakdown analysis to gain insight into a more positive signature collection of Bacillus sp. Literature has shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of endospores could be statistically separated from other vegetative genera, but could not be separated among one another. Results of this study showed endospore species separation is possible using laser-induce fluorescence with lifetime decay analysis for Bacillus endospores. Lifetime decays of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, and B. anthracis Sterne strain were investigated. Using the Multi-Exponential fit method data showed three distinct lifetimes for each species within the following ranges, 0.2-1.3 ns; 2.5-7.0 ns; 7.5-15.0 ns, when laser induced at 307 nm. The four endospore species were individually separated using principle component analysis (95% CI).

  10. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Laura A; Rhodes, Eric R; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Ryu, Jongseong; Popovici, Jonathan; Hoelle, Jill M; Sivaganesan, Mano; Hayes, Samuel L; Rodgers, Mark R; Ryu, Hodon

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate for human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a propagation method that utilizes a commercially available medium to produce UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores with a consistent UV sensitivity. It is further demonstrated that the endospores of B. pumilus strain (ATCC 27142), produced using this protocol (half strength Columbia broth, 5 days incubation, with 0.1mM MnSO4), display a UV dose-response that is similar to that of HAdV. Endospore stocks could be stored in ethanol for up to two months at 4 °C without a significant change in UV sensitivity. Synergistic endospore damage was observed by pre-heat treatment of water samples followed by UV irradiation. UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores are a potential surrogate of HAdV for UV treatment performance tests in water utilities which do not have in-house research virology laboratories.

  11. Biogenesis of endosome-derived transport carriers.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard J; Harrison, Megan S; Burd, Christopher G

    2015-09-01

    Sorting of macromolecules within the endosomal system is vital for physiological control of nutrient homeostasis, cell motility, and proteostasis. Trafficking routes that export macromolecules from the endosome via vesicle and tubule transport carriers constitute plasma membrane recycling and retrograde endosome-to-Golgi pathways. Proteins of the sorting nexin family have been discovered to function at nearly every step of endosomal transport carrier biogenesis and it is becoming increasingly clear that they form the core machineries of cargo-specific transport pathways that are closely integrated with cellular physiology. Here, we summarize recent progress in elucidating the pathways that mediate the biogenesis of endosome-derived transport carriers.

  12. Effects of proton beam irradiation on mitochondrial biogenesis in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Jung, Sung Suk; Shon, Yun Hee

    2017-09-01

    Proton beam therapy has recently been used to improve local control of tumor growth and reduce side-effects by decreasing the global dose to normal tissue. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying the physiological role of proton beam radiation are not well understood, and many studies are still being conducted regarding these mechanisms. To determine the effects of proton beams on mitochondrial biogenesis, we investigated: mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mass; the gene expression of mitochondrial transcription factors, functional regulators, and dynamic-related regulators; and the phosphorylation of the signaling molecules that participate in mitochondrial biogenesis. Both the mtDNA/nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio and the mitochondria staining assays showed that proton beam irradiation increases mitochondrial biogenesis in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced aggressive HT-29 cells. Simultaneously, proton beam irradiation increases the gene expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors PGC-1α, NRF1, ERRα, and mtTFA, the dynamic regulators DRP1, OPA1, TIMM44, and TOM40, and the functional regulators CytC, ATP5B and CPT1-α. Furthermore, proton beam irradiation increases the phosphorylation of AMPK, an important molecule involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that is an energy sensor and is regulated by the AMP/ATP ratio. Based on these findings, we suggest that proton beam irradiation inhibits metastatic potential by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function in TPA-induced aggressive HT-29 cells.

  13. Survival of Bacillus subtilis endospores on ultraviolet-irradiated rover wheels and Mars regolith under simulated Martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Kerney, Krystal R; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2011-06-01

    Endospores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 were applied to a simulated Mars Exploration Rover (MER) wheel and exposed to Mars-normal UV irradiation for 1, 3, or 6 h. The experiment was designed to simulate a contaminated rover wheel sitting on its landing platform before rolling off onto the martian terrain, as was encountered during the Spirit and Opportunity missions. When exposed to 1 h of Mars UV, a reduction of 81% of viable endospores was observed compared to the non-UV irradiated controls. When exposed for 3 or 6 h, reductions of 94.6% and 96.6%, respectively, were observed compared to controls. In a second experiment, the contaminated rover wheel was rolled over a bed of heat-sterilized Mars analog soil; then the analog soil was exposed to full martian conditions of UV irradiation, low pressure (6.9 mbar), low temperature (-10°C), and an anaerobic CO(2) martian atmosphere for 24 h to determine whether endospores of B. subtilis on the contaminated rover wheel could be transferred to the surface of the analog soil and survive martian conditions. The experiment simulated conditions in which a rover wheel might come into contact with martian regolith immediately after landing, such as is designed for the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The contaminated rover wheel transferred viable endospores of B. subtilis to the Mars analog soil, as demonstrated by 31.7% of samples showing positive growth. However, when contaminated soil samples were exposed to full martian conditions for 24 h, only 16.7% of samples exhibited positive growth-a 50% reduction in the number of soil samples positive for the transferred viable endospores.

  14. Fast and effective inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus endospores using light-activated derivatives of vitamin B2.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Anja; Gollmer, Anita; Späth, Andreas; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Regensburger, Johannes; König, Burkhard; Maisch, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Highly resistant endospores may cause severe problems in medicine as well as in the food and packaging industries. We found that bacterial endospores can be inactivated quickly with reactive oxygen species (ROS) that were generated by a new generation of flavin photosensitizers. Flavins like the natural compound vitamin B2 are already known to produce ROS but they show a poor antimicrobial photodynamic killing efficacy due to the lack of positive charges. Therefore we synthesized new flavin photosensitizers that have one (FLASH-01a) or eight (FLASH-07a) positive charges and can hence attach to the negatively charged surface of endospores. In this study we used standardized Bacillus atrophaeus endospores (ATCC 9372) as a biological surrogate model for a proof-of-concept study of photodynamic inactivation experiments using FLASH-01a and FLASH-07a. After incubation of spores with different flavin concentrations, the flavin derivatives were excited with blue light at a light dose of 70 J cm(-2). The inactivation of spores was investigated either in suspension or after attachment to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. Incubation of spores suspended in Millipore water with 4 mM FLASH-01a for 10 seconds and irradiation with blue light for 10 seconds caused a biologically relevant decrease of spore survival of 3.5 log10 orders. Using FLASH-07a under the same conditions we achieved a decrease of 4.4 log10 orders. Immobilized spores on PET surfaces were efficiently killed with 7.0 log10 orders using 8 mM FLASH-07a. The total treatment time (incubation + irradiation) was as short as 20 seconds. The results of this study show evidence that endospores can be fastly and effectively inactivated with new generations of flavin photosensitizers that may be useful for industrial or medical applications in the future.

  15. Autophagy plays a role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in an endurance exercise-trained condition.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jeong-Sun; Jeon, Sei-Il; Park, Je-Young; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Ki-Jung; Jeong, Jong-Moon

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is tightly regulated by two major processes: mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial degradation by autophagy (mitophagy). Research in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training has been well established, while the mechanisms regulating mitophagy and the interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation following endurance exercise training are not yet well defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term inhibition of autophagy in response to acute endurance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in an exercise-trained condition. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice performed five daily bouts of 1-h swimming per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure autophagy flux in mouse skeletal muscle, mice were treated with or without 2 days of 0.4 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal colchicine (blocking the degradation of autophagosomes) following swimming exercise training. The autophagic flux assay demonstrated that swimming training resulted in an increase in the autophagic flux (~100 % increase in LC3-II) in mouse skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial fusion proteins, Opa1 and MFN2, were significantly elevated, and mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, was also increased in trained mouse skeletal muscle, suggesting that endurance exercise training promotes both mitochondrial fusion and fission processes. A mitochondrial receptor, Bnip3, was further increased in exercised muscle when treated with colchicine while Pink/Parkin protein levels were unchanged. The endurance exercise training induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis marker proteins, SDH, COX IV, and a mitochondrial biogenesis promoting factor, PGC-1α but this effect was abolished in colchicine-treated mouse skeletal muscle. This suggests that autophagy plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and this coordination between these opposing processes is involved in the cellular

  16. Resistance of bacterial endospores to outer space for planetary protection purposes--experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Nicholson, Wayne L; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the "trip to Mars" spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the "stay on Mars" spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the "trip to Mars" or "stay on Mars" spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations.

  17. Resistance of Bacterial Endospores to Outer Space for Planetary Protection Purposes—Experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the “trip to Mars” spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the “stay on Mars” spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the “trip to Mars” or “stay on Mars” spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations. Key Words: Planetary protection—Bacterial spores—Space experiment—Simulated Mars mission. Astrobiology 12, 445–456. PMID:22680691

  18. Role of pigmentation in protecting Bacillus sp. endospores against environmental UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Facius, Rainer; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus endospores show different kinds of pigmentation. Red-pigmented spores of Bacillus atrophaeus DSM 675, dark-gray spores of B. atrophaeus(T) DSM 7264 and light-gray spores of B. subtilis DSM 5611 were used to study the protective role of the pigments in their resistance to defined ranges of environmental UV radiation. Spores of B. atrophaeus DSM 675 possessing a dark-red pigment were 10 times more resistant to UV-A radiation than those of the other two investigated strains, whereas the responses to the more energetic UV-B and UV-C radiation were identical in all three strains. The methanol fraction of the extracted pigment from the spores absorbs in the associated wavelength area. These results indicate that the carotene-like pigment of spores of B. atrophaeus DSM 675 affects the resistance of spores to environmental UV-A radiation.

  19. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression by exercise.

    PubMed

    Holloszy, John O

    2011-04-01

    Endurance exercise training can induce large increases mitochondria and the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. For a long time after the discovery in the 1960s that exercise results in an increase in muscle mitochondria, there was no progress in elucidation of the mechanisms involved. The reason for this lack of progress was that nothing was known regarding how expression of the genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins is coordinately regulated. This situation changed rapidly after discovery of transcription factors that control transcription of genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins and, most importantly, the discovery of peroxisome proliferator-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). This transcription coactivator binds to and activates transcription factors that regulate transcription of genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins. Thus, PGC-1α activates and coordinates mitochondrial biogenesis. It is now known that exercise rapidly activates and induces increased expression of PGC-1α. The exercise-generated signals that lead to PGC-1α activation and increased expression are the increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and decreases in ATP and creatine phosphate (∼P). Ca(2+) mediates its effect by activating CAMKII, while the decrease in ∼P mediates its effect via activation of AMPK. Expression of the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter is regulated in parallel with mitochondrial biogenesis via the same signaling pathways. This review describes what is known regarding the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression by exercise. A major component of this review deals with the physiological and metabolic consequences of the exercise-induced increase in mitochondria and GLUT4. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:699-729, 2011.

  20. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Christian A.; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores. We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near) isothermal HPT treatments at 300–1200 MPa at 30–75°C for 1 s to 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone), large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated) or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer) spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed first order kinetics. Dipicolinic acid release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective) physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced) germination at ≤450 MPa/≤45°C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60–70°C. Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores compared with the resistance of spores from other C. botulinum types could allow for the implementation of

  1. Validation of a Rapid Bacteria Endospore Enumeration System for Planetary Protection Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Kern, Roger; Kazarians, Gayane; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    NASA monitors spacecraft surfaces to assure that the presence of bacterial endospores meets strict criteria at launch, to minimize the risk of inadvertent contamination of the surface of Mars. Currently, the only approved method for enumerating the spores is a culture based assay that requires three days to produce results. In order to meet the demanding schedules of spacecraft assembly, a more rapid spore detection assay is being considered as an alternate method to the NASA standard culture-based assay. The Millipore Rapid Microbiology Detection System (RMDS) has been used successfully for rapid bioburden enumeration in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The RMDS is rapid and simple, shows high sensitivity (to 1 colony forming unit [CFU]/sample), and correlates well with traditional culture-based methods. It combines membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and image analysis based on photon detection with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera. In this study, we have optimized the assay conditions and evaluated the use of the RMDS as a rapid spore detection tool for NASA applications. In order to select for spores, the samples were subjected to a heat shock step before proceeding with the RMDS incubation protocol. Seven species of Bacillus (nine strains) that have been repeatedly isolated from clean room environments were assayed. All strains were detected by the RMDS in 5 hours and these assay times were repeatedly demonstrated along with low image background noise. Validation experiments to compare the Rapid Sore Assay (RSA) and NASA standard assay (NSA) were also performed. The evaluation criteria were modeled after the FDA Guideline of Process Validation, and Analytical Test Methods. This body of research demonstrates that the Rapid Spore Assay (RSA) is quick, and of equivalent sensitivity to the NASA standard assay, potentially reducing the assay time for bacterial endospores from over 72 hours to less than 8 hours

  2. The Enzyme-Mediated Direct Reversal of a Dithymine Photoproduct in Germinating Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct, or SP, in germinating endospores. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damaging product found in endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. Early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair SP in the absence of light. Recently, it has been established that SPL belongs to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily utilize a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to reductively cleave its C5′-S bond, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. The H atom donor is suggested to be a conserved cysteine141 in B. subtilis SPL; the resulting thiyl radical likely interacts with a neighboring tyrosine99 before oxidizing the 5′-dA to 5′-dA radical and, subsequently, regenerating SAM. These findings suggest SPL to be the first enzyme in the large radical SAM superfamily (>44,000 members) to utilize a radical transfer pathway for catalysis; its study should shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the SAM regeneration process in other members of the superfamily. PMID:23799365

  3. Quantification of Endospore-Forming Firmicutes by Quantitative PCR with the Functional Gene spo0A

    PubMed Central

    Bueche, Matthieu; Wunderlin, Tina; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Junier, Thomas; Sauvain, Loic; Jeanneret, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endospores are highly specialized cellular forms that allow endospore-forming Firmicutes (EFF) to tolerate harsh environmental conditions. EFF are considered ubiquitous in natural environments, in particular, those subjected to stress conditions. In addition to natural habitats, EFF are often the cause of contamination problems in anthropogenic environments, such as industrial production plants or hospitals. It is therefore desirable to assess their prevalence in environmental and industrial fields. To this end, a high-sensitivity detection method is still needed. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an approach based on quantitative PCR (qPCR). For this, the suitability of functional genes specific for and common to all EFF were evaluated. Seven genes were considered, but only spo0A was retained to identify conserved regions for qPCR primer design. An approach based on multivariate analysis was developed for primer design. Two primer sets were obtained and evaluated with 16 pure cultures, including representatives of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, Sulfobacillus, Clostridium, and Desulfotomaculum, as well as with environmental samples. The primer sets developed gave a reliable quantification when tested on laboratory strains, with the exception of Sulfobacillus and Desulfotomaculum. A test using sediment samples with a diverse EFF community also gave a reliable quantification compared to 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. A detection limit of about 104 cells (or spores) per gram of initial material was calculated, indicating this method has a promising potential for the detection of EFF over a wide range of applications. PMID:23811505

  4. Acute and chronic mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency differentially regulate lysosomal biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mosquera, Lorena; Diogo, Cátia V.; Yambire, King Faisal; Santos, Gabriela L.; Luna Sánchez, Marta; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Lopez, Luis Carlos; Milosevic, Ira; Raimundo, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are key cellular signaling platforms, affecting fundamental processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. However, it remains unclear how mitochondrial signaling affects other organelles, particularly lysosomes. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) impairments elicit a stress signaling pathway that regulates lysosomal biogenesis via the microphtalmia transcription factor family. Interestingly, the effect of mitochondrial stress over lysosomal biogenesis depends on the timeframe of the stress elicited: while RC inhibition with rotenone or uncoupling with CCCP initially triggers lysosomal biogenesis, the effect peaks after few hours and returns to baseline. Long-term RC inhibition by long-term treatment with rotenone, or patient mutations in fibroblasts and in a mouse model result in repression of lysosomal biogenesis. The induction of lysosomal biogenesis by short-term mitochondrial stress is dependent on TFEB and MITF, requires AMPK signaling and is independent of calcineurin signaling. These results reveal an integrated view of how mitochondrial signaling affects lysosomes, which is essential to fully comprehend the consequences of mitochondrial malfunction, particularly in the context of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:28345620

  5. Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Response to Chromium (VI) Toxicity in Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiali; de Cássia da Silveira E Sá, Rita; Zhong, Caigao

    2017-09-14

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, which poses a threat to human public health. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial biogenesis can be activated by inflammatory and oxidative stress. However, whether mitochondrial biogenesis is involved in Cr(VI)-induced hepatotoxicity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated the induction of inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as indicated by upregulation of inflammatory factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Subsequently, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis, comprising the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass, was significantly increased in HepG2 cells exposed to low concentrations of Cr(VI). Expression of genes related to mitochondrial function complex I and complex V was upregulated at low concentrations of Cr(VI). mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD1 and SOD2, respectively), kech like ECH associate protein 1 (KEAP1) and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), were also upregulated. Consistent with the above results, mRNA and protein levels of key transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis such as the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), NRF-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were increased by low concentrations of Cr(VI) in HepG2 cells. Moreover, we found that PGC-1α and NRF-1 tended to translocate into the nucleus. The expression of genes potentially involved in mitochondrial biogenesis pathways, including mRNA level of silent information regulator-1 (SIRT1), forkhead box class-O (FOXO1), threonine kinase 1 (AKT1), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB1), was also upregulated. In contrast, mitochondrial biogenesis was inhibited and the expression of its regulatory factors and antioxidants was downregulated at high and cytotoxic concentrations of Cr(VI) in HepG2 cells. It is believed that pretreatment with α-tocopherol could be acting

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle by endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Irrcher, Isabella; Adhihetty, Peter J; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Hood, David A

    2003-01-01

    Behavioural and hereditary conditions are known to decrease mitochondrial volume and function within skeletal muscle. This reduces endurance performance, and is manifest both at high- and low-intensity levels of exertion. A programme of regular endurance exercise, undertaken over a number of weeks, produces significant adaptations within skeletal muscle such that noticeable improvements in oxidative capacity are evident, and the related decline in endurance performance can be attenuated. Notwithstanding the important implications that this has for the highly trained endurance athlete, an improvement in mitochondrial volume and function through regular physical activity also endows the previously sedentary and/or aging population with an improved quality of life, and a greater functional independence. An understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern the increases in mitochondrial volume with repeated bouts of exercise can provide insights into possible therapeutic interventions to care for those with mitochondrially-based diseases, and those unable to withstand regular physical activity. This review focuses on the recent developments in the molecular aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis in chronically exercising muscle. Specifically, we discuss the initial signalling events triggered by muscle contraction, the activation of transcription factors involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transcription, as well as the post-translational import mechanisms required for mitochondrial biogenesis. We consider the importance and relevance of chronic physical activity in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, with particular emphasis on how an endurance training programme could positively affect the age-related decline in mitochondrial content and delay the progression of age- and physical inactivity-related diseases.

  7. Rationally designed small compounds inhibit pilus biogenesis in uropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinkner, Jerome S; Remaut, Han; Buelens, Floris; Miller, Eric; Aberg, Veronica; Pemberton, Nils; Hedenström, Mattias; Larsson, Andreas; Seed, Patrick; Waksman, Gabriel; Hultgren, Scott J; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2006-11-21

    A chemical synthesis platform with broad applications and flexibility was rationally designed to inhibit biogenesis of adhesive pili assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway in Gram-negative pathogens. The activity of a family of bicyclic 2-pyridones, termed pilicides, was evaluated in two different pilus biogenesis systems in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Hemagglutination mediated by either type 1 or P pili, adherence to bladder cells, and biofilm formation mediated by type 1 pili were all reduced by approximately 90% in laboratory and clinical E. coli strains. The structure of the pilicide bound to the P pilus chaperone PapD revealed that the pilicide bound to the surface of the chaperone known to interact with the usher, the outer-membrane assembly platform where pili are assembled. Point mutations in the pilicide-binding site dramatically reduced pilus formation but did not block the ability of PapD to bind subunits and mediate their folding. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed that the pilicide interfered with the binding of chaperone-subunit complexes to the usher. These pilicides thus target key virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria and represent a promising proof of concept for developing drugs that function by targeting virulence factors.

  8. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-09-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. PMID:27440937

  10. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloois, Edwin van; Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M. ten; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  11. The Virus-Host Interplay: Biogenesis of +RNA Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Colleen R.; Airo, Adriana M.; Hobman, Tom C.

    2015-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA (+RNA) viruses are an important group of human and animal pathogens that have significant global health and economic impacts. Notable members include West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Chikungunya, Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus and enteroviruses of the Picornaviridae family.Unfortunately, prophylactic and therapeutic treatments against these pathogens are limited. +RNA viruses have limited coding capacity and thus rely extensively on host factors for successful infection and propagation. A common feature among these viruses is their ability to dramatically modify cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions. These viral replication complexes (VRCs) serve two main functions: To increase replication efficiency by concentrating critical factors and to protect the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge of critical host factors recruited to or demonstrated to be involved in the biogenesis and stabilization of +RNA virus VRCs. PMID:26287230

  12. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores. PMID:26300855

  13. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores.

  14. Centriole biogenesis and function in multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Mitchell, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for the development of ciliated epithelia is well established. This tissue is comprised of numerous cell types, most notably the multiciliated cells (MCCs) that each contain approximately 150 motile cilia. At the base of each cilium lies the centriole-based structure called the basal body. Centriole biogenesis is typically restricted to two new centrioles per cell cycle, each templating from an existing “mother” centriole. In contrast, MCCs are post-mitotic cells in which the majority of centrioles arise “de novo” without templating from a mother centriole, instead, these centrioles nucleate from an electron-dense structure termed the deuterostome. How centriole number is regulated in these cells and the mechanism by which the deuterosome templates nascent centrioles is still poorly understood. Here, we describe methods for regulating MCC cell fate as well as for visualizing and manipulating centriole biogenesis. PMID:26175436

  15. Curli Biogenesis: Order out of Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Margery L.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria assemble extracellular amyloid fibers on their cell surface. Secretion of proteins across membranes and the assembly of complex macromolecular structures must be highly coordinated to avoid the accumulation of potentially toxic intracellular protein aggregates. Extracellular amyloid fiber assembly poses an even greater threat to cellular health due to the highly aggregative nature of amyloids and the inherent toxicity of amyloid assembly intermediates. Therefore, temporal and spatial control of amyloid protein secretion is paramount. The biogenesis and assembly of the extracellular bacterial amyloid curli is an ideal system for studying how bacteria cope with the many challenges of controlled and ordered amyloid assembly. Here, we review the recent progress in the curli field that has made curli biogenesis one of the best-understood functional amyloid assembly pathways. PMID:24080089

  16. Enantiomeric Natural Products: Occurrence and Biogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Finefield, Jennifer M.; Sherman, David H.; Kreitman, Martin; Williams, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Nature, chiral natural products are usually produced in optically pure form; however, on occasion Nature is known to produce enantiomerically opposite metabolites. These enantiomeric natural products can arise in Nature from a single species, or from different genera and/or species. Extensive research has been carried out over the years in an attempt to understand the biogenesis of naturally occurring enantiomers, however, many fascinating puzzles and stereochemical anomalies still remain. PMID:22555867

  17. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio . E-mail: rfoncea@med.puc.cl; Leighton, Federico

    2005-12-16

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-{kappa}B activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy.

  18. Outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rollauer, Sarah E.; Sooreshjani, Moloud A.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria contain a double membrane which serves for both protection and for providing nutrients for viability. The outermost of these membranes is called the outer membrane (OM), and it contains a host of fully integrated membrane proteins which serve essential functions for the cell, including nutrient uptake, cell adhesion, cell signalling and waste export. For pathogenic strains, many of these outer membrane proteins (OMPs) also serve as virulence factors for nutrient scavenging and evasion of host defence mechanisms. OMPs are unique membrane proteins in that they have a β-barrel fold and can range in size from 8 to 26 strands, yet can still serve many different functions for the cell. Despite their essential roles in cell survival and virulence, the exact mechanism for the biogenesis of these OMPs into the OM has remained largely unknown. However, the past decade has witnessed significant progress towards unravelling the pathways and mechanisms necessary for moulding a nascent polypeptide into a functional OMP within the OM. Here, we will review some of these recent discoveries that have advanced our understanding of the biogenesis of OMPs in Gram-negative bacteria, starting with synthesis in the cytoplasm to folding and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370935

  19. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15°C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03574.001 PMID:25233066

  20. Vulnerability of microRNA biogenesis in FTD-ALS.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Chen; Hornstein, Eran

    2016-09-15

    The genetics of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) turn our attention to RNA metabolism, primarily because many of the identified diseases-associated genes encode for RNA-binding proteins. microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in maintaining brain integrity. The current review sheds light on miRNA dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on FTD-ALS. We propose that miRNAs are susceptible to fail when protein factors that are critical for miRNA biogenesis malfunction. Accordingly, potential insufficiencies of the 'microprocessor' complex, the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of miRNA precursors or their processing by Dicer were recently reported. Furthermore, specific miRNAs are involved in the regulation of pathways that are essential for neuronal survival or function. Any change in the expression of these specific miRNAs or in their ability to recognize their target sequences will have negative consequences. Taken together, recent reports strengthens the hypothesis that dysregulation of miRNAs might play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and highlights the miRNA biogenesis machinery as an interesting target for therapeutic interventions for ALS as well as FTD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease.

  1. Investigating CRISPR RNA Biogenesis and Function Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Nadja; Dugar, Gaurav; Vogel, Jörg; Sharma, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    The development of deep sequencing technology has greatly facilitated transcriptome analyses of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), which is based on massively parallel sequencing of cDNAs, has been used to annotate transcript boundaries and revealed widespread antisense transcription as well as a wealth of novel noncoding transcripts in many bacteria. Moreover, RNA-seq is nowadays widely used for gene expression profiling and about to replace hybridization-based approaches such as microarrays. RNA-seq has also informed about the biogenesis and function of CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) of different types of bacterial RNA-based CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Here we describe several studies that employed RNA-seq for crRNA analyses, with a particular focus on a differential RNA-seq (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts and allows for a genome-wide annotation of transcriptional start sites. This approach helped to identify a new crRNA biogenesis pathway of Type II CRISPR-Cas systems that involves a trans-encoded small RNA, tracrRNA, and the host factor RNase III.

  2. Isolation and structure elucidation of avocado seed (Persea americana) lipid derivatives that inhibit Clostridium sporogenes endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana Graciela; Pacheco, Adriana; García-Cruz, María Isabel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Benavides-Lozano, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-07-31

    Avocado fruit extracts are known to exhibit antimicrobial properties. However, the effects on bacterial endospores and the identity of antimicrobial compounds have not been fully elucidated. In this study, avocado seed extracts were tested against Clostridium sporogenes vegetative cells and active endospores. Bioassay-guided purification of a crude extract based on inhibitory properties linked antimicrobial action to six lipid derivatives from the family of acetogenin compounds. Two new structures and four compounds known to exist in nature were identified as responsible for the activity. Structurally, most potent molecules shared features of an acetyl moiety and a trans-enone group. All extracts produced inhibition zones on vegetative cells and active endospores. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of isolated molecules ranged from 7.8 to 15.6 μg/mL, and bactericidal effects were observed for an enriched fraction at 19.5 μg/mL. Identified molecules showed potential as natural alternatives to additives and antibiotics used by the food and pharmaceutical industries to inhibit Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria.

  3. piRNA Biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiawei; Fejes Tóth, Katalin; Aravin, Alexei A

    2017-09-27

    The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is a conserved defense system that protects the genome integrity of the animal germline from deleterious transposable elements. Targets of silencing are recognized by small noncoding piRNAs that are processed from long precursor molecules. Although piRNAs and other classes of small noncoding RNAs, such as miRNAs and small interfering (si)RNAs, interact with members of the same family of Argonaute (Ago) proteins and their function in target repression is similar, the biogenesis of piRNAs differs from those of the other two small RNAs. Recently, many aspects of piRNA biogenesis have been revealed in Drosophila melanogaster. In this review, we elaborate on piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila somatic and germline cells. We focus on the mechanisms by which piRNA precursor transcription is regulated and highlight recent work that has advanced our understanding of piRNA precursor processing to mature piRNAs. We finish by discussing current models to the still unresolved question of how piRNA precursors are selected and channeled into the processing machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anatomy, biogenesis, and regeneration of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Kyle V.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients per year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients’ quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland (SMG), which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of three general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy, and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph. PMID:24862590

  5. Anatomy, biogenesis and regeneration of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Kyle V; Hoffman, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients each year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients' quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland, which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting that nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of 3 general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph.

  6. The Interaction of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Fission/Fusion Mediated by PGC-1α Regulates Rotenone-Induced Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaige; Yang, Likui; Wang, Jian; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Cai, Ying; Cui, Zhihong; Ao, Lin; Liu, Jinyi; Zou, Zhongmin; Sai, Yan; Cao, Jia

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly, and mitochondrial defects underlie the pathogenesis of PD. Impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis results in reactive oxygen species formation, which in turn can potentiate the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, forming a vicious cycle in the neuron. Mitochondrial fission/fusion and biogenesis play important roles in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. It has been reported that PGC-1α is a powerful transcription factor that is widely involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative stress, and other processes. Therefore, we explored mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial fission/fusion, and especially PGC-1α as the key point in the signaling mechanism of their interaction in rotenone-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. The results showed that mitochondrial number and mass were reduced significantly, accompanied by alterations in proteins known to regulate mitochondrial fission/fusion (MFN2, OPA1, Drp1, and Fis1) and mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and mtTFA). Further experiments proved that inhibition of mitochondrial fission or promotion of mitochondrial fusion has protective effects in rotenone-induced neurotoxicity and also promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. By establishing cell models of PGC-1α overexpression and reduced expression, we found that PGC-1α can regulate MFN2 and Drp1 protein expression and phosphorylation to influence mitochondrial fission/fusion. In summary, it can be concluded that PGC-1α-mediated cross talk between mitochondrial biogenesis and fission/fusion contributes to rotenone-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  7. Validation of a rapid bacteria endospore enumeration system for use with spacecraft assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Kuhlman, G.; Kirschner, L.; Kazarians, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Pickett, M.; Venkateswaran, K.; Kastner, J.; Kern, R.

    NASA planetary protection policy sets forth strict limits on the number of bacterial endospores that can be present on a spacecraft at launch Currently the only approved method for counting the spores is a culture based assay that requires three days to produce results a timeframe that can be at odds with the rapid pace and rigorous deadlines of spacecraft assembly A possible alternative to the traditional culture based approach is the Millipore Rapid Microbiology Detection System RMDS which has previously been used for process and contamination control in the pharmaceutical and food industries The RMDS is rapid and simple shows high sensitivity 1 colony forming unit CFU sample and correlates well with traditional culture-based methods It combines membrane filtration adenosine triphosphate ATP bioluminescence chemistry and image analysis based on photon detection with a Charge Coupled Device CCD camera In this study we have optimized the assay condition and evaluated the use of the RMDS as a rapid spore detection tool for NASA applications Seven species of Bacillus nine strains that have been repeatedly isolated from clean room environments were assayed In order to select for spores the samples were subjected to a heat shock step before proceeding with the RMDS incubation protocol All strains were detected by the RMDS in sim 5 hours and these assay times were repeatedly demonstrated along with low image background noise The RMDS-based spore detection method is undergoing the final stages of validation and is

  8. Quantum Photonics BioLaser Transducer for Ultrasensitive Detection and Differential Analysis of Anthrax Endospore Simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Chen, Peter; Guild Copeland, R.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Barrett, Keith E.

    2003-03-01

    We are investigating novel optical transduction methods for high-speed sensing of cells, organelles, virus particles, and biomolecules using semiconductor light sources integrated with microfluidics into laser microcavities. These new tools have potential for ultrasensitive detection of submicron particles using quantum photonic effects. We have recorded lasing spectra for a variety of bioparticles ranging over 2 orders of magnitude in size from 30 microns to 300 nm. The laser light is spatially/temporally resolved, recorded by high-speed digital video imaging, and analyzed within seconds using efficient pattern recognition algorithms. These laser hyperspectra are sensitive to scattering from the distribution of protein molecules in organelles and cells. As the diameter decreases, we observe the number of quantized photon modes to decrease from the order of 100 to 1 as the particle approaches submicron dimensions. Surprisingly, the intensity of the emitted light remains high, despite nearly 10^6 decrease in particle volume. We attribute this enhanced light emission to quantum squeezing of light into a limited number of photon modes. We have used this technique to distinguish anthrax endospore simulants from other powders and to distinguish one spore type from another. This analysis could be very useful for rapid, front-end screen of suspected pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Combined scanning transmission X-ray and electron microscopy for the characterization of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Shao, Paul P; Suvorova, Elena; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-09-01

    Endospores (also referred to as bacterial spores) are bacterial structures formed by several bacterial species of the phylum Firmicutes. Spores form as a response to environmental stress. These structures exhibit remarkable resistance to harsh environmental conditions such as exposure to heat, desiccation, and chemical oxidants. The spores include several layers of protein and peptidoglycan that surround a core harboring DNA as well as high concentrations of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA). A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was used for the direct quantitative characterization of bacterial spores. The concentration and localization of DPA, Ca(2+) , and other elements were determined and compared for the core and cortex of spores from two distinct genera: Bacillus subtilis and Desulfotomaculum reducens. This micro-spectroscopic approach is uniquely suited for the direct study of individual bacterial spores, while classical molecular and biochemical methods access only bulk characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnesium-Calcite Crystal Formation Mediated by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Requires Calcium and Endospores.

    PubMed

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    Fresh Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius cells grown on soybean-casein digest nutrient agar were inoculated as a parent colony 1 cm in diameter on the surface of an agar gel containing acetate and calcium ions (calcite-promoting hydrogel) and incubated at 60 °C for 4 days, after which magnesium-calcite single crystals of 50-130 µm in size formed within the parent colony. Addition of EDTA, polyacrylic acid or N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to the calcite-forming hydrogel inhibited the parent colony from forming magnesium-calcite crystals. Inoculation of G. thermoglucosidasius on calcite-forming hydrogel containing 5 µM cadmium and 20 µM zinc resulted in a decrease in the sporulation rate from 55 to 7-8 %. Magnesium-calcite synthesis decreased relative to the sporulation rate. G. thermoglucosidasius exhibited higher adsorption/absorbance of calcium than other Geobacillus sp. that do not mediate calcite formation and higher levels of magnesium accumulation. Calcium ions contained in the calcite-promoting hydrogel and magnesium ions concentrated in G. thermoglucosidasius cells serve as the elements for magnesium-calcite synthesis. The observed decreases in sporulation rate and magnesium-calcite formation support the hypothesis that endospores act as nuclei for the synthesis of magnesium-calcite single crystals.

  11. Towards Single-Shot Detection of Bacterial Endospores via Coherent Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav; Murawski, Robert; Sautenkov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy hold exciting promise to make the most out of now readily available ultrafast laser sources. Techniques have been devised to mitigate the nonresonant four-wave-mixing in favor of informative Raman-resonant signal. In particular, a hybrid technique for CARS (see Science 316, 265 (2007)) brings together the advantages of coherent broadband pump-Stokes excitation of molecular vibrations and their time-delayed but frequency-resolved probing via a spectrally narrowed and shaped laser pulse. We apply this technique to the problem of real-time detection of warfare bioagents and report single-shot acquisition of a distinct CARS spectrum from a small volume of B. subtilis endospores (˜10^4 spores), a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis. We study the dependence of the CARS signal on the energy of the ultrashort preparation pulses and find the limit on the pulse energy fluence (˜0.2 J/cm^2), imposed by the laser-induced damage of the spores.

  12. Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Addou, Nariman Ammara; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Fauque, Guy; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    A novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain Nari2A(T) was isolated from soil collected from an Algerian salt lake, Chott Melghir. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 50-55 °C, 7-10% (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. The strain exhibited 95.4, 95.4 and 95.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Thalassobacillus devorans G19.1(T), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) and Virgibacillus kekensis YIM-kkny16(T), respectively. The major menaquinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phosphoglycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.9 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain Nari2A(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae , order Bacillales , for which the name Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus is Nari2A(T) ( = DSM 25894(T) = CCUG 62543(T)).

  13. The evolution of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from a yeast perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ebersberger, Ingo; Simm, Stefan; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Schmitzberger, Peter; Mirus, Oliver; von Haeseler, Arndt; Bohnsack, Markus T.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is fundamental for cellular life, but surprisingly little is known about the underlying pathway. In eukaryotes a comprehensive collection of experimentally verified ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) exists only for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Far less is known for other fungi, animals or plants, and insights are even more limited for archaea. Starting from 255 yeast RBFs, we integrated ortholog searches, domain architecture comparisons and, in part, manual curation to investigate the inventories of RBF candidates in 261 eukaryotes, 26 archaea and 57 bacteria. The resulting phylogenetic profiles reveal the evolutionary ancestry of the yeast pathway. The oldest core comprising 20 RBF lineages dates back to the last universal common ancestor, while the youngest 20 factors are confined to the Saccharomycotina. On this basis, we outline similarities and differences of ribosome biogenesis across contemporary species. Archaea, so far a rather uncharted domain, possess 38 well-supported RBF candidates of which some are known to form functional sub-complexes in yeast. This provides initial evidence that ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotes and archaea follows similar principles. Within eukaryotes, RBF repertoires vary considerably. A comparison of yeast and human reveals that lineage-specific adaptation via RBF exclusion and addition characterizes the evolution of this ancient pathway. PMID:24234440

  14. A New Sensitive GC-MS-based Method for Analysis of Dipicolinic Acid and Quantifying Bacterial Endospores in Deep Marine Subsurface Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments cover more than two-thirds of the Earth's surface and represent a major part of the deep biosphere. Microbial cells and microbial activity appear to be widespread in these sediments. Recently, we reported the isolation of gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming piezophilic bacteria and detection of bacterial endospores in marine subsurface sediment from the Shimokita coalbed, Japan. However, the modern molecular microbiological methods (e.g., DNA-based microbial detection techniques) cannot detect bacterial endospore, because endospores are impermeable and are not stained by fluorescence DNA dyes or by ribosomal RNA staining techniques such as catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization. Thus, the total microbial cell abundance in the deep biosphere may has been globally underestimated. This emphasizes the need for a new cultivation independent approach for the quantification of bacterial endospores in the deep subsurface. Dipicolinic acid (DPA, pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) is a universal and specific component of bacterial endospores, representing 5-15wt% of the dry spore, and therefore is a useful indicator and quantifier of bacterial endospores and permits to estimate total spore numbers in the subsurface biosphere. We developed a sensitive analytical method to quantify DPA content in environmental samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method is sensitive and more convenient in use than other traditional methods. We applied this method to analyzing sediment samples from the South China Sea (obtained from IODP Exp. 349) to determine the abundance of spore-forming bacteria in the deep marine subsurface sediment. Our results suggest that gram-positive, endospore-forming bacteria may be the "unseen majority" in the deep biosphere.

  15. SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MELANOSOME BIOGENESIS AND PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are the specialized intracellular organelles of pigment cells devoted to the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin pigments, which are responsible for most visible pigmentation in mammals and other vertebrates. As a direct consequence, any genetic mutation resulting in alteration of melanosomal function, either because affecting pigment cell survival, migration and differentiation, or because interfering with melanosome biogenesis, transport and transfer to keratinocytes, is immediately translated into color variations of skin, fur, hair or eyes. Thus, over one hundred genes and proteins have been identified as pigmentary determinants in mammals, providing us with a deep understanding of this biological system, which functions by using mechanisms and processes that have parallels in other tissues and organs. In particular, many genes implicated in melanosome biogenesis have been characterized, so that melanosomes represent an incredible source of information and a model for organelles belonging to the secretory pathway. Furthermore, the function of melanosomes can be associated with common physiological phenotypes, such as variation of pigmentation among individuals, and with rare pathological conditions, such as albinism, characterized by severe visual defects. Among the most relevant mechanisms operating in melanosome biogenesis are the signal transduction pathways mediated by two peculiar G protein-coupled receptors: the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), involved in the fair skin/red hair phenotype and skin cancer; and OA1 (GPR143), whose loss-of-function results in X-linked ocular albinism. This review will focus on the most recent novelties regarding the functioning of these two receptors, by highlighting emerging signaling mechanisms and general implications for cell biology and pathology. PMID:20381640

  16. Biogenesis and regulation of the let-7 miRNAs and their functional implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hosuk; Han, Sungwook; Kwon, Chang Seob; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-02-01

    The let-7 miRNA was one of the first miRNAs discovered in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and its biological functions show a high level of evolutionary conservation from the nematode to the human. Unlike in C. elegans, higher animals have multiple isoforms of let-7 miRNAs; these isoforms share a consensus sequence called the 'seed sequence' and these isoforms are categorized into let-7 miRNA family. The expression of let-7 family is required for developmental timing and tumor suppressor function, but must be suppressed for the self-renewal of stem cells. Therefore, let-7 miRNA biogenesis must be carefully controlled. To generate a let-7 miRNA, a primary transcript is produced by RNA polymerase II and then subsequently processed by Drosha/DGCR8, TUTase, and Dicer. Because dysregulation of let-7 processing is deleterious, biogenesis of let-7 is tightly regulated by cellular factors, such as the RNA binding proteins, LIN28A/B and DIS3L2. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of regulation of let-7 biogenesis in vertebrates, such as the mouse and the human.

  17. E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 regulates peroxisome biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ronghui; Satkovich, John; Hu, Jianping

    2016-10-31

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles that play pivotal roles in a suite of metabolic processes and often act coordinately with other organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Peroxisomes import proteins to the peroxisome matrix by peroxins (PEX proteins), but how the function of the PEX proteins is regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we identified the Arabidopsis RING (really interesting new gene) type E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 [suppressor of plastid protein import locus 1 (ppi1) 1] as a peroxisome membrane protein with a regulatory role in peroxisome protein import. SP1 interacts physically with the two components of the peroxisomemore » protein docking complex PEX13–PEX14 and the (RING)-finger peroxin PEX2. Loss of SP1 function suppresses defects of the pex14-2 and pex13-1 mutants, and SP1 is involved in the degradation of PEX13 and possibly PEX14 and all three RING peroxins. An in vivo ubiquitination assay showed that SP1 has the ability to promote PEX13 ubiquitination. Our study has revealed that, in addition to its previously reported function in chloroplast biogenesis, SP1 plays a role in peroxisome biogenesis. The same E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes the destabilization of components of two distinct protein-import machineries, indicating that degradation of organelle biogenesis factors by the ubiquitin–proteasome system may constitute an important regulatory mechanism in coordinating the biogenesis of metabolically linked organelles in eukaryotes.« less

  18. The effects of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function after glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-11-07

    NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in axons in cell culture and animal models of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Andrea M; Edwards, James L; McLean, Lisa L; Hong, Yu; Cerri, Federica; Lopez, Ignazio; Quattrini, Angelo; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress in response to high glucose is proposed as a primary cause of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron injury in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. In the present study, we report a greater number of mitochondria in both myelinated and unmyelinated dorsal root axons in a well-established model of murine diabetic neuropathy. No similar changes were seen in younger diabetic animals without neuropathy or in the ventral motor roots of any diabetic animals. These findings led us to examine mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in response to hyperglycemia in the neurites of cultured DRG neurons. We demonstrate overall mitochondrial biogenesis via increases in mitochondrial transcription factors and increases in mitochondrial DNA in both DRG neurons and axons. However, this process occurs over a longer time period than a rapidly observed increase in the number of mitochondria in DRG neurites that appears to result, at least in part, from mitochondrial fission. We conclude that during acute hyperglycemia, mitochondrial fission is a prominent response, and excessive mitochondrial fission may result in dysregulation of energy production, activation of caspase 3, and subsequent DRG neuron injury. During more prolonged hyperglycemia, there is evidence of compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis in axons. Our data suggest that an imbalance between mitochondrial biogenesis and fission may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens C; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species.

  1. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species. PMID:26063571

  2. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function in Arabidopsis†

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Small, Ian D.; Day, David A.; Whelan, James

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria represent the powerhouse of cells through their synthesis of ATP. However, understanding the role of mitochondria in the growth and development of plants will rely on a much deeper appreciation of the complexity of this organelle. Arabidopsis research has provided clear identification of mitochondrial components, allowed wide-scale analysis of gene expression, and has aided reverse genetic manipulation to test the impact of mitochondrial component loss on plant function. Forward genetics in Arabidopsis has identified mitochondrial involvement in mutations with notable impacts on plant metabolism, growth and development. Here we consider the evidence for components involved in mitochondria biogenesis, metabolism and signalling to the nucleus. PMID:22303236

  3. Human disorders of peroxisome metabolism and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Waterham, Hans R; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are dynamic organelles that play an essential role in a variety of cellular catabolic and anabolic metabolic pathways, including fatty acid alpha- and beta-oxidation, and plasmalogen and bile acid synthesis. Defects in genes encoding peroxisomal proteins can result in a large variety of peroxisomal disorders either affecting specific metabolic pathways, i.e., the single peroxisomal enzyme deficiencies, or causing a generalized defect in function and assembly of peroxisomes, i.e., peroxisome biogenesis disorders. In this review, we discuss the clinical, biochemical, and genetic aspects of all human peroxisomal disorders currently known.

  4. Mechanistic insight into the ribosome biogenesis functions of the ancient protein KsgA

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith; Rife, Jason P.; Culver, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Summary While the general blueprint of ribosome biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved, most details have diverged considerably. A striking exception to this divergence is the universally conserved KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family, which modifies two adjacent adenosines in the terminal helix of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA). While localization of KsgA on 30S subunits (SSUs) and genetic interaction data have suggested that KsgA acts as a ribosome biogenesis factor, mechanistic details and a rationale for its extreme conservation are still lacking. To begin to address these questions we have characterized the function of E. coli KsgA in vivo using both a ksgA deletion strain and a methyltransferase deficient form of this protein. Our data reveals cold sensitivity and altered ribosomal profiles are associated with a ΔksgA genotype in E. coli. Our work also indicates that loss of KsgA alters 16S rRNA processing. These findings allow KsgAs role in SSU biogenesis to be integrated into the network of other identified factors. Moreover, a methyltransferase-inactive form of KsgA, which we show to be deleterious to cell growth, profoundly impairs ribosome biogenesis prompting discussion of KsgA as a possible anti-microbial drug target. These unexpected data suggest that methylation is a second layer of function for KsgA and that its critical role is as a supervisor of biogenesis of SSUs in vivo. These new findings and this proposed regulatory role offer a mechanistic explanation for the extreme conservation of the KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family. PMID:18990185

  5. Effects of Formulation and Host Nematode Density on the Ability of In Vitro-Produced Pasteuria Endospores to Control its Host Belonolaimus longicaudatus

    PubMed Central

    Luc, John E.; Pang, Wenjing; Crow, William T.; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of nematode population density at the time of application and formulations of in vitro-produced Pasteuria spp. endospores on the final population density of Belonolaimus longicaudatus was studied in an 84-d-long pot bioassay. The experiment utilized a factorial design consisting of 30 or 300 B. longicaudatus /100 cm3 of sandy soil and three formulations of in vitro-produced Pasteuria spp. endospores (nontreated, granular, or liquid). No differences were observed in percent endospore attachment between nematode inoculum levels during either trial. Granular and liquid formulations of in vitro-produced endospores suppressed nematode population densities by 22% and 59% in the first trial and 20% and 63% in the second, respectively compared with the nontreated control. The liquid formulation increased percent endospore attachment by 147% and 158%, respectively, compared with the granular formulation. The greatest root retention by the host plant was observed at the lower B. longicaudatus inoculation level following application of the liquid formulation. While both the granular and liquid formulations reduced B. longicaudatus population densities in the soil, the liquid spore suspension was most effective. PMID:22736843

  6. Role of chelation and water binding of calcium in dormancy and heat resistance of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Rajan, K S; Jaw, R; Grecz, N

    1978-06-01

    The possible relationship between the water binding by bacterial endospores and their dormancy and heat resistances has been examined in terms of the coordination characteristics of the spore-bound calcium. Stabilities of the calcium complexes of typical cytoplasmic and structural spore components were determined by potentiometric equilibrium pH measurements in model systems consisting of DPA, glycine, alanine, glutamic acid, alanyl-glutamic acid, triglycine, and tetraglycine. The Ca++-form and H+-form spores of Clostridium botulinum 33A were investigated in vivo with respect to their water sorption and heat-resistance characteristics. The results suggest that the complexing of calcium and Ca(II)-DPA may be biologically significant for spore resistance and dormancy at the following three levels: (1) complexing with spore cytoplasmic pool constituents consistent with the idea of a metal-chelate cross-linked cytoplasm or spore cement stabilizing the essential biological macromolecules, (2) complexing with structural components of the spore as indicated by the interaction with model peptides, and (3) coordination with water to produce an apparently dehydrated environment in the spore as evident from the much greater water-sorption capacity of the Ca++-form spores vs the much smaller water sorption of the H+-form spores. Interestingly enough, DPA itself, in the absence of metal ion, showed some interaction with di-, tri-, and tetrapeptides and a weak but detectable interaction with amino acids. Although the exact mode of the DPA-peptide interaction is not clear, it is attractive to speculate about its possible involvement in the control of spore dormancy and resistance.

  7. Effects of Thermoradiation Treatments on the DNA of Bacillus Subtilis Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    JACOBS, JENNIFER A.; TURMAN, BOBBY N.; FAGUY, D.M.

    2002-06-01

    Endospores of the bacterium, Bacillus subfilis, have been shown to exhibit a synergistic rate of cell death when treated with particular levels of heat and ionizing radiation in combination. This synergism has been documented for a number of different organisms at various temperatures and radiation doses (Sivinski, H.D., D.M. Garst, M.C. Reynolds, C.A. Trauth, Jr., R.E. Trujillo, and W.J. Whitfield, ''The Synergistic Inactivation of Biological Systems by Thermoradiation,'' Industrial Sterilization, International Symposium, Amsterdam, 1972, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, pp. 305-335). However, the mechanism of the synergistic action is unknown. This study attempted to determine whether the mechanism of synergism was specifically connected to the DNA strand breakage--either single strand breakage or double strand breakage. Some work was also done to examine the effect of free radicals and ions created in the spore body by the radiation treatments, as well as to determine the functionality of repair enzymes following heat, radiation, and thermoradiation treatments. Bacillus subtilis spores were treated at combinations of 33 kr/hr, 15 kr/hr, 105 C, 85 C, 63 C, and 50 C. Some synergistic correlation was found with the number of double strand breaks, and a strong correlation was found with the number of single strand breaks. In cases displaying synergism of spore killing, single strand breakage while the DNA was in a denatured state is suspected as a likely mechanism. DNA was damaged more by irradiation in the naked state than when encased within the spore, indicating that the spore encasement provides an overall protective effect from radiation damage in spite of free radicals and ions which may be created from molecules other than the DNA molecule within the spore body. Repair enzymes were found to be functional following treatments by radiation only, heat only, and thermoradiation.

  8. Stratosphere Conditions Inactivate Bacterial Endospores from a Mars Spacecraft Assembly Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Wong, Gregory M.; James, Leandro M.; Thakrar, Prital J.; Lane, Michael A.; Catechis, John A.; Smith, David J.

    2017-04-01

    Every spacecraft sent to Mars is allowed to land viable microbial bioburden, including hardy endospore-forming bacteria resistant to environmental extremes. Earth's stratosphere is severely cold, dry, irradiated, and oligotrophic; it can be used as a stand-in location for predicting how stowaway microbes might respond to the martian surface. We launched E-MIST, a high-altitude NASA balloon payload on 10 October 2015 carrying known quantities of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (4.07 × 107 spores per sample), a radiation-tolerant strain collected from a spacecraft assembly facility. The payload spent 8 h at ˜31 km above sea level, exposing bacterial spores to the stratosphere. We found that within 120 and 240 min, spore viability was significantly reduced by 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. By 480 min, <0.001% of spores carried to the stratosphere remained viable. Our balloon flight results predict that most terrestrial bacteria would be inactivated within the first sol on Mars if contaminated spacecraft surfaces receive direct sunlight. Unfortunately, an instrument malfunction prevented the acquisition of UV light measurements during our balloon mission. To make up for the absence of radiometer data, we calculated a stratosphere UV model and conducted ground tests with a 271.1 nm UVC light source (0.5 W/m2), observing a similarly rapid inactivation rate when using a lower number of contaminants (640 spores per sample). The starting concentration of spores and microconfiguration on hardware surfaces appeared to influence survivability outcomes in both experiments. With the relatively few spores that survived the stratosphere, we performed a resequencing analysis and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms compared to unexposed controls. It is therefore plausible that bacteria enduring radiation-rich environments (e.g., Earth's upper atmosphere, interplanetary space, or the surface of Mars) may be pushed in evolutionarily consequential directions.

  9. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  10. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Blamowska, Marta; Neupert, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Chaperones mediate protein folding and prevent deleterious protein aggregation in the cell. However, little is known about the biogenesis of chaperones themselves. In this study, we report on the biogenesis of the yeast mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) chaperone, which is essential for the functionality of mitochondria. We show in vivo and in organello that mtHsp70 rapidly folds after its import into mitochondria, with its ATPase domain and peptide-binding domain (PBD) adopting their structures independently of each other. Importantly, folding of the ATPase domain but not of the PBD was severely affected in the absence of the Hsp70 escort protein, Hep1. We reconstituted the folding of mtHsp70, demonstrating that Hep1 and ATP/ADP were required and sufficient for its de novo folding. Our data show that Hep1 bound to a folding intermediate of mtHsp70. Binding of an adenine nucleotide triggered release of Hep1 and folding of the intermediate into native mtHsp70. Thus, Hep1 acts as a specialized chaperone mediating the de novo folding of an Hsp70 chaperone. PMID:23007651

  11. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  12. Evaluation of Sampling Tools for Environmental Sampling of Bacterial Endospores from Porous and Non-porous Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Butcher, Mark G.; Su, Yin-Fong; Jarman, Kristin H.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Seiders, Barbara AB; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-03-08

    Aims: Having and executing a well-defined and validated sampling protocol is critical following a purposeful release of a biological agent for response and recovery activities, for clinical and epidemiological analysis and for forensic purposes. The objective of this study was to address the need for validated sampling and analysis methods called out by the General Accounting Office and others to systematically compare the collection efficiency of various swabs and wipes for collection of bacterial endospores from five different surfaces, both porous and non-porous. This study was also designed to test the collection and extraction solutions used for endospore recovery from swabs and wipes. Methods and Results: Eight collection tools were used, five swabs and three wipes. Three collection/preservation solutions were evaluated: sterile E-pure® water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and phosphate buffered saline with 0.3% Tween (PBST). An Ink Jet Aerosol Generator (IJAG) was used to apply Bacillus subtilis endospores to five porous and non-porous surfaces. The collection efficiencies of the swabs and wipes were compared using a statistical multiple comparison analysis. Results indicated that wipes tend to have higher collection efficiency than swabs. Of the swabs tested, the recovery from most of the surfaces was highest with the polyurethane foam swab. Conclusions: The ScottPure® wipe had the highest collection efficiency and PBST was the best collection solution of those tested. Significance and Impact of Study: Validated sampling for potential biological warfare is of significant importance and this study answered some relevant questions.

  13. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Luning; Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying; Ge, Zhiming

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  14. THE UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE IN RELATION TO MITOCHONDRIAL BIOGENESIS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Mesbah Moosavi, Zahra S; Hood, David A

    2017-03-08

    Mitochondria are comprised of both nuclear- and mitochondrially-encoded proteins requiring precise stoichiometry for their integration into functional complexes. The augmented protein synthesis associated with mitochondrial biogenesis results in the accumulation of unfolded proteins, thus triggering cellular stress. As such, the unfolded protein responses emanating from the endoplasmic reticulum (UPR(ER)) or the mitochondrion (UPR(MT)) are triggered to ensure correct protein handling. Whether this response is necessary for mitochondrial adaptations is unknown. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis were used: muscle differentiation and chronic contractile activity (CCA) in murine muscle cells. After 4 days of differentiation, our findings depict selective activation of the UPR(MT) in which chaperones decreased, however Sirt3 and UPR(ER) markers were elevated. To delineate the role of ER stress in mitochondrial adaptations, the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA was administered. Surprisingly, mitochondrial markers COX-I, COX-IV, and PGC-1α protein levels were augmented up to 1.5-fold above that of vehicle-treated cells. Similar results were obtained in myotubes undergoing CCA in which biogenesis was enhanced by ~2-3-fold, along with elevated UPR(MT) markers Sirt3 and CPN10. To verify whether the findings were attributable to the terminal UPRER branch directed by the transcription factor CHOP, cells were transfected with CHOP siRNA. Basally, COX-I levels increased (~20%) and COX-IV decreased (~30%), suggesting that CHOP influences mitochondrial composition. This effect was fully restored by CCA. Therefore, our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis is independent of the terminal UPR(ER) Under basal conditions CHOP is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial composition, but not for differentiation- or CCA-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

  15. The co-chaperone and reductase ERdj5 facilitates rod opsin biogenesis and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Aguila, Monica; McCulley, Caroline; Kanuga, Naheed; Iwawaki, Takao; Paul Chapple, J.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensitive protein of rod cells, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Many rod opsin mutations, such as P23H, lead to misfolding of rod opsin with detrimental effects on photoreceptor function and viability. Misfolded P23H rod opsin and other mutations in the intradiscal domain are characterized by the formation of an incorrect disulphide bond between C185 and C187, as opposed to the correct and highly conserved C110–C187 disulphide bond. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that incorrect disulphide bond formation might be a factor that affects the biogenesis of rod opsin by studying wild-type (WT) or P23H rod opsin in combination with amino acid substitutions that prevent the formation of incorrect disulphide bonds involving C185. These mutants had altered traffic dynamics, suggesting a requirement for regulation of disulphide bond formation/reduction during rod opsin biogenesis. Here, we show that the BiP co-chaperone and reductase protein ERdj5 (DNAJC10) regulates this process. ERdj5 overexpression promoted the degradation, improved the endoplasmic reticulum mobility and prevented the aggregation of P23H rod opsin. ERdj5 reduction by shRNA delayed rod opsin degradation and promoted aggregation. The reductase and co-chaperone activity of ERdj5 were both required for these effects on P23H rod opsin. Furthermore, mutations in these functional domains acted as dominant negatives that affected WT rod opsin biogenesis. Collectively, these data identify ERdj5 as a member of the proteostasis network that regulates rod opsin biogenesis and supports a role for disulphide bond formation/reduction in rod opsin biogenesis and disease. PMID:25055872

  16. The co-chaperone and reductase ERdj5 facilitates rod opsin biogenesis and quality control.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Aguila, Monica; McCulley, Caroline; Kanuga, Naheed; Iwawaki, Takao; Chapple, J Paul; Cheetham, Michael E

    2014-12-15

    Mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensitive protein of rod cells, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Many rod opsin mutations, such as P23H, lead to misfolding of rod opsin with detrimental effects on photoreceptor function and viability. Misfolded P23H rod opsin and other mutations in the intradiscal domain are characterized by the formation of an incorrect disulphide bond between C185 and C187, as opposed to the correct and highly conserved C110-C187 disulphide bond. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that incorrect disulphide bond formation might be a factor that affects the biogenesis of rod opsin by studying wild-type (WT) or P23H rod opsin in combination with amino acid substitutions that prevent the formation of incorrect disulphide bonds involving C185. These mutants had altered traffic dynamics, suggesting a requirement for regulation of disulphide bond formation/reduction during rod opsin biogenesis. Here, we show that the BiP co-chaperone and reductase protein ERdj5 (DNAJC10) regulates this process. ERdj5 overexpression promoted the degradation, improved the endoplasmic reticulum mobility and prevented the aggregation of P23H rod opsin. ERdj5 reduction by shRNA delayed rod opsin degradation and promoted aggregation. The reductase and co-chaperone activity of ERdj5 were both required for these effects on P23H rod opsin. Furthermore, mutations in these functional domains acted as dominant negatives that affected WT rod opsin biogenesis. Collectively, these data identify ERdj5 as a member of the proteostasis network that regulates rod opsin biogenesis and supports a role for disulphide bond formation/reduction in rod opsin biogenesis and disease.

  17. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl₂), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl₂ supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning.

  18. Recurrent post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea secondary to aerobic endospore-forming bacilli: a case report and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Jaber, James J; Kircher, Matthew L; Thorpe, Eric; Porter, Ryan G; Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J

    2013-02-01

    We report a unique case in which a 57-year-old man with an 8-year history of late recurrent post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea (PTTO) was found to harbor Bacillus subtilis, an aerobic endospore-forming bacillus that is typically resistant to chemical and physical agents because of its unique life cycle. Removal of the patient's tympanostomy tube resulted in complete resolution of his long-standing otorrhea. We also review the etiologies of and treatment strategies for early, late, chronic, and recurrent PTTO. We conclude that regardless of the etiology, a patient with persistent or recurrent PTTO should consider undergoing removal of the ventilation tube.

  19. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alenquer, Marta; Amorim, Maria João

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) during the process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functional proteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in the physiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identification of mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles and the understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with the plasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is in its early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functional factor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation. This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores the regulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system, which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in the composition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changes affect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins of endocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, although no direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet been reported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infected with a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of the microenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomes in viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  20. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Alenquer, Marta; Amorim, Maria João

    2015-09-17

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies(MVBs) with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) during the process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functional proteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in the physiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identification of mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles and the understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with the plasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is in its early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functional factor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation.This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores the regulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system,which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in the composition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changes affect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins of endocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, although no direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet been reported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infected with a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of the microenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomes in viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  1. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically.

    PubMed

    Caro, Andres A; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R; Ronis, Martin J J

    2014-12-01

    Chronic ethanol (EtOH) administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic EtOH up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic EtOH feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Rats were fed an EtOH-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/d; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for EtOH calories. EtOH administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and reduced glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of EtOH and NAC. Chronic EtOH increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of EtOH and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic EtOH administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic EtOH triggered the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by chronic EtOH, mitochondrial

  2. Sulforaphane induces differential modulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in normal cells and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario I; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez, Esteban; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-02-01

    Antioxidant-based chemotherapy has been intensely debated. Herein, we show that sulforaphane (SFN) induced mitochondrial biogenesis followed by mitochondrial fusion in a kidney cell line commonly used in nephroprotective models. At the same concentration and exposure time, SFN induced cell death in prostate cancer cells accompanied by mitochondrial biogenesis and fragmentation. Stabilization of the nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) could be associated with these effects in the tumor cell line. An increase in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α (PGC1α) level and a decrease in the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) level would suggest a possible metabolic shift. The knockdown in the nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) attenuated the SFN-induced effect on prostate cancer cells demonstrating that mitochondrial biogenesis plays an important role in cell death for this kind of tumor cells. This evidence supports SFN as a potential antineoplastic agent that could inhibit tumor development and could protect normal tissues by modulating common processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional link between ribosome formation and biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Yarunin, Alexander; Panse, Vikram Govind; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Dez, Christophe; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Eduard C

    2005-02-09

    In genetic screens for ribosomal export mutants, we identified CFD1, NBP35 and NAR1 as factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Notably, these components were recently reported to function in extramitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis. In particular, Nar1 was implicated to generate the Fe-S clusters within Rli1, a potential substrate protein of unknown function. We tested whether the Fe-S protein Rli1 functions in ribosome formation. We report that rli1 mutants are impaired in pre-rRNA processing and defective in the export of both ribosomal subunits. In addition, Rli1p is associated with both pre-40S particles and mature 40S subunits, and with the eIF3 translation initiation factor complex. Our data reveal an unexpected link between ribosome biogenesis and the biosynthetic pathway of cytoplasmic Fe-S proteins.

  4. Functional link between ribosome formation and biogenesis of iron–sulfur proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yarunin, Alexander; Panse, Vikram Govind; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Dez, Christophe; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Ed

    2005-01-01

    In genetic screens for ribosomal export mutants, we identified CFD1, NBP35 and NAR1 as factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Notably, these components were recently reported to function in extramitochondrial iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster biosynthesis. In particular, Nar1 was implicated to generate the Fe–S clusters within Rli1, a potential substrate protein of unknown function. We tested whether the Fe–S protein Rli1 functions in ribosome formation. We report that rli1 mutants are impaired in pre-rRNA processing and defective in the export of both ribosomal subunits. In addition, Rli1p is associated with both pre-40S particles and mature 40S subunits, and with the eIF3 translation initiation factor complex. Our data reveal an unexpected link between ribosome biogenesis and the biosynthetic pathway of cytoplasmic Fe–S proteins. PMID:15660135

  5. Thrombopoietin-induced Dami cells as a model for alpha-granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Briquet-Laugier, Véronique; El Golli, Nargès; Nurden, Paquita; Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Nurden, Alan; Rosa, Jean-Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Megakaryocytic alpha-granules contain secretory proteins relevant to megakaryocyte and platelet functions. Understanding alpha-granule biogenesis is hampered because human primary megakaryocytes are difficult to manipulate. Existing promegakaryocytic cell lines do not spontaneously exhibit mature alpha-granules. Dami cells, transfected with the megakaryocytic platelet factor 4, fused to GFP (PF4-GFP), were induced in the presence of thrombopoietin (TPO), a megakaryocyte cytokine and PMA. Using confocal microscopy, PF4-GFP colocalized with von Willebrand Factor (vWF) in newly formed storage granules. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated alpha-granule-like features, including a dense core or parallel tubules and colocalization of PF4-GFP and vWF. Hence, TPO-treated Dami cells are a suitable model to study alpha-granules and their biogenesis.

  6. Myc controls transcriptional regulation of cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to pathological stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Preeti; Zhao, Peng; Angelis, Ekaterini; Ruan, Hongmei; Korge, Paavo; Olson, Aaron; Wang, Yibin; Jin, Eunsook S.; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Portman, Michael; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2010-01-01

    In the adult heart, regulation of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial genes is controlled by the PPARγ coactivator–1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators. However, in response to pathological stressors such as hemodynamic load or ischemia, cardiac myocytes downregulate PGC-1 activity and fatty acid oxidation genes in preference for glucose metabolism pathways. Interestingly, despite the reduced PGC-1 activity, these pathological stressors are associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, at least initially. The transcription factors that regulate these changes in the setting of reduced PGC-1 are unknown, but Myc can regulate glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis during cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in cancer cells. Here we have demonstrated that Myc activation in the myocardium of adult mice increases glucose uptake and utilization, downregulates fatty acid oxidation by reducing PGC-1α levels, and induces mitochondrial biogenesis. Inactivation of Myc in the adult myocardium attenuated hypertrophic growth and decreased the expression of glycolytic and mitochondrial biogenesis genes in response to hemodynamic load. Surprisingly, the Myc-orchestrated metabolic alterations were associated with preserved cardiac function and improved recovery from ischemia. Our data suggest that Myc directly regulates glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac myocytes and is an important regulator of energy metabolism in the heart in response to pathologic stress. PMID:20364083

  7. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centred RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis.

  8. Stratosphere Conditions Inactivate Bacterial Endospores from a Mars Spacecraft Assembly Facility.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Christina L; Wong, Gregory M; James, Leandro M; Thakrar, Prital J; Lane, Michael A; Catechis, John A; Smith, David J

    2017-04-01

    Every spacecraft sent to Mars is allowed to land viable microbial bioburden, including hardy endospore-forming bacteria resistant to environmental extremes. Earth's stratosphere is severely cold, dry, irradiated, and oligotrophic; it can be used as a stand-in location for predicting how stowaway microbes might respond to the martian surface. We launched E-MIST, a high-altitude NASA balloon payload on 10 October 2015 carrying known quantities of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (4.07 × 10(7) spores per sample), a radiation-tolerant strain collected from a spacecraft assembly facility. The payload spent 8 h at ∼31 km above sea level, exposing bacterial spores to the stratosphere. We found that within 120 and 240 min, spore viability was significantly reduced by 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. By 480 min, <0.001% of spores carried to the stratosphere remained viable. Our balloon flight results predict that most terrestrial bacteria would be inactivated within the first sol on Mars if contaminated spacecraft surfaces receive direct sunlight. Unfortunately, an instrument malfunction prevented the acquisition of UV light measurements during our balloon mission. To make up for the absence of radiometer data, we calculated a stratosphere UV model and conducted ground tests with a 271.1 nm UVC light source (0.5 W/m(2)), observing a similarly rapid inactivation rate when using a lower number of contaminants (640 spores per sample). The starting concentration of spores and microconfiguration on hardware surfaces appeared to influence survivability outcomes in both experiments. With the relatively few spores that survived the stratosphere, we performed a resequencing analysis and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms compared to unexposed controls. It is therefore plausible that bacteria enduring radiation-rich environments (e.g., Earth's upper atmosphere, interplanetary space, or the surface of Mars) may be pushed in evolutionarily

  9. Structural analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 endospore peptidoglycan and its role during differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Zöllner, P; Allmaier, G; Foster, S J

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the endospore cell wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus subtilis has been examined. Spore peptidoglycan was produced by the development of a method based on chemical permeabilization of the spore coats and enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan. The resulting muropeptides which were >97% pure were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, and mass spectrometry. This revealed that 49% of the muramic acid residues in the glycan backbone were present in the delta-lactam form which occurred predominantly every second muramic acid. The glycosidic bonds adjacent to the muramic acid delta-lactam residues were resistant to the action of muramidases. Of the muramic acid residues, 25.7 and 23.3% were substituted with a tetrapeptide and a single L-alanine, respectively. Only 2% of the muramic acids had tripeptide side chains and may constitute the primordial cell wall, the remainder of the peptidoglycan being spore cortex. The spore peptidoglycan is very loosely cross-linked at only 2.9% of the muramic acid residues, a figure approximately 11-fold less than that of the vegetative cell wall. The peptidoglycan from strain AA110 (dacB) had fivefold-greater cross-linking (14.4%) than the wild type and an altered ratio of muramic acid substituents having 37.0, 46.3, and 12.3% delta-lactam, tetrapeptide, and single L-alanine, respectively. This suggests a role for the DacB protein (penicillin-binding protein 5*) in cortex biosynthesis. The sporulation-specific putative peptidoglycan hydrolase CwlD plays a pivotal role in the establishment of the mature spore cortex structure since strain AA107 (cwlD) has spore peptidoglycan which is completely devoid of muramic acid delta-lactam residues. Despite this drastic change in peptidoglycan structure, the spores are still stable but are unable to germinate. The role of delta-lactam and other spore peptidoglycan structural features in the maintenance of dormancy, heat resistance

  10. Stratosphere Conditions Inactivate Bacterial Endospores from a Mars Spacecraft Assembly Facility

    PubMed Central

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Wong, Gregory M.; James, Leandro M.; Thakrar, Prital J.; Lane, Michael A.; Catechis, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Every spacecraft sent to Mars is allowed to land viable microbial bioburden, including hardy endospore-forming bacteria resistant to environmental extremes. Earth's stratosphere is severely cold, dry, irradiated, and oligotrophic; it can be used as a stand-in location for predicting how stowaway microbes might respond to the martian surface. We launched E-MIST, a high-altitude NASA balloon payload on 10 October 2015 carrying known quantities of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (4.07 × 107 spores per sample), a radiation-tolerant strain collected from a spacecraft assembly facility. The payload spent 8 h at ∼31 km above sea level, exposing bacterial spores to the stratosphere. We found that within 120 and 240 min, spore viability was significantly reduced by 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. By 480 min, <0.001% of spores carried to the stratosphere remained viable. Our balloon flight results predict that most terrestrial bacteria would be inactivated within the first sol on Mars if contaminated spacecraft surfaces receive direct sunlight. Unfortunately, an instrument malfunction prevented the acquisition of UV light measurements during our balloon mission. To make up for the absence of radiometer data, we calculated a stratosphere UV model and conducted ground tests with a 271.1 nm UVC light source (0.5 W/m2), observing a similarly rapid inactivation rate when using a lower number of contaminants (640 spores per sample). The starting concentration of spores and microconfiguration on hardware surfaces appeared to influence survivability outcomes in both experiments. With the relatively few spores that survived the stratosphere, we performed a resequencing analysis and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms compared to unexposed controls. It is therefore plausible that bacteria enduring radiation-rich environments (e.g., Earth's upper atmosphere, interplanetary space, or the surface of Mars) may be pushed in evolutionarily

  11. Divergent Mitochondrial Biogenesis Responses in Human Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Preeti; Wanagat, Jonathan; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Yibin; Liem, David A.; Ping, Peipei; Antoshechkin, Igor A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are key players in the development and progression of heart failure (HF). Mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction leads to diminished energy production and increased cell death contributing to the progression of left ventricular (LV) failure. The fundamental mechanisms that underlie mt dysfunction in HF have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results To characterize mt morphology, biogenesis and genomic integrity in human HF, we investigated LV tissue from non-failing (NF) hearts and end-stage ischemic (ICM) or dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathic hearts. Although mt dysfunction was present in both types of cardiomyopathy, mt were smaller and increased in number in DCM compared to ICM or NF hearts. Mt volume density and mtDNA copy number was increased by ~2-fold (P<0.001) in DCM hearts in comparison to ICM hearts. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes in DCM versus no change in ICM. mtDNA repair and antioxidant genes were reduced in failing hearts suggestive of a defective repair and protection system, which may account for the 4.1-fold increase in mtDNA deletion mutations in DCM (P<0.05 vs NF hearts, P<0.05 vs ICM). Conclusions In DCM, mt dysfunction is associated with mtDNA damage and deletions, which could be a consequence of mutating stress coupled with a PGC-1α-dependent stimulus for mt biogenesis. However, this maladaptive compensatory response contributes to additional oxidative damage. Thus, our findings support further investigations into novel mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for mt dysfunction in DCM. PMID:23589024

  12. Study of Phagolysosome Biogenesis in Live Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bronietzki, Marc; Kasmapour, Bahram; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Phagocytic cells play a major role in the innate immune system by removing and eliminating invading microorganisms in their phagosomes. Phagosome maturation is the complex and tightly regulated process during which a nascent phagosome undergoes drastic transformation through well-orchestrated interactions with various cellular organelles and compartments in the cytoplasm. This process, which is essential for the physiological function of phagocytic cells by endowing phagosomes with their lytic and bactericidal properties, culminates in fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes and biogenesis of phagolysosomes which is considered to be the last and critical stage of maturation for phagosomes. In this report, we describe a live cell imaging based method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the dynamic process of lysosome to phagosome content delivery, which is a hallmark of phagolysosome biogenesis. This approach uses IgG-coated microbeads as a model for phagocytosis and fluorophore-conjugated dextran molecules as a luminal lysosomal cargo probe, in order to follow the dynamic delivery of lysosmal content to the phagosomes in real time in live macrophages using time-lapse imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Here we describe in detail the background, the preparation steps and the step-by-step experimental setup to enable easy and precise deployment of this method in other labs. Our described method is simple, robust, and most importantly, can be easily adapted to study phagosomal interactions and maturation in different systems and under various experimental settings such as use of various phagocytic cells types, loss-of-function experiments, different probes, and phagocytic particles. PMID:24638150

  13. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity.

  14. Impaired Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Myogenesis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ripolone, Michela; Ronchi, Dario; Violano, Raffaella; Vallejo, Dionis; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Barca, Emanuele; Lucchini, Valeria; Colombo, Irene; Villa, Luisa; Berardinelli, Angela; Balottin, Umberto; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Parisi, Daniela; Toscano, Antonio; Sciacco, Monica; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Moggio, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    , implying depression of the entire mitochondrial biogenesis. Results of Western blot analysis confirmed the reduced levels of the respiratory chain subunits that included mitochondrially encoded COX1 (47.5%; P = .004), COX2 (32.4%; P < .001), COX4 (26.6%; P < .001), and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (65.8%; P = .03) as well as the structural outer membrane mitochondrial porin (33.1%; P < .001). Conversely, the levels of expression of 3 myogenic regulatory factors—muscle-specificmyogenic factor 5, myoblast determination 1, and myogenin—were higher in muscles from patients with SMA compared with muscles from age-matched controls (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our results strongly support the conclusion that an altered regulation of myogenesis and a downregulated mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to pathologic change in the muscle of patients with SMA. Therapeutic strategies should aim at counteracting these changes. PMID:25844556

  15. Hydroxytyrosol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Yu, Guangli; Jia, Haiqun; Li, Xuesen; Feng, Zhihui; Wang, Ying; Weber, Peter; Wertz, Karin; Sharman, Edward; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) in extra-virgin olive oil is considered one of the most important polyphenolic compounds responsible for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet for lowering incidence of cardiovascular disease, the most common and most serious complication of diabetes. We propose that HT may prevent these diseases by a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis that leads to enhancement of mitochondrial function and cellular defense systems. In the present study, we investigated effects of HT that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. HT over the concentration range of 0.1-10 micromol/L stimulated the promoter transcriptional activation and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1 alpha, the central factor for mitochondrial biogenesis) and its downstream targets; these included nuclear respiration factors 1 and 2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, which leads to an increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the number of mitochondria. Knockdown of Ppargc1 alpha by siRNA blocked HT's stimulating effect on Complex I expression and mtDNA copy number. The HT treatment resulted in an enhancement of mitochondrial function, including an increase in activity and protein expression of Mitochondrial Complexes I, II, III and V; increased oxygen consumption; and a decrease in free fatty acid contents in the adipocytes. The mechanistic study of the PPARGC1 alpha activation signaling pathway demonstrated that HT is an activator of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and also up-regulates gene expression of PPAR alpha, CPT-1 and PPAR gamma. These data suggest that HT is able to promote mitochondrial function by stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  17. Impaired exercise tolerance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and muscle fiber maintenance in miR-133a-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yaohui; Sato, Yoriko; Wang, Chao; Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan; Gavin, Timothy P

    2016-11-01

    Exercise promotes multiple beneficial effects on muscle function, including induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. miR-133a is a muscle-enriched microRNA that regulates muscle development and function. The role of miR-133a in exercise tolerance has not been fully elucidated. In the current study, mice that were deficient in miR-133a demonstrated low maximal exercise capacity and low resting metabolic rate. Transcription of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-β, nuclear respiratory factor-1, and transcription factor A, mitochondrial were lower in miR-133a-deficient muscle, which was consistent with lower mitochondrial mass and impaired exercise capacity. Six weeks of endurance exercise training increased the transcriptional level of miR-133a and stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in wild-type mice, but failed to improve mitochondrial function in miR-133a-deficient mice. Further mechanistic analysis showed an increase in the miR-133a potential target, IGF-1 receptor, along with hyperactivation of Akt signaling, in miR-133a-deficient mice, which was consistent with lower transcription of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators. These findings indicate an essential role of miR-133a in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, exercise tolerance, and response to exercise training.-Nie, Y., Sato, Y., Wang, C., Yue, F., Kuang, S., Gavin, T. P. Impaired exercise tolerance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and muscle fiber maintenance in miR-133a-deficient mice. © FASEB.

  18. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice.

  19. Tetramethylpyrazine ameliorates high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Xia, Pu; Li, Xi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhenqi; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound isolated from a Chinese herbal prescription that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that TMP acts as a potent antioxidant protecting endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damages. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the antioxidant effect of TMP remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that TMP increases nitric oxide production in endothelial cells and promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation in rate aortic rings. The antioxidant effect of TMP appears attributable to its ability to activate the mitochondrial biogenesis, as reflected in an up-regulation of complex III and amelioration of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, TMP is able to reverse high glucose-induced suppression of SIRT1 and the biogenesis-related factors, including PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM, suggesting a new molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of TMP on the endothelium.

  20. Cathepsin B modulates lysosomal biogenesis and host defense against Francisella novicida infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Man, Si Ming; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Lupfer, Christopher; Gurung, Prajwal; Neale, Geoffrey; Guy, Clifford S; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-09-19

    Lysosomal cathepsins regulate an exquisite range of biological functions, and their deregulation is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and degenerative diseases in humans. In this study, we identified a key cell-intrinsic role for cathepsin B as a negative feedback regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Mice and macrophages lacking cathepsin B activity had increased resistance to the cytosolic bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B down-regulated mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and prevented cleavage of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. These events drove transcription of lysosomal and autophagy genes via transcription factor EB, which increased lysosomal biogenesis and activation of autophagy initiation kinase ULK1 for clearance of the bacteria. Our results identified a fundamental biological function of cathepsin B in providing a checkpoint for homeostatic maintenance of lysosome populations and basic recycling functions in the cell. © 2016 Qi et al.

  1. Regulatory multidimensionality of gas vesicle biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Andrew I; Facciotti, Marc T

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 is multifaceted and appears to integrate environmental and metabolic cues at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The mechanistic details underlying this process, however, remain unclear. In this manuscript, we quantify the contribution of light scattering made by both intracellular and released gas vesicles isolated from Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, demonstrating that each form can lead to distinct features in growth curves determined by optical density measured at 600 nm (OD(600)). In the course of the study, we also demonstrate the sensitivity of gas vesicle accumulation in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 on small differences in growth conditions and reevaluate published works in the context of our results to present a hypothesis regarding the roles of the general transcription factor tbpD and the TCA cycle enzyme aconitase on the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis.

  2. Regulatory Multidimensionality of Gas Vesicle Biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Andrew I.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 is multifaceted and appears to integrate environmental and metabolic cues at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The mechanistic details underlying this process, however, remain unclear. In this manuscript, we quantify the contribution of light scattering made by both intracellular and released gas vesicles isolated from Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, demonstrating that each form can lead to distinct features in growth curves determined by optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600). In the course of the study, we also demonstrate the sensitivity of gas vesicle accumulation in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 on small differences in growth conditions and reevaluate published works in the context of our results to present a hypothesis regarding the roles of the general transcription factor tbpD and the TCA cycle enzyme aconitase on the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis. PMID:22110395

  3. Cathepsin B modulates lysosomal biogenesis and host defense against Francisella novicida infection

    PubMed Central

    Malireddi, R.K. Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Lupfer, Christopher; Gurung, Prajwal; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal cathepsins regulate an exquisite range of biological functions, and their deregulation is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and degenerative diseases in humans. In this study, we identified a key cell-intrinsic role for cathepsin B as a negative feedback regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Mice and macrophages lacking cathepsin B activity had increased resistance to the cytosolic bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B down-regulated mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and prevented cleavage of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. These events drove transcription of lysosomal and autophagy genes via transcription factor EB, which increased lysosomal biogenesis and activation of autophagy initiation kinase ULK1 for clearance of the bacteria. Our results identified a fundamental biological function of cathepsin B in providing a checkpoint for homeostatic maintenance of lysosome populations and basic recycling functions in the cell. PMID:27551156

  4. Melatonin promotes adipogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hisashi; Tanaka, Goki; Masuda, Shinya; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Sakurai, Takuya; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki; Izawa, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland, but elicits a wide range of physiological responses in peripheral target tissues. Recent advances suggest that melatonin controls adiposity, resulting in changes in body weight. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of melatonin on adipogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 mouse embryo fibroblasts. Melatonin significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), a master regulator of adipogenesis, and promoted differentiation into adipocytes. Melatonin-treated cells also formed smaller lipid droplets and abundantly expressed several molecules associated with lipolysis, including adipose triglyceride lipase, perilipin, and comparative gene identification-58. Moreover, the hormone promoted biogenesis of mitochondria, as indicated by fluorescent staining, elevated the citrate synthase activity, and upregulated the expression of PPAR-γ coactivator 1 α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, and transcription factor A. The expression of uncoupling protein 1 was also observable both at mRNA and at protein level in melatonin-treated cells. Finally, adiponectin secretion and the expression of adiponectin receptors were enhanced. These results suggest that melatonin promotes adipogenesis, lipolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis, and adiponectin secretion. Thus, melatonin has potential as an anti-obesity agent that may reverse obesity-related disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Coordinated changes in mitochondrial function and biogenesis in healthy and diseased human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anne; Fortin, Dominique; Zoll, Joffrey; N'Guessan, Benoit; Mettauer, Bertrand; Lampert, Eliane; Veksler, Vladimir; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2005-01-01

    We examined the transcriptional signaling cascade involved in the changes of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle and of the exercise capacity of humans in response to long-term physical activity and chronic heart failure (CHF). Biopsy samples of vastus lateralis muscle were obtained from 18 healthy subjects with different fitness levels (assessed by maximal oxygen uptake, VO2 peak). We compared 9 sedentary subjects with 10 CHF patients undergoing transplantation. Muscle oxidative capacity was measured in permeabilized fibers (Vmax). Transcript levels of target genes were quantified by RT-PCR. In healthy subjects, VO2 peak was linearly related to Vmax (P<0.01) and to the gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and of the coactivator PGC-1alpha and its downstream transcription factors. A coordinate increase in PGC-1alpha and mRNA levels of proteins involved in degradation, fusion, and fission of mitochondria was observed associated with calcineurin activation. Despite decreased VO2 peak, in CHF patients skeletal muscles showed preserved Vmax in accordance with preserved markers and transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, with no calcineurin activation. The results provide strong support for a central role for PGC-1alpha and calcineurin activation in mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy and diseased human skeletal muscles.

  6. A Simple Method for the Extraction, PCR-amplification, Cloning, and Sequencing of Pasteuria 16S rDNA from Small Numbers of Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Atibalentja, N.; Noel, G. R.; Ciancio, A.

    2004-01-01

    For many years the taxonomy of the genus Pasteuria has been marred with confusion because the bacterium could not be cultured in vitro and, therefore, descriptions were based solely on morphological, developmental, and pathological characteristics. The current study sought to devise a simple method for PCR-amplification, cloning, and sequencing of Pasteuria 16S rDNA from small numbers of endospores, with no need for prior DNA purification. Results show that DNA extracts from plain glass bead-beating of crude suspensions containing 10,000 endospores at 0.2 × 10⁶ endospores ml-1 were sufficient for PCR-amplification of Pasteuria 16S rDNA, when used in conjunction with specific primers. These results imply that for P. penetrans and P. nishizawae only one parasitized female of Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines, respectively, should be sufficient, and as few as eight cadavers of Belonolaimus longicaudatus with an average number of 1,250 endospores of "Candidatus Pasteuria usgae" are needed for PCR-amplification of Pasteuria 16S rDNA. The method described in this paper should facilitate the sequencing of the 16S rDNA of the many Pasteuria isolates that have been reported on nematodes and, consequently, expedite the classification of those isolates through comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19262793

  7. Pasteuria endospores from Heterodera cajani (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) exhibit inverted attachment and altered germination in cross-infection studies with Globodera pallida (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sharad; Mauchline, Tim H; Rowe, Janet; Hirsch, Penny R; Davies, Keith G

    2012-03-01

    The Pasteuria group of Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacteria are parasites of invertebrates and exhibit differences in host specificity. We describe a cross-infection study between an isolate of Pasteuria from pigeon pea cyst nematode, Heterodera cajani, which also infects the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, from the United Kingdom. A proportion of the attached endospores, 13% on H. cajani and 22% on G. pallida adhere to the cuticle in an inverted orientation. Inverted and conventionally attached endospores germinated and produced bacillus-like rods that completed their life cycle in < 15 weeks within females of G. pallida. This is the first example in which the life cycle of a Pasteuria population was systematically followed in two different nematode genera. A 1430-base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the Pasteuria isolate from H. cajani revealed 98.6% similarity to the orthologous gene in Pasteuria nishizawae. Additionally, their respective endospore sizes were not significantly different, in contrast their host ranges are. Potential reasons for this remain unclear and are discussed.

  8. First Insights into the Genome of the Gram-Negative, Endospore-Forming Organism Sporomusa ovata Strain H1 DSM 2662

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The genome of Sporomusa ovata strain H1 DSM 2662, an anaerobic, Gram-negative endospore-forming bacterium, was sequenced. S. ovata uses N-methyl compounds, primary alcohols, fatty acids, and H2 and CO2 as energy and carbon sources to produce acetate. The genome harbors one chromosome, which encodes proteins typical for sporulation. PMID:24029766

  9. First Insights into the Genome of the Gram-Negative, Endospore-Forming Organism Sporomusa ovata Strain H1 DSM 2662.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-09-12

    The genome of Sporomusa ovata strain H1 DSM 2662, an anaerobic, Gram-negative endospore-forming bacterium, was sequenced. S. ovata uses N-methyl compounds, primary alcohols, fatty acids, and H2 and CO2 as energy and carbon sources to produce acetate. The genome harbors one chromosome, which encodes proteins typical for sporulation.

  10. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  11. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  12. Identifying components required for OMP biogenesis as novel targets for antiinfective drugs.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Johanna; Bräutigam, Cornelia; Mühlenkamp, Melanie; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Meuskens, Ina; Skurnik, Mikael; Leskinen, Katarzyna; Bohn, Erwin; Autenrieth, Ingo; Schütz, Monika

    2017-01-24

    The emergence of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria requires new therapies for combating bacterial infections. Targeting the biogenesis of virulence factors could be an alternative strategy instead of killing bacteria with antibiotics. The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria acts as a physical barrier. At the same time it facilitates the exchange of molecules and harbors a multitude of proteins associated with virulence. In order to insert proteins into the OM, an essential oligomeric membrane-associated protein complex, the ß-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is required. Being essential for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) the BAM and also periplasmic chaperones may serve as attractive targets to develop novel antiinfective agents. Herein, we aimed to elucidate which proteins belonging to the OMP biogenesis machinery have the most important function in granting bacterial fitness, OM barrier function, facilitating biogenesis of dedicated virulence factors and determination of overall virulence. To this end we used the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica as a model system. We individually knocked out all non-essential components of the BAM (BamB, C and E) as well as the periplasmic chaperones DegP, SurA and Skp. In summary, we found that the most profound phenotypes were produced by the loss of BamB or SurA with both knockouts resulting in significant attenuation or even avirulence of Ye in a mouse infection model. Thus, we assume that both BamB and SurA are promising targets for the development of new antiinfective drugs in the future.

  13. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: . implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 °C), gas composition (Earth-normal N 2/O 2 mix, pure N 2, pure CO 2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO 2 (95.3%), N 2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O 2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47×10 6 bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 °C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N 2/O 2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 °C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO 2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on sun

  14. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: implications for the forward contamination of Mars.

    PubMed

    Schuerger, Andrew C; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Kern, Roger G; Rothschild, Lynn J; McKay, Christopher P

    2003-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 degrees C), gas composition (Earth-normal N2/O2 mix, pure N2, pure CO2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47 x 10(6) bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 degrees C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N2/O2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 degrees C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on

  15. Dietary isoflavone daidzein promotes Tfam expression that increases mitochondrial biogenesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Makiko; Naka, Ayano; Sakamoto, Yuri; Shibasaki, Ayako; Toh, Mariko; Tsukamoto, Sakuka; Kondo, Kazuo; Iida, Kaoruko

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in muscles leads to a wide range of metabolic and age-related disorders. Recently, it has been reported that a natural polyphenol, resveratrol, affects mitochondrial biogenesis. This study aimed to identify other natural polyphenolic compounds that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis in muscles. For this purpose, we used the C2C12 murine muscle cell line. Screening involved a reporter assay based on the promoter of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). We found that several polyphenols exhibited the ability to increase Tfam promoter activity and that the soy isoflavone daidzein was a most potent candidate that regulated mitochondrial biogenesis. When C2C12 myotubes were treated with 25-50 μM daidzein for 24h, there were significant increases in the expression of Tfam and mitochondrial genes such as COX1 and Cytb as well as the mitochondrial content. Using several mutant Tfam promoter fragments, we found that the transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) and its coactivator, PGC1α, were necessary for the effect of daidzein on Tfam expression. Finally, silencing of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) by shRNA resulted in inhibition of the daidzein effects on mitochondrial gene expression. In conclusion, daidzein regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle cells by regulating transcriptional networks through a SIRT1-associated pathway. These results suggest that daidzein would be beneficial to protect against a wide range of diseases caused by muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J.L.; Quattrini, A.; Lentz, S.I.; Figueroa-Romero, C.; Cerri, F.; Backus, C.; Hong, Y.; Feldman, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Normal mitochondrial (Mt) activity is a critical component of neuronal metabolism and function. Disruption of Mt activity by altered Mt fission and fusion is the root cause of both neurodegenerative disorders and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2A inherited neuropathy. The current study addressed the role of Mt fission in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). Methods Mt biogenesis and fission were assayed in both in vivo and in vitro models of DN. Gene, protein, mitochondrial DNA and ultrastructural analyses were used to assess Mt biogenesis and fission. Results Our data reveal increased Mt biogenesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from diabetic compared to non-diabetic mice. An essential step in Mt biogenesis is Mt fission, regulated by the Mt fission protein Drp1. Evaluation of in vivo diabetic neurons indicated small, fragmented Mt, suggesting increased fission. In vitro studies reveal short-term hyperglycemic exposure increased expression of Drp1. The influence of hyperglycemia-mediated Mt fission on cellular viability was evaluated by knockdown of Drp1. Knockdown of Drp1 resulted in decreased susceptibility to hyperglycemic damage. Conclusions We propose that: 1) Mt undergo biogenesis in response to hyperglycemia, but the increased biogenesis is insufficient to accommodate the metabolic load; 2) hyperglycemia causes an excess of Mt fission, creating small, damaged mitochondria; and 3) reduction of aberrant Mt fission increases neuronal survival and indicates an important role for the fission-fusion equilibrium in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:19847394

  17. The fungal vacuole: composition, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Klionsky, D J; Herman, P K; Emr, S D

    1990-01-01

    The fungal vacuole is an extremely complex organelle that is involved in a wide variety of functions. The vacuole not only carries out degradative processes, the role most often ascribed to it, but also is the primary storage site for certain small molecules and biosynthetic precursors such as basic amino acids and polyphosphate, plays a role in osmoregulation, and is involved in the precise homeostatic regulation of cytosolic ion and basic amino acid concentration and intracellular pH. These many functions necessitate an intricate interaction between the vacuole and the rest of the cell; the vacuole is part of both the secretory and endocytic pathways and is also directly accessible from the cytosol. Because of the various roles and properties of the vacuole, it has been possible to isolate mutants which are defective in various vacuolar functions including the storage and uptake of metabolites, regulation of pH, sorting and processing of vacuolar proteins, and vacuole biogenesis. These mutants show a remarkable degree of genetic overlap, suggesting that these functions are not individual, discrete properties of the vacuole but, rather, are closely interrelated. Images PMID:2215422

  18. Neisserial surface lipoproteins: structure, function and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyejin E; Bateman, Thomas J; Moraes, Trevor F

    2017-03-01

    The surface of many Gram-negative bacteria contains lipidated protein molecules referred to as surface lipoproteins or SLPs. SLPs play critical roles in host immune evasion, nutrient acquisition and regulation of the bacterial stress response. The focus of this review is on the SLPs present in Neisseria, a genus of bacteria that colonise the mucosal surfaces of animals. Neisseria contains two pathogens of medical interest, namely Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. Several SLPs have been identified in Neisseria and their study has elucidated key strategies used by these pathogens to survive inside the human body. Herein, we focus on the identification, structure and function of SLPs that have been identified in Neisseria. We also survey the translocation pathways used by these SLPs to reach the cell surface. Specifically, we elaborate on the strategies used by neisserial SLPs to translocate across the outer membrane with an emphasis on Slam, a novel outer membrane protein that has been implicated in SLP biogenesis. Taken together, the study of SLPs in Neisseria illustrates the widespread roles played by this family of proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Diet, energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Anthony E; Smith, Steven R; Ravussin, Eric

    2007-11-01

    This review highlights some recent findings regarding nutritional and endocrine regulators of mitochondrial mass and function and their association with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is central to many chronic metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with lower mitochondrial mass and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Part of the mitochondrial dysfunction can be triggered by adverse nutrition. Increased fatty acid exposure, resulting from high fats diets or overfeeding, is linked to both decreased mitochondrial number and markers of oxidative phosphorylation. Caloric restriction and the adiponectin signaling pathway, however, can stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis by elevating the transcriptional machinery that regulates mitochondrial mass, improving mitochondrial efficiency, activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1alpha mediated reactive oxygen species scavenging mechanism, and lowering reactive oxygen species production. States of insulin resistance are characterized by defects in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Abnormalities in oxidative capacity, however, can be partially normalized by caloric restriction by modulating mitochondrial mass in an insulin sensitizing manner.

  20. Secretory granule biogenesis: rafting to the SNARE.

    PubMed

    Tooze, S A; Martens, G J; Huttner, W B

    2001-03-01

    Regulated secretion of hormones occurs when a cell receives an external stimulus, triggering the secretory granules to undergo fusion with the plasma membrane and release their content into the extracellular milieu. The formation of a mature secretory granule (MSG) involves a series of discrete and unique events such as protein sorting, formation of immature secretory granules (ISGs), prohormone processing and vesicle fusion. Regulated secretory proteins (RSPs), the proteins stored and secreted from MSGs, contain signals or domains to direct them into the regulated secretory pathway. Recent data on the role of specific domains in RSPs involved in sorting and aggregation suggest that the cell-type-specific composition of RSPs in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) has an important role in determining how the RSPs get into ISGs. The realization that lipid rafts are implicated in sorting RSPs in the TGN and the identification of SNARE molecules represent further major advances in our understanding of how MSGs are formed. At the heart of these findings is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving protein--lipid and protein--protein interactions specific for secretory granule biogenesis.

  1. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Emerging roles of mitochondria in the evolution, biogenesis, and function of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Abhishek; McBride, Heidi M.

    2013-01-01

    In the last century peroxisomes were thought to have an endosymbiotic origin. Along with mitochondria and chloroplasts, peroxisomes primarily regulate their numbers through the growth and division of pre-existing organelles, and they house specific machinery for protein import. These features were considered unique to endosymbiotic organelles, prompting the idea that peroxisomes were key cellular elements that helped facilitate the evolution of multicellular organisms. The functional similarities to mitochondria within mammalian systems expanded these ideas, as both organelles scavenge peroxide and reactive oxygen species, both organelles oxidize fatty acids, and at least in higher eukaryotes, the biogenesis of both organelles is controlled by common nuclear transcription factors of the PPAR family. Over the last decade it has been demonstrated that the fission machinery of both organelles is also shared, and that both organelles act as critical signaling platforms for innate immunity and other pathways. Taken together it is clear that the mitochondria and peroxisomes are functionally coupled, regulating cellular metabolism and signaling through a number of common mechanisms. However, recent work has focused primarily on the role of the ER in the biogenesis of peroxisomes, potentially overshadowing the critical importance of the mitochondria as a functional partner. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of functional coupling of the peroxisomes to the mitochondria/ER networks, providing some new perspectives on the potential contribution of the mitochondria to peroxisomal biogenesis. PMID:24133452

  3. A new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology.

    PubMed

    Hodneland Nilsson, Linn Iren; Nitschke Pettersen, Ina Katrine; Nikolaisen, Julie; Micklem, David; Avsnes Dale, Hege; Vatne Røsland, Gro; Lorens, James; Tronstad, Karl Johan

    2015-11-24

    Changes in mitochondrial amount and shape are intimately linked to maintenance of cell homeostasis via adaptation of vital functions. Here, we developed a new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology. This was achieved by making a genetic reporter construct where a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), controls expression of mitochondria targeted green fluorescent protein (mitoGFP). HeLa cells with the reporter construct demonstrated inducible expression of mitoGFP upon activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) with AICAR. We established stable reporter cells where the mitoGFP reporter activity corresponded with mitochondrial biogenesis both in magnitude and kinetics, as confirmed by biochemical markers and confocal microscopy. Quantitative 3D image analysis confirmed accordant increase in mitochondrial biomass, in addition to filament/network promoting and protecting effects on mitochondrial morphology, after treatment with AICAR. The level of mitoGFP reversed upon removal of AICAR, in parallel with decrease in mtDNA. In summary, we here present a new GFP-based genetic reporter strategy to study mitochondrial regulation and dynamics in living cells. This combinatorial reporter concept can readily be transferred to other cell models and contexts to address specific physiological mechanisms.

  4. Small molecule inhibition of apicomplexan FtsH1 disrupts plastid biogenesis in human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Amberg-Johnson, Katherine; Hari, Sanjay B; Ganesan, Suresh M; Lorenzi, Hernan A; Sauer, Robert T; Niles, Jacquin C; Yeh, Ellen

    2017-08-18

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related apicomplexan pathogens contain an essential plastid organelle, the apicoplast, which is a key anti-parasitic target. Derived from secondary endosymbiosis, the apicoplast depends on novel, but largely cryptic, mechanisms for protein/lipid import and organelle inheritance during parasite replication. These critical biogenesis pathways present untapped opportunities to discover new parasite-specific drug targets. We used an innovative screen to identify actinonin as having a novel mechanism-of-action inhibiting apicoplast biogenesis. Resistant mutation, chemical-genetic interaction, and biochemical inhibition demonstrate that the unexpected target of actinonin in P. falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii is FtsH1, a homolog of a bacterial membrane AAA+ metalloprotease. PfFtsH1 is the first novel factor required for apicoplast biogenesis identified in a phenotypic screen. Our findings demonstrate that FtsH1 is a novel and, importantly, druggable antimalarial target. Development of FtsH1 inhibitors will have significant advantages with improved drug kinetics and multistage efficacy against multiple human parasites.

  5. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-10-18

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA-rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

  6. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA–rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27708161

  7. Emerging roles of mitochondria in the evolution, biogenesis, and function of peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Abhishek; McBride, Heidi M

    2013-09-26

    In the last century peroxisomes were thought to have an endosymbiotic origin. Along with mitochondria and chloroplasts, peroxisomes primarily regulate their numbers through the growth and division of pre-existing organelles, and they house specific machinery for protein import. These features were considered unique to endosymbiotic organelles, prompting the idea that peroxisomes were key cellular elements that helped facilitate the evolution of multicellular organisms. The functional similarities to mitochondria within mammalian systems expanded these ideas, as both organelles scavenge peroxide and reactive oxygen species, both organelles oxidize fatty acids, and at least in higher eukaryotes, the biogenesis of both organelles is controlled by common nuclear transcription factors of the PPAR family. Over the last decade it has been demonstrated that the fission machinery of both organelles is also shared, and that both organelles act as critical signaling platforms for innate immunity and other pathways. Taken together it is clear that the mitochondria and peroxisomes are functionally coupled, regulating cellular metabolism and signaling through a number of common mechanisms. However, recent work has focused primarily on the role of the ER in the biogenesis of peroxisomes, potentially overshadowing the critical importance of the mitochondria as a functional partner. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of functional coupling of the peroxisomes to the mitochondria/ER networks, providing some new perspectives on the potential contribution of the mitochondria to peroxisomal biogenesis.

  8. Posttranslational regulation of the scaffold for Fe-S cluster biogenesis, Isu.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Amy J; Song, Ji-Yoon; Schilke, Brenda; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2008-12-01

    Isu, the scaffold protein on which Fe-S clusters are built in the mitochondrial matrix, plays a central role in the biogenesis of Fe-S cluster proteins. We report that the reduction in the activity of several components of the cluster biogenesis system, including the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, causes a 15-20-fold up-regulation of Isu. This up-regulation results from changes at both the transcriptional and posttranslational level: an increase in ISU mRNA levels and in stability of ISU protein. Its biological importance is demonstrated by the fact that cells lacking Ssq1 grow poorly when Isu levels are prevented from rising above those found in wild-type cells. Of the biogenesis factors tested, Nfs1, the sulfur donor, was unique. Little increase in Isu levels occurred when Nfs1 was depleted. However, its presence was required for the up-regulation caused by reduction in activity of other components. Our results are consistent with the existence of a mechanism to increase the stability of Isu, and thus its level, that is dependent on the presence of the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1.

  9. Posttranslational Regulation of the Scaffold for Fe-S Cluster Biogenesis, Isu

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy J.; Song, Ji-Yoon; Schilke, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    Isu, the scaffold protein on which Fe-S clusters are built in the mitochondrial matrix, plays a central role in the biogenesis of Fe-S cluster proteins. We report that the reduction in the activity of several components of the cluster biogenesis system, including the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, causes a 15–20-fold up-regulation of Isu. This up-regulation results from changes at both the transcriptional and posttranslational level: an increase in ISU mRNA levels and in stability of ISU protein. Its biological importance is demonstrated by the fact that cells lacking Ssq1 grow poorly when Isu levels are prevented from rising above those found in wild-type cells. Of the biogenesis factors tested, Nfs1, the sulfur donor, was unique. Little increase in Isu levels occurred when Nfs1 was depleted. However, its presence was required for the up-regulation caused by reduction in activity of other components. Our results are consistent with the existence of a mechanism to increase the stability of Isu, and thus its level, that is dependent on the presence of the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1. PMID:18843040

  10. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-08-15

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1-Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis.

  11. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1–Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis. PMID:19684114

  12. Lipid rafts are essential for peroxisome biogenesis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Woudenberg, Jannes; Rembacz, Krzysztof P; Hoekstra, Mark; Pellicoro, Antonella; van den Heuvel, Fiona A J; Heegsma, Janette; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Holzinger, Andreas; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2010-08-01

    Peroxisomes are particularly abundant in the liver and are involved in bile salt synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. Peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) are required for peroxisome biogenesis [e.g., the interacting peroxisomal biogenesis factors Pex13p and Pex14p] and its metabolic function [e.g., the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) and PMP70]. Impaired function of PMPs is the underlying cause of Zellweger syndrome and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we studied for the first time the putative association of PMPs with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts and their function in peroxisome biogenesis. Lipid rafts were isolated from Triton X-100-lysed or Lubrol WX-lysed HepG2 cells and analyzed for the presence of various PMPs by western blotting. Lovastatin and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were used to deplete cholesterol and disrupt lipid rafts in HepG2 cells, and this was followed by immunofluorescence microscopy to determine the subcellular location of catalase and PMPs. Cycloheximide was used to inhibit protein synthesis. Green fluorescent protein-tagged fragments of PMP70 and ALDP were analyzed for their lipid raft association. PMP70 and Pex14p were associated with Triton X-100-resistant rafts, ALDP was associated with Lubrol WX-resistant rafts, and Pex13p was not lipid raft-associated in HepG2 cells. The minimal peroxisomal targeting signals in ALDP and PMP70 were not sufficient for lipid raft association. Cholesterol depletion led to dissociation of PMPs from lipid rafts and impaired sorting of newly synthesized catalase and ALDP but not Pex14p and PMP70. Repletion of cholesterol to these cells efficiently reestablished the peroxisomal sorting of catalase but not ALDP. Human PMPs are differentially associated with lipid rafts independently of the protein homology and/or their functional interaction. Cholesterol is required for peroxisomal lipid raft assembly and peroxisome biogenesis.

  13. Global identification of genes affecting iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hidese, Ryota; Mihara, Hisaaki; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2014-03-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ubiquitous cofactors that are crucial for many physiological processes in all organisms. In Escherichia coli, assembly of Fe-S clusters depends on the activity of the iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) assembly and sulfur mobilization (SUF) apparatus. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and the mechanisms that control Fe-S cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis are still poorly defined. In this study, we performed a global screen to identify the factors affecting Fe-S cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis using the Keio collection, which is a library of 3,815 single-gene E. coli knockout mutants. The approach was based on radiolabeling of the cells with [2-(14)C]dihydrouracil, which entirely depends on the activity of an Fe-S enzyme, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. We identified 49 genes affecting Fe-S cluster biogenesis and/or iron homeostasis, including 23 genes important only under microaerobic/anaerobic conditions. This study defines key proteins associated with Fe-S cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis, which will aid further understanding of the cellular mechanisms that coordinate the processes. In addition, we applied the [2-(14)C]dihydrouracil-labeling method to analyze the role of amino acid residues of an Fe-S cluster assembly scaffold (IscU) as a model of the Fe-S cluster assembly apparatus. The analysis showed that Cys37, Cys63, His105, and Cys106 are essential for the function of IscU in vivo, demonstrating the potential of the method to investigate in vivo function of proteins involved in Fe-S cluster assembly.

  14. SIRT1 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis reprogramming in hypoxic human pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Liu, Yan; Burns, Nana; Zhao, Ke-Seng; Song, Rui

    2017-03-22

    Although recent studies have reported that mitochondria are putative oxygen sensors underlying hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, little is known concerning the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory program in pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). We investigated the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in human PASMCs during H/R. Human PASMCs were exposed to hypoxia of 24-48 h and reoxygenation of 24-48 h. The expression of SIRT1 was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression was increased during hypoxia and decreased during reoxygenation, while the release of TFAM was increased in a time-dependent manner. Lentiviral overexpression of SIRT1 preserved SIRT3 deacetylase activity in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of PGC-1α suppressed the effect of SIRT1 on SIRT3 activity. Knockdown of SIRT3 abrogated SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of cyclophilin D (CyPD). Notably, knockdown of SIRT3 or PGC-1α suppressed the incremental effect of SIRT1 on mitochondrial TFAM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cellular ATP levels. Importantly, polydatin restored SIRT1 levels in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed the effect of polydatin on mitochondrial TFAM, mtDNA content and cellular ATP levels. In conclusion, SIRT1 expression is decreased in human PASMCs during H/R. TFAM expression in mitochondria is reduced and the release of TFAM is increased by H/R. PGC-1α/SIRT3/CyPD mediates the protective effect of SIRT1 on expression and release of TFAM and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Polydatin improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function by enhancing SIRT1 expression in hypoxic human PASMCs.

  15. Flavivirus Infection Impairs Peroxisome Biogenesis and Early Antiviral Signaling.

    PubMed

    You, Jaehwan; Hou, Shangmei; Malik-Soni, Natasha; Xu, Zaikun; Kumar, Anil; Rachubinski, Richard A; Frappier, Lori; Hobman, Tom C

    2015-12-01

    Flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that have an enormous impact on the global health burden. Currently, there are very few vaccines against or therapeutic treatments for flaviviruses, and our understanding of how these viruses cause disease is limited. Evidence suggests that the capsid proteins of flaviviruses play critical nonstructural roles during infection, and therefore, elucidating how these viral proteins affect cellular signaling pathways could lead to novel targets for antiviral therapy. We used affinity purification to identify host cell proteins that interact with the capsid proteins of West Nile and dengue viruses. One of the cellular proteins that formed a stable complex with flavivirus capsid proteins is the peroxisome biogenesis factor Pex19. Intriguingly, flavivirus infection resulted in a significant loss of peroxisomes, an effect that may be due in part to capsid expression. We posited that capsid protein-mediated sequestration and/or degradation of Pex19 results in loss of peroxisomes, a situation that could result in reduced early antiviral signaling. In support of this hypothesis, we observed that induction of the lambda interferon mRNA in response to a viral RNA mimic was reduced by more than 80%. Together, our findings indicate that inhibition of peroxisome biogenesis may be a novel mechanism by which flaviviruses evade the innate immune system during early stages of infection. RNA viruses infect hundreds of millions of people each year, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Chief among these pathogens are the flaviviruses, which include dengue virus and West Nile virus. Despite their medical importance, there are very few prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for these viruses. Moreover, the manner in which they subvert the innate immune response in order to establish infection in mammalian cells is not well understood. Recently, peroxisomes were reported to function in early antiviral signaling, but very little is known

  16. Biogeography of thermophilic, endospore-forming bacteria in deepwater hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Hubert, C. R.; Ellefson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Dormant endospores of thermophilic bacteria (thermospores) are routinely detected in permanently cold marine surface sediments and are an example of the microbial rare biosphere. These endospores remain undetected in nucleic-acid based community surveys, but can germinate and proliferate during high-temperature incubations. Prominent genera of thermospores include sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum and Pelotomaculum as well as fermentative Caloranaerobacter and Thermicanus, within the phylum Firmicutes. Many thermospores are closely related to microorganisms indigenous to subseafloor petroleum reservoirs. If thermospores found in the cold seabed originate warm subsurface petroleum reservoirs, hydrocarbon seeps are likely natural conduits for their passive dispersal up into the ocean. As such, thermospore distributions in marine sediments might have utility in detection of natural hydrocarbon seeps. Marine surface sediments from 112 locations in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico ranging from 100 to 3300 m water depth and situated 6 to 600 km away from each other were sampled and classified according to geochemical indications of oil seepage. Sediment microcosms amended with 20 mM sulfate and a mixture of organic substrates were pasteurized at 80°C then incubated at 50-55°C for 14 days. Sulfate reduction was monitored and detected in 84 (75%) of the sediment samples. The rate and extent of sulfate reduction at this high temperature was greater in the oil-containing sediments than in the sediments without oil. Sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on an Illumina MiSeq benchtop sequencer before and after high temperature incubations revealed enrichments of various thermospore genera with the majority being closely related to bacteria previously detected in deep subsurface environments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that thermospores in the vicinity of hydrocarbon seeps originate from warm deep biosphere habitats.

  17. Oil body biogenesis and biotechnology in legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Song, Youhong; Wang, Xin-Ding; Rose, Ray J

    2017-09-02

    The seeds of many legume species including soybean, Pongamia pinnata and the model legume Medicago truncatula store considerable oil, apart from protein, in their cotyledons. However, as a group, legume storage strategies are quite variable and provide opportunities for better understanding of carbon partitioning into different storage products. Legumes with their ability to fix nitrogen can also increase the sustainability of agricultural systems. This review integrates the cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology of oil body biogenesis before considering biotechnology strategies to enhance oil body biosynthesis. Cellular aspects of packaging triacylglycerol (TAG) into oil bodies are emphasized. Enhancing seed oil content has successfully focused on the up-regulation of the TAG biosynthesis pathways using overexpression of enzymes such as diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and transcription factors such as WRINKLE1 and LEAFY COTYLEDON1. While these strategies are central, decreasing carbon flow into other storage products and maximizing the packaging of oil bodies into the cytoplasm are other strategies that need further examination. Overall there is much potential for integrating carbon partitioning, up-regulation of fatty acid and TAG synthesis and oil body packaging, for enhancing oil levels. In addition to the potential for integrated strategies to improving oil yields, the capacity to modify fatty acid composition and use of oil bodies as platforms for the production of recombinant proteins in seed of transgenic legumes provide other opportunities for legume biotechnology.

  18. Hoxa10 null animals exhibit reduced platelet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Iwona M.; DeLuca, Teresa A.; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Miller, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor HOXA10 is an important regulator of myelopoiesis. Engineered over-expression of Hoxa10 in mice results in a myeloproliferative disorder that progresses to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) over time, and in humans over-expression is associated with poor outcomes in AML. Here, we report that loss of Hoxa10 expression in mice results in reduced platelet count and platelet production, but does not affect clotting efficiency. About 40% fewer platelets were found in Hoxa10 null animals in comparison to wild type littermates. We found a nearly 50% reduction in the percentage of reticulated platelets in Hoxa10 null mice, suggesting deficient platelet production. Furthermore, Hoxa10 null animals recovered less efficiently from induced thrombocytopenia, supporting our hypothesis of defective platelet production. This also correlated with reduced colony formation potential of stem and progenitor cells seeded in megakaryocyte-enhancing conditions in vitro. Together, our results indicate that HOXA10 is important for megakaryopoiesis and platelet biogenesis. PMID:26847476

  19. Ribosome Biogenesis and the Translation Process in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Translation, the decoding of mRNA into protein, is the third and final element of the central dogma. The ribosome, a nucleoprotein particle, is responsible and essential for this process. The bacterial ribosome consists of three rRNA molecules and approximately 55 proteins, components that are put together in an intricate and tightly regulated way. When finally matured, the quality of the particle, as well as the amount of active ribosomes, must be checked. The focus of this review is ribosome biogenesis in Escherichia coli and its cross-talk with the ongoing protein synthesis. We discuss how the ribosomal components are produced and how their synthesis is regulated according to growth rate and the nutritional contents of the medium. We also present the many accessory factors important for the correct assembly process, the list of which has grown substantially during the last few years, even though the precise mechanisms and roles of most of the proteins are not understood. PMID:17804668

  20. Biogenesis, assembly and turnover of photosystem II units.

    PubMed Central

    Baena-González, Elena; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2002-01-01

    Assembly of photosystem II, a multiprotein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane, requires stoichiometric production of over 20 protein subunits. Since part of the protein subunits are encoded in the chloroplast genome and part in the nucleus, a signalling network operates between the two genetic compartments in order to prevent wasteful production of proteins. Coordinated synthesis of proteins also takes place among the chloroplast-encoded subunits, thus establishing a hierarchy in the protein components that allows a stepwise building of the complex. In addition to this dependence on assembly partners, other factors such as the developmental stage of the plastid and various photosynthesis-related parameters exert a strict control on the accumulation, membrane targeting and assembly of the PSII subunits. Here, we briefly review recent results on this field obtained with three major approaches: biogenesis of photosystem II during the development of chloroplasts from etioplasts, use of photosystem II-specific mutants and photosystem II turnover during its repair cycle. PMID:12437884

  1. Storage pool diseases illuminate platelet dense granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2016-11-16

    Platelet dense granules (DGs) are membrane bound compartments that store polyphosphate and small molecules such as ADP, ATP, Ca(2+), and serotonin. The release of DG contents plays a central role in platelet aggregation to form a hemostatic plug. Accordingly, congenital deficiencies in the biogenesis of platelet DGs underlie human genetic disorders that cause storage pool disease and manifest with prolonged bleeding. DGs belong to a family of lysosome-related organelles, which also includes melanosomes, the compartments where the melanin pigments are synthesized. These organelles share several characteristics including an acidic lumen and, at least in part, the molecular machinery involved in their biogenesis. As a result, many genes affect both DG and melanosome biogenesis and the corresponding patients present not only with bleeding but also with oculocutaneous albinism. The identification and characterization of such genes has been instrumental in dissecting the pathways responsible for organelle biogenesis. Because the study of melanosome biogenesis has advanced more rapidly, this knowledge has been extrapolated to explain how DGs are produced. However, some progress has recently been made in studying platelet DG biogenesis directly in megakaryocytes and megakaryocytoid cells. DGs originate from an endosomal intermediate compartment, the multivesicular body. Maturation and differentiation into a DG begins when newly synthesized DG-specific proteins are delivered from early/recycling endosomal compartments. The machinery that orchestrates this vesicular trafficking is composed of a combination of both ubiquitous and cell type-specific proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on DG biogenesis. In particular, we focus on the individual human and murine genes encoding the molecular machinery involved in this process and how their deficiencies result in disease.

  2. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  3. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome protein Nep1 (Emg1) has a dual role in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, as an essential assembly factor and in the methylation of Ψ1191 in yeast 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kötter, Peter; Leisegang, Matthias S; Schilling, Valeska; Buchhaupt, Markus; Held, Martin; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael; Heckel, Alexander; Bohnsack, Markus T; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The Nep1 (Emg1) SPOUT-class methyltransferase is an essential ribosome assembly factor and the human Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is caused by a specific Nep1(D86G) mutation. We recently showed in vitro that Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Nep1 is a sequence-specific pseudouridine-N1-methyltransferase. Here, we show that in yeast the in vivo target site for Nep1-catalyzed methylation is located within loop 35 of the 18S rRNA that contains the unique hypermodification of U1191 to 1-methyl-3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-pseudouri-dine (m1acp3Ψ). Specific (14)C-methionine labelling of 18S rRNA in yeast mutants showed that Nep1 is not required for acp-modification but suggested a function in Ψ1191 methylation. ESI MS analysis of acp-modified Ψ-nucleosides in a Δnep1-mutant showed that Nep1 catalyzes the Ψ1191 methylation in vivo. Remarkably, the restored growth of a nep1-1(ts) mutant upon addition of S-adenosylmethionine was even observed after preventing U1191 methylation in a Δsnr35 mutant. This strongly suggests a dual Nep1 function, as Ψ1191-methyltransferase and ribosome assembly factor. Interestingly, the Nep1 methyltransferase activity is not affected upon introduction of the BCS mutation. Instead, the mutated protein shows enhanced dimerization propensity and increased affinity for its RNA-target in vitro. Furthermore, the BCS mutation prevents nucleolar accumulation of Nep1, which could be the reason for reduced growth in yeast and the Bowen-Conradi syndrome.

  4. A high throughput respirometric assay for mitochondrial biogenesis and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, Craig C.; Beeson, Gyda C.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are a common target of toxicity for drugs and other chemicals, and results in decreased aerobic metabolism and cell death. In contrast, mitochondrial biogenesis restores cell vitality and there is a need for new agents to induce biogenesis. Current cell-based models of mitochondrial biogenesis or toxicity are inadequate because cultured cell lines are highly glycolytic with minimal aerobic metabolism and altered mitochondrial physiology. In addition, there are no high-throughput, real-time assays that assess mitochondrial function. We adapted primary cultures of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) that exhibit in vivo levels of aerobic metabolism, are not glycolytic, and retain higher levels of differentiated functions and used the Seahorse Biosciences analyzer to measure mitochondrial function in real time in multi-well plates. Using uncoupled respiration as a marker of electron transport chain (ETC) integrity, the nephrotoxicants cisplatin, HgCl2 and gentamicin exhibited mitochondrial toxicity prior to decreases in basal respiration and cell death. Conversely, using FCCP-uncoupled respiration as a marker of maximal ETC activity, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), SRT1720, resveratrol, daidzein, and metformin produced mitochondrial biogenesis in RPTC. The merger of the RPTC model and multi-well respirometry results in a single high throughput assay to measure mitochondrial biogenesis and toxicity, and nephrotoxic potential. PMID:20465991

  5. p53 and ribosome biogenesis stress: the essentials.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Lior; Volarevic, Sinisa; Oren, Moshe

    2014-08-19

    Cell proliferation and cell growth are two tightly linked processes, as the proliferation program cannot be executed without proper accumulation of cell mass, otherwise endangering the fate of the two daughter cells. It is therefore not surprising that ribosome biogenesis, a key element in cell growth, is regulated by many cell cycle regulators. This regulation is exerted transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally, in conjunction with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Those signals eventually converge at the nucleolus, the cellular compartment that is not only responsible for executing the ribosome biogenesis program, but also serves as a regulatory hub, responsible for integrating and transmitting multiple stress signals to the omnipotent cell fate gatekeeper, p53. In this review we discuss when, how and why p53 is activated upon ribosomal biogenesis stress, and how perturbation of this critical regulatory interplay may impact human disease.

  6. Biogenesis and Function of Ago-Associated RNAs.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Iben; Hansen, Thomas Birkballe

    2017-03-01

    Numerous sophisticated high-throughput sequencing technologies have been developed over the past decade, and these have enabled the discovery of a diverse catalog of small non-coding (nc)RNA molecules that function as regulatory entities by associating with Argonaute (Ago) proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are currently the best-described class of post-transcriptional regulators that follow a specific biogenesis pathway characterized by Drosha/DGCR8 and Dicer processing. However, more exotic miRNA-like species that bypass particular steps of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway continue to emerge, with one of the most recent additions being the agotrons, which escape both Drosha/DGCR8- and Dicer-processing. We review here the current knowledge and most recent discoveries relating to alternative functions and biogenesis strategies for Ago-associated RNAs in mammals.

  7. Prokaryotic membrane vesicles: new insights on biogenesis and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Haurat, M Florencia; Elhenawy, Wael; Feldman, Mario F

    2015-02-01

    Biogenesis and trafficking of membrane vesicles are essential and well-studied processes in eukaryotes. In contrast, vesiculation in bacteria is not well understood. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in Gram-negative bacteria by blebbing of the outer membrane. In addition to the roles in pathogenesis, cell-to-cell communication and stress response, recent work has suggested that OMVs play important roles in immunomodulation and the establishment and balance of the gut microbiota. In this review we discuss the known and novel roles of OMVs and the different biogenesis models proposed, and address the evidence for cargo selection into OMVs. We also discuss the growing evidence for the existence of membrane vesicles in Gram-positive bacteria and Archaea. Due to their biological importance and promising applications in vaccinology, the biogenesis of OMVs is an important topic in microbiology.

  8. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria from geothermal environments in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago, with the proposal of Bacillus fumarioli sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Logan, N A; Lebbe, L; Hoste, B; Goris, J; Forsyth, G; Heyndrickx, M; Murray, B L; Syme, N; Wynn-Williams, D D; De Vos, P

    2000-09-01

    Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria were isolated from soils taken from active fumaroles on Mount Rittmann and Mount Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and from active and inactive fumaroles on Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago. The Mt Rittmann and Mt Melbourne soils yielded a dominant, moderately thermophilic and acidophilic, aerobic endospore-former growing at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C, and further strains of the same organism were isolated from a cold, dead fumarole at Clinker Gulch, Candlemas Island. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis, SDS-PAGE and routine phenotypic tests show that the Candlemas Island isolates are not distinguishable from the Mt Rittmann strains, although the two sites are 5600 km apart, and 16S rDNA sequence comparisons and DNA relatedness data support the proposal of a new species, Bacillus fumarioli, the type strain of which is LMG 17489T.

  9. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenglin; Chen, Dongrui; Xie, Qihai; Yang, Ying; Shen, Weili

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors.

  10. Melatonin enhances mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Hong, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis leads to liver cirrhosis and failure, and no effective treatment is currently available. Growing evidence supports a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and liver fibrogenesis and mitochondrial quality control-based therapy has emerged as a new therapeutic target. We investigated the protective mechanisms of melatonin against mitochondrial dysfunction-involved liver fibrosis, focusing on mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) dissolved in olive oil (0.5 mL/kg, twice a week, i.p.) for 8 wk. Melatonin was administered orally at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg once a day. Chronic CCl4 exposure induced collagen deposition, hepatocellular damage, and oxidative stress, and melatonin attenuated these increases. Increases in mRNA and protein expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in response to CCl4 were attenuated by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial swelling and glutamate dehydrogenase release. Chronic CCl4 exposure impaired mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and melatonin attenuated this impairment, as indicated by increases in mitochondrial DNA and in protein levels of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1); Parkin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1); and transcription factor A, mitochondrial (TFAM). CCl4-mediated decreases in mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins, such as dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 2, were also attenuated by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These results suggest that melatonin protects against liver fibrosis via upregulation of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may be useful as an anti-fibrotic treatment.

  11. Lithium increases PGC-1alpha expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in primary bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Struewing, Ian T; Barnett, Corey D; Tang, Tao; Mao, Catherine D

    2007-06-01

    Lithium is a therapeutic agent commonly used to treat bipolar disorder and its beneficial effects are thought to be due to a combination of activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and depletion of the inositol pool via inhibition of the inositol monophosphatase-1. We demonstrated that lithium in primary endothelial cells induced an increase in mitochondrial mass leading to an increase in ATP production without any significant change in mitochondrial efficiency. This increase in mitochondrial mass was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis transcription factors: nuclear respiratory factor-1 and -2beta, as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B2, which lead to the coordinated upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation components encoded by either the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. These effects of lithium on mitochondrial biogenesis were independent of the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and independent of inositol depletion. Also, expression of the coactivator PGC-1alpha was increased, whereas expression of the coactivator PRC was not affected. Lithium treatment rapidly induced a decrease in activating Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation and inhibitory Forkhead box class O (FOXO1)-Thr24 phosphorylation, as well as an increase in activating c-AMP responsive element binding (CREB)-Ser133 phosphorylation, two mechanisms known to control PGC-1alpha expression. Together, our results show that lithium induces mitochondrial biogenesis via CREB/PGC-1alpha and FOXO1/PGC-1alpha cascades, which highlight the pleiotropic effects of lithium and reveal also novel beneficial effects via preservation of mitochondrial functions.

  12. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 degrees C), gas composition (Earth-normal N2/O2 mix, pure N2, pure CO2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47 x 10(6) bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 degrees C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N2/O2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 degrees C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on

  13. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 degrees C), gas composition (Earth-normal N2/O2 mix, pure N2, pure CO2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47 x 10(6) bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 degrees C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N2/O2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 degrees C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on

  14. Ribosome biogenesis; the KsgA protein throws a methyl-mediated switch in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Chand S; Brown, Eric D

    2008-12-01

    Many trans-acting factors that aid in ribosome biogenesis have been identified in higher organisms but relatively few such factors are known in prokaryotes. In bacteria, the list of such factors includes ATP-energized helicases and chaperones as well as an emerging cadre of switch GTPases. The KsgA protein is a universally conserved methyltransferase that dimethylates both A1518 and A1519 of the 16S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Methylation has long been thought to be solely for fine-tuning of protein translation. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Connolly et al. present data suggesting KsgA might function in the assembly of the small subunit of the ribosome. Indeed, the work indicates that KsgA might have a checkpoint role in ribosome biogenesis where methylation by this protein marks the completion of its assembly role. These findings open our thinking to new candidate assembly factors and provide a new direction for understanding ribosome assembly.

  15. Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Harris, Janna L; Carl, Steven M; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Eva Selfridge, J; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Koppel, Scott; Morris, Jill; Burns, Jeffrey M; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Brooks, William M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-12-15

    Brain bioenergetic function declines in some neurodegenerative diseases, this may influence other pathologies and administering bioenergetic intermediates could have therapeutic value. To test how one intermediate, oxaloacetate (OAA) affects brain bioenergetics, insulin signaling, inflammation and neurogenesis, we administered intraperitoneal OAA, 1-2 g/kg once per day for 1-2 weeks, to C57Bl/6 mice. OAA altered levels, distributions or post-translational modifications of mRNA and proteins (proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, PGC1 related co-activator, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor A of the mitochondria, cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, cAMP-response element binding, p38 MAPK and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) in ways that should promote mitochondrial biogenesis. OAA increased Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and P70S6K phosphorylation. OAA lowered nuclear factor κB nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios and CCL11 mRNA. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, doublecortin mRNA, doublecortin protein, doublecortin-positive neuron counts and neurite length increased in OAA-treated mice. (1)H-MRS showed OAA increased brain lactate, GABA and glutathione thereby demonstrating metabolic changes are detectable in vivo. In mice, OAA promotes brain mitochondrial biogenesis, activates the insulin signaling pathway, reduces neuroinflammation and activates hippocampal neurogenesis.

  16. Repeated sprints alter signaling related to mitochondrial biogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Serpiello, Fabio R; McKenna, Michael J; Bishop, David J; Aughey, Robert J; Caldow, Marissa K; Cameron-Smith, David; Stepto, Nigel K

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effects of acute and chronic repeated-sprint exercise (RSE) on the skeletal muscle messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein abundance/phosphorylation associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. Ten healthy young adults (seven males, three females) performed the RSE trial, comprising three sets of 5 × 4-s maximal sprints on a nonmotorized treadmill, with a 20-s recovery between sprints and 4.5 min between sets. After 4 wk of repeated-sprint training, three times per week, participants repeated the RSE. A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was obtained at rest, immediately after, and 1 and 4 h after RSE, before and after training. Venous blood lactate and glucose were measured at rest and during recovery. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot techniques were used to measure mRNA expression and protein abundance, respectively. Acute RSE increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (86%, effect size (ES) = 1.4 ± 0.8, P < 0.001) and Ca calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (69%, ES = 0.7 ± 0.6). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α; 208%, ES = 1.5 ± 0.7, P < 0.001) and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (92%, ES = 0.7 ± 0.8) mRNA expression was increased after RSE. Four weeks of training increased the abundance of PGC-1α protein at rest (33%, ES = 0.9 ± 0.7). Both acute and chronic RSE, despite only 60 s and 12 min of exercise, respectively, altered the molecular signaling associated with mitochondrial adaptations and PGC-1α mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. However, the small-to-moderate changes in resting PGC-1α protein abundance after training, together with the absence of changes in aerobic fitness, require further research to understand the functional significance of PGC-1α in response to RSE.

  17. Mitochondrial iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and human disease.

    PubMed

    Stehling, Oliver; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Lill, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Work during the past 14 years has shown that mitochondria are the primary site for the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters. In fact, it is this process that renders mitochondria essential for viability of virtually all eukaryotes, because they participate in the synthesis of the Fe/S clusters of key nuclear and cytosolic proteins such as DNA polymerases, DNA helicases, and ABCE1 (Rli1), an ATPase involved in protein synthesis. As a consequence, mitochondrial function is crucial for nuclear DNA synthesis and repair, ribosomal protein synthesis, and numerous other extra-mitochondrial pathways including nucleotide metabolism and cellular iron regulation. Within mitochondria, the synthesis of Fe/S clusters and their insertion into apoproteins is assisted by 17 proteins forming the ISC (iron-sulfur cluster) assembly machinery. Biogenesis of mitochondrial Fe/S proteins can be dissected into three main steps: First, a Fe/S cluster is generated de novo on a scaffold protein. Second, the Fe/S cluster is dislocated from the scaffold and transiently bound to transfer proteins. Third, the latter components, together with specific ISC targeting factors insert the Fe/S cluster into client apoproteins. Disturbances of the first two steps impair the maturation of extra-mitochondrial Fe/S proteins and affect cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In line with the essential function of mitochondria, genetic mutations in a number of ISC genes lead to severe neurological, hematological and metabolic diseases, often with a fatal outcome in early childhood. In this review we briefly summarize our current functional knowledge on the ISC assembly machinery, and we present a comprehensive overview of the various Fe/S protein assembly diseases.

  18. Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Adipose Tissue in Acquired Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Sini; Buzkova, Jana; Muniandy, Maheswary; Kaksonen, Risto; Ollikainen, Miina; Ismail, Khadeeja; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesse; Lundbom, Nina; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Moilanen, Eeva; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Suomalainen, Anu; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2015-09-01

    Low mitochondrial number and activity have been suggested as underlying factors in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. However, the stage at which mitochondrial dysfunction manifests in adipose tissue after the onset of obesity remains unknown. Here we examined subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples from healthy monozygotic twin pairs, 22.8-36.2 years of age, who were discordant (ΔBMI >3 kg/m(2), mean length of discordance 6.3 ± 0.3 years, n = 26) and concordant (ΔBMI <3 kg/m(2), n = 14) for body weight, and assessed their detailed mitochondrial metabolic characteristics: mitochondrial-related transcriptomes with dysregulated pathways, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amount, mtDNA-encoded transcripts, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein levels. We report global expressional downregulation of mitochondrial oxidative pathways with concomitant downregulation of mtDNA amount, mtDNA-dependent translation system, and protein levels of the OXPHOS machinery in the obese compared with the lean co-twins. Pathway analysis indicated downshifting of fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and breakdown, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which inversely correlated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative metabolic pathways, and OXPHOS proteins in SAT are downregulated in acquired obesity, and are associated with metabolic disturbances already at the preclinical stage. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. The structure of Rpf2–Rrs1 explains its role in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kharde, Satyavati; Calviño, Fabiola R.; Gumiero, Andrea; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is a hierarchical process involving about 200 biogenesis factors and a series of remodeling steps. The 5S RNP consisting of the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and RpL11 is recruited at an early stage, but has to rearrange during maturation of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit. Rpf2 and Rrs1 have been implicated in 5S RNP biogenesis, but their precise role was unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex from Aspergillus nidulans at 1.5 Å resolution and describe it as Brix domain of Rpf2 completed by Rrs1 to form two anticodon-binding domains with functionally important tails. Fitting the X-ray structure into the cryo-EM density of a previously described pre-60S particle correlates with biochemical data. The heterodimer forms specific contacts with the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and the biogenesis factor Rsa4. The flexible protein tails of Rpf2–Rrs1 localize to the central protuberance. Two helices in the Rrs1 C-terminal tail occupy a strategic position to block the rotation of 25S rRNA and the 5S RNP. Our data provide a structural model for 5S RNP recruitment to the pre-60S particle and explain why removal of Rpf2–Rrs1 is necessary for rearrangements to drive 60S maturation. PMID:26117542

  20. eNOS correlates with mitochondrial biogenesis in hearts of congenital heart disease with cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Mei; Xiao, Yingbin

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis program in heart appears to exhibit adaptive remodeling following biomechanical and oxidative stress. The adaptive mechanisms that protect myocardium metabolism during hypoxia are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). To observe mitochondrial biogenesis and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in hearts of congenital heart disease with cyanosis, discuss mitochondrial response to chronic hypoxia in myocardium. 20 patients with cyanotic (n=10) or acyanotic cardiac defects (n=10) were investigated. Samples from the right ventricular outflow tract myocardium taken during operation were studied. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria was performed with transmission electron microscope. Relative mtDNA/nDNA ratio was determined with real-time PCR. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COXI), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) transcript levels were detected by real-time fluorescent RT-PCR. COXI and nNOS, iNOS and eNOS protein levels were measured with western blot. Mitochondrial volume density (Vv) and numerical density (Nv) were significantly elevated in patients with cyanotic compared to acyanotic congenital heart disease. Elevated mtDNA and up-regulated COXI, PGC-1α, NRF1 and Tfam mRNA levels were observed in cyanotic patients. Protein levels of COXI and eNOS were significantly higher in the myocardium of cyanotic than of acyanotic patients. PGC-1α transcript levels correlated with the levels of eNOS. Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated in right ventricular outflow tract myocardium in congenital heart disease with cyanosis, which could be the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia and possibly involves eNOS up-regulation.

  1. Mechanisms of calcium-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wright, David C

    2007-10-01

    Regularly performed aerobic exercise leads to increases in skeletal muscle mitochondria and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content, resulting in an enhanced capacity to oxidize substrates and improvements in insulin- and contraction-mediated glucose uptake. Although the specific mechanisms governing these adaptive responses have not been fully elucidated, accumulating evidence suggests that the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ that occurs with each wave of sacrolemmal depolarization is a key component of these processes. Treating L6 muscle cells with agents that increase Ca2+ without causing reductions in ~P or the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase leads to increases in GLUT4 and mitochondrial protein contents. This effect is likely controlled through calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), since KN93, a specific CaMK inhibitor, blocks these adaptive responses. Recent findings provide evidence that the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in the pathway through which Ca2+/CaMK mediates mitochondrial and GLUT4 biogenesis. p38 MAPK initiates GLUT4 and mitochondrial biogenesis through the activation of transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators such as myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha). Subsequent increases in the content of these proteins further enhance Ca2+-induced GLUT4 and mitochondrial biogenesis. Since decreases in mitochondrial and GLUT4 contents are associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, an understanding of the mechanisms by which these processes can be normalized will aid in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  3. Endospores of halophilic bacteria of the family Bacillaceae isolated from non-saline Japanese soil may be transported by Kosa event (Asian dust storm)

    PubMed Central

    Echigo, Akinobu; Hino, Miki; Fukushima, Tadamasa; Mizuki, Toru; Kamekura, Masahiro; Usami, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Background Generally, extremophiles have been deemed to survive in the extreme environments to which they had adapted to grow. Recently many extremophiles have been isolated from places where they are not expected to grow. Alkaliphilic microorganisms have been isolated from acidic soil samples with pH 4.0, and thermophiles have been isolated from samples of low temperature. Numerous moderately halophilic microorganisms, defined as those that grow optimally in media containing 0.5–2.5 Molar (3–15%) NaCl, and halotolerant microorganisms that are able to grow in media without added NaCl and in the presence of high NaCl have been isolated from saline environments such as salterns, salt lakes and sea sands. It has tacitly been believed that habitats of halophiles able to grow in media containing more than 20% (3.4 M) are restricted to saline environments, and no reports have been published on the isolation of halophiles from ordinary garden soil samples. Results We demonstrated that many halophilic bacteria that are able to grow in the presence of 20% NaCl are inhabiting in non-saline environments such as ordinary garden soils, yards, fields and roadways in an area surrounding Tokyo, Japan. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 176 isolates suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Bacillaceae, Bacillus (11 isolates), Filobacillus (19 isolates), Gracilibacillus (6 isolates), Halobacillus (102 isolates), Lentibacillus (1 isolate), Paraliobacillus (5 isolates) and Virgibacillus (17 isolates). Sequences of 15 isolates showed similarities less than 92%, suggesting that they may represent novel taxa within the family Bacillaceae. Conclusion The numbers of total bacteria of inland soil samples were in a range from 1.4 × 107/g to 1.1 × 106/g. One tenth of the total bacteria was occupied by endospore-forming bacteria. Only very few of the endospore-forming bacteria, roughly 1 out of 20,000, are halophilic bacteria. Most of the

  4. The Role of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:23637287

  5. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum in peroxisome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-05-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis.

  6. Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders: Biological, Clinical and Pathophysiological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Nancy E.; D'Agostino, Maria Daniela; MacLean, Gillian E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 "PEX" genes;…

  7. Peroxisome biogenesis and human peroxisome-deficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    FUJIKI, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome is a single-membrane-bounded ubiquitous organelle containing a hundred different enzymes that catalyze various metabolic pathways such as β-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids and synthesis of plasmalogens. To investigate peroxisome biogenesis and human peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) including Zellweger syndrome, more than a dozen different complementation groups of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants impaired in peroxisome biogenesis are isolated as a model experimental system. By taking advantage of rapid functional complementation assay of the CHO cell mutants, successful cloning of PEX genes encoding peroxins required for peroxisome assembly invaluably contributed to the accomplishment of cloning of pathogenic genes responsible for PBDs. Peroxins are divided into three groups: 1) peroxins including Pex3p, Pex16p and Pex19p, are responsible for peroxisome membrane biogenesis via Pex19p- and Pex3p-dependent class I and Pex19p- and Pex16p-dependent class II pathways; 2) peroxins that function in matrix protein import; 3) those such as Pex11pβ are involved in peroxisome division where DLP1, Mff, and Fis1 coordinately function. PMID:27941306

  8. Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders: Biological, Clinical and Pathophysiological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Nancy E.; D'Agostino, Maria Daniela; MacLean, Gillian E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 "PEX" genes;…

  9. PLK4 trans-Autoactivation Controls Centriole Biogenesis in Space.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla A M; Jana, Swadhin Chandra; Cunha-Ferreira, Inês; Zitouni, Sihem; Bento, Inês; Duarte, Paulo; Gilberto, Samuel; Freixo, Francisco; Guerrero, Adán; Francia, Maria; Lince-Faria, Mariana; Carneiro, Jorge; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica

    2015-10-26

    Centrioles are essential for cilia and centrosome assembly. In centriole-containing cells, centrioles always form juxtaposed to pre-existing ones, motivating a century-old debate on centriole biogenesis control. Here, we show that trans-autoactivation of Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), the trigger of centriole biogenesis, is a critical event in the spatial control of that process. We demonstrate that centrioles promote PLK4 activation through its recruitment and local accumulation. Though centriole removal reduces the proportion of active PLK4, this is rescued by concentrating PLK4 to the peroxisome lumen. Moreover, while mild overexpression of PLK4 only triggers centriole amplification at the existing centriole, higher PLK4 levels trigger both centriolar and cytoplasmatic (de novo) biogenesis. Hence, centrioles promote their assembly locally and disfavor de novo synthesis. Similar mechanisms enforcing the local concentration and/or activity of other centriole components are likely to contribute to the spatial control of centriole biogenesis under physiological conditions.

  10. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  11. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Shasha; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wenjing; Bian, Fang; Wu, Dan; Chi, Jiangyang; Xu, Gao; Zhang, Yonghui; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙−) production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB). SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24868319

  12. Standardized Boesenbergia pandurata Extract Stimulates Exercise Endurance Through Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr. (fingerroot) ethanol extract on exercise endurance was investigated in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells and C57BL/6J mice. Standardized B. pandurata ethanol extract (BPE) increased mitochondrial mass and stimulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. BPE also elevated the mRNA expression of key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, which are activated by PGC-1α, such as estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). In animal models, both normal and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice treated with BPE ran much longer than their respective controls. In addition, BPE increased the protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), PGC-1α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), which are stimulated by exercise. These results indicate that B. pandurata could be a potential nutraceutical candidate for enhancing exercise endurance based on its mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise-mimicking effects.

  13. Production of autoinducer-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria isolated from the West African fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yang; Kando, Christine Kere; Thorsen, Line; Larsen, Nadja; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a quorum-sensing (QS) molecule which mediates interspecies signaling and affects various bacterial behaviors in food fermentation. Biosynthesis of AI-2 is controlled by S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase encoded by the luxS gene. The objective of this study was to investigate production of AI-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEB) isolated from the West African alkaline fermented seed products Mantchoua and Maari. The study included 13 AEB strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. altitudinis, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. licheniformis, B. aryabhattai, B. safensis, Lysinibacillus macroides and Paenibacillus polymyxa. All the tested strains harbored the luxS gene and all strains except for P. polymyxa B314 were able to produce AI-2 during incubation in laboratory medium. Production of AI-2 by AEB was growth phase dependent, showing maximum activity at the late exponential phase. AI-2 was depleted from the culture medium at the beginning of the stationary growth phase, indicating that the tested AEB possess a functional AI-2 receptor that internalizes AI-2. This study provides the evidences of QS system in Bacillus spp. and L. macroides and new knowledge of AI-2 production by AEB. This knowledge contributes to the development of QS-based strategies for better control of alkaline fermentation.

  14. Antimicrobial properties of CuO nanorods and multi-armed nanoparticles against B. anthracis vegetative cells and endospores

    PubMed Central

    Packiyaraj, Merwyn S; Nigam, Himangini; Agarwal, Gauri S; Singh, Beer; Patra, Manoj K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Two different kinds of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) namely CuO nanorods (PS2) and multi-armed nanoparticles (P5) were synthesized by wet and electrochemical routes, respectively. Their structure, morphology, size and compositions were characterized by SEM, EDX and XRD. The NPs demonstrated strong bactericidal potential against Bacillus anthracis cells and endospores. PS2 killed 92.17% of 4.5 × 104 CFU/mL B. anthracis cells within 1 h at a dose of 1 mg/mL. Whereas P5 showed a higher efficacy by killing 99.92% of 7 × 105 CFU/mL B. anthracis cells within 30 min at a dose of 0.5 mg/mL and 99.6% of 1.25 × 104 CFU/mL B. anthracis cells within 5 min at a dose of 2 mg/mL. More than 99% of spores were killed within 8 h with 2 mg/mL PS2 in LB media. PMID:24991516

  15. The Endospore-Forming Pathogen Bacillus cereus Exploits a Small Colony Variant-Based Diversification Strategy in Response to Aminoglycoside Exposure.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Elrike; Kranzler, Markus; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-12-08

    Bacillus cereus is among the microorganisms most often isolated from cases of food spoilage and causes gastrointestinal diseases as well as nongastrointestinal infections elicited by the emetic toxin cereulide, enterotoxins, and a panel of tissue-destructive virulence factors. This opportunistic pathogen is increasingly associated with rapidly fatal clinical infections especially linked to neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Fatality results from either the misdiagnosis of B. cereus as a contaminant of the clinical specimen or from failure of antibiotic therapy. Here we report for the first time that exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics induces a phenotype switching of emetic B. cereus subpopulations to a slow-growing small colony variant (SCV) state. Along with altered antibiotic resistance, SCVs showed distinct phenotypic and metabolic properties, bearing the risk of antibiotic treatment failure and of clinical misdiagnosis by standard identification tests used in routine diagnostic. The SCV subpopulation is characterized by enhanced production of the toxin cereulide, but it does not secrete tissue-destructive and immune system-affecting enzymes such as sphingomyelinase and phospholipase. SCVs showed significantly prolonged persistence and decreased virulence in the Galleria mellonella model for bacterial infections, indicating diversification concerning their ecological lifestyle. Importantly, diversification into coexisting wild-type and SCV subpopulations also emerged during amikacin pressure during in vivo infection experiments. This study shows for the first time that pathogenic spore-forming B. cereus strains are able to switch to a so far unreported slow-growing lifestyle, which differs substantially in terms of developmental, phenotypic, metabolic, and virulence traits from the wild-type populations. This underpins the necessity of molecular-based differential diagnostics and a well-chosen therapeutic treatment strategy in clinical

  16. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering increases host cell susceptibility to invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms and resistance to tissue culture trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Cristian; Real, Fernando; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental question to be clarified concerning the host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi is whether the insect-borne and mammalian-stage parasites use similar mechanisms for invasion. To address that question, we analysed the cell invasion capacity of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) and tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT) under diverse conditions. Incubation of parasites for 1 h with HeLa cells in nutrient-deprived medium, a condition that triggered lysosome biogenesis and scattering, increased MT invasion and reduced TCT entry into cells. Sucrose-induced lysosome biogenesis increased HeLa cell susceptibility to MT and resistance to TCT. Treatment of cells with rapamycin, which inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), induced perinuclear lysosome accumulation and reduced MT invasion while augmenting TCT invasion. Metacylic trypomastigotes, but not TCT, induced mTOR dephosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a mTOR-associated lysosome biogenesis regulator. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering was stimulated upon HeLa cell interaction with MT but not with TCT. Recently, internalized MT, but not TCT, were surrounded by colocalized lysosome marker LAMP2 and mTOR. The recombinant gp82 protein, the MT-specific surface molecule that mediates invasion, induced mTOR dephosphorylation, nuclear TFEB translocation and lysosome biogenesis/scattering. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that MT invasion is mainly lysosome-dependent, whereas TCT entry is predominantly lysosome-independent. © 2015 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Drosophila Low Temperature Viability Protein 1 (LTV1) Is Required for Ribosome Biogenesis and Cell Growth Downstream of Drosophila Myc (dMyc)*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonho; Kim, Hag Dong; Jung, Youjin; Kim, Joon; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-01-01

    During animal development, various signaling pathways converge to regulate cell growth. In this study, we identified LTV1 as a novel cell growth regulator in Drosophila. LTV1 mutant larvae exhibited developmental delays and lethality at the second larval stage. Using biochemical studies, we discovered that LTV1 interacted with ribosomal protein S3 and co-purified with free 40S ribosome subunits. We further demonstrated that LTV1 is crucial for ribosome biogenesis through 40S ribosome subunit synthesis and preribosomal RNA processing, suggesting that LTV1 is required for cell growth by regulating protein synthesis. We also demonstrated that Drosophila Myc (dMyc) directly regulates LTV1 transcription and requires LTV1 to stimulate ribosome biogenesis. Importantly, the loss of LTV1 blocked the cell growth and endoreplication induced by dMyc. Combined, these results suggest that LTV1 is a key downstream factor of dMyc-induced cell growth by properly maintaining ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25858587

  18. Biogenesis of thermogenic mitochondria in brown adipose tissue of Djungarian hamsters during cold adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Klingenspor, M; Ivemeyer, M; Wiesinger, H; Haas, K; Heldmaier, G; Wiesner, R J

    1996-01-01

    After cold exposure, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity increased about 2.5-fold within 2 weeks in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of Djungarian hamsters. The mRNAs for COX subunits I and III and the 12 S rRNA, encoded on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as well as mRNAs for COX subunits IV, Va and mitochondrial transcription factor A, encoded in the nucleus, were unchanged when expressed per unit of total tissue RNA. However, since total tissue RNA doubled per BAT depot, while total DNA remained unchanged, the actual levels of these transcripts were increased within BAT cells. In contrast, the abundance of mRNA for uncoupling protein was increased 10-fold, indicating specific activation of this gene. In addition, the maximal rate of protein synthesis analysed in a faithful in organello system was increased 2.5-fold in mitochondria isolated from BAT after 7 days of cold exposure. We conclude from these data that the biogenesis of thermogenic mitochondria in BAT following cold adaptation is achieved by increasing the overall capacity for synthesis of mitochondrial proteins in both compartments, by increasing their mRNAs as well as the ribosomes needed for their translation. In addition, the translational rate for COX subunits as well as all other proteins encoded on mtDNA is increased. Thus the pool of subunits encoded on mtDNA required for assembly of respiratory chain complexes is provided. By comparison with other models of increased mitochondrial biogenesis, we propose that thyroid hormone (generated within BAT cells by 5'-deiodinase, and induced upon sympathetic stimulation), which is a well known regulator of the biogenesis of mitochondria in many tissues, is also the major effector of these adaptive changes in BAT. PMID:8687407

  19. Sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavone, improves glucose and lipid metabolism by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and stroke. Flavonoids are effective antioxidants that protect against these chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid found in the skin of the Citrus sudachi fruit, on glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity and db/db diabetic mice. In our current study, we show that sudachitin improves metabolism and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby increasing energy expenditure and reducing weight gain. Methods C57BL/6 J mice fed a high-fat diet (40% fat) and db/db mice fed a normal diet were treated orally with 5 mg/kg sudachitin or vehicle for 12 weeks. Following treatment, oxygen expenditure was assessed using indirect calorimetry, while glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and indices of dyslipidemia were assessed by serum biochemistry. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effect of sudachitin on the transcription of key metabolism-regulating genes in the skeletal muscle, liver, and white and brown adipose tissues. Primary myocytes were also prepared to examine the signaling mechanisms targeted by sudachitin in vitro. Results Sudachitin improved dyslipidemia, as evidenced by reduction in triglyceride and free fatty acid levels, and improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. It also enhanced energy expenditure and fatty acid β-oxidation by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function. The in vitro assay results suggest that sudachitin increased Sirt1 and PGC-1α expression in the skeletal muscle. Conclusions Sudachitin may improve dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome by improving energy metabolism. Furthermore, it also induces mitochondrial biogenesis to protect against metabolic disorders. PMID:25114710

  20. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants.

  1. Inherited Variants in Mitochondrial Biogenesis Genes May Influence Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Chen, Y. Ann; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Qu, Xiaotao; Lancaster, Johnathan M.; Stockwell, Heather; Dagne, Getachew; Iversen, Edwin; Risch, Harvey; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Sutphen, Rebecca; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Fenstermacher, David; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondria contribute to oxidative stress, a phenomenon implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that inherited variants in mitochondrial-related genes influence epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. Methods Through a multi-center study of 1,815 Caucasian EOC cases and 1,900 controls, we investigated associations between EOC risk and 128 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 22 genes/regions within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and 2,839 nuclear-encoded SNPs localized to 138 genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (BIO, n=35), steroid hormone metabolism (HOR, n=13), and oxidative phosphorylation (OXP, n=90) pathways. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between genotype and case status. Overall significance of each gene and pathway was evaluated using Fisher’s method to combine SNP-level evidence. At the SNP-level, we investigated whether lifetime ovulation, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and cigarette smoking were confounders or modifiers of associations. Results Inter-individual variation involving BIO was most strongly associated with EOC risk (empirical P=0.050), especially for NRF1, MTERF, PPARGC1A, ESRRA, and CAMK2D. Several SNP-level associations strengthened after adjustment for non-genetic factors, particularly for MTERF. Statistical interactions with cigarette smoking and HRT use were observed with MTERF and CAMK2D SNPs, respectively. Overall variation within mtDNA, HOR, and OXP was not statistically significant (empirical P >0.10). Conclusion We provide novel evidence to suggest that variants in mitochondrial biogenesis genes may influence EOC susceptibility. Impact A deeper understanding of the complex mechanisms implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress may aid in developing strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality from EOC. PMID:21447778

  2. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies.

  4. Sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavone, improves glucose and lipid metabolism by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Yoshida, Tomomi; Nii, Yoshitaka; Okahisa, Naoki; Iwata, Shinya; Tsukayama, Masao; Hashimoto, Rei; Taniguchi, Yasuko; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Toshio; Shuto, Emi; Sakai, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and stroke. Flavonoids are effective antioxidants that protect against these chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid found in the skin of the Citrus sudachi fruit, on glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity and db/db diabetic mice. In our current study, we show that sudachitin improves metabolism and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby increasing energy expenditure and reducing weight gain. C57BL/6 J mice fed a high-fat diet (40% fat) and db/db mice fed a normal diet were treated orally with 5 mg/kg sudachitin or vehicle for 12 weeks. Following treatment, oxygen expenditure was assessed using indirect calorimetry, while glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and indices of dyslipidemia were assessed by serum biochemistry. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effect of sudachitin on the transcription of key metabolism-regulating genes in the skeletal muscle, liver, and white and brown adipose tissues. Primary myocytes were also prepared to examine the signaling mechanisms targeted by sudachitin in vitro. Sudachitin improved dyslipidemia, as evidenced by reduction in triglyceride and free fatty acid levels, and improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. It also enhanced energy expenditure and fatty acid β-oxidation by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function. The in vitro assay results suggest that sudachitin increased Sirt1 and PGC-1α expression in the skeletal muscle. Sudachitin may improve dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome by improving energy metabolism. Furthermore, it also induces mitochondrial biogenesis to protect against metabolic disorders.

  5. Eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hiramitsu, Masanori; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Inoue, Takashi; Katagiri, Takao; Zang, Liqing; Nishimura, Yuhei; Nishimura, Norihiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Lemon (Citrus limon) contains various bioactive flavonoids, and prevents obesity and obesity-associated metabolic diseases. We focused on eriocitrin (eriodictyol 7-rutinoside), a powerful antioxidative flavonoid in lemon with lipid-lowering effects in a rat model of high-fat diet. To investigate the mechanism of action of eriocitrin, we conducted feeding experiments on zebrafish with diet-induced obesity. Oral administration of eriocitrin (32 mg/kg/day for 28 days) improved dyslipidaemia and decreased lipid droplets in the liver. DNA microarray analysis revealed that eriocitrin increased mRNA of mitochondrial biogenesis genes, such as mitochondria transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4, and ATP synthase. In HepG2 cells, eriocitrin also induced the corresponding orthologues, and reduced lipid accumulation under conditions of lipid loading. Eriocitrin increased mitochondrial size and mtDNA content, which resulted in ATP production in HepG2 cells and zebrafish. In summary, dietary eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24424211

  6. Role of copper in mitochondrial biogenesis via interaction with ATP synthase and cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Denis M; Jennings, Dianne

    2002-10-01

    Animals that are copper deficient have cardiac hypertrophy where there is a dramatic increase in mitochondria. Mitochondrial biogenesis is enhanced in this model and there is an upregulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2). While the cuproenzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), is an attractive candidate to explain the connection between cardiac hypertrophy in copper deficiency and subsequent mitochondrial biogenesis, studies have revealed that ATP synthase may be impacted by copper depletion. NRF-1 and NRF-2 can bind to some of the subunits of both CCO and ATP synthase to regulate gene expression. Furthermore, oxidative phosphorylation appears to occur unaltered in the copper-deficient state. Copper-deficient mitochondria appear to be less sensitive to the inhibitory effect of oligomycin compared to controls. Decreases in the delta subunit protein and beta mRNA transcript have been reported for ATP synthase as a function of copper deficiency. The limited data available suggest that copper, either indirectly or directly, alters ATP synthase function.

  7. MicroRNA-761 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle in response to exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanli; Zhao, Chaoxian; Sun, Xuewen; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-11-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play critical roles in skeletal muscle in response to exercise. Previous study has shown that miR-761 was involved in a novel model regulating the mitochondrial network. However, its role in mitochondrial biogenesis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-761 on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that aberrantly expressed miR-761 is involved in exercise activity and miR-761 is decreased by exercise training compared with the sedentary control mice. miR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis of C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes by targeting the 3′-UTR of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1α). Overexpression of miR-761 was capable of inhibiting the protein expression levels of PGC-1α. Moreover, miR-761 overexpression suppressed the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (P-MK2), a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK. The phosphorylation of activating transcription factors 2 (ATF2) that plays a functional role in linking the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway to enhanced transcription of the PGC-1α was also inhibited by the overexpression of miR-761. These findings revealed a novel regulation mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes, and contributed to a better understanding of the modulation of skeletal muscle in response to exercise. - Highlights: • Endurance exercise decreases miR-761 expression in skeletal muscle. • MiR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • MiR-761 directly targeted PGC-1α expression. • MiR-761 suppresses p38 MAPK signaling pathways in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • A novel mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes is demonstrated.

  8. Field-scale evaluation of the co-transport impacts of Bacillus subtilis endospores on other pathogen surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, J. R.; Chik, A. H.; Mesquita, M. M.; McLellan, N. L.; Emelko, M.

    2009-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores are increasingly used as a surrogate in pathogen fate and transport studies, in particular as a conservative indicator of Cryptosporidium parvum transport in engineered and riverbank filtration systems. As part of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR), riverbank filtration systems can obtain additional log credits for pathogen removal through conducting a demonstration of performance study. Several studies have shown that the removal of total aerobic endospores (and often B. subtilis specifically) provide a conservative estimate of Crytosporidium oocyst removal during during conventional granular media and slow sand filtration processes used for drinking water treatment. Spores are persistent in groundwater settings, but readily attach to geological media due to high zeta potential and hydrophobic properties of the spore coat. “Demonstration” or “performance studies” are often conducted using more than one pathogen surrogate to provide regulators with greater confidence in projected pathogen removals during subsurface “treatment” of surface water. Column studies conducted at the University of Waterloo reproducibly indicated that the presence of Bacillus spores resulted in increased removal of other pathogen surrogates such as bacteria- and protozoan-sized carboxylated microspheres. A field study was subsequently conducted to determine if the same increase in removal occurs when B. subtilis spores are present during a field-scale injection experiment. Colloid suspensions were injected into a shallow well and extracted from another well at a distance of 0.4 m. These wells were installed in unconsolidated silty, sandy, gravel and boulder riverbank sediments along the Grand River in Kitchener, Ontario. Two initial injection experiments were conducted, one with 1.5 µm microspheres (a non-biological surrogate) alone and a second with B. subtilis spores and 1.5 µm fluorescent microspheres. Total aerobic

  9. Assessment of functional and genetic diversity of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus L.

    PubMed

    Kadyan, Sangeeta; Panghal, Manju; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Khushboo; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Fifty two aerobic and endospore forming Bacilli (AEFB) strains were recovered from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rDNA gene sequencing has shown that these bacterial strains belong to six different genera of AEFB i.e. Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Terribacillus and Jeotgalibacillus. Analysis of their PGP activities has shown that 92.30 % strains produced indole acetic acid hormone, 86.53 % of the strains solubilized Phosphate and 44.23 % strains produced siderophore. Chitinase production activity was shown by 42.30 % of the strains and 21.15 % of the strains produced 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. 46.15 % of isolates have shown antagonistic activity against common fungal pathogen of the plant i.e. Corynespora cassiicola. Among all of the isolated strains B. Cereus JP44SK22 and JP44SK42 have shown all of the six plant growth promoting traits tested. B. megaterium strains (JP44SK18 and JP44SK35), Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains (JP44SK3 and JP44SK4) and Brevibacillus laterosporus strain JP44SK51 have also shown multiple PGP activities except ACC deaminase production activity. In the present study bacterial strain belonging to genera Jeotgalibacillus sp. JP44SK37 has been reported first time as a member of rhizospheric soil habitat and has also shown PGP activities. It can be concluded that Rhizosphere of P. amarus has harboured a good diversity of AEFB bacterial strains having a lot of biofertilizing and biocontrol abilities.

  10. Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov., an endospore-forming, Mn-oxidizing, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from deep subseafloor basaltic crust.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Hoffman, Colleen L; Momper, Lily M; Toner, Brandy M; Amend, Jan P; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-06-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain 1MBB1T, was isolated from basaltic breccia collected from 341 m below the seafloor by seafloor drilling of Rigil Guyot during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330. The cells were straight rods, 0.5 μm wide and 1-3 μm long, that occurred singly and in chains. Strain 1MBB1T stained Gram-positive. Catalase and oxidase were produced. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.5, and could grow with up to 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 40.5 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1ω11c (26.5 %), anteiso-C15:0 (19.5 %), C16:0 (18.7 %) and iso-C15:0 (10.4 %), and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Endospores of strain 1MBB1T oxidized Mn(II) to Mn(IV), and siderophore production by vegetative cells was positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain 1MBB1T was a member of the family Bacillaceae, with Bacillus foraminis CV53T and Bacillus novalis LMG 21837T being the closest phylogenetic neighbours (96.5 and 96.2 % similarity, respectively). This is the first novel species described from deep subseafloor basaltic crust. On the basis of our polyphasic analysis, we conclude that strain 1MBB1T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which we propose the name Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov. The type strain is 1MBB1T ( = NCMA B78T = LMG 28275T).

  11. Mitochondrial disease genes COA6, COX6B and SCO2 have overlapping roles in COX2 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Pratt, Anthony T.; Soma, Shivatheja; Theriault, Sarah G.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a complex process facilitated by several assembly factors. Pathogenic mutations were recently reported in one such assembly factor, COA6, and our previous work linked Coa6 function to mitochondrial copper metabolism and expression of Cox2, a copper-containing subunit of CcO. However, the precise role of Coa6 in Cox2 biogenesis remained unknown. Here we show that yeast Coa6 is an orthologue of human COA6, and like Cox2, is regulated by copper availability, further implicating it in copper delivery to Cox2. In order to place Coa6 in the Cox2 copper delivery pathway, we performed a comprehensive genetic epistasis analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that simultaneous deletion of Coa6 and Sco2, a mitochondrial copper metallochaperone, or Coa6 and Cox12/COX6B, a structural subunit of CcO, completely abrogates Cox2 biogenesis. Unlike Coa6 deficient cells, copper supplementation fails to rescue Cox2 levels of these double mutants. Overexpression of Cox12 or Sco proteins partially rescues the coa6Δ phenotype, suggesting their overlapping but non-redundant roles in copper delivery to Cox2. These genetic data are strongly corroborated by biochemical studies demonstrating physical interactions between Coa6, Cox2, Cox12 and Sco proteins. Furthermore, we show that patient mutations in Coa6 disrupt Coa6–Cox2 interaction, providing the biochemical basis for disease pathogenesis. Taken together, these results place COA6 in the copper delivery pathway to CcO and, surprisingly, link it to a previously unidentified function of CcO subunit Cox12 in Cox2 biogenesis. PMID:26669719

  12. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  13. Pex19p, a Farnesylated Protein Essential for Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Klaudia; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Linkert, Michael; Baumgart, Evelyn; Kammerer, Stefan; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Erdmann, Ralf

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification and molecular characterization of Pex19p, an oleic acid-inducible, farnesylated protein of 39.7 kDa that is essential for peroxisome biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells lacking Pex19p are characterized by the absence of morphologically detectable peroxisomes and mislocalization of peroxisomal matrix proteins to the cytosol. The human HK33 gene product was identified as the putative human ortholog of Pex19p. Evidence is provided that farnesylation of Pex19p takes place at the cysteine of the C-terminal CKQQ amino acid sequence. Farnesylation of Pex19p was shown to be essential for the proper function of the protein in peroxisome biogenesis. Pex19p was shown to interact with Pex3p in vivo, and this interaction required farnesylation of Pex19p. PMID:9418908

  14. De novo peroxisome biogenesis: evolving concepts and conundrums

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Gaurav; Subramani, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes proliferate by growth and division of pre-existing peroxisomes or could arise de novo. Though the de novo pathway of peroxisome biogenesis is a more recent discovery, several recent studies have highlighted key mechanistic details of the pathway. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary source of lipids and proteins for the newly-formed peroxisomes. More recently, an intricate sorting process functioning at the ER has been proposed, that segregates specific set of PMPs first to peroxisome-specific ER domains (pER) and then assembles PMPs selectively into distinct pre-peroxisomal vesicles (ppVs) that later fuse to form import-competent peroxisomes. In addition, plausible roles of the three key peroxins Pex3, Pex16 and Pex19, which are also central to the growth and division pathway, have been suggested in the de novo process. In this review, we discuss key developments and highlight the unexplored avenues in de novo peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:26381541

  15. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Sutherland, Molly C; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2015-08-01

    Cytochromes c (cyt c) and c1 are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cyt c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for the import of apocytochrome c (apocyt c). Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cyt c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles of heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways.

  16. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; Sutherland, Molly C.; Francisco, Brian San; Mendez, Deanna L.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c and c1are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for import of apocytochrome c. Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cytochrome c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles played by heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. PMID:26073510

  17. Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannerjee, P.

    1993-09-02

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

  18. Comparison of coherent and spontaneous Raman microspectroscopies for noninvasive detection of single bacterial endospores

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Georgi I.; Arora, Rajan; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Wang, Xi; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2007-01-01

    Single bacterial spores were analyzed by using nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The Raman spectra were retrieved from CARS spectra and found to be in excellent agreement with conventionally collected Raman spectra. The phase retrieval method based on maximum entropy model revealed significant robustness to external noise. The direct comparison of signal amplitudes exhibited a factor of 100 stronger CARS signal, as compared with the Raman signal. PMID:17483468

  19. Primary piRNA biogenesis: caught up in a Maelstrom

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Radha Raman; Pillai, Ramesh S

    2014-01-01

    Precursors for most Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are indistinguishable from other RNA polymerase II-transcribed long non-coding RNAs. So, it is currently unclear how they are recognized as substrates by the piRNA processing machinery that resides in cytoplasmic granules called nuage. In this issue, Castaneda et al (2014) reveal a role for the nuage component and nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein Maelstrom in mouse piRNA biogenesis. PMID:25149904

  20. Primary piRNA biogenesis: caught up in a Maelstrom.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Radha Raman; Pillai, Ramesh S

    2014-09-17

    Precursors for most Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are indistinguishable from other RNA polymerase II-transcribed long noncoding RNAs. So, it is currently unclear how they are recognized as substrates by the piRNA processing machinery that resides in cytoplasmic granules called nuage. In this issue, Castaneda et al (2014) reveal a role for the nuage component and nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein Maelstrom in mouse piRNA biogenesis.

  1. Germ Plasm Biogenesis--An Oskar-Centric Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Germ granules are the hallmark of all germ cells. These membrane-less, electron-dense structures were first observed over 100 years ago. Today, their role in regulating and processing transcripts critical for the establishment, maintenance, and protection of germ cells is well established, and pathways outlining the biochemical mechanisms and physical properties associated with their biogenesis are emerging. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quercetin increases brain and muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Mark; Murphy, E Angela; Carmichael, Martin D; Davis, Ben

    2009-04-01

    Quercetin is one of a broad group of natural polyphenolic flavonoid substances that are being investigated for their widespread health benefits. These benefits have generally been ascribed to its combination of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, but recent in vitro evidence suggests that improved mitochondrial biogenesis could play an important role. In addition, the in vivo effects of quercetin on mitochondrial biogenesis exercise tolerance are unknown. We examined the effects of 7 days of quercetin feedings in mice on markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and brain, and on endurance exercise tolerance. Mice were randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment groups: placebo, 12.5 mg/kg quercetin, or 25 mg/kg quercetin. Following 7 days of treatment, mice were killed, and soleus muscle and brain were analyzed for mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC-1alpha) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and cytochrome c. Additional mice underwent a treadmill performance run to fatigue or were placed in voluntary activity wheel cages, and their voluntary activity (distance, time, and peak speed) was recorded. Quercetin increased mRNA expression of PGC-1alpha and SIRT1 (P < 0.05), mtDNA (P < 0.05) and cytochrome c concentration (P < 0.05). These changes in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were associated with an increase in both maximal endurance capacity (P < 0.05) and voluntary wheel-running activity (P < 0.05). These benefits of querectin on fitness without exercise training may have important implications for enhancement of athletic and military performance and may also extend to prevention and/or treatment of chronic diseases.

  3. The ExPortal: an organelle dedicated to the biogenesis of secreted proteins in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Jason W; Caparon, Michael G

    2005-11-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes secretes proteins through the ExPortal, a unique single microdomain of the cellular membrane specialized to contain the Sec translocons. It has been proposed that the ExPortal functions as an organelle to promote the biogenesis of secreted proteins by coordinating interactions between nascent unfolded secretory proteins and membrane-associated chaperones. In this study we provide evidence to support this model. It was found that HtrA (DegP), a surface anchored accessory factor required for maturation of the secreted SpeB cysteine protease, was localized exclusively to the ExPortal. Furthermore, the ATP synthase beta subunit was not localized to the ExPortal, suggesting that retention is likely restricted to a specific subset of exported proteins. Mutations that disrupted the anchoring, but not the protease activity, of HtrA, also altered the maturation kinetics of SpeB demonstrating that localization to the ExPortal was important for HtrA function. These data indicate that the ExPortal provides a mechanism by which Gram-positive bacteria can coordinate protein secretion and subsequent biogenesis in the absence of a specialized protein-folding compartment.

  4. Recovery of Indicators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Oxidative Stress, and Aging With (-)-Epicatechin in Senile Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Nogueira, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Alonso; Barboza, Jonathan; Hogan, Michael C; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel

    2015-11-01

    There is evidence implicating oxidative stress (OS) as the cause of the deleterious effects of aging. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of the flavanol (-)-epicatechin (Epi) to reduce aging-induced OS and restore mitochondrial biogenesis, as well as, structural and functional endpoints in aged mice. Senile (S; 26-month-old) C57BL/6 male mice were randomly assigned to receive either water (vehicle) or 1mg/kg of Epi via oral gavage (twice daily) for 15 days. Young (Y; 6-month-old) mice were used as controls. In S brain, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle (compared with Y animals) an increase in OS was observed as evidenced by increased protein-free carbonyls and decreased reduced glutathione levels as well as sirtuin 3, superoxide dismutase 2, catalase, thioredoxin and glutathione peroxidase protein levels. Well-recognized factors (eg, sirtuin 1) that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial structure- and/or function-related endpoints (eg, mitofilin and citrate synthase) protein levels were also reduced in S organs. In contrast, the aging biomarker senescence-associated β-galactosidase was increased in S compared with Y animals, and Epi administration reduced levels towards those observed in Y animals. Altogether, these data suggest that Epi is capable of shifting the biology of S mice towards that of Y animals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Deacetylation of TFEB promotes fibrillar Aβ degradation by upregulating lysosomal biogenesis in microglia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jintao; Zheng, Liangjun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Xuefei; Li, Zeyang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Zhong; Huo, Wei; Zhao, Xuyang; Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Chen; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Microglia play a pivotal role in clearance of Aβ by degrading them in lysosomes, countering amyloid plaque pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal dysfunction leads to insufficient elimination of toxic protein aggregates. We tested whether enhancing lysosomal function with transcription factor EB (TFEB), an essential regulator modulating lysosomal pathways, would promote Aβ clearance in microglia. Here we show that microglial expression of TFEB facilitates fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) degradation and reduces deposited amyloid plaques, which are further enhanced by deacetylation of TFEB. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we firstly confirmed acetylation as a previously unreported modification of TFEB and found that SIRT1 directly interacted with and deacetylated TFEB at lysine residue 116. Subsequently, SIRT1 overexpression enhanced lysosomal function and fAβ degradation by upregulating transcriptional levels of TFEB downstream targets, which could be inhibited when TFEB was knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of deacetylated TFEB at K116R mutant in microglia accelerated intracellular fAβ degradation by stimulating lysosomal biogenesis and greatly reduced the deposited amyloid plaques in the brain slices of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Our findings reveal that deacetylation of TFEB could regulate lysosomal biogenesis and fAβ degradation, making microglial activation of TFEB a possible strategy for attenuating amyloid plaque deposition in AD.

  6. Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis and Metallochaperone Interactions: Steps in the Assembly Pathway of a Bacterial Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a complex process involving the coordinate expression and assembly of numerous subunits (SU) of dual genetic origin. Moreover, several auxiliary factors are required to recruit and insert the redox-active metal compounds, which in most cases are buried in their protein scaffold deep inside the membrane. Here we used a combination of gel electrophoresis and pull-down assay techniques in conjunction with immunostaining as well as complexome profiling to identify and analyze the composition of assembly intermediates in solubilized membranes of the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. Our results show that the central SUI passes through at least three intermediate complexes with distinct subunit and cofactor composition before formation of the holoenzyme and its subsequent integration into supercomplexes. We propose a model for COX biogenesis in which maturation of newly translated COX SUI is initially assisted by CtaG, a chaperone implicated in CuB site metallation, followed by the interaction with the heme chaperone Surf1c to populate the redox-active metal-heme centers in SUI. Only then the remaining smaller subunits are recruited to form the mature enzyme which ultimately associates with respiratory complexes I and III into supercomplexes. PMID:28107462

  7. Pro-hormone secretogranin II regulates dense core secretory granule biogenesis in catecholaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Mahata, Sushil K; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J; O'Connor, Daniel T; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-03-26

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H(+)-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network.

  8. Pro-hormone Secretogranin II Regulates Dense Core Secretory Granule Biogenesis in Catecholaminergic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H+-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:20061385

  9. [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer in iron–sulfur protein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banci, Lucia; Brancaccio, Diego; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Del Conte, Rebecca; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Mikolajczyk, Maciej; Neri, Sara; Piccioli, Mario; Winkelmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Monothiol glutaredoxins play a crucial role in iron–sulfur (Fe/S) protein biogenesis. Essentially all of them can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster and have been proposed to mediate the transfer of [2Fe-2S] clusters from scaffold proteins to target apo proteins, possibly by acting as cluster transfer proteins. The molecular basis of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from monothiol glutaredoxins to target proteins is a fundamental, but still unresolved, aspect to be defined in Fe/S protein biogenesis. In mitochondria monothiol glutaredoxin 5 (GRX5) is involved in the maturation of all cellular Fe/S proteins and participates in cellular iron regulation. Here we show that the structural plasticity of the dimeric state of the [2Fe-2S] bound form of human GRX5 (holo hGRX5) is the crucial factor that allows an efficient cluster transfer to the partner proteins human ISCA1 and ISCA2 by a specific protein–protein recognition mechanism. Holo hGRX5 works as a metallochaperone preventing the [2Fe-2S] cluster to be released in solution in the presence of physiological concentrations of glutathione and forming a transient, cluster-mediated protein–protein intermediate with two physiological protein partners receiving the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The cluster transfer mechanism defined here may extend to other mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] target proteins. PMID:24733926

  10. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis.

  11. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28123053

  12. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α Induces Lysosomal Biogenesis in Brain Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Sims, Katherine B.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role. PMID:25750174

  13. A dynamin is required for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Breinich, Manuela S; Ferguson, David J P; Foth, Bernardo J; van Dooren, Giel G; Lebrun, Maryse; Quon, Doris V; Striepen, Boris; Bradley, Peter J; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Carruthers, Vern B; Meissner, Markus

    2009-02-24

    Apicomplexans contain only a core set of factors involved in vesicular traffic. Yet these obligate intracellular parasites evolved a set of unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries, and dense granules) that are required for invasion and modulation of the host cell. Apicomplexa replicate by budding from or within a single mother cell, and secretory organelles are synthesized de novo at the final stage of division. To date, the molecular basis for their biogenesis is unknown. We demonstrate that the apicomplexan dynamin-related protein B (DrpB) belongs to an alveolate specific family of dynamins that is expanded in ciliates. DrpB accumulates in a cytoplasmic region close to the Golgi that breaks up during replication and reforms after assembly of the daughter cells. Conditional ablation of DrpB function results in mature daughter parasites that are devoid of micronemes and rhoptries. In the absence of these organelles, invasion-related secretory proteins are mistargeted to the constitutive secretory pathway. Mutant parasites are able to replicate but are unable to escape from or invade into host cells. DrpB is the essential mechanoenzyme for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Apicomplexa. We suggest that DrpB is required during replication to generate vesicles for the regulated secretory pathway that form the unique secretory organelles. Our study supports a role of an alveolate-specific dynamin that was required for the evolution of novel, secretory organelles. In the case of Apicomplexa, these organelles further evolved to enable a parasitic lifestyle.

  14. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaptation to endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anna-Maria; Pilegaard, Henriette; Litvintsev, Anastassia; Leick, Lotte; Hood, David A

    2006-01-01

    Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent of these adaptations is an increase in mitochondrial content, which confers a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. This essay reviews current knowledge on the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis at the molecular level. The major steps involved include, (i) transcriptional regulation of nuclear-encoded genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by the coactivator peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1, (ii) control of mitochondrial DNA gene expression by the transcription factor Tfam, (iii) mitochondrial fission and fusion mechanisms, and (iv) import of nuclear-derived gene products into the mitochondrion via the protein import machinery. It is now known that exercise can modify the rates of several of these steps, leading to mitochondrial biogenesis. An understanding of how exercise can produce this effect could help us decide whether exercise is beneficial for patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders, as well as a variety of metabolic diseases.

  15. Mitochondrial nutrients stimulate performance and mitochondrial biogenesis in exhaustively exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Qian, F; Shen, W; Tian, C; Hao, J; Sun, L; Liu, J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a combination of nutrients on physical performance, oxidative stress and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats subjected to exhaustive exercise. Rats were divided into sedentary control (SC), exhaustive exercise (EC) and exhaustive exercise with nutrient supplementation (EN). The nutrients include (mg/kg/day): R-α-lipoic acid 50, acetyl-L-carnitine 100, biotin 0.1, nicotinamide 15, riboflavin 6, pyridoxine 6, creatine 50, CoQ10 5, resveratrol 5 and taurine 100. Examination of running distances over the 4-week period revealed that EN rats ran significantly longer throughout the entire duration of the exhaustive exercise period compared with the EC rats. Nutrient supplementation significantly inhibited the increase in activities of alanine transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, reversed increases in malondialdehyde, inhibited decreases in glutathione S-transferase and total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in splenic lymphocytes. Nutrient supplementation increased the protein expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II and III, mtDNA number and transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion in skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that mitochondrial nutrient supplementation can reduce exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, thus leading to enhancement of physical performance and of fatigue recovery. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Temperature and carbon assimilation regulate the chlorosome biogenesis in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Saikin, Semion K; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A; Urban, Volker S; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-09-17

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome-the light-absorbing antenna complex-in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study, we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of C. tepidum grows slower and incorporates fewer BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size, (b) simplified BChl c homologs with smaller side chains, (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima, and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism spectra. Using a theoretical model, we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis.

  17. Research on biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes in sepsis-associated encephalopathy models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y-Z; Gao, Z-Y; Ma, L-Q; Zhuang, Y-Y; Guan, F-L

    2017-10-01

    To study the structural and functional changes in mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in the simulated sepsis environment in vitro and the relationship between these changes and the biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes by establishing models of sepsis astrocytes. The structural and functional changes in mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats were evaluated. The ultra structural changes in the mitochondria, astrocytes, and ultrathin sections, were observed with a transmission electron microscope. The expression of the regulatory factors related to biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats was evaluated in various experimental groups. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to evaluate the expression of the regulatory factors related to biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats. The "point grid method" was used to evaluate the volume density of the mitochondria in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in various experimental groups. The Western blotting was used to evaluate the role of fusion and fission of mitochondria in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in various experimental groups in regulating the expression of the protein-OPAI and DRPI. In the sepsis astrocyte models established by co-incubation of LPS and IFN-γ and astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats, the mitochondria with a minor injury in the 6 h group (2.97± 0.92) increased significantly when compared with those in the 0 h group (1.08±0.95), 12 h group (1.70±1.01), and 24 h group (1.59±0.55) (p<0.05); the concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in the 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h groups increased significantly when compared with that in the 0 h group (p<0.05). PGC-1α mRNA, NRF-1 mRNA, NRF-2α mRNA, NRF-2β mRNA, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) mRNA in the astrocytes of the cerebral

  18. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Butler, Lisa M; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was evaluated in prostate cancer and non-malignant cells and a significant increase in gene and protein expression was found for early, but not late endosomal proteins. There was also a differential distribution of early endosomes, and altered endosomal traffic and signalling of the transferrin receptors (TFRC and TFR2) in prostate cancer cells. These findings support the concept that endosome biogenesis and function is altered in prostate cancer. Microarray analysis of a clinical cohort confirmed the altered endosomal gene expression observed in cultured prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, in prostate cancer patient tissue specimens, the early endosomal marker and adaptor protein APPL1 showed consistently altered basement membrane histology in the vicinity of tumours and concentrated staining within tumour masses. These novel observations on altered early endosome biogenesis provide a new avenue for prostate cancer biomarker investigation and suggest new methods for the early diagnosis and accurate prognosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25080433

  19. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  20. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K.; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wek, Ronald C.; Ellis, Steven R.; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in down-regulation of transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including diamond blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  1. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C; Wek, Ronald C; Ellis, Steven R; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in decreased transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Dissecting Escherichia coli Outer Membrane Biogenesis Using Differential Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandra M.; Motta, Sara; Di Silvestre, Dario; Falchi, Federica; Dehò, Gianni; Mauri, Pierluigi; Sperandeo, Paola; Polissi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex multi-layered structure comprising an inner cytoplasmic membrane and an additional asymmetric lipid bilayer, the outer membrane, which functions as a selective permeability barrier and is essential for viability. Lipopolysaccharide, an essential glycolipid located in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, greatly contributes to the peculiar properties exhibited by the outer membrane. This complex molecule is transported to the cell surface by a molecular machine composed of seven essential proteins LptABCDEFG that form a transenvelope complex and function as a single device. While advances in understanding the mechanisms that govern the biogenesis of the cell envelope have been recently made, only few studies are available on how bacterial cells respond to severe envelope biogenesis defects on a global scale. Here we report the use of differential proteomics based on Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to investigate how Escherichia coli cells respond to a block of lipopolysaccharide transport to the outer membrane. We analysed the envelope proteome of a lptC conditional mutant grown under permissive and non permissive conditions and identified 123 proteins whose level is modulated upon LptC depletion. Most such proteins belong to pathways implicated in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodelling, cell division and protein folding. Overall these data contribute to our understanding on how E. coli cells respond to LPS transport defects to restore outer membrane functionality. PMID:24967819

  3. Microprocessor activity controls differential miRNA biogenesis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Marsico, Annalisa; Gehre, Maja; Orom, Ulf Andersson

    2014-10-23

    In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  4. Moesin and cortactin control actin-dependent multivesicular endosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Muriel, Olivia; Tomas, Alejandra; Scott, Cameron C.; Gruenberg, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We used in vivo and in vitro strategies to study the mechanisms of multivesicular endosome biogenesis. We found that, whereas annexinA2 and ARP2/3 mediate F-actin nucleation and branching, respectively, the ERM protein moesin supports the formation of F-actin networks on early endosomes. We also found that moesin plays no role during endocytosis and recycling to the plasma membrane but is absolutely required, much like actin, for early-to-late-endosome transport and multivesicular endosome formation. Both actin network formation in vitro and early-to-late endosome transport in vivo also depend on the F-actin–binding protein cortactin. Our data thus show that moesin and cortactin are necessary for formation of F-actin networks that mediate endosome biogenesis or maturation and transport through the degradative pathway. We propose that the primary function of endosomal F-actin is to control the membrane remodeling that accompanies endosome biogenesis. We also speculate that this mechanism helps segregate tubular and multivesicular membranes along the recycling and degradation pathways, respectively. PMID:27605702

  5. Gamma rays induce a p53-independent mitochondrial biogenesis that is counter-regulated by HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, A; Mariani, E; Kurelac, I; Maresca, A; Caratozzolo, M F; Iommarini, L; Carelli, V; Eusebi, L H; Guido, A; Cenacchi, G; Fuccio, L; Rugolo, M; Tullo, A; Porcelli, A M; Gasparre, G

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an orchestrated process that presides to the regulation of the organelles homeostasis within a cell. We show that γ-rays, at doses commonly used in the radiation therapy for cancer treatment, induce an increase in mitochondrial mass and function, in response to a genotoxic stress that pushes cells into senescence, in the presence of a functional p53. Although the main effector of the response to γ-rays is the p53-p21 axis, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis is only indirectly regulated by p53, whose activation triggers a murine double minute 2 (MDM2)-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) degradation, leading to the release of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1β inhibition by HIF1α, thus promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Mimicking hypoxia by HIF1α stabilization, in fact, blunts the mitochondrial response to γ-rays as well as the induction of p21-mediated cell senescence, indicating prevalence of the hypoxic over the genotoxic response. Finally, we also show in vivo that post-radiotherapy mitochondrial DNA copy number increase well correlates with lack of HIF1α increase in the tissue, concluding this may be a useful molecular tool to infer the trigger of a hypoxic response during radiotherapy, which may lead to failure of activation of cell senescence. PMID:23764844

  6. Gamma rays induce a p53-independent mitochondrial biogenesis that is counter-regulated by HIF1α.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, A; Mariani, E; Kurelac, I; Maresca, A; Caratozzolo, M F; Iommarini, L; Carelli, V; Eusebi, L H; Guido, A; Cenacchi, G; Fuccio, L; Rugolo, M; Tullo, A; Porcelli, A M; Gasparre, G

    2013-06-13

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an orchestrated process that presides to the regulation of the organelles homeostasis within a cell. We show that γ-rays, at doses commonly used in the radiation therapy for cancer treatment, induce an increase in mitochondrial mass and function, in response to a genotoxic stress that pushes cells into senescence, in the presence of a functional p53. Although the main effector of the response to γ-rays is the p53-p21 axis, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis is only indirectly regulated by p53, whose activation triggers a murine double minute 2 (MDM2)-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) degradation, leading to the release of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1β inhibition by HIF1α, thus promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Mimicking hypoxia by HIF1α stabilization, in fact, blunts the mitochondrial response to γ-rays as well as the induction of p21-mediated cell senescence, indicating prevalence of the hypoxic over the genotoxic response. Finally, we also show in vivo that post-radiotherapy mitochondrial DNA copy number increase well correlates with lack of HIF1α increase in the tissue, concluding this may be a useful molecular tool to infer the trigger of a hypoxic response during radiotherapy, which may lead to failure of activation of cell senescence.

  7. Biogenesis of the Inner Membrane Complex Is Dependent on Vesicular Transport by the Alveolate Specific GTPase Rab11B

    PubMed Central

    Langsley, Gordon; Foth, Bernardo J.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Meissner, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites belong to a recently recognised group of protozoa referred to as Alveolata. These protists contain membranous sacs (alveoli) beneath the plasma membrane, termed the Inner Membrane Complex (IMC) in the case of Apicomplexa. During parasite replication the IMC is formed de novo within the mother cell in a process described as internal budding. We hypothesized that an alveolate specific factor is involved in the specific transport of vesicles from the Golgi to the IMC and identified the small GTPase Rab11B as an alveolate specific Rab-GTPase that localises to the growing end of the IMC during replication of Toxoplasma gondii. Conditional interference with Rab11B function leads to a profound defect in IMC biogenesis, indicating that Rab11B is required for the transport of Golgi derived vesicles to the nascent IMC of the daughter cell. Curiously, a block in IMC biogenesis did not affect formation of sub-pellicular microtubules, indicating that IMC biogenesis and formation of sub-pellicular microtubules is not mechanistically linked. We propose a model where Rab11B specifically transports vesicles derived from the Golgi to the immature IMC of the growing daughter parasites. PMID:20686666

  8. Nuclear recruitment of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by α-syntrophin is crucial for the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aquilano, Katia; Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria R

    2014-01-03

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) has various splicing variants and different subcellular localizations. nNOS can be found also in the nucleus; however, its exact role in this compartment is still not completely defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the PDZ domain allows the recruitment of nNOS to nuclei, thus favoring local NO production, nuclear protein S-nitrosylation, and induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. In particular, overexpression of PDZ-containing nNOS (nNOSα) increases S-nitrosylated CREB with consequent augmented binding on cAMP response element consensus sequence on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator (PGC)-1α promoter. The resulting PGC-1α induction is accompanied by the expression of mitochondrial genes (e.g., TFAM, MtCO1) and increased mitochondrial mass. Importantly, full active nNOS lacking PDZ domain (nNOSβ) does not localize in nuclei and fails in inducing the expression of PGC-1α. Moreover, we substantiate that the mitochondrial biogenesis normally accompanying myogenesis is associated with nuclear translocation of nNOS. We demonstrate that α-Syntrophin, which resides in nuclei of myocytes, functions as the upstream mediator of nuclear nNOS translocation and nNOS-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis. Overall, our results indicate that altered nNOS splicing and nuclear localization could be contributing factors in human muscular diseases associated with mitochondrial impairment.

  9. An in vivo RNAi assay identifies major genetic and cellular requirements for primary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Daniel; Sykora, Martina M; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Mechtler, Karl; Brennecke, Julius

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, PIWI proteins and bound PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) form the core of a small RNA-mediated defense system against selfish genetic elements. Within germline cells, piRNAs are processed from piRNA clusters and transposons to be loaded into Piwi/Aubergine/AGO3 and a subset of piRNAs undergoes target-dependent amplification. In contrast, gonadal somatic support cells express only Piwi, lack signs of piRNA amplification and exhibit primary piRNA biogenesis from piRNA clusters. Neither piRNA processing/loading nor Piwi-mediated target silencing is understood at the genetic, cellular or molecular level. We developed an in vivo RNAi assay for the somatic piRNA pathway and identified the RNA helicase Armitage, the Tudor domain containing RNA helicase Yb and the putative nuclease Zucchini as essential factors for primary piRNA biogenesis. Lack of any of these proteins leads to transposon de-silencing, to a collapse in piRNA levels and to a failure in Piwi-nuclear accumulation. We show that Armitage and Yb interact physically and co-localize in cytoplasmic Yb bodies, which flank P bodies. Loss of Zucchini leads to an accumulation of Piwi and Armitage in Yb bodies, indicating that Yb bodies are sites of primary piRNA biogenesis. PMID:20818334

  10. Regulation of alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and peroxisome biogenesis in different fermentation processes in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehoon; Warburton, Shannon; Boldogh, Istvan; Svensson, Cecilia; Pon, Liza; d'Anjou, Marc; Stadheim, Terrance A; Choi, Byung-Kwon

    2013-07-20

    Production of recombinant proteins is affected by process conditions, where transcriptional regulation of Pichia pastoris alcohol oxidase 1 (PpAOX1) promoter has been a key factor to influence expression levels of proteins of interest. Here, we demonstrate that the AOX1 promoter and peroxisome biogenesis are regulated based on different process conditions. Two types of GFP-fusion proteins, Ub-R-GFP (short-lived GFP in the cytosol) and GFP-SKL (peroxisomal targeting GFP), were successfully used to characterize the time-course of the AOX1 promoter and peroxisome biogenesis, respectively. The activity of the AOX1 promoter and peroxisome biogenesis was highly subjected to different fermentation process conditions - methanol-limited condition at normoxy (ML), switched feeding of carbon sources (e.g., glucose and methanol) under carbon-limited condition at normoxy (SML), and oxygen-limited (OL) condition. The AOX1 promoter was most active under the ML, but less active under the OL. Peroxisome biogenesis showed a high dependency on methanol consumption. In addition, the proliferation of peroxisomes was inhibited in a medium containing glucose and stimulated in the methanol phase under a carbon-limited fed-batch culture condition. The specific productivity of a monoclonal antibody (qp) under the AOX1 promoter was higher at 86h of induction in the ML than in the OL (0.026 vs 0.020mgg(-1)h(-1)). However, the oxygen-limited condition was a robust process suitable for longer induction (180h) due to high cell fitness. Our study suggests that the maximal production of a recombinant protein is highly dependent on methanol consumption rate that is affected by the availability of methanol and oxygen molecules.

  11. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Zhongbo; Jia, Haiqun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM) more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD). Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  12. Anoxybacillusgeothermalis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from mineral deposits in a geothermal station.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Palmieri, Fabio; Palmieri, Ilona; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Chain, Patrick S; Regenspurg, Simona; Junier, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    A novel endospore-forming bacterium designated strain GSsed3T was isolated from deposits clogging aboveground filters from the geothermal power platform of Groß Schönebeck in northern Germany. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 60 °C, 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain GSsed3T belonged to the genus Anoxybacillus, and showed 99.8 % sequence similarity to Anoxybacillus rupiensis R270T, 98.2 % similarity to Anoxybacillus tepidamans GS5-97T, 97.9 % similarity to Anoxybacillus voinovskiensis TH13T, 97.7 % similarity to Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus DSM 15730T and 97.6 % similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus MR3CT. DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) indicated only 16 % relatedness to Anoxybacillus rupiensis DSM 17127T. Furthermore, DDH estimation based on genomes analysis indicated only 19.9 % overall nucleotide similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus DSM 15939T. The major respiratory menaquinone was MK-8. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phosphoglycolipid and one unknown phospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ meso-Dpm-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 46.9 mol%. The phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization indicated that strain GSsed3T differs from related species of the genus. Therefore, strain GSsed3T is considered to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Anoxybacillus, for which the name Anoxybacillus geothermalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anoxybacillus geothermalis is GSsed3T (=CCOS808T =ATCC BAA2555T).

  13. Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Schumann, Peter; Didari, Maryam; Mehrshad, Malihe; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain G8B(T), was isolated from water of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain G8B(T) were rod-shaped, motile and produced oval endospores at a terminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain G8B(T) was strictly aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-12.5 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 5-7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35-40 °C and pH 7.5-8.0, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G8B(T) was shown to belong to the genus Ornithinibacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity with Ornithinibacillus bavariensis WSBC 24001(T) (97.6 %). The DNA G+C content of strain G8B(T) was 36.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain G8B(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four unknown phospholipids and an unknown aminolipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (98 %) and MK-8 (2 %). Strain G8B(T) contained a peptidoglycan of type A4β, l-Orn-d-Asp. All these features confirmed the placement of isolate G8B(T) within the genus Ornithinibacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level of relatedness (6 %) between strain G8B(T) and Ornithinibacillus bavariensis DSM 15681(T). On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Ornithinibacillus, Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., is proposed, with strain G8B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10683(T) = KCTC 13822(T)) as the type strain.

  14. The PASTA domain of penicillin-binding protein SpoVD is dispensable for endospore cortex peptidoglycan assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bukowska-Faniband, Ewa; Hederstedt, Lars

    2015-02-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major structural component of the bacterial cell wall. Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), located at the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane, play a major role in peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. A PASTA domain (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase associated domain) of about 65 residues is found at the C-terminal end of some PBPs and eukaryotic-like protein serine/threonine kinases in a variety of bacteria. The function of PASTA domains is not understood, but some of them are thought to bind uncross linked peptidoglycan. Bacillus subtilis has 16 different PBPs, but only 2 of them, Pbp2b and SpoVD, contain a PASTA domain. SpoVD is specific for sporulation and essential for endospore cortex peptidoglycan synthesis. We have studied the role of the PASTA domain in SpoVD by deleting this domain and analysing the effects on endospore formation and subcellular localization of SpoVD. Our results demonstrate that the PASTA domain in SpoVD is not essential for cortex synthesis and not important for targeting SpoVD to the forespore outer membrane during sporulation.

  15. Bacterial Growth, Necromass Turnover, And Endospore Abundance In The Deep Subseafloor Sediments Of The Greenland Shelf Using D:L Amino Acid Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhatre, S. S.; Braun, S.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface realm is colonized by a large number of microorganisms- about 3 × 1029. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize at a much slower rate than model organisms in nutrient rich cultures. The aim of this work was to use recently developed D:L-amino acid racemization model for studying the turnover times of microbial biomass and microbial necromass in a ~12,000 years old Greenland shelf marine sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers of aspartic acid. The percentage amino acid carbon content (%TAAC) and the percentage amino acid nitrogen content (%TAAN) were used for determining the degradation state of the organic matter. Endospores quantified using DPA quantification method were found to be as abundant as vegetative cells. The microbial necromass turnover times were thousand years, and biomass turnover times were in the range of tens to hundred years. Studies with deeper sediment cores will further improve our understanding of the energetic limits of life in the deep biosphere.

  16. α-granule biogenesis: from disease to discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang Hua; Lo, Richard W; Urban, Denisa; Pluthero, Fred G; Kahr, Walter H A

    2017-03-01

    Platelets are critical to hemostasis and thrombosis. Upon detecting injury, platelets show a range of responses including the release of protein cargo from α-granules. This cargo is synthesized by platelet precursor megakaryocytes or endocytosed by megakaryocytes and/or platelets. Insights into α-granule biogenesis have come from studies of hereditary conditions where these granules are immature, deficient or absent. Studies of Arthrogryposis, Renal dysfunction, and Cholestasis (ARC) syndrome identified the first proteins essential to α-granule biogenesis: VPS33B and VPS16B. VPS33B and VPS16B form a complex, and in the absence of either, platelets lack α-granules and the granule-specific membrane protein P-selectin. Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS) platelets also lack conventionally recognizable α-granules, although P-selectin containing structures are present. GPS arises from mutations affecting NBEAL2. The GPS phenotype is more benign than ARC syndrome, but it can cause life-threatening bleeding, progressive thrombocytopenia, and myelofibrosis. We review the essential roles of VPS33B, VPS16B, and NBEAL2 in α-granule development. We also examine the existing data on their mechanisms of action, where many details remain poorly understood. VPS33B and VPS16B are ubiquitously expressed and ARC syndrome is a multisystem disorder that causes lethality early in life. Thus, VPS33B and VPS16B are clearly involved in other processes besides α-granule biogenesis. Studies of their involvement in vesicular trafficking and protein interactions are reviewed to gain insights into their roles in α-granule formation. NBEAL2 mutations primarily affect megakaryocytes and platelets, and while little is known about NBEAL2 function some insights can be gained from studies of related proteins, such as LYST.

  17. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  18. Successive bouts of cycling stimulates genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Charles L; Mark Davis, J; Angela Murphy, E; Nieman, David C; Carmichael, Martin D; Quindry, John C; Travis Triplett, N; Utter, Alan C; Gross Gowin, Sarah J; Henson, Dru A; McAnulty, Steven R; McAnulty, Lisa S

    2009-11-01

    Exercise increases mRNA for genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative enzyme capacity. However, little is known about how these genes respond to consecutive bouts of prolonged exercise. We examined the effects of 3 h of intensive cycling performed on three consecutive days on the mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in trained human subjects. Forty trained cyclists were tested for VO(2max) (54.7 +/- 1.1 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). The subjects cycled at 57% watts(max) for 3 h using their own bicycles on CompuTrainer Pro Model trainers (RacerMate, Seattle, WA) on three consecutive days. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis pre- and post-exercise on days one and three. Muscle samples were analyzed for mRNA content of peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1alpha), sirtuin 1 (Sirt-1), cytochrome c, and citrate synthase. Data were analyzed using a 2 (time) x 2 (day) repeated measures ANOVA. Of the mRNA analyzed, the following increased from pre to post 3 h rides: cytochrome c (P = 0.006), citrate synthase (P = 0.03), PGC-1alpha (P < 0.001), and Sirt-1 (P = 0.005). The following mRNA showed significant effects from days one to three: cytochrome c (P < 0.001) and citrate synthase (P = 0.01). These data show that exhaustive cycling performed on three consecutive days resulted in both acute and chronic stimuli for mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in already trained subjects. This is the first study to illustrate an increase in sirtuin-1 mRNA with acute and chronic exercise. These data contribute to the understanding of mRNA expression during both acute and successive bouts of prolonged exercise.

  19. HO-1 Is Essential for Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Mediated Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Anti-Inflammation Process in LPS-Treated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng

    2017-01-01

    2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an important monomer extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, can prevent a number of inflammation associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanism involved in TSG inducing anti-inflammatory role remains unclear. As an inducible antioxidant enzyme, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), is crucial for protecting the mammalian cells against adverse stimuli. Here, we found that the TSG treatment strongly induces the expression of HO-1 in an NRF2-depended manner. Meanwhile, TSG increased the mitochondrial mass through upregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis activators (PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM) as well as the mitochondrial complex IV. Furthermore, TSG attenuated Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated RAW264.7 cells activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1 activity, was able to attenuate TSG mediated mitochondrial biogenesis and anti-inflammatory process. Finally, we observed that LPS induced obvious mtDNA depletion and ATP deficiency, which indicated a severe damage of mitochondria. TSG restored the LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. ZnPP treatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effects of TSG on mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in LPS stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSG enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function mainly via activation the HO-1. TSG can be developed as a potential drug for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28473878

  20. HO-1 Is Essential for Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Mediated Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Anti-Inflammation Process in LPS-Treated RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Qingbiao; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Hai, Chunxu

    2017-01-01

    2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an important monomer extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, can prevent a number of inflammation associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanism involved in TSG inducing anti-inflammatory role remains unclear. As an inducible antioxidant enzyme, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), is crucial for protecting the mammalian cells against adverse stimuli. Here, we found that the TSG treatment strongly induces the expression of HO-1 in an NRF2-depended manner. Meanwhile, TSG increased the mitochondrial mass through upregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis activators (PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM) as well as the mitochondrial complex IV. Furthermore, TSG attenuated Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated RAW264.7 cells activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1 activity, was able to attenuate TSG mediated mitochondrial biogenesis and anti-inflammatory process. Finally, we observed that LPS induced obvious mtDNA depletion and ATP deficiency, which indicated a severe damage of mitochondria. TSG restored the LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. ZnPP treatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effects of TSG on mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in LPS stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSG enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function mainly via activation the HO-1. TSG can be developed as a potential drug for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  1. The type II secretion system: biogenesis, molecular architecture and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Konstantin V; Sandkvist, Maria; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-04-02

    Many gram-negative bacteria use the sophisticated type II secretion system (T2SS) to translocate a wide range of proteins from the periplasm across the outer membrane. The inner-membrane platform of the T2SS is the nexus of the system and orchestrates the secretion process through its interactions with the periplasmic filamentous pseudopilus, the dodecameric outer-membrane complex and a cytoplasmic secretion ATPase. Here, recent structural and biochemical information is reviewed to describe our current knowledge of the biogenesis and architecture of the T2SS and its mechanism of action.

  2. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles.

    PubMed

    Luzio, J Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M G; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2014-09-02

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. MITF drives endolysosomal biogenesis and potentiates Wnt signaling in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ploper, Diego; Taelman, Vincent F.; Robert, Lidia; Perez, Brian S.; Titz, Björn; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Graeber, Thomas G.; von Euw, Erika; Ribas, Antoni; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in development and disease, regulating transcription of target genes and stabilizing many proteins phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). We observed that the MiT family of transcription factors, which includes the melanoma oncogene MITF (micropthalmia-associated transcription factor) and the lysosomal master regulator TFEB, had the highest phylogenetic conservation of three consecutive putative GSK3 phosphorylation sites in animal proteomes. This finding prompted us to examine the relationship between MITF, endolysosomal biogenesis, and Wnt signaling. Here we report that MITF expression levels correlated with the expression of a large subset of lysosomal genes in melanoma cell lines. MITF expression in the tetracycline-inducible C32 melanoma model caused a marked increase in vesicular structures, and increased expression of late endosomal proteins, such as Rab7, LAMP1, and CD63. These late endosomes were not functional lysosomes as they were less active in proteolysis, yet were able to concentrate Axin1, phospho-LRP6, phospho-β-catenin, and GSK3 in the presence of Wnt ligands. This relocalization significantly enhanced Wnt signaling by increasing the number of multivesicular bodies into which the Wnt signalosome/destruction complex becomes localized upon Wnt signaling. We also show that the MITF protein was stabilized by Wnt signaling, through the novel C-terminal GSK3 phosphorylations identified here. MITF stabilization caused an increase in multivesicular body biosynthesis, which in turn increased Wnt signaling, generating a positive-feedback loop that may function during the proliferative stages of melanoma. The results underscore the importance of misregulated endolysosomal biogenesis in Wnt signaling and cancer. PMID:25605940

  4. Impaired Nrf2 regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in rostral ventrolateral medulla on hypertension induced by systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kay L H; Wu, Chih-Wei; Chao, Yung-Mei; Hung, Chun-Ying; Chan, Julie Y H

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where sympathetic premotor neurons reside, is involved in the development of hypertension under systemic inflammation. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to tissue oxidative stress. In this study, we sought to investigate whether hypertension developed under systemic inflammation is attributable to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis in RVLM. In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, intraperitoneal infusion of a low dose Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 7 days promoted a pressor response, alongside a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, reductions in protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded transcription factors for mitochondrial biogenesis, including mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2), and suppression of nuclear translocation of the phosphorylated Nrf2 (p-Nrf2) in RVLM neurons; all of which were abrogated by treatment with intracisternal infusion of an interleukin-1β (IL-1β) blocker, IL-1Ra, or a mobile mitochondrial electron carrier, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Microinjection into RVLM of IL-1β suppressed the expressions of p-Nrf2 and TFAM, and evoked a pressor response; conversely, the Nrf2 inducer, tert-butylhydroquinone, lessened the LPS-induced suppression of TFAM expression and pressor response. At cellular level, exposure of neuronal N2a cells to IL-1β decreased mtDNA copy number, increased protein interaction of Nrf2 to its negative regulator, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), and reduced DNA binding activity of p-Nrf2 to Tfam gene. Together these results indicate that defect mitochondrial biogenesis in RVLM neurons entailing redox-sensitive and IL-1β-dependent suppression of TFAM because of the increase in the formation of Keap1/Nrf2 complex, reductions in nuclear translocation of the activated Nrf2 and its binding to the Tfam gene promoter may underlie hypertension developed under the LPS

  5. Skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization involves IGF1 signaling: implications in ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Valdes, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez, Marco

    2014-10-01

    One of the most fundamental biological processes in living organisms that are affected by environmental fluctuations is growth. In fish, skeletal muscle accounts for the largest proportion of body mass, and the growth of this tissue is mainly controlled by the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system. By using the carp (Cyprinus carpio), a fish that inhabits extreme conditions during winter and summer, we assessed the skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization and the relation of IGF signaling with protein synthesis and ribosomal biogenesis. The expression of igf1 in muscle decreased during winter in comparison with summer, whereas the expression for both paralogues of igf2 did not change significantly between seasons. The expression of igf1 receptor a (igf1ra), but not of igf1rb, was down-regulated in muscle during the winter as compared to the summer. A decrease in protein contents and protein phosphorylation for IGF signaling molecules in muscle was observed in winter-acclimatized carp. This was related with a decreased expression in muscle for markers of myogenesis (myoblast determination factor (myod), myogenic factor 5 (myf5), and myogenin (myog)); protein synthesis (myosin heavy chain (mhc) and myosin light chain (mlc3 and mlc1b)); and ribosomal biogenesis (pre-rRNA and ribosomal proteins). IGF signaling, and key markers of ribosomal biogenesis, protein synthesis, and myogenesis were affected by seasonal acclimatization, with differential regulation in gene expression and signaling pathway activation observed in muscle between both seasons. This suggests that these molecules are responsible for the muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Potent, Reversible, and Specific Chemical Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Chen, Zhen; Aoi, Yuki; Patgiri, Anupam; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-10-06

    All cellular proteins are synthesized by ribosomes, whose biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multi-step process completed within minutes. Several chemical inhibitors of ribosome function are available and used as tools or drugs. By contrast, we lack potent validated chemical probes to analyze the dynamics of eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Here, we combine chemical and genetic approaches to discover ribozinoindoles (or Rbins), potent and reversible triazinoindole-based inhibitors of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. Analyses of Rbin sensitivity and resistance conferring mutations in fission yeast, along with biochemical assays with recombinant proteins, provide evidence that Rbins' physiological target is Midasin, an essential ∼540-kDa AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein. Using Rbins to acutely inhibit or activate Midasin function, in parallel experiments with inhibitor-sensitive or inhibitor-resistant cells, we uncover Midasin's role in assembling Nsa1 particles, nucleolar precursors of the 60S subunit. Together, our findings demonstrate that Rbins are powerful probes for eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dysregulation of microRNA biogenesis machinery in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hata, Akiko; Kashima, Risa

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are integral to the gene regulatory network. A single miRNA is capable of controlling the expression of hundreds of protein coding genes and modulate a wide spectrum of biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, stress responses, DNA repair, cell adhesion, motility, inflammation, cell survival, senescence and apoptosis, all of which are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Overexpression, genetic amplification, and gain-of-function mutation of oncogenic miRNAs ("onco-miRs") as well as genetic deletion and loss-of-function mutation of tumor suppressor miRNAs ("suppressor-miRs") are linked to human cancer. In addition to the dysregulation of a specific onco-miR or suppressor-miRs, changes in global miRNA levels resulting from a defective miRNA biogenesis pathway play a role in tumorigenesis. The function of individual onco-miRs and suppressor-miRs and their target genes in cancer has been described in many different articles elsewhere. In this review, we primarily focus on the recent development regarding the dysregulation of the miRNA biogenesis pathway and its contribution to cancer.

  8. Biogenesis, maintenance and dynamics of glycosomes in trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A M

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes of organisms belonging to the protist group Kinetoplastea, which include trypanosomatid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, are unique in playing a crucial role in glycolysis and other parts of intermediary metabolism. They sequester the majority of the glycolytic enzymes and hence are called glycosomes. Their glycosomal enzyme content can vary strongly, particularly quantitatively, between different trypanosomatid species, and within each species during its life cycle. Turnover of glycosomes by autophagy of redundant ones and biogenesis of a new population of organelles play a pivotal role in the efficient adaptation of the glycosomal metabolic repertoire to the sudden, major nutritional changes encountered during the transitions in their life cycle. The overall mechanism of glycosome biogenesis is similar to that of peroxisomes in other organisms, but the homologous peroxins involved display low sequence conservation as well as variations in motifs mediating crucial protein-protein interactions in the process. The correct compartmentalisation of enzymes is essential for the regulation of the trypanosomatids' metabolism and consequently for their viability. For Trypanosoma brucei it was shown that glycosomes also play a crucial role in its life-cycle regulation: a crucial developmental control switch involves the translocation of a protein phosphatase from the cytosol into the organelles. Many glycosomal proteins are differentially phosphorylated in different life-cycle stages, possibly indicative of regulation of enzyme activities as an additional means to adapt the metabolic network to the different environmental conditions encountered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Computationally Driven, Quantitative Experiments Discover Genes Required for Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C.; Hayes, Alicia P.; Paw, Jadine; Clore, John J.; Mendoza, Rosa M.; Luis, Bryan San; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Costanzo, Michael; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Caudy, Amy A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are central to many cellular processes including respiration, ion homeostasis, and apoptosis. Using computational predictions combined with traditional quantitative experiments, we have identified 100 proteins whose deficiency alters mitochondrial biogenesis and inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we used computational predictions to perform targeted double-mutant analysis detecting another nine genes with synthetic defects in mitochondrial biogenesis. This represents an increase of about 25% over previously known participants. Nearly half of these newly characterized proteins are conserved in mammals, including several orthologs known to be involved in human disease. Mutations in many of these genes demonstrate statistically significant mitochondrial transmission phenotypes more subtle than could be detected by traditional genetic screens or high-throughput techniques, and 47 have not been previously localized to mitochondria. We further characterized a subset of these genes using growth profiling and dual immunofluorescence, which identified genes specifically required for aerobic respiration and an uncharacterized cytoplasmic protein required for normal mitochondrial motility. Our results demonstrate that by leveraging computational analysis to direct quantitative experimental assays, we have characterized mutants with subtle mitochondrial defects whose phenotypes were undetected by high-throughput methods. PMID:19300474

  10. De novo peroxisome biogenesis: Evolving concepts and conundrums.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Gaurav; Subramani, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes proliferate by growth and division of pre-existing peroxisomes or could arise de novo. Though the de novo pathway of peroxisome biogenesis is a more recent discovery, several studies have highlighted key mechanistic details of the pathway. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary source of lipids and proteins for the newly-formed peroxisomes. More recently, an intricate sorting process functioning at the ER has been proposed, that segregates specific PMPs first to peroxisome-specific ER domains (pER) and then assembles PMPs selectively into distinct pre-peroxisomal vesicles (ppVs) that later fuse to form import-competent peroxisomes. In addition, plausible roles of the three key peroxins Pex3, Pex16 and Pex19, which are also central to the growth and division pathway, have been suggested in the de novo process. In this review, we discuss key developments and highlight the unexplored avenues in de novo peroxisome biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional parameters of Dicer-independent microRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jr-Shiuan; Maurin, Thomas; Lai, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, a Dicer-class RNase III enzyme was believed to be essential for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in all animals. The conserved vertebrate locus mir-451 defies this expectation and instead matures by direct cleavage of its pre-miRNA hairpin via the Slicer activity of Argonaute2 (Ago2). In this study, we used structure–function analysis to define the functional parameters of Ago2-mediated miRNA biogenesis. These include (1) the requirement for base-pairing at most, but not all, positions within the pre-mir-451 stem; (2) surprisingly little influence of the 5′-nucleotide on Ago sorting; (3) substantial influence of Ago protein stoichiometry on mir-451 maturation; (4) strong influence of G:C content in the distal stem on 3′ resection of cleaved mir-451 substrates; and (5) the influence of hairpin length on substrate utilization by Ago2 and Dicer. Unexpectedly, we find that certain hairpin lengths confer competence to mature via both Dicer-mediated and Ago2-mediated pathways, and we show, in fact, that a conventional shRNA can traverse the Dicer-independent pathway. Altogether, these data inform the design of effective Dicer-independent substrates for gene silencing and reveal novel aspects of substrate handling by Ago proteins. PMID:22461413

  12. Biogenesis of Yeast Telomerase Depends on the Importin Mtr10

    PubMed Central

    Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Steiner, Barbara; Aldea, Martí; Futcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) involved in chromosome end replication, but its biogenesis is poorly understood. The RNA component of yeast telomerase (Tlc1) is synthesized as a polyadenylated precursor and then processed to a mature poly(A)− form. We report here that the karyopherin Mtr10p is required for the normal accumulation of mature Tlc1 and its proper localization to the nucleus. Neither TLC1 transcription nor the stability of poly(A)− Tlc1 is significantly affected in mtr10Δ cells. Tlc1 was mostly nuclear in a wild-type background, and this localization was not affected by mutations in other telomerase components. Strikingly, in the absence of Mtr10p, Tlc1 was found dispersed throughout the entire cell. Our results are compatible with two alternative models. First, Mtr10p may import a cytoplasmic complex containing Tlc1 and perhaps other components of telomerase, and shuttling of Tlc1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and back may be necessary for the biogenesis of telomerase (the “shuttling” model). Second, Mtr10p may be necessary for the nuclear import of some enzyme needed for the nuclear processing and maturation of Tlc1, and in the absence of this maturation, poly(A)+ Tlc1 is aberrantly exported to the cytoplasm (the “processing enzyme” model). PMID:12167699

  13. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N.; Alonso, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27583248

  14. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Chad R.; Han, Dong-Ho; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Holloszy, John O.

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that 30% calorie restriction (CR) for 3 mo results in large increases in mitochondrial biogenesis in heart, brain, liver, and adipose tissue, with concomitant increases in respiration and ATP synthesis. We found these results surprising, and performed this study to determine whether 30% CR does induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, and/or skeletal muscle. To this end, we measured the levels of a range of mitochondrial proteins, and mRNAs. With the exception of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein level, which was increased ∼60% in adipose tissue, none of the mitochondrial proteins or mRNAs that we measured were increased in rats subjected to 30% CR for 14 wk. There was also no increase in citrate synthase activity. Because it is not possible to have an increase in mitochondria without any increase in key mitochondrial proteins, we conclude that 30% CR does not induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, or skeletal muscle in laboratory rodents.—Hancock, C. R., Han, D.-H., Higashida, K., Kim, S. H., Holloszy, J. O. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation. PMID:21048043

  15. Microalgal lipid droplets: composition, diversity, biogenesis and functions.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2015-04-01

    Lipid droplet is the major site of neutral lipid storage in eukaryotic cells, and increasing evidence show its involvement in numerous cellular processes such as lipid homeostasis, signaling, trafficking and inter-organelle communications. Although the biogenesis, structure, and functions of lipid droplets have been well documented for seeds of vascular plants, mammalian adipose tissues, insects and yeasts, relative little is known about lipid droplets in microalgae. Over the past 5 years, the growing interest of microalgae as a platform for biofuel, green chemicals or value-added polyunsaturated fatty acid production has brought algal lipid droplets into spotlight. Studies conducted on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other model microalgae such as Haematococcus and Nannochloropsis species have led to the identification of proteins associated with lipid droplets, which include putative structural proteins different from plant oleosins and animal perilipins, as well as candidate proteins for lipid biosynthesis, mobilization, trafficking and homeostasis. Biochemical and microscopy studies have also started to shed light on the role of chloroplasts in the biogenesis of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes.

  17. Progranulin regulates lysosomal function and biogenesis through acidification of lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Genjiro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Hosokawa, Masato; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Hasegawa, Masato; Nishihara, Masugi

    2017-01-10

    Progranulin (PGRN) haploinsufficiency resulting from loss-of-function mutations in the PGRN gene causes frontotemporal lobar degeneration accompanied by TDP-43 accumulation, and patients with homozygous mutations in the PGRN gene present with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although it remains unknown why PGRN deficiency causes neurodegenerative diseases, there is increasing evidence that PGRN is implicated in lysosomal functions. Here, we show PGRN is a secretory lysosomal protein that regulates lysosomal function and biogenesis by controlling the acidification of lysosomes. PGRN gene expression and protein levels increased concomitantly with the increase of lysosomal biogenesis induced by lysosome alkalizers or serum starvation. Down-regulation or insufficiency of PGRN led to the increased lysosomal gene expression and protein levels, while PGRN overexpression led to the decreased lysosomal gene expression and protein levels. In particular, the level of mature cathepsin D (CTSDmat) dramatically changed depending upon PGRN levels. The acidification of lysosomes was facilitated in cells transfected with PGRN. Then, this caused degradation of CTSDmat by cathepsin B. Secreted PGRN is incorporated into cells via sortilin or cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, and facilitated the acidification of lysosomes and degradation of CTSDmat Moreover, the change of PGRN levels led to a cell-type-specific increase of insoluble TDP-43. In the brain tissue of FTLD-TDP patients with PGRN deficiency, CTSD and phosphorylated TDP-43 accumulated in neurons. Our study provides new insights into the physiological function of PGRN and the role of PGRN insufficiency in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  19. Biogenesis and functions of lipid droplets in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kent D.; Dyer, John M.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    The compartmentation of neutral lipids in plants is mostly associated with seed tissues, where triacylglycerols (TAGs) stored within lipid droplets (LDs) serve as an essential physiological energy and carbon reserve during postgerminative growth. However, some nonseed tissues, such as leaves, flowers and fruits, also synthesize and store TAGs, yet relatively little is known about the formation or function of LDs in these tissues. Characterization of LD-associated proteins, such as oleosins, caleosins, and sterol dehydrogenases (steroleosins), has revealed surprising features of LD function in plants, including stress responses, hormone signaling pathways, and various aspects of plant growth and development. Although oleosin and caleosin proteins are specific to plants, LD-associated sterol dehydrogenases also are present in mammals, and in both plants and mammals these enzymes have been shown to be important in (steroid) hormone metabolism and signaling. In addition, several other proteins known to be important in LD biogenesis in yeasts and mammals are conserved in plants, suggesting that at least some aspects of LD biogenesis and/or function are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:22045929

  20. Probing peroxisome dynamics and biogenesis by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Miluska; Kim, Peter K

    2014-03-03

    Peroxisomes are the most recently discovered classical organelles, and only lately have their diverse functions been truly recognized. Peroxisomes are highly dynamic structures, changing both morphologically and in number in response to both extracellular and intracellular signals. This metabolic organelle came to prominence due to the many genetic disorders caused by defects in its biogenesis or enzymatic functions. There is now growing evidence that suggests peroxisomes are involved in lipid biosynthesis, innate immunity, redox homeostasis, and metabolite scavenging, among other functions. Therefore, it is important to have available suitable methods and techniques to visualize and quantify peroxisomes in response to various cellular signals. This unit includes a number of protocols that will enable researchers to image, qualify, and quantify peroxisome numbers and morphology-with both steady-state and time-lapse imaging using mammalian cells. The use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to detect and measure peroxisome biogenesis is also described. Altogether, the protocols described here will facilitate understanding of the dynamic changes that peroxisomes undergo in response to various cellular signals.

  1. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  4. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and biogenesis in different tissues of early- and late-lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laubenthal, L; Hoelker, M; Frahm, J; Dänicke, S; Gerlach, K; Südekum, K-H; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2016-02-01

    Energy balance in dairy cows changes during the course of lactation due to alterations in voluntary feed intake and energy required for milk synthesis. To adapt to the demands of lactation, energy metabolism needs to be regulated and coordinated in key organs such as adipose tissue (AT), liver, and mammary gland. Mitochondria are the main sites of energy production in mammalian cells and their number varies depending on age, organ, and physiological condition. The copy number of the mitochondrial genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), reflects the abundance of mitochondria within a cell and is regulated by transcriptional and translational factors. Environmental, physiological, and energetic conditions change during lactation and we thus hypothesized that these changes may influence the mtDNA copy number and the abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to provide an overview of mitochondrial biogenesis in liver, subcutaneous (sc)AT, mammary gland, and peripheral blood cells during early and late lactation in dairy cows. German Holstein cows (n=21) were fed according to their requirements, and biopsies from scAT, liver, mammary gland, and blood were collected in early and late lactation and assayed for relative mtDNA copy numbers and the mRNA abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, such as nuclear-respiratory factor 1 and 2 (NRF-1, NRF-2), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α). The number of mtDNA copies increased from early to late lactation in all tissues, whereas that in peripheral blood cells was greater in early compared with late lactation. Moreover, mitochondrial activity enzymes (i.e., citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase) increased from early to late lactation in scAT. Comparing the number of mtDNA copies between tissues and blood in dairy cows, the highest mtDNA content was observed in liver. The mRNA abundance of

  5. Dietary wolfberry upregulates carotenoid metabolic genes and enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of db/db diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huifeng; Wark, Logan; Ji, Hua; Willard, Lloyd; Jaing, Yu; Han, Jing; He, Hui; Ortiz, Edlin; Zhang, Yunong; Medeiros, Denis M; Lin, Dingbo

    2013-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether dietary wolfberry altered carotenoid metabolic gene expression and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of diabetic mice. Six-week-old male db/db and wild-type mice were fed the control or wolfberry diets for 8 weeks. At study termination, liver and retinal tissues were collected for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and HPLC. Wolfberry elevated zeaxanthin and lutein levels in the liver and retinal tissues and stimulated expression of retinal scavenger receptor class B type I, glutathione S-transferase Pi 1, and β,β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase 2, and induced activation and nuclear enrichment of retinal AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPK-α2). Furthermore, wolfberry attenuated hypoxia and mitochondrial stress as demonstrated by declined expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heat shock protein 60. Wolfberry enhanced retinal mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic retinas as demonstrated by reversed mitochondrial dispersion in the retinal pigment epithelium, increased mitochondrial copy number, elevated citrate synthase activity, and upregulated expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Consumption of dietary wolfberry could be beneficial to retinoprotection through reversal of mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Pyrroloquinoline quinone stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis through cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Bauerly, Kathryn A; Tchaparian, Eskouhie; Wong, Alice; Cortopassi, Gino A; Rucker, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive compounds reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis are linked to many health benefits such increased longevity, improved energy utilization, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Previously studies have shown that mice and rats fed diets lacking in pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) have reduced mitochondrial content. Therefore, we hypothesized that PQQ can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse hepatocytes. Exposure of mouse Hepa1-6 cells to 10-30 microm PQQ for 24-48 h resulted in increased citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activity, Mitotracker staining, mitochondrial DNA content, and cellular oxygen respiration. The induction of this process occurred through the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a pathway known to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. PQQ exposure stimulated phosphorylation of CREB at serine 133, activated the promoter of PGC-1alpha, and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA and protein expression. PQQ did not stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis after small interfering RNA-mediated reduction in either PGC-1alpha or CREB expression. Consistent with activation of the PGC-1alpha pathway, PQQ increased nuclear respiratory factor activation (NRF-1 and NRF-2) and Tfam, TFB1M, and TFB2M mRNA expression. Moreover, PQQ protected cells from mitochondrial inhibition by rotenone, 3-nitropropionic acid, antimycin A, and sodium azide. The ability of PQQ to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis accounts in part for action of this compound and suggests that PQQ may be beneficial in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Disparate Pathways for the Biogenesis of Cytochrome Oxidases in Bradyrhizobium japonicum*

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Doris; Rossmann, Reinhild; Landolt, Sarah; Balsiger, Sylvia; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Hennecke, Hauke

    2010-01-01

    This work addresses the biogenesis of heme-copper terminal oxidases in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiont of soybean. B. japonicum has four quinol oxidases and four cytochrome oxidases. The latter include the aa3- and cbb3-type oxidases. Although both have a CuB center in subunit I, the subunit II proteins differ in having either a CuA center (in aa3) or a covalently bound heme c (in cbb3). Two biogenesis factors were genetically studied here, the periplasmically exposed CoxG and ScoI proteins, which are the respective homologs of the mitochondrial copper-trafficking chaperones Cox11 and Sco1 for the formation of the CuB center in subunit I and the CuA center in subunit II of cytochrome aa3. We could demonstrate copper binding to ScoI in vitro, a process for which the thiols of cysteine residues 74 and 78 in the ScoI polypeptide were shown to be essential. Knock-out mutations in the B. japonicum coxG and scoI genes led to loss of cytochrome aa3 assembly and activity in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas the cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase apparently remained unaffected. This suggests that subunit I of the cbb3-type oxidase obtains its copper cofactor via a different pathway than cytochrome aa3. In contrast to the coxG mutation, the scoI mutation caused a decreased symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity. We hypothesize that a periplasmic B. japonicum protein other than any of the identified CuA proteins depends on ScoI and is required for an effective symbiosis. PMID:20335176

  8. Disparate pathways for the biogenesis of cytochrome oxidases in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Doris; Rossmann, Reinhild; Landolt, Sarah; Balsiger, Sylvia; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Hennecke, Hauke

    2010-05-21

    This work addresses the biogenesis of heme-copper terminal oxidases in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiont of soybean. B. japonicum has four quinol oxidases and four cytochrome oxidases. The latter include the aa(3)- and cbb(3)-type oxidases. Although both have a Cu(B) center in subunit I, the subunit II proteins differ in having either a Cu(A) center (in aa(3)) or a covalently bound heme c (in cbb(3)). Two biogenesis factors were genetically studied here, the periplasmically exposed CoxG and ScoI proteins, which are the respective homologs of the mitochondrial copper-trafficking chaperones Cox11 and Sco1 for the formation of the Cu(B) center in subunit I and the Cu(A) center in subunit II of cytochrome aa(3). We could demonstrate copper binding to ScoI in vitro, a process for which the thiols of cysteine residues 74 and 78 in the ScoI polypeptide were shown to be essential. Knock-out mutations in the B. japonicum coxG and scoI genes led to loss of cytochrome aa(3) assembly and activity in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas the cbb(3)-type cytochrome oxidase apparently remained unaffected. This suggests that subunit I of the cbb(3)-type oxidase obtains its copper cofactor via a different pathway than cytochrome aa(3). In contrast to the coxG mutation, the scoI mutation caused a decreased symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity. We hypothesize that a periplasmic B. japonicum protein other than any of the identified Cu(A) proteins depends on ScoI and is required for an effective symbiosis.

  9. Enhancing astrocytic lysosome biogenesis facilitates Aβ clearance and attenuates amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Burchett, Jack M; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Diwan, Abhinav; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2014-07-16

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), impaired Aβ removal contributes to elevated extracellular Aβ levels that drive amyloid plaque pathogenesis. Extracellular proteolysis, export across the blood-brain barrier, and cellular uptake facilitate physiologic Aβ clearance. Astrocytes can take up and degrade Aβ, but it remains unclear whether this function is insufficient in AD or can be enhanced to accelerate Aβ removal. Additionally, age-related dysfunction of lysosomes, the major degradative organelles wherein Aβ localizes after uptake, has been implicated in amyloid plaque pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing lysosomal function in astrocytes with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, would promote Aβ uptake and catabolism and attenuate plaque pathogenesis. Exogenous TFEB localized to the nucleus with transcriptional induction of lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro. This resulted in significantly accelerated uptake of exogenously applied Aβ42, with increased localization to and degradation within lysosomes in C17.2 cells and primary astrocytes, indicating that TFEB is sufficient to coordinately enhance uptake, trafficking, and degradation of Aβ. Stereotactic injection of adeno-associated viral particles carrying TFEB driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter was used to achieve astrocyte-specific expression in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exogenous TFEB localized to astrocyte nuclei and enhanced lysosome function, resulting in reduced Aβ levels and shortened half-life in the brain interstitial fluid and reduced amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus compared with control virus-injected mice. Therefore, activation of TFEB in astrocytes is an effective strategy to restore adequate Aβ removal and counter amyloid plaque pathogenesis in AD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349607-14$15.00/0.

  10. Enhancing Astrocytic Lysosome Biogenesis Facilitates Aβ Clearance and Attenuates Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Burchett, Jack M.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.

    2014-01-01

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), impaired Aβ removal contributes to elevated extracellular Aβ levels that drive amyloid plaque pathogenesis. Extracellular proteolysis, export across the blood–brain barrier, and cellular uptake facilitate physiologic Aβ clearance. Astrocytes can take up and degrade Aβ, but it remains unclear whether this function is insufficient in AD or can be enhanced to accelerate Aβ removal. Additionally, age-related dysfunction of lysosomes, the major degradative organelles wherein Aβ localizes after uptake, has been implicated in amyloid plaque pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing lysosomal function in astrocytes with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, would promote Aβ uptake and catabolism and attenuate plaque pathogenesis. Exogenous TFEB localized to the nucleus with transcriptional induction of lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro. This resulted in significantly accelerated uptake of exogenously applied Aβ42, with increased localization to and degradation within lysosomes in C17.2 cells and primary astrocytes, indicating that TFEB is sufficient to coordinately enhance uptake, trafficking, and degradation of Aβ. Stereotactic injection of adeno-associated viral particles carrying TFEB driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter was used to achieve astrocyte-specific expression in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exogenous TFEB localized to astrocyte nuclei and enhanced lysosome function, resulting in reduced Aβ levels and shortened half-life in the brain interstitial fluid and reduced amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus compared with control virus-injected mice. Therefore, activation of TFEB in astrocytes is an effective strategy to restore adequate Aβ removal and counter amyloid plaque pathogenesis in AD. PMID:25031402

  11. The unique regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in a Gram-positive bacterium.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana A; Alonso-García, Noelia; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-06-03

    Iron-sulfur clusters function as cofactors of a wide range of proteins, with diverse molecular roles in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Dedicated machineries assemble the clusters and deliver them to the final acceptor molecules in a tightly regulated process. In the prototypical Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, the two existing iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems, iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur assimilation (SUF) pathways, are closely interconnected. The ISC pathway regulator, IscR, is a transcription factor of the helix-turn-helix type that can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox conditions and iron or sulfur availability modulate the ligation status of the labile IscR cluster, which in turn determines a switch in DNA sequence specificity of the regulator: cluster-containing IscR can bind to a family of gene promoters (type-1) whereas the clusterless form recognizes only a second group of sequences (type-2). However, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria is not so well characterized, and most organisms of this group display only one of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems. A notable exception is the unique Gram-positive dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Thermincola potens, where genes from both systems could be identified, albeit with a diverging organization from that of Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrated that one of these genes encodes a functional IscR homolog and is likely involved in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in T. potens. Structural and biochemical characterization of T. potens and E. coli IscR revealed a strikingly similar architecture and unveiled an unforeseen conservation of the unique mechanism of sequence discrimination characteristic of this distinctive group of transcription regulators.

  12. The unique regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in a Gram-positive bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana A.; Alonso-García, Noelia; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters function as cofactors of a wide range of proteins, with diverse molecular roles in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Dedicated machineries assemble the clusters and deliver them to the final acceptor molecules in a tightly regulated process. In the prototypical Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, the two existing iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems, iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur assimilation (SUF) pathways, are closely interconnected. The ISC pathway regulator, IscR, is a transcription factor of the helix-turn-helix type that can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox conditions and iron or sulfur availability modulate the ligation status of the labile IscR cluster, which in turn determines a switch in DNA sequence specificity of the regulator: cluster-containing IscR can bind to a family of gene promoters (type-1) whereas the clusterless form recognizes only a second group of sequences (type-2). However, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria is not so well characterized, and most organisms of this group display only one of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems. A notable exception is the unique Gram-positive dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Thermincola potens, where genes from both systems could be identified, albeit with a diverging organization from that of Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrated that one of these genes encodes a functional IscR homolog and is likely involved in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in T. potens. Structural and biochemical characterization of T. potens and E. coli IscR revealed a strikingly similar architecture and unveiled an unforeseen conservation of the unique mechanism of sequence discrimination characteristic of this distinctive group of transcription regulators. PMID:24847070

  13. Transformation competence and type-4 pilus biogenesis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae--a review.

    PubMed

    Fussenegger, M; Rudel, T; Barten, R; Ryll, R; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-11

    In Neisseria gonorrhoea (Ngo), the processes of type-4 pilus biogenesis and DNA transformation are functionally linked and play a pivotal role in the life style of this strictly human pathogen. The assembly of pili from its main subunit pilin (PilE) is a prerequisite for gonococcal infection since it allows the first contact to epithelial cells in conjunction with the pilus tip-associated PilC protein. While the components of the pilus and its assembly machinery are either directly or indirectly involved in the transport of DNA across the outer membrane, other factors unrelated to pilus biogenesis appear to facilitate further DNA transfer across the murein layer (ComL, Tpc) and the inner membrane (ComA) before the transforming DNA is rescued in the recipient bacterial chromosome in a RecA-dependent manner. Interestingly, PilE is essential for the first step of transformation, i.e., DNA uptake, and is itself also subject to transformation-mediated phase and antigenic variation. This short-term adaptive mechanism allows Ngo to cope with changing micro-environments in the host as well as to escape the immune response during the course of infection. Given the fact that Ngo has no ecological niche other than man, horizontal genetic exchange is essential for a successful co-evolution with the host. Horizontal exchange gives rise to heterogeneous populations harboring clones which better withstand selective forces within the host. Such extended horizontal exchange is reflected by a high genome plasticity, the existence of mosaic genes and a low linkage disequilibrium of genetic loci within the neisserial population. This led to the concept that rather than regarding individual Neisseria species as independent traits, they comprise a collective of species interconnected via horizontal exchange and relying on a common gene pool.

  14. Tissue-specific control of brain-enriched miR-7 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nila Roy; de Lima Alves, Flavia; de Andrés-Aguayo, Luisa; Graf, Thomas; Cáceres, Javier F.; Rappsilber, Juri; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis is a highly regulated process in eukaryotic cells. Several mature miRNAs exhibit a tissue-specific pattern of expression without an apparent tissue-specific pattern for their corresponding primary transcripts. This discrepancy is suggestive of post-transcriptional regulation of miRNA abundance. Here, we demonstrate that the brain-enriched expression of miR-7, which is processed from the ubiquitous hnRNP K pre-mRNA transcript, is achieved by inhibition of its biogenesis in nonbrain cells in both human and mouse systems. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) mass spectrometry combined with RNase-assisted RNA pull-down, we identified Musashi homolog 2 (MSI2) and Hu antigen R (HuR) proteins as inhibitors of miR-7 processing in nonneural cells. This is achieved through HuR-mediated binding of MSI2 to the conserved terminal loop of pr