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Sample records for endothelial barrier function

  1. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  2. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  3. Update on pulmonary edema: the role and regulation of endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C E; Lum, H

    2001-01-01

    Discovery of the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary edema and identification of effective strategies for prevention remain significant clinical concerns. Endothelial barrier function is a key component for maintenance of the integrity of the vascular boundary in the lung, particularly since the gas exchange surface area of the alveolar-capillary membrane is large. This review is focused on new insights in the pulmonary endothelial response to injury and recovery, reversible activation by edemagenic agents, and the biochemical/structural basis for regulation of endothelial barrier function. This information is discussed in the context of fundamental concepts of lung fluid balance and pulmonary function.

  4. Actin dynamics in the regulation of endothelial barrier functions and neutrophil recruitment during endotoxemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael; García Ponce, Alexander; Vadillo, Eduardo; Pelayo, Rosana; Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2017-02-02

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death worldwide. Increased vascular permeability is a major hallmark of sepsis. Dynamic alterations in actin fiber formation play an important role in the regulation of endothelial barrier functions and thus vascular permeability. Endothelial integrity requires a delicate balance between the formation of cortical actin filaments that maintain endothelial cell contact stability and the formation of actin stress fibers that generate pulling forces, and thus compromise endothelial cell contact stability. Current research has revealed multiple molecular pathways that regulate actin dynamics and endothelial barrier dysfunction during sepsis. These include intracellular signaling proteins of the small GTPases family (e.g., Rap1, RhoA and Rac1) as well as the molecules that are directly acting on the actomyosin cytoskeleton such as myosin light chain kinase and Rho kinases. Another hallmark of sepsis is an excessive recruitment of neutrophils that also involves changes in the actin cytoskeleton in both endothelial cells and neutrophils. This review focuses on the available evidence about molecules that control actin dynamics and regulate endothelial barrier functions and neutrophil recruitment. We also discuss treatment strategies using pharmaceutical enzyme inhibitors to target excessive vascular permeability and leukocyte recruitment in septic patients.

  5. Effects of Fe particle irradiation on human endothelial barrier structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Space travel involves exposure to biologically effective heavy ion radiation and there is consequently a concern for possible degenerative disorders in humans. A significant target for radiation effects is the microvascular system, which is crucial to healthy functioning of the tissues. Its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function and is not only a primary event in a range of degenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. Thus, an assessment of the effects of heavy ion radiation on endothelial barrier function would be useful for estimating the risks of space travel. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of high LET Fe particles (1 GeV/n) and is the first investigation of the effects of charged particles on the function of the human endothelial barrier. We used a set of established and novel endpoints to assess barrier function after exposure. These include, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), morphological effects, localization of adhesion and cell junction proteins (in 2D monolayers and in 3D tissue models), and permeability of molecules through the endothelial barrier. A dose of 0.50 Gy was sufficient to cause a progressive reduction in TEER measurements that were significant 48 hours after exposure. Concurrently, there were morphological changes and a 14% loss of cells from monolayers. Gaps also appeared in the normally continuous cell-border localization of the tight junction protein - ZO-1 but not the Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in both monolayers and in 3D vessel models. Disruption of barrier function was confirmed by increased permeability to 3 kDa and 10 kDa dextran molecules. A dose of 0.25 Gy caused no detectible change in cell number, morphology, or TEER, but did cause barrier disruption since there were gaps in the cell border localization of ZO-1 and an increased permeability to 3 kDa dextran. These results indicate that Fe particles potently have

  6. Modulation of Rac1 Activity by ADMA/DDAH Regulates Pulmonary Endothelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Torondel, Belen; Zhao, Lan; Renné, Thomas; Leiper, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, asymmetric methylarginine (ADMA) is associated with vascular dysfunction and endothelial leakage. We studied the role of ADMA, and the enzymes metabolizing it, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH) in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in pulmonary macrovascular and microvascular cells in vitro and in lungs of genetically modified heterozygous DDAHI knockout mice in vivo. We show that ADMA increases pulmonary endothelial permeability in vitro and in in vivo and that this effect is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) acting via protein kinase G (PKG) and independent of reactive oxygen species formation. ADMA-induced remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and intercellular adherens junctions results from a decrease in PKG-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and a subsequent down-regulation of Rac1 activity. The effects of ADMA on endothelial permeability, Rac1 activation and VASP phosphorylation are prevented by overexpression of active DDAHI and DDAHII, whereas inactive DDAH mutants have no effect. These findings demonstrate for the first time that ADMA metabolism critically determines pulmonary endothelial barrier function by modulating Rac1-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and intercellular junctions. PMID:18923147

  7. Methamphetamine disrupts blood-brain barrier function by induction of oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava; Fan, Shongshan; Eidem, Tess; Papugani, Anil; Reichenbach, Nancy; Dykstra, Holly; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre O; Persidsky, Yuri

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a potent stimulant with strong euphoric properties, has a high abuse liability and long-lasting neurotoxic effects. Recent studies in animal models have indicated that METH can induce impairment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus suggesting that some of the neurotoxic effects resulting from METH abuse could be the outcome of barrier disruption. In this study, we provide evidence that METH alters BBB function through direct effects on endothelial cells and explore possible underlying mechanisms leading to endothelial injury. We report that METH increases BBB permeability in vivo, and exposure of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) to METH diminishes the tightness of BMVEC monolayers in a dose- and time-dependent manner by decreasing the expression of cell membrane-associated tight junction (TJ) proteins. These changes were accompanied by the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, increased monocyte migration across METH-treated endothelial monolayers, and activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in BMVEC. Antioxidant treatment attenuated or completely reversed all tested aspects of METH-induced BBB dysfunction. Our data suggest that BBB injury is caused by METH-mediated oxidative stress, which activates MLCK and negatively affects the TJ complex. These observations provide a basis for antioxidant protection against brain endothelial injury caused by METH exposure.

  8. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lefeng; Mehta, Sanjay; Brock, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix]) of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:28250575

  9. Tesmilifene modifies brain endothelial functions and opens the blood-brain/blood-glioma barrier.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Péterfi, Zoltán A; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Cervenak, László; Ábrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2015-09-01

    Tesmilifene, a tamoxifen analog with antihistamine action, has chemopotentiating properties in experimental and clinical cancer studies. In our previous works, tesmilifene increased the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in animal and culture models. Our aim was to investigate the effects of tesmilifene on brain microvessel permeability in the rat RG2 glioma model and to reveal its mode of action in brain endothelial cells. Tesmilifene significantly increased fluorescein extravasation in the glioma. Short-term treatment with tesmilifene reduced the resistance and increased the permeability for marker molecules in a rat triple co-culture BBB model. Tesmilifene also affected the barrier integrity in brain endothelial cells co-cultured with RG2 glioblastoma cells. Tesmilifene inhibited the activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 efflux pumps and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, efflux pumps, solute carriers, and metabolic enzymes important for BBB functions. Among the possible signaling pathways that regulate BBB permeability, tesmilifene activated the early nuclear translocation of NFκB. The MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt kinase pathways were also involved. We demonstrate for the first time that tesmilifene increases permeability marker molecule extravasation in glioma and inhibits efflux pump activity in brain endothelial cells, which may have therapeutic relevance. Tesmilifene, a chemopotentiator in experimental and clinical cancer studies increases vascular permeability in RG2 glioma in rats and permeability for marker molecules in a culture model of the blood-brain barrier. Tesmilifene inhibits the activity of efflux pumps and down-regulates the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, transporters, and metabolic enzymes important for the blood-brain barrier functions, which may have therapeutic relevance.

  10. Regulation of endothelial barrier function by p120-catenin∙VE-cadherin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Joshua P.; Lowery, Anthony M.; Adam, Alejandro P.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.; Vincent, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial p120-catenin (p120) maintains the level of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-Cad) by inhibiting VE-Cad endocytosis. Loss of p120 results in a decrease in VE-Cad levels, leading to the formation of monolayers with decreased barrier function (as assessed by transendothelial electrical resistance [TEER]), whereas overexpression of p120 increases VE-Cad levels and promotes a more restrictive monolayer. To test whether reduced endocytosis mediated by p120 is required for VE-Cad formation of a restrictive barrier, we restored VE-Cad levels using an endocytic-defective VE-Cad mutant. This endocytic-defective mutant was unable to rescue the loss of TEER associated with p120 or VE-Cad depletion. In contrast, the endocytic-defective mutant was able to prevent sprout formation in a fibrin bead assay, suggesting that p120•VE-Cad interaction regulates barrier function and angiogenic sprouting through different mechanisms. Further investigation found that depletion of p120 increases Src activity and that loss of p120 binding results in increased VE-Cad phosphorylation. In addition, expression of a Y658F–VE-Cad mutant or an endocytic-defective Y658F–VE-Cad double mutant were both able to rescue TEER independently of p120 binding. Our results show that in addition to regulating endocytosis, p120 also allows the phosphorylated form of VE-Cad to participate in the formation of a restrictive monolayer. PMID:27852896

  11. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  12. The Mouse Blood-Brain Barrier Transcriptome: A New Resource for Understanding the Development and Function of Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, Richard; Zhou, Lu; Agalliu, Dritan; Cahoy, John D.; Kaushal, Amit; Barres, Ben A.

    2010-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintains brain homeostasis and limits the entry of toxins and pathogens into the brain. Despite its importance, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating the development and function of this crucial barrier. In this study we have developed methods to highly purify and gene profile endothelial cells from different tissues, and by comparing the transcriptional profile of brain endothelial cells with those purified from the liver and lung, we have generated a comprehensive resource of transcripts that are enriched in the BBB forming endothelial cells of the brain. Through this comparison we have identified novel tight junction proteins, transporters, metabolic enzymes, signaling components, and unknown transcripts whose expression is enriched in central nervous system (CNS) endothelial cells. This analysis has identified that RXRalpha signaling cascade is specifically enriched at the BBB, implicating this pathway in regulating this vital barrier. This dataset provides a resource for understanding CNS endothelial cells and their interaction with neural and hematogenous cells. PMID:21060791

  13. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing for the quantification of endothelial proliferation, barrier function, and motility.

    PubMed

    Szulcek, Robert; Bogaard, Harm Jan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2014-03-28

    Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) is an in vitro impedance measuring system to quantify the behavior of cells within adherent cell layers. To this end, cells are grown in special culture chambers on top of opposing, circular gold electrodes. A constant small alternating current is applied between the electrodes and the potential across is measured. The insulating properties of the cell membrane create a resistance towards the electrical current flow resulting in an increased electrical potential between the electrodes. Measuring cellular impedance in this manner allows the automated study of cell attachment, growth, morphology, function, and motility. Although the ECIS measurement itself is straightforward and easy to learn, the underlying theory is complex and selection of the right settings and correct analysis and interpretation of the data is not self-evident. Yet, a clear protocol describing the individual steps from the experimental design to preparation, realization, and analysis of the experiment is not available. In this article the basic measurement principle as well as possible applications, experimental considerations, advantages and limitations of the ECIS system are discussed. A guide is provided for the study of cell attachment, spreading and proliferation; quantification of cell behavior in a confluent layer, with regard to barrier function, cell motility, quality of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions; and quantification of wound healing and cellular responses to vasoactive stimuli. Representative results are discussed based on human microvascular (MVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but are applicable to all adherent growing cells.

  14. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the ‘apical junctional complex—AJC’ with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the ‘Junctional Adhesion Molecules’ (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers. PMID:25610754

  15. Heat stress-induced disruption of endothelial barrier function is via PAR1 signaling and suppressed by Xuebijing injection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiulin; Liu, Jingxian; Wang, Zhenglian; Guo, Xiaohua; Zhou, Gengbiao; Liu, Yanan; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular permeability leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is central to the pathogenesis of heatstroke. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), the receptor for thrombin, plays a key role in disruption of endothelial barrier function in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the role of PAR1 in heat stress-induced endothelial hyper-permeability is unknown. In this study, we measured PAR1 protein expression in heat-stressed human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), investigated the influences of PAR1 on endothelial permeability, F-actin rearrangement, and moesin phosphorylation by inhibiting PAR1 with its siRNA, neutralizing antibody (anti-PAR1), specific inhibitor(RWJ56110), and Xuebijing injection (XBJ), a traditional Chinese medicine used for sepsis treatment, and evaluated the role of PAR1 in heatstroke-related ALI/ARDS in mice by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1and XBJ. We found that heat stress induced PAR1 protein expression 2h after heat stress in endothelial cells, caused the release of endothelial matrix metalloprotease 1, an activator of PAR1, after 60 or 120 min of heat stimulation, as well as promoted endothelial hyper-permeability and F-actin rearrangement, which were inhibited by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1 and siRNA. PAR1 mediated moesin phosphorylation, which caused F-actin rearrangement and disruption of endothelial barrier function. To corroborate findings from in vitro experiments, we found that RWJ56110 and the anti-PAR1 significantly decreased lung edema, pulmonary microvascular permeability, protein exudation, and leukocytes infiltrations in heatstroke mice. Additionally, XBJ was found to suppress PAR1-moesin signal pathway and confer protective effects on maintaining endothelial barrier function both in vitro and in vivo heat-stressed model, similar to those observed above with the inhibition of PAR1. These results suggest that PAR1 is a potential

  16. Impedance analysis of GPCR-mediated changes in endothelial barrier function: overview and fundamental considerations for stable and reproducible measurements.

    PubMed

    Stolwijk, Judith A; Matrougui, Khalid; Renken, Christian W; Trebak, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The past 20 years has seen significant growth in using impedance-based assays to understand the molecular underpinning of endothelial and epithelial barrier function in response to physiological agonists and pharmacological and toxicological compounds. Most studies on barrier function use G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists which couple to fast and transient changes in barrier properties. The power of impedance-based techniques such as electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) resides in its ability to detect minute changes in cell layer integrity label-free and in real-time ranging from seconds to days. We provide a comprehensive overview of the biophysical principles, applications, and recent developments in impedance-based methodologies. Despite extensive application of impedance analysis in endothelial barrier research, little attention has been paid to data analysis and critical experimental variables, which are both essential for signal stability and reproducibility. We describe the rationale behind common ECIS data presentation and interpretation and illustrate practical guidelines to improve signal intensity by adapting technical parameters such as electrode layout, monitoring frequency, or parameter (resistance versus impedance magnitude). Moreover, we discuss the impact of experimental parameters, including cell source, liquid handling, and agonist preparation on signal intensity and kinetics. Our discussions are supported by experimental data obtained from human microvascular endothelial cells challenged with three GPCR agonists, thrombin, histamine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

  17. Iloprost improves endothelial barrier function in lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Wu, Tinghuai; Tian, Yufeng; Meliton, Angelo; Sarich, Nicolene; Tian, Xinyong; Leff, Alan; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2013-01-01

    The protective effects of prostacyclin and its stable analogue iloprost are mediated by elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) leading to enhancement of the peripheral actin cytoskeleton and cell-cell adhesive structures. This study tested the hypothesis that iloprost may exhibit protective effects against lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Endothelial barrier dysfunction was assessed by measurements of transendothelial permeability, morphologically and by analysis of LPS-activated inflammatory signalling. In vivo, C57BL/6J mice were challenged with LPS with or without iloprost or 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (Br-cAMP) treatment. Lung injury was monitored by measurements of bronchoalveolar lavage protein content, cell count and Evans blue extravasation. Iloprost and Br-cAMP attenuated the disruption of the endothelial monolayer, and suppressed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, Rho signalling, intercellular adhesion molecular (ICAM)-1 expression and neutrophil migration after LPS challenge. In vivo, iloprost was effective against LPS-induced protein and neutrophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced myeloperoxidase activation, ICAM-1 expression and Evans blue extravasation in the lungs. Inhibition of Rac activity abolished the barrier-protective and anti-inflammatory effects of iloprost and Br-cAMP. Iloprost-induced elevation of intracellular cAMP triggers Rac signalling, which attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB and p38 MAPK inflammatory pathways and the Rho-dependent mechanism of endothelial permeability.

  18. Pitfalls in assessing microvascular endothelial barrier function: impedance-based devices versus the classic macromolecular tracer assay

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Iris; Hornburger, Michael C.; Mayer, Bettina A.; Beyerle, Andrea; Wegener, Joachim; Fürst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently used parameters to describe the barrier properties of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro are (i) the macromolecular permeability, indicating the flux of a macromolecular tracer across the endothelium, and (ii) electrical impedance of ECs grown on gold-film electrodes reporting on the cell layer’s tightness for ion flow. Due to the experimental differences between these approaches, inconsistent observations have been described. Here, we present the first direct comparison of these assays applied to one single cell type (human microvascular ECs) under the same experimental conditions. The impact of different pharmacological tools (histamine, forskolin, Y-27632, blebbistatin, TRAP) on endothelial barrier function was analyzed by Transwell® tracer assays and two commercial impedance devices (xCELLigence®, ECIS®). The two impedance techniques provided very similar results for all compounds, whereas macromolecular permeability readings were found to be partly inconsistent with impedance. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. We conclude that the complementary combination of both approaches is highly recommended to overcome the restrictions of each assay. Since the nature of the growth support may contribute to the observed differences, structure-function relationships should be based on cells that are consistently grown on either permeable or impermeable growth supports in all experiments. PMID:27025965

  19. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Glading, Angela J.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability. PMID:27612188

  20. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Smrcka, Alan V; Glading, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability.

  1. TGF-β Is Required for Vascular Barrier Function, Endothelial Survival and Homeostasis of the Adult Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Arindel S. R.; Sekiyama, Eiichi; Maldonado, Angel E.; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Pericyte-endothelial cell (EC) interactions are critical to both vascular development and vessel stability. We have previously shown that TGF-β signaling between EC and mural cells participates in vessel stabilization in vitro. We therefore investigated the role of TGF-β signaling in maintaining microvessel structure and function in the adult mouse retinal microvasculature. TGF-β signaling was inhibited by systemic expression of soluble endoglin (sEng) and inhibition was demonstrated by reduced phospho-smad2 in the adult retina. Blockade of TGF-β signaling led to increased vascular and neural cell apoptosis in the retina, which was associated with decreased retinal function, as measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Perfusion of the inner retinal vasculature was impaired and was accompanied by defective autoregulation and loss of capillary integrity. Fundus angiography and Evans blue permeability assay revealed a breakdown of the blood-retinal-barrier that was characterized by decreased association between the tight junction proteins zo-1 and occludin. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in cocultures of EC and 10T1/2 cells corroborated the in vivo findings, with impaired EC barrier function, dissociation of EC from 10T1/2 cells, and endothelial cell death, supporting the role of EC-mesenchymal interactions in TGF-β signaling. These results implicate constitutive TGF-β signaling in maintaining the integrity and function of the adult microvasculature and shed light on the potential role of TGF-β signaling in vasoproliferative and vascular degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:19340291

  2. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    PubMed

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  3. TNF-induced endothelial barrier disruption: beyond actin and Rho.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Ramiro, B; García-Weber, D; Millán, J

    2014-12-01

    The decrease of endothelial barrier function is central to the long-term inflammatory response. A pathological alteration of the ability of endothelial cells to modulate the passage of cells and solutes across the vessel underlies the development of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mediates changes in the barrier properties of the endothelium. TNF activates different Rho GTPases, increases filamentous actin and remodels endothelial cell morphology. However, inhibition of actin-mediated remodelling is insufficient to prevent endothelial barrier disruption in response to TNF, suggesting that additional molecular mechanisms are involved. Here we discuss, first, the pivotal role of Rac-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to regulate the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junctions and, second, the ability of endothelial adhesion receptors such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1, involved in leukocyte transendothelial migration, to control endothelial permeability to small molecules, often through ROS generation. These adhesion receptors regulate endothelial barrier function in ways both dependent on and independent of their engagement by immune cells, and orchestrate the crosstalk between leukocyte transendothelial migration and endothelial permeability during inflammation.

  4. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  5. Cellular crosstalk between airway epithelial and endothelial cells regulates barrier functions during exposure to double‐stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Loxham, Matthew; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Swindle, Emily J.; Morgan, Hywel; Davies, Donna E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The epithelial and endothelial barriers of the airway mucosa are critical for regulation of tissue homeostasis and protection against pathogens or other tissue damaging agents. In response to a viral infection, epithelial cells must signal to the endothelium to initiate immune cell recruitment. This is a highly temporal regulated process; however, the mechanisms of this cross‐talk are not fully understood. Methods In a close‐contact co‐culture model of human airway epithelial and endothelial cells, cellular crosstalk was analyzed using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurements, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and ELISA. Viral infections were simulated by exposing airway epithelial cells apically to double‐stranded RNA (Poly(I:C)). Using a microfluidic culture system, the temporal release of mediators was analyzed in the co‐culture model. Results Within 4 h of challenge, double‐stranded RNA induced the release of TNF‐α by epithelial cells. This activated endothelial cells by triggering the release of the chemoattractant CX3CL1 (fractalkine) by 8 h post‐challenge and expression of adhesion molecules E‐selectin and ICAM‐1. These responses were significantly reduced by neutralising TNF‐α. Conclusion By facilitating kinetic profiling, the microfluidic co‐culture system has enabled identification of a key signaling mechanism between the epithelial and endothelial barriers. Better understanding of cell–cell cross‐talk and its regulatory mechanisms has the potential to identify new therapeutic strategies to control airway inflammation. PMID:28250924

  6. Src Family Kinases Modulate the Loss of Endothelial Barrier Function in Response to TNF-α: Crosstalk with p38 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Anthony M.; Martino, Nina; Alsaffar, Hiba; Vincent, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Src Family Kinase (SFK) signaling is required for the increase in endothelial permeability induced by a variety of cytokines and growth factors. However, we previously demonstrated that activation of endogenous SFKs by expression of dominant negative C-terminal Src Kinase (DN-Csk) is not sufficient to decrease endothelial adherens junction integrity. Basal SFK activity has been observed in normal venular endothelia and was not associated with increased basal permeability. The basal SFK activity however was found to contribute to increased sensitivity of the venular endothelium to inflammatory mediator-induced leakage. How SFK activation achieves this is still not well understood. Here, we show that SFK activation renders human dermal microvascular endothelial cells susceptible to low doses of TNF-α. Treatment of DN-Csk-expressing cells with 50 pg/ml TNF-α induced a loss of TEER as well as drastic changes in the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion proteins. This synergistic effect was independent of ROCK or NF-κB activity. TNF-α-induced p38 signaling was required for the synergistic effect on barrier function, and activation of the p38 MAPK alone was also able to induce changes in permeability only in monolayers with active SFKs. These results suggest that the activation of endogenous levels of SFK renders the endothelial barrier more susceptible to low, physiologic doses of TNF-α through activation of p38 which leads to a loss of endothelial tight junctions. PMID:27603666

  7. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  8. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I Modulates Endothelial Blood-Brain Barrier Function in Ischemic Middle-Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bake, Shameena; Okoreeh, Andre K.; Alaniz, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    In comparison with young females, middle-aged female rats sustain greater cerebral infarction and worse functional recovery after stroke. These poorer stroke outcomes in middle-aged females are associated with an age-related reduction in IGF-I levels. Poststroke IGF-I treatment decreases infarct volume in older females and lowers the expression of cytokines in the ischemic hemisphere. IGF-I also reduces transfer of Evans blue dye to the brain, suggesting that this peptide may also promote blood-brain barrier function. To test the hypothesis that IGF-I may act at the blood-brain barrier in ischemic stroke, 2 approaches were used. In the first approach, middle-aged female rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and treated with IGF-I after reperfusion. Mononuclear cells from the ischemic hemisphere were stained for CD4 or triple-labeled for CD4/CD25/FoxP3 and subjected to flow analyses. Both cohorts of cells were significantly reduced in IGF-I–treated animals compared with those in vehicle controls. Reduced trafficking of immune cells to the ischemic site suggests that blood-brain barrier integrity is better maintained in IGF-I–treated animals. The second approach directly tested the effect of IGF-I on barrier function of aging endothelial cells. Accordingly, brain microvascular endothelial cells from middle-aged female rats were cultured ex vivo and subjected to ischemic conditions (oxygen-glucose deprivation). IGF-I treatment significantly reduced the transfer of fluorescently labeled BSA across the endothelial monolayer as well as cellular internalization of fluorescein isothiocyanate–BSA compared with those in vehicle-treated cultures, Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that IGF-I improves blood-brain barrier function in middle-aged females. PMID:26556536

  10. Soluble complement receptor 1 preserves endothelial barrier function and microcirculation in postischemic pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    von Dobschuetz, E; Bleiziffer, O; Pahernik, S; Dellian, M; Hoffmann, T; Messmer, K

    2004-05-01

    Components of the activated complement cascade are considered to play a pivotal role in ischemia-reperfusion-induced organ injury. With the use of intravital epifluorescence microscopy, we investigated the effect of complement inhibition by the recombinant soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1; TP10) on the effect of macromolecular microvascular permeability, functional capillary perfusion, and leukocyte endothelium interaction in postischemic pancreatitis. Anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 60 min of normothermic pancreatic ischemia induced by microclipping of the blood-supplying arteries of the organ. Rats who received sCR1 (15 mg/kg body wt iv; n = 7) during reperfusion showed a significant reduction of permeability (1.77 +/- 1.34 x 10(-8) cm/s; n = 7) of tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled albumin injected 90 min after the onset of reperfusion compared with vehicle-treated animals (6.95 +/- 1.56 x 10(-8) cm/s; n = 7). At 120 min after the onset of reperfusion, the length of red blood cell-perfused capillaries (functional capillary density) was significantly improved (from 279 +/- 15.7 to 330 +/- 3.7 cm(-1); n = 7) and the number of leukocytes adherent to postcapillary venules was significantly reduced (from 314 +/- 87 to 163 +/- 71 mm(-2); n = 7) by sCR1 compared with vehicle treatment. Complement inhibition by sCR1 effectively ameliorates pancreatic ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory disturbances and might be considered for treatment of postischemic pancreatitis.

  11. Flow shear stress regulates endothelial barrier function and expression of angiogenic factors in a 3D microfluidic tumor vascular model

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Cara F; Verbridge, Scott S; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining blood vessels are exposed to various hemodynamic forces associated with blood flow. These include fluid shear, the tangential force derived from the friction of blood flowing across the luminal cell surface, tensile stress due to deformation of the vessel wall by transvascular flow, and normal stress caused by the hydrodynamic pressure differential across the vessel wall. While it is well known that these fluid forces induce changes in endothelial morphology, cytoskeletal remodeling, and altered gene expression, the effect of flow on endothelial organization within the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Using a previously established microfluidic tumor vascular model, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of normal (4 dyn/cm2), low (1 dyn/cm2), and high (10 dyn/cm2) microvascular wall shear stress (WSS) on tumor-endothelial paracrine signaling associated with angiogenesis. It is hypothesized that high WSS will alter the endothelial phenotype such that vascular permeability and tumor-expressed angiogenic factors are reduced. Results demonstrate that endothelial permeability decreases as a function of increasing WSS, while co-culture with tumor cells increases permeability relative to mono-cultures. This response is likely due to shear stress-mediated endothelial cell alignment and tumor-VEGF-induced permeability. In addition, gene expression analysis revealed that high WSS (10 dyn/cm2) significantly down-regulates tumor-expressed MMP9, HIF1, VEGFA, ANG1, and ANG2, all of which are important factors implicated in tumor angiogenesis. This result was not observed in tumor mono-cultures or static conditioned media experiments, suggesting a flow-mediated paracrine signaling mechanism exists with surrounding tumor cells that elicits a change in expression of angiogenic factors. Findings from this work have significant implications regarding low blood velocities commonly seen in the tumor vasculature

  12. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation.

  13. Three-dimensional culture conditions differentially affect astrocyte modulation of brain endothelial barrier function in response to transforming growth factor β1.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brian T; Grego, Sonia; Sellgren, Katelyn L

    2015-05-22

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function is regulated by dynamic interactions among cell types within the neurovascular unit, including astrocytes and endothelial cells. Co-culture models of the BBB typically involve astrocytes seeded on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces, which recent studies indicate cause astrocytes to express a phenotype similar to that of reactive astrocytes in situ. We hypothesized that the culture conditions of astrocytes would differentially affect their ability to modulate BBB function in vitro. Brain endothelial cells were grown alone or in co-culture with astrocytes. Astrocytes were grown either as conventional (2D) monolayers, or in a collagen-based gel which allows them to grow in a three-dimensional (3D) construct. Astrocytes were viable in 3D conditions, and displayed a marked reduction in their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting reduced activation. Stimulation of astrocytes with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and reduced expression of claudin-5 in co-cultures, whereas treatment of endothelial cells in the absence of astrocytes was without effect. The effect of TGFβ1 on TEER was significantly more pronounced in endothelial cells cultured with 3D astrocytes compared to 2D astrocytes. These results demonstrate that astrocyte culture conditions differentially affect their ability to modulate brain endothelial barrier function, and suggest a direct relationship between reactive gliosis and BBB permeability. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the potential importance of physiologically relevant culture conditions to in vitro modeling of disease processes that affect the neurovascular unit.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein and soluble CD14 function as accessory molecules for LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function, in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Brann, T W; Ding, X; Pugin, J; Tobias, P S

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial LPS induces endothelial cell (EC) injury both in vivo and in vitro. We studied the effect of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS on movement of 14C-BSA across bovine pulmonary artery EC monolayers. In the presence of serum, a 6-h LPS exposure augmented (P < 0.001) transendothelial 14C-BSA flux compared with the media control at concentrations > or = 0.5 ng/ml, and LPS (10 ng/ml) exposures of > or = 2-h increased (P < 0.005) the flux. In the absence of serum, LPS concentrations of up to 10 micrograms/ml failed to increase 14C-BSA flux at 6 h. The addition of 10% serum increased EC sensitivity to the LPS stimulus by > 10,000-fold. LPS (10 ng/ml, 6 h) failed to increase 14C-BSA flux at serum concentrations < 0.5%, and maximum LPS-induced increments could be generated in the presence of > or = 2.5%. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) could each satisfy this serum requirement; either anti-LBP or anti-CD14 antibody each totally blocked (P < 0.00005) the LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function. LPS-LBP had a more rapid onset than did LPS-sCD14. The LPS effect in the presence of both LBP and sCD14 exceeded the effect in the presence of either protein alone. These data suggest that LBP and sCD14 each independently functions as an accessory molecule for LPS presentation to the non-CD14-bearing endothelial surface. However, in the presence of serum both molecules are required. Images PMID:7509346

  15. Apoptosis of Endothelial Cells by 13-HPODE Contributes to Impairment of Endothelial Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Valerie E.; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential host response during bacterial infections such as bovine mastitis. Endothelial cells are critical for an appropriate inflammatory response and loss of vascular barrier integrity is implicated in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus uberis-induced mastitis. Previous studies suggested that accumulation of linoleic acid (LA) oxygenation products derived from 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) metabolism could regulate vascular functions. The initial LA derivative from the 15-LOX-1 pathway, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE), can induce endothelial death, whereas the reduced hydroxyl product, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), is abundantly produced during vascular activation. However, the relative contribution of specific LA-derived metabolites on impairment of mammary endothelial integrity is unknown. Our hypothesis was that S. uberis-induced LA-derived 15-LOX-1 oxygenation products impair mammary endothelial barrier integrity by apoptosis. Exposure of bovine mammary endothelial cells (BMEC) to S. uberis did not increase 15-LOX-1 LA metabolism. However, S. uberis challenge of bovine monocytes demonstrated that monocytes may be a significant source of both 13-HPODE and 13-HODE during mastitis. Exposure of BMEC to 13-HPODE, but not 13-HODE, significantly reduced endothelial barrier integrity and increased apoptosis. Changing oxidant status by coexposure to an antioxidant during 13-HPODE treatment prevented adverse effects of 13-HPODE, including amelioration of apoptosis. A better understanding of how the oxidant status of the vascular microenvironment impacts endothelial barrier properties could lead to more efficacious treatments for S. uberis mastitis. PMID:27818578

  16. Crossing the endothelial barrier during metastasis.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; d'Água, Bárbara Borda; Ridley, Anne J

    2013-12-01

    During metastasis, cancer cells disseminate to other parts of the body by entering the bloodstream in a process that is called intravasation. They then extravasate at metastatic sites by attaching to endothelial cells that line blood vessels and crossing the vessel walls of tissues or organs. This Review describes how cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier during extravasation and how different receptors, signalling pathways and circulating cells such as leukocytes and platelets contribute to this process. Identification of the mechanisms that underlie cancer cell extravasation could lead to the development of new therapies to reduce metastasis.

  17. [In vitro study of endothelial tolerance of 10 culture media with special reference to the pump and barrier function].

    PubMed

    Kloss, A; Böhnke, M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated ten commercially available tissue culture media in a series of perfusion experiments. Porcine cornea were perfused in groups of 10-15 with the media M 199 Earle, MEM Earle, MEM Hank, DMEM, RPMI 1640, Ham's F-12, BM-86 Wissler. Perfusions were done with and without the addition of 2% fetal calf serum. As a control, BSS PLUS (R) was used. We compared the change in corneal thickness in a 6-h perfusion interval. The corneal endothelium was present after all perfusion experiments. Evaluation of the changes in corneal thickness showed that culture media rich in bicarbonate support the endothelial pumping function. The presence of fetal calf serum had no influence on corneal thickness. The absence of glutathione in the culture media did not result in increased corneal thickness. Medium 199 with Earle salt, BSS Plus, DMEM, RPMI 1640 and Ham's F-12 gave the best results and may be considered possible intraocular irrigation solutions.

  18. eNOS-derived nitric oxide regulates endothelial barrier function through VE-cadherin and Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Lin, Michelle I.; Murata, Takahisa; Landskroner-Eiger, Shira; Schleicher, Michael; Kothiya, Milankumar; Iwakiri, Yasuko; Yu, Jun; Huang, Paul L.; Sessa, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Transient disruption of endothelial adherens junctions and cytoskeletal remodeling are responsible for increases in vascular permeability induced by inflammatory stimuli and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) is crucial for VEGF-induced changes in permeability in vivo; however, the molecular mechanism by which endogenous NO modulates endothelial permeability is not clear. Here, we show that the lack of eNOS reduces VEGF-induced permeability, an effect mediated by enhanced activation of the Rac GTPase and stabilization of cortical actin. The loss of NO increased the recruitment of the Rac guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) TIAM1 to adherens junctions and VE-cadherin (also known as cadherin 5), and reduced Rho activation and stress fiber formation. In addition, NO deficiency reduced VEGF-induced VE-cadherin phosphorylation and impaired the localization, but not the activation, of c-Src to cell junctions. The physiological role of eNOS activation is clear given that VEGF-, histamine- and inflammation-induced vascular permeability is reduced in mice bearing a non-phosphorylatable knock-in mutation of the key eNOS phosphorylation site S1176. Thus, NO is crucial for Rho GTPase-dependent regulation of cytoskeletal architecture leading to reversible changes in vascular permeability. PMID:24046447

  19. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Physiology and Metabolic Plasticity in Brain Angiogenesis and Blood-Brain Barrier Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Malinovskaya, Natalia A.; Komleva, Yulia K.; Salmin, Vladimir V.; Morgun, Andrey V.; Shuvaev, Anton N.; Panina, Yulia A.; Boitsova, Elizaveta B.; Salmina, Alla B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB) development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons). Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies. PMID:27990124

  20. RhoA S-nitrosylation as a regulatory mechanism influencing endothelial barrier function in response to G(+)-bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Wang, Y; Rafikov, R; Haigh, S; Zhi, W B; Kumar, S; Doulias, P T; Rafikova, O; Pillich, H; Chakraborty, T; Lucas, R; Verin, A D; Catravas, J D; She, J X; Black, S M; Fulton, D J R

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier in response to Gram positive (G(+)) bacterial toxins is a major complication of acute lung injury (ALI) and can be further aggravated by antibiotics which stimulate toxin release. The integrity of the pulmonary endothelial barrier is mediated by the balance of disruptive forces such as the small GTPase RhoA, and protective forces including endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). How NO protects against the barrier dysfunction is incompletely understood and our goal was to determine whether NO and S-nitrosylation can modulate RhoA activity and whether this mechanism is important for G(+) toxin-induced microvascular permeability. We found that the G(+) toxin listeriolysin-O (LLO) increased RhoA activity and that NO and S-NO donors inhibit RhoA activity. RhoA was robustly S-nitrosylated as determined by biotin-switch and mercury column analysis. MS revealed that three primary cysteine residues are S-nitrosylated including cys16, cys20 and cys159. Mutation of these residues to serine diminished S-nitrosylation to endogenous NO and mutant RhoA was less sensitive to inhibition by S-NO. G(+)-toxins stimulated the denitrosylation of RhoA which was not mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), thioredoxin (TRX) or thiol-dependent enzyme activity but was instead stimulated directly by elevated calcium levels. Calcium-promoted the direct denitrosylation of WT but not mutant RhoA and mutant RhoA adenovirus was more effective than WT in disrupting the barrier integrity of human lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we reveal a novel mechanism by which NO and S-nitrosylation reduces RhoA activity which may be of significance in the management of pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by G(+)-toxins.

  1. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C.; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C.; Alonso, Miguel A.; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  2. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  3. Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Haskó, György; Liaudet, Lucas; Drel, Viktor R; Obrosova, Irina G; Pacher, Pál

    2007-07-01

    A nonpsychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and has recently been reported to lower the incidence of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice and to preserve the blood-retinal barrier in experimental diabetes. In this study we have investigated the effects of CBD on high glucose (HG)-induced, mitochondrial superoxide generation, NF-kappaB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, monocyte-endothelial adhesion, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and disruption of endothelial barrier function in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HG markedly increased mitochondrial superoxide generation (measured by flow cytometry using MitoSOX), NF-kappaB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, upregulation of iNOS and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and monocyte-endothelial adhesion in HCAECs. HG also decreased endothelial barrier function measured by increased permeability and diminished expression of vascular endothelial cadherin in HCAECs. Remarkably, all the above mentioned effects of HG were attenuated by CBD pretreatment. Since a disruption of the endothelial function and integrity by HG is a crucial early event underlying the development of various diabetic complications, our results suggest that CBD, which has recently been approved for the treatment of inflammation, pain, and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis in humans, may have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  4. Dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-Cadherin Involved in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Injury Induced by Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhiwei; Dai, Feifeng; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) caused pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury, which induced acute aortic dissection (AAD) combined with acute lung injury (ALI). However, the exact mechanism is unclear. We investigated the role of dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin in the AngII induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury. Mice or pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were divided into control group, AngII group, AngII+PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor) group, and PP2 group. PP2 was used to inhibit the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin. Pathological changes, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and pulmonary microvascular permeability were used to determine the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier function. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis of PMVECs, and immunofluorescence was used to determine the skeletal arrangement. Transendothelial resistance was used to detect the permeability of endothelial barrier. Phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was significantly reduced after AngII stimulation (P < 0.05), together with skeletal rearrangement, and elevation of endothelial permeability which finally induced endothelial barrier injury. After PP2 interference, the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was further reduced and the endothelial permeability was further elevated. These data indicated that AngII could induce pulmonary injury by triggering endothelial barrier injury, and such process may be related to the dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin and the endothelial skeletal rearrangement.

  5. Dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-Cadherin Involved in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Injury Induced by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Dai, Feifeng; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) caused pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury, which induced acute aortic dissection (AAD) combined with acute lung injury (ALI). However, the exact mechanism is unclear. We investigated the role of dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin in the AngII induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury. Mice or pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were divided into control group, AngII group, AngII+PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor) group, and PP2 group. PP2 was used to inhibit the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin. Pathological changes, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and pulmonary microvascular permeability were used to determine the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier function. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis of PMVECs, and immunofluorescence was used to determine the skeletal arrangement. Transendothelial resistance was used to detect the permeability of endothelial barrier. Phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was significantly reduced after AngII stimulation (P < 0.05), together with skeletal rearrangement, and elevation of endothelial permeability which finally induced endothelial barrier injury. After PP2 interference, the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was further reduced and the endothelial permeability was further elevated. These data indicated that AngII could induce pulmonary injury by triggering endothelial barrier injury, and such process may be related to the dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin and the endothelial skeletal rearrangement. PMID:28119542

  6. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  7. Intracellular Ascorbate Prevents Endothelial Barrier Permeabilization by Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Parker, William H; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M

    2015-08-28

    Intracellular ascorbate (vitamin C) has previously been shown to tighten the endothelial barrier and maintain barrier integrity during acute inflammation in vitro. However, the downstream effectors of ascorbate in the regulation of endothelial permeability remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated ascorbate as a mediator of thrombin-induced barrier permeabilization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their immortalized hybridoma line, EA.hy926. We found that the vitamin fully prevented increased permeability to the polysaccharide inulin by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner, and it took effect both before and after subjection to thrombin. Thrombin exposure consumed intracellular ascorbate but not the endogenous antioxidant GSH. Likewise, the antioxidants dithiothreitol and tempol did not reverse permeabilization. We identified a novel role for ascorbate in preserving cAMP during thrombin stimulation, resulting in two downstream effects. First, ascorbate maintained the cortical actin cytoskeleton in a Rap1- and Rac1-dependent manner, thus preserving stable adherens junctions between adjacent cells. Second, ascorbate prevented actin polymerization and formation of stress fibers by reducing the activation of RhoA and phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Although ascorbate and thrombin both required calcium for their respective effects, ascorbate did not prevent thrombin permeabilization by obstructing calcium influx. However, preservation of cAMP by ascorbate was found to depend on both the production of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, which ascorbate is known to activate, and the subsequent generation cGMP by guanylate cyclase. Together, these data implicate ascorbate in the prevention of inflammatory endothelial barrier permeabilization and explain the underlying signaling mechanism.

  8. Intracellular Ascorbate Prevents Endothelial Barrier Permeabilization by Thrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William H.; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular ascorbate (vitamin C) has previously been shown to tighten the endothelial barrier and maintain barrier integrity during acute inflammation in vitro. However, the downstream effectors of ascorbate in the regulation of endothelial permeability remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated ascorbate as a mediator of thrombin-induced barrier permeabilization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their immortalized hybridoma line, EA.hy926. We found that the vitamin fully prevented increased permeability to the polysaccharide inulin by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner, and it took effect both before and after subjection to thrombin. Thrombin exposure consumed intracellular ascorbate but not the endogenous antioxidant GSH. Likewise, the antioxidants dithiothreitol and tempol did not reverse permeabilization. We identified a novel role for ascorbate in preserving cAMP during thrombin stimulation, resulting in two downstream effects. First, ascorbate maintained the cortical actin cytoskeleton in a Rap1- and Rac1-dependent manner, thus preserving stable adherens junctions between adjacent cells. Second, ascorbate prevented actin polymerization and formation of stress fibers by reducing the activation of RhoA and phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Although ascorbate and thrombin both required calcium for their respective effects, ascorbate did not prevent thrombin permeabilization by obstructing calcium influx. However, preservation of cAMP by ascorbate was found to depend on both the production of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, which ascorbate is known to activate, and the subsequent generation cGMP by guanylate cyclase. Together, these data implicate ascorbate in the prevention of inflammatory endothelial barrier permeabilization and explain the underlying signaling mechanism. PMID:26152729

  9. Genetic Regulation of Endothelial Vasomotor Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Kyum; Massett, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of vasomotor tone and the maintenance of vascular integrity. Endothelial dysfunction, i.e., impaired endothelial dependent dilation, is a fundamental component of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Although endothelial dysfunction is associated with a number of cardiovascular disease risk factors, those risk factors are not the only determinants of endothelial dysfunction. Despite knowing many molecules involved in endothelial signaling pathways, the genetic contribution to endothelial function has yet to be fully elucidated. This mini-review summarizes current evidence supporting the genetic contribution to endothelial vasomotor function. Findings from population-based studies, association studies for candidate genes, and unbiased large genomic scale studies in humans and rodent models are discussed. A brief synopsis of the current studies addressing the genetic regulation of endothelial responses to exercise training is also included. PMID:27932996

  10. Protein kinase C-mediated endothelial barrier regulation is caveolin-1-dependent.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Jens; Golenhofen, Nikola; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V; Drenckhahn, Detlev

    2006-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is activated in response to various inflammatory mediators and contributes significantly to the endothelial barrier breakdown. However, the mechanisms underlying PKC-mediated permeability regulation are not well understood. We prepared microvascular myocardial endothelial cells from both wild-type (WT) and caveolin-1-deficient mice. Activation of PKC by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (100 nM) for 30 min induced intercellular gap formation and fragmentation of VE-cadherin immunoreactivity in WT but not in caveolin-1-deficient monolayers. To test the effect of PKC activation on VE-cadherin-mediated adhesion, we allowed VE-cadherin-coated microbeads to bind to the endothelial cell surface and probed their adhesion by laser tweezers. PMA significantly reduced bead binding to 78+/-6% of controls in WT endothelial cells without any effect in caveolin-1-deficient cells. In WT cells, PMA caused an 86+/-18% increase in FITC-dextran permeability whereas no increase in permeability was observed in caveolin-1-deficient monolayers. Inhibition of PKC by staurosporine (50 nM, 30 min) did not affect barrier functions in both WT and caveolin-1-deficient MyEnd cells. Theses data indicate that PKC activation reduces endothelial barrier functions at least in part by the reduction of VE-cadherin-mediated adhesion and demonstrate that PKC-mediated permeability regulation depends on caveolin-1.

  11. Effects of Escherichia coli hemolysin on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, N; Flöer, B; Schnittler, H; Seeger, W; Bhakdi, S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin is considered an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections. The present study demonstrates that cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells are susceptible to attack by low concentrations of E. coli hemolysin (greater than or equal to 0.05 hemolytic units/ml; greater than or equal to 5 ng/ml). Sublytic amounts of hemolysin increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The hydraulic conductivity increased approximately 30-fold and the reflection coefficient for large molecules dropped from 0.71 to less than 0.05, indicating a toxin-induced loss of endothelial barrier function. The alterations of endothelial monolayer permeability were accompanied by cell retraction and interendothelial gap formation. In addition, E. coli hemolysin stimulated prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not of Mg2+. An enhanced passive influx of 45Ca2+ and 3H-sucrose but not of tritiated inulin and dextran was noted in toxin-treated cells, indicating that small transmembrane pores comparable to those detected in rabbit erythrocytes had been generated in endothelial cell membranes. These pores may act as nonphysiologic Ca2+ gates, thereby initiating different Ca2+-dependent cellular processes. We conclude that endothelial cells are highly susceptible to E. coli hemolysin and that two major endothelial cell functions are altered by very low concentrations of hemolysin. Images PMID:2121650

  12. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E; Chen, Alex F; Gladwin, Mark T; McVerry, Bryan J

    2014-12-15

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature.

  13. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  14. Methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide promotes vesicular transport in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tânia; Burgoyne, Thomas; Kenny, Bridget-Ann; Hudson, Natalie; Futter, Clare E; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P; Greenwood, John; Turowski, Patric

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine's (METH) neurotoxicity is thought to be in part due to its ability to induce blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Here, we investigated the effect of METH on barrier properties of cultured rat primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). Transendothelial flux doubled in response to METH, irrespective of the size of tracer used. At the same time, transendothelial electrical resistance was unchanged as was the ultrastructural appearance of inter-endothelial junctions and the distribution of key junction proteins, suggesting that METH promoted vesicular but not junctional transport. Indeed, METH significantly increased uptake of horseradish peroxidase into vesicular structures. METH also enhanced transendothelial migration of lymphocytes indicating that the endothelial barrier against both molecules and cells was compromised. Barrier breakdown was only observed in response to METH at low micromolar concentrations, with enhanced vesicular uptake peaking at 1 μM METH. The BMVEC response to METH also involved rapid activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and its inhibition abrogated METH-induced permeability and lymphocyte migration, indicating that nitric oxide was a key mediator of BBB disruption in response to METH. This study underlines the key role of nitric oxide in BBB function and describes a novel mechanism of drug-induced fluid-phase transcytosis at the BBB.

  15. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  16. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  17. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; Graham, E. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. PMID:26813587

  18. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Chen, Chia-Ling; Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  19. Instruction of Circulating Endothelial Progenitors In Vitro towards Specialized Blood-Brain Barrier and Arterial Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ponio, Julie Boyer-Di; El-Ayoubi, Fida; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Driancourt, Catherine; Godet, Maeva; Perrière, Nicolas; Guillevic, Oriane; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Uzan, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Objective The vascular system is adapted to specific functions in different tissues and organs. Vascular endothelial cells are important elements of this adaptation, leading to the concept of ‘specialized endothelial cells’. The phenotype of these cells is highly dependent on their specific microenvironment and when isolated and cultured, they lose their specific features after few passages, making models using such cells poorly predictive and irreproducible. We propose a new source of specialized endothelial cells based on cord blood circulating endothelial progenitors (EPCs). As prototype examples, we evaluated the capacity of EPCs to acquire properties characteristic of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (blood-brain barrier (BBB)) or of arterial endothelial cells, in specific inducing culture conditions. Approach and Results First, we demonstrated that EPC-derived endothelial cells (EPDCs) co-cultured with astrocytes acquired several BBB phenotypic characteristics, such as restricted paracellular diffusion of hydrophilic solutes and the expression of tight junction proteins. Second, we observed that culture of the same EPDCs in a high concentration of VEGF resulted, through activation of Notch signaling, in an increase of expression of most arterial endothelial markers. Conclusions We have thus demonstrated that in vitro culture of early passage human cord blood EPDCs under specific conditions can induce phenotypic changes towards BBB or arterial phenotypes, indicating that these EPDCs maintain enough plasticity to acquire characteristics of a variety of specialized phenotypes. We propose that this property of EPDCs might be exploited for producing specialized endothelial cells in culture to be used for drug testing and predictive in vitro assays. PMID:24392113

  20. Novel Identity and Functional Markers for Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartakova, Alena; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Weisman, Alejandra D.; Salero, Enrique; Raffa, Gabriella A.; Merkhofer, Richard M.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) density decreases with age, surgical complications, or disease, leading to vision impairment. Such endothelial dysfunction is an indication for corneal transplantation, although there is a worldwide shortage of transplant-grade tissue. To overcome the current poor donor availability, here we isolate, expand, and characterize HCECs in vitro as a step toward cell therapy. Methods Human corneal endothelial cells were isolated from cadaveric corneas and expanded in vitro. Cell identity was evaluated based on morphology and immunocytochemistry, and gene expression analysis and flow cytometry were used to identify novel HCEC-specific markers. The functional ability of HCEC to form barriers was assessed by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) assays. Results Cultured HCECs demonstrated canonical morphology for up to four passages and later underwent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Quality of donor tissue influenced cell measures in culture including proliferation rate. Cultured HCECs expressed identity markers, and microarray analysis revealed novel endothelial-specific markers that were validated by flow cytometry. Finally, canonical HCECs expressed higher levels of CD56, which correlated with higher TEER than fibroblastic HCECs. Conclusions In vitro expansion of HCECs from cadaveric donor corneas yields functional cells identifiable by morphology and a panel of novel markers. Markers described correlated with function in culture, suggesting a basis for cell therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27196322

  1. Selective HDAC6 inhibition prevents TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyan; Ma, Zhongsen; Shetty, Sreerama; Ma, Mengshi; Fu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Lung endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. New strategies against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction may provide therapeutic benefits against lung vascular injury. Cell-cell junctions and microtubule cytoskeleton are basic components in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. HDAC6, a deacetylase primarily localized in the cytoplasm, has been reported to modulate nonnuclear protein function through deacetylation. Both α-tubulin and β-catenin are substrates for HDAC6. Here, we examined the effects of tubastatin A, a highly selective HDAC6 inhibitor, on TNF-α induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A blocked TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell hyperpermeability, which was associated with increased α-tubulin acetylation and microtubule stability. Tubastatin A pretreatment inhibited TNF-α-induced endothelial cell contraction and actin stress fiber formation with reduced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A also induced β-catenin acetylation in human lung endothelial cells, which was associated with increased membrane localization of β-catenin and stabilization of adherens junctions. HDAC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA also prevented TNF-α-induced barrier dysfunction and increased α-tubulin and β-catenin acetylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, in a mouse model of endotoxemia, tubastatin A was able to prevent endotoxin-induced deacetylation of α-tubulin and β-catenin in lung tissues, which was associated with reduced pulmonary edema. Collectively, our data indicate that selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A is a potent approach against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  2. Functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC) antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, a human blood–brain barrier model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the molecular basis and transport function of the human blood–brain barrier (BBB) is important for not only understanding human cerebral physiology, but also development of new central nervous system (CNS)-acting drugs. However, few studies have been done using human brain capillary endothelial cells, because human brain materials are difficult to obtain. The purpose of this study is to clarify the functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC) antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, which has been recently developed as an in vitro human BBB model. Methods Diphenhydramine, [3H]pyrilamine and oxycodone were used as cationic drugs that proved to be H+/OC antiporter substrates. The in vitro uptake experiments by hCMEC/D3 cells were carried out under several conditions. Results Diphenhydramine and [3H]pyrilamine were both transported into hCMEC/D3 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with Km values of 59 μM and 19 μM, respectively. Each inhibited uptake of the other in a competitive manner, suggesting that a common mechanism is involved in their transport. The diphenhydramine uptake was significantly inhibited by amantadine and quinidine, but not tetraethylammonium and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (substrates for well-known organic cation transporters). The uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors, but was insensitive to extracellular sodium and membrane potential. Further, the uptake was increased by extracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification. These transport properties are completely consistent with those of previously characterized H+/OC antiporter in rat BBB. Conclusions The present results suggest that H+/OC antiporter is functionally expressed in hCMEC/D3 cells. PMID:23351963

  3. Netrin 1 regulates blood-brain barrier function and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Podjaski, Cornelia; Alvarez, Jorge I; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Larouche, Sandra; Terouz, Simone; Bin, Jenea M; Lécuyer, Marc-André; Saint-Laurent, Olivia; Larochelle, Catherine; Darlington, Peter J; Arbour, Nathalie; Antel, Jack P; Kennedy, Timothy E; Prat, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Blood-brain barrier function is driven by the influence of astrocyte-secreted factors. During neuroinflammatory responses the blood-brain barrier is compromised resulting in central nervous system damage and exacerbated pathology. Here, we identified endothelial netrin 1 induction as a vascular response to astrocyte-derived sonic hedgehog that promotes autocrine barrier properties during homeostasis and increases with inflammation. Netrin 1 supports blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating endothelial junctional protein expression, while netrin 1 knockout mice display disorganized tight junction protein expression and barrier breakdown. Upon inflammatory conditions, blood-brain barrier endothelial cells significantly upregulated netrin 1 levels in vitro and in situ, which prevented junctional breach and endothelial cell activation. Finally, netrin 1 treatment during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis significantly reduced blood-brain barrier disruption and decreased clinical and pathological indices of disease severity. Our results demonstrate that netrin 1 is an important regulator of blood-brain barrier maintenance that protects the central nervous system against inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  4. Irritants and Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Angelova-Fischer, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The barrier response to irritant challenge involves complex biologic events and can be modulated by various environmental, exposure and host-related factors. Irritant damage to the epidermal barrier elicits a cascade of homeostatic or pathologic responses that could be investigated by both in vitro and in vivo methods providing different information at biochemical and functional level. The present chapter summarizes the changes in key barrier function parameters following irritant exposure with focus on experimental controlled in vivo human skin studies.

  5. NF-κB-to-AP-1 Switch: A Mechanism Regulating Transition From Endothelial Barrier Injury to Repair in Endotoxemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Ye, Xiaobing; Miller, Edmund J.; Liu, Shu Fang

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier disruption is a hallmark of multiple organ injury (MOI). However, mechanisms governing the restoration of endothelial barrier function are poorly understood. Here, we uncovered an NF-κB-to-AP-1 switch that regulates the transition from barrier injury to repair following endotoxemic MOI. Endothelial NF-κB mediates barrier repair by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Blockade of endothelial NF-κB pathway activated the activator protein (AP)-1 pathway (NF-κB-to-AP-1 switch), which compensated for the anti-apoptotic and barrier-repair functions of NF-κB. The NF-κB-to-AP-1 switch occurred at 24 hours (injury to repair transition phase), but not at 48 hours (repair phase) post-LPS, and required an inflammatory signal within the endothelium. In the absence of an inflammatory signal, the NF-κB-to-AP-1 switch failed, resulting in enhanced EC apoptosis, augmented endothelial permeability, and impeded transition from barrier injury to recovery. The NF-κB-to-AP-1 switch is a protective mechanism to ensure timely transition from endothelial barrier injury to repair, accelerating barrier restoration following MOI. PMID:24986487

  6. Hypoxia/Aglycemia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and tight junction protein downregulation can be ameliorated by citicoline.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaotang; Zhang, Huiting; Pan, Qunwen; Zhao, Yuhui; Chen, Ji; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effect of citicoline on the permeability and expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs) in endothelial cells under hypoxia/aglycemia conditions. Hypoxia or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) was utilized to induce endothelial barrier breakdown model on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3s). The effect of citicoline on endothelial barrier breakdown models was determined at either low or high concentrations. FITC-Dextran flux was used to examine the endothelial permeability. The expression of TJPs was measured by immunofluorescence, Real-time PCR and Western Blot methods. Results showed that hypoxia or OGD increased the permeability of HUVECs accompanied with down-regulation of occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin at both mRNA and protein levels. Similarly in bEnd.3s, hypoxia increased the permeability and decreased the expression of ZO-1 and claudin-5. Citicoline treatment dose-dependently decreased the permeability in these two models, which paralleled with elevated expression of TJPs. The data demonstrate that citicoline restores the barrier function of endothelial cells compromised by hypoxia/aglycemia probably via up-regulating the expression of TJPs.

  7. Transendothelial migration of effector T cells across inflamed endothelial barriers does not require heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Stoler-Barak, Liat; Barzilai, Sagi; Zauberman, Ayelet; Alon, Ronen

    2014-06-01

    Leukocyte diapedesis is a chemotactic multistep process that requires optimal chemoattractant presentation by the endothelial barrier. Recent studies have described a critical role for heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) in the presentation and functions of chemokines essential for lymphocyte interactions with the lymph node vasculature. We wished to test whether HS expression by a prototypic endothelial cell type, i.e. human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), is critical for their ability to support neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM) under shear flow. We found that HUVECs deposit HS GAGs mainly at their basolateral compartments in both their resting and inflamed states. We next inactivated the key enzyme involved in HS biosynthesis, exostosin-1 (Ext1). Silencing Ext1 resulted in a complete loss of HS biosynthesis; nonetheless, TNF-α and IL-1β stimulation of key adhesion molecules and inflammatory chemokines necessary for neutrophil or lymphocyte adhesion and TEM remained intact. Ext1 silencing reduced neutrophil arrest and markedly impaired TEM, consistent with a role of basolateral HS GAGs in directing neutrophil crossing of inflamed endothelial barriers. Strikingly, however, the TEM of effector T cells across identically Ext1-silenced HUVECs remained normal. Importantly, the biosynthesis of the main promigratory chemokines for effector T cells and neutrophils, respectively, CCL2 and CXCL1, and their vesicle distributions were also Ext1 independent. These results suggest that transmigrating neutrophils must respond to chemokines transiently presented by apical and basolateral endothelial HS GAGs. In contrast, effector T cells can integrate chemotactic TEM signals directly from intra-endothelial chemokine stores rather than from externally deposited chemokines.

  8. Insulin resistance and vessel endothelial function.

    PubMed Central

    van Oostrom, A J H H M; Cabezas, M Castro; Rabelink, T J

    2002-01-01

    IRS is a complex disease consisting of a clustering of metabolic disorders, of which hyperglycaemia, hyper-insulinaemia and dyslipidaemia are the most important. Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The effects of hyperinsulinaemia seem to depend on lipidaemia and glycaemia. Hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia have detrimental effects on endothelial function in the fasting as well as the postprandial states. In both situations, the generation of ROS and vasoactive molecules plays a major role in interfering with the atheroprotective endothelium-dependent NO system. Treatment of IRS in regard to endothelial function should be focused initially on lifestyle improvement, such as stopping smoking and eating a balanced diet containing antioxidant vitamins, folic-acid, L-arginine and long-chain omega-3 unsaturated FA. Strict glucose control has shown to improve endothelial function and decrease microvascular complications. However, macrovascular complications, in line with endothelial functional improvement, have so far been reduced only when treatment was focused on other characteristics of the IRS syndrome, in particular dyslipidaemia. Other relevant treatments include ACE inhibitors and thiazolidinediones, and probably tetrahydrobiopterin and folic acid supplementation. Future studies should address the effects of therapeutic neovascularization on endothelial dysfunction. PMID:12216328

  9. Myosin di-phosphorylation and peripheral actin bundle formation as initial events during endothelial barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mayumi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-02-11

    The phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain (MLC) and actin filament formation play a key role in endothelial barrier disruption. MLC is either mono- or di-phosphorylated (pMLC and ppMLC) at T18 or S19. The present study investigated whether there are any distinct roles of pMLC and ppMLC in barrier disruption induced by thrombin. Thrombin induced a modest bi-phasic increase in pMLC and a robust mono-phasic increase in ppMLC. pMLC localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm during the initial phase, while ppMLC localized in the cell periphery, where actin bundles were formed. Later, the actin bundles were rearranged into stress fibers, where pMLC co-localized. Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited thrombin-induced barrier disruption and peripheral localization of ppMLC and actin bundles. The double, but not single, mutation of phosphorylation sites abolished the formation of peripheral actin bundles and the barrier disruption, indicating that mono-phosphorylation of MLC at either T18 or S19 is functionally sufficient for barrier disruption. Namely, the peripheral localization, but not the degree of phosphorylation, is suggested to be essential for the functional effect of ppMLC. These results suggest that MLC phosphorylation and actin bundle formation in cell periphery are initial events during barrier disruption.

  10. 12(S)-HETE increases intracellular Ca(2+) in lymph-endothelial cells disrupting their barrier function in vitro; stabilization by clinical drugs impairing calcium supply.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Brenner, Stefan; Huttary, Nicole; Li, Yuanfang; Atanasov, Atanas Georgiev; Dirsch, Verena M; Holzner, Silvio; Stadler, Serena; Riha, Juliane; Krieger, Sigurd; Milovanovic, Danijela; Fristiohardy, Adryan; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Dolznig, Helmut; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Jäger, Walter; Krupitza, Georg

    2016-09-28

    Secretion of 12(S)-HETE by breast cancer emboli provokes "circular chemorepellent induced defects" (CCIDs) in the adjacent lymphatic vasculature facilitating their intravasation and lymph node metastasis which determines prognosis. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of lymph endothelial cell (LEC) wall disintegration may provide cues for anti-metastatic intervention. The role of intracellular free Ca(2+) for CCID formation was investigated in LECs using MCF-7 or MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell spheroids in a three-dimensional cell co-culture model. 12(S)-HETE elevated the Ca(2+) level in LEC by activating PLC/IP3. Downstream, the Ca(2+)-calmodulin kinase MYLK contributed to the phosphorylation of Ser19-MLC2, LEC contraction and CCID formation. Approved clinical drugs, lidoflazine, ketotifen, epiandrosterone and cyclosporine, which reportedly disturb cellular calcium supply, inhibited 12(S)-HETE-induced Ca(2+) increase, Ser19-MLC2 phosphorylation and CCID formation. This treatment strategy may reduce spreading of breast cancer through lymphatics.

  11. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Interleukin-34 Restores Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity by Upregulating Tight Junction Proteins in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood–brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood–brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25535736

  13. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  14. Cardiotoxic drugs Herceptin and doxorubicin inhibit cardiac microvascular endothelial cell barrier formation resulting in increased drug permeability

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Emma L.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiotoxicity induced by anti-cancer therapeutics is a severe, and potentially fatal, adverse reaction of the heart in response to certain drugs. Current in vitro approaches to assess cardiotoxicity have focused on analysing cardiomyocytes. More recently it has become apparent that non-cardiomyocyte cells of the heart can potentially contribute to cardiotoxicity. Herceptin and doxorubicin are known to induce cardiotoxicity in the clinic. The effect of these drugs on the endothelial tight junction barrier was tested by analysing tight junction formation and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) levels, revealing that Herceptin and doxorubicin are able to induce barrier perturbment and decrease barrier function in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) leading to increased permeability. Herceptin treatment had no effect on the tight junction barrier function in human dermal and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. HCMECs showed detectable levels of HER2 compared with the other endothelial cells suggesting that Herceptin binding to HER2 in these cells may interfere with tight junction formation. Our data suggests that doxorubicin and Herceptin can affect tight junction formation in the cardiac microvasculature leading to increased drug permeability and adverse effects on the cardiac myocytes. PMID:27543060

  15. Short-Term Effects of Low-LET Radiation on the Endothelial Barrier: Uncoupling of PECAM-1 and the Production of Endothelial Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Templin, Thomas; Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2016-12-01

    A significant target for radiation-induced effects is the microvascular system, which is critical to healthy tissue function and its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation is a source of noncancer pathologies in humans and little is known about the early events that could initiate subsequent diseases. However, it is well known that gamma radiation causes a very early disruption of the endothelial barrier at doses below those required for cytotoxic effects. After irradiation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to doses as low as 2 Gy, transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is transiently reduced at 3 h, and the platelet-derived endothothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1 or CD31) is uncoupled from the cells along with the release of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). In this study, we measured TEER reduction as an indicator of barrier function loss, and specifically examined the shedding of EMPs from human endothelial barrier models after a variety of low-LET irradiations, including photons and charged particles. Our findings showed two TEER responses, dependent on radiation type and environmental conditions. The first response was diminishing oscillations of TEER, which occurred during the first 10 h postirradiation. This response occurred after a 5 Gy proton or helium-ion (1 GeV/n) dose in addition to a 5 Gy gamma or X radiation dose. This occurred only in the presence of multiple growth factors and did not show a dose response, nor was it associated with EMP release. The second response was a single acute drop in TEER at 3 h after photon irradiation. Dose response was observed and was associated with the shedding of EMPs in 2D barrier cultures and in 3D vessel models. In this case, helium-ion and proton irradiations did not induce a drop in TEER or shedding of EMPs. The photon radiation effects was observed both in serum-free media and in the presence of multiple

  16. [Assessment of endothelial function in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Y; Bellien, J; Armengol, G; Gomez, E; Richard, V; Lévesque, H; Joannidès, R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidence. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction is an important early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, contributing to plaque initiation and progression. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, a proinflammatory and a proadhesive state, and prothrombic properties. Therefore, assessment of endothelial dysfunction targets this vascular phenotype using several biological markers as indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Measurements of soluble adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin), pro-thrombotic factors (thrombomodulin, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammatory cytokines are most often performed. Regarding the functional assessment of the endothelium, the flow-mediated dilatation of conduit arteries is a non-invasive method widely used in pathophysiological and interventional studies. In this review, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction mechanisms and explorations. We will summarize the similarities and differences in the biological and functional assessments of the endothelium in different autoimmune diseases.

  17. Junctional proteins of the blood-brain barrier: New insights into function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Johnson, Allison M; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2016-01-01

    abstract The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a highly complex and dynamic barrier. It is formed by an interdependent network of brain capillary endothelial cells, endowed with barrier properties, and perivascular cells (astrocytes and pericytes) responsible for inducing and maintaining those properties. One of the primary properties of the BBB is a strict regulation of paracellular permeability due to the presence of junctional complexes (tight, adherens and gap junctions) between the endothelial cells. Alterations in junction assembly and function significantly affect BBB properties, particularly barrier permeability. However, such alterations are also involved in remodeling the brain endothelial cell surface and regulating brain endothelial cell phenotype. This review summarizes the characteristics of brain endothelial tight, adherens and gap junctions and highlights structural and functional alterations in junctional proteins that may contribute to BBB dysfunction. PMID:27141427

  18. Disruption of in vitro endothelial barrier integrity by Japanese encephalitis virus-Infected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Li, Jian-Ri; Chen, Wen-Ying; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Chen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-05-08

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) characteristics are induced and maintained by crosstalk between brain microvascular endothelial cells and neighboring cells. Using in vitro cell models, we previously found that a bystander effect was a cause for Japanese encephalitis-associated endothelial barrier disruption. Brain astrocytes, which neighbor BBB endothelial cells, play roles in the maintenance of BBB integrity. By extending the scope of relevant studies, a potential mechanism has been shown that the activation of neighboring astrocytes could be a cause of disruption of endothelial barrier integrity during the course of Japanese encephalitis viral (JEV) infection. JEV-infected astrocytes were found to release biologically active molecules that activated ubiquitin proteasome, degraded zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5, and disrupted endothelial barrier integrity in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells. JEV infection caused astrocytes to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/MMP-9). Our data demonstrated that VEGF and IL-6 released by JEV-infected astrocytes were critical for the proteasomal degradation of ZO-1 and the accompanying disruption of endothelial barrier integrity through the activation of Janus kinase-2 (Jak2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) signaling as well as the induction of ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component, n-recognin-1 (Ubr 1) in endothelial cells. MMP-induced endothelial barrier disruption was accompanied by MMP-mediated proteolytic degradation of claudin-5 and ubiquitin proteasome-mediated degradation of ZO-1 via extracellular VEGF release. Collectively, these data suggest that JEV infection could activate astrocytes and cause release of VEGF, IL-6, and MMP-2/MMP-9, thereby contributing, in a concerted action, to the induction of Japanese encephalitis-associated BBB breakdown. GLIA 2015.

  19. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  20. Dietary phosphorus acutely impairs endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-07-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  1. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier.

  2. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation. PMID:26112597

  3. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guansong

    2015-12-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation.

  4. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun E; Adderley, Shaquria P; Breslin, Jerome W

    2016-01-01

    Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS). The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process.

  5. Endothelial cells use dynamic actin to facilitate lymphocyte transendothelial migration and maintain the monolayer barrier.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Olivia L; Li, Jinmei; Nawas, Julie; Cooper, John A

    2014-12-15

    The vascular endothelium is a highly dynamic structure, and the integrity of its barrier function is tightly regulated. Normally impenetrable to cells, the endothelium actively assists lymphocytes to exit the bloodstream during inflammation. The actin cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell (EC) is known to facilitate transmigration, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report that actin assembly in the EC, induced by Arp2/3 complex under control of WAVE2, is important for several steps in the process of transmigration. To begin transmigration, ECs deploy actin-based membrane protrusions that create a cup-shaped docking structure for the lymphocyte. We found that docking structure formation involves the localization and activation of Arp2/3 complex by WAVE2. The next step in transmigration is creation of a migratory pore, and we found that endothelial WAVE2 is needed for lymphocytes to follow a transcellular route through an EC. Later, ECs use actin-based protrusions to close the gap behind the lymphocyte, which we discovered is also driven by WAVE2. Finally, we found that ECs in resting endothelial monolayers use lamellipodial protrusions dependent on WAVE2 to form and maintain contacts and junctions between cells.

  6. CD36 and Fyn kinase mediate malaria-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Anidi, Ifeanyi U; Servinsky, Laura E; Rentsendorj, Otgonchimeg; Stephens, R Scott; Scott, Alan L; Pearse, David B

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria can trigger acute lung injury characterized by pulmonary edema resulting from increased endothelial permeability. However, the mechanism through which lung fluid conductance is altered during malaria remains unclear. To define the role that the scavenger receptor CD36 may play in mediating this response, C57BL/6J (WT) and CD36-/- mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA and monitored for changes in pulmonary endothelial barrier function employing an isolated perfused lung system. WT lungs demonstrated a >10-fold increase in two measures of paracellular fluid conductance and a decrease in the albumin reflection coefficient (σalb) compared to control lungs indicating a loss of barrier function. In contrast, malaria-infected CD36-/- mice had near normal fluid conductance but a similar reduction in σalb. In WT mice, lung sequestered iRBCs demonstrated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether knockout of CD36 could protect against ROS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, mouse lung microvascular endothelial monolayers (MLMVEC) from WT and CD36-/- mice were exposed to H2O2. Unlike WT monolayers, which showed dose-dependent decreases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) from H2O2 indicating loss of barrier function, CD36-/- MLMVEC demonstrated dose-dependent increases in TER. The differences between responses in WT and CD36-/- endothelial cells correlated with important differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of the CD36-associated Fyn kinase. Malaria infection increased total lung Fyn levels in CD36-/- lungs compared to WT, but this increase was due to elevated production of the inactive form of Fyn further suggesting a dysregulation of Fyn-mediated signaling. The importance of Fyn in CD36-dependent endothelial signaling was confirmed using in vitro Fyn knockdown as well as Fyn-/- mice, which were also protected from H2O2- and malaria-induced lung endothelial leak, respectively. Our results demonstrate

  7. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms in Compromised Endothelial Barrier during Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    diapedesis . We proposed to examine these transient and localized signaling events using a three dimensional (3D) assay with superior spatio-temporal...reports have documented the phenomenon of transcellular diapedesis by leukocytes through the endothelial layer over the years, the actual transcellular...the surface of the endothelial cell [9]. However, the actual process of diapedesis of the tumor cell triggered a marked regional activation of MLCK

  9. Intracellular ascorbate tightens the endothelial permeability barrier through Epac1 and the tubulin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Parker, William H; Rhea, Elizabeth Meredith; Qu, Zhi-Chao; Hecker, Morgan R; May, James M

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, both tightens the endothelial permeability barrier in basal cells and also prevents barrier leak induced by inflammatory agents. Barrier tightening by ascorbate in basal endothelial cells requires nitric oxide derived from activation of nitric oxide synthase. Although ascorbate did not affect cyclic AMP levels in our previous study, there remains a question of whether it might activate downstream cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. In this work, we found in both primary and immortalized cultured endothelial cells that ascorbate tightened the endothelial permeability barrier by ∼30%. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, this occurred at what are likely physiologic intracellular ascorbate concentrations. In so doing, ascorbate decreased measures of oxidative stress and also flattened the cells to increase cell-to-cell contact. Inhibition of downstream cyclic AMP-dependent proteins via protein kinase A did not prevent ascorbate from tightening the endothelial permeability barrier, whereas inhibition of Epac1 did block the ascorbate effect. Although Epac1 was required, its mediator Rap1 was not activated. Furthermore, ascorbate acutely stabilized microtubules during depolymerization induced by colchicine and nocodazole. Over several days in culture, ascorbate also increased the amount of stable acetylated α-tubulin. Microtubule stabilization was further suggested by the finding that ascorbate increased the amount of Epac1 bound to α-tubulin. These results suggest that physiologic ascorbate concentrations tighten the endothelial permeability barrier in unstimulated cells by stabilizing microtubules in a manner downstream of cyclic AMP that might be due both to increasing nitric oxide availability and to scavenging of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species.

  10. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization (CS) and allergy following increased penetration of potential allergens. However, the relationship between common dermatoses such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (AD) and irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and the development of contact allergy (CA) is complex, and depends on immunologic responses and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due to increased levels of Th17 cells and its associated cytokines. As for AD, a positive association to CS has been established in epidemiological studies, but is still unresolved. Experimental studies show, however, an inverse relationship between AD and CS. The opposing and antagonistic influences of Th1 (CS) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen-presenting cells and promotes their migration to local lymph nodes, thus increasing the probability of CS and ultimately the development of CA.

  11. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers.

    PubMed

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O; Breslin, Jerome W

    2015-07-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity.

  12. Neurothelin: an inducible cell surface glycoprotein of blood-brain barrier-specific endothelial cells and distinct neurons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is characterized by still poorly understood barrier and transport functions performed by specialized endothelial cells. Hybridoma technology has been used to identify a protein termed neurothelin that is specific for these endothelial cells. Neurothelin is defined by the species-specific mouse mAb 1W5 raised against lentil- lectin-binding proteins of neural tissue from embryonic chick. In the posthatch chick, neurothelin expression is found on endothelial cells within the brain but not on those of the systemic vascular system. Injection of the monoclonal antibody in vivo leads to labeling of brain capillaries, indicating that the corresponding antigen is expressed on the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. Transplantation of embryonic mouse brain onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane results in rodent brain vascularization by the avian vascular system. Subsequently, normally mAb 1W5-negative endothelial cells, originating from blood vessels of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, are induced to express neurothelin when they are in contact with mouse neural tissue. In contrast to differentiated brain neurons that do not express neurothelin, neurons of the nonvascularized chick retina synthesize neurothelin. However, neurothelin is not found on retinal ganglion cell axons terminating on 1W5-negative brain cells. 1W5 immunoreactivity was also found in the pigment epithelium that forms the blood-eye barrier. Putting epithelial cells into culture results in concentration of neurothelin at cell-cell contact sites, leaving other cell surface areas devoid of antigen. Therefore, the distribution of neurothelin appears to be regulated by cell-cell interactions. In Western blot analysis, neurothelin was identified as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 43 kD. The protein bears at least one intramolecular disulfide bridge and sulfated glucuronic acid as well as alpha-D- substituted mannose/glucose moieties. The exclusive

  13. Arterial endothelial barrier dysfunction: actions of homocysteine and the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase free radical generating system.

    PubMed

    Berman, R S; Martin, W

    1993-04-01

    1. Endothelial barrier function was assessed by use of an in vitro model in which transfer of trypan blue-labelled albumin was measured across monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells grown on polycarbonate membranes. 2. Addition of either hypoxanthine (0.2 mM) or xanthine oxidase (20 mu ml-1) alone during a 90 min incubation did not affect albumin transfer across endothelial cell monolayers, but a combination of both increased transfer. 3. The increase in albumin transfer induced by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase was abolished by catalase (3 u ml-1), reduced by allopurinol (4 mM), but unaffected by superoxide dismutase (6000 u ml-1), the hydroxyl radical scavengers, mannitol (15 mM), dimethylthiourea (10 mM) and N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (1 mM), the iron chelator, deferoxamine (0.5 mM), ferric chloride (50 microM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine (30 microM), or the antioxidant, dithiothreitol (3 mM). 4. Hydrogen peroxide (0.1-30 mM) itself increased albumin transfer across endothelial cell monolayers, exhibiting a biphasic concentration-response curve. The increase induced by 0.1 mM hydrogen peroxide was abolished in the presence of 0.3 u ml-1 catalase whilst that induced by 10 mM hydrogen peroxide was abolished by 3000 u ml-1 catalase. 5. Homocysteine (0.5-1.5 mM) did not affect albumin transfer across endothelial monolayers when added alone, but when added in combination with copper sulphate (50 microM), which catalyses its oxidation, a significant increase in albumin transfer was observed. 6. The increase in albumin transfer induced by the combination of homocysteine (1.5 mM) and copper sulphate was abolished by catalase (1 u ml-1), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (6000 u ml-1), mannitol (15 mM), dimethylthiourea (1 mM) or deferoxamine (0.5 mM).7. The data suggest that the endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by the combination of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase is mediated solely by the action of

  14. Endothelial cell heterogeneity of blood-brain barrier gene expression along the cerebral microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Jennifer A; Murugesan, Nivetha; Pachter, Joel S

    2010-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) refers to the network of microvessels that selectively restricts the passage of substances between the circulation and the central nervous system (CNS). This microvascular network is comprised of arterioles, capillaries and venules, yet the respective contribution of each of these to the BBB awaits clarification. In this regard, it has been postulated that brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) from these different tributaries might exhibit considerable heterogeneity in form and function, with such diversity underlying unique roles in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Means to begin exploring such endothelial differences in situ, free from caveats associated with cell isolation and culturing procedures, are crucial to comprehending the nature and treatment of CNS diseases with vascular involvement. Here, the recently validated approach of immuno-laser capture microdissection (immuno-LCM) coupled to quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze gene expression patterns of BMEC retrieved in situ from either capillaries or venules. From profiling 87 genes known to play a role in BBB function and/or be enriched in isolated brain microvessels, results imply that most BBB properties reside in both segments, but that capillaries preferentially express some genes related to solute transport, while venules tend toward higher expression of an assortment of genes involved in inflammatory-related tasks. Fuller appreciation of such heterogeneity will be critical for efficient therapeutic targeting of the endothelium and the management of CNS disease.

  15. Derivation of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Ethan S; Azarin, Samira M; Kay, Jennifer E; Nessler, Randy A; Wilson, Hannah K; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial to the health of the brain and is often compromised in neurological disease. Moreover, because of its barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts uptake of neurotherapeutics. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could spur brain research and pharmaceutical development. Here we show that endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) acquire BBB properties when co-differentiated with neural cells that provide relevant cues, including those involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The resulting endothelial cells have many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, appropriate expression of nutrient transporters and polarized efflux transporter activity. Notably, they respond to astrocytes, acquiring substantial barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1,450 ± 140 Ω cm2), and they possess molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo rodent blood-brain transfer coefficients.

  16. How leukocytes trigger opening and sealing of gaps in the endothelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debashree; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The entry of leukocytes into tissues requires well-coordinated interactions between the immune cells and endothelial cells which form the inner lining of blood vessels. The molecular basis for recognition, capture, and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial apical surface is well studied. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of events following the firm interaction of leukocytes with the inner surface of the blood vessel wall. We will discuss how leukocytes initiate the transmigration (diapedesis) process, trigger the opening of gaps in the endothelial barrier, and eventually move through this boundary. PMID:27703663

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  18. Methamphetamine is not Toxic but Disrupts the Cell Cycle of Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Gamieldien, K; Mafunda, P S

    2015-07-01

    The cytotoxic effects of methamphetamine (MA) are well established to be caused via induced oxidative stress which in turn compromises the core function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by reducing its ability to regulate the homeostatic environment of the brain. While most studies were conducted over a period of 24-48 h, this study investigated the mechanisms by which chronic exposure of MA adversely affect the endothelial cells of BBB over an extended period of 96 h. MA induced significant depression of cell numbers at 96 h. This result was supported by flow cytometric data on the cell cycle which showed that brain endothelial cells (bEnd5) at 96 h were significantly suppressed in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, at 24-72 h control cell numbers for G1, S and G2-M phases were similar to MA-exposed cells. MA (0-1,000 µM) did not, however, statistically affect the viability and cytotoxicity of the bEnd5 cells, and the profile of ATP production and DNA synthesis (BrdU) across 96 h did not provide a rationale for the suppression of cell division. Our study reports for the first time that chronic exposure to MA results in long-term disruption of the cell cycle phases which eventuates in the attenuation of brain capillary endothelial cell growth after 96 h, compounding and contributing to the already well-known adverse short-term permeability effects of MA exposure on the BBB.

  19. Akt1 promotes stimuli-induced endothelial-barrier protection through FoxO-mediated tight-junction protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Artham, Sandeep; Sabbineni, Harika; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Hay, Nissim; Adams, Ralf H; Byzova, Tatiana V; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2016-10-01

    Vascular permeability regulated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through endothelial-barrier junctions is essential for inflammation. Mechanisms regulating vascular permeability remain elusive. Although 'Akt' and 'Src' have been implicated in the endothelial-barrier regulation, it is puzzling how both agents that protect and disrupt the endothelial-barrier activate these kinases to reciprocally regulate vascular permeability. To delineate the role of Akt1 in endothelial-barrier regulation, we created endothelial-specific, tamoxifen-inducible Akt1 knockout mice and stable ShRNA-mediated Akt1 knockdown in human microvascular endothelial cells. Akt1 loss leads to decreased basal and angiopoietin1-induced endothelial-barrier resistance, and enhanced VEGF-induced endothelial-barrier breakdown. Endothelial Akt1 deficiency resulted in enhanced VEGF-induced vascular leakage in mice ears, which was rescued upon re-expression with Adeno-myrAkt1. Furthermore, co-treatment with angiopoietin1 reversed VEGF-induced vascular leakage in an Akt1-dependent manner. Mechanistically, our study revealed that while VEGF-induced short-term vascular permeability is independent of Akt1, its recovery is reliant on Akt1 and FoxO-mediated claudin expression. Pharmacological inhibition of FoxO transcription factors rescued the defective endothelial barrier due to Akt1 deficiency. Here we provide novel insights on the endothelial-barrier protective role of VEGF in the long term and the importance of Akt1-FoxO signaling on tight-junction stabilization and prevention of vascular leakage through claudin expression.

  20. Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Azarin, Samira M.; Kay, Jennifer E.; Nessler, Randy A.; Wilson, Hannah K.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain health and is often compromised in disease. Moreover, as a result of its significant barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts neurotherapeutic uptake. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could prove enabling for brain research and pharmaceutical development. Herein, we demonstrate that endothelial cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be specified to possess many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, expression of nutrient transporters, and polarized efflux transporter activity. Importantly, hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells respond to astrocytic cues yielding impressive barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1450±140 Ωxcm2) and molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo brain uptake. In addition, specification of hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells occurs in concert with neural cell co-differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling, consistent with previous transgenic studies. This study represents the first example of organ-specific endothelial differentiation from hPSCs. PMID:22729031

  1. The role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling in hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Devendra A; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A; Childs, Ed W

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock leads to endothelial cell barrier dysfunction resulting in microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. The results from our laboratory have illustrated a possible pathophysiological mechanism showing involvement of mitochondria-mediated "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling in regulating hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock results in overexpression of Bcl-2 family of pro-apoptotic protein, BAK, in the microvascular endothelial cells. The increase in BAK initiates "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling cascade with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in the cytoplasm and activation of downstream effector caspase-3, leading to loss of endothelial cell barrier integrity. Thus, this review article offers a brief overview of important findings from our past and present research work along with new leads for future research. The summary of our research work will provide information leading to different avenues in developing novel strategies against microvascular hyperpermeability following hemorrhagic shock.

  2. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response.

  3. Epidermal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production Is Required for Permeability Barrier Homeostasis, Dermal Angiogenesis, and the Development of Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E.; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf−/− mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis. PMID:18688025

  4. Functions for the cAMP/Epac/Rap1 Signaling Pathway in Low-Dose Endothelial Monocyte-Activating Polypeptide-II-Induced Opening of Blood-Tumor Barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Bai; Liu, Yun-Hui; Xue, Yi-Xue; Wang, Ping; Liu, Li-Bo; Yao, Yi-Long; Ma, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that low-dose endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) induces blood-tumor barrier (BTB) hyperpermeability via both paracellular and transcellular pathways. In a recent study, we revealed that cAMP/PKA-dependent and cAMP/PKA-independent signaling pathways are both involved in EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability. The present study further investigated the exact mechanisms through which the cAMP/PKA-independent signaling pathway affects EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability. In an in vitro BTB model, low-dose EMAP-II (0.05 nM) induced a significant decrease in Rap1 activity in RBMECs. Pretreatment with forskolin to elevate intracellular cAMP concentration completely blocked EMAP-II-induced Rap1 inactivation. Epac/Rap1 activation by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly prevented EMAP-II-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK. Furthermore, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP pretreatment significantly inhibited EMAP-II-induced decreases in TEER and increases in HRP flux. Pretreatment also significantly prevented EMAP-II-induced changes in MLC phosphorylation, actin cytoskeleton arrangement, and expression and distribution of ZO-1 in RBMECs. This study demonstrates that the cAMP/Epac/Rap1 signaling cascade is a crucial pathway in EMAP-II-induced BTB hyperpermeability.

  5. Concepts for Functional Restoration of Barrier Islands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Frisian barrier islands to sea-level rise: An investigation of past and future evolution. Geomorphology 15, 57-65. Farley, P. P. 1923. Coney Island ...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-74 September 2009 Concepts for Functional Restoration of Barrier Islands by Julie Dean Rosati PURPOSE: This Coastal and...Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) presents guid- ance for functional restoration of barrier islands . The concept of functional restoration

  6. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-06-30

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity.

  7. Electroporation of Brain Endothelial Cells on Chip toward Permeabilizing the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bonakdar, Mohammad; Wasson, Elisa M.; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier, mainly composed of brain microvascular endothelial cells, poses an obstacle to drug delivery to the brain. Controlled permeabilization of the constituent brain endothelial cells can result in overcoming this barrier and increasing transcellular transport across it. Electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon that has shown potential in permeabilizing and overcoming this barrier. In this study we developed a microengineered in vitro model to characterize the permeabilization of adhered brain endothelial cells to large molecules in response to applied pulsed electric fields. We found the distribution of affected cells by reversible and irreversible electroporation, and quantified the uptaken amount of naturally impermeable molecules into the cells as a result of applied pulse magnitude and number of pulses. We achieved 81 ± 1.7% (N = 6) electroporated cells with 17 ± 8% (N = 5) cell death using an electric-field magnitude of ∼580 V/cm and 10 pulses. Our results provide the proper range for applied electric-field intensity and number of pulses for safe permeabilization without significantly compromising cell viability. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to permeabilize the endothelial cells of the BBB in a controlled manner, therefore lending to the feasibility of using pulsed electric fields to increase drug transport across the BBB through the transcellular pathway. PMID:26789772

  8. Electroporation of Brain Endothelial Cells on Chip toward Permeabilizing the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Mohammad; Wasson, Elisa M; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2016-01-19

    The blood-brain barrier, mainly composed of brain microvascular endothelial cells, poses an obstacle to drug delivery to the brain. Controlled permeabilization of the constituent brain endothelial cells can result in overcoming this barrier and increasing transcellular transport across it. Electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon that has shown potential in permeabilizing and overcoming this barrier. In this study we developed a microengineered in vitro model to characterize the permeabilization of adhered brain endothelial cells to large molecules in response to applied pulsed electric fields. We found the distribution of affected cells by reversible and irreversible electroporation, and quantified the uptaken amount of naturally impermeable molecules into the cells as a result of applied pulse magnitude and number of pulses. We achieved 81 ± 1.7% (N = 6) electroporated cells with 17 ± 8% (N = 5) cell death using an electric-field magnitude of ∼580 V/cm and 10 pulses. Our results provide the proper range for applied electric-field intensity and number of pulses for safe permeabilization without significantly compromising cell viability. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to permeabilize the endothelial cells of the BBB in a controlled manner, therefore lending to the feasibility of using pulsed electric fields to increase drug transport across the BBB through the transcellular pathway.

  9. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  10. miR-155 Modifies Inflammation, Endothelial Activation and Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction in Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Kevin R; Lu, Ziyue; Kim, Hani; Zheng, Ying; Chen, Junmei; Conroy, Andrea L; Hawkes, Michael; Cheng, Henry S; Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Fish, Jason E; Harlan, John M; López, Jose A; Liles, W Conrad; Kain, Kevin C

    2017-01-01

    miR-155 has been shown to participate in host response to infection and neuroinflammation via negative regulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and T cell function. We hypothesized that miR-155 may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM). To test this hypothesis, we used a genetic approach to modulate miR-155 expression in an experimental model of cerebral malaria (ECM). In addition, an engineered endothelialized microvessel system and serum samples from Ugandan children with CM were used to examine anti–miR-155 as a potential adjunctive therapeutic for severe malaria. Despite higher parasitemia, survival was significantly improved in miR-155-/- mice versus wild-type littermate mice in ECM. Improved survival was associated with preservation of BBB integrity and reduced endothelial activation, despite increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Pretreatment with antagomir-155 reduced vascular leak induced by human CM sera in an ex vivo endothelial microvessel model. These data provide evidence supporting a mechanistic role for miR-155 in host response to malaria via regulation of endothelial activation, microvascular leak and BBB dysfunction in CM. PMID:28182191

  11. VE-cadherin involved in the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell barrier injury induced by angiotensin II through modulating the cellular apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyong; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Dai, Feifeng; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin II (AngII) involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary injury through impairing the integrity of pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier, but the mechanism is still not clear. We aim to determine the roles of VE-cadherin, playing crucial roles in the adhesion of the vascular endothelial barrier and the barrier function, in the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMVEC) barrier injury mediated by AngII. Methods: Mice acute lung injury (ALI) model was induced through pumping of AngII. The infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils as well as the PMVEC permeability were determined in order to determine the barrier injury in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VE-cadherin was established using siRNA technique, and its roles in the apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement in the PMVECs were evaluated. Results: After AngII interference, the expression of VE-cadherin in the PMVECs and pulmonary tissues in mice was down-regulated. Upon VE-cadherin knockdown through siRNA technique, AngII induced susceptibility of PMVECs to apoptosis. Knockdown of VE-cadherin contributed to the skeletal rearrangement in the endothelial cells, together with increase of permeability. Conclusions: VE-cadherin expression is closely related to the apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement of PMVECs induced by AngII. PMID:27830014

  12. Early radiation-induced endothelial cell loss and blood-spinal cord barrier breakdown in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Chen, Paul; Jain, Vipan; Reilly, Raymond M; Wong, C Shun

    2004-02-01

    Using a rat spinal cord model, this study was designed to characterize radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell loss and its relationship to early blood-brain barrier disruption in the central nervous system. Adult rats were given a single dose of 0, 2, 8, 19.5, 22, 30 or 50 Gy to the cervical spinal cord. At various times up to 2 weeks after irradiation, the spinal cord was processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by morphology and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling combined with immunohistochemical markers for endothelial and glial cells. Image analysis was performed to determine endothelial cell and microvessel density using immunohistochemistry with endothelial markers, namely endothelial barrier antigen, glucose transporter isoform 1, laminin and zonula occludens 1. Blood-spinal cord barrier permeability was assessed using immunohistochemistry for albumin and (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a vascular tracer. Endothelial cell proliferation was assessed using in vivo BrdU labeling. During the first 24 h after irradiation, apoptotic endothelial cells were observed in the rat spinal cord. The decrease in endothelial cell density at 24 h after irradiation was associated with an increase in albumin immunostaining around microvessels. The decrease in the number of endothelial cells persisted for 7 days and recovery of endothelial density was apparent by day 14. A similar pattern of blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and recovery of permeability was observed over the 2 weeks, and an increase in BrdU-labeled endothelial cells was seen at day 3. These results are consistent with an association between endothelial cell death and acute blood-spinal cord barrier disruption in the rat spinal cord after irradiation.

  13. Sphingosine 1 Phosphate at the Blood Brain Barrier: Can the Modulation of S1P Receptor 1 Influence the Response of Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes to Inflammatory Stimuli?

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Simona F; Obermeier, Birgit; Cotleur, Anne; Love, Anna; Takeshita, Yukio; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) to maintain proper barrier functions, keeping an optimal environment for central nervous system (CNS) activity and regulating leukocytes' access, can be affected in CNS diseases. Endothelial cells and astrocytes are the principal BBB cellular constituents and their interaction is essential to maintain its function. Both endothelial cells and astrocytes express the receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid S1P. Fingolimod, an immune modulatory drug whose structure is similar to S1P, has been approved for treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS): fingolimod reduces the rate of MS relapses by preventing leukocyte egress from the lymph nodes. Here, we examined the ability of S1P and fingolimod to act on the BBB, using an in vitro co-culture model that allowed us to investigate the effects of S1P on endothelial cells, astrocytes, and interactions between the two. Acting selectively on endothelial cells, S1P receptor signaling reduced cell death induced by inflammatory cytokines. When acting on astrocytes, fingolimod treatment induced the release of a factor, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that reduced the effects of cytokines on endothelium. In an in vitro BBB model incorporating shear stress, S1P receptor modulation reduced leukocyte migration across the endothelial barrier, indicating a novel mechanism that might contribute to fingolimod efficacy in MS treatment.

  14. Treatments Improving Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Moisturizers affect the stratum corneum architecture and barrier homeostasis, i.e. topically applied ingredients are not as inert to the skin as one might expect. A number of different mechanisms behind the barrier-influencing effects of moisturizers have been suggested, such as simple deposition of lipid material outside the skin. Ingredients in the moisturizers may also change the lamellar organization and the packing of the lipid matrix and thereby skin permeability. Topically applied substances may also penetrate deeper into the skin and interfere with the production of barrier lipids and the maturation of corneocytes. Furthermore, moisturizing creams may influence the desquamatory proteases and alter the thickness of the stratum corneum.

  15. Evaluation of Bioenergetic Function in Cerebral Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rellick, Stephanie L; Hu, Heng; Simpkins, James W; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-11-19

    The integrity of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is critical to prevent brain injury. Cerebral vascular endothelial (CVE) cells are one of the cell types that comprise the BBB; these cells have a very high-energy demand, which requires optimal mitochondrial function. In the case of disease or injury, the mitochondrial function in these cells can be altered, resulting in disease or the opening of the BBB. In this manuscript, we introduce a method to measure mitochondrial function in CVE cells by using whole, intact cells and a bioanalyzer. A mito-stress assay is used to challenge the cells that have been perturbed, either physically or chemically, and evaluate their bioenergetic function. Additionally, this method also provides a useful way to screen new therapeutics that have direct effects on mitochondrial function. We have optimized the cell density necessary to yield oxygen consumption rates that allow for the calculation of a variety of mitochondrial parameters, including ATP production, maximal respiration, and spare capacity. We also show the sensitivity of the assay by demonstrating that the introduction of the microRNA, miR-34a, leads to a pronounced and detectable decrease in mitochondrial activity. While the data shown in this paper is optimized for the bEnd.3 cell line, we have also optimized the protocol for primary CVE cells, further suggesting the utility in preclinical and clinical models.

  16. Dasatinib-loaded albumin nanoparticles possess diminished endothelial cell barrier disruption and retain potent anti-leukemia cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Shetty, Sreerama; Fu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib (DAS), a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is highly effective in treating chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, its clinical use is limited due to serious adverse effects. DAS can disrupt endothelial barrier integrity and increase endothelial permeability which may cause peripheral edema and pleural effusion. Albumin nanoparticles (NPs) as a drug carrier may serve as a useful tool for cell-selective drug delivery to reduce DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability and maintain endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, we reported that DAS-loaded NPs exhibited potent anti-leukemia efficacy as DAS alone. Importantly, albumin NPs as a drug carrier markedly reduced DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability by restraining the inhibition of Lyn kinase signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Therefore, albumin NPs could be a potential tool to improve anti-leukemia efficacy of DAS through its cell-selective effects. PMID:27391073

  17. Transient Intervals of Hyper-Gravity Enhance Endothelial Barrier Integrity: Impact of Mechanical and Gravitational Forces Measured Electrically

    PubMed Central

    Szulcek, Robert; van Bezu, Jan; Boonstra, Johannes; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial cells (EC) guard vascular functions by forming a dynamic barrier throughout the vascular system that sensitively adapts to ‘classical’ biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress and hydrostatic pressure. Alterations in gravitational forces might similarly affect EC integrity, but remain insufficiently studied. Methods In an unique approach, we utilized Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) in the gravity-simulators at the European Space Agency (ESA) to study dynamic responses of human EC to simulated micro- and hyper-gravity as well as to classical forces. Results Short intervals of micro- or hyper-gravity evoked distinct endothelial responses. Stimulated micro-gravity led to decreased endothelial barrier integrity, whereas hyper-gravity caused sustained barrier enhancement by rapid improvement of cell-cell integrity, evidenced by a significant junctional accumulation of VE-cadherin (p = 0.011), significant enforcement of peripheral F-actin (p = 0.008) and accompanied by a slower enhancement of cell-matrix interactions. The hyper-gravity triggered EC responses were force dependent and nitric-oxide (NO) mediated showing a maximal resistance increase of 29.2±4.8 ohms at 2g and 60.9±6.2 ohms at 4g vs. baseline values that was significantly suppressed by NO blockage (p = 0.011). Conclusion In conclusion, short-term application of hyper-gravity caused a sustained improvement of endothelial barrier integrity, whereas simulated micro-gravity weakened the endothelium. In clear contrast, classical forces of shear stress and hydrostatic pressure induced either short-lived or no changes to the EC barrier. Here, ECIS has proven a powerful tool to characterize subtle and distinct EC gravity-responses due to its high temporal resolution, wherefore ECIS has a great potential for the study of gravity-responses such as in real space flights providing quantitative assessment of a variety of cell biological characteristics of any adherent

  18. Intermittent Hypoxia Impairs Endothelial Function in Early Preatherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tuleta, I; França, C N; Wenzel, D; Fleischmann, B; Nickenig, G; Werner, N; Skowasch, D

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia seems to be a major pathomechanism of obstructive sleep apnea-associated progression of atherosclerosis. The goal of the present study was to assess the influence of hypoxia on endothelial function depending on the initial stage of vasculopathy. We used 16 ApoE-/- mice were exposed to a 6-week-intermittent hypoxia either immediately (early preatherosclerosis) or after 5 weeks of high-cholesterol diet (advanced preatherosclerosis). Another 16 ApoE-/- mice under normoxia served as corresponding controls. Endothelial function was measured by an organ bath technique. Blood plasma CD31+/annexin V+ endothelial microparticles as well as sca1/flk1+ endothelial progenitor cells in blood and bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometry. The findings were that intermittent hypoxia impaired endothelial function (56.6±6.2% of maximal phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction vs. 35.2±4.1% in control) and integrity (increased percentage of endothelial microparticles: 0.28±0.05% vs. 0.15±0.02% in control) in early preatherosclerosis. Peripheral repair capacity expressed as the number of endothelial progenitor cells in blood was attenuated under hypoxia (2.0±0.5% vs. 5.3±1.9% in control), despite the elevated number of these cells in the bone marrow (2.0±0.4% vs. 1.1±0.2% in control). In contrast, endothelial function, as well as microparticle and endothelial progenitor cell levels were similar under hypoxia vs. control in advanced preatherosclerosis. We conclude that hypoxia aggravates endothelial dysfunction and destruction in early preatherosclerosis.

  19. Metformin restores endothelial function in aorta of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Louro, Teresa; Nunes, Elsa; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The effects of metformin, an antidiabetic agent that improves insulin sensitivity, on endothelial function have not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to assess the effect of metformin on impaired endothelial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and advanced glycation end products formation in type 2 diabetes mellitus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of nonobese type 2 diabetes, fed with normal and high-fat diet during 4 months were treated with metformin for 4 weeks before evaluation. Systemic oxidative stress, endothelial function, insulin resistance, nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, glycation and vascular oxidative stress were determined in the aortic rings of the different groups. A pro-inflammatory biomarker the chemokine CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) was also evaluated. KEY RESULTS High-fat fed GK rats with hyperlipidaemia showed increased vascular and systemic oxidative stress and impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. Metformin treatment significantly improved glycation, oxidative stress, CCL2 levels, NO bioavailability and insulin resistance and normalized endothelial function in aorta. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Metformin restores endothelial function and significantly improves NO bioavailability, glycation and oxidative stress in normal and high-fat fed GK rats. This supports the concept of the central role of metformin as a first-line therapeutic to treat diabetic patients in order to protect against endothelial dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21250975

  20. Expression and functional activity of P-glycoprotein in cultured cerebral capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hegmann, E J; Bauer, H C; Kerbel, R S

    1992-12-15

    Analysis of a panel of endothelial cells passaged between 5 and 25 times and derived from various organs and species demonstrated that murine and porcine cerebral capillary endothelial cells actively excluded the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-glycoprotein. In addition, rhodamine 123 accumulation could be enhanced by the multidrug resistance chemosensitizer verapamil, known to reduce P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux. Cloned murine and porcine cerebral capillary endothelial cells were immunoreactive with the C219 monoclonal antibody to P-glycoprotein, and a C219 epitope-specific blocking peptide could abolish staining. The antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of vincristine, but not cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride, were increased by the addition of either verapamil or cyclosporin A to brain endothelial cell cultures in a 72-h assay, as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation and total protein measurement. Cyclosporin A was a more effective reversal agent than verapamil. Thus, a P-glycoprotein isoform may be constitutively expressed in brain endothelial cells in vitro and supports the available data on in situ immunohistochemical staining of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier. In addition, these findings may indicate that one function of P-glycoprotein in vivo at the blood-brain barrier is the exclusion of xenobiotics from central nervous system tissues.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption and lung edema: critical role for bicarbonate stimulation of AC10

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Jordan; Obiako, Boniface; Ramila, K. C.; Putinta, Kevin; Schilling, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria-induced sepsis is a common cause of pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction and can progress toward acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in intracellular cAMP tightly regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity; however, cAMP signals are highly compartmentalized: whether cAMP is barrier-protective or -disruptive depends on the compartment (plasma membrane or cytosol, respectively) in which the signal is generated. The mammalian soluble adenylyl cyclase isoform 10 (AC10) is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate and is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Elevated extracellular bicarbonate increases cAMP in PMVECs to disrupt the endothelial barrier and increase the filtration coefficient (Kf) in the isolated lung. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis-induced endothelial barrier disruption and increased permeability are dependent on extracellular bicarbonate and activation of AC10. Our findings reveal that LPS-induced endothelial barrier disruption is dependent on extracellular bicarbonate: LPS-induced barrier failure and increased permeability are exacerbated in elevated bicarbonate compared with low extracellular bicarbonate. The AC10 inhibitor KH7 attenuated the bicarbonate-dependent LPS-induced barrier disruption. In the isolated lung, LPS failed to increase Kf in the presence of minimal perfusate bicarbonate. An increase in perfusate bicarbonate to the physiological range (24 mM) revealed the LPS-induced increase in Kf, which was attenuated by KH7. Furthermore, in PMVECs treated with LPS for 6 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in AC10 expression. Thus these findings reveal that LPS-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier failure requires bicarbonate activation of AC10. PMID:26475732

  2. Asef mediates HGF protective effects against LPS-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Mutlu, Gokhan; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-03-01

    Increased vascular endothelial permeability and inflammation are major pathological mechanisms of pulmonary edema and its life-threatening complication, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have previously described potent protective effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) against thrombin-induced hyperpermeability and identified the Rac pathway as a key mechanism of HGF-mediated endothelial barrier protection. However, anti-inflammatory effects of HGF are less understood. This study examined effects of HGF on the pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) inflammatory activation and barrier dysfunction caused by the gram-negative bacterial pathogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We tested involvement of the novel Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in the HGF anti-inflammatory effects. HGF protected the pulmonary EC monolayer against LPS-induced hyperpermeability, disruption of monolayer integrity, activation of NF-kB signaling, expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and production of IL-8. These effects were critically dependent on Asef. Small-interfering RNA-induced downregulation of Asef attenuated HGF protective effects against LPS-induced EC barrier failure. Protective effects of HGF against LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak were also diminished in Asef knockout mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate potent anti-inflammatory effects by HGF and delineate a key role of Asef in the mediation of the HGF barrier protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Modulation of Asef activity may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS-induced gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Moldobaeva, Nurgul

    2011-01-01

    Lung inflammation and alterations in endothelial cell (EC) permeability are key events to development of acute lung injury (ALI). Protective effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been shown against inflammatory signaling and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by gram-negative bacterial wall liposaccharide. We hypothesized that ANP may possess more general protective effects and attenuate lung inflammation and EC barrier dysfunction by suppressing inflammatory cascades and barrier-disruptive mechanisms shared by gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. C57BL/6J wild-type or ANP knockout mice (Nppa−/−) were treated with gram-positive bacterial cell wall compounds, Staphylococcus aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PepG) and/or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (intratracheal, 2.5 mg/kg each), with or without ANP (intravenous, 2 μg/kg). In vitro, human pulmonary EC barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis of gap formation and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. LTA and PepG markedly increased pulmonary EC permeability and activated p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Rho/Rho kinase signaling. EC barrier dysfunction was further elevated upon combined LTA and PepG treatment, but abolished by ANP pretreatment. In vivo, LTA and PepG-induced accumulation of protein and cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tissue neutrophil infiltration, and increased Evans blue extravasation in the lungs was significantly attenuated by intravenous injection of ANP. Accumulation of bronchoalveolar lavage markers of LTA/PepG-induced lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction was further augmented in ANP−/− mice and attenuated by exogenous ANP injection. These results strongly suggest a protective role of ANP in the in vitro and in vivo models of ALI associated with gram-positive infection. Thus ANP may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and ALI-induced gram-positive bacterial

  4. The function of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Bonnie J; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bryan, Brad A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the master regulator of angiogenesis during growth and development, as well as in disease states such as cancer, diabetes, and macular degeneration. This review details our current understanding of VEGF signaling and discusses the benefits and unexpected side effects of promising anti-angiogenic therapeutics that are currently being used to inhibit neovacularization in tumors.

  5. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  6. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  7. Circulating humanin levels are associated with preserved coronary endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. J.; Flammer, A. J.; Herrmann, J.; Rodriguez-Porcel, M.; Wan, J.; Cohen, P.; Lerman, L. O.

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a small endogenous antiapoptotic peptide, originally identified as protective against Alzheimer's disease, but subsequently also found on human endothelium as well as carotid artery plaques. Endothelial dysfunction is a precursor to the development of atherosclerotic plaques, which are characterized by a highly proinflammatory, reactive oxygen species, and apoptotic milieu. Previous animal studies demonstrated that humanin administration may improve endothelial function. Thus the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with coronary endothelial dysfunction have reduced systemic levels of humanin. Forty patients undergoing coronary angiography and endothelial function testing were included and subsequently divided into two groups based on coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intracoronary acetylcholine (normal ≥ 50% increase from baseline, n = 20 each). Aortic plasma samples were obtained at the time of catheterization for the analysis of humanin levels and traditional biomarkers of atherosclerosis including C-reactive protein, Lp-Pla2, and homocysteine. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Patients with coronary endothelial dysfunction (change in CBF = −33 ± 25%) had significantly lower humanin levels (1.3 ± 1.1 vs. 2.2 ± 1.5 ng/ml, P = 0.03) compared with those with normal coronary endothelial function (change in CBF = 194 ± 157%). There was a significant and positive correlation between improved CBF and humanin levels (P = 0.0091) not seen with changes in coronary flow reserve (P = 0.76). C-reactive protein, Lp-Pla2, and homocysteine were not associated with humanin levels. Thus we observed that preserved human coronary endothelial function is uniquely associated with higher systemic humanin levels, introducing a potential diagnostic and/or therapeutic target for patients with coronary endothelial function. PMID:23220334

  8. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell-cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E; Randi, Anna M; Schwartz, Martin A; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2015-03-16

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell-cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin-VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell-cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

  9. Diverse Functions of Endothelial NO Synthases System: NO and EDH

    PubMed Central

    Godo, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Endothelium-dependent relaxations are predominantly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) in large conduit arteries and by endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in small resistance vessels. Although the nature of EDH factors varies depending on species and vascular beds, we have previously demonstrated that endothelial NO synthases (eNOS)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an EDH factor in animals and humans. This vessel size-dependent contribution of NO and EDH is, at least in part, attributable to the diverse roles of endothelial NOSs system; in large conduit arteries, eNOS mainly serves as a NO-generating system to elicit soluble guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated relaxations, whereas in small resistance vessels, it serves as a superoxide-generating system to cause EDH/H2O2-mediated relaxations. Endothelial caveolin-1 may play an important role for the diverse roles of NOSs. Although reactive oxygen species are generally regarded harmful, the physiological roles of H2O2 have attracted much attention as accumulating evidence has shown that endothelium-derived H2O2 contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis. The diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system with NO and EDH/H2O2 could account for a compensatory mechanism in the setting of endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we will briefly summarize the current knowledge on the diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system: NO and EDH/H2O2. PMID:26647119

  10. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Buettner, Manuela; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not known. A human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) was used to study whether cell-to-cell Pgp transfer occurs during co-culturing with Pgp-EGFP expressing hCMEC/D3 cells. The Pgp-EGFP fusion protein was transferred from donor to recipient cells by cell-to-cell contact and Pgp-EGFP enriched vesicles, which were exocytosed by donor cells and endocytosed by adherent recipient cells. Flow cytometry experiments with the Pgp substrate eFLUXX-ID Gold demonstrated that the transferred Pgp is functional in the recipient cells. Exposure of the donor cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) resulted in an enhanced intercellular Pgp transfer. Non-genetic transfer of a resistance phenotype and its regulation by HDACs is a novel mechanism of altering BBB functionality. This mechanism may have important implications for understanding drug-induced alterations in Pgp expression and activity. PMID:27375084

  11. Endothelial cell laminin isoforms, laminins 8 and 10, play decisive roles in T cell recruitment across the blood-brain barrier in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sixt, M; Engelhardt, B; Pausch, F; Hallmann, R; Wendler, O; Sorokin, L M

    2001-05-28

    An active involvement of blood-brain barrier endothelial cell basement membranes in development of inflammatory lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) has not been considered to date. Here we investigated the molecular composition and possible function of the extracellular matrix encountered by extravasating T lymphocytes during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Endothelial basement membranes contained laminin 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1) and/or 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1) and their expression was influenced by proinflammatory cytokines or angiostatic agents. T cells emigrating into the CNS during EAE encountered two biochemically distinct basement membranes, the endothelial (containing laminins 8 and 10) and the parenchymal (containing laminins 1 and 2) basement membranes. However, inflammatory cuffs occurred exclusively around endothelial basement membranes containing laminin 8, whereas in the presence of laminin 10 no infiltration was detectable. In vitro assays using encephalitogenic T cell lines revealed adhesion to laminins 8 and 10, whereas binding to laminins 1 and 2 could not be induced. Downregulation of integrin alpha6 on cerebral endothelium at sites of T cell infiltration, plus a high turnover of laminin 8 at these sites, suggested two possible roles for laminin 8 in the endothelial basement membrane: one at the level of the endothelial cells resulting in reduced adhesion and, thereby, increased penetrability of the monolayer; and secondly at the level of the T cells providing direct signals to the transmigrating cells.

  12. Overexpression of actin-depolymerizing factor blocks oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Lu; Si, Yan-Fang; Li, Bao-Min

    2012-12-01

    The aim of present work was to elucidate the role of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF), an important regulator of actin cytoskeleton, in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to ox-LDL. Treatment with LDL served as control. It was found that ADF mRNA level and protein expression were decreased when exposed to ox-LDL in MBMECs. Then, we investigated the influence of ADF overexpression on ox-LDL-treated MBMECs. Structurally, overexpression of ADF inhibited ox-LDL-induced F-actin formation. Functionally, overexpression of ADF attenuated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier marked by restoration of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability of Evans Blue and expression of tight junction-associated proteins including ZO-1 and occludin, and blocked ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress marked by inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and activity of NADPH oxidase and Nox2 expression. However, overexpression of ADF in control cells had no significant effect on endothelial permeability and ROS formation. In conclusion, overexpression of ADF blocks ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. In addition, siRNA-mediated downregulation of ADF expression aggravated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier and ROS formation. These findings identify ADF as a key signaling molecule in the regulation of BBB integrity and suggest that ADF might be used as a target to modulate diseases accompanied by ox-LDL-induced BBB compromise.

  13. Calcium Channel Blockade and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor γ Agonism Diminish Cognitive Loss and Preserve Endothelial Function During Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia (VaD) by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent VaD in rats. Attentional set shifting (ASST) and Morris water-maze (MWM) test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of nifedipine and pioglitazone significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker may be considered as a potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent VaD.

  14. Effects of irrigation solutions on corneal endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yagoubi, M I; Armitage, W J; Diamond, J; Easty, D L

    1994-04-01

    Rabbit corneas were perfused in vitro with an irrigation solution for 90 minutes. This was followed by 6 hours of perfusion with tissue culture medium TC199 during which endothelial function was assessed by monitoring rates of swelling during a period of perfusion in the absence of bicarbonate ions, and subsequent rates of thinning when bicarbonate ions were restored to the perfusate. Corneal thickness (measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter) immediately following excision was 401 microns (SD 19, n = 23). During the 90 minute perfusion at 35 degrees C, corneas exposed to balanced salt solution (BSS), Hartmann's solution or 0.9% NaCl (all initially at room temperature) swelled, respectively, at 14 (SD 2.3, n = 4), 11 (SD 2.6, n = 4), and 70 (SD 4.3, n = 4) microns/h. Cold Hartmann's solution (initially at 4 degrees C) caused corneas to swell at 9 (SD 2.3, n = 4) microns/h. On the other hand, corneas perfused with BSS Plus thinned at 9 (SD 3.4, n = 4) microns/h and TC199 with Earle's salts had little effect on thickness. Rates of swelling and thinning during the following assessment perfusion showed no apparent effects of prior exposure to any of the irrigation solutions on the barrier properties or pump function of the endothelium. Despite this, the increased thickness of corneas exposed initially to BSS, cold Hartmann's solution, or 0.9% NaCl was not fully reversed, even by the end of the 6 hour assessment perfusion. In contrast, the swelling observed in corneas exposed to Hartmann's solution at room temperature was reversed and these corneas had returned to their normal thickness by the end of the assessment period. All corneas, even those exposed to 0.9% NaCl, had an intact endothelial mosaic with no evidence of damage or cell loss, although morphological differences in cell shape and the appearance of cell borders were evident compared with freshly isolated cornea.

  15. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome, Endothelial Function and Markers of Endothelialization. Changes after CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Armengol, Angeles; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Caballero-Eraso, Candela; Macher, Hada C.; Villar, Jose; Merino, Ana M; Castell, Javier; Capote, Francisco; Stiefel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives This study tries to assess the endothelial function in vivo using flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and several biomarkers of endothelium formation/restoration and damage in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome at baseline and after three months with CPAP therapy. Design Observational study, before and after CPAP therapy. Setting and Patients We studied 30 patients with apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) >15/h that were compared with themselves after three months of CPAP therapy. FMD was assessed non-invasively in vivo using the Laser-Doppler flowmetry. Circulating cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) and microparticles (MPs) were measured as markers of endothelial damage and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined as a marker of endothelial restoration process. Measurements and results After three month with CPAP, FMD significantly increased (1072.26 ± 483.21 vs. 1604.38 ± 915.69 PU, p< 0.005) cf-DNA and MPs significantly decreased (187.93 ± 115.81 vs. 121.28 ± 78.98 pg/ml, p<0.01, and 69.60 ± 62.60 vs. 39.82 ± 22.14 U/μL, p<0.05, respectively) and VEGF levels increased (585.02 ± 246.06 vs. 641.11 ± 212.69 pg/ml, p<0.05). These changes were higher in patients with more severe disease. There was a relationship between markers of damage (r = -0.53, p<0.005) but not between markers of damage and restoration, thus suggesting that both types of markers should be measured together. Conclusions CPAP therapy improves FMD. This improvement may be related to an increase of endothelial restoration process and a decrease of endothelial damage. PMID:25815511

  17. β2 integrin-mediated crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Gorina, Roser; Lyck, Ruth; Vestweber, Dietmar; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuroinflammatory states such as meningitis, neutrophils cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and contribute to pathological alterations of cerebral function. The mechanisms that govern neutrophil migration across the BBB are ill defined. Using live-cell imaging, we show that LPS-stimulated BBB endothelium supports neutrophil arrest, crawling, and diapedesis under physiological flow in vitro. Investigating the interactions of neutrophils from wild-type, CD11a(-/-), CD11b(-/-), and CD18(null) mice with wild-type, junctional adhesion molecule-A(-/-), ICAM-1(null), ICAM-2(-/-), or ICAM-1(null)/ICAM-2(-/-) primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, we demonstrate that neutrophil arrest, polarization, and crawling required G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent activation of β2 integrins and binding to endothelial ICAM-1. LFA-1 was the prevailing ligand for endothelial ICAM-1 in mediating neutrophil shear resistant arrest, whereas Mac-1 was dominant over LFA-1 in mediating neutrophil polarization on the BBB in vitro. Neutrophil crawling was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and neutrophil LFA-1 and Mac-1. In the absence of crawling, few neutrophils maintained adhesive interactions with the BBB endothelium by remaining either stationary on endothelial junctions or displaying transient adhesive interactions characterized by a fast displacement on the endothelium along the direction of flow. Diapedesis of stationary neutrophils was unchanged by the lack of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and occurred exclusively via the paracellular pathway. Crawling neutrophils, although preferentially crossing the BBB through the endothelial junctions, could additionally breach the BBB via the transcellular route. Thus, β2 integrin-mediated neutrophil crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed BBB.

  18. Lymph-Borne Chemokines and Other Low Molecular Weight Molecules Reach High Endothelial Venules via Specialized Conduits While a Functional Barrier Limits Access to the Lymphocyte Microenvironments in Lymph Node Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gretz, J. Elizabeth; Norbury, Christopher C.; Anderson, Arthur O.; Proudfoot, Amanda E.I.; Shaw, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Lymph-borne, soluble factors (e.g., chemokines and others) influence lymphocyte recirculation and endothelial phenotype at high endothelial venules (HEVs) in lymph node cortex. Yet the route lymph-borne soluble molecules travel from the subcapsular sinus to the HEVs is unclear. Therefore, we injected subcutaneously into mice and rats a wide variety of fluorophore-labeled, soluble molecules and examined their distribution in the draining lymph nodes. Rather than percolating throughout the draining lymph node, all molecules, including microbial lipopolysaccharide, were very visible in the subcapsular and medullary sinuses but were largely excluded from the cortical lymphocyte microenvironments. Exclusion prevailed even during the acute lymph node enlargement accompanying viral infection. However, low molecular mass (MW) molecules, including chemokines, did gain entry into the cortex, but in a very defined manner. Low MW, fluorophore-labeled molecules highlighted the subcapsular sinus, the reticular fibers, and the abluminal and luminal surfaces of the associated HEVs. These low MW molecules were in the fibers of the reticular network, a meshwork of collagen fibers ensheathed by fibroblastic reticular cells that connects the subcapsular sinus floor and the HEVs by intertwining with their basement membranes. Thus, low MW, lymph-borne molecules, including chemokines, traveled rapidly from the subcapsular sinus to the HEVs using the reticular network as a conduit. PMID:11085745

  19. Comparative evaluation of the impact on endothelial cells induced by different nanoparticle structures and functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ines; Ernst, Peter; Schäfer, Miriam; Rosman, Christina; Schick, Isabel; Köhler, Oskar; Oehring, Hartmut; Breus, Vladimir V; Basché, Thomas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the research field of nanoparticles, many studies demonstrated a high impact of the shape, size and surface charge, which is determined by the functionalization, of nanoparticles on cell viability and internalization into cells. This work focused on the comparison of three different nanoparticle types to give a better insight into general rules determining the biocompatibility of gold, Janus and semiconductor (quantum dot) nanoparticles. Endothelial cells were subject of this study, since blood is the first barrier after intravenous nanoparticle application. In particular, stronger effects on the viability of endothelial cells were found for nanoparticles with an elongated shape in comparison to spherical ones. Furthermore, a positively charged nanoparticle surface (NH2, CyA) leads to the strongest reduction in cell viability, whereas neutral and negatively charged nanoparticles are highly biocompatible to endothelial cells. These findings are attributed to a rapid internalization of the NH2-functionalized nanoparticles in combination with the damage of intracellular membranes. Interestingly, the endocytotic pathway seems to be a size-dependent process whereas nanoparticles with a size of 20 nm are internalized by caveolae-mediated endocytosis and nanoparticles with a size of 40 nm are taken up by clathrin-mediated internalization and macropinocytosis. Our results can be summarized to formulate five general rules, which are further specified in the text and which determine the biocompatibility of nanoparticles on endothelial cells. Our findings will help to design new nanoparticles with optimized properties concerning biocompatibility and uptake behavior with respect to the respective intended application. PMID:25821668

  20. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  1. Permanent isolation surface barrier: Functional performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, N.R.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the functional performance parameters for permanent isolation surface barriers. Permanent isolation surface barriers have been proposed for use at the Hanford Site (and elsewhere) to isolate and dispose of certain types of waste in place. Much of the waste that would be disposed of using in-place isolation techniques is located in subsurface structures, such as solid waste burial grounds, tanks, vaults, and cribs. Unless protected in some way, the wastes could be transported to the accessible environment via transport pathways, such as water infiltration, biointrusion, wind and water erosion, human interference, and/or gaseous release.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  3. Proliferation status defines functional properties of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lipps, Christoph; Badar, Muhammad; Butueva, Milada; Dubich, Tatyana; Singh, Vivek Vikram; Rau, Sophie; Weber, Axel; Kracht, Michael; Köster, Mario; May, Tobias; Schulz, Thomas F; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Homeostasis of solid tissue is characterized by a low proliferative activity of differentiated cells while special conditions like tissue damage induce regeneration and proliferation. For some cell types it has been shown that various tissue-specific functions are missing in the proliferating state, raising the possibility that their proliferation is not compatible with a fully differentiated state. While endothelial cells are important players in regenerating tissue as well as in the vascularization of tumors, the impact of proliferation on their features remains elusive. To examine cell features in dependence of proliferation, we established human endothelial cell lines in which proliferation is tightly controlled by a doxycycline-dependent, synthetic regulatory unit. We observed that uptake of macromolecules and establishment of cell-cell contacts was more pronounced in the growth-arrested state. Tube-like structures were formed in vitro in both proliferating and non-proliferating conditions. However, functional vessel formation upon transplantation into immune-compromised mice was restricted to the proliferative state. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) infection resulted in reduced expression of endothelial markers. Upon transplantation of infected cells, drastic differences were observed: proliferation arrested cells acquired a high migratory activity while the proliferating counterparts established a tumor-like phenotype, similar to Kaposi Sarcoma lesions. The study gives evidence that proliferation governs endothelial functions. This suggests that several endothelial functions are differentially expressed during angiogenesis. Moreover, since proliferation defines the functional properties of cells upon infection with KSHV, this process crucially affects the fate of virus-infected cells.

  4. Improvement of endothelial function following initiation of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tucky, Barbara; Polackwich, Allan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Isolated recent studies have suggested an increased risk of heart attack as early as 3 months following testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Such a rapid risk increase would likely require rapid deterioration of arterial endothelial function. Our goal was to assess arterial endothelial function in hypogonadal men prior to and at least 3 months after initiation of TRT. Methods Adult men were consented if they had symptoms of hypogonadism, a total testosterone <350 ng/dL, and planned to begin TRT. Endothelial function was non-invasively assessed using the EndoPAT-2000 machine. We measured the augmentation index (AI) (normal <3%), a measure of arterial stiffness and reactive hyperemia index (RHI), a measure of endothelial vasodilation (normal >1.69). Prior studies suggest that a 10% level of day-to-day test variability is expected. Endothelial function was reassessed at the next clinic visit, between 3 and 6 months if the patients were compliant with therapy. Changes in continuous variables were assessed with the paired t test. Results Twenty-three patients were consented with a mean age of 52.7 years (range, 34–68 years) and starting testosterone 196.9 ng/dL (range, 35–339 ng/dL). There was a history of diabetes in four, hypertension in ten and coronary artery disease in five. Mean RHI was 1.67±0.37 (70% were abnormal) and mean AI was 2.57%±14.0% (39% were abnormal). There were no cardiac events. At follow-up 20 patients were compliant with therapy and retested. Mean testosterone increased from 203 to 511 (P<0.0001). Mean RHI improved from 1.70 to 2.14 (P=0.01). Mean AI improved from 2.9% to −1.75% (P=0.01). In four men RHI worsened but in each case less than the 10% error of the test. No man had worsened AI. Conclusions Men with symptomatic hypogonadism often have abnormal arterial endothelial function. Following TRT, endothelial function either remains unchanged or improves. PMID:28078212

  5. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  6. Arginase inhibition restores endothelial function in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Moon, Jiyoung; Lee, Youn Sue; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Min; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2014-08-22

    Arginase may play a major role in the regulation of vascular function in various cardiovascular disorders by impairing nitric oxide (NO) production. In the current study, we investigated whether supplementation of the arginase inhibitor N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) could restore endothelial function in an animal model of diet-induced obesity. Arginase 1 expression was significantly lower in the aorta of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with nor-NOHA (40mgkg(-1)/day) than in mice fed HFD without nor-NOHA. Arginase inhibition led to considerable increases in eNOS expression and NO levels and significant decreases in the levels of circulating ICAM-1. These findings were further confirmed by the results of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Arg in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, arginase inhibition can help restore dysregulated endothelial function by increasing the eNOS-dependent NO production in the endothelium, indicating that arginase could be a therapeutic target for correcting obesity-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Cancer-secreted miR-105 destroys vascular endothelial barriers to promote metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiying; Fong, Miranda Y.; Min, Yongfen; Somlo, George; Liu, Liang; Palomares, Melanie R.; Yu, Yang; Chow, Amy; O’Connor, Sean Timothy Francis; Chin, Andrew R.; Yen, Yun; Wang, Yafan; Marcusson, Eric G.; Chu, Peiguo; Wu, Jun; Wu, Xiwei; Li, Arthur Xuejun; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Hanlin; Ren, Xiubao; Boldin, Mark P.; Lin, Pengnian Charles; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer-secreted miRNAs are emerging mediators of cancer–host crosstalk. Here we show that miR-105, which is characteristically expressed and secreted by metastatic breast cancer cells, is a potent regulator of migration through targeting the tight junction protein ZO-1. In endothelial monolayers, exosome-mediated transfer of cancer-secreted miR-105 efficiently destroys tight junctions and the integrity of these natural barriers against metastasis. Overexpression of miR-105 in non-metastatic cancer cells induces metastasis and vascular permeability in distant organs, whereas inhibition of miR-105 in highly metastatic tumors alleviates these effects. MiR-105 can be detected in the circulation at the pre-metastatic stage, and its levels in the blood and tumor are associated with ZO-1 expression and metastatic progression in early-stage breast cancer. PMID:24735924

  8. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  9. Endothelial function, folate pharmacogenomics, and neurocognition in psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler; Taylor, Stephan; Dalack, Gregory; Ellingrod, Vicki

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a well-described complication of schizophrenia, however, mechanisms connecting CVD with other facets of psychotic disorders, such as neurocognition, are not understood. The current study examined folate metabolism as a potential mechanism of CVD and neurocognitive deficits by: 1) using endothelial dysfunction as a biomarker of CVD, and 2) comparing enzymes associated with neurocognition, CVD, and critical to folate metabolism, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and catechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT). Endothelial function was assessed in 147 participants with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and psychotic disorder not otherwise specified grouped by MTHFR and COMT allele status. Regression models were used to compare neurocognitive performance based on the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Overall, endothelial function predicted BACS composite z-scores after controlling for age, race, level of education, serum folate levels, and MTHFR/COMT risk allele status. Participants with at least one or more MTHFR and/or COMT risk alleles had lower BACS Composite and BACS Symbol Coding adjusted mean z-scores than those with both MTHFR CC and COMT Met/Met genotypes. Thus, endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the neurocognitive deficits seen in psychotic disorders. CVD interventions may not only reduce CVD-related morbidity, but also lessen progressive neurocognitive deficits reported in psychotic disorders.

  10. Endothelial function markers in parkinsonian patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti; Katsarou, Zoe; Frangia, Theodora; Hatzizisi, Olga; Papazisis, Kostas; Kyriazis, George; Kiosseoglou, Gregory; Kazis, Aristidis

    2005-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is considered a risk factor for vascular disease causing endothelial damage and consequently atherogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elevated homocysteine on certain biochemical markers of endothelial function in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Blood homocysteine levels were assessed in 57 PD patients and 40 matched normal controls. Investigation of the C677T 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype was also performed in 43 PD patients. The following markers of endothelial function were assessed: superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), sICAM-1 and sE-selectin. Homocysteine levels were found mildly elevated in PD patients particularly in those treated with L-Dopa. MTHFR genotype did not influence significantly this finding. SOD activity was found reduced but it was not correlated to homocysteine levels. All other parameters measured were normal and were not related to hyperhomocysteinemia. Our findings indicate that mild hyperhomocysteinemia in PD patients was not associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Simultaneous Non-Invasive Assessment of Systemic and Coronary Endothelial Function Iantorno et al: Cardiac MRI and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael; Krishnaswamy, Rupa; Soleimanifard, Sahar; Steinberg, Angela; Stuber, Matthias; Gerstenblith, Gary; Weiss, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Normal endothelial function is a measure of vascular health and dysfunction a predictor of coronary events. Nitric Oxide (NO)-mediated coronary artery endothelial function (CEF), as assessed by vasomotor reactivity during isometric handgrip exercise (IHE), was recently quantified noninvasively with MRI. Because the internal mammary artery (IMA) is often visualized during coronary MRI we propose the strategy of simultaneously assessing systemic and coronary endothelial function noninvasively by MRI during IHE. Methods and Results Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and blood flow (BF) in the right coronary artery (RCA) and the IMA in 25 CAD patients and 26 healthy subjects during IHE were assessed using 3T MRI. In 8 healthy subjects a NO synthase inhibitor was infused to evaluate the role of NO in the IMA-IHE response. Inter-observer IMA-IHE reproducibility was good for CSA (R=0.91) and BF (R=0.91). In healthy subjects, CSA and BF of the IMA increased during IHE and these responses were significantly attenuated by L-NMMA (p<0.01 vs. placebo). In CAD patients, the RCA did not dilate with IHE and dilation of the IMA was less than that of the healthy subjects (p=0.01). The BF responses of both the RCA and IMA to IHE were also significantly reduced in CAD patients. Conclusions MRI-detected IMA responses to IHE primarily reflect NO-dependent endothelial function, are reproducible and reduced in CAD patients. Endothelial function in both coronary and systemic (IMA) arteries can now be measured noninvasively with the same imaging technique and promises novel insights into systemic and local factors affecting vascular health. PMID:26919997

  12. Endothelial function in postmenopausal women with nighttime systolic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Faye S.; Hinderliter, Alan L.; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith; Blumenthal, James A.; Paine, Nicola J.; Sherwood, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypertension becomes more prevalent in women during their postmenopausal years. Nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) is especially predictive of adverse cardiac events and the relationship between rising nighttime SBP and cardiovascular risk increases more rapidly in women compared to men. The reasons for the prognostic significance of nighttime SBP are not completely known, but may involve vascular endothelial dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of nighttime SBP and endothelial function, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and to determine whether postmenopausal women with nighttime hypertension (SBP≥120 mm Hg) evidenced greater endothelial dysfunction compared to women with normal nighttime SBP. Methods One-hundred postmenopausal women (mean age: 65.8 ± 7.5 years, body mass index: 28.3 ± 4.7 kg/m2, hypertension: 47%, coronary artery disease: 51%, mean clinic BP 137 ± 17/67 ± 11 mm Hg, 34 with nighttime hypertension) underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, actigraphy, and brachial artery FMD assessments. Results Multivariate regression models showed that higher nighttime SBP and larger baseline artery diameter were inversely related to FMD. Nighttime SBP and baseline artery diameter accounted for 23% of the variance in FMD. After adjusting for baseline artery diameter, women with nighttime hypertension had lower FMD than women with normal nighttime SBP (2.95%±0.65 vs 5.52%±0.46, p = .002). Conclusions In postmenopausal women, nighttime hypertension was associated with reduced endothelial function. Research examining the therapeutic benefits of treating nighttime hypertension on endothelial function and future cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women is warranted. PMID:25563797

  13. Mechanisms of modulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells function by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Shipsky, Megan M; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Brailoiu, G Cristina

    2017-02-15

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the blood-brain barrier. They form a tight monolayer which is essential for maintaining the brain homeostasis. Blood-derived proteases such as thrombin may enter the brain during pathological conditions like trauma, stroke, and inflammation and further disrupts the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, via incompletely characterized mechanisms. We examined the underlying mechanisms evoked by thrombin in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Our results indicate that thrombin, acting on protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in RBMVEC via Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular space. Thrombin increases nitric oxide production; the effect is abolished by inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase or by antagonism of PAR1 receptors. In addition, thrombin increases mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species production via PAR1-dependent mechanisms. Immunocytochemistry studies indicate that thrombin increases F-actin stress fibers, and disrupts the tight junctions. Thrombin increased the RBMVEC permeability assessed by a fluorescent flux assay. Taken together, our results indicate multiple mechanisms by which thrombin modulates the function of RBMVEC and may contribute to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

  14. Alterations of blood brain barrier function in hyperammonemia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Ammonia is a neurotoxin involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions associated with hyperammonemia, including hepatic encephalopathy, a condition associated with acute--(ALF) or chronic liver failure. This article reviews evidence that apart from directly affecting the metabolism and function of the central nervous system cells, ammonia influences the passage of different molecules across the blood brain barrier (BBB). A brief description is provided of the tight junctions, which couple adjacent cerebral capillary endothelial cells to each other to form the barrier. Ammonia modulates the transcellular passage of low-to medium-size molecules, by affecting their carriers located at the BBB. Ammonia induces interrelated aberrations of the transport of the large neutral amino acids and aromatic amino acids (AAA), whose influx is augmented by exchange with glutamine produced in the course of ammonia detoxification, and maybe also modulated by the extracellularly acting gamma-glutamyl moiety transferring enzyme, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase. Impaired AAA transport affects neurotransmission by altering intracerebral synthesis of catecholamines (serotonin and dopamine), and producing "false neurotransmitters" (octopamine and phenylethylamine). Ammonia also modulates BBB transport of the cationic amino acids: the nitric oxide precursor, arginine, and ornithine, which is an ammonia trap, and affects the transport of energy metabolites glucose and creatine. Moreover, ammonia acting either directly or in synergy with liver injury-derived inflammatory cytokines also evokes subtle increases of the transcellular passage of molecules of different size (BBB "leakage"), which appears to be responsible for the vasogenic component of cerebral edema associated with ALF.

  15. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  16. XIAP reverses various functional activities of FRNK in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Chi, Sung-Gil; Park, Heonyong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRNK domain is recruited into focal adhesion (FA), controlling endothelial cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP binds the FRNK domain of FAK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP inhibits recruitment of FRNK into Fas and FRNK-promoted cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and shear-stimulated activation of MAPK. We recently found that FAK is recruited into focal adhesion (FA) sites through interactions with XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and activated by Src kinase in response to shear stress. In this study, we examined which domain(s) of FAK is(are) important for various vascular functions such as FA recruiting, XIAP-binding and shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. Through a series of experiments, we determined that the FRNK domain is recruited into FA sites and promotes endothelial cell adhesion. Interestingly, XIAP knockdown was shown to reduce FA recruitment of FRNK and the cell adhesive effect of FRNK. In addition, we found that XIAP interacts with FRNK, suggesting cross-talk between XIAP and FRNK. We also demonstrated that FRNK inhibits endothelial cell migration and shear-stimulated ERK activation. These inhibitory effects of FRNK were reversed by XIAP knockdown. Taken together, we can conclude that XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK.

  17. Endothelial PECAM-1 and its function in vascular physiology and atherogenic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-06-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) is highly expressed in vascular cells such as endothelial cells (ECs) and blood-borne cells like platelets and leukocytes. In ECs, this molecule controls junctional and adhesive properties. In physiological conditions, PECAM-1 supports the endothelial barrier function. In inflammation that is observed in vessels affected by atherosclerosis, the function of PECAM-1 is impaired, an event that leads to increased adhesion of neutrophils and other leukocytes to ECs, decreased vascular integrity, and higher leukocyte transmigration to the intima media. PECAM-1 has six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains that support attraction and adhesion of leukocytes to ECs. The cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues (Tyr-663 and Tyr-686) that could be phosphorylated by Src family protein kinases is involved in the intracellular signaling. Actually, those tyrosines are the part of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) that inhibit inflammation. However, in atherosclerosis, the PECAM-1-dependent immune suppression is disturbed. This in turn facilitates recruitment of leukocytes and supports proatherogenic inflammation.

  18. Vitamin D Enhances Corneal Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaohong; Pintea, Victorina; Lin, Yanping; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and/or its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), can enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. The authors also determined if corneas contain mRNA for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1α-hydroxylase, the enzyme required to convert 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, and measured vitamin D metabolite concentrations in aqueous and vitreous humor. Methods. RT-PCR was used to examine mouse, rabbit, and human corneal epithelial VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. Vitamin D metabolites were measured using a selective vitamin D derivatizing agent and mass spectroscopy. Barrier function experiments were performed by measuring inulin permeability (IP) and/or transepithelial resistance (TER) in control, 25(OH)D3-, and 1,25(OH)2D3-treated human and rabbit corneal epithelial monolayers cultured on permeable inserts. Ca2+ was removed, then reintroduced to the culture medium while IP and TER readings were taken. Occludin levels were examined using Western blotting. Results. All corneal samples were positive for both VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. All vitamin D metabolites except for unhydroxylated vitamin D3 were detected in aqueous and vitreous humor. Epithelial cells showed increased TER, decreased IP, and increased occludin levels when cultured with 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3. Conclusions. We conclude that corneas contain mRNA for VDR and 1α-hydroxylase as well as significant vitamin D concentrations. 25(OH)D3 and its active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, both enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. PMID:21715350

  19. Impaired endothelial function and blood flow in repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Brunnekreef, J; Brunnekreef, J J; Benda, N; Benda, N M M; Schreuder, T; Schreuder, T H A; Hopman, M; Hopman, M T E; Thijssen, D; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a disabling upper extremity overuse injury that may be associated with pathophysiological changes in the vasculature. In this study we investigated whether RSI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired exercise-induced blood flow in the affected forearm. 10 patients with RSI (age, 40.2 ± 10.3; BMI, 23.8 ± 3.3) and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects (age, 38.0 ± 12.4; BMI, 22.7 ± 3.4) participated in this study. Brachial artery blood flow was measured at rest and during 3-min periods of isometric handgrip exercise at 15%, 30% and 45% of the individual maximal voluntary contraction. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed as the flow mediated dilation (FMD), by measuring brachial artery diameter and velocity before and after 5-min ischemic occlusion. We found a lower exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in patients with RSI than in controls (p=0.04). Brachial artery FMD was significantly lower in patients with RSI than in controls (p<0.01), whilst a lower FMD was also found in patient with unilateral RSI when comparing the affected arm with the non-affected arm (p=0.04). Our results suggest that patients with RSI have an attenuated exercise-induced blood flow and an impaired endothelial function in the affected arm. These findings importantly improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of RSI.

  20. Metoprolol Improves Endothelial Function in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Majidinia, Maryam; Rasmi, Yousef; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Seyed-Mohammadzad, MirHossein; Saboory, Ehsan; Shirpoor, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction which is manifested by the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability, is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac syndrome X (CSX) and beta blockers are used for the treatment of this syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate effects of metoprolol, as a beta blocker, on endothelial function in CSX patients. The study included 25 CSX patients (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 55.36±10.31 years) who received metoprolol (50 mg BID) for one month. In addition, 25 healthy controls (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 54.32 ±9.27 years) were enrolled. Levels of endothelin-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in controls and CSX patients were measured, both at the baseline and after the treatment, by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CSX patients, at the baseline, levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 were significantly higher than those of the controls. In addition, levels of these biomarkers in CSX patients after the treatment significantly decreased compared to the baseline. In spite of similar tendency, these differences were not significant for endothelin-1. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy improves endothelial function. Thus, it may be a suggested choice for CSX treatment. However, further studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of metoprolol therapy for CSX patients. PMID:27980592

  1. Trafficking of Endogenous Immunoglobulins by Endothelial Cells at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Ozmen, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Grüninger, Fiona; Loetscher, Hansruedi; Keller, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Collin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) restricts access of large molecules to the brain. The low endocytic activity of brain endothelial cells (BECs) is believed to limit delivery of immunoglobulins (IgG) to the brain parenchyma. Here, we report that endogenous mouse IgG are localized within intracellular vesicles at steady state in BECs in vivo. Using high-resolution quantitative microscopy, we found a fraction of endocytosed IgG in lysosomes. We observed that loss of pericytes (key components of the BBB) in pdgf-bret/ret mice affects the intracellular distribution of endogenous mouse IgG in BECs. In these mice, endogenous IgG was not detected within lysosomes but instead accumulate at the basement membrane and brain parenchyma. Such IgG accumulation could be due to reduced lysosomal clearance and increased sorting to the abluminal membrane of BECs. Our results suggest that, in addition to low uptake from circulation, IgG lysosomal degradation may be a downstream mechanism by which BECs further restrict IgG access to the brain. PMID:27149947

  2. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  3. An in vitro and in vivo study of peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for brain targeting: The importance of selective blood-brain barrier uptake.

    PubMed

    Bode, Gerard H; Coué, Gregory; Freese, Christian; Pickl, Karin E; Sanchez-Purrà, Maria; Albaiges, Berta; Borrós, Salvador; van Winden, Ewoud C; Tziveleka, Leto-Aikaterini; Sideratou, Zili; Engbersen, Johan F J; Singh, Smriti; Albrecht, Krystyna; Groll, Jürgen; Möller, Martin; Pötgens, Andy J G; Schmitz, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Grandfils, Christian; Sinner, Frank M; Kirkpatrick, C James; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Frank, Hans-Georg; Unger, Ronald E; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2016-11-21

    Targeted delivery of drugs across endothelial barriers remains a formidable challenge, especially in the case of the brain, where the blood-brain barrier severely limits entry of drugs into the central nervous system. Nanoparticle-mediated transport of peptide/protein-based drugs across endothelial barriers shows great potential as a therapeutic strategy in a wide variety of diseases. Functionalizing nanoparticles with peptides allows for more efficient targeting to specific organs. We have evaluated the hemocompatibilty, cytotoxicity, endothelial uptake, efficacy of delivery and safety of liposome, hyperbranched polyester, poly(glycidol) and acrylamide-based nanoparticles functionalized with peptides targeting brain endothelial receptors, in vitro and in vivo. We used an ELISA-based method for the detection of nanoparticles in biological fluids, investigating the blood clearance rate and in vivo biodistribution of labeled nanoparticles in the brain after intravenous injection in Wistar rats. Herein, we provide a detailed report of in vitro and in vivo observations.

  4. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-10-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice.

  5. Correlation between Diastolic Function and Endothelial Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bedirian, Ricardo; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg Odebrecht Curi; Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Ladeira, Marcia Cristina Boaventura; Castier, Marcia Bueno

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endothelial dysfunction may be involved in the pathophysiology of cardiac abnormalities in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). A correlation between endothelial dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction in patients with type 1 DM has been demonstrated, but this relationship has not been well investigated in type 2 DM. Objective: Compare groups of patients with type 2 DM and hypertension with and without diastolic dysfunction using endothelial function indexes, and to assess whether correlations exist between the diastolic function and the endothelial function indexes. Method: This was a cross-sectional study of 34 men and women with type 2 DM and hypertension who were aged between 40 and 70 years and were categorized based on assessments of their Doppler echocardiographic parameters as having normal (14 patients) and abnormal (20 patients) diastolic function. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) assessments of the brachial artery evaluated the patients’ endothelial function. Results: The mean maximum FMD was 7.15 ± 2.80% for the patients with diastolic dysfunction and it was 11.85 ± 4.77% for the patients with normal diastolic function (p = 0.004). Correlations existed between the maximum FMD and the E/e' ratio (p = 0.040, r = -0.354) and the early wave velocity (e') at the lateral mitral annulus (p = 0.002, r = 0.509). Conclusion: The endothelial function assessed by FMD was worse in hypertensive diabetic patients with diastolic dysfunction. There were correlations between the diastolic function indexes and the endothelial function indexes in our sample. PMID:27867429

  6. Organization of Endothelial Cells, Pericytes, and Astrocytes into a 3D Microfluidic in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jack D; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Khanafer, Khalil; Takayama, Shuichi; ElSayed, Mohamed E H

    2016-03-07

    The endothelial cells lining the capillaries supplying the brain with oxygen and nutrients form a formidable barrier known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which exhibits selective permeability to small drug molecules and virtually impermeable to macromolecular therapeutics. Current in vitro BBB models fail to replicate this restrictive behavior due to poor integration of the endothelial cells with supporting cells (pericytes and astrocytes) following the correct anatomical organization observed in vivo. We report the coculture of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (b.End3), pericytes, with/without C8-D1A astrocytes in layered microfluidic channels forming three-dimensional (3D) bi- and triculture models of the BBB. The live/dead assay indicated high viability of all cultured cells up to 21 days. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values confirmed the formation of intact monolayers after 3 days in culture and showed statistically higher values for the triculture model compared to the single and biculture models. Screening the permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol and [(14)C]-urea showed the ability of bi- and triculture models to discriminate between different markers based on their size. Further, permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol across the triculture model after 18 days in culture matched its reported permeability across the BBB in vivo. Mathematical calculations also showed that the radius of the tight junctions pores (R) in the triculture model is similar to the reported diameter of the BBB in vivo. Finally, both the bi- and triculture models exhibited functional expression of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump, which increased with the increase in the number of days in culture. These results collectively indicate that the triculture model is a robust in vitro model of the BBB.

  7. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  8. Salvianolic acid B improves vascular endothelial function in diabetic rats with blood glucose fluctuations via suppression of endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Younan; Tao, Shanjun; Zheng, Shuguo; Zhao, Mengqiu; Zhu, Yuanmei; Yang, Jieren; Wu, Yuanjie

    2016-11-15

    Vascular endothelial cell injury is an initial event in atherosclerosis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a main bioactive component in the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has vascular protective effect in diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigated the effect of Sal B on vascular endothelial function in diabetic rats with blood glucose fluctuations and the possible mechanisms implicated. The results showed that diabetic rats developed marked endothelial dysfunction as exhibited by impaired acetylcholine induced vasodilation. Supplementation with Sal B resulted in an evident improvement of endothelial function. Phosphorylation (Ser 1177) of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was significantly restored in Sal B treated diabetic rats, accompanied by an evident recovery of NO metabolites. Sal B effectively reduced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, with Bcl-2 protein up-regulated and Bax protein down-regulated markedly. Treatment with Sal B led to an evident amelioration of oxidative stress in diabetic rats as manifested by enhanced antioxidant capacity and decreased contents of malondialdehyde in aortas. Protein levels of NOX2 and NOX4, two main isoforms of NADPH oxidase known as the major source of reactive oxygen species in the vasculature, were markedly decreased in Sal B treated groups. In addition, treatment with Sal B led to an evident decrease of serum lipids. Taken together, this study indicates that Sal B is capable of improving endothelial function in diabetic rats with blood glucose fluctuations, of which the underlying mechanisms might be related to suppression of endothelial cell apoptosis and stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser 1177).

  9. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars I; Høgh, Julie K; Drachmann, T; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-07-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found for men than for women (p = 0.02).

  10. Amyloid β induces adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and affects endothelial viability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Kuriwada, Satoko; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) might mediate the adhesion of erythrocytes to the endothelium which could disrupt the properties of endothelial cells. We provide evidence here that Aβ actually induced the binding of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and decreased endothelial viability, perhaps by the generation of oxidative and inflammatory stress. These changes are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves.

  12. Assessment of endothelial and neurovascular function in human skin microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral microvascular dysfunction has been described in many physiological and pathological conditions. Owing to its accessibility, the cutaneous microcirculation provides a unique index of microvascular function. Skin microvascular function has therefore been proposed as a prognostic marker or for evaluating the effect of drugs on the microcirculation. Various reactivity tests, coupled with techniques measuring skin blood flux, are used to non-invasively explore both endothelial and neurovascular microvascular functioning in humans. We review the advantages and limitations of the main reactivity tests, including post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, pressure-induced vasodilation, and iontophoresis of vasodilators, combined with measurement techniques such as laser Doppler and laser speckle contrast imaging. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests, as well as technological developments in microcirculation imaging, have provided reliable and reproducible tools for studying the microcirculation.

  13. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  14. Low-Dose Lithium Stabilizes Human Endothelial Barrier by Decreasing MLC Phosphorylation and Universally Augments Cholinergic Vasorelaxation Capacity in a Direct Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bosche, Bert; Molcanyi, Marek; Rej, Soham; Doeppner, Thorsten R.; Obermann, Mark; Müller, Daniel J.; Das, Anupam; Hescheler, Jürgen; Macdonald, R. Loch; Noll, Thomas; Härtel, Frauke V.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium at serum concentrations up to 1 mmol/L has been used in patients suffering from bipolar disorder for decades and has recently been shown to reduce the risk for ischemic stroke in these patients. The risk for stroke and thromboembolism depend not only on cerebral but also on general endothelial function and health; the entire endothelium as an organ is therefore pathophysiologically relevant. Regardless, the knowledge about the direct impact of lithium on endothelial function remains poor. We conducted an experimental study using lithium as pharmacologic pretreatment for murine, porcine and human vascular endothelium. We predominantly investigated endothelial vasorelaxation capacities in addition to human basal and dynamic (thrombin-/PAR-1 receptor agonist-impaired) barrier functioning including myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation (MLC-P). Low-dose therapeutic lithium concentrations (0.4 mmol/L) significantly augment the cholinergic endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation capacities of cerebral and thoracic arteries, independently of central and autonomic nerve system influences. Similar concentrations of lithium (0.2–0.4 mmol/L) significantly stabilized the dynamic thrombin-induced and PAR-1 receptor agonist-induced permeability of human endothelium, while even the basal permeability appeared to be stabilized. The lithium-attenuated dynamic permeability was mediated by a reduced endothelial MLC-P known to be followed by a lessening of endothelial cell contraction and paracellular gap formation. The well-known lithium-associated inhibition of inositol monophosphatase/glycogen synthase kinase-3-β signaling-pathways involving intracellular calcium concentrations in neurons seems to similarly occur in endothelial cells, too, but with different down-stream effects such as MLC-P reduction. This is the first study discovering low-dose lithium as a drug directly stabilizing human endothelium and ubiquitously augmenting cholinergic endothelium

  15. Endothelial β-Catenin Signaling Is Required for Maintaining Adult Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and CNS Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Khiem A.; Zhang, Xianming; Predescu, Dan; Huang, Xiaojia; Machado, Roberto F.; Göthert, Joachim R.; Malik, Asrar B.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Zhao, You-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain endothelial cells (ECs) interconnected by tight junctions (TJs) is essential for the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). Although studies have shown the importance of various signaling molecules in BBB formation during development, little is known about the molecular basis regulating the integrity of the adult BBB. Methods and Results Using a mouse model with tamoxifen-inducible EC-restricted disruption of ctnnb1 (iCKO), here we show that endothelial β-catenin signaling is essential for maintaining BBB integrity and CNS homeostasis in adult. The iCKO mice developed severe seizures accompanied by neuronal injury, multiple brain petechial hemorrhages, and CNS inflammation, and all died postictal. Disruption of endothelial β-catenin induced BBB breakdown and downregulation of specific TJ proteins Claudin-1 and -3 in adult brain ECs. The clinical relevance of the data is indicated by the observation of decreased expression of Claudin-1 and nuclear β-catenin in brain ECs of hemorrhagic lesions of hemorrhagic stroke patients. Conclusion These results demonstrate the prerequisite role of endothelial β-catenin in maintaining the integrity of adult BBB. The results suggest that BBB dysfunction secondary to defective β-catenin transcription activity is a key pathogenic factor in hemorrhagic stroke, seizure activity and CNS inflammation. PMID:26538583

  16. Permeability of endothelial and astrocyte cocultures: in vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug delivery studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglei; Simon, Melissa J; Cancel, Limary M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xinying; Tarbell, John M; Morrison, Barclay; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. To seek for in vitro BBB models that are more accessible than animals for investigating drug transport across the BBB, we compared four in vitro cultured cell models: endothelial monoculture (bEnd3 cell line), coculture of bEnd3 and primary rat astrocytes (coculture), coculture with collagen type I and IV mixture, and coculture with Matrigel. The expression of the BBB tight junction proteins in these in vitro models was assessed using RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. We also quantified the hydraulic conductivity (L (p)), transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) and diffusive solute permeability (P) of these models to three solutes: TAMRA, Dextran 10K and Dextran 70K. Our results show that L (p) and P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not different from each other. Compared with in vivo permeability data from rat pial microvessels, P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not significantly different from in vivo data for Dextran 70K, but they are 2-4 times higher for TAMRA and Dextran 10K. This suggests that the endothelial monoculture and all of the coculture models are fairly good models for studying the transport of relatively large solutes across the BBB.

  17. Sirtuin1 protects endothelial Caveolin-1 expression and preserves endothelial function via suppressing miR-204 and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Kassan, M.; Vikram, A.; Kim, Y. R.; Li, Q.; Kassan, A.; Patel, H. H.; Kumar, S.; Gabani, M.; Liu, J.; Jacobs, J. S.; Irani, K.

    2017-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) is a class III histone deacetylase that regulates a variety of physiological processes, including endothelial function. Caveolin1 (Cav1) is also an important determinant of endothelial function. We asked if Sirt1 governs endothelial Cav1 and endothelial function by regulating miR-204 expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Knockdown of Sirt1 in endothelial cells, and in vivo deletion of endothelial Sirt1, induced endothelial ER stress and miR-204 expression, reduced Cav1, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. All of these effects were reversed by a miR-204 inhibitor (miR-204 I) or with overexpression of Cav1. A miR-204 mimic (miR-204 M) decreased Cav1 in endothelial cells. In addition, high-fat diet (HFD) feeding induced vascular miR-204 and reduced endothelial Cav1. MiR-204-I protected against HFD-induced downregulation of endothelial Cav1. Moreover, pharmacologic induction of ER stress with tunicamycin downregulated endothelial Cav1 and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation that was rescued by overexpressing Cav1. In conclusion, Sirt1 preserves Cav1-dependent endothelial function by mitigating miR-204-mediated vascular ER stress. PMID:28181559

  18. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  19. VE-cadherin trans-interactions modulate Rac activation and enhancement of lung endothelial barrier by iloprost.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Tian, Yufeng; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Zebda, Noureddine; Sarich, Nicolene; Tian, Xinyong; Wang, Yingxiao; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2012-10-01

    Small GTPase Rac is important regulator of endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement by prostacyclin characterized by increased peripheral actin cytoskeleton and increased interactions between VE-cadherin and other adherens junction (AJ) proteins. This study utilized complementary approaches including siRNA knockdown, culturing in Ca(2+) -free medium, and VE-cadherin blocking antibody to alter VE-cadherin extracellular interactions to investigate the role of VE-cadherin outside-in signaling in modulation of Rac activation and EC barrier regulation by prostacyclin analog iloprost. Spatial analysis of Rac activation in pulmonary EC by FRET revealed additional spike in iloprost-induced Rac activity at the sites of newly formed cell-cell junctions. In contrast, disruption of VE-cadherin extracellular trans-interactions suppressed iloprost-activated Rac signaling and attenuated EC barrier enhancement and cytoskeletal remodeling. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased membrane accumulation and activation of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Tiam1 and Vav2. Conversely, plating of pulmonary EC on surfaces coated with extracellular VE-cadherin domain further promoted iloprost-induced Rac signaling. In the model of thrombin-induced EC barrier recovery, blocking of VE-cadherin trans-interactions attenuated activation of Rac pathway during recovery phase and delayed suppression of Rho signaling and restoration of EC barrier properties. These results suggest that VE-cadherin outside-in signaling controls locally Rac activity stimulated by barrier protective agonists. This control is essential for maximal EC barrier enhancement and accelerated barrier recovery.

  20. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function.

  1. Effects of physical training on endothelial function and limb blood flow in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Mette Paulli; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Olsen, David Benee; Højbjerre, Lise; Alibegovic, Amra; Nielsen, Ninna Bo; Stallknecht, Bente; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Vaag, Allan; Dela, Flemming

    2007-10-01

    The term "endothelial dysfunction" refers to the inability or attenuated effect of the endothelial cells in participating in the relaxation of the adjacent smooth muscle, thus causing less vasodilation. Although endothelial dysfunction is often seen in patients with type 2 diabetes, it does not necessarily follow that insulin resistance and (or) hyperglycemia is causing the inability to respond properly to vasodilatory stimuli. Rather, this could be related to the impact of concomitant cardiovascular risk factors that are almost invariably present in patients with type 2 diabetes. The impact of physical training - or the opposite, inactivity - on endothelial function is not fully elucidated. Some studies have shown positive effects of physical training, whereas others have not. In general, physical training can improve endothelial function when this is impaired. However, physical training does not seem to have any effect on endothelial function when this is normal.

  2. VEGF-A165 potently induces human blood-nerve barrier endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Chetan Lakshmana; Yosef, Nejla; Ubogu, Eroboghene E.

    2013-01-01

    Several mitogens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been implicated in mammalian vascular proliferation and repair. However, the molecular mediators of human blood-nerve barrier (BNB) development and specialization are unknown. Primary human endoneurial endothelial cells (pHEndECs) were expanded in vitro and specific mitogen receptors detected by western blot. pHEndECs were cultured with basal medium containing different mitogen concentrations with or without heparin. Non-radioactive cell proliferation, Matrigel™-induced angiogenesis and sterile micropipette injury wound healing assays were performed. Proliferation rates, number and total length of induced microvessels and rate of endothelial cell monolayer wound healing were determined and compared to basal conditions. VEGF-A165 in the presence of heparin, was the most potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro. 1.31 nM VEGF-A165 induced ~110% increase in cell proliferation relative to basal conditions (~51% without heparin). 2.62 pM VEGF-A165 induced a 3-fold increase in mean number of microvessels and 3.9-fold increase in total capillary length/field relative to basal conditions. In addition, 0.26 nM VEGF-A165 induced ~1.3-fold increased average rate of endothelial wound healing 4–18 hours after endothelial monolayer injury, mediated by increased cell migration. VEGF-A165 was the only mitogen capable of complete wound closure, occurring within 30 hours following injury via increased cell proliferation. This study demonstrates that VEGF-A165, in the presence of heparin, is a potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro. VEGF-A165 may be an important mitogen necessary for human BNB development and recovery in response to peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23712256

  3. Adiponectin in Fresh Frozen Plasma Contributes to Restoration of Vascular Barrier Function After Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiyun; Cao, Yanna; Huby, Maria P; Duan, Chaojun; Baer, Lisa; Peng, Zhanglong; Kozar, Rosemary A; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Ko, Tien C

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of preventable deaths in civilian and military trauma. Use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients requiring massive transfusion is associated with improved outcomes. FFP contains significant amounts of adiponectin, which is known to have vascular protective function. We hypothesize that FFP improves vascular barrier function largely via adiponectin. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 19 severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock (HS). Compared with normal individuals, plasma adiponectin levels decreased to 49% in HS patients before resuscitation (P < 0.05) and increased to 64% post-resuscitation (but not significant). In a HS mouse model, we demonstrated a similar decrease in plasma adiponectin to 54% but a significant increase to 79% by FFP resuscitation compared with baseline (P < 0.05). HS disrupted lung vascular barrier function, leading to an increase in permeability. FFP resuscitation reversed these HS-induced effects. Immunodepletion of adiponectin from FFP abolished FFP's effects on blocking endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro, and on improving lung vascular barrier function in HS mice. Replenishment with adiponectin rescued FFP's effects. These findings suggest that adiponectin is an important component in FFP resuscitation contributing to the beneficial effects on vascular barrier function after HS.

  4. Disruption of the endothelial barrier by proteases from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa: implication of matrilysis and receptor cleavage.

    PubMed

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Corvazier, Elisabeth; Mlanaoindrou, Saouda; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Pidard, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    , pseudomonal LasB thus appears to induce endothelial anoikis not only via matrilysis, as observed for many pro-apoptotic proteinases, but also via cleavage of some essential cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion receptors implicated in the maintenance of the endothelial barrier.

  5. The human brain endothelial barrier: transcytosis of AAV9, transduction by AAV2: An Editorial Highlight for 'Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells'.

    PubMed

    Weber-Adrian, Danielle; Heinen, Stefan; Silburt, Joseph; Noroozian, Zeinab; Aubert, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Read the highlighted article 'Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells' on page 216.

  6. ADAM12 and ADAM17 are essential molecules for hypoxia-induced impairment of neural vascular barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dan; Arima, Mitsuru; Takubo, Keiyo; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Minagawa, Takuya; Matsuda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Neural vascular barrier is essential for the life of multicellular organisms, and its impairment by tissue hypoxia is known to be a central of pathophysiology accelerating the progression of various intractable neural diseases. Therefore, the molecules involved in hypoxia-induced impairment of vascular barrier can be the targets to establish new therapies for intractable diseases. Here, we demonstrate that a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) 12 and 17 expressed in endothelial cells are the molecules responsible for the impairment of neural vascular barrier by hypoxia. Brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro lost their barrier properties immediately after hypoxic stimulation through diminished localization of claudin-5, a tight junction molecule, on cell membranes. Hypoxic disappearance of claudin-5 from cell membranes and the consequent loss of barrier properties were completely suppressed by inhibition of the metalloproteinase activity which was found to be attributed to ADAM12 and ADAM17. Inhibition of either ADAM12 or ADAM17 was sufficient to rescue the in vivo neural vasculature under hypoxia from the loss of barrier function. This is the first report to specify the molecules which are responsible for hypoxia-induced impairment of neural vascular barrier and furthermore can be the targets of new therapeutic strategies for intractable neural diseases. PMID:26242473

  7. ADAM12 and ADAM17 are essential molecules for hypoxia-induced impairment of neural vascular barrier function.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Arima, Mitsuru; Takubo, Keiyo; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Minagawa, Takuya; Matsuda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Eiji

    2015-08-05

    Neural vascular barrier is essential for the life of multicellular organisms, and its impairment by tissue hypoxia is known to be a central of pathophysiology accelerating the progression of various intractable neural diseases. Therefore, the molecules involved in hypoxia-induced impairment of vascular barrier can be the targets to establish new therapies for intractable diseases. Here, we demonstrate that a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) 12 and 17 expressed in endothelial cells are the molecules responsible for the impairment of neural vascular barrier by hypoxia. Brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro lost their barrier properties immediately after hypoxic stimulation through diminished localization of claudin-5, a tight junction molecule, on cell membranes. Hypoxic disappearance of claudin-5 from cell membranes and the consequent loss of barrier properties were completely suppressed by inhibition of the metalloproteinase activity which was found to be attributed to ADAM12 and ADAM17. Inhibition of either ADAM12 or ADAM17 was sufficient to rescue the in vivo neural vasculature under hypoxia from the loss of barrier function. This is the first report to specify the molecules which are responsible for hypoxia-induced impairment of neural vascular barrier and furthermore can be the targets of new therapeutic strategies for intractable neural diseases.

  8. Effects of Vitamin D on Blood Pressure and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent, primarily due to limited sun exposure, which may be observed in urban areas, or as a result of modern lifestyles. Common myths about vitamin D persist, including that it is mostly obtained from the diet and is only essential for bone and mineral homeostasis. Nonetheless, advances in biomedical science suggest that vitamin D is a hormone that is integral to numerous physiologic functions in most cells and tissues. Therefore, abnormal vitamin D levels may contribute to health disturbances. A number of recent reports on potential associations between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease have highlighted its role in this system. A focus over the previous decade has been to better understand the mechanisms behind vitamin D regulation and the pathophysiology associated with suboptimal vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency is highly associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, even when considering other well-known risk factors. In this process, the renin-angiotensin system is disrupted, and hypertension and endothelial dysfunction contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease. Likewise, clinical outcomes upon the normalization of vitamin D levels have been investigated in different patient populations. It makes sense that vitamin D supplementation to improve vitamin D status among vitamin D-deficient individuals could be useful without requiring a sudden lifestyle change. This manuscript provides a brief overview of vitamin D metabolism and the vitamin D receptor. It also summarizes the current clinical research relating to vitamin D supplementation and its effects on hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24227938

  9. Standards for the Protection of Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a vital organ, and through our skin we are in close contact with the entire environment. If we lose our skin we lose our life. The barrier function of the skin is mainly driven by the sophisticated epidermis in close relationship with the dermis. The epidermal epithelium is a mechanically, chemically, biologically and immunologically active barrier submitted to continuous turnover. The barrier function of the skin needs to be protected and restored. Its own physiology allows its recovery, but many times this is not sufficient. This chapter is focused on the standards to restore, treat and prevent barrier function disruption. These standards were developed from a scientific, academic and clinical point of view. There is a lack of standardized administrative recommendations. Still, there is a walk to do that will help to reduce the social and economic burden of diseases characterized by an abnormal skin barrier function.

  10. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, vascular pathology, endothelial function and endothelial cells and circulating microparticles.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Pablo; Sánchez-Armengol, Maria Angeles; Villar, José; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Capote, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk are frequently reported in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome. In this article the authors attempt a review of the current understanding of the relationship between vascular risk and OSA syndrome based on large cohort studies that related the disease to several cardiovascular risk factors and vascular pathologies. We also discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that may be involved in this relationship, starting with endothelial dysfunction and its mediators. These include an increased oxidative stress and inflammation as well as several disorders of coagulation and lipid metabolism. Moreover, circulating microparticles from activated leukocytes (CD62L_MPs) are higher in patients with OSA and there is a positive correlation between circulating levels of CD62L_MPs and nocturnal hypoxemia severity. Finally, circulating level of endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial cells seem to be increased in patients with OSA. Also, endothelial progenitor cells are reduced and plasma levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor are increased.

  12. Activated T cell trans-endothelial migration relies on myosin-IIA contractility for squeezing the cell nucleus through endothelial cell barriers.

    PubMed

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Estin Matthews, Miriam; Chen, Stephanie; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Following activation, T cells are released from lymph nodes to traffic via the blood to effector sites. The re-entry of these activated T cells into tissues represents a critical step for them to carry out local effector functions. Here we have assessed defects in effector T cells that are acutely depleted in Myosin-IIA (MyoIIA) and show a T cell intrinsic requirement for this motor to facilitate the diapedesis step of extravasation. We show that MyoIIA accumulates at the rear of T cells undergoing trans-endothelial migration. T cells can extend protrusions and project a substantial portion of their cytoplasm through the endothelial wall in the absence of MyoIIA. However, this motor protein plays a crucial role in allowing T cells to complete the movement of their relatively rigid nucleus through the endothelial junctions. In vivo, this defect manifests as poor entry into lymph nodes, tumors and into the spinal cord, during tissue-specific autoimmunity, but not the spleen. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of this molecule may allow for differential attenuation of tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

  13. PGC-1α dictates endothelial function through regulation of eNOS expression

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Siobhan M.; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Li, Chunying; Kant, Shashi; Cai, Shenghe; Chen, Kai; Contractor, Mayur M.; Pei, Yongmei; Schulz, Eberhard; Keaney, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic of many vascular related diseases such as hypertension. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a unique stress sensor that largely acts to promote adaptive responses. Therefore, we sought to define the role of endothelial PGC-1α in vascular function using mice with endothelial specific loss of function (PGC-1α EC KO) and endothelial specific gain of function (PGC-1α EC TG). Here we report that endothelial PGC-1α is suppressed in angiotensin-II (ATII)-induced hypertension. Deletion of endothelial PGC-1α sensitized mice to endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in response to ATII, whereas PGC-1α EC TG mice were protected. Mechanistically, PGC-1α promotes eNOS expression and activity, which is necessary for protection from ATII-induced dysfunction as mice either treated with an eNOS inhibitor (LNAME) or lacking eNOS were no longer responsive to transgenic endothelial PGC-1α expression. Finally, we determined that the orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) is required to coordinate the PGC-1α -induced eNOS expression. In conclusion, endothelial PGC-1α expression protects from vascular dysfunction by promoting NO• bioactivity through ERRα induced expression of eNOS. PMID:27910955

  14. Methodological issues in the assessment of skin microvascular endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Minson, Christopher T; Salvat-Melis, Muriel; Halliwill, John R

    2006-09-01

    The study of microvascular function can be performed in humans using laser Doppler flowmetry of the skin. This technology lends itself to a wide range of applications for studying the endothelial function of skin blood vessels. We review the advantages and limitations of postocclusive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, acetylcholine iontophoresis, flowmotion and association with microdialysis as tools with which to investigate skin microvascular endothelial function in humans. Postocclusive hyperemia, thermal hyperemia and acetylcholine iontophoresis provide integrated indexes of microvascular function rather than specific endothelial markers. However, they are valuable tools and can be used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in which the assessment of microvascular function in humans is required.

  15. Differential roles for endothelial ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and VCAM-1 in shear-resistant T cell arrest, polarization, and directed crawling on blood-brain barrier endothelium.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Oliver; Coisne, Caroline; Cecchelli, Roméo; Boscacci, Rémy; Deutsch, Urban; Engelhardt, Britta; Lyck, Ruth

    2010-10-15

    Endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were shown to be essential for T cell diapedesis across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro under static conditions. Crawling of T cells prior to diapedesis was only recently revealed to occur preferentially against the direction of blood flow on the endothelial surface of inflamed brain microvessels in vivo. Using live cell-imaging techniques, we prove that Th1 memory/effector T cells predominantly crawl against the direction of flow on the surface of BBB endothelium in vitro. Analysis of T cell interaction with wild-type, ICAM-1-deficient, ICAM-2-deficient, or ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 double-deficient primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells under physiological flow conditions allowed us to dissect the individual contributions of endothelial ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and VCAM-1 to shear-resistant T cell arrest, polarization, and crawling. Although T cell arrest was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, T cell polarization and crawling were mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 but not by endothelial VCAM-1. Therefore, our data delineate a sequential involvement of endothelial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in mediating shear-resistant T cell arrest, followed by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 in mediating T cell crawling to sites permissive for diapedesis across BBB endothelium.

  16. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  17. Cytotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1 on human brain microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Humaira; Hamid, Saeed S; Ali, Syed Shayan; Anwar, Javeria; Siddiqui, Anwar Ali; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus spp. Although AFB1 is implicated as a carcinogen in hepatocellular carcinoma, brain autopsies in affected areas have revealed its presence in 81% of cases. Given its haematogenous spread, here we determined the cytotoxic effects of AFB1 on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as well as immortalized epithelial cells of human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh7). The cell types were exposed to AFB1 (3-32 nM) for 24 h and release of lactate dehydrogenase was measured as cell cytotoxicity marker. Furthermore, DNA was collected from both cell types and DNA adduct formation was determined by immunoblot using anti-AFB1-DNA adduct antibody. At 32 nM, AFB1 killed >85% HBMEC, while controls showed minimal effects (P < .05). Similar concentrations of AFB1 showed 22% cell death of HUVEC, while the same concentration did not kill Huh7. At low concentrations, in other words, 3.2 nM, AFB1 produced DNA adduct formation in HBMEC, while high concentration (32 nM) did not form DNA adducts. For HUVEC, 16 nM and 32 nM exhibited DNA adduct formation. For Huh7, 3.2 nM did not form DNA adducts, while 32 nM exhibited DNA adduct formation. For the first time, we report that AFB1 affected the viability of primary endothelial cells but not immortalized Huh7 cells. Cytotoxicity of brain endothelial cells suggests extra-hepatic complications post-AFB1 exposure.

  18. Effect of Hypergravity on Endothelial Cell Function and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Lucia; Marziliano, Nicola; Basile, Venere; Pezzatini, Silvia; Romano, Giovanni; Conti, Antonio; Monici, Monica

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that endothelial cells (ECs), which play a major role in cardiovascular system functioning, are very sensitive to mechanical stimuli. It has been demonstrated that changes in inertial conditions (i.e. microgravity and hypergravity) can affect both phenotypic and genotypic expression in ECs. In this report we describe the effects of hypergravity on ECs isolated from bovine aorta (BAECs). ECs were repeatedly exposed to discontinuous hypergravity conditions (5 × 10 min at 10× g with 10 min at 1× g between sets), simulated in a hyperfuge. Then, cell morphology and metabolism were analyzed by autofluorescence techniques. The phenotypic expression of cytoskeleton constituents ( β-actin, vimentin, tubulin), adhesion and survival signals (integrins), mediators of inflammation and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunocytofluorescence. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with Low Density Arrays (LDAs) was used to evaluate modifications in gene expression. After hypergravity exposure, no significant changes were observed in cell morphology and energy metabolism. Cells remained adherent to the substratum, but integrin distribution was modified. Accordingly, the cytoskeletal network reorganized, documenting cell activation. There was a reduction in expression of genes controlling vasoconstriction and inflammation. Proapoptotic signals were downregulated. On the whole, the results documented that hypergravity exposure maintained EC survival and function by activation of adaptive mechanisms.

  19. Polyploidy impairs human aortic endothelial cell function and is prevented by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Polyploid endothelial cells are found in aged and atherosclerotic arteries. However, whether increased chromosome content has an impact on endothelial cell function is unknown. We show here that human aortic endothelial cells become tetraploid as they approach replicative senescence. Furthermore, accumulation of tetraploid endothelial cells was accelerated during growth in high glucose. Interestingly, induction of polyploidy was completely prevented by modest overexpression of the NAD+ regenerating enzyme, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). To determine the impact of polyploidy on endothelial cell function, independent of replicative senescence, we induced tetraploidy using the spindle poison, nocodazole. Global gene expression analyses of tetraploid endothelial cells revealed a dysfunctional phenotype characterized by a cell cycle arrest profile (decreased CCNE2/A2, RBL1, BUB1B; increased CDKN1A) and increased expression of genes involved in inflammation (IL32, TNFRSF21/10C, PTGS1) and extracellular matrix remodeling (COL5A1, FN1, MMP10/14). The protection from polyploidy conferred by Nampt was not associated with enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 or sirtuin (SIRT) 2 activity, but with increased SIRT1 activity, which reduced cellular reactive oxygen species and the associated oxidative stress stimulus for the induction of polyploidy. We conclude that human aortic endothelial cells are prone to chromosome duplication that, in and of itself, can induce characteristics of endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, the emergence of polyploid endothelial cells during replicative aging and glucose overload can be prevented by optimizing the Nampt-SIRT1 axis.

  20. Cell surface levels of endothelial ICAM-1 influence the transcellular or paracellular T-cell diapedesis across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Abadier, Michael; Haghayegh Jahromi, Neda; Cardoso Alves, Ludmila; Boscacci, Rémy; Vestweber, Dietmar; Barnum, Scott; Deutsch, Urban; Engelhardt, Britta; Lyck, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    The extravasation of CD4(+) effector/memory T cells (TEM cells) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis (MS). Endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 are essential for CD4(+) TEM cell crawling on the BBB prior to diapedesis. Here, we investigated the influence of cell surface levels of endothelial ICAM-1 in determining the cellular route of CD4(+) TEM -cell diapedesis across cytokine treated primary mouse BBB endothelial cells under physiological flow. Inflammatory conditions, inducing high levels of endothelial ICAM-1, promoted rapid initiation of transcellular diapedesis of CD4(+) T cells across the BBB, while intermediate levels of endothelial ICAM-1 favored paracellular CD4(+) T-cell diapedesis. Importantly, the route of T-cell diapedesis across the BBB was independent of loss of BBB barrier properties. Unexpectedly, a low number of CD4(+) TEM cells was found to cross the inflamed BBB in the absence of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 via an obviously alternatively regulated transcellular pathway. In vivo, this translated to the development of ameliorated EAE in ICAM-1(null) //ICAM-2(-/-) C57BL/6J mice. Taken together, our study demonstrates that cell surface levels of endothelial ICAM-1 rather than the inflammatory stimulus or BBB integrity influence the pathway of T-cell diapedesis across the BBB.

  1. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2014-09-16

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE-ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2(-/-) mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2(-/-) mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function.

  2. Basigin can be a therapeutic target to restore the retinal vascular barrier function in the mouse model of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Mitsuru; Cui, Dan; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Matsuda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advance in medical technology, diabetic retinopathy (DR) is still an intractable disease which leads to the damage of retinal cells and finally the visual loss. Impairment of retinal vascular barrier triggered by an admixture of multiple inflammatory cytokines is a core of pathophysiology of DR. Therefore, the molecules involved commonly in multiple cytokines-induced impairment of vascular barrier would be the targets of curative treatment of DR. Here, we demonstrate that basigin, a transmembrane molecule expressed in neural barrier-forming endothelial cells, is the molecule essential for vascular barrier impairment which is shared by various triggers including VEGF, TNFα and IL-1β. In vitro data with neural microvascular endothelial cells indicated that stimulation with cytokines decreases the levels of claudin-5 in cell membranes and consequently impairs the barrier function in a manner dependent on the interaction of claudin-5 with basigin and caveolin-1. In addition, the increased vascular permeability in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice was shown to be clearly normalized by intravitreous injection of siRNAs specific for basigin. This study has highlighted basigin as a common essential molecule for various stimuli-induced impairment of retinal vascular barrier, which can be a target for strategies to establish a curative treatment of DR. PMID:27917946

  3. Associations of endothelial function and air temperature in diabetic subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: Epidemiological studies consistently show that air temperature is associated with changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the association remain largely unknown. As one index of endothelial functio...

  4. An Epoxyisoprostane is a Major Regulator of Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Springstead, James R.; Al-Mubarak, Ramea; Lee, Sangderk; Li, Rongsong; Emert, Benjamin; Berliner, Judith A.; Jung, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to determine the effect of 5,6-epoxyisoprostane, EI, on human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). EI can form as a phospholipase product of 1-palmitoyl-2-(5,6-epoxyisoprostane E2)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PEIPC, a pro-inflammatory molecule that accumulates in sites of inflammation where phospholipases are also increased. To determine the effect of EI on HAEC, we synthesized several stereoisomers of EI using a convergent approach from the individual optically pure building blocks, the epoxyaldehydes 5 and 6 and the bromoenones 14 and 16. The desired stereoisomer of EI can be prepared from these materials in only six operations and thus large amounts of the product can be obtained. The trans/trans isomers had the most potent activity, suggesting specificity in the interaction of EI with the cell surface. EI has potent anti-inflammatory effects in HAEC. EI strongly inhibits the production of MCP-1, a major monocyte chemotactic factor, and either decreases or minimally increases the levels of ten pro-inflammatory molecules increased by PEIPC. EI also strongly downregulates the inflammatory effects of IL-1β, a major inflammatory cytokine. Thus EI, a hydrolytic product of PEIPC, has potent anti-inflammatory function. PMID:24117045

  5. The endothelial protein C receptor and malaria.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom

    2013-08-01

    In this issue of Blood, Moxon et al provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, linking loss of the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) on brain vessels, caused by cytoadherent infected erythrocytes, with localized coagulation, inflammation, and disruption of endothelial barrier function.

  6. Wnt activation of immortalized brain endothelial cells as a tool for generating a standardized model of the blood brain barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Paolinelli, Roberta; Corada, Monica; Ferrarini, Luca; Devraj, Kavi; Artus, Cédric; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Rudini, Noemi; Maddaluno, Luigi; Papa, Eleanna; Engelhardt, Britta; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Liebner, Stefan; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain microvasculature in vivo. In the present study, following on from earlier observations, we have developed a novel model of the BBB in vitro that may be suitable for large scale screening assays. This model is based on immortalized endothelial cell lines derived from murine and human brain, with no need for co-culture with astrocytes. To maintain the BBB endothelial cell properties, the cell lines are cultured in the presence of Wnt3a or drugs that stabilize β-catenin, or they are infected with a transcriptionally active form of β-catenin. Upon these treatments, the cell lines maintain expression of BBB-specific markers, which results in elevated transendothelial electrical resistance and reduced cell permeability. Importantly, these properties are retained for several passages in culture, and they can be reproduced and maintained in different laboratories over time. We conclude that the brain-derived endothelial cell lines that we have investigated gain their specialized characteristics upon activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. This model may be thus suitable to test the BBB permeability to chemicals or large molecular weight proteins, transmigration of inflammatory cells, treatments with cytokines, and genetic manipulation.

  7. Wnt Activation of Immortalized Brain Endothelial Cells as a Tool for Generating a Standardized Model of the Blood Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Paolinelli, Roberta; Artus, Cédric; Czupalla, Cathrin J.; Rudini, Noemi; Maddaluno, Luigi; Papa, Eleanna; Engelhardt, Britta; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Liebner, Stefan; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain microvasculature in vivo. In the present study, following on from earlier observations, we have developed a novel model of the BBB in vitro that may be suitable for large scale screening assays. This model is based on immortalized endothelial cell lines derived from murine and human brain, with no need for co-culture with astrocytes. To maintain the BBB endothelial cell properties, the cell lines are cultured in the presence of Wnt3a or drugs that stabilize β-catenin, or they are infected with a transcriptionally active form of β-catenin. Upon these treatments, the cell lines maintain expression of BBB-specific markers, which results in elevated transendothelial electrical resistance and reduced cell permeability. Importantly, these properties are retained for several passages in culture, and they can be reproduced and maintained in different laboratories over time. We conclude that the brain-derived endothelial cell lines that we have investigated gain their specialized characteristics upon activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. This model may be thus suitable to test the BBB permeability to chemicals or large molecular weight proteins, transmigration of inflammatory cells, treatments with cytokines, and genetic manipulation. PMID:23940549

  8. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙−) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙− production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  9. Irisin improves endothelial function in obese mice through the AMPK-eNOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Zhang, Shuxian; Hou, Ningning; Wang, Di; Sun, Xiaodong

    2015-11-01

    Irisin is a novel hormone secreted by myocytes. Lower levels of irisin are independently associated with endothelial dysfunction in obese subjects. The objective of this study was to explore whether irisin exerts a direct vascular protective effect on endothelial function in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were given chow or a high-fat diet with or without treatment with irisin. Aortic endothelial function was determined by measuring endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV). Nitric oxide (NO) in the aorta was determined. The effect of irisin on the levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in endothelial cells was determined. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to study the role of irisin in the AMPK-eNOS pathway. Acetylcholine-stimulated EDV was significantly lower in obese mice compared with control mice. Treatment of obese mice with irisin significantly enhanced EDV and improved endothelial function. This beneficial effect of irisin was partly attenuated in the presence of inhibitors of AMPK, Akt, and eNOS. Treatment of obese mice with irisin enhanced NO production and phosphorylation of AMPK, Akt, and eNOS in endothelial cells. These factors were also enhanced by irisin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Suppression of AMPK expression by small interfering RNA blocked irisin-induced eNOS and Akt phosphorylation and NO production. We have provided the first evidence that irisin improves endothelial function in aortas of high-fat-diet-induced obese mice. The mechanism for this protective effect is related to the activation of the AMPK-eNOS signaling pathway.

  10. BASIS FOR ENHANCED BARRIER FUNCTION OF PIGMENTED SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S.; Wei, Maria L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans with darkly-pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison to humans with lightly-pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly-pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly-pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly-pigmented levels. In SKH1 (non-pigmented) vs. SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J vs. SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that co-localizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly-pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate re-acidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly-pigmented-bearing human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison to lightly-pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) carrier-dependent regulation of endothelial barrier: high density lipoprotein (HDL)-S1P prolongs endothelial barrier enhancement as compared with albumin-S1P via effects on levels, trafficking, and signaling of S1P1.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Brent A; Grass, G Daniel; Wing, Shane B; Argraves, W Scott; Argraves, Kelley M

    2012-12-28

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lysosphingolipid that acts to promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. In plasma, S1P is associated with both high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, but it is not known whether the carriers impart different effects on S1P signaling. Here we establish that HDL-S1P sustains EC barrier longer than albumin-S1P. We showed that the sustained barrier effects of HDL-S1P are dependent on signaling by the S1P receptor, S1P1, and involve persistent activation of Akt and endothelial NOS (eNOS), as well as activity of the downstream NO target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Total S1P1 protein levels were found to be higher in response to HDL-S1P treatment as compared with albumin-S1P, and this effect was not associated with increased S1P1 mRNA or dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Several pieces of evidence indicate that long term EC barrier enhancement activity of HDL-S1P is due to specific effects on S1P1 trafficking. First, the rate of S1P1 degradation, which is proteasome-mediated, was slower in HDL-S1P-treated cells as compared with cells treated with albumin-S1P. Second, the long term barrier-promoting effects of HDL-S1P were abrogated by treatment with the recycling blocker, monensin. Finally, cell surface levels of S1P1 and levels of S1P1 in caveolin-enriched microdomains were higher after treatment with HDL-S1P as compared with albumin-S1P. Together, the findings reveal S1P carrier-specific effects on S1P1 and point to HDL as the physiological mediator of sustained S1P1-PI3K-Akt-eNOS-sGC-dependent EC barrier function.

  12. Mechanisms and regulation of iron trafficking across the capillary endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C.; Kosman, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The transcellular trafficking of iron from the blood into the brain interstitium depends on iron uptake proteins in the apical membrane of brain microvascular capillary endothelial cells and efflux proteins at the basolateral, abluminal membrane. In this review, we discuss the three mechanisms by which these cells take-up iron from the blood and the sole mechanism by which they efflux this iron into the abluminal space. We then focus on the regulation of this efflux pathway by exocrine factors that are released from neighboring astrocytes. Also discussed are the cytokines secreted by capillary cells that regulate the expression of these glial cell signals. Among the interstitial factors that regulate iron efflux into the brain is the Amyloid precursor protein (APP). The role of this amyliodogenic species in brain iron metabolism is discussed. Last, we speculate on the potential relationship between iron transport at the blood-brain barrier and neurological disorders associated with iron mismanagement. PMID:26236187

  13. Glyoxalase 1-knockdown in human aortic endothelial cells – effect on the proteome and endothelial function estimates

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Bernd; Engelbrecht, Britta; Espelage, Britta C.; Klusmeier, Nadine; Tiemann, Janina; Gawlowski, Thomas; Mattern, Yvonne; Eisenacher, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E.; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J.; Tschoepe, Diethelm; Poschmann, Gereon; Stühler, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), an arginine-directed glycating agent, is implicated in diabetic late complications. MG is detoxified by glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) of the cytosolic glyoxalase system. The aim was to investigate the effects of MG accumulation by GLO1-knockdown under hyperglycaemic conditions in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) hypothesizing that the accumulation of MG accounts for the deleterious effects on vascular function. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GLO1 was performed and MG concentrations were determined. The impact of MG on the cell proteome and targets of MG glycation was analysed, and confirmed by Western blotting. Markers of endothelial function and apoptosis were assessed. Collagen content was assayed in cell culture supernatant. GLO1-knockdown increased MG concentration in cells and culture medium. This was associated with a differential abundance of cytoskeleton stabilisation proteins, intermediate filaments and proteins involved in posttranslational modification of collagen. An increase in fibrillar collagens 1 and 5 was detected. The extracellular concentration of endothelin-1 was increased following GLO1-knockdown, whereas the phosphorylation and amount of eNOS was not influenced by GLO1-knockdown. The expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and of MCP-1 was elevated and apoptosis was increased. MG accumulation by GLO1-knockdown provoked collagen expression, endothelial inflammation and dysfunction and apoptosis which might contribute to vascular damage. PMID:27898103

  14. Mechanism of action of collagenase on the blood-brain barrier permeability. Increase of endothelial cell pinocytotic activity as shown with horse-radish peroxidase as a tracer.

    PubMed

    Godeau, G; Robert, A M

    1979-12-01

    The ultrastructural mechanism of the protease induced blood-brain barrier permeability-increase was studied with horse-radish peroxidase as a tracer. After intravenous injection of collagenase or pronase, a significantly increased number of pinocytotic vesicles was found in brain capillary endothelial cells. alpha-Chymotrypsine did not exert such an action.

  15. PDCD10 (CCM3) regulates brain endothelial barrier integrity in cerebral cavernous malformation type 3: role of CCM3-ERK1/2-cortactin cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Sladojevic, Nikola; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2015-11-01

    Impairment of brain endothelial barrier integrity is critical for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) lesion development. The current study investigates changes in tight junction (TJ) complex organization when PDCD10 (CCM3) is mutated/depleted in human brain endothelial cells. Analysis of lesions with CCM3 mutation and brain endothelial cells transfected with CCM3 siRNA (CCM3-knockdown) showed little or no increase in TJ transmembrane and scaffolding proteins mRNA expression, but proteins levels were generally decreased. CCM3-knockdown cells had a redistribution of claudin-5 and occludin from the membrane to the cytosol with no alterations in protein turnover but with diminished protein-protein interactions with ZO-1 and ZO-1 interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. The most profound effect of CCM3 mutation/depletion was on an actin-binding protein, cortactin. CCM3 depletion caused cortactin Ser-phosphorylation, dissociation from ZO-1 and actin, redistribution to the cytosol and degradation. This affected cortical actin ring organization, TJ complex stability and consequently barrier integrity, with constant hyperpermeability to inulin. A potential link between CCM3 depletion and altered cortactin was tonic activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2. ERK1/2 inhibition increased cortactin expression and incorporation into the TJ complex and improved barrier integrity. This study highlights the potential role of CCM3 in regulating TJ complex organization and brain endothelial barrier permeability.

  16. PDCD10 (CCM3) REGULATES BRAIN ENDOTHELIAL BARRIER INTEGRITY IN CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION TYPE 3: ROLE OF CCM3-ERK1/2-CORTACTIN CROSS-TALK

    PubMed Central

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M.; Sladojevic, Nikola; Keep, Richard F.; Andjelkovic, Anuska V.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of brain endothelial barrier integrity is critical for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) lesion development. The current study investigates changes in tight junction (TJ) complex organization when PDCD10 (CCM3) is mutated/depleted in human brain endothelial cells. Analysis of lesions with CCM3 mutation and brain endothelial cells transfected with CCM3 siRNA (CCM3-knockdown) showed little or no increase in TJ transmembrane and scaffolding proteins mRNA expression, but proteins levels were generally decreased. CCM3- knockdown cells had a redistribution of claudin-5 and occludin from the membrane to the cytosol with no alterations in protein turnover but with diminished protein-protein interactions with ZO-1 and ZO-1 interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. The most profound effect of CCM3 mutation/depletion was on an actin-binding protein, cortactin. CCM3 depletion caused cortactin Ser-phosphorylation, dissociation from ZO-1 and actin, redistribution to the cytosol and degradation. This affected cortical actin ring organization, TJ complex stability and consequently barrier integrity, with constant hyperpermeability to inulin. A potential link between CCM3 depletion and altered cortactin was tonic activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2. ERK1/2 inhibition increased cortactin expression and incorporation into the TJ complex and improved barrier integrity. This study highlights the potential role of CCM3 in regulating TJ complex organization and brain endothelial barrier permeability. PMID:26385474

  17. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 improves endothelial function and prevents hypertension in insulin-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagareddy, PR; Rajput, PS; Vasudevan, H; McClure, B; Kumar, U; MacLeod, KM; McNeill, JH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Insulin resistance is often found to be associated with high blood pressure. We propose that in insulin-resistant hypertension, endothelial dysfunction is the consequence of increased activity of vascular MMP-2. As MMP-2 proteolytically cleaves a number of extracellular matrix proteins, we hypothesized that MMP-2 impairs endothelial function by proteolytic degradation of endothelial NOS (eNOS) or its cofactor, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We tested our hypothesis in bovine coronary artery endothelial cells and fructose-fed hypertensive rats (FHR), a model of acquired systolic hypertension and insulin resistance. KEY RESULTS Treatment of FHRs with the MMP inhibitor doxycycline, preserved endothelial function as well as prevented the development of hypertension, suggesting that MMPs impair endothelial function. Furthermore, incubating endothelial cells in vitro with a recombinant MMP-2 decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Using substrate cleavage assays and immunofluorescence microscopy studies, we found that MMP-2 not only cleaves and degrades HSP90, an eNOS cofactor but also co-localizes with both eNOS and HSP90 in endothelial cells, suggesting that MMPs functionally interact with the eNOS system. Treatment of FHRs with doxycycline attenuated the decrease in eNOS and HSP90 expression but did not improve insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data suggest that increased activity of MMP-2 in FHRs impairs endothelial function and promotes hypertension. Inhibition of MMP-2 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the management of hypertension. PMID:21740410

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Modulates Skeletal Myoblast Function

    PubMed Central

    Germani, Antonia; Di Carlo, Anna; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Giacinti, Cristina; Turrini, Paolo; Biglioli, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is enhanced in ischemic skeletal muscle and is thought to play a key role in the angiogenic response to ischemia. However, it is still unknown whether, in addition to new blood vessel growth, VEGF modulates skeletal muscle cell function. In the present study immunohistochemical analysis showed that, in normoperfused mouse hindlimb, VEGF and its receptors Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed mostly in quiescent satellite cells. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced by left femoral artery ligation. At day 3 and day 7 after the induction of ischemia, Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed in regenerating muscle fibers and VEGF expression by these fibers was markedly enhanced. Additional in vitro experiments showed that in growing medium both cultured satellite cells and myoblast cell line C2C12 expressed VEGF and its receptors. Under these conditions, Flk-1 receptor exhibited constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation that was increased by VEGF treatment. During myogenic differentiation Flk-1 and Flt-1 were down-regulated. In a modified Boyden Chamber assay, VEGF enhanced C2C12 myoblasts migration approximately fivefold. Moreover, VEGF administration to differentiating C2C12 myoblasts prevented apoptosis, while inhibition of VEGF signaling either with selective VEGF receptor inhibitors (SU1498 and CB676475) or a neutralizing Flk-1 antibody, enhanced cell death approximately 3.5-fold. Finally, adenovirus-mediated VEGF165 gene transfer inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. These results support a role for VEGF in myoblast migration and survival, and suggest a novel autocrine role of VEGF in skeletal muscle repair during ischemia. PMID:14507649

  19. Functional Imaging of Working Memory and Peripheral Endothelial Function in Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Tarumi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Jun; Swann-Sternberg, Tali; Goudarzi, Katyoon; Haley, Andreana P.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between a prognostic indicator of vascular health, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and working memory-related brain activation in healthy middle-aged adults. Forty-two participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a 2-Back working memory task. Brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. The relationship between FMD and task-related brain activation in a priori regions of interest was modeled using hierarchical linear regression. Brachial FMD, was significantly related to reduced working memory-related activation in the right superior parietal lobule (β=0.338, p=0.027), independent of age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and full scale IQ (F(5,36)=2.66, p=0.038). These data provide preliminary support for the association between a preclinical marker of endothelial dysfunction and cerebral hemodynamic alterations in healthy middle-aged adults. Considering the modifiable nature of endothelial function, additional investigations on the prognostic significance of FMD on future cognitive impairment are warranted. PMID:20493622

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Energy Drinks and Coffee on Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Janos; Somberg, John C

    2015-11-01

    Endothelial function plays an important role in circulatory physiology. There has been differing reports on the effect of energy drink on endothelial function. We set out to evaluate the effect of 3 energy drinks and coffee on endothelial function. Endothelial function was evaluated in healthy volunteers using a device that uses digital peripheral arterial tonometry measuring endothelial function as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI). Six volunteers (25 ± 7 years) received energy drink in a random order at least 2 days apart. Drinks studied were 250 ml "Red Bull" containing 80 mg caffeine, 57 ml "5-hour Energy" containing 230 mg caffeine, and a can of 355 ml "NOS" energy drink containing 120 mg caffeine. Sixteen volunteers (25 ± 5 years) received a cup of 473 ml coffee containing 240 mg caffeine. Studies were performed before drink (baseline) at 1.5 and 4 hours after drink. Two of the energy drinks (Red Bull and 5-hour Energy) significantly improved endothelial function at 4 hours after drink, whereas 1 energy drink (NOS) and coffee did not change endothelial function significantly. RHI increased by 82 ± 129% (p = 0.028) and 63 ± 37% (p = 0.027) after 5-hour Energy and Red Bull, respectively. The RHI changed after NOS by 2 ± 30% (p = 1.000) and by 7 ± 30% (p = 1.000) after coffee. In conclusion, some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function. Caffeine does not appear to be the component responsible for these differences.

  1. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein–coupled receptor–dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II–induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  2. Globular adiponectin improves high glucose-suppressed endothelial progenitor cell function through endothelial nitric oxide synthase dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Feng-Yen; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2011-07-01

    Plasma levels of adiponectin, an adipose-specific protein with putative anti-atherogenic properties, could be down-regulated in obese and diabetic subjects. Recent insights suggest that the injured endothelial monolayer is regenerated by circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but high glucose reduces number and functions of EPCs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that globular adiponectin can improve high glucose-suppressed EPC functions by restoration of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Late EPCs isolated from healthy subjects appeared with cobblestone shape at 2-4 weeks. EPCs were incubated with high glucose (25 mM) and treatment with globular adiponectin for functional study. Migration and tube formation assays were used to evaluate the vasculogenetic capacity of EPCs. The activities of eNOS, Akt and concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were also determined. Administration of globular adiponectin at physiological concentrations promoted EPC migration and tube formation, and dose-dependently upregulated phosphorylation of eNOS, Akt and augmented NO production. Chronic incubation of EPCs in high-glucose medium significantly impaired EPC function and induced cellular senescence, but these suppression effects were reversed by treatment with globular adiponectin. Globular adiponectin reversed high glucose-impaired EPC functions through NO- and p38 MAPK-related mechanisms. In addition, nude mice that received EPCs treated with adiponectin in high glucose medium showed a significant improvement in blood flow than those received normal saline and EPCs incubated in high glucose conditions. The administration of globular adiponectin improved high glucose-impaired EPC functions in vasculogenesis by restoration of eNOS activity. These beneficial effects may provide some novel rational to the vascular protective properties of adiponectin.

  3. Down-regulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor in uveitic lesion associates with focal vascular endothelial growth factor expression and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Deeg, Cornelia A; Altmann, Frank; Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius

    2007-05-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Identifying biological markers or pathways associated with this disease may allow the understanding of its pathogenesis at a molecular level. The vitreous is the body fluid closest to the disease-affected tissue and possibly also an effector of pathological processes relevant for ERU. Surgical removal of vitreous leads to cessation of relapses in spontaneous uveitis of both man and horse, therefore vitreous composites are likely to contribute to disease progression. Uveitic vitreous is likely to contain potential biomarkers in relatively undiluted quantities. With the goal to identify these markers, we systematically compared vitreous from healthy and disease-affected eyes by proteomic profiling. Nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, that are functionally related to immune response, inflammation, and maintenance of the blood-retinal barrier. One of these, pigment epithelium-derived factor, a protein involved in maintaining a proper blood-retina barrier as well as protecting from neoangiogenesis was additionally found to be down-regulated within uveitic retinal lesions whereas, conversely, vascular endothelial growth factor was found to be up-regulated at these sites. Together, these changes point to as of yet undiscovered biological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  4. Lung endothelial barrier protection by resveratrol involves inhibition of HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Wen; Liu, Yu-Jian; Lv, Zhou; Mao, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ying-Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Jiang, Lai

    2015-11-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) contributes to lung vascular hyperpermeability during ventilator-induced lung injury. We aimed to determine whether the natural antioxidant resveratrol protected against HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability both in vitro and in vivo. We found that HMGB1 decreased vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin expression and increased endothelial permeability, leading to mitochondrial oxidative damage in primary cultured mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs). Both the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 mimetic MnTBAP and resveratrol blocked HMGB1-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage, VE-cadherin downregulation, and endothelial hyperpermeability. In in vivo studies, anesthetized male ICR mice were ventilated for 4h using low tidal volume (6 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (HVT; 30 ml/kg) ventilation. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with resveratrol immediately before the onset of ventilation. We found that resveratrol attenuated HVT-associated lung vascular hyperpermeability and HMGB1 production. HVT caused a significant increase in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and Nrf2 target gene expression in lung tissues, which was further enhanced by resveratrol treatment. HMGB1 had no effect on Nrf2 activation, whereas resveratrol treatment activated the Nrf2 signaling pathway in HMGB1-treated MLVECs. Moreover, Nrf2 knockdown reversed the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on HMGB1-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage and endothelial hyperpermeability. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on cyclic stretch-induced HMGB1 mRNA expression in primary cultured MLVECs was also abolished by Nrf2 knockdown. In summary, this study demonstrates that resveratrol protects against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction initiated by HVT. Lung endothelial barrier protection by resveratrol involves inhibition of mechanical stretch-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage

  5. Fo Shou San, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction, protects endothelial function through increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cathy W C; Xu, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Ken Y Z; Lau, Chi Wai; Lau, David T W; Choi, Roy C Y; Dong, Tina T X; Huang, Yu; Tsim, Karl W K

    2012-01-01

    Fo Shou San (FSS) is an ancient herbal decoction comprised of Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR; Chuanxiong) and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR; Danggui) in a ratio of 2:3. Previous studies indicate that FSS promotes blood circulation and dissipates blood stasis, thus which is being used widely to treat vascular diseases. Here, we aim to determine the cellular mechanism for the vascular benefit of FSS. The treatment of FSS reversed homocysteine-induced impairment of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortic rings, isolated from rats. Like radical oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol, FSS attenuated homocysteine-stimulated ROS generation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and it also stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) as measured by fluorescence dye and biochemical assay. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of both Akt kinase and endothelial NO synthases (eNOS) were markedly increased by FSS treatment, which was abolished by an Akt inhibitor triciribine. Likewise, triciribine reversed FSS-induced NO production in HUVECs. Finally, FSS elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels in HUVECs, and the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM inhibited the FSS-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation. The present results show that this ancient herbal decoction benefits endothelial function through increased activity of Akt kinase and eNOS; this effect is causally via a rise of intracellular Ca(2+) and a reduction of ROS.

  6. Salmon-derived thrombin inhibits development of chronic pain through an endothelial barrier protective mechanism dependent on APC

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jenell R; Galie, Peter A; Slochower, David R; Weisshaar, Christine L.; Janmey, Paul A; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological disorders are initiated by blood-brain barrier breakdown, which potentiates spinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Peripheral neuropathic injuries are known to disrupt the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and to potentiate inflammation. But, it is not known whether BSCB breakdown facilitates pain development. In this study, a neural compression model in the rat was used to evaluate relationships among BSCB permeability, inflammation and pain-related behaviors. BSCB permeability increases transiently only after injury that induces mechanical hyperalgesia, which correlates with serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-7, IL-12, IL-1α and TNF-α. Mammalian thrombin dually regulates vascular permeability through PAR1 and activated protein C (APC). Since thrombin protects vascular integrity through APC, directing its affinity towards protein C, while still promoting coagulation, might be an ideal treatment for BSCB-disrupting disorders. Salmon thrombin, which prevents the development of mechanical allodynia, also prevents BSCB breakdown after neural injury and actively inhibits TNF-α-induced endothelial permeability in vitro, which is not evident the case for human thrombin. Salmon thrombin’s production of APC faster than human thrombin is confirmed using a fluorogenic assay and APC is shown to inhibit BSCB breakdown and pain-related behaviors similar to salmon thrombin. Together, these studies highlight the impact of BSCB on pain and establish salmon thrombin as an effective blocker of BSCB, and resulting nociception, through its preferential affinity for protein C. PMID:26708087

  7. Anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody modulates blood-brain barrier function in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyong; Sadowska, Grazyna B; Chen, Xiaodi; Park, Seon Yeong; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Bodge, Courtney A; Cummings, Erin; Lim, Yow-Pin; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G; Gaitanis, John; Banks, William A; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2015-05-01

    Impaired blood-brain barrier function represents an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the perinatal period. Proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to ischemia-related blood-brain barrier dysfunction. IL-6 increases vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability in vitro. However, contributions of IL-6 to blood-brain barrier abnormalities have not been examined in the immature brain in vivo. We generated pharmacologic quantities of ovine-specific neutralizing anti-IL-6 mAbs and systemically infused mAbs into fetal sheep at 126 days of gestation after exposure to brain ischemia. Anti-IL-6 mAbs were measured by ELISA in fetal plasma, cerebral cortex, and cerebrospinal fluid, blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified using the blood-to-brain transfer constant in brain regions, and IL-6, tight junction proteins, and plasmalemma vesicle protein (PLVAP) were detected by Western immunoblot. Anti-IL-6 mAb infusions resulted in increases in mAb (P < 0.05) in plasma, brain parenchyma, and cerebrospinal fluid and decreases in brain IL-6 protein. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, anti-IL-6 mAb infusions attenuated ischemia-related increases in blood-brain barrier permeability and modulated tight junction and PLVAP protein expression in fetal brain. We conclude that inhibiting the effects of IL-6 protein with systemic infusions of neutralizing antibodies attenuates ischemia-related increases in blood-brain barrier permeability by inhibiting IL-6 and modulates tight junction proteins after ischemia.

  8. Systemic endothelial function is preserved in men with both active and inactive variant angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Akita, H; Kanazawa, K; Yamada, S; Shiga, N; Terashima, M; Matsuda, Y; Takai, E; Iwai, C; Takaoka, H; Yokoyama, M

    1999-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that coronary spasm could be a coronary manifestation of systemic endothelial dysfunction and that the activity of coronary spasm could influence systemic endothelial function, we examined brachial flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and nitroglycerin-induced endothelium-independent vasodilation with high-resolution ultrasound in 11 men with variant angina pectoris (6 active and 5 inactive) without established coronary atherosclerosis. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral circulation was preserved in men with active and inactive variant angina pectoris, suggesting that systemic endothelial dysfunction is not involved in either the pathogenesis or the activity of coronary spasm.

  9. How hormones influence composition and physiological function of the brain-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Hampl, R; Bičíková, M; Sosvorová, L

    2015-01-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain. Their access and effects in the brain are regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Hormones as other substances may enter the brain and vice versa either by paracellular way requiring breaching tight junctions stitching the endothelial cells composing the BBB, or by passage through the cells (transcellular way). Hormones influence both ways through their receptors, both membrane and intracellular, present on/in the BBB. In the review the main examples are outlined how hormones influence the expression and function of proteins forming the tight junctions, as well as how they regulate expression and function of major protein transporters mediating transport of various substances including hormone themselves.

  10. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  11. A study on the quantitative evaluation of skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomomi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Kido, Michiko; Yamada, Kenji; Oikaze, Hirotoshi; Takechi, Yohei; Furuta, Tomotaka; Ishii, Shoichi; Katayama, Haruna; Jeong, Hieyong; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose a quantitative evaluation method of skin barrier function using Optical Coherence Microscopy system (OCM system) with coherency of near-infrared light. There are a lot of skin problems such as itching, irritation and so on. It has been recognized skin problems are caused by impairment of skin barrier function, which prevents damage from various external stimuli and loss of water. To evaluate skin barrier function, it is a common strategy that they observe skin surface and ask patients about their skin condition. The methods are subjective judgements and they are influenced by difference of experience of persons. Furthermore, microscopy has been used to observe inner structure of the skin in detail, and in vitro measurements like microscopy requires tissue sampling. On the other hand, it is necessary to assess objectively skin barrier function by quantitative evaluation method. In addition, non-invasive and nondestructive measuring method and examination changes over time are needed. Therefore, in vivo measurements are crucial for evaluating skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluate changes of stratum corneum structure which is important for evaluating skin barrier function by comparing water-penetrated skin with normal skin using a system with coherency of near-infrared light. Proposed method can obtain in vivo 3D images of inner structure of body tissue, which is non-invasive and non-destructive measuring method. We formulate changes of skin ultrastructure after water penetration. Finally, we evaluate the limit of performance of the OCM system in this work in order to discuss how to improve the OCM system.

  12. An update of the defensive barrier function of skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2006-06-30

    Skin, as the outermost organ in the human body, continuously confronts the external environment and serves as a primary defense system. The protective functions of skin include UV-protection, anti-oxidant and antimicrobial functions. In addition to these protections, skin also acts as a sensory organ and the primary regulator of body temperature. Within these important functions, the epidermal permeability barrier, which controls the transcutaneous movement of water and other electrolytes, is probably the most important. This permeability barrier resides in the stratum corneum, a resilient layer composed of corneocytes and stratum corneum intercellular lipids. Since the first realization of the structural and biochemical diversities involved in the stratum corneum, a tremendous amount of work has been performed to elucidate its roles and functions in the skin, and in humans in general. The perturbation of the epidermal permeability barrier, previously speculated to be just a symptom involved in skin diseases, is currently considered to be a primary pathophysiologic factor for many skin diseases. In addition, much of the evidence provides support for the idea that various protective functions in the skin are closely related or even co-regulated. In this review, the recent achievements of skin researchers focusing on the functions of the epidermal permeability barrier and their importance in skin disease, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, are introduced.

  13. An Update of the Defensive Barrier Function of Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Kyoo; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2006-01-01

    Skin, as the outermost organ in the human body, continuously confronts the external environment and serves as a primary defense system. The protective functions of skin include UV-protection, anti-oxidant and antimicrobial functions. In addition to these protections, skin also acts as a sensory organ and the primary regulator of body temperature. Within these important functions, the epidermal permeability barrier, which controls the transcutaneous movement of water and other electrolytes, is probably the most important. This permeability barrier resides in the stratum corneum, a resilient layer composed of corneocytes and stratum corneum intercellular lipids. Since the first realization of the structural and biochemical diversities involved in the stratum corneum, a tremendous amount of work has been performed to elucidate its roles and functions in the skin, and in humans in general. The perturbation of the epidermal permeability barrier, previously speculated to be just a symptom involved in skin diseases, is currently considered to be a primary pathophysiologic factor for many skin diseases. In addition, much of the evidence provides support for the idea that various protective functions in the skin are closely related or even co-regulated. In this review, the recent achievements of skin researchers focusing on the functions of the epidermal permeability barrier and their importance in skin disease, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, are introduced. PMID:16807977

  14. Ecscr regulates insulin sensitivity and predisposition to obesity by modulating endothelial cell functions.

    PubMed

    Akakabe, Yoshiki; Koide, Masahiro; Kitamura, Youhei; Matsuo, Kiyonari; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Keishi; Oike, Yuichi; Ikeda, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity and is one of the earliest symptoms of type-2 diabetes. Endothelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through their role in insulin delivery and adipose tissue angiogenesis. Here we show that Ecscr (endothelial cell surface expressed chemotaxis and apoptosis regulator; also known as ARIA), the transmembrane protein that regulates endothelial cell signalling, is highly expressed in white and brown adipose tissues, and regulates energy metabolism and glucose homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell functions. Ecscr-deficient mice fed a normal chow show improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin sensitivity. We demonstrate that Ecscr deletion enhances the insulin-mediated Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells, which increases insulin delivery into the skeletal muscle. Ecscr deletion also protects mice on a high-fat diet from obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders by enhancing adipose tissue angiogenesis. Conversely, targeted activation of Ecscr in endothelial cells impairs glucose tolerance and predisposes mice to diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that the inactivation of Ecscr enhances insulin sensitivity and may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating metabolic syndrome.

  15. Insulin Downregulates the Transcriptional Coregulator CITED2, an Inhibitor of Proangiogenic Function in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanchun; Lockhart, Samuel M; Rathjen, Thomas; Albadawi, Hassan; Sørensen, Ditte; O'Neill, Brian T; Dwivedi, Nishant; Preil, Simone R; Beck, Hans Christian; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Watkins, Michael T; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Rask-Madsen, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In patients with atherosclerotic complications of diabetes, impaired neovascularization of ischemic tissue in the myocardium and lower limb limits the ability of these tissues to compensate for poor perfusion. We identified 10 novel insulin-regulated genes, among them Adm, Cited2, and Ctgf, which were downregulated in endothelial cells by insulin through FoxO1. CBP/p300-interacting transactivator with ED-rich tail 2 (CITED2), which was downregulated by insulin by up to 54%, is an important negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and impaired HIF signaling is a key mechanism underlying the impairment of angiogenesis in diabetes. Consistent with impairment of vascular insulin action, CITED2 was increased in cardiac endothelial cells from mice with diet-induced obesity and from db/db mice and was 3.8-fold higher in arterial tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes than control subjects without diabetes. CITED2 knockdown promoted endothelial tube formation and endothelial cell proliferation, whereas CITED2 overexpression impaired HIF activity in vitro. After femoral artery ligation, induction of an endothelial-specific HIF target gene in hind limb muscle was markedly upregulated in mice with endothelial cell deletion of CITED2, suggesting that CITED2 can limit HIF activity in vivo. We conclude that vascular insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes contributes to the upregulation of CITED2, which impairs HIF signaling and endothelial proangiogenic function.

  16. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  17. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  18. Endothelial function in well-developed canine coronary collateral vessels.

    PubMed

    Altman, J; Dulas, D; Pavek, T; Laxson, D D; Homans, D C; Bache, R J

    1993-02-01

    This study examined responses of coronary collateral blood flow to endothelial-dependent vasodilators. Studies were performed in 13 dogs 4-6 mo after embolic occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Collateral flow was determined as the sum of retrograde flow from the cannulated LAD, and continuing tissue flow was measured with microspheres administered during the retrograde flow collection. Agonists were introduced into the left main coronary artery to reach collaterals arising from the left coronary arterial system. The endothelial-dependent vasodilators acetylcholine and bradykinin caused 21 +/- 7 and 25 +/- 8% increases of collateral flow, respectively (each P < 0.05). This was not different from the 28 +/- 8% increase in collateral flow produced by nitroglycerin. To determine whether vasodilator prostaglandins contributed to the increased collateral flow, studies were performed after cyclooxygenase blockade with indomethacin (5 mg/kg iv). Indomethacin caused a 30 +/- 9% decrease of retrograde flow during basal conditions but did not blunt the maximum collateral flow rates produced by acetylcholine, bradykinin, or nitroglycerin. These data demonstrate intact endothelial-dependent vasodilator mechanisms in the well-developed coronary collateral circulation.

  19. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis. PMID:26904289

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis.

  1. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C; Adams, Ralf H; Duarte, António

    2015-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy.

  2. Interaction of integrin β4 with S1P receptors in S1P- and HGF-induced endothelial barrier enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiuqin; Epshtein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2014-06-01

    We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment endothelial cell (EC) barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin β4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1 µM, 5 min) or HGF (25 ng/ml, 5 min). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI.

  3. Scar Functions, Barriers for Chemical Reactivity, and Vibrational Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-14

    The performance of a recently proposed method to efficiently calculate scar functions is analyzed in problems of chemical interest. An application to the computation of wave functions associated with barriers relevant for the LiNC ⇄ LiCN isomerization reaction is presented as an illustration. These scar functions also constitute excellent elements for basis sets suitable for quantum calculation of vibrational energy levels. To illustrate their efficiency, a calculation of the LiNC/LiCN eigenfunctions is also presented.

  4. Glycolysis-mediated control of blood-brain barrier development and function.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Alla B; Kuvacheva, Natalia V; Morgun, Andrey V; Komleva, Yulia K; Pozhilenkova, Elena A; Lopatina, Olga L; Gorina, Yana V; Taranushenko, Tatyana E; Petrova, Lyudmila L

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of differentiated cells integrating in one ensemble to control transport processes between the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral blood. Molecular organization of BBB affects the extracellular content and cell metabolism in the CNS. Developmental aspects of BBB attract much attention in recent years, and barriergenesis is currently recognized as a very important and complex mechanism of CNS development and maturation. Metabolic control of angiogenesis/barriergenesis may be provided by glucose utilization within the neurovascular unit (NVU). The role of glycolysis in the brain has been reconsidered recently, and it is recognized now not only as a process active in hypoxic conditions, but also as a mechanism affecting signal transduction, synaptic activity, and brain development. There is growing evidence that glycolysis-derived metabolites, particularly, lactate, affect barriergenesis and functioning of BBB. In the brain, lactate produced in astrocytes or endothelial cells can be transported to the extracellular space via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), and may act on the adjoining cells via specific lactate receptors. Astrocytes are one of the major sources of lactate production in the brain and significantly contribute to the regulation of BBB development and functioning. Active glycolysis in astrocytes is required for effective support of neuronal activity and angiogenesis, while endothelial cells regulate bioavailability of lactate for brain cells adjusting its bidirectional transport through the BBB. In this article, we review the current knowledge with regard to energy production in endothelial and astroglial cells within the NVU. In addition, we describe lactate-driven mechanisms and action of alternative products of glucose metabolism affecting BBB structural and functional integrity in developing and mature brain.

  5. Methylmercury Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Damage in Rats via Upregulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuya; Fujimura, Masatake; Koyama, Misaki; Kanazawa, Masato; Usuki, Fusako; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication include cerebellar ataxia, concentric constriction of visual fields, and sensory and auditory disturbances. The symptoms depend on the site of MeHg damage, such as the cerebellum and occipital lobes. However, the underlying mechanism of MeHg-induced tissue vulnerability remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we used a rat model of subacute MeHg intoxication to investigate possible MeHg-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. The model was established by exposing the rats to 20-ppm MeHg for up to 4 weeks; the rats exhibited severe cerebellar pathological changes, although there were no significant differences in mercury content among the different brain regions. BBB damage in the cerebellum after MeHg exposure was confirmed based on extravasation of endogenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) and decreased expression of rat endothelial cell antigen-1. Furthermore, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic growth factor, increased markedly in the cerebellum and mildly in the occipital lobe following MeHg exposure. VEGF expression was detected mainly in astrocytes of the BBB. Intravenous administration of anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody mildly reduced the rate of hind-limb crossing signs observed in MeHg-exposed rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that MeHg induces BBB damage via upregulation of VEGF expression at the BBB in vivo. Further studies are required in order to determine whether treatment targeted at VEGF can ameliorate MeHg-induced toxicity. PMID:28118383

  6. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aline Cristina; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords ‘endothelial', ‘children', ‘pediatric' and ‘infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children. PMID:22473410

  7. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Aline Cristina; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords 'endothelial', 'children', 'pediatric' and 'infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children.

  8. Akt-mediated transactivation of the S1P1 receptor in caveolin-enriched microdomains regulates endothelial barrier enhancement by oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Chatchavalvanich, Santipongse; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie; Birukova, Anna A; Fortune, Jennifer A; Klibanov, Alexander M; Garcia, Joe G N; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2009-04-24

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction results in increased vascular permeability, leading to increased mass transport across the vessel wall and leukocyte extravasation, the key mechanisms in pathogenesis of tissue inflammation and edema. We have previously demonstrated that OxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) significantly enhances vascular endothelial barrier properties in vitro and in vivo and attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability induced by inflammatory and edemagenic agents via Rac and Cdc42 GTPase dependent mechanisms. These findings suggested potential important therapeutic value of barrier-protective oxidized phospholipids. In this study, we examined involvement of signaling complexes associated with caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) in barrier-protective responses of human pulmonary ECs to OxPAPC. Immunoblotting from OxPAPC-treated ECs revealed OxPAPC-mediated rapid recruitment (5 minutes) to CEMs of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P(1)), the serine/threonine kinase Akt, and the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 and phosphorylation of caveolin-1, indicative of signaling activation in CEMs. Abolishing CEM formation (methyl-beta-cyclodextrin) blocked OxPAPC-mediated Rac1 activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and EC barrier enhancement. Silencing (small interfering RNA) Akt expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated S1P(1) activation (threonine phosphorylation), whereas silencing S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated Tiam1 recruitment to CEMs, Rac1 activation, and EC barrier enhancement. To confirm our in vitro results in an in vivo murine model of acute lung injury with pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that selective lung silencing of caveolin-1 or S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. Taken together, these results suggest Akt-dependent transactivation of S1P(1) within CEMs is important for Ox

  9. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on vascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients after intensive periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Rubio, María C; Lewin, Pablo G; De la Cruz, Griselda; Sarudiansky, Andrea N; Nieto, Mauricio; Costa, Osvaldo R; Nicolosi, Liliana N

    2016-04-01

    There is a relation between vascular endothelial function, atherosclerotic disease, and inflammation. Deterioration of endothelial function has been observed twenty-four hours after intensive periodontal treatment. This effect may be counteracted by the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, which improve endothelial function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular endothelial function after intensive periodontal treatment, in hypertensive patients treated with angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors. A prospective, longitudinal, comparative study involving repeated measurements was conducted. Fifty-two consecutive patients with severe periodontal disease were divided into two groups, one comprising hypertensive patients treated with converting enzyme inhibitors and the other comprising patients with no clinical signs of pathology and not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring postischemic dilation of the humeral artery (baseline echocardiography Doppler), and intensive periodontal treatment was performed 24h later. Endothelial function was re-assessed 24h and 15 days after periodontal treatment.

  10. Disruption of barrier function in dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Jun Young; Song, Chang Hyun; Jung, Hong Dae; Lee, Su Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won

    2011-11-01

    Dermatophytes have the ability to form molecular attachments to keratin and use it as a source of nutrients, colonizing keratinized tissues, including the stratum corneum of the skin. Malassezia species also affect the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor of the skin are thought to be important factors of profound changes in skin barrier structure and function. We aimed to describe the changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, and skin pH in the lesions of the dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor. Thirty-six patients with dermatophytosis (14 with tinea cruris, 13 with tinea corporis and nine with tinea pedis or tinea manus) and 11 patients with pityriasis versicolor were included in this study. TEWL, stratum corneum conductance and skin pH were determined by biophysical methods to examine whether our patients exhibited changes in barrier function. Dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor except tinea pedis and tinea manus showed highly significant increase in TEWL compared with adjacent infection-free skin. Hydration was significantly reduced in lesional skin compared with adjacent infection-free skin. From this study, infections with dermatophytes and Malassezia species on the body can alter biophysical properties of the skin, especially the function of stratum corneum as a barrier to water loss. On the contrary, infections with dermatophytes on the palms and soles little affect the barrier function of the skin.

  11. Resveratrol Treatment Normalizes the Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fabricio, Victor; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Biffe, Bruna Gabriele; Ruffoni, Leandro Dias Gonçalves; da Silva, Karina Ana; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Rodrigues, Gerson Jhonatan

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite knowing that resveratrol has effects on blood vessels, blood pressure and that phytostrogens can also improve the endothelium-dependent relaxation/vasodilation, there are no reports of reveratrol's direct effect on the endothelial function and blood pressure of animals with estrogen deficit (mimicking post-menopausal increased blood pressure). Objective To verify the effect of two different periods of preventive treatment with resveratrol on blood pressure and endothelial function in ovariectomized young adult rats. Methods 3-month old female Wistar rats were used and distributed in 6 groups: intact groups with 60 or 90 days, ovariectomized groups with 60 or 90 days, and ovariectomized treated with resveratrol (10 mg/kg of body weight per day) for 60 or 90 days. The number of days in each group corresponds to the duration of the experimental period. Vascular reactivity study was performed in abdominal aortic rings, systolic blood pressure was measured and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration was quantified. Results Ovariectomy induced blood pressure increase 60 and 90 days after surgery, whereas the endothelial function decreased only 90 days after surgery, with no difference in NO concentration among the groups. Only longer treatment (90 days) with resveratrol was able to improve the endothelial function and normalize blood pressure. Conclusion Our results suggest that 90 days of treatment with resveratrol is able to improve the endothelial function and decrease blood pressure in ovariectomized rats. PMID:28327868

  12. Inhibitor-κB kinase attenuates Hsp90-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase function in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Konopinski, Ryszard; Krishnan, Manickam; Roman, Linda; Bera, Alakesh; Hongying, Zheng; Habib, Samy L.; Mohan, Sumathy

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) is the predominant isoform that generates NO in the blood vessels. Many different regulators, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), govern eNOS function. Hsp90-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS is a critical event that determines eNOS activity. In our earlier study we demonstrated an inhibitor-κB kinase-β (IKKβ)-Hsp90 interaction in a high-glucose environment. In the present study we further define the putative binding domain of IKKβ on Hsp90. Interestingly, IKKβ binds to the middle domain of Hsp90, which has been shown to interact with eNOS to stimulate its activity. This new finding suggests a tighter regulation of eNOS activity than was previously assumed. Furthermore, addition of purified recombinant IKKβ to the eNOS-Hsp90 complex reduces the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction and eNOS activity, indicating a competition for Hsp90 between eNOS and IKKβ. The pathophysiological relevance of the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction has also been demonstrated using in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and an Ins2Akita in vivo model. Our study further defines the preferential involvement of α- vs. β-isoforms of Hsp90 in the IKKβ-eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, even though both Hsp90α and Hsp90β stimulate NO production. These studies not only reinforce the significance of maintaining a homeostatic balance of eNOS and IKKβ within the cell system that regulates NO production, but they also confirm that the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction is favored in a high-glucose environment, leading to impairment of the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, which contributes to endothelial dysfunction and vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25652452

  13. Engineering angiogenesis following spinal cord injury: A coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells in a degradable polymer implant leads to an increase in vessel density and formation of the blood-spinal cord barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Millicent Ford; Hynes, Sara Royce; Bertram, James; Redmond, Andrew; Robinson, Rebecca; Williams, Cicely; Xu, Hao; Madri, Joseph A.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis precedes recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI), and its extent correlates with neural regeneration suggesting that angiogenesis may play a role in repair. An important precondition for studying the role of angiogenesis is the ability to induce it in a controlled manner. Previously, we showed that a coculture of endothelial cells (ECs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) promoted the formation of stable tubes in vitro and stable, functional vascular networks in vivo in a subcutaneous model. We sought to test whether a similar coculture would lead to formation of stable functional vessels in the spinal cord following injury. We created microvascular networks in a biodegradable two component implant system and tested the ability of the coculture or controls (lesion control, implant alone, implant plus ECs, or implant plus NPCs) to promote angiogenesis in a rat hemisection model of spinal cord injury. The coculture implant led to a four fold increase in functional vessels compared to the lesion control, implant alone, or implant plus NPCs groups and a 2 fold increase in functional vessels over the implant plus ECs group. Furthermore, half of the vessels in the coculture implant exhibited positive staining for the endothelial barrier antigen, a marker for formation of the blood spinal cord barrier (BSB). No other groups showed positive staining for the BSB in the injury epicenter. This work provides a novel method to induce angiogenesis following SCI and a foundation for studying its role in repair. PMID:19120441

  14. The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, James L.

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

  15. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  16. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating −18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r2 = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  17. Glucocorticoids and endothelial function in inflammatory diseases: focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Frank; Prati, Clément; Maguin-Gaté, Katy; Wendling, Daniel; Demougeot, Céline

    2016-11-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular (CV) diseases. RA increases the CV mortality by up to 50 % compared with the global population and CV disease is the leading cause of death in patients with RA. There is growing evidence that RA favors accelerated atherogenesis secondary to endothelial dysfunction (ED) that occurs early in the course of the disease. ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium towards reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state, proliferative and prothrombotic properties. The mechanistic links between RA and ED have not been fully explained, but growing evidence suggests a role for traditional CV factors, auto-antibodies, genetic factors, oxidative stress, inflammation and iatrogenic interventions such as glucocorticoids (GCs) use. GCs have been used in RA for several decades. Whilst their deleterious CV side effects were described in the 1950s, their effect on CV risk associated with inflammatory arthritis remains subject for debate. GC might induce negative effects on endothelial function, via a direct effect on endothelium or via increasing CV risk factors. Conversely, they might actually improve endothelial function by decreasing systemic and/or vascular inflammation. The present review summarizes the available data on the impact of GCs on endothelial function, both in normal and inflammatory conditions, with a special focus on RA patients.

  18. Functionalization Of Polymers Using N2 Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    wettability of the material through the inclusion of polar functional groups. Through the use of atmospheric pulsed-dielectric barrier discharges...work, many have used air and oxygen plasmas operating at atmospheric conditions to enhance the wettability of the polymer surface through the...An alternative method that has been explored to increase adhesion and wettability of these hydrophobic surfaces is the selective functionalization

  19. Dietary polyphenols regulate endothelial function and prevent cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Tagami, Motoki; Yamori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction strongly induces development of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated a preventative effect of dietary polyphenols toward cardiovascular disease. In studies using cultured vascular ECs, polyphenols were recognized to regulate nitric oxide and endothelin-1 (ET-1) production. Furthermore, epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules by a signaling pathway that is similar to that of high-density lipoprotein and involves induction of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, liver kinase B, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase expression. The effects of polyphenols on ECs include antioxidant activity and enhancement of the expression of several protective proteins, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase and paraoxonase 1. However, the observed effects of dietary polyphenols in vitro do not always translate to an in vivo setting. As such, there are many questions concerning their physiological mode of action. In this review, we discuss research on the effect of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular disease and their protective effect on EC dysfunction.

  20. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Toegel, Stefan; Viernstein, Helmut; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R.; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1), an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1), another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset uncovered herein should

  1. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Toegel, Stefan; Viernstein, Helmut; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1), an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1), another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset uncovered herein should

  2. Typical diffusion behaviour in packaging polymers - application to functional barriers.

    PubMed

    Dole, Patrice; Feigenbaum, Alexandre E; De La Cruz, Carlos; Pastorelli, Sara; Paseiro, Perfecto; Hankemeier, Thomas; Voulzatis, Yiannis; Aucejo, Susana; Saillard, Philippe; Papaspyrides, Costas

    2006-02-01

    When plastics are collected for recycling, possibly contaminated articles might be recycled into food packaging, and thus the contaminants might subsequently migrate into the food. Multilayer functional barriers may be used to delay and to reduce such migration. The contribution of the work reported here is to establish reference values (at 40 degrees C) of diffusion coefficients and of activation energies to predict the functional barrier efficiency of a broad range of polymers (polyolefins, polystyrene, polyamide, PVC, PET, PVDC, [ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer], polyacrylonitrile and [ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer]). Diffusion coefficients (D) and activation energies (Ea) were measured and were compiled together with literature data. This allowed identification of new trends for the log D=f(molecular weight) relationships. The slopes were a function of the barrier efficiency of the polymer and temperature. The apparent activation energy of diffusion displayed two domains of variation with molecular weight (M). For low M (gases), there was little variation of Ea. Focusing on larger molecules, high barrier polymers displayed a larger dependence of Ea with M. The apparent activation energy decreased with T. These results suggest a discontinuity between rubbery and glassy polymers.

  3. A large-scale electrophoresis- and chromatography-based determination of gene expression profiles in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form the physiological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The barrier function is (at least in part) due to well-known proteins such as transporters, tight junctions and metabolic barrier proteins (e.g. monoamine oxidase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase and P-glycoprotein). Our previous 2-dimensional gel proteome analysis had identified a large number of proteins and revealed the major role of dynamic cytoskeletal remodelling in the differentiation of bovine BCECs. The aim of the present study was to elaborate a reference proteome of Triton X-100-soluble species from bovine BCECs cultured in the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory. Results A total of 215 protein spots (corresponding to 130 distinct proteins) were identified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, whereas over 350 proteins were identified by a shotgun approach. We classified around 430 distinct proteins expressed by bovine BCECs. Our large-scale gene expression analysis enabled the correction of mistakes referenced into protein databases (e.g. bovine vinculin) and constitutes valuable evidence for predictions based on genome annotation. Conclusions Elaboration of a reference proteome constitutes the first step in creating a gene expression database dedicated to capillary endothelial cells displaying BBB characteristics. It improves of our knowledge of the BBB and the key proteins in cell structures, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, detoxification and drug resistance. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for both appropriate experimental design and correct interpretation of proteome datasets. PMID:21078152

  4. Human Intestinal Barrier Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    König, Julia; Wells, Jerry; Cani, Patrice D; García-Ródenas, Clara L; MacDonald, Tom; Mercenier, Annick; Whyte, Jacqueline; Troost, Freddy; Brummer, Robert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract consists of an enormous surface area that is optimized to efficiently absorb nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food. At the same time, it needs to provide a tight barrier against the ingress of harmful substances, and protect against a reaction to omnipresent harmless compounds. A dysfunctional intestinal barrier is associated with various diseases and disorders. In this review, the role of intestinal permeability in common disorders such as infections with intestinal pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and food allergies will be discussed. In addition, the effect of the frequently prescribed drugs proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability, as well as commonly used methods to assess barrier function will be reviewed. PMID:27763627

  5. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways.

  7. The natural antioxidants, pomegranate extract and soy isoflavones, favourably modulate canine endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that "vasoprotective factors" (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas "risk factors" such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs.

  8. The Natural Antioxidants, Pomegranate Extract and Soy Isoflavones, Favourably Modulate Canine Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M.; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that “vasoprotective factors” (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas “risk factors” such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs. PMID:23762588

  9. Angiogenic functions of voltage-gated Na+ Channels in human endothelial cells: modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Petros; Fraser, Scott P; Patterson, Lisa; Ahmad, Zahida; Burcu, Hakan; Ottaviani, Diego; Diss, James K J; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2011-05-13

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) activity has previously been reported in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the exact isoforms of VGSCs present, their mode(s) of action, and potential role(s) in angiogenesis have not been investigated. The main aims of this study were to determine the role of VGSC activity in angiogenic functions and to elucidate the potentially associated signaling mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model system. Real-time PCR showed that the primary functional VGSC α- and β-subunit isoforms in HUVECs were Nav1.5, Nav1.7, VGSCβ1, and VGSCβ3. Western blots verified that VGSCα proteins were expressed in HUVECs, and immunohistochemistry revealed VGSCα expression in mouse aortic ECs in vivo. Electrophysiological recordings showed that the channels were functional and suppressed by tetrodotoxin (TTX). VGSC activity modulated the following angiogenic properties of HUVECs: VEGF-induced proliferation or chemotaxis, tubular differentiation, and substrate adhesion. Interestingly, different aspects of angiogenesis were controlled by the different VGSC isoforms based on TTX sensitivity and effects of siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Additionally, we show for the first time that TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs (Nav1.5) potentiate VEGF-induced ERK1/2 activation through the PKCα-B-RAF signaling axis. We postulate that this potentiation occurs through modulation of VEGF-induced HUVEC depolarization and [Ca(2+)](i). We conclude that VGSCs regulate multiple angiogenic functions and VEGF signaling in HUVECs. Our results imply that targeting VGSC expression/activity could be a novel strategy for controlling angiogenesis.

  10. Peripheral Endothelial Function After Arterial Switch Operation for D-looped Transposition of the Great Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heather Y; Stauffer, Katie Jo; Nourse, Susan E; Vu, Chau; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda

    2017-03-27

    Coronary artery re-implantation during arterial switch operation in patients with D-looped transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) can alter coronary arterial flow and increase shear stress, leading to local endothelial dysfunction, although prior studies have conflicting results. Endothelial pulse amplitude testing can predict coronary endothelial dysfunction by peripheral arterial testing. This study tested if, compared to healthy controls, patients with D-TGA after arterial switch operation had peripheral endothelial dysfunction. Patient inclusion criteria were (1) D-TGA after neonatal arterial switch operation; (2) age 9-29 years; (3) absence of known cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, vascular disease, recurrent vasovagal syncope, and coronary artery disease; and (4) ability to comply with overnight fasting. Exclusion criteria included (1) body mass index ≥85th percentile, (2) use of medications affecting vascular tone, or (3) acute illness. We assessed endothelial function by endothelial pulse amplitude testing and compared the results to our previously published data in healthy controls (n = 57). We tested 20 D-TGA patients (16.4 ± 4.8 years old) who have undergone arterial switch operation at a median age of 5 days (0-61 days). Endothelial pulse amplitude testing indices were similar between patients with D-TGA and controls (1.78 ± 0.61 vs. 1.73 ± 0.54, p = 0.73).In our study population of children and young adults, there was no evidence of peripheral endothelial dysfunction in patients with D-TGA who have undergone arterial switch operation. Our results support the theory that coronary arterial wall thickening and abnormal vasodilation reported in these patients is a localized phenomenon and not reflective of overall atherosclerotic burden.

  11. Irisin improves endothelial function in type 2 diabetes through reducing oxidative/nitrative stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di; Wang, Haichang; Zhang, Jinglong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Xin, Chao; Zhang, Fuyang; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Yan, Wenjun; Ma, Xinliang; Liu, Yi; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Vascular complications are the major causes of death in patients with diabetes, and endothelial dysfunction is the earliest event in vascular complications of diabetes. It has been reported that plasma irisin level is significantly reduced in patients with type 2 diabetic patients. The present study aimed to investigate whether irisin improved endothelial function in type 2 diabetes as well as the underlying mechanisms. The type 2 diabetes model was established by feeding C57BL/6 mice with high-fat diet. The type 2 diabetic mice exhibited reduced serum irisin level and impaired endothelial function. Irisin treatment (0.5 mg/kg/d) for two weeks improved vascular function based on the evaluation of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and p-VASP levels. To investigate the direct endothelial protective effects of irisin, diabetic aortic segments were incubated with irisin (1 μg/ml) ex vivo. Exposure to irisin improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of diabetic aortas. Mechanically, the diabetic aortic segments exhibited increased oxidative/nitrative stresses. Irisin reduced the diabetes-induced oxidative/nitrative stresses evidenced by reducing overproduction of superoxide and peroxynitrite, and down-regulation of iNOS and gp91(phox). To further investigate the protective effects of irisin on endothelial cells and the underlying mechanisms, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in high-glucose/high-fat (HG/HF) medium were pre-incubated with irisin. Irisin (1 μg/ml) reduced the oxidative/nitrative stresses and apoptosis induced by HG/HF in HUVECs probably via inhibiting activation of PKC-β/NADPH oxidase and NF-κB/iNOS pathways. Taken together, irisin alleviates endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes partially via reducing oxidative/nitrative stresses through inhibiting signaling pathways implicating PKC-β/NADPH oxidase and NF-κB/iNOS, suggesting that irisin may be a promising molecule for the treatment of vascular complications of

  12. Lysosomal Trapping Is Present in Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells: Insight into Its Influence on Cationic Drug Transport at the Inner Blood-Retinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Seko, Narumi; Usui, Takuya; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal trapping was investigated in the retinal capillary endothelial cells that are responsible for the inner blood-retinal barrier (BRB) using LysoTracker(®) Red (LTR). Using confocal microscopy on TR-iBRB2 cells, an in vitro model of the inner BRB, the presence of lysosomal trapping in retinal capillary endothelial cells was suggested since TR-iBRB2 cells exhibited punctuate intracellular localization of LTR that was attenuated by NH4Cl treatment. The study confirmed that LTR uptake by retinal capillary endothelial cells took place in a time- and temperature-dependent manner, and exhibited the 1.58-fold greater uptake at pH 8.4 than that at pH 7.4 while there was no change in uptake between pH 6.4 and pH 7.4, suggesting that passive diffusion is not enough to explain LTR uptake. The inhibition study showed the possible influence of lysosomal trapping on cationic drug transport by retinal capillary endothelial cells since LTR uptake was significantly inhibited by cationic amphiphilic drugs. Inhibition profiling and the estimation of IC50 suggested the influence of lysosomal trapping on propranolol and low-affinity pyrilamine transport while lysosomal trapping had only a partial effect on verapamil, clonidine, nicotine and high-affinity pyrilamine transport in retinal capillary endothelial cells.

  13. Epigenetic control of intestinal barrier function and inflammation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Lindsay; Alvers, Ashley; Deerhake, M. Elizabeth; Bagwell, Jennifer; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Cocchiaro, Jordan L.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Willer, Jason; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Rawls, John F.; Goll, Mary G.; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a barrier protecting the organism from microbes and other proinflammatory stimuli. The integrity of this barrier and the proper response to infection requires precise regulation of powerful immune homing signals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Dysregulation of TNF leads to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but the mechanism controlling the expression of this potent cytokine and the events that trigger the onset of chronic inflammation are unknown. Here, we show that loss of function of the epigenetic regulator ubiquitin-like protein containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (uhrf1) in zebrafish leads to a reduction in tnfa promoter methylation and the induction of tnfa expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The increase in IEC tnfa levels is microbe-dependent and results in IEC shedding and apoptosis, immune cell recruitment, and barrier dysfunction, consistent with chronic inflammation. Importantly, tnfa knockdown in uhrf1 mutants restores IEC morphology, reduces cell shedding, and improves barrier function. We propose that loss of epigenetic repression and TNF induction in the intestinal epithelium can lead to IBD onset. PMID:25730872

  14. NF-κB contributes to MMP1 expression in breast cancer spheroids causing paracrine PAR1 activation and disintegrations in the lymph endothelial barrier in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Senfter, Daniel; Basilio, Jose; Holzner, Silvio; Stadler, Serena; Krieger, Sigurd; Huttary, Nicole; Milovanovic, Daniela; Viola, Katharina; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Jäger, Walter; de Martin, Rainer; Krupitza, Georg

    2015-01-01

    RELA, RELB, CREL, NFKB1 and NFKB2, and the upstream regulators NEMO and NIK were knocked-down in lymph endothelial cells (LECs) and in MDA-MB231 breast cancer spheroids to study the contribution of NF-κB in vascular barrier breaching. Suppression of RELA, NFKB1 and NEMO inhibited “circular chemo-repellent induced defects” (CCIDs), which form when cancer cells cross the lymphatic vasculature, by ~20–30%. Suppression of RELB, NFKB2 and NIK inhibited CCIDs by only ~10–15%. In MDA-MB231 cells RELA and NFKB1 constituted MMP1 expression, which caused the activation of PAR1 in adjacent LECs. The knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 spheroids and pharmacological inhibition of PAR1 in LECs inhibited CCID formation by ~30%. Intracellular Ca2+ release in LECs, which was induced by recombinant MMP1, was suppressed by the PAR1 inhibitor SCH79797, thereby confirming a functional intercellular axis: RELA/NFKB1 – MMP1 (MDA-MB231) – PAR1 (LEC). Recombinant MMP1 induced PAR1-dependent phosphorylation of MLC2 and FAK in LECs, which is indicative for their activity and for directional cell migration such as observed during CCID formation. The combined knock-down of the NF-κB pathways in LECs and MDA-MB231 spheroids inhibited CCIDs significantly stronger than knock-down in either cell type alone. Also the knock-down of ICAM-1 in LECs (a NF-κB endpoint with relevance for CCID formation) and knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 augmented CCID inhibition. This evidences that in both cell types NF-κB significantly and independently contributes to tumour-mediated breaching of the lymphatic barrier. Hence, inflamed tumour tissue and/or vasculature pose an additional threat to cancer progression. PMID:26513020

  15. NF-κB contributes to MMP1 expression in breast cancer spheroids causing paracrine PAR1 activation and disintegrations in the lymph endothelial barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Senfter, Daniel; Basilio, Jose; Holzner, Silvio; Stadler, Serena; Krieger, Sigurd; Huttary, Nicole; Milovanovic, Daniela; Viola, Katharina; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Jäger, Walter; de Martin, Rainer; Krupitza, Georg

    2015-11-17

    RELA, RELB, CREL, NFKB1 and NFKB2, and the upstream regulators NEMO and NIK were knocked-down in lymph endothelial cells (LECs) and in MDA-MB231 breast cancer spheroids to study the contribution of NF-κB in vascular barrier breaching. Suppression of RELA, NFKB1 and NEMO inhibited "circular chemo-repellent induced defects" (CCIDs), which form when cancer cells cross the lymphatic vasculature, by ~20-30%. Suppression of RELB, NFKB2 and NIK inhibited CCIDs by only ~10-15%. In MDA-MB231 cells RELA and NFKB1 constituted MMP1 expression, which caused the activation of PAR1 in adjacent LECs. The knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 spheroids and pharmacological inhibition of PAR1 in LECs inhibited CCID formation by ~30%. Intracellular Ca(2+) release in LECs, which was induced by recombinant MMP1, was suppressed by the PAR1 inhibitor SCH79797, thereby confirming a functional intercellular axis: RELA/NFKB1 - MMP1 (MDA-MB231) - PAR1 (LEC). Recombinant MMP1 induced PAR1-dependent phosphorylation of MLC2 and FAK in LECs, which is indicative for their activity and for directional cell migration such as observed during CCID formation. The combined knock-down of the NF-κB pathways in LECs and MDA-MB231 spheroids inhibited CCIDs significantly stronger than knock-down in either cell type alone. Also the knock-down of ICAM-1 in LECs (a NF-κB endpoint with relevance for CCID formation) and knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 augmented CCID inhibition. This evidences that in both cell types NF-κB significantly and independently contributes to tumour-mediated breaching of the lymphatic barrier. Hence, inflamed tumour tissue and/or vasculature pose an additional threat to cancer progression.

  16. Blood–brain barrier transport studies, aggregation, and molecular dynamics simulation of multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalized with fluorescein isothiocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Salvador, Ellaine; Pastorin, Giorgia; Förster, Carola

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the ability of a multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (MWCNT–FITC) was assessed as a prospective central nervous system-targeting drug delivery system to permeate the blood–brain barrier. The results indicated that the MWCNT–FITC conjugate is able to penetrate microvascular cerebral endothelial monolayers; its concentrations in the Transwell® system were fully equilibrated after 48 hours. Cell viability test, together with phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopies, did not detect any signs of MWCNT–FITC toxicity on the cerebral endothelial cells. These microscopic techniques also revealed presumably the intracellular localization of fluorescent MWCNT–FITCs apart from their massive nonfluorescent accumulation on the cellular surface due to nanotube lipophilic properties. In addition, the 1,000 ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo discovered the phenomenon of carbon nanotube aggregation driven by van der Waals forces via MWCNT–FITC rapid dissociation as an intermediate phase. PMID:25784800

  17. Blood-brain barrier transport studies, aggregation, and molecular dynamics simulation of multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalized with fluorescein isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Shityakov, Sergey; Salvador, Ellaine; Pastorin, Giorgia; Förster, Carola

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the ability of a multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (MWCNT-FITC) was assessed as a prospective central nervous system-targeting drug delivery system to permeate the blood-brain barrier. The results indicated that the MWCNT-FITC conjugate is able to penetrate microvascular cerebral endothelial monolayers; its concentrations in the Transwell(®) system were fully equilibrated after 48 hours. Cell viability test, together with phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopies, did not detect any signs of MWCNT-FITC toxicity on the cerebral endothelial cells. These microscopic techniques also revealed presumably the intracellular localization of fluorescent MWCNT-FITCs apart from their massive nonfluorescent accumulation on the cellular surface due to nanotube lipophilic properties. In addition, the 1,000 ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo discovered the phenomenon of carbon nanotube aggregation driven by van der Waals forces via MWCNT-FITC rapid dissociation as an intermediate phase.

  18. Contribution of pannexin 1 and connexin 43 hemichannels to extracellular calcium-dependent transport dynamics in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akaogi, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Megumi; Uchida, Yasuo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport function is thought to exacerbate neuronal damage in acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of pannexin (Px) and/or connexin (Cx) hemichannel(s)-mediated transport of organic anions and cations in human BBB endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and to identify inhibitors of hemichannel opening in hCMEC/D3 cells in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), a condition mimicking acute ischemic stroke. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), the cells showed increased uptake and efflux transport of organic ionic fluorescent dyes. Classic hemichannel inhibitors markedly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics confirmed Px1 and Cx43 protein expression in plasma membrane of hCMEC/D3 cells. Knockdown of Px1 and Cx43 with the small interfering RNAs significantly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux of organic anionic and cationic fluorescent dyes. Clinically used cilnidipine and progesterone, which have neuroprotective effects in animal ischemia models, were identified as inhibitors of hemichannel opening. These findings suggest that altered transport dynamics at the human BBB in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) is at least partly attributable to opening of Px1 and Cx43 hemichannels. Therefore, we speculate that Px1 and Cx43 may be potential drug targets to ameliorate BBB transport dysregulation during acute ischemia.

  19. Postprandial endothelial function, inflammation, and oxidative stress in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Metzig, Andrea M; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Fox, Claudia K; Deering, Mary M; Nathan, Brandon M; Kelly, Aaron S

    2011-06-01

    Most studies in adults suggest that acute glucose consumption induces a transient impairment in endothelial function. We hypothesized that obese youth would demonstrate reduced endothelial function and increased inflammation and oxidative stress following acute glucose ingestion and that transient elevations in plasma glucose would correlate with endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Thirty-four obese (BMI ≥ 95th percentile) children and adolescents (age 12.4 ± 2.6 years; BMI = 37.9 ± 6.7 kg/m2; 50% females) underwent measurement of endothelial function (reactive hyperemic index (RHI)), glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in a fasting state and at 1- and 2-h following glucose ingestion. Repeated measures ANOVA with Tukey post-tests and Pearson correlations were performed. Glucose and insulin levels significantly increased at 1- and 2-h (all P values < 0.001). Compared to baseline, there were no statistically significant differences in 1- and 2-h RHI, CRP, IL-6, and oxLDL. However, MPO significantly decreased at the 1- (P < 0.05) and 2-h (P < 0.001) time points. At the 1-h time point, glucose level was significantly inversely correlated with RHI (r = -0.40, P < 0.05) and at the 2-h time point, glucose level was positively correlated with MPO (r = 0.40, P < 0.05). An acute oral glucose load does not reduce endothelial function or increase levels of inflammation or oxidative stress in obese youth. However, associations of postprandial hyperglycemia with endothelial function and oxidative stress may have implications for individuals with impaired glucose tolerance or frank type 2 diabetes.

  20. Assessing blood-brain barrier function using in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Joseph; Clark, Katherine; O'Driscoll, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    The impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is due to a number of properties including tight junctions on adjoining endothelial cells, absence of pinocytic vesicles, and expression of multidrug transporters. Although the permeability of many chemicals can be predicted by their polarity, or oil/water partition coefficient, many lipophilic chemicals are not permeable because of multidrug transporters at the luminal and abluminal membranes. In contrast, many nutrients, which are usually polar, cross the BBB more readily than predicted by their oil/water partition coefficients due to the expression of specific nutrient transporters. In vitro models are being developed because rodent models are of low input and relatively expensive. Isolated brain microvessels and cell culture models each offers certain advantages and disadvantages. Isolated brain microvessels are useful in measuring multidrug drug transporters and tight junction integrity, whereas cell culture models allow the investigator to measure directional transport and can be genetically manipulated. In this chapter, we describe how to isolate large batches of brain microvessels from freshly slaughtered cows. The different steps in the isolation procedure include density gradient centrifugations and filtering. Purity is determined microscopically and by marker enzymes. Permeability is assessed by measuring the uptake of fluorescein-labeled dextran in an assay that has been optimized to have a large dynamic range and low inter-day variability. We also describe how to evaluate transendothelial cell electrical resistance and paracellular transport in cell culture models.

  1. Improved endothelialization of NiTi alloy by VEGF functionalized nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weixing; Cai, Kaiyong; Yang, Zaixiang; Yan, Ying; Yang, Weihu; Liu, Peng

    2012-06-01

    To improve surface endothelialization of NiTi alloy substrate, a nano-structured coating functionalized with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was fabricated via polydopamine (PDOP) as intermediate layer. The successful preparation of VEGF conjugated nanocoating was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) test showed that the formed nanocoating significantly reduced the release of Ni ion from NiTi alloy in simulated body fluid. The biological behaviors of endothelial cells adhered to modified NiTi alloy substrates, including cell proliferation, cell spreading and production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin were investigated in vitro. The results suggest that surface functionalization of NiTi alloy substrate with VEGF is beneficial for cell growth. The approach presented here affords an alternative for surface modification of NiTi implants applied as heart and vascular implant devices.

  2. Beta-lactam antibiotic-mediated changes in platelet reactivity and vascular endothelial functions.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Caprino, L

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate vascular and platelet compatibility of intravenous administration of beta-lactam antibiotics, we assessed the effects of therapeutic concentrations of ceftriaxone, aztreonam, and ceftazidime on platelet reactivity to different agonists (sodium arachidonate, collagen and adenosine diphosphate) and on selected vascular endothelial functions (adenosine diphosphatase activity, prostacyclin production and t-PA release). Ceftriaxone and, to a lesser degree, aztreonam, enhanced platelet reactivity, evaluated as onset of platelet aggregating response, and increased thromboxane production to subthreshold concentrations of arachidonate. There was no modification in platelet reactivity after ceftazidime treatment. Ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, but not aztreonam, inhibited endothelial adenosine diphosphatase activity. Prostacyclin production and t-PA release were inhibited only by ceftriaxone at high concentrations. While it is difficult to establish which marker (platelet or endothelial functions) has more clinical reference in human vascular compatibility, it seems feasible to consider aztreonam the most compatible of the beta-lactams studied.

  3. Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Biniek, Krysta; Levi, Kemal; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2012-10-16

    The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for vitamin D production but also leads to skin photoaging, damage, and malignancies. Photoaging and skin cancer have been extensively studied, but the effects of UV on the critical mechanical barrier function of the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), are not understood. The SC is the first line of defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets within the SC and subsequent alterations in the mechanical properties and related barrier function are unclear. Alteration of the SC's mechanical properties can lead to severe macroscopic skin damage such as chapping and cracking and associated inflammation, infection, scarring, and abnormal desquamation. Here, we show that UV exposure has dramatic effects on cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the SC's intercellular components, including intercellular lipids and corneodesmosomes. We found that, although the keratin-controlled stiffness remained surprisingly constant with UV exposure, the intercellular strength, strain, and cohesion decreased markedly. We further show that solar UV radiation poses a double threat to skin by both increasing the biomechanical driving force for damage while simultaneously decreasing the skin's natural ability to resist, compromising the critical barrier function of the skin.

  4. Loss of functional endothelial connexin40 results in exercise-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Howitt, Lauren; Heisler, Jillian; Nicholson, Bruce J; Fairweather, Stephen; Bröer, Stefan; Ashton, Anthony W; Matthaei, Klaus I; Hill, Caryl E

    2015-03-01

    During activity, coordinated vasodilation of microcirculatory networks with upstream supply vessels increases blood flow to skeletal and cardiac muscles and reduces peripheral resistance. Endothelial dysfunction in humans attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, resulting in exercise-induced hypertension in otherwise normotensive individuals. Underpinning activity-dependent hyperemia is an ascending vasodilation in which the endothelial gap junction protein, connexin (Cx)40, plays an essential role. Because exercise-induced hypertension is proposed as a forerunner to clinical hypertension, we hypothesized that endothelial disruption of Cx40 function in mice may create an animal model of this condition. To this end, we created mice in which a mutant Cx40T152A was expressed alongside wildtype Cx40 selectively in the endothelium. Expression of the Cx40T152A transgene in Xenopus oocytes and mouse coronary endothelial cells in vitro impaired both electric and chemical conductance and acted as a dominant-negative against wildtype Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45, but not Cx37. Endothelial expression of Cx40T152A in Cx40T152ATg mice attenuated ascending vasodilation, without effect on radial coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. Using radiotelemetry, Cx40T152ATg mice showed an activity-dependent increase in blood pressure, which was significantly greater than in wildtype mice, but significantly less than in chronically hypertensive, Cx40knockout mice. The increase in heart rate with activity was also greater than in wildtype or Cx40knockout mice. We conclude that the endothelial Cx40T152A mutation attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, producing a model of exercise-induced hypertension. These data highlight the importance of endothelial coupling through Cx40 in regulating blood pressure during activity.

  5. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide and/or Unconjugated Bilirubin Impair the Integrity and Function of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Filipa L.; Kittel, Ágnes; Veszelka, Szilvia; Palmela, Inês; Tóth, Andrea; Brites, Dora; Deli, Mária A.; Brito, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Methodology/Principal Findings Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. Conclusions LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period. PMID:22586454

  6. Hypoxia modulates the barrier and coagulant function of cultured bovine endothelium. Increased monolayer permeability and induction of procoagulant properties.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, S; Gerlach, H; Esposito, C; Pasagian-Macaulay, A; Brett, J; Stern, D

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of cultured endothelium to environments with low concentrations of oxygen, in the range of those observed in pathophysiologic hypoxemic states in vivo, compromises cellular barrier and coagulant function. An atmosphere with PO2 approximately 14 mm Hg was not lethally toxic to endothelial cultures, but cells became larger and exhibited small intercellular gaps. At low oxygen concentrations, passage of macromolecular tracers through hypoxic endothelial monolayers was accelerated in a time- and dose-dependent manner, presumably by a paracellular pathway via the gaps. Cell surface coagulant properties of the endothelium were also perturbed. At PO2 approximately 14 mm Hg thrombomodulin antigen and functional activity on the cell surface were diminished by 80-90%, and Northern blots demonstrated suppression of thrombomodulin mRNA. The decrease in thrombomodulin was twice as great compared with the general decline in total protein synthesis in hypoxia. In addition, expression of a direct Factor X activator developed under hypoxic conditions; the activator was membrane-associated and expressed on the surface of intact cultures, Ca-dependent, inhibited by HgCl2 but not PMSF, and had Km approximately 25 micrograms/ml for the substrate at pH 7.4. Synthesis of the activator was blocked by inclusion of cycloheximide, but not warfarin, in the culture medium. These results demonstrate that endothelial function is perturbed in a selective manner in the presence of low concentrations of oxygen, providing insights into mechanisms which may contribute to vascular dysfunction in hypoxemic states. Images PMID:2156893

  7. Intestinal barrier integrity and function in infants with cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Tahra M. K.; Mohammed, Omnia A.; Nasif, Khalid A.; El Gezawy, Ebtesam M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The safety of the human body is maintained by effective monitoring of the mucosal surface integrity and protection against potentially harmful compounds. This function of the gut called intestinal barrier function can be affected by cholestasis and the absence of bile in the intestinal lumen. We aimed to determine whether the gut barrier integrity is impaired in infants with cholestasis by evaluation of the intestinal fatty acid binding proteins (I-FABP) and ileal bile acid binding protein (I-BABP) as markers of intestinal epithelial cell damage and plasma D-lactate level as a marker of gut wall permeability. Methods This case-control study included 53 infants with cholestasis and 29 controls. Serum levels of I-FABP, I-BABP, and D-lactate were measured in all subjects. Results Both groups of patients with neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia showed significantly higher levels of I-FABP and I-BABP than the controls. There were no differences in the serum D-lactate level between the cases and controls. There was no difference between the two groups of patients (I and II) regarding any of the parameters studied. No significant correlations between serum levels of I-FABP, I-BABP, or D-lactate and total or direct bilirubin levels were found in the cholestatic infants. Conclusions The intestinal epithelial barrier integrity is breached nearly in all parts of the intestine in infants with cholestasis. Further research is recommended to determine the impact of this finding on the management of these infants. The relationship between physical intestinal barrier damage and its functional failure remains subject for further research. PMID:28239322

  8. Cystathionine β-synthase regulates endothelial function via protein S-sulfhydration

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sounik; Chakraborty, Prabir K.; Xiong, Xunhao; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Leigh, Noah R.; Ramchandran, Ramani; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Bhattacharya, Resham

    2016-01-01

    Deficiencies of the human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) enzyme are characterized by a plethora of vascular disorders and hyperhomocysteinemia. However, several clinical trials demonstrated that despite reduction in homocysteine levels, disease outcome remained unaffected, thus the mechanism of endothelial dysfunction is poorly defined. Here, we show that the loss of CBS function in endothelial cells (ECs) leads to a significant down-regulation of cellular hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by 50% and of glutathione (GSH) by 40%. Silencing CBS in ECs compromised phenotypic and signaling responses to the VEGF that were potentiated by decreased transcription of VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 and neuropilin (NRP)-1, the primary receptors regulating endothelial function. Transcriptional down-regulation of VEGFR-2 and NRP-1 was mediated by a lack in stability of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1), which is a sulfhydration target of H2S at residues Cys68 and Cys755. Reinstating H2S but not GSH in CBS-silenced ECs restored Sp1 levels and its binding to the VEGFR-2 promoter and VEGFR-2, NRP-1 expression, VEGF-dependent proliferation, and migration phenotypes. Thus, our study emphasizes the importance of CBS-mediated protein S-sulfhydration in maintaining vascular health and function.—Saha, S., Chakraborty, P. K., Xiong, X., Dwivedi, S. K. D., Mustafi, S. B., Leigh, N. R., Ramchandran, R., Mukherjee, P., Bhattacharya, R. Cystathionine β-synthase regulates endothelial function via protein S-sulfhydration. PMID:26405298

  9. Weight loss improves endothelial function independently of ADMA reduction in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Rudofsky, G; Roeder, E; Merle, T; Hildebrand, M; Nawroth, P P; Wolfrum, C

    2011-05-01

    This prospective study was performed in order to establish whether improvement of endothelial function after weight reduction can be explained by a decrease of elevated asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), an inhibitor of endogenous NO-synthase (eNOS). Therefore, 21 obese subjects (BMI: 41.1±6.4 kg/m(2)) were studied at baseline and after 12 weeks of weight reduction with a very low calorie diet. Biochemical and clinical parameters of endothelial function were assessed before and after weight loss. Biochemical parameters were determined by measurement of ADMA and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM). Clinical parameters were assessed by pulse wave analysis (PWA). Weight intervention resulted in a 21.4±6.8 kg reduction of body weight from 119.7±12.8 kg at study start to 98.3±11.6 kg at study end (p<0.001). Accordingly, biochemical markers improved under weight reduction (ADMA from 0.47±0.07 mmol/l to 0.42±0.08 mmol/l; p=0.002; ICAM from 276±42 ng/ml to 236±29 ng/ml; p<0.001). Further, clinical parameters of functional endothelial function improved with an increase of deltaRI after salbutamol inhalation from -1% before to -9% after weight reduction (p=0.02). Interestingly, improvement of endothelial function correlated with improved HOMA index only (r=-0.60, p=0.04) but not with reduced ADMA levels, improved hypertension or reduced body weight. In conclusion, weight reduction with a very low calorie diet improves endothelial function measured by pulse wave velocity. The missing correlation with ADMA suggests possible further mechanisms underlying this observed effect, for example, improvement of insulin resistance.

  10. Teneligliptin improves left ventricular diastolic function and endothelial function in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hashikata, Takehiro; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Kakizaki, Ryota; Nemoto, Teruyoshi; Fujiyoshi, Kazuhiro; Namba, Sayaka; Kitasato, Lisa; Hashimoto, Takuya; Kameda, Ryo; Maekawa, Emi; Shimohama, Takao; Tojo, Taiki; Ako, Junya

    Incretin hormones have been reported to have cytoprotective actions in addition to their glucose-lowering effects. We evaluated whether teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, affects left ventricular (LV) function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Twenty-nine T2DM patients not receiving any incretin-based drugs were enrolled and prescribed with teneligliptin for 3 months. Compared to baseline levels, hemoglobin A1c levels decreased (7.6 ± 1.0 % to 6.9 ± 0.7 %, p < 0.01) and 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol levels increased (9.6 ± 7.2 μg/mL to 13.5 ± 8.7 μg/mL, p < 0.01) after treatment. Clinical parameters, including body mass index and blood pressure, did not show any difference before and after treatment. Three months after treatment, there were improvements in LV systolic and diastolic function [LV ejection fraction, 62.0 ± 6.5 % to 64.5 ± 5.0 %, p = 0.01; peak early diastolic velocity/basal septal diastolic velocity (E/e') ratio, 13.3 ± 4.1 to 11.9 ± 3.3, p = 0.01]. Moreover, there was an improvement in endothelial function (reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry [RH-PAT] index; 1.58 ± 0.47 to 2.01 ± 0.72, p < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between changes in the E/e' ratio and RH-PAT values. Furthermore, circulating adiponectin levels increased (27.0 ± 38.5 pg/mL to 42.7 ± 33.2 pg/mL, p < 0.01) without changes in patient body weight. Teneligliptin treatment was associated with improvements in LV function and endothelial functions, and an increase in serum adiponectin levels. These results support the cardio-protective effects of teneligliptin in T2DM patients and increase in serum adiponectin levels.

  11. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  12. Intracellular mediators of JAM-A-dependent epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana C; Parkos, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a critical signaling component of the apical junctional complex, a structure composed of several transmembrane and scaffold molecules that controls the passage of nutrients and solutes across epithelial surfaces. Observations from JAM-A-deficient epithelial cells and JAM-A knockout animals indicate that JAM-A is an important regulator of epithelial paracellular permeability; however, the mechanism(s) linking JAM-A to barrier function are not understood. This review highlights recent findings relevant to JAM-A-mediated regulation of epithelial permeability, focusing on the role of upstream and downstream signaling candidates. We draw on what is known about proteins reported to associate with JAM-A in other pathways and on known modulators of barrier function to propose candidate effectors that may mediate JAM-A regulation of epithelial paracellular permeability. Further investigation of pathways highlighted in this review may provide ideas for novel therapeutics that target debilitating conditions associated with barrier dysfunction, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on endothelial function: a fully controlled dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Lieke; Dower, James I; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Kusters, Yvo H A M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Hollman, Peter C H; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2015-11-14

    High Na and low K intakes have adverse effects on blood pressure, which increases the risk for CVD. The role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in this pathophysiological process is not yet clear. In a randomised placebo-controlled cross-over study in untreated (pre)hypertensives, we examined the effects of Na and K supplementation on endothelial function and inflammation. During the study period, subjects were provided with a diet that contained 2·4 g/d of Na and 2·3 g/d of K for a 10 460 kJ (2500 kcal) intake. After 1-week run-in, subjects received capsules with supplemental Na (3·0 g/d), supplemental K (2·8 g/d) or placebo, for 4 weeks each, in random order. After each intervention, circulating biomarkers of endothelial function and inflammation were measured. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and skin microvascular vasomotion were assessed in sub-groups of twenty-two to twenty-four subjects. Of thirty-seven randomised subjects, thirty-six completed the study. Following Na supplementation, serum endothelin-1 was increased by 0·24 pg/ml (95 % CI 0·03, 0·45), but no change was seen in other endothelial or inflammatory biomarkers. FMD and microvascular vasomotion were unaffected by Na supplementation. K supplementation reduced IL-8 levels by 0·28 pg/ml (95 % CI 0·03, 0·53), without affecting other circulating biomarkers. FMD was 1·16 % (95% CI 0·37, 1·96) higher after K supplementation than after placebo. Microvascular vasomotion was unaffected. In conclusion, a 4-week increase in Na intake increased endothelin-1, but had no effect on other endothelial or inflammatory markers. Increased K intake had a beneficial effect on FMD and possibly IL-8, without affecting other circulating endothelial or inflammatory biomarkers.

  14. Endothelial Function in the Time of the Giants: Paul M. Vanhoutte Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.

    2010-01-01

    Paul Vanhoutte is one of the fathers of vascular biology. Among his great contributions, he demonstrated that endothelium modulates vasomotor response to vasoactive products (including serotonin) that are released when platelets aggregate in an artery. He found in arteries ex vivo that when endothelium is dysfunctional, in atherosclerosis or hypertension, normal relaxation to aggregation of platelets is impaired, and vessels may contract. He proposed that this mechanism may predispose to vasospasm. Our experiments in vivo indicated that atherosclerosis greatly potentiates vasoconstrictor responses to serotonin in the limb, brain, and eye of monkeys. We proposed that transient ischemic attacks may be mediated by platelet-induced vasospasm. We observed endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic monkeys, with improvement of endothelial function when hypercholesterolemia was corrected. Recently, we have studied the aortic valve (which has unique endothelium) in hypercholesterolemic mice, to examine the pathophysiology of aortic valvular stenosis. Oxidative stress is increased in stenotic valves, and severe aortic stenosis develops in about one-third of old, hypercholesterolemic mice. In stenotic aortic valves from humans, there is increased oxidative stress near calcified regions of the valves. Oxidative stress may trigger expression of pro-calcific genes in the aortic valve. Finally, we have used gene transfer of extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) to study endothelial effects of oxidative stress. Gene transfer of normal ecSOD improves endothelial dysfunction in several disease states, but gene transfer of ecSODR213G, a gene variant of ecSOD that is common in humans, fails to improve endothelial function. Gene transfer approaches may be useful to study mechanisms by which gene variants predispose to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. PMID:19033817

  15. Catalase and superoxide dismutase conjugated with platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule antibody distinctly alleviate abnormal endothelial permeability caused by exogenous reactive oxygen species and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2011-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion (O(2)()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced by activated leukocytes and endothelial cells in sites of inflammation or ischemia cause endothelial barrier dysfunction that may lead to tissue edema. Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) conjugated with antibodies to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) specifically bind to endothelium, quench the corresponding ROS, and alleviate vascular oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present work, we studied the effects of anti-PECAM/catalase and anti-PECAM/SOD conjugates on the abnormal permeability manifested by transendothelial electrical resistance decline, increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran influx, and redistribution of vascular endothelial-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers. Anti-PECAM/catalase protected HUVEC monolayers against H(2)O(2)-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase exerted orders of magnitude lower endothelial uptake and no protective effect, similarly to IgG/catalase. Anti-PECAM/catalase, but not anti-PECAM/SOD, alleviated endothelial hyperpermeability caused by exposure to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, implicating primarily H(2)O(2) in the disruption of the endothelial barrier in this model. Thrombin-induced endothelial permeability was not affected by treatment with anti-PECAM/AOEs or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or overexpression of AOEs, indicating that the endogenous ROS play no key role in thrombin-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction. In contrast, anti-PECAM/SOD, but not anti-PECAM/catalase, inhibited a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced increase in endothelial permeability, identifying a key role of endogenous O(2)() in the VEGF-mediated regulation of endothelial barrier function. Therefore, AOEs targeted to endothelial cells provide versatile molecular tools for testing the roles of

  16. The effects of anthrax lethal toxin on host barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Frucht, David M

    2011-06-01

    The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA). LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs), but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT) leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  17. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  18. Folic Acid Supplementation Improves Vascular Function in Professional Dancers With Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Anne Z.; Papanek, Paula; Szabo, Aniko; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gutterman, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if folic acid supplementation improves vascular function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in professional dancers with known endothelial dysfunction. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Academic institution in the Midwestern United States. Subjects Twenty-two professional ballet dancers volunteered for this study. Main Outcome Measures Subjects completed a 3-day food record to determine caloric and micronutrient intake. Menstrual status was determined by interview and questionnaire. Endothelial function was determined as flow-induced vasodilation measured by high-frequency ultrasound of the brachial artery. A change in brachial diameter of <5% to hyperemic flow stimulus was defined a priori as endothelial dysfunction. Subjects with abnormal FMD took 10 mg of folic acid daily for 4 weeks, and FMD testing was then repeated. Serum whole blood was measured for folic acid levels before and after supplementation. Results Sixty-four percent of dancers (n = 14) had abnormal brachial artery FMD (<5%) (mean ± standard deviation, 2.9% ± 1.5%). After 4 weeks of folic acid supplementation (10 mg/day), FMD improved in all the subjects (7.1% ± 2.3%; P < .0001). Conclusions This study reveals that vascular endothelial function improves in dancers after supplementation with folic acid (10 mg/day) for at least 4 weeks. This finding may have clinically important implications for future cardiovascular disease risk prevention. PMID:21715240

  19. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  20. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  1. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  2. Preserved endothelial function in human obesity in the absence of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, obesity has long been related to IR and increased CVD. However it is not known if IR is a necessary condition for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity, allowing for preserved endothelial function in obese people when absent. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between IR and endothelial dysfunction in human obesity and the mechanisms involved. Methods Twenty non-insulin resistant morbid obese (NIR-MO), 32 insulin resistant morbid obese (IR-MO), and 12 healthy subjects were included. Serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), resistin and adiponectin were determined. IR was evaluated by HOMA-index. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to bradykinin (BK) in mesenteric microvessels was assessed in wire myograph. Results Serum IL-6, and TNF-α levels were elevated only in IR-MO patients while resistin was elevated and adiponectin reduced in all MO individuals. Mesenteric arteries from IR-MO, but not from NIR-MO subjects displayed blunted relaxation to BK. Vasodilatation was improved in IR-MO arteries by the superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or the mitochondrial-targeted SOD mimetic, mito-TEMPO. NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and VAS2870) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin failed to modify BK-induced vasodilatations. Superoxide generation was higher in vessels from IR-MO subjects and reduced by mito-TEMPO. Blockade of TNF-α with infliximab, but not inhibition of inducible NOS or cyclooxygenase, improved endothelial relaxation and decreased superoxide formation. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is observed in human morbid obesity only when insulin resistance is present. Mechanisms involved include augmented mitochondrial superoxide generation, and

  3. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    van Assema, Daniëlle M E; Lubberink, Mark; Bauer, Martin; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Schuit, Robert C; Windhorst, Albert D; Comans, Emile F I; Hoetjes, Nikie J; Tolboom, Nelleke; Langer, Oliver; Müller, Markus; Scheltens, Philip; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2012-01-01

    A major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of amyloid-β in senile plaques in the brain. Evidence is accumulating that decreased clearance of amyloid-β from the brain may lead to these elevated amyloid-β levels. One of the clearance pathways of amyloid-β is transport across the blood-brain barrier via efflux transporters. P-glycoprotein, an efflux pump highly expressed at the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, has been shown to transport amyloid-β. P-glycoprotein function can be assessed in vivo using (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and positron emission tomography. The aim of this study was to assess blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with age-matched healthy controls using (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and positron emission tomography. In 13 patients with Alzheimer's disease (age 65 ± 7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 23 ± 3), global (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were increased significantly (P = 0.001) compared with 14 healthy controls (aged 62 ± 4 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 30 ± 1). Global (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were 2.18 ± 0.25 for patients with Alzheimer's disease and 1.77 ± 0.41 for healthy controls. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, higher (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were found for frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and posterior and anterior cingulate. No significant differences between groups were found for medial temporal lobe and cerebellum. These data show altered kinetics of (R)-[(11)C]verapamil in Alzheimer's disease, similar to alterations seen in studies where P-glycoprotein is blocked by a pharmacological agent. As such, these data indicate that P-glycoprotein function is decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. This is the first direct evidence that the P-glycoprotein transporter at the blood-brain barrier is compromised in sporadic

  4. TNFα-Damaged-HUVECs Microparticles Modify Endothelial Progenitor Cell Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Carmona, Andrés; Alique, Matilde; Carracedo, Julia; Ramirez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have an important role in the maintenance of vascular integrity and homeostasis. While there are many studies that explain EPCs mechanisms action, there are few studies that demonstrate how they interact with other emerging physiological elements such as Endothelial Microparticles (EMPs). EMPs are membranous structures with a size between 100 and 1000 nm that act as molecular information transporter in biological systems and are known as an important elements in develop different pathologies; moreover a lot of works explains that are novel biomarkers. To elucidate these interactions, we proposed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by TNFalpha, in which damaged EMPs and EPCs are in contact to assess EPCs functional effects. We have observed that damaged EMPs can modulate several EPCs classic factors as colony forming units (CFUs), contribution to repair a physically damaged endothelium (wound healing), binding to mature endothelium, and co-adjuvants to the formation of new vessels in vitro (angiogenesis). All of these in a dose-dependent manner. Damaged EMPs at a concentration of 103 MPs/ml have an activating effect of these capabilities, while at concentrations of 105 MPs/ml these effects are attenuated or reduced. This in vitro model helps explain that in diseases where there is an imbalance between these two elements (EPCs and damaged EMPs), the key cellular elements in the regeneration and maintenance of vascular homeostasis (EPCs) are not fully functional, and could explain, at least in part, endothelial dysfunction associated in various pathologies. PMID:26733886

  5. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  6. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  7. Acute improvement of endothelial functions after oral ingestion of isohumulones, bitter components of beer.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Junko; Mochizuki, Seiichi; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Kashihara, Naoki; Akasaka, Takashi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-18

    Isohumulones, principal components of the bitter taste of beers, have antioxidant capacity. We studied i) the effects of oral ingestion of isomerized hop extract (IHE) on the endothelial functions in smokers as well as non-smokers and ii) the effects of IHE on cultured endothelial cells in high oxidative stress state. Twelve cigarette smokers and eleven non-smokers ingested IHE and placebo in a randomized crossover design. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) was measured using ultrasonography. We also studied the effects of isohumulones on i) the cell viability under hypoxia and ii) the levels of angiotensin II (AT-II)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). At baseline, the FMDs of the smokers were significantly lower than those of the non-smokers. The FMDs increased significantly after 30 min and 120 min of IHE ingestion in both the smokers and the non-smokers. IHE protected the HAECs from hypoxia-induced cell death as assessed by cell viability. IHE also reduced the AT-II-induced intracellular ROS level. Oral ingestion of IHE appears to exert acute beneficial effects on the endothelial functions in both the smokers and non-smokers, and the in vitro experiments using HAECs suggested that the effect be through reducing intracellular oxidative stress.

  8. Role of folic acid in nitric oxide bioavailability and vascular endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-01-01

    Folic acid is a member of the B-vitamin family and is essential for amino acid metabolism. Adequate intake of folic acid is vital for metabolism, cellular homeostasis, and DNA synthesis. Since the initial discovery of folic acid in the 1940s, folate deficiency has been implicated in numerous disease states, primarily those associated with neural tube defects in utero and neurological degeneration later in life. However, in the past decade, epidemiological studies have identified an inverse relation between both folic acid intake and blood folate concentration and cardiovascular health. This association inspired a number of clinical studies that suggested that folic acid supplementation could reverse endothelial dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, in vitro and in vivo studies have begun to elucidate the mechanism(s) through which folic acid improves vascular endothelial function. These studies, which are the focus of this review, suggest that folic acid and its active metabolite 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate improve nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability by increasing endothelial NO synthase coupling and NO production as well as by directly scavenging superoxide radicals. By improving NO bioavailability, folic acid may protect or improve endothelial function, thereby preventing or reversing the progression of CVD in those with overt disease or elevated CVD risk.

  9. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, An N.; Blajan, Marius

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote percutaneous absorption. A hairless Yucatan micropig skin was used for this ex vivo study. After AAMI, the disturbance in the stratum corneum (SC) lipids was observed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, an increase in transepidermal water loss and no physical damage on pig skins were confirmed by microscopic observation. These results of AAMI were compared with those of a plasma jet irradiation (PJI) and a tape stripping test (TST) leading to the conclusion that AAMI reduces the barrier function of the skin and could also enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs.

  10. [Endothelial glycocalyx of blood circulation. II. Biological functions, state at norm and pathology, bioengineering application].

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A V; Turashev, A D

    2014-01-01

    In normal state, a complex multicomponent system called glycocalyx is present on the surface of endothelial vascular system. Due to complexity of its composition and location on the border between vessel wall and blood circulation, glycocalyx participates in a number of functions supporting the metabolism of the vascular wall. In pathological conditions undergo complete or partial loss of this structure, which leads to inconsistencies in the vascular wall and change its functions. The functions of endothelial glycocalyx are its involvement in the regulation of vascular permeability, transduction and transformation by the shear stress of blood flow on endothelium, the molecular regulation of glycocalyx microenvironment and its interaction with circulating blood cells. Also briefly be considered participation of glycocalyx in the implementation of cardiovascular diseases, their correction, bioengineering application of glycocalyx and its components.

  11. Recovery of Endothelial Function in Severe Falciparum Malaria: Relationship with Improvement in Plasma L-Arginine and Blood Lactate Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Gitawati, Retno; Tjitra, Emiliana; Kenangalem, Enny; McNeil, Yvette R.; Darcy, Christabelle J.; Granger, Donald L.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Lopansri, Bert K.; Price, Ric N.; Duffull, Stephen B.; Celermajer, David S.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Severe malaria is characterized by microvascular obstruction, endothelial dysfunction, and reduced levels of L-arginine and nitric oxide (NO). L-Arginine infusion improves endothelial function in moderately severe malaria. Neither the longitudinal course of endothelial dysfunction nor factors associated with recovery have been characterized in severe malaria. Methods Endothelial function was measured longitudinally in adults with severe malaria (n = 49) or moderately severe malaria (n = 48) in Indonesia, using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT). In a mixed-effects model, changes in RH-PAT index values in patients with severe malaria were related to changes in parasitemia, lactate, acidosis, and plasma L-arginine concentrations. Results Among patients with severe malaria, the proportion with endothelial dysfunction fell from 94% (46/49 patients) to 14% (6/42 patients) before discharge or death (P <.001). In severe malaria, the median time to normal endothelial function was 49 h (interquartile range, 20–70 h) after the start of antimalarial therapy. The mean increase in L-arginine concentrations in patients with severe malaria was 11 μmol/L/24 h (95% confidence interval [CI], 9–13 μmol/L/24 h), from a baseline of 49 μmol/L (95% CI, 37–45 μmol/L). Improvement of endothelial function in patients with severe malaria correlated with increasing levels of L-arginine (r = 0.56; P =.008) and decreasing levels of lactate (r = −0.44; P =.001). Conclusions Recovery of endothelial function in severe malaria is associated with recovery from hypoargininemia and lactic acidosis. Agents that can improve endothelial NO production and endothelial function, such as L-arginine, may have potential as adjunctive therapy early during the course of severe malaria. PMID:18605903

  12. Different modes of endothelial-smooth muscle cell interaction elicit differential β-catenin phosphorylations and endothelial functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Chen, Li-Jing; Lee, Pei-Ling; Lee, Ding-Yu; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2014-02-04

    β-Catenin phosphorylation plays important roles in modulating its functions, but the effects of different phosphorylated forms of β-catenin in response to heterocellular interaction are unclear. Here we investigated whether distinct modes of phosphorylation on β-catenin could be triggered through heterocellular interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and the consequent modulation of EC functions. ECs were cocultured with SMCs to initiate direct contact and paracrine interaction. EC-SMC coculture induced EC β-catenin phosphorylations simultaneously at tyrosine 142 (Tyr142) and serine 45/threonine 41 (Ser45/Thr41) at the cytoplasm/nuclei and the membrane, respectively. Treating ECs with SMC-conditional medium induced β-catenin phosphorylation only at Ser45/Thr41. These findings indicate that different phosphorylation effects of EC-SMC coculture were induced through heterocellular direct contact and paracrine effects, respectively. Using specific blocking peptides, antagonists, and siRNAs, we found that the β-catenin Tyr142-phosphorylation was mediated by connexin 43/Fer and that the β-catenin Ser45/Thr41-phosphorylation was mediated by SMC-released bone morphogenetic proteins through VE-cadherin and bone morphogenetic protein receptor-II/Smad5. Transfecting ECs with β-catenin-Tyr142 or -Ser45 mutants showed that these two phosphorylated forms of β-catenin modulate differential EC function: The Tyr142-phosphorylated β-catenin stimulates vascular cell-adhesion molecule-1 expression to increase EC-monocytic adhesion, but the Ser45/Thr41-phosphorylated β-catenin attenuates VE-cadherin-dependent junction structures to increase EC permeability. Our findings provide new insights into the understanding of regulatory complexities of distinct modes of β-catenin phosphorylations under EC-SMC interactions and suggest that different phosphorylated forms of β-catenin play important roles in modulating vascular pathophysiology

  13. Vascular risk factors, endothelial function, and carotid thickness in patients with migraine: relationship to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Hamed, Enas A; Ezz Eldin, Azza M; Mahmoud, Nagia M

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that migraine is associated with specific vascular risk profile. However, the functional and structural vascular abnormalities in migraine are rarely addressed. We evaluated the vascular risk factors, endothelial function, and carotid artery (CA)-intima-media thickness (IMT), segregators of preclinical atherosclerosis, in migraineurs. This preliminary study included 63 adults with headache (migraine with aura [n=14], migraine without aura [n=24], transformed migraine [n=6], and tension headache [n=19]) and 35 matched healthy subjects. The following vascular risks were assessed: body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), serum levels of C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Plasma endothelin (ET)-1, a vasoactive peptide produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and marker for endothelial injury and atherosclerosis, was measured. Endothelial-dependent vasoreactivity was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in response to hyperemia. CA-IMT, structural marker of early atherosclerosis, was measured. Compared with control subjects, SBP, DBP, glucose, insulin, ET-1, and CA-IMT were elevated with migraine. FMD% was inversely correlated with SBP (P < .001), DBP (P < .01), glucose (P < .001), and insulin levels (P < .01). CA-IMT was correlated with BMI (P < .05), SBP (P < .01), total cholesterol (P < .01), triglycerides (P < .001), glucose (P < .001), insulin (P < .01), and FMD% (P < .05). In multivariate analysis, ET-1 was correlated with duration of illness, SBP, DBP, glucose, insulin, IMT, and FMD%. We conclude that endothelial injury, impaired endothelial vasoreactivity, and increased CA-IMT occur with migraine and are associated with vascular risk factors that strongly suggest that migraine could be a risk for atherosclerosis.

  14. Breaking barriers. New insights into airway epithelial barrier function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Fariba; Georas, Steve N

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial permeability is a hallmark of mucosal inflammation, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. A key component of the epithelial barrier is the apical junctional complex that forms between neighboring cells. Apical junctional complexes are made of tight junctions and adherens junctions and link to the cellular cytoskeleton via numerous adaptor proteins. Although the existence of tight and adherens junctions between epithelial cells has long been recognized, in recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of junctional complex assembly and disassembly. Here we review the current thinking about the structure and function of the apical junctional complex in airway epithelial cells, emphasizing the translational aspects of relevance to cystic fibrosis and asthma. Most work to date has been conducted using cell culture models, but technical advancements in imaging techniques suggest that we are on the verge of important new breakthroughs in this area in physiological models of airway diseases.

  15. Glycosaminoglycan mimetic improves enrichment and cell functions of human endothelial progenitor cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Fabien; Lavergne, Mélanie; Negroni, Elisa; Ferratge, Ségolène; Carpentier, Gilles; Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Siñeriz, Fernando; Uzan, Georges; Albanese, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Human circulating endothelial progenitor cells isolated from peripheral blood generate in culture cells with features of endothelial cells named late-outgrowth endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC). In adult blood, ECFC display a constant quantitative and qualitative decline during life span. Even after expansion, it is difficult to reach the cell dose required for cell therapy of vascular diseases, thus limiting the clinical use of these cells. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are components from the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are able to interact and potentiate heparin binding growth factor (HBGF) activities. According to these relevant biological properties of GAG, we designed a GAG mimetic having the capacity to increase the yield of ECFC production from blood and to improve functionality of their endothelial outgrowth. We demonstrate that the addition of [OTR(4131)] mimetic during the isolation process of ECFC from Cord Blood induces a 3 fold increase in the number of colonies. Moreover, addition of [OTR(4131)] to cell culture media improves adhesion, proliferation, migration and self-renewal of ECFC. We provide evidence showing that GAG mimetics may have great interest for cell therapy applied to vascular regeneration therapy and represent an alternative to exogenous growth factor treatments to optimize potential therapeutic properties of ECFC.

  16. Functional interaction of vascular endothelial-protein-tyrosine phosphatase with the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2.

    PubMed

    Fachinger, G; Deutsch, U; Risau, W

    1999-10-21

    During development of the vertebrate vascular system essential signals are transduced via protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. Null-mutations of receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) display early lethal vascular phenotypes. We aimed to identify endothelial protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which should have similar importance in EC-biology. A murine receptor-type PTP was identified by a degenerated PCR cloning approach from endothelial cells (VE-PTP). By in situ hybridization this phosphatase was found to be specifically expressed in vascular ECs throughout mouse development. In experiments using GST-fusion proteins, as well as in transient transfections, trapping mutants of VE-PTP co-precipitated with the Angiopoietin receptor Tie-2, but not with the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2/Flk-1). In addition, VE-PTP dephosphorylates Tie-2 but not VEGFR-2. We conclude that VE-PTP is a Tie-2 specific phosphatase expressed in ECs, and VE-PTP phosphatase activity serves to specifically modulate Angiopoietin/Tie-2 function. Based on its potential role as a regulator of blood vessel morphogenesis and maintainance, VE-PTP is a candidate gene for inherited vascular malformations similar to the Tie-2 gene.

  17. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  18. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  19. Induction of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cell Urokinase Expression by Cryptococcus neoformans Facilitates Blood-Brain Barrier Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stie, Jamal; Fox, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The invasive ability of the blood-borne fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans can be enhanced through interactions with host plasma components, such as plasminogen. Previously we showed by in vitro studies that plasminogen coats the surface of C. neoformans and is converted to the active serine protease, plasmin, by host plasminogen activators. Viable, but not formaldehyde- or sodium azide-killed, cryptococcal strains undergo brain microvascular endothelial cell-dependent plasminogen-to-plasmin activation, which results in enhanced, plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion of primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and fungal ability to degrade plasmin substrates. In the present work, brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, cryptococcal strains led to significant increases in both urokinase mRNA transcription and cell-associated urokinase protein expression. Soluble urokinase was also detected in conditioned medium from brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, C. neoformans. Exposure of plasminogen pre-coated viable C. neoformans to conditioned medium from strain-matched brain microvascular endothelial cell-fungal co-cultures resulted in plasminogen-to-plasmin activation and plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion. siRNA-mediated silencing of urokinase gene expression or the use of specific inhibitors of urokinase activity abrogated both plasminogen-to-plasmin activation on C. neoformans and cryptococcal-brain microvascular endothelial cell invasion. Our results suggest that pathogen exploitation of the host urokinase-plasmin(ogen) system may contribute to C. neoformans virulence during invasive cryptococcosis. PMID:23145170

  20. Longitudinal assessment of endothelial function in the microvasculature of mice in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Belch, Jill J F; Akbar, Naveed; Alapati, Venkateswara; Petrie, John; Arthur, Simon; Khan, Faisel

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is associated with early development of cardiovascular disease, making longitudinal measurements desirable. We devised a protocol using laser Doppler imaging (LDI) and iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to assess the skin microcirculation longitudinally in mice every 4 weeks for 24 weeks in two groups of C57BL/6 mice, chow versus high-cholesterol diet(known to induce endothelial dysfunction). LDI measurements were compared with vascular function (isometric tension) measured using wire myography in the tail artery in response to ACh and SNP. Microvascular responses to ACh were significantly reduced in cholesterol-fed versus chow-fed mice from week 4 onwards (P<0.005, ANOVA). Pre-treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl-ester-hydrochloride (L-NAME) showed a significant reduction in ACh response compared with vehicle-treated animals (P<0.05) at baseline and at 12 weeks. In cholesterol-fed mice, ACh responses were 226 ± 21 and 180 ± 21 AU (P=0.03) before and after L-NAME, respectively. A reduction in ex-vivo ACh response was detected in the tail artery in cholesterol-fed mice, and a significant correlation found between peak microvascular ACh response and maximum ACh response in the tail artery (r=0.699, P=0.017). No changes were found in SNP responses in the microvasculature or tail artery. Using this protocol, we have shown longitudinal decreases in microvascular endothelial function to cholesterol feeding. L-NAME studies confirm that the reduced vasodilatation to ACh in cholesterol-fed mice was mediated partly through reduced NO bioavailability. Wire myography of tail arteries confirmed that in-vivo measurements of microvascular function reflect ex-vivo vascular function in other beds. Longitudinal assessments of skin microvascular function in mice could provide a useful translatable model for assessing early endothelial dysfunction.

  1. The Synthetic Tie2 Agonist Peptide Vasculotide Protects Renal Vascular Barrier Function In Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rübig, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Spieker, Tilmann; Buscher, Konrad; Reuter, Stefan; Goerge, Tobias; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular barrier dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Angiopoietin-1, the natural agonist ligand for the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor, is a non-redundant endothelial survival and vascular stabilization factor. Here we evaluate the efficacy of a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2 agonist peptide, vasculotide (VT), to protect against endothelial-cell activation with subsequent microvascular dysfunction in a murine model of ischemic AKI. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was induced by clamping of the renal arteries for 35 minutes. Mice were treated with VT or PEGylated cysteine before IRI. Sham-operated animals served as time-matched controls. Treatment with VT significantly reduced transcapillary albumin flux and renal tissue edema after IRI. The protective effects of VT were associated with activation of Tie2 and stabilization of its downstream effector, VE-cadherin in renal vasculature. VT abolished the decline in renal tissue blood flow, attenuated the increase of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen after IRI, improved recovery of renal function and markedly reduced mortality compared to PEG [HR 0.14 (95% CI 0.05–0.78) P < 0.05]. VT is inexpensive to produce, chemically stable and unrelated to any Tie2 ligands. Thus, VT may represent a novel therapy to prevent AKI in patients. PMID:26911791

  2. Citrus Polyphenol Hesperidin Stimulates Production of Nitric Oxide in Endothelial Cells while Improving Endothelial Function and Reducing Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rizza, Stefano; Muniyappa, Ranganath; Iantorno, Micaela; Kim, Jeong-a; Chen, Hui; Pullikotil, Philomena; Senese, Nicoletta; Tesauro, Manfredi; Lauro, Davide; Cardillo, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    Context: Hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid, and its metabolite hesperetin may have vascular actions relevant to their health benefits. Molecular and physiological mechanisms of hesperetin actions are unknown. Objective: We tested whether hesperetin stimulates production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelium and evaluated endothelial function in subjects with metabolic syndrome on oral hesperidin therapy. Design, Setting, and Interventions: Cellular mechanisms of action of hesperetin were evaluated in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) in primary culture. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial examined whether oral hesperidin administration (500 mg once daily for 3 wk) improves endothelial function in individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 24). Main Outcome Measure: We measured the difference in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation between placebo and hesperidin treatment periods. Results: Treatment of BAEC with hesperetin acutely stimulated phosphorylation of Src, Akt, AMP kinase, and endothelial NO synthase to produce NO; this required generation of H2O2. Increased adhesion of monocytes to BAEC and expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in response to TNF-α treatment was reduced by pretreatment with hesperetin. In the clinical study, when compared with placebo, hesperidin treatment increased flow-mediated dilation (10.26 ± 1.19 vs. 7.78 ± 0.76%; P = 0.02) and reduced concentrations of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A protein, soluble E-selectin). Conclusions: Novel mechanisms for hesperetin action in endothelial cells inform effects of oral hesperidin treatment to improve endothelial dysfunction and reduce circulating markers of inflammation in our exploratory clinical trial. Hesperetin has vasculoprotective actions that may explain beneficial cardiovascular effects of citrus consumption. PMID:21346065

  3. Acute Effect of High-Intensity Eccentric Exercise on Vascular Endothelial Function in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Ra, Song-Gyu; Shiraki, Hitoshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    Choi, Y, Akazawa, N, Zempo-Miyaki, A, Ra, S-G, Shiraki, H, Ajisaka, R, and Maeda, S. Acute effect of high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function in young men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2279-2285, 2016-Increased central arterial stiffness is as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence regarding the effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness is conflicting. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness. We evaluated the acute changes in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and arterial stiffness after high-intensity eccentric exercise. Seven healthy, sedentary men (age, 24 ± 1 year) performed maximal eccentric elbow flexor exercise using their nondominant arm. Before and 45 minutes after eccentric exercise, carotid arterial compliance and brachial artery FMD and L-FMC in the nonexercised arm were measured. Carotid arterial compliance was significantly decreased, and β-stiffness index significantly increased after eccentric exercise. Brachial FMD was significantly reduced after eccentric exercise, whereas there was no significant difference in brachial L-FMC before and after eccentric exercise. A positive correlation was detected between change in arterial compliance and change in FMD (r = 0.779; p ≤ 0.05), and a negative correlation was detected between change in β-stiffness index and change in FMD (r = -0.891; p < 0.01) with eccentric exercise. In this study, acute high-intensity eccentric exercise increased central arterial stiffness; this increase was accompanied by a decrease in endothelial function caused by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation but not by a change in endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction.

  4. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade Associated with Statin Improves Endothelial Function in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Bedirian, Ricardo; Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Ladeira, Márcia Cristina; Oigman, Wille; Neves, Mário Fritsch

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that statins have pleiotropic effects, such as reduction in blood pressure, and improvement in endothelial function and vascular stiffness. Objective To analyze if prior statin use influences the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors on blood pressure, endothelial function, and vascular stiffness. Methods Patients with diabetes and hypertension with office systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg had their antihypertensive medications replaced by amlodipine during 6 weeks. They were then randomized to either benazepril or losartan for 12 additional weeks while continuing on amlodipine. Blood pressure (assessed with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring), endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation), and vascular stiffness (pulse wave velocity) were evaluated before and after the combined treatment. In this study, a post hoc analysis was performed to compare patients who were or were not on statins (SU and NSU groups, respectively). Results The SU group presented a greater reduction in the 24-hour systolic blood pressure (from 134 to 122 mmHg, p = 0.007), and in the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (from 6.5 to 10.9%, p = 0.003) when compared with the NSU group (from 137 to 128 mmHg, p = 0.362, and from 7.5 to 8.3%, p = 0.820). There was no statistically significant difference in pulse wave velocity (SU group: from 9.95 to 9.90 m/s, p = 0.650; NSU group: from 10.65 to 11.05 m/s, p = 0.586). Conclusion Combined use of statins, amlodipine, and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors improves the antihypertensive response and endothelial function in patients with hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26465872

  5. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications.

  6. Curcumin ingestion and exercise training improve vascular endothelial function in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Miyaki, Asako; Tanabe, Yoko; Sugawara, Jun; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial function is declines with aging and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle modification, particularly aerobic exercise and dietary adjustment, has a favorable effect on vascular aging. Curcumin is a major component of turmeric with known anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. We investigated the effects of curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training on flow-mediated dilation as an indicator endothelial function in postmenopausal women. A total of 32 postmenopausal women were assigned to 3 groups: control, exercise, and curcumin groups. The curcumin group ingested curcumin orally for 8 weeks. The exercise group underwent moderate aerobic exercise training for 8 weeks. Before and after each intervention, flow-mediated dilation was measured. No difference in baseline flow-mediated dilation or other key dependent variables were detected among the groups. Flow-mediated dilation increased significantly and equally in the curcumin and exercise groups, whereas no changes were observed in the control group. Our results indicated that curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training can increase flow-mediated dilation in postmenopausal women, suggesting that both can potentially improve the age-related decline in endothelial function.

  7. Effect of breaking up sedentary time with callisthenics on endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sophie E; Gladwell, Valerie F

    2016-08-25

    Periods of prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in lower limb conduit arteries, which is attenuated with physical activity breaks. The effect of activity breaks on upper limb arteries has not been examined. This study assessed changes in brachial artery endothelial function following either a prolonged sitting period or breaking up this sedentary time by performing sets of callisthenics exercises. Ten healthy participants (6 men) completed 2 conditions in a counterbalanced order: (a) 1-h 26-min sitting, or (b) breaking up this period every 20 min by performing a set of 5 callisthenics exercises. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed via ultrasound using the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique prior to and following each condition, while brachial shear rate (SR) was acquired after each set of callisthenics. There was no significant change in FMD over time (P = 0.09) or between conditions (P = 0.12). Compared to sitting, brachial SR increased following each set of callisthenics, with a significant difference after the third break (Sit: 33.94 ± 12.79 s(-1); Callisthenics: 57.16 ± 30.48 s(-1), P = 0.02). Alterations in SR in the upper limbs suggest callisthenics may be an effective intervention to break up sedentary time and attenuate the potentially deleterious effects of prolonged sitting on cardiovascular health.

  8. Relationships between maximal oxygen uptake and endothelial function in healthy male adults: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Silvio; Canino, Baldassare; Batsis, John A; Buscemi, Chiara; Calandrino, Vincenzo; Mattina, Alessandro; Arnone, Mariangela; Caimi, Gregorio; Cerasola, Giovanni; Verga, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Aerobic capacity, as indicated by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) has an important role in contrasting the traditional cardiovascular risk factors and preventing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is known that endothelial function, measured as flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, is strictly linked to atherogenesis and cardiovascular risk. However, the relationship between VO2 max and FMD has not been fully investigated especially in healthy non-obese subjects. This preliminary study cross-sectionally investigated the relationship between VO2 max and FMD in 22 non-obese, healthy sedentary male subjects. Dividing the cohort in two subgroups of 11 subjects each according to the median value of VO2 max, the FMD was significantly lower in the subgroup with lower VO2 max (mean ± sem: 7.1 ± 0.7 vs. 9.5 ± 0.8 %; P = 0.035). Absolute VO2 max (mL min(-1)) was significantly and independently correlated with body fat mass (r = -0.50; P = 0.018) and with FMD (r = 0.44; P = 0.039). This preliminary study suggests that maximal oxygen uptake is independently correlated with endothelial function in healthy non-obese adults. These results are also in agreement with the possibility that improving maximal oxygen uptake may have a favorable effect on endothelial function and vice versa.

  9. The impact of decreases in air temperature and increases in ozone on markers of endothelial function in individuals having type-2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have reported an association between air pollution and endothelial dysfunction, especially in individuals having diabetes. However, very few studies have examined the impact of air temperature on endothelial function. The objective of this analysis was to investig...

  10. Endothelial Cells Derived from the Blood-Brain Barrier and Islets of Langerhans Differ in their Response to the Effects of Bilirubin on Oxidative Stress Under Hyperglycemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kapitulnik, Jaime; Benaim, Clara; Sasson, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). High glucose levels (hyperglycemia) generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 μM) induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM) levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM) glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 μM) did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ("physiological") UCB concentrations (0.1-5 μM) attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 μM) increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  11. Endothelial Function and Serum Concentration of Toxic Metals in Frequent Consumers of Fish

    PubMed Central

    Buscemi, Silvio; Vasto, Sonya; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Grosso, Giuseppe; Bergante, Sonia; Galvano, Fabio; Massenti, Fatima Maria; Amodio, Emanuele; Rosafio, Giuseppe; Verga, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Consumption of fish is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk, but there is paucity of data concerning its effect on endothelial function. Furthermore, investigation of the effects of fish consumption on health must take into account the ingestion of contaminants, including transition metals and some metalloids, which may have unfavorable effects on health, including those on the cardiovascular system. We investigated the association between fish consumption, endothelial function (flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery), and serum concentration of some toxic metals in apparently healthy people. Methods Twenty-nine high fish consumers (at least 3 portions a week) were compared with 25 low fish consumers (less than 1 portion a week). All participants were free of diabetes, cardiovascular or other systemic diseases. Serum metal (antimonium, arsenic, mercury, lead, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, strontium) concentrations were measured in subgroups of 24 high fish consumers and 19 low fish consumers. Results Both groups exhibited similar habitual dietary patterns, age and anthropometric characteristics. The high fish consumers had higher flow mediated dilation (9.7±1.8 vs. 7.3±1.9%; P<0.001), but also higher serum concentrations of mercury (5.87±2.69 vs. 1.65±1.10 mcg/L; P<0.001) and arsenic (6.04±3.25 vs. 2.30±1.58 mcg/L; P<0.001). The fasting plasma glucose concentrations were significantly correlated with both mercury (r = 0.39; P = 0.01) and arsenic concentrations (r = 0.55; P<0.001). Conclusions Habitual consumption of high amounts of fish is associated with better endothelial function despite higher serum concentrations of mercury and arsenic. PMID:25401695

  12. Endothelial Function and Carotid Intimal Medial Thickness in Asymptomatic Subjects With and Without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Shankarappa, Ravindranath K; Rangan, Kapil; Chandrasekaran, Dhanalakshmi; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2012-01-01

    Background The study was performed to assess endothelial function and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) in asymptomatic patients, with and without risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Methods A cross sectional survey of asymptomatic patients, aged 21 - 60 years, with and without risk factors for cardiovascular disease was recruited from the outpatient department of Cardiology. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid IMT was determined using a high resolution B mode ultrasonography system. Results A total of 104 patients were included in the study. The mean carotid IMT was 0.67 ± 0.05 mm in the group without risk factors and 0.78 ± 0.12 mm in the group with risk factors (P value < 0.05). Endothelial dysfunction (ED) and increased carotid IMT were more significant in the group with risk factors (P value < 0.001). Age, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, body mass index and HbA1c had a significant correlation with both IMT and FMD response. A higher proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus (87%), metabolic syndrome (86%) and family history of premature coronary artery disease (78%) had ED. In subjects with normal coronary angiogram, 71% had abnormal FMD response and 36% had increased carotid IMT. Conclusion In asymptomatic subjects, risk factors for cardiovascular disease are significantly associated with objective evidence of ED and increased carotid IMT. FMD response and carotid IMT values are likely to yield additional information beyond traditional risk factors for classifying patients in regard to the likelihood of cardiovascular event. Therapeutic measures with the aim of improving endothelial function and reducing carotid IMT may reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Anthocyanin Bioavailability from Acute Cranberry Juice Consumption and Evidence of Effects on Endothelial Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse correlation between intake of flavonoidcontaining foods and cardiovascular risk. Multiple health beneficial effect of flavonoids have been proposed to account for this observation, including effects on endothelial function. Cranberries contain relatively high...

  14. Impaired postprandial endothelial function depends on the type of fat consumed by healthy men.

    PubMed

    Berry, Sarah E E; Tucker, Sally; Banerji, Radhika; Jiang, Benyu; Chowienczyk, Phillip J; Charles, Sonia M; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2008-10-01

    Postprandial lipemia impairs endothelial function possibly via an oxidative stress mechanism. A stearic acid-rich triacylglycerol (TAG) (shea butter) results in a blunted postprandial increase in plasma TAG compared with an oleic acid-rich TAG; however, its acute effects on endothelial function and oxidative stress are unknown. A randomized crossover trial (n = 17 men) compared the effects of 50 g fat, rich in stearic acid [shea butter blend (SA)] or oleic acid [high oleic sunflower oil (HO)], on changes in endothelial function [brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD)], arterial tone [pulse wave analysis (PWA), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV(c-f))], and oxidative stress (plasma 8-isoprostane F2alpha) at fasting and 3 h following the test meals. The postprandial increase in plasma TAG was lower (66% lower incremental area under curve) following the SA meal [28.3 (9.7, 46.9)] than after the HO meal [83.4 (57.0, 109.8); P < 0.001] (geometric means with 95% CI, arbitary units). Following the HO meal, there was a decrease in FMD [-3.0% (-4.4, -1.6); P < 0.001] and an increase in plasma 8-isoprostane F2alpha [10.4ng/L (3.8, 16.9); P = 0.005] compared with fasting values, but no changes followed the SA meal. The changes in 8-isoprostane F2alpha and FMD differed between meals and were 14.0 ng/L (6.4, 21.6; P = 0.001) and 1.75% (0.10, 3.39; P = 0.02), respectively. The reductions in PWA and PWV c-f did not differ between meals. This study demonstrates that a stearic acid-rich fat attenuates the postprandial impairment in endothelial function compared with an oleic acid-rich fat and supports the hypothesis that postprandial lipemia impairs endothelial function via an increase in oxidative stress.

  15. Soy provides modest benefits on endothelial function without affecting inflammatory biomarkers in adults at cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Reverri, Elizabeth J.; LaSalle, Colette D.; Franke, Adrian A.; Steinberg, Francene M.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Epidemiological evidence supports an association between whole soy food consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this randomized, controlled, crossover study was to evaluate the effects of soy nut consumption on inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial function and to assess whether isoflavone metabolism to secondary products, equol and/or O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA), modifies these responses. Methods and Results n=17 adults at cardiometabolic risk were randomly assigned to the order of two snack interventions, soy nuts and macronutrient-matched control snack, for four weeks each, separated by a two week washout period. Outcome measures included biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glycemic control (ELISA and clinical analyzers), endothelial function and arterial stiffness (peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT)), and isoflavone metabolites (LC-MS/MS). Results revealed that consuming soy nuts improved arterial stiffness as assessed by the augmentation index using PAT (P=0.03), despite lack of improvement in inflammatory biomarkers. Addition of equol and/ODMA production status as covariates did not significantly change these results. Conclusions Soy nuts when added to a usual diet for one month provide some benefit on arterial stiffness in adults at cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25351805

  16. The Association between Circulating MicroRNA Levels and Coronary Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Chung, Woo-Young; Herrmann, Joerg; Jordan, Kyra L.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Human microRNAs (miRs) have been implicated in human diseases presumably through the downregulation and silencing of targeted genes via post-translational modifications. However, their role in the early stage of coronary atherosclerosis is not known. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with early atherosclerosis and coronary endothelial dysfunction (CED) have alterations in transcoronary miR gradients. Patients underwent coronary angiography and endothelial function testing in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Patients were divided into abnormal (n = 26) and normal (n = 22) microvascular coronary endothelial function based on intracoronary response to infused acetylcholine measured as a percent change in coronary blood flow (CBF) and arterial diameter. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the aorta and coronary sinus at the time of catheterization for RNA isolation, and miR subsequently assessed. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Patients with microvascular CED displayed transcoronary gradients significantly elevated in miR-92a and miR-133 normalized to C-elegans-39 miR. Percent change in CBF and the transcoronary gradient of miR-133 displayed a significant inverse correlation (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.03). Thus, we present novel data whereupon selected miRs demonstrate elevated transcoronary gradients in patients with microvascular CED. The current findings support further studies on the mechanistic role of miRs in coronary atherosclerosis and in humans. PMID:25310838

  17. Structural and functional characterization of endothelial microparticles released by cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Karina A.; Rezania, Samin; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Poirier, Christophe; Cao, Danting; Justice, Matthew J.; Patel, Milan; Tsvetkova, Irina; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Mikosz, Andrew; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Jacobson, Sean; Cardoso, Angelo; Carlesso, Nadia; Hubbard, Walter C.; Kechris, Katerina; Dragnea, Bogdan; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McClintock, Jeanette; Petrache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are emerging as biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), but their mechanism of release and function remain unknown. We assessed biochemical and functional characteristics of EMPs and circulating microparticles (cMPs) released by CS. CS exposure was sufficient to increase microparticle levels in plasma of humans and mice, and in supernatants of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. CS-released EMPs contained predominantly exosomes that were significantly enriched in let-7d, miR-191; miR-126; and miR125a, microRNAs that reciprocally decreased intracellular in CS-exposed endothelium. CS-released EMPs and cMPs were ceramide-rich and required the ceramide-synthesis enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) for their release, an enzyme which was found to exhibit significantly higher activity in plasma of COPD patients or of CS-exposed mice. The ex vivo or in vivo engulfment of EMPs or cMPs by peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages was associated with significant inhibition of efferocytosis. Our results indicate that CS, via aSMase, releases circulating EMPs with distinct microRNA cargo and that EMPs affect the clearance of apoptotic cells by specialized macrophages. These targetable effects may be important in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to endothelial injury and inflammation in smokers. PMID:27530098

  18. Endothelial function, blood pressure control, and risk modification: impact of irbesartan alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Salvadeo, Sibilla AT

    2010-01-01

    Irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, is approved as monotherapy, or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of hypertension in many countries worldwide. Data in the literature suggest that irbesartan is effective for reducing blood pressure over a 24-hour period with once-daily administration, and slows the progression of renal disease in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, irbesartan shows a good safety and tolerability profile, compared with angiotensin II inhibitors and other angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists. Thus, irbesartan appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with hypertension, including those with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. Irbesartan has an inhibitory effect on the pressor response to angiotensin II and improves arterial stiffness, vascular endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation in hypertensive patients. There has been considerable interest recently in the renoprotective effect of irbesartan, which appears to be independent of reductions in blood pressure. In particular, mounting data suggests that irbesartan improves endothelial function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the kidneys. Recent studies have highlighted a possible role for irbesartan in improving coronary artery inflammation and vascular dysfunction. In this review we summarize and comment on the most important data available with regard to antihypertensive effect, endothelial function improvement, and cardiovascular risk reduction with irbesartan. PMID:21949618

  19. Compatibility Study of Danggui Buxue Tang on Chemical Ingredients, Angiogenesis and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Lan; Li, Zhi-Cheng; Xie, Rui-Fang; Wang, You-Hua; Zhou, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT) is a classic Chinese herbal formula which consists of Astragali mongholici Radix and Angelica sinensis Radix (ASR). For chemical ingredients, HPLC were performed. Results showed compared with single herbs, DBT decoction could promote the dissolution of ingredients such as ferulic acid and calycosin. Furthermore, when ratio of AMR to ASR was 5 to 1, synthetic score was the best. For angiogenesis, normal and injured zebrafish model were applied. Results showed DBT and its ingredients had angiogenesis effects on Sub Intestinal vessels (SIVs) of normal zebrafish. Meanwhile, DBT and its single herbs could also recover Inter-Segmental Vessels (ISVs) injured by VRI. Angiogenesis effects of DBT on ISVs were better than single herbs. AMR extract, Total Saponins of AMR, Polysaccharide of ASR, ferulic acid, calycosin and calycosin-7-glucoside could be effective ingredients for angiogenisis. For endothelium functions, Lysoph-Osphatidyl choline was used to damage rat endothelial function of thoracic aorta. The results showed DBT and its single herbs could improve endothelial dysfunctions in dose-dependence. Both ferulic acid and calycosin-7-glucoside could also improve endothelium dysfunction in dose dependence. Therefore, compatibility of DBT was reasonable. Compared with single herbs, DBT could promote dissolution of effective ingredients, enhance angiogenesis and relieve endothelial dysfunction. PMID:28327640

  20. Endothelial function impairment in chronic venous insufficiency: effect of some cardiovascular protectant agents.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Omar F; Ranero, Alejandra; Hong, Enrique; Vidrio, Horacio

    In segments of human varicose veins, endothelial function was assessed by measuring relaxation induced by acetylcholine in noradrenaline-precontracted preparations. In addition, concentration-response curves to acetylcholine were obtained before and after incubation with the arterial endothelium protectant agents captopril, losartan, troglitazone, pravastatin, or simvastatin. The antivaricose agent escin was also tested. Mean acetylcholine-induced relaxation of varicose venous rings was about 13%, approximately one third of that reported for control saphenous veins. Concentration-response curves to acetylcholine were ''u'' shaped, the result of endothelium-mediated relaxation at low concentrations, superseded by subsequent smooth muscle contractile responses. Relaxation was enhanced by the endothelium-protecting agents and by escin, troglitazone being the least, and simvastatin the most effective. It was concluded that endothelial dysfunction is present in varicose veins, that this anomaly can be reverted by cardiovascular protecting agents, and that it can play a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

  1. Critical role of TRPP2 and TRPC1 channels in stretch-induced injury of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berrout, Jonathan; Jin, Min; O'Neil, Roger G

    2012-02-03

    The microvessels of the brain are very sensitive to mechanical stresses such as observed in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such stresses can quickly lead to dysfunction of the microvessel endothelial cells, including disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB). It is now evident that elevation of cytosolic calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) can compromise the BBB integrity, however the mechanism by which mechanical injury can produce a [Ca2+]i increase in brain endothelial cells is unclear. To assess the effects of mechanical/stretch injury on [Ca2+]i signaling, mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells (bEnd3) were grown to confluency on elasticized membranes and [Ca2+]i monitored using fura 2 fluorescence imaging. Application of an injury, using a pressure/stretch pulse of 50 ms, induced a rapid transient increase in [Ca2+]i. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, the injury-induced [Ca2+]i transient was greatly reduced, but not fully eliminated, while unloading of Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin treatment in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ abolished the injury transient. Application of LOE-908 and amiloride, TRPC and TRPP2 channel blockers, respectively, both reduced the transient [Ca2+]i increase. Further, siRNA knockdown assays directed at TRPC1 and TRPP2 expression also resulted in a reduction of the injury-induced [Ca2+]i response. In addition, stretch injury induced increases of NO production and actin stress fiber formation, both of which were markedly reduced upon treatment with LOE908 and/or amiloride. We conclude that mechanical injury of brain endothelial cells induces a rapid influx of calcium, mediated by TRPC1 and TRPP2 channels, which leads to NO synthesis and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement.

  2. Adenosine promotes vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jonathan; Karmouty‐Quintana, Harry; Le, Thuy T.; Chen, Ning‐Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Molina, Jose; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hyperoxic lung injury is characterized by cellular damage from high oxygen concentrations that lead to an inflammatory response in the lung with cellular infiltration and pulmonary edema. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that is generated extracellularly by CD73 in response to injury. Extracellular adenosine signals through cell surface receptors and has been found to be elevated and plays a protective role in acute injury situations. In particular, ADORA2B activation is protective in acute lung injury. However, little is known about the role of adenosine signaling in hyperoxic lung injury. We hypothesized that hyperoxia‐induced lung injury leads to CD73‐mediated increases in extracellular adenosine, which is protective through ADORA2B signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we exposed C57BL6, CD73−/−, and Adora2B−/− mice to 95% oxygen or room air and examined markers of pulmonary inflammation, edema, and monitored lung histology. Hyperoxic exposure caused pulmonary inflammation and edema in association with elevations in lung adenosine levels. Loss of CD73‐mediated extracellular adenosine production exacerbated pulmonary edema without affecting inflammatory cell counts. Furthermore, loss of the ADORA2B had similar results with worsening of pulmonary edema following hyperoxia exposure without affecting inflammatory cell infiltration. This loss of barrier function correlated with a decrease in occludin in pulmonary vasculature in CD73−/− and Adora2B−/− mice following hyperoxia exposure. These results demonstrate that exposure to a hyperoxic environment causes lung injury associated with an increase in adenosine concentration, and elevated adenosine levels protect vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury through the ADORA2B‐dependent regulation of occludin. PMID:25263205

  3. Contribution of insulin and Akt1 signaling to endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the regulation of endothelial function and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Symons, J David; McMillin, Shawna L; Riehle, Christian; Tanner, Jason; Palionyte, Milda; Hillas, Elaine; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Robert C; Birnbaum, Morris J; McClain, Donald A; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Gale, Derrick; Wilson, Lloyd J; Abel, E Dale

    2009-05-08

    Impaired insulin signaling via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the vasculature has been postulated to lead to arterial dysfunction and hypertension in obesity and other insulin resistant states. To investigate this, we compared insulin signaling in the vasculature, endothelial function, and systemic blood pressure in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet to mice with genetic ablation of insulin receptors in all vascular tissues (TTr-IR(-/-)) or mice with genetic ablation of Akt1 (Akt1-/-). HF mice developed obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated free fatty acids that was associated with endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Basal and insulin-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt in the vasculature was preserved, but basal and insulin-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was abolished in vessels from HF versus lean mice. In contrast, basal vascular eNOS phosphorylation, endothelial function, and blood pressure were normal despite absent insulin-mediated eNOS phosphorylation in TTr-IR(-/-) mice and absent insulin-mediated eNOS phosphorylation via Akt1 in Akt1-/- mice. In cultured endothelial cells, 6 hours of incubation with palmitate attenuated basal and insulin-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and NO production despite normal activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt. Moreover, incubation of isolated arteries with palmitate impaired endothelium-dependent but not vascular smooth muscle function. Collectively, these results indicate that lower arterial eNOS phosphorylation, hypertension, and vascular dysfunction following HF feeding do not result from defective upstream signaling via Akt, but from free fatty acid-mediated impairment of eNOS phosphorylation.

  4. Treatment of denture-related stomatitis improves endothelial function assessed by flow-mediated vascular dilation

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Joanna; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Anna; Nowakowski, Daniel; Loster, Jolanta; Dembowska, Elżbieta; Robertson, Douglas; Guzik, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The presence of oral inflammation has recently been linked with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. While numerous studies have described links between periodontitis and endothelial dysfunction, little is known about the influence of denture-related stomatitis (DRS) on cardiovascular risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the treatment of DRS can lead to improvement of the clinical measures of vascular dysfunction. Material and methods The DRS patients were treated with a local oral antifungal agent for 3 weeks. Blood pressure, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and nitroglycerine-mediated vascular dilatation (NMD) were measured during three study visits: before treatment, one day and two months after conclusion of antifungal therapy. Results Flow-mediated dilatation measurements showed significant improvement of endothelial function 2 months after treatment (FMD median 5%, 95 CI: 3–8.3 vs. 11%, 95% CI: 8.8–14.4; p < 0.01), while there was no difference in control, endothelium-independent vasorelaxations (NMD; median = 15.3%, 95% CI: 10.8–19.3 vs. 12.7%, 95% CI: 10.6–15; p = 0.3). Other cardiovascular parameters such as systolic (median = 125 mm Hg; 95% CI: 116–129 vs. 120 mm Hg, 95% CI: 116–126; p = 0.1) as well as diastolic blood pressure and heart rate (median = 65.5 bpm, 95% CI: 56.7–77.7 vs. 71 bpm, 95% CI: 66.7–75; p = 0.5) did not change during or after the treatment. Conclusions Treatment of DRS is associated with improvement of endothelial function. Since endothelial dysfunction is known to precede the development of severe cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, patients should be more carefully screened for DRS in general dental practice, and immediate DRS treatment should be advised. PMID:28144257

  5. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  6. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with dysfunctional versus normally functioning congenitally bicuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Perl, Leor; Leshem-Lev, Dorit; Dadush, Oshrat; Bental, Tamir; Shapira, Yaron; Yedidya, Idit; Greenberg, Gabi; Kornowski, Ran; Sagie, Alexander; Battler, Alexander; Lev, Eli I

    2011-07-15

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) may gradually develop significant valve dysfunction, whereas others remain free of dysfunction. Factors that determine the prognosis of BAV remain unclear. Because endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have a role in the repair of endothelial surfaces after injury, we hypothesized that EPCs may also be involved in preventing BAV degeneration. Accordingly, we compared EPC level and function in patients with BAV with versus without valve dysfunction. The study group included 22 patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction (at least moderate aortic regurgitation and/or at least moderate aortic stenosis). The control group included 28 patients with BAV without valve dysfunction. All patients had 1 blood sample taken. Proportion of peripheral mononuclear cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133 and CD34 was evaluated by flow cytometry. EPC colony-forming units (CFUs) were grown from peripheral mononuclear cells, characterized, and counted after 7 days of culture. The 2 groups had similar clinical characteristics except for higher prevalence of hypertension in the dysfunctional valve group. Number of EPC CFUs was smaller in the dysfunctional valve group (32 CFUs/plate, 15 to 42.5, vs 48 CFUs/plate, 30 to 62.5, respectively, p = 0.01), and the migratory capacity of the cells in this group was decreased. In addition, the proportion of cells coexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133, and CD34 tended to be smaller in the dysfunctional valve group. In conclusion, patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction appear to have circulating EPCs with impaired functional properties. These findings require validation by further studies.

  7. Control of the blood-brain barrier function in cancer cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Blecharz, Kinga G; Colla, Ruben; Rohde, Veit; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral metastases are the most common brain neoplasms seen clinically in the adults and comprise more than half of all brain tumours. Actual treatment options for brain metastases that include surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are rarely curative, although palliative treatment improves survival and life quality of patients carrying brain-metastatic tumours. Chemotherapy in particular has also shown limited or no activity in brain metastasis of most tumour types. Many chemotherapeutic agents used systemically do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), whereas others may transiently weaken the BBB and allow extravasation of tumour cells from the circulation into the brain parenchyma. Increasing evidence points out that the interaction between the BBB and tumour cells plays a key role for implantation and growth of brain metastases in the central nervous system. The BBB, as the tightest endothelial barrier, prevents both early detection and treatment by creating a privileged microenvironment. Therefore, as observed in several in vivo studies, precise targetting the BBB by a specific transient opening of the structure making it permeable for therapeutic compounds, might potentially help to overcome this difficult clinical problem. Moreover, a better understanding of the molecular features of the BBB, its interrelation with metastatic tumour cells and the elucidation of cellular mechanisms responsible for establishing cerebral metastasis must be clearly outlined in order to promote treatment modalities that particularly involve chemotherapy. This in turn would substantially expand the survival and quality of life of patients with brain metastasis, and potentially increase the remission rate. Therefore, the focus of this review is to summarise the current knowledge on the role and function of the BBB in cancer metastasis.

  8. Functional interplay between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase in migrating endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Genís, Laura; Gonzalo, Pilar; Tutor, Antonio S.; Gálvez, Beatriz G.; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Zaragoza, Carlos; Lamas, Santiago; Tryggvason, Karl; Apte, Suneel S.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is essential for vascular homeostasis and is also a critical modulator of angiogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of NO action during angiogenesis remain elusive. We have investigated the potential relationship between NO and membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) during endothelial migration and capillary tube formation. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) colocalizes with MT1-MMP at motility-associated structures in migratory human endothelial cells (ECs); moreover, NO is produced at these structures and is released into the medium during EC migration. We have therefore addressed 2 questions: (1) the putative regulation of MT1-MMP by NO in migratory ECs; and (2) the requirement for MT1-MMP in NO-induced EC migration and tube formation. NO upregulates MT1-MMP membrane clustering on migratory human ECs, and this is accompanied by increased degradation of type I collagen substrate. MT1-MMP membrane expression and localization are impaired in lung ECs from eNOS-deficient mice, and these cells also show impaired migration and tube formation in vitro. Inhibition of MT1-MMP with a neutralizing antibody impairs NOinduced tube formation by human ECs, and NO-induced endothelial migration and tube formation are impaired in lung ECs from mice deficient in MT1-MMP. MT1-MMP thus appears to be a key molecular effector of NO during the EC migration and angiogenic processes, and is a potential therapeutic target for NO-associated vascular disorders. PMID:17606763

  9. Functional interplay between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in migrating endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Genís, Laura; Gonzalo, Pilar; Tutor, Antonio S; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Zaragoza, Carlos; Lamas, Santiago; Tryggvason, Karl; Apte, Suneel S; Arroyo, Alicia G

    2007-10-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is essential for vascular homeostasis and is also a critical modulator of angiogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of NO action during angiogenesis remain elusive. We have investigated the potential relationship between NO and membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) during endothelial migration and capillary tube formation. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) colocalizes with MT1-MMP at motility-associated structures in migratory human endothelial cells (ECs); moreover, NO is produced at these structures and is released into the medium during EC migration. We have therefore addressed 2 questions: (1) the putative regulation of MT1-MMP by NO in migratory ECs; and (2) the requirement for MT1-MMP in NO-induced EC migration and tube formation. NO upregulates MT1-MMP membrane clustering on migratory human ECs, and this is accompanied by increased degradation of type I collagen substrate. MT1-MMP membrane expression and localization are impaired in lung ECs from eNOS-deficient mice, and these cells also show impaired migration and tube formation in vitro. Inhibition of MT1-MMP with a neutralizing antibody impairs NOinduced tube formation by human ECs, and NO-induced endothelial migration and tube formation are impaired in lung ECs from mice deficient in MT1-MMP. MT1-MMP thus appears to be a key molecular effector of NO during the EC migration and angiogenic processes, and is a potential therapeutic target for NO-associated vascular disorders.

  10. Geniposide ameliorates TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats via reducing inflammatory cytokine release and restoring impaired intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Yan-Li; Xu, Ming; Yu, Chang-Chun; Lian, Meng-Qiao; Tang, Ze-Yao; Li, Chuan-Xun; Lin, Yuan

    2017-03-06

    Geniposide is an iridoid glycosides purified from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is known to have antiinflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-tumor activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of geniposide on experimental rat colitis and to reveal the related mechanisms. Experimental rat colitis was induced by rectal administration of a TNBS solution. The rats were treated with geniposide (25, 50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) or with sulfasalazine (SASP, 100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) as positive control for 14 consecutive days. A Caco-2 cell monolayer exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) was used as an epithelial barrier dysfunction model. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured to evaluate intestinal barrier function. In rats with TNBS-induced colitis, administration of geniposide or SASP significantly increased the TNBS-decreased body weight and ameliorated TNBS-induced experimental colitis and related symptoms. Geniposide or SASP suppressed inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) release and neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) in the colon. In Caco-2 cells, geniposide (25-100 μmol/L) ameliorated LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via dose-dependently increasing transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The results from both in vivo and in vitro studies revealed that geniposide down-regulated NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS and MLCK protein expression, up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and ZO-1), and facilitated AMPK phosphorylation. Both AMPK siRNA transfection and AMPK overexpression abrogated the geniposide-reduced MLCK protein expression, suggesting that geniposide ameliorated barrier dysfunction via AMPK-mediated inhibition of the MLCK pathway. In conclusion, geniposide ameliorated TNBS-induced experimental rat colitis by both reducing inflammation and modulating the disrupted epithelial barrier function via activating the AMPK signaling pathway..

  11. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates sidestream cigarette smoke-induced endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Low, Brad; Liang, Mei; Fu, Jian

    2007-07-01

    Second-hand smoke is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. So far, little is known about the signaling mechanisms of second-hand smoke-induced vascular dysfunction. Endothelial junctions are fundamental structures important for maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our study showed that sidestream cigarette smoke (SCS), a major component of second-hand smoke, was able to disrupt endothelial junctions and increase endothelial permeability. Sidestream cigarette smoke stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and myosin light chain (MLC). A selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB203580) prevented SCS-induced loss of endothelial barrier integrity as evidenced by transendothelial resistance measurements. Resveratrol, an antioxidant that was able to inhibit SCS-induced p38 MAPK and MLC phosphorylation, also protected endothelial cells from the damage. Thus, p38 MAPK mediates SCS-induced endothelial permeability. Inhibition of p38 MAPK may have therapeutic potential for second-hand smoke-induced vascular injury.

  12. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment and blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela; Ureña-Guerrero, Monica E; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo I; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    It is likely that monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the excitotoxin that has been most commonly employed to characterize the process of excitotoxicity and to improve understanding of the ways that this process is related to several pathological conditions of the central nervous system. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal MSG treatment produces a significant pathophysiological impact on adulthood, which could be due to modifications in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and vice versa. This mini-review analyzes this topic through brief descriptions about excitotoxicity, BBB structure and function, role of the BBB in the regulation of Glu extracellular levels, conditions that promote breakdown of the BBB, and modifications induced by neonatal MSG treatment that could alter the behavior of the BBB. In conclusion, additional studies to better characterize the effects of neonatal MSG treatment on excitatory amino acids transporters, ionic exchangers, and efflux transporters, as well as the role of the signaling pathways mediated by erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor in the cellular elements of the BBB, should be performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the increase in neurovascular permeability associated with excitotoxicity observed in several diseases and studied using neonatal MSG treatment.

  13. Modulation of cerebral endothelial cell function by TGF-β in glioblastoma: VEGF-dependent angiogenesis versus endothelial mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shanmugarajan; Szabo, Emese; Burghardt, Isabel; Frei, Karl; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Weller, Michael

    2015-09-08

    Glioblastoma are among the most angiogenic tumors. The molecular mechanisms that control blood vessel formation by endothelial cells (EC) in glioblastoma remain incompletely understood. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a key regulatory cytokine that has proinvasive and stemness-maintaining autocrine properties in glioblastoma and confers immunosuppression to the tumor microenvironment. Here we characterize potential pro- and anti-angiogenic activities of TGF-β in the context of glioblastoma in vitro, using human brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and glioblastoma-derived endothelial cells (GMEC) as model systems. We find that TGF-β induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) mRNA expression and protein release in a TGF-β receptor (TβR) II / activin-like kinase (ALK)-5-dependent manner under normoxia and hypoxia, defining potential indirect proangiogenic activity of TGF-β in glioblastoma. In parallel, exogenous TGF-β has also inhibitory effects on EC properties and induces endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in hCMEC and GMEC. Accordingly, direct inhibition of endogenous TGF-β/ALK-5 signalling increases EC properties such as tube formation, von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and claudin (CLDN) 5 expression. Yet, the supernatant of TGF-β-stimulated hCMEC and GMEC strongly promotes EC-related gene expression and tube formation in a cediranib-sensitive manner. These observations shed light on the complex pro- and anti-angiogenic pathways involving the cross-talk between TGF-β and VEGF/PLGF signalling in glioblastoma which may involve parallel stimulation of angiogenesis and EndMT in distinct target cell populations.

  14. Microvesicles Derived from Inflammation-Challenged Endothelial Cells Modulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qunwen; Liu, Hua; Zheng, Chunyan; Zhao, Yuhui; Liao, Xiaorong; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yanfang; Zhao, Bin; Lazartigues, Eric; Yang, Yi; Ma, Xiaotang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Microvesicles (MV) can modulate the function of recipient cells by transferring their contents. Our previous study highlighted that MV released from tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plus serum deprivation (SD)-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells, induce detrimental effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of endothelial MV (EMV) on proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of human brain vascular smooth cells (HBVSMC). Methods: EMV were prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) cultured in a TNF-α plus SD medium. RNase-EMV were made by treating EMV with RNase A for RNA depletion. The proliferation, apoptosis and migration abilities of HBVSMC were determined after co-culture with EMV or RNase-EMV. The Mek1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, was used for pathway analysis. Western blot was used for analyzing the proteins of Mek1/2, Erk1/2, phosphorylation Erk1/2, activated caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The level of miR-146a-5p was measured by qRT-PCR. Results: (1) EMV significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of HBVSMC. The effects were accompanied by an increase in Mek1/2 and p-Erk1/2, which could be abolished by PD0325901; (2) EMV decreased the apoptotic rate of HBVSMC by approximately 35%, which was accompanied by cleaved caspase-3 down-regulation and Bcl-2 up-regulation; (3) EMV increased miR-146a-5p level in HBVSMC by about 2-folds; (4) RNase-treated EMV were less effective than EMV on HBVSMC activities and miR-146a-5p expression. Conclusion: EMV generated under inflammation challenge can modulate HBVSMC function and fate via their carried RNA. This is associated with activation of theMek1/2/Erk1/2 pathway and caspase-3/Bcl-2 regulation, during which miR-146a-5p may play an important role. The data suggest that EMV derived from inflammation-challenged endothelial cells are detrimental to HBVSMC homeostatic functions, highlighting potential novel therapeutic targets for vascular diseases. PMID

  15. Exercise training improves vascular endothelial function in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Pleiner, Johannes; Wiesinger, Günther F; Sieder, Anna E; Quittan, Michael; Nuhr, Martin J; Francesconi, Claudia; Seit, Hans-Peter; Francesconi, Mario; Schmetterer, Leopold; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-10-01

    OBJECTIVE-Impaired endothelial function of resistance and conduit arteries can be detected in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied whether a persistent improvement of endothelial function can be achieved by regular physical training. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The study included 26 patients with type 1 diabetes of 20 +/- 10 years' duration and no overt angiopathy; 18 patients (42 +/- 10 years old) participated in a bicycle exercise training program, and 8 patients with type 1 diabetes (33 +/- 11 years old) served as control subjects. Vascular function of conduit arteries was assessed by flow-mediated and endothelium-independent dilation of the brachial artery and of resistance vessels by the response of ocular fundus pulsation amplitudes to intravenous N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) at baseline, after 2 and 4 months of training, and 8 months after cessation of regular exercise. RESULTS-Training increased peak oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) by 13% after 2 months and by 27% after 4 months (P = 0.04). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery increased from 6.5 +/- 1.1 to 9.8 +/- 1.1% (P = 0.04) by training. L-NMMA administration decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) by 9.1 +/- 0.9% before training and by 13.4 +/- 1.5% after 4 months of training (P = 0.02). VO(2max), FMD, and FPA were unchanged in the control group. Vascular effects from training were abrogated 8 months after cessation of exercise. CONCLUSIONS-Our study demonstrates that aerobic exercise training can improve endothelial function in different vascular beds in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes, who are at considerable risk for diabetic angiopathy. However, the beneficial effect on vascular function is not maintained in the absence of exercise.

  16. Consumption of High-Polyphenol Dark Chocolate Improves Endothelial Function in Individuals with Stage 1 Hypertension and Excess Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lívia de Paula; Knibel, Marcela Paranhos; Torres, Márcia Regina Simas Gonçalves; Nogueira Neto, José Firmino; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hypertension and excess body weight are important risk factors for endothelial dysfunction. Recent evidence suggests that high-polyphenol dark chocolate improves endothelial function and lowers blood pressure. This study aimed to evaluate the association of chocolate 70% cocoa intake with metabolic profile, oxidative stress, inflammation, blood pressure, and endothelial function in stage 1 hypertensives with excess body weight. Methods. Intervention clinical trial includes 22 stage 1 hypertensives without previous antihypertensive treatment, aged 18 to 60 years and presents a body mass index between 25.0 and 34.9 kg/m2. All participants were instructed to consume 50 g of chocolate 70% cocoa/day (2135 mg polyphenols) for 4 weeks. Endothelial function was evaluated by peripheral artery tonometry using Endo-PAT 2000 (Itamar Medical). Results. Twenty participants (10 men) completed the study. Comparison of pre-post intervention revealed that (1) there were no significant changes in anthropometric parameters, percentage body fat, glucose metabolism, lipid profile, biomarkers of inflammation, adhesion molecules, oxidized LDL, and blood pressure; (2) the assessment of endothelial function through the reactive hyperemia index showed a significant increase: 1.94 ± 0.18 to 2.22 ± 0.08, P = 0.01. Conclusion.In individuals with stage 1 hypertension and excess body weight, high-polyphenol dark chocolate improves endothelial function. PMID:23209885

  17. PLEKHA7 modulates epithelial tight junction barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Paschoud, Serge; Jond, Lionel; Guerrera, Diego; Citi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently identified protein of the epithelial zonula adhaerens (ZA), and is part of a protein complex that stabilizes the ZA, by linking it to microtubules. Since the ZA is important in the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions (TJ), we asked whether PLEKHA7 is involved in modulating epithelial TJ barrier function. We generated clonal MDCK cell lines in which one of four different constructs of PLEKHA7 was inducibly expressed. All constructs were localized at junctions, but constructs lacking the C-terminal region were also distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm. Inducible expression of PLEKHA7 constructs did not affect the expression and localization of TJ proteins, the steady-state value of transepithelial resistance (TER), the development of TER during the calcium switch, and the flux of large molecules across confluent monolayers. In contrast, expression of three out of four constructs resulted both in enhanced recruitment of E-cadherin and associated proteins at the apical ZA and at lateral puncta adherentia (PA), a decreased TER at 18 h after assembly at normal calcium, and an attenuation in the fall in TER after extracellular calcium removal. This latter effect was inhibited when cells were treated with nocodazole. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLEKHA7 forms a complex with the cytoplasmic TJ proteins ZO-1 and cingulin, and this association does not depend on the integrity of microtubules. These results suggest that PLEKHA7 modulates the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of the TJ barrier, through E-cadherin protein complex- and microtubule-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24843844

  18. Dihydrotestosterone modulates endothelial progenitor cell function via RhoA/ROCK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Shi, Liang; Ren, Guo-Qing; Sun, Wen-Wen; Wang, Yi-Bin; Chen, Yi-Kun; Yin, Jiang-Ning; Wan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous findings indicate that testosterone level is negatively correlated with the incidence and mortality of cardiovascular diseases in men. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in endothelial healing and vascular integrity. This study aimed to examine the effects of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an active metabolite of testosterone, on human EPC function and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy adult males and incubated with a series of concentrations (1, 10, and 100 nmol/L in dimethyl sulfoxide) of DHT for 24 h or with 10 nmol/L DHT for different periods (6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h). EPC proliferation, migration, and adhesion were determined by MTT assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and cell counting, respectively. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production was examined by ELISA, RhoA activity was determined through pull-down assay. The protein level of RhoA was quantified by Western blot analysis. Results: DHT significantly increased the proliferative, migratory, and adhesive abilities of EPCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and upregulated the levels of VEGF and activated RhoA. However, RhoA inhibitor C3 exoenzyme or ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 significantly inhibited DHT-induced proliferation, migration, and adhesion, as well as VEGF production. Moreover, C3 exoenzyme inhibited the activation of RhoA stimulated by DHT. Conclusions: DHT promotes EPC proliferation, migration, and adhesion activities via RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:27830013

  19. Association of Microvascular Function and Endothelial Biomarkers With Clinical Outcome in Dengue: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Sophie; Lam, Phung Khanh; Vu, Le Hoang Mai; Le, Thi Lien; Ha, Ngo Thanh; Toan, Tran Thi; Van, Nguyen Thu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Le Duyen, Huynh Thi; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Fox, Annette; Mongkolspaya, Juthathip; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron Paul; Screaton, Gavin Robert; Wertheim, Heiman; Wills, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background. The hallmark of severe dengue is increased microvascular permeability, but alterations in the microcirculation and their evolution over the course of dengue are unknown. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the sublingual microcirculation using side-stream dark-field imaging in patients presenting early (<72 hours after fever onset) and patients hospitalized with warning signs or severe dengue in Vietnam. Clinical findings, microvascular function, global hemodynamics assessed with echocardiography, and serological markers of endothelial activation were determined at 4 time points. Results. A total of 165 patients were enrolled. No difference was found between the microcirculatory parameters comparing dengue with other febrile illnesses. The proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) and the mean flow index (MFI) were lower in patients with dengue with plasma than those without leakage (PPV, 88.1% vs 90.6% [P = .01]; MFI, 2.1 vs 2.4 [P = .007]), most markedly during the critical phase. PPV and MFI were correlated with the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (P < .001 for both) and angiopoietin 2 (P < .001 for both), negatively correlated. Conclusions. Modest microcirculatory alterations occur in dengue, are associated with plasma leakage, and are correlate with molecules of endothelial activation, angiopoietin 2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. PMID:27230099

  20. Hop derived flavonoid xanthohumol inhibits endothelial cell functions via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Cristina; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bassani, Barbara; Rossi, Teresa; Rossello, Armando; Noonan, Douglas M; D'Uva, Gabriele; Bruno, Antonino; Albini, Adriana

    2016-09-13

    Angiogenesis, a process characterized by the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a crucial step in tumor growth and dissemination. Recently, increased attention has been addressed to the ability of flavonoids to prevent cancer by suppressing angiogenesis, strategy that we named "angioprevention". Several natural compounds exert their anti-tumor properties by activating 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of metabolism in cancer cells. Drugs with angiopreventive activities, in particular metformin, regulate AMPK in endothelial cells. Here we investigated the involvement of AMPK in the anti-angiogenic effects of xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated flavonoid of the hop plant, and mechanisms of action. The anti-angiogenic activity of XN was more potent than epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Treatment of endothelial cells with XN led to increased AMPK phosphorylation and activity. Functional studies using biochemical approaches confirmed that AMPK mediates XN anti-angiogenic activity. AMPK activation by XN was mediated by CAMMKβ, but not LKB1. Analysis of the downstream mechanisms showed that XN-induced AMPK activation reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels in endothelial cells by decreasing eNOS phosphorylation. Finally, AKT pathway was inactivated by XN as part of its anti-angiogenic activity, but independently from AMPK, suggesting that these two signaling pathways proceed autonomously. Our study dissects the molecular mechanism by which XN exerts its potent anti-angiogenic activity, pointing out AMPK as a crucial signal transducer.

  1. Hop derived flavonoid xanthohumol inhibits endothelial cell functions via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Cristina; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bassani, Barbara; Rossi, Teresa; Rossello, Armando; Noonan, Douglas M.; D'Uva, Gabriele; Bruno, Antonino; Albini, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, a process characterized by the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a crucial step in tumor growth and dissemination. Recently, increased attention has been addressed to the ability of flavonoids to prevent cancer by suppressing angiogenesis, strategy that we named “angioprevention”. Several natural compounds exert their anti-tumor properties by activating 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of metabolism in cancer cells. Drugs with angiopreventive activities, in particular metformin, regulate AMPK in endothelial cells. Here we investigated the involvement of AMPK in the anti-angiogenic effects of xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated flavonoid of the hop plant, and mechanisms of action. The anti-angiogenic activity of XN was more potent than epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Treatment of endothelial cells with XN led to increased AMPK phosphorylation and activity. Functional studies using biochemical approaches confirmed that AMPK mediates XN anti-angiogenic activity. AMPK activation by XN was mediated by CAMMKβ, but not LKB1. Analysis of the downstream mechanisms showed that XN-induced AMPK activation reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels in endothelial cells by decreasing eNOS phosphorylation. Finally, AKT pathway was inactivated by XN as part of its anti-angiogenic activity, but independently from AMPK, suggesting that these two signaling pathways proceed autonomously. Our study dissects the molecular mechanism by which XN exerts its potent anti-angiogenic activity, pointing out AMPK as a crucial signal transducer. PMID:27494895

  2. Extracellular Stiffness Modulates the Expression of Functional Proteins and Growth Factors in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lívia; Fuhrmann, Gregor; Juenet, Maya; Amdursky, Nadav; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Campagnolo, Paola; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-08-13

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is of vital importance during the early stages of bone healing. Extracellular stiffness plays an important role in regulating endothelial cell behavior and angiogenesis, but how this mechanical cue affects proliferation kinetics, gene regulation, and the expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and bone regeneration remains unclear. Using collagen-coated polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are exposed to an environment that mimics the elastic properties of collagenous bone, and cellular proliferation and gene and protein expressions are assessed. The proliferation and gene expression of HUVECs are not differentially affected by culture on 3 or 30 kPa PAAm hydrogels, henceforth referred to as low and high stiffness gels, respectively. Although the proliferation and gene transcript levels remain unchanged, significant differences are found in the expressions of functional proteins and growth factors implicated both in the angiogenic and osteogenic processes. The down-regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 protein with concomitant over-expression of caveolin-1, wingless-type 2, bone morphogenic protein 2, and basic fibroblast growth factor on the high stiffness PAAm hydrogel suggests that rigidity has a pro-angiogenic effect with inherent benefits for bone regeneration.

  3. Upregulation of functionally active vascular endothelial growth factor by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Barbara; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Bossert, Andrea; Lüske, Anke; Finkenzeller, Günter; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is known to modulate host gene expression and has been linked to the pathogenesis of vasculopathies; however, relevant pathomechanisms are still unclear. It was shown that HCMV infection leads to upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human foreskin fibroblasts and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). Activation of VEGF transcription by HCMV infection was confirmed by transient-expression experiments, which revealed that a short promoter fragment, pLuc135 (-85 to +50), is sufficient for activation. Site-directed mutagenesis of Sp1-recognition sites within this fragment abolished the upregulation of transcription. Functional VEGF protein is released into the culture supernatant of infected SMC. Incubation of endothelial cells with supernatants from HCMV-infected SMC cultures induced upregulation of VEGF receptor-2 expression on endothelial cells, as well as a significant upregulation of DNA synthesis, implicating cell proliferation. The mean incline of DNA synthesis at 48 and 72 h post-infection was 148 and 197 %, respectively. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against VEGF completely abolished this effect. Supernatants from SMC cultures incubated with UV-inactivated virus induced a comparable effect. This virus-induced paracrine effect may represent a molecular mechanism for HCMV-induced pathogenesis, such as inflammatory vasculopathies, by inducing a proatherogenic phenotype in SMC.

  4. Boldine protects endothelial function in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress through an antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siang; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu; Murugan, Dharmani; Achike, Francis I; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2013-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetes. Antioxidants are therapeutically beneficial for oxidative stress-associated diseases. Boldine ([s]-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine) is a major alkaloid present in the leaves and bark of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus Molina), with known an antioxidant activity. This study examined the protective effects of boldine against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) and its mechanisms of vasoprotection related to diabetic endothelial dysfunction. In RAEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h, pre-treatment with boldine reduced the elevated ROS and nitrotyrosine formation, and preserved nitric oxide (NO) production. Pre-incubation with β-NAPDH reduced the acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation; this attenuation was reversed by boldine. Compared with control, endothelium-dependent relaxation in the aortas of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated diabetic rats was significantly improved by both acute (1 μM, 30 min) and chronic (20mg/kg/daily, i.p., 7 days) treatment with boldine. Intracellular superoxide and peroxynitrite formation measured by DHE fluorescence or chemiluminescence assay were higher in sections of aortic rings from diabetic rats compared with control. Chronic boldine treatment normalized ROS over-production in the diabetic group and this correlated with reduction of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOX2 and p47(phox). The present study shows that boldine reversed the increased ROS formation in high glucose-treated endothelial cells and restored endothelial function in STZ-induced diabetes by inhibiting oxidative stress and thus increasing NO bioavailability.

  5. Irisin Increased the Number and Improved the Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetes Mellitus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Song, Mingbao; Zhou, Fang; Fu, Dagan; Ruan, Guangping; Zhu, Xiangqing; Bai, Yinyin; Huang, Lan; Pang, Rongqing; Kang, Huali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was found to be associated with vascular complications in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Previous studies found that regular exercise could improve the function of EPCs in DM patients, but the underling mechanism was unclear. Irisin, a newly identified myokine, was induced by exercise and has been demonstrated to mediate some of the positive effects of exercise. In this study, we hypothesize that irisin may have direct effects on EPC function in DM mice. These data showed for the first time that irisin increased the number of EPCs in peripheral blood of DM mice and improved the function of EPCs derived from DM mice bone marrow. The mechanism for the effect of irisin is related to the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. Furthermore, irisin was demonstrated to improve endothelial repair in DM mice that received EPC transplants after carotid artery injury. The results of this study indicate a novel effect of irisin in regulating the number and function of EPCs via the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway, suggesting a potential for the administration of exogenous irisin as a succedaneum to improve EPC function in diabetic patients who fail to achieve such improvements through regular exercise. PMID:27002278

  6. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  7. Food derived bioactive peptides and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-12-09

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action.

  8. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  9. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Katelee Barrett; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension.

  10. Vascular endothelial cells in cell-mediated immunity: adoptive transfer with in vitro conditioned cells is genetically restricted at the endothelial cell barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Standage, B.A.; Vetto, R.M.; Jones, R.; Burger, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is a cell-mediated immune response that can be adoptively transferred in rats when greater than 2 X 10(8) cells from peritoneal exudate, lymph nodes, or spleen are used. We have shown that by using an in vitro conditioning step with antigen, transfer can be subsequently carried out with as few as 2 X 10(7) spleen cells. The magnitude of DTH was reflected in ear swelling after intradermal injection of antigen (tuberculin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)) and confirmed histologically. The transfer was antigen specific, requiring the sensitizing antigen in both the in vitro conditioning step and in the ear test challenge. Adoptive transfer with conditioned cells was genetically restricted by alleles of the RT-1 region (major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the rat). Brown Norway strain (n haplotype) immune cells would not transfer DTH to Lewis (1 haplotype), ACI (a haplotype), or Buffalo (b haplotype) rats, whereas each strain would transfer DTH to syngeneic recipients. Moreover, this pattern of restriction held for all strains when tested in reciprocal fashion. In additional experiments, F1 to parental bone marrow chimeras were constructed so that bone-marrow-derived cells and non-bone-marrow-derived cells were of different RT-1 haplotypes. When these chimeras were used as recipients, transfer of DTH was only observed when immune donor cells and recipient non-bone-marrow-derived cells were syngeneic. These results point to the critical role of non-bone-marrow-derived cells (endothelial cells) in the DTH reaction.

  11. Time Rate of Blood Pressure Variation Is Associated With Endothelial Function in Patients With Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yanping; Wei, Wanlin; Yan, Jianhua; Sun, Lixian; Lian, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Liang, Ruijuan; Xiaole, Liu; Fan, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The time rate of blood pressure (BP) variation indicates the speed of BP fluctuations. Previous studies have demonstrated that the time rate of BP variation was associated with target organ damage. However, the association between time rate of BP variation and endothelial function has not been evaluated.24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed in 61 patients with metabolic syndrome. Time rate of BP variation was calculated from BP recordings of ABPM. Endothelial function was assessed using reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry index (RHI) by EndoPat2000. Multiple linear regression models were used to detect the association between time rate of BP variation and RHI.Among all the subjects (n = 61), the multiple linear regression models revealed that the daytime rate of systolic blood pressure (SBP) variation was independently associated with RHI (β = -0.334, P = 0.008). A 0.1 mmHg/minute increase in the daytime rate of SBP variation correlated with a decline of 0.20 in RHI. The same effect was also found in the subjects with eGFR ≥ 60 mL/ (minute*1.73 m(2)). A greater association was found in those who were not taking a statin, β-blocker, ACEI/ARB, or diuretic and those without diabetes compared with those with any antihypertensive medication or with diabetes. Other ambulatory blood pressure parameters and central hemodynamics were not found to be associated with RHI.Our findings have shown that the daytime rate of SBP variation was associated with endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome, independent of other BP parameters and central hemodynamics.

  12. Effects of the brown rice diet on visceral obesity and endothelial function: the BRAVO study.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Higa, Moritake; Kinjo, Rie; Yamakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Hideaki; Kozuka, Chisayo; Yabiku, Kouichi; Taira, Shin-Ichiro; Sata, Masataka; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-28

    Brown rice (BR) and white rice (WR) produce different glycaemic responses and their consumption may affect the dietary management of obesity. In the present study, the effects of BR and WR on abdominal fat distribution, metabolic parameters and endothelial function were evaluated in subjects with the metabolic syndrome in a randomised cross-over fashion. In study 1, acute postprandial metabolic parameters and flow- and nitroglycerine-mediated dilation (FMD and NMD) of the brachial artery were determined in male volunteers with or without the metabolic syndrome after ingestion of either BR or WR. The increases in glucose and insulin AUC were lower after ingestion of BR than after ingestion of WR (P= 0·041 and P= 0·045, respectively). FMD values were decreased 60 min after ingestion of WR (P= 0·037 v. baseline), but the decrease was protected after ingestion of BR. In study 2, a separate cohort of male volunteers (n 27) with the metabolic syndrome was randomised into two groups with different BR and WR consumption patterns. The values of weight-based parameters were decreased after consumption of BR for 8 weeks, but returned to baseline values after a WR consumption period. Insulin resistance and total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were reduced after consumption of BR. In conclusion, consumption of BR may be beneficial, partly owing to the lowering of glycaemic response, and may protect postprandial endothelial function in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Long-term beneficial effects of BR on metabolic parameters and endothelial function were also observed.

  13. Sphingolipids are required for mammalian epidermal barrier function. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis delays barrier recovery after acute perturbation.

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, W M; Man, M Q; Gao, W N; Menon, G K; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1991-01-01

    Stratum corneum lipids comprise an approximately equimolar mixture of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, arranged as intercellular membrane bilayers that are presumed to mediate the epidermal permeability barrier. Prior studies have shown that alterations in epidermal barrier function lead to a rapid increase in cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis which parallels the early stages of the repair process. Despite an abundance of indirect evidence for their role in the barrier, the importance of sphingolipids has yet to be demonstrated directly. Whereas sphingolipid synthesis also increases during barrier repair, this response is delayed in comparison to cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis (Holleran, W.M., et al. 1991. J. Lipid Res. 32:1151-1158). To further delineate the role of sphingolipids in barrier homeostasis, we assessed the impact of inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis on epidermal barrier recovery. A single topical application of beta-chloro-L-alanine (beta-CA), an irreversible inhibitor of serine-palmitoyl transferase (SPT), applied to acetone-treated skin of hairless mice resulted in: (a) greater than 75% inhibition of SPT activity at 30 min (P less than 0.001); (b) a global decrease in sphingolipid synthesis between 1 and 3 h (P less than 0.02); (c) reduction of epidermal sphingolipid content at 18 h (P less than 0.01); (d) delayed reaccumulation of histochemical staining for sphingolipids in the stratum corneum; and (e) reduced numbers and contents of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum. Finally, despite its immediate, marked diminution of sphingolipid synthesis, beta-CA slowed barrier recovery only at late time points (greater than 6 h) after acetone treatment. This inhibition was overridden by coapplications of ceramides (the distal SPT product), indicating that the delay in repair was not due to non-specific toxicity. These studies demonstrate a distinctive role for epidermal sphingolipids in permeability barrier homeostasis

  14. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D; Denning, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Optimizing intestinal barrier function is thought to be key to preventing neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. In this review, we will first summarize the key components of the intestinal epithelial barrier, what is known about its development, and how this may explain NEC pathogenesis. Finally, we will review what therapeutic strategies may be used to promote optimal development of neonatal intestinal barrier function in order to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:25927016

  15. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, Nhat An; Blajan, Marius

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote drug delivery through skin. Yucatan micropig skin was used as a biological object for evaluation of in vitro percutaneous absorption. The changes in lipids, proteins and water content of the pig stratum corneum (SC) after AAMI were compared to those of a tape stripping test (TST) and plasma jet irradiation (PJI) using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The significant reduction in the methylene stretching modes absorbance resulted in the disturbance in the SC lipids caused by AAMI was observed at 2850 and 2920 cm-1. Moreover, as the result of TST, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) after both AAMI and PJI were also increased, that could lead to a decrease of barrier function of SC, and could enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs. Under the conditions of this study, TEWL value of 5 minutes AAMI (35.92 +/- 3.48 g/m2h) was approximately the same as that value of 10 times TST (34.30 +/- 3.54 g/m2h), that makes the effect of these manipulations on the surfaces is considered to be at the same levels. Furthermore, unlike the obtained microscopic observation from PJI, there was no thermal damage observed on the skins after AAMI.

  16. Revisiting nanoparticle technology for blood-brain barrier transport: Unfolding at the endothelial gate improves the fate of transferrin receptor-targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-28

    An unmet need exists for therapeutic compounds to traverse the brain capillary endothelial cells that denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver effective treatment to the diseased brain. The use of nanoparticle technology for targeted delivery to the brain implies that targeted liposomes encapsulating a drug of interest will undergo receptor-mediated uptake and transport through the BBB with a subsequent unfolding of the liposomal content inside the brain, hence revealing drug release to adjacent drug-demanding neurons. As transferrin receptors (TfRs) are present on brain capillary endothelial, but not on endothelial cells elsewhere in the body, the use of TfR-targeted liposomes - colloidal particulates with a phospholipid bilayer membrane - remains the most relevant strategy to obtain efficient drug delivery to the brain. However, many studies have failed to provide sufficient quantitative data to proof passage of the BBB and significant appearance of drugs inside the brain parenchyma. Here, we critically evaluate the current evidence on the use of TfR-targeted liposomes for brain drug delivery based on a thorough investigation of all available studies within this research field. We focus on issues with respect to experimental design and data analysis that may provide an explanation to conflicting reports, and we discuss possible explanations for the current lack of sufficient transcytosis across the BBB for implementation in the design of TfR-targeted liposomes. We finally provide a list of suggestions for strategies to obtain substantial uptake and transport of drug carriers at the BBB with a concomitant transport of therapeutics into the brain.

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in red blood cells: Key to a new erythrocrine function?☆

    PubMed Central

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M.; Kelm, Malte

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) have been considered almost exclusively as a transporter of metabolic gases and nutrients for the tissues. It is an accepted dogma that RBCs take up and inactivate endothelium-derived NO via rapid reaction with oxyhemoglobin to form methemoglobin and nitrate, thereby limiting NO available for vasodilatation. Yet it has also been shown that RBCs not only act as “NO sinks”, but exert an erythrocrine function – i.e an endocrine function of RBC – by synthesizing, transporting and releasing NO metabolic products and ATP, thereby potentially controlling systemic NO bioavailability and vascular tone. Recent work from our and others laboratory demonstrated that human RBCs carry an active type 3, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), constitutively producing NO under normoxic conditions, the activity of which is compromised in patients with coronary artery disease. In this review we aim to discuss the potential role of red cell eNOS in RBC signaling and function, and to critically revise evidence to this date showing a role of non-endothelial circulating eNOS in cardiovascular pathophysiology. PMID:24494200

  18. Cell adhesive peptides functionalized on CoCr alloy stimulate endothelialization and prevent thrombogenesis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Isabel; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Escolar, Ginés; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Gil, Francisco Javier; Pegueroles, Marta; Manero, Jose María

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of bioactive peptide sequences on CoCr surfaces is an effective route to improve endothelialization, which is of great interest for cardiovascular stents. In this work, we explored the effect of physical and covalent immoblization of RGDS, YIGSR and their equimolar combination peptides on endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion and on thrombogenicity. We extensively investigated using RT-qPCR, the expression by ECs cultured on functionalised CoCr surfaces of different genes. Genes relevant for adhesion (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), vascularization (VEGFA, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) and anti-thrombogenicity (tPA and eNOS) were over-expressed in the ECs grown to covalently functionalized CoCr surfaces compared to physisorbed and control surfaces. Pro-thrombogenic genes expression (PAI-1 and vWF) decreased over time. Cell co-cultures of ECs/SMCs found that functionalization increased the amount of adhered ECs onto modified surfaces compared to plain CoCr, independently of the used peptide and the strategy of immobilization. SMCs adhered less compared to ECs in all surfaces. All studied peptides showed a lower platelet cell adhesion compared to TCPS. Covalent functionalization of CoCr surfaces with an equimolar combination of RGDS and YIGSR represented prevailing strategy to enhance the early stages of ECs adhesion and proliferation, while preventing SMCs and platelet adhesion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 973-983, 2017.

  19. Effect of Ivabradine on Endothelial Function in Diastolic and Right Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Infante-Vázquez, Oscar; Martínez Memije, Raúl; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Dorantes-García, Joel; Narváez-David, René; Vázquez-Ortíz, Zuilma

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ivabradine is an If ion current inhibitor that has proved to reduce mortality in patients with systolic heart failure by slowing heart rate without decreasing myocardial contractility. Photoplethysmography is a simple, low-cost optical technique that can evaluate vascular function and detect changes in blood flow, pulse, and swelling of tissular microvascular space. Objective. To evaluate the effect of ivabradine on endothelial function by photoplethysmography in diastolic and right heart failure patients. Methodology. 15 patients were included (mean age of 78.1 ± 9.2 years) with optimally treated diastolic and right heart failure. They underwent photoplethysmography before and after induced ischemia to evaluate the wave blood flow on the finger, using the maximum amplitude time/total time (MAT/TT) index. Two measurements were made before and after oral Ivabradine (mean 12.5 mg a day during 6 months of followup). Results. In the study group, the MAT/TT index was 29.1 ± 2.2 versus 24.3 ± 3.2 (P = 0.05) in basal recording and 30.4 ± 2.1 versus 23.3 ± 2.9 (P = 0.002), before versus after ischemia and before versus after Ivabradine intervention, respectively. Conclusions. Ivabradine administration improves endothelial function (shear stress) in diastolic and right heart failure patients. PMID:24222884

  20. Effect of ivabradine on endothelial function in diastolic and right heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Infante-Vázquez, Oscar; Martínez Memije, Raúl; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Dorantes-García, Joel; Narváez-David, René; Vázquez-Ortíz, Zuilma

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ivabradine is an If ion current inhibitor that has proved to reduce mortality in patients with systolic heart failure by slowing heart rate without decreasing myocardial contractility. Photoplethysmography is a simple, low-cost optical technique that can evaluate vascular function and detect changes in blood flow, pulse, and swelling of tissular microvascular space. Objective. To evaluate the effect of ivabradine on endothelial function by photoplethysmography in diastolic and right heart failure patients. Methodology. 15 patients were included (mean age of 78.1 ± 9.2 years) with optimally treated diastolic and right heart failure. They underwent photoplethysmography before and after induced ischemia to evaluate the wave blood flow on the finger, using the maximum amplitude time/total time (MAT/TT) index. Two measurements were made before and after oral Ivabradine (mean 12.5 mg a day during 6 months of followup). Results. In the study group, the MAT/TT index was 29.1 ± 2.2 versus 24.3 ± 3.2 (P = 0.05) in basal recording and 30.4 ± 2.1 versus 23.3 ± 2.9 (P = 0.002), before versus after ischemia and before versus after Ivabradine intervention, respectively. Conclusions. Ivabradine administration improves endothelial function (shear stress) in diastolic and right heart failure patients.

  1. Skin Barrier Function and Its Importance at the Start of the Atopic March

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Mary Beth; Peele, Kathy; Wilson, Nevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis can be due to a variety of causes from nonatopic triggers to food allergy. Control of egress of water and protection from ingress of irritants and allergens are key components of cutaneous barrier function. Current research suggests that a degraded barrier function of the skin allows the immune system inappropriate access to environmental allergens. Epidermal aeroallergen exposure may allow sensitization to allergen possibly initiating the atopic march. Further research into connections between epidermal barrier function and possible allergen sensitization will be important to undertake. Future clinical trials focused on skin barrier protection may be of value as a possible intervention in prevention of the initiation of the atopic march. PMID:22619686

  2. KLF2 and KLF4 control endothelial identity and vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Sangwung, Panjamaporn; Zhou, Guangjin; Nayak, Lalitha; Chan, E. Ricky; Kang, Dong-Won; Zhang, Rongli; Lu, Yuan; Sugi, Keiki; Fujioka, Hisashi; Shi, Hong; Lapping, Stephanie D.; Ghosh, Chandra C.; Higgins, Sarah J.; Parikh, Samir M.; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of vascular integrity in the adult animal is needed for survival, and it is critically dependent on the endothelial lining, which controls barrier function, blood fluidity, and flow dynamics. However, nodal regulators that coordinate endothelial identity and function in the adult animal remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that endothelial KLF2 and KLF4 control a large segment of the endothelial transcriptome, thereby affecting virtually all key endothelial functions. Inducible endothelial-specific deletion of Klf2 and/or Klf4 reveals that a single allele of either gene is sufficient for survival, but absence of both (EC-DKO) results in acute death from myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. EC-DKO animals exhibit profound compromise in vascular integrity and profound dysregulation of the coagulation system. Collectively, these studies establish an absolute requirement for KLF2/4 for maintenance of endothelial and vascular integrity in the adult animal. PMID:28239661

  3. Effect of the transdermal low-level laser therapy on endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Szymczyszyn, Alicja; Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Rola, Piotr; Gutherc, Radosław; Jasiczek, Jakub; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-09-01

    The effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the cardiovascular system is not fully established. Since the endothelium is an important endocrine element, establishing the mechanisms of LLLT action is an important issue.The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of transdermal LLLT on endothelial function.In this study, healthy volunteers (n = 40, age = 20-40 years) were enrolled. N = 30 (14 female, 16 male, mean age 30 ± 5 years) constituted the laser-irradiated group (LG). The remaining 10 subjects (6 women, 4 men, mean age 28 ± 5 years) constituted the control group (CG). Participants were subjected to LLLT once a day for three consecutive days. Blood for biochemical assessments was drawn before the first irradiation and 24 h after the last session. In the LG, transdermal illumination of radial artery was conducted (a semiconductor laser λ = 808 nm, irradiation 50 mW, energy density 1.6 W/cm(2) and a dose 20 J/day, a total dose of 60 J). Biochemical parameters (reflecting angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), angiostatin; antioxidative status: glutathione (GSH) and the nitric oxide metabolic pathway: symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine) were assessed. In the LG, a significant increase in GSH levels and considerable decrease in angiostatin concentration following the LLLT were observed. No significant differences in levels of the VEGF, FGF, SDMA, ADMA were observed.LLLT modifies vascular endothelial function by increasing its antioxidant and angiogenic potential. We found no significant differences in levels of the nitric oxide pathway metabolites within 24 h following the LLLT irradiation.

  4. Effect of miR-200b on retinal endothelial cell function under high glucose environment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Rongrong; Liu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    As one of the important complications of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy (DR) presented high incidence worldwide. Hyperglycemia is an important promoting factor for DR occurrence and development. It can damage retinal endothelial cell, resulting in retinal structure and function disorder. Studies have shown that miR-200b may involve in regulating DR occurrence and development, but its specific function and mechanism have not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate miR-200b effect and mechanism on human retinal endothelial cells (hRECs) under high glucose environment. hRECs were cultured under high glucose or normal environment. Real time PCR was applied to detect miR-200b expression. MiR-200b was transfected to hRECs and MTT was used to detect its effect on hRECs proliferation under high glucose environment. Real time PCR and Western blot were performed to determine VEGF and TGFβ1 expression in the retina endothelial cells. MiR-200b expression decreased significantly under high glucose environment, whereas hRECs proliferated obviously. Compared with normal control, VEGF and TGFβ1 mRNA and protein expression increased markedly (P < 0.05). After miR-200b transfection, miR-200b expression increased, while VEGF and TGFβ1 mRNA and protein expression decreased obviously. Compared with high glucose group, hRECs proliferation was inhibited (P < 0.05). MiR-200b can regulate RECs growth and proliferation by changing VEGF and TGFβ1 expression to delay DR.

  5. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell “storage lesion” is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Methods: Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656) PMID:26222884

  6. Chronic Exercise Training Improved Aortic Endothelial and Mitochondrial Function via an AMPKα2-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; An, Xiangbo; Chen, Dongrui; Ye, Maoqing; Shen, Weili; Han, Weiqing; Zhang, Youyi; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exercise training is known to protect the vasculature; however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. The present study hypothesized that exercise may improve aortic endothelial and mitochondrial function through an adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2)-dependent manner. Ten-week-old AMPKα2 knockout (AMPKα2−/−) mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to daily treadmill running for 6 weeks, and the thoracic aorta from these mice were used for further examination. Our results showed that exercise significantly promoted vasodilatation and increased expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), concomitant with increased AMPKα2 expression in WT mice. These effects were not observed in AMPKα2−/− mice. Furthermore, exercise training increased thoracic aortic mitochondrial content as indicated by increased Complex I and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in WT mice but not in AMPKα2−/− mice. This may be caused by decreased mitochondrial autophagy since the expression of BH3 domain-containing BCL2 family members BNIP3-like (BNIP3L) and LC3B were decreased in WT mice with exercise. And these changes were absent with AMPKα2 deletion in mice. Importantly, exercise increased the expression of manganous superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase, suggesting that mitochondrial antioxidative capacity was increased. Notably, the improved antioxidative capacity was lost in AMPKα2−/− mice with exercise. In conclusion, this study illustrated that AMPKα2 plays a critical role in exercise-related vascular protection via increasing endothelial and mitochondrial function in the artery. PMID:28066264

  7. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome: influence of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Prázný, M; Jezková, J; Horová, E; Lazárová, V; Hána, V; Kvasnicka, J; Pecen, L; Marek, J; Skrha, J; Krsek, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate skin microvascular reactivity (MVR) and possible influencing factors (fibrinolysis, oxidative stress, and endothelial function) in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-nine patients with active Cushing's syndrome (ten of them also examined after a successful operation) and 16 control subjects were studied. Skin MVR was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry during post-occlusive (PORH) and thermal hyperemia (TH). Malondialdehyde and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase were used as markers of oxidative stress. Fibrinolysis was estimated by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1). N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 were used as markers of endothelial function. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction was present in patients with hypercortisolism, however, increased concentration of ICAM-1 was also found in patients after the operation as compared to controls (290.8+/-74.2 vs. 210.9+/-56.3 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05). Maximal perfusion was significantly lower in patients with arterial hypertension during PORH and TH (36.3+/-13.0 vs. 63.3+/-32.4 PU, p<0.01, and 90.4+/-36.6 vs. 159.2+/-95.3 PU, p<0.05, respectively) and similarly the velocity of perfusion increase during PORH and TH was lower (3.2+/-1.5 vs. 5.2+/-3.4 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, and 0.95+/-0.6 vs. 1.8+/-1.1 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, respectively). The most pronounced impairment of microvascular reactivity was present in patients with combination of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Isolation of Functional Human Endothelial Cells from Small Volumes of Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Do Kang, Sa; Carlon, Tim A.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Ley, Melissa M.; Allen, Jason D.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Haley, N. Rebecca; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from endothelial progenitor cells in blood have great potential as a therapeutic tool to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, current methods to isolate ECs are limited by a low yield with few colonies appearing during isolation. In order to utilize blood-derived ECs for therapeutic applications, a simple method is needed that can produce a high yield of ECs from small volumes of blood without the addition of animal-derived products. For the first time, we show that human endothelial cells can be isolated without the prior separation of blood components through the technique of diluted whole blood incubation (DWBI) utilizing commercially available human serum. We isolated ECs from small volumes of blood (~ 10 ml) via DWBI and characterized them with flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and uptake of DiI-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL). These ECs are functional as demonstrated by their ability to form tubular networks in Matrigel, adhere and align with flow under physiological fluid shear stress, and produce increased nitric oxide under fluid flow. An average of 7.0 ± 2.5 EC colonies that passed all functional tests described above were obtained per 10 ml of blood as compared to only 0.3 ± 0.1 colonies with the traditional method based on density centrifugation. The time until first colony appearance was 8.3 ± 1.2 days for ECs isolated with the DWBI method and 12 ± 1.4 days for ECs isolated with the traditional isolation method. A simplified method, such as DWBI, in combination with advances in isolation yield could enable the use of blood-derived ECs in clinical practice. PMID:23604849

  9. Acetylcholine versus cold pressor testing for evaluation of coronary endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    AlBadri, Ahmed; Wei, Janet; Mehta, Puja K.; Landes, Sofy; Petersen, John W.; Anderson, R. David; Samuels, Bruce; Azarbal, Babak; Handberg, Eileen M.; Li, Quanlin; Minissian, Margo; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Pepine, Carl J.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2017-01-01

    Background Assessment of coronary endothelial function with intracoronary acetylcholine (IC-Ach) provides diagnostic and prognostic data in patients with suspected coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD), but is often not feasible due in part to the time and expertise needed for pharmacologic mixing. Cold pressor testing (CPT) is a simple and safe stimulus useful for either invasive or non-invasive endothelial function testing and myocardial perfusion imaging but has not been specifically evaluated among symptomatic women with signs of ischemic heart disease (IHD) who have no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods 163 women with signs and symptoms of IHD and no obstructive CAD from the NHLBI- Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation-Coronary Vascular Dysfunction (WISE-CVD) study underwent coronary reactivity testing with a Doppler flow wire (FloWire® Volcano, San Diego, CA) in the proximal left anterior descending artery. Coronary artery diameter and coronary blood flow (CBF) assessed by core lab using QCA before and after IC-Ach (18.2 μg/ml infused over 3 minutes) and during CPT. Results Mean age was 55 ± 12 years. Rate pressure product (RPP) in response to IC-Ach did not change (baseline to peak, P = 0.26), but increased during CPT (363±1457; P = 0.0028). CBF in response to CPT was poorly correlated to IC-Ach CBF. Change in coronary artery diameter after IC-Ach correlated with change after CPT (r = 0.59, P<0.001). The correlation coefficient was stronger in subjects with coronary dilation to IC-Ach (r = 0.628, P<0.001) versus those without dilation (r = 0.353, P = 0.002), suggesting that other factors may be important to this relationship when endothelium is abnormal. Conclusions In women with no obstructive CAD and suspected CMD, coronary diameter changes with IC-Ach and CPT are moderately-well correlated suggesting that CPT testing may be of some use, particularly among patients with normal endothelial function, however, not an alternative to IC

  10. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  11. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2009-01-01

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via ‘Trojan horse’ mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology. PMID:19135695

  12. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2–4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research. PMID:27070801

  13. Functional Anatomy and Oncologic Barriers of the Larynx.

    PubMed

    Mor, Niv; Blitzer, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Laryngeal barriers to tumor spread are a product of laryngeal development, anatomic barriers, and enzymatic activity. Supraglottic and glottic/subglottic development is distinct and partially explains the metastatic behavior of laryngeal carcinoma. Dense connective tissues and elastic fibers provide anatomic barriers within the larynx. Laryngeal cartilage contains dense cartilage, enzyme inhibitors, and an intact perichondrium making it relatively resistant to tumor invasion; however, focal areas of vulnerability are created by ossified cartilage and natural interruptions in the perichondrium. Local inflammation and the enzymatic interplay between tumor and host are important factors in the spread of laryngeal tumor.

  14. Effect of high-intensity training on endothelial function in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kolmos, Mia; Krawcyk, Rikke Steen; Kruuse, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Exercise improves endothelial dysfunction, the key manifestation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, and is recommended in both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular rehabilitation. Disagreement remains, however, on the role of intensity of exercise. The purpose of this review was to gather current knowledge on the effects of high-intensity training versus moderate-intensity continuous exercise on endothelial function in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular patients. Methods: A systematic review was performed in PubMed database, Embase and Cochrane libraries and on PEDro using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Studies were restricted to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular patients, and healthy subjects as general reference. Interventions comprised of high-intensity training alone, high-intensity training compared to moderate-intensity continuous exercise, or no training, with endothelial function as outcome measure. Endothelial function was measured either physiologically by flow-mediated dilatation and/or by systemic biomarkers. Data were analyzed descriptively due to non-comparability for a meta-analysis to be performed. Results: A total of 20 studies were included in the review. Although there was great heterogenecity in design, population and exercise protocols, all studies found high-intensity training to be safe. High-intensity training was equal to moderate-intensity continuous exercise through improvement in endothelial function in 15 of the 20 selected studies, as measured by flow-mediated dilatation, nitric oxide bioavailability and circulating biomarkers. Only a few studies examined high-intensity training in cerebrovascular patients, none with endothelial function as outcome. Conclusion: High-intensity training is promising as a time-efficient exercise strategy in cardiovascular rehabilitation, but data on endothelial effects in cerebrovascular rehabilitation are warranted. Agreement on a

  15. Fat-derived factor omentin stimulates endothelial cell function and ischemia-induced revascularization via endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Sonomi; Shibata, Rei; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Rokutanda, Taku; Araki, Satoshi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Koji; Daida, Hiroyuki; Kihara, Shinji; Ogawa, Hisao; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2012-01-02

    Obesity-related diseases are associated with vascular dysfunction and impaired revascularization. Omentin is a fat-derived secreted protein, which is down-regulated in association with obese complications. Here, we investigated whether omentin modulates endothelial cell function and revascularization processes in vitro and in vivo. Systemic delivery of an adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) enhanced blood flow recovery and capillary density in ischemic limbs of wild-type mice in vivo, which were accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a physiological concentration of recombinant omentin protein increased differentiation into vascular-like structures and decreased apoptotic activity under conditions of serum starvation. Treatment with omentin protein stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in HUVECs. Inhibition of Akt signaling by treatment with dominant-negative Akt or LY294002 blocked the stimulatory effects of omentin on differentiation and survival of HUVECs and reversed omentin-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation. Pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor also reduced the omentin-induced increase in HUVEC differentiation and survival. Omentin protein also stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase in HUVECs. Transduction with dominant-negative AMP-activated protein kinase diminished omentin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and omentin-stimulated increase in HUVEC differentiation and survival. Of importance, in contrast to wild-type mice, systemic administration of Ad-omentin did not affect blood flow in ischemic muscle in eNOS-deficient mice in vivo. These data indicate that omentin promotes endothelial cell function and revascularization in response to ischemia through its ability to stimulate an Akt-eNOS signaling pathway.

  16. Acute effects of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia on vascular inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial function in overweight and obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Jennifer M.; Joy, Nino G.; Tate, Donna B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the separate and combined effects of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on markers of endothelial function, proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic responses in overweight/obese nondiabetic humans. Twenty-two individuals (13 F/9 M, BMI 30.1 ± 4.1 kg/m2) were studied during four randomized, single-blind protocols. The pancreatic clamp technique was combined with 4-h glucose clamps consisting of either 1) euinsulinemia-euglycemia, 2) euinsulinemia-hyperglycemia, 3) hyperinsulinemia-hyperglycemia, or 4) hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia. Insulin levels were higher (998 ± 66 vs. 194 ± 22 pmol/l) during hyperinsulinemia compared with euinsulinemia. Glucose levels were 11.1 mmol/l during hyperinsulinemia compared with 5.1 ± 0.1 mmol/l during euglycemia. VCAM, ICAM, P-selectin, E-selectin, IL-6, adiponectin, and PAI-1 responses were all increased (P < 0.01-0.0001), and endothelial function was decreased (P < 0.0005) during euinsulinemia-hyperglycemia compared with other protocols. Hyperinsulinemia in the presence of hyperglycemia prevented the increase in proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic markers while also normalizing vascular endothelial function. We conclude that 4 h of moderate hyperglycemia can result in increases of proinflammatory markers (ICAM, VCAM, IL-6, E-selectin), platelet activation (P-selectin), reduced fibrinolytic balance (increased PAI-1), and disordered endothelial function in a group of obese and overweight individuals. Hyperinsulinemia prevents the actions of moderate hyperglycemia to reduce endothelial function and increase proinflammatory and proatherothrombotic markers. PMID:26015434

  17. Systemic endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation is impaired in patients with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Yencilek, Esin; Sarı, Hakan; Yencilek, Faruk; Yeşil, Ezgi; Aydın, Hasan

    2016-11-23

    Some in vitro and animal studies have shown endothelial dysfunction in hyperoxaluria models indicating its role in pathogenesis of urolithiasis and relation to CVD. The aim of this study was to investigate endothelial function in patients with urolithiasis in relation to urinary stone risk factors and metabolic parameters. A total of 120 subjects without any known CVD (60 with urolithiasis and 60 healthy subjects) were included into study. Fasting blood and 24-h urine samples were collected to study metabolic parameters (glucose and lipids) and urine stone risk factors (oxalate, citrate, uric acid, and calcium, pH). Endothelial function was assessed as flow-mediated dilation (FMD) at the brachial artery. Age, sex, and body mass index were similar in patients and controls. Of urine stone risk factors, oxalate and citrate were higher in patients than controls. Fasting blood glucose, total LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride were higher, and HDL cholesterol was lower in patients than controls. Although within normal limits systolic blood pressure was higher in patient group, patients with urolithiasis had a lower %FMD than controls. Percent FMD was negatively correlated with urinary oxalate/creatinine ratio (p = 0.019, r = -0.315), calcium/creatinine ratio (p = 0.0001, r = -0.505) age (p < 0.001, r = -0.694), BMI (p < 0.001, r = -0.838), total cholesterol (p < 0.001, r = -0.559), and triglyceride (p < 0.001, r = -0.529). Urine oxalate/creatinine ratio was positively correlated with age (p = 0.01, r = 0.327) and calcium/creatinine ratio with BMI (p = 0.001, r = 0.410). This is the first study demonstrating endothelial dysfunction in human subjects with urolithiasis. This indicates a possible predictive role of urolithiasis in future development of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Impaired Endothelial Function: The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Aoi; Cui, Renzhe; Kitamura, Akihiko; Liu, Keyang; Imano, Hironori; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is protective against cardiovascular disease, but heavy alcohol consumption increases its risk. Endothelial dysfunction is hypothesized to contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. However, few population-based studies have examined a potential effect of alcohol consumption on endothelial function. Methods: This study included 404 men aged 30–79 years who were recruited from residents in 2 communities under the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study in 2013 and 2014. We asked the individuals about the frequency and volume of alcohol beverages and converted the data into grams of ethanol per day. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurements during reactive hyperemia. We performed cross-sectional analysis of alcohol consumption and %FMD by logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, baseline brachial artery diameter, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HbA1c, smoking, antihypertensive medication use, and community. Results: Individuals who drank ≥ 46 g/day ethanol had a lower age-adjusted mean %FMD than non-drinkers (p<0.01). Compared with non-drinkers, the age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval) of low %FMD (<5.3%) for former, light (<23.0 g/day ethanol), moderate (23.0–45.9 g/day ethanol), and heavy (≥ 46.0 g/day ethanol) drinkers were 1.61 (0.67–3.89), 0.84 (0.43–1.66), 1.09 (0.52–2.25), and 2.99 (1.56–5.70), respectively. The corresponding multivariable-adjusted ORs were 1.76 (0.69–4.50), 0.86 (0.42–1.76), 0.98 (0.45–2.12), and 2.39 (1.15–4.95), respectively. Conclusions: Heavy alcohol consumption may be an independent risk factor of endothelial dysfunction in Japanese men. PMID:27025680

  19. The Modulation of Endothelial Cell Morphology, Function, and Survival Using Anisotropic Nanofibrillar Collagen Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ngan F.; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C.; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S.; Paukshto, Michael V.; Sun, John; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G.; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues. PMID:23480958

  20. Endothelial-specific inhibition of NF-κB enhances functional haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Michael G.; Ramalingam, Pradeep; Gutkin, Michael C.; Kleppe, Maria; Ginsberg, Michael; Crowley, Michael J. P.; Elemento, Olivier; Levine, Ross L.; Rafii, Shahin; Kitajewski, Jan; Greenblatt, Matthew B.; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Butler, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in distinct niches within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, comprised of endothelial cells (ECs) and tightly associated perivascular constituents that regulate haematopoiesis through the expression of paracrine factors. Here we report that the canonical NF-κB pathway in the BM vascular niche is a critical signalling axis that regulates HSC function at steady state and following myelosuppressive insult, in which inhibition of EC NF-κB promotes improved HSC function and pan-haematopoietic recovery. Mice expressing an endothelial-specific dominant negative IκBα cassette under the Tie2 promoter display a marked increase in HSC activity and self-renewal, while promoting the accelerated recovery of haematopoiesis following myelosuppression, in part through protection of the BM microenvironment following radiation and chemotherapeutic-induced insult. Moreover, transplantation of NF-κB-inhibited BM ECs enhanced haematopoietic recovery and protected mice from pancytopenia-induced death. These findings pave the way for development of niche-specific cellular approaches for the treatment of haematological disorders requiring myelosuppressive regimens. PMID:28000664

  1. Production of functional human vascular endothelial growth factor(165) in transgenic rice cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nguyen-Duc; Kim, Nan-Sun; Giap, Do Van; Jang, Seon-Hui; Oh, Sun-Mi; Jang, Sun-Hee; Kim, Tae-Geum; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2014-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are secreted by tumor cells and other cells exposed to hypoxia, and play a critical role in the development and differentiation of the vascular system. In this study, we investigated the production of functional recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) in transgenic rice cell suspension culture. Complementary DNA was synthesized from human leukemia HL60 cells and cloned into expression vectors under the control of the rice α-amylase 3D (RAmy3D) promoter. The rice seed (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) was transformed with this recombinant vector by the Agrobacterium mediated method and the integration of the target gene into the plant genome was confirmed by genomic PCR. The expression of rhVEGF165 in the rice cells was determined by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. The accumulated rhVEGF165 protein in the culture medium was 19 mg/L after 18 days of culturing in a sugar-free medium. The rhVEGF165 was purified using a heparin HP column and its biological activity was tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The purified rhVEGF165 significantly increased the proliferative activity of the HUVECs. Therefore, it was demonstrated that functional rhVEGF165 could be produced using transgenic rice suspension culture vector under the control of the RAmy3D promoter.

  2. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  3. Chemokine receptor CXCR7 is a functional receptor for CXCL12 in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Carson-Walter, Eleanor; Walter, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 regulates multiple cell functions through its receptor, CXCR4. However, recent studies have shown that CXCL12 also binds a second receptor, CXCR7, to potentiate signal transduction and cell activity. In contrast to CXCL12/CXCR4, few studies have focused on the role of CXCR7 in vascular biology and its role in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) remains unclear. In this report, we used complementary methods, including immunocytofluorescence, Western blot, and flow cytometry analyses, to demonstrate that CXCR7 was expressed on HBMECs. We then employed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology to knockdown CXCR7 in HBMECs. Knockdown of CXCR7 in HBMECs resulted in significantly reduced HBMEC proliferation, tube formation, and migration, as well as adhesion to matrigel and tumor cells. Blocking CXCR7 with a specific antibody or small molecule antagonist similarly disrupted HBMEC binding to matrigel or tumor cells. We found that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced CXCR7 in a time and dose-response manner and that this increase preceded an increase in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in suppression of VCAM-1, suggesting that the reduced binding of CXCR7-knockdown HBMECs may result from suppression of VCAM-1. Collectively, CXCR7 acted as a functional receptor for CXCL12 in brain endothelial cells. Targeting CXCR7 in tumor vasculature may provide novel opportunities for improving brain tumor therapy.

  4. Nitrotyrosine impairs mitochondrial function in fetal lamb pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzong-Jin; Afolayan, Adeleye J.; Konduri, Girija G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitration of both protein-bound and free tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species results in the formation of nitrotyrosine (NT). We previously reported that free NT impairs microtubule polymerization and uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). Because microtubules modulate mitochondrial function, we hypothesized that increased NT levels during inflammation and oxidative stress will lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in PAEC. PAEC isolated from fetal lambs were exposed to varying concentrations of free NT. At low concentrations (1–10 μM), NT increased nitration of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunit complexes I–V and state III oxygen consumption. Higher concentrations of NT (50 μM) caused decreased microtubule acetylation, impaired eNOS interactions with mitochondria, and decreased ETC protein levels. We also observed increases in heat shock protein-90 nitration, mitochondrial superoxide formation, and fragmentation of mitochondria in PAEC. Our data suggest that free NT accumulation may impair microtubule polymerization and exacerbate reactive oxygen species-induced cell damage by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26491046

  5. Transfer of functional microRNAs between glioblastoma and microvascular endothelial cells through gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Thuringer, Dominique; Boucher, Jonathan; Jego, Gaetan; Pernet, Nicolas; Cronier, Laurent; Hammann, Arlette; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Extensive invasion and angiogenesis are hallmark features of malignant glioblastomas. Here, we co-cultured U87 human glioblastoma cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to demonstrate the exchange of microRNAs that initially involve the formation of gap junction communications between the two cell types. The functional inhibition of gap junctions by carbenoxolone blocks the transfer of the anti-tumor miR-145-5p from HMEC to U87, and the transfer of the pro-invasive miR-5096 from U87 to HMEC. These two microRNAs exert opposite effects on angiogenesis in vitro. MiR-5096 was observed to promote HMEC tubulogenesis, initially by increasing Cx43 expression and the formation of heterocellular gap junctions, and secondarily through a gap-junction independent pathway. Our results highlight the importance of microRNA exchanges between tumor and endothelial cells that in part involves the formation of functional gap junctions between the two cell types. PMID:27661112

  6. Effects of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Endothelial Function and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Conor; Harris, Ryan A.; Brown, Malcolm; Brown, John C.; Davison, Gareth W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure endothelial function and oxidative stress immediately, 90 minutes, and three hours after exercise of varying intensities. Methods. Sixteen apparently healthy men completed three exercise bouts of treadmill running for 30 minutes at 55% V˙O2max (mild); 20 minutes at 75% V˙O2max (moderate); or 5 minutes at 100% V˙O2max (maximal) in random order. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed with venous blood samples drawn for measurement of endothelin-1 (ET-1), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), and lipid soluble antioxidants. Results. LOOH increased immediately following moderate exercise (P < 0.05). ET-1 was higher immediately after exercise and 3 hours after exercise in the mild trial compared to maximal one (P < 0.05). Transient decreases were detected for ΔFMD/ShearAUC from baseline following maximal exercise, but it normalised at 3 hours after exercise (P < 0.05). Shear rate was higher immediately after exercise in the maximal trial compared to mild exercise (P < 0.05). No changes in baseline diameter, peak diameter, absolute change in diameter, or FMD were observed following any of the exercise trials (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Acute exercise at different intensities elicits varied effects on oxidative stress, shear rate, and ET-1 that do not appear to mediate changes in endothelial function measured by FMD. PMID:26583061

  7. The modulation of endothelial cell morphology, function, and survival using anisotropic nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ngan F; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Paukshto, Michael V; Sun, John S; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G; Cooke, John P

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues.

  8. Transfer of functional microRNAs between glioblastoma and microvascular endothelial cells through gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique; Boucher, Jonathan; Jego, Gaetan; Pernet, Nicolas; Cronier, Laurent; Hammann, Arlette; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-11-08

    Extensive invasion and angiogenesis are hallmark features of malignant glioblastomas. Here, we co-cultured U87 human glioblastoma cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to demonstrate the exchange of microRNAs that initially involve the formation of gap junction communications between the two cell types. The functional inhibition of gap junctions by carbenoxolone blocks the transfer of the anti-tumor miR-145-5p from HMEC to U87, and the transfer of the pro-invasive miR-5096 from U87 to HMEC. These two microRNAs exert opposite effects on angiogenesis in vitro. MiR-5096 was observed to promote HMEC tubulogenesis, initially by increasing Cx43 expression and the formation of heterocellular gap junctions, and secondarily through a gap-junction independent pathway. Our results highlight the importance of microRNA exchanges between tumor and endothelial cells that in part involves the formation of functional gap junctions between the two cell types.

  9. Murine filaggrin-2 is involved in epithelial barrier function and down-regulated in metabolically induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Britta; Ahrens, Kerstin; Wu, Zhihong; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2012-04-01

    The S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) are thought to be involved in the barrier formation and function of the skin. Mutations in the profilaggrin gene, one of the best investigated members of this family, are known to be the major risk factors for ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. Recently, we identified human filaggrin-2 as a new member of the SFTP family. To achieve further insight into its function, here the murine filaggrin-2 was analysed as a possible orthologue. The 5' and 3' ends of the mouse filaggrin-2 cDNA of the BALB/c strain were sequenced and confirmed an organization typical for SFTPs. Murine filaggrin-2 showed an expression pattern mainly in keratinizing epithelia in the upper cell layers on both mRNA and protein levels. The expression in cultured mouse keratinocytes was increased upon elevated Ca(2+) levels. Immunoblotting experiments indicated an intraepidermal processing of the 250-kDa full-length protein. In metabolically (essential fatty acid-deficient diet) induced skin barrier dysfunction, filaggrin-2 expression was significantly reduced, whereas filaggrin expression was up-regulated. In contrast, mechanical barrier disruption with acetone treatment did not affect filaggrin-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that filaggrin-2 may contribute to epidermal barrier function and its regulation differs, at least in parts, from that of filaggrin.

  10. Impaired endothelial function and microvascular asymmetrical dimethylarginine in angiotensin II-infused rats: effects of tempol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Zaiming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jose, Pedro A; Falck, John R; Welch, William J; Aslam, Shakil; Teerlink, Tom; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II causes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the hypothesis that Ang II increases microvascular reactive oxygen species and asymmetrical dimethylarginine and switches endothelial function from vasodilator to vasoconstrictor pathways. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent responses of mesenteric resistance arterioles were assessed in a myograph and vascular NO and reactive oxygen species by fluorescent probes in groups (n=6) of male rats infused for 14 days with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) or given a sham infusion. Additional groups of Ang or sham-infused rats were given oral Tempol (2 mmol · L(-1)). Ang II infusion increased mean blood pressure (119±5 versus 89±7 mm Hg; P<0.005) and plasma malondialdehyde (0.57±0.02 versus 0.37±0.05 μmol · L(-1); P<0.035) and decreased maximal endothelium-dependent relaxation (18±5% versus 54±6%; P<0.005) and hyperpolarizing (19±3% versus 29±3%; P<0.05) responses and NO activity (0.9±0.1 versus 1.6±0.2 U; P<0.01) yet enhanced endothelium-dependent contraction responses (23±5% versus 5±5%; P<0.05) and reactive oxygen species production (0.82±0.05 versus 0.15±0.03 U; P<0.01). Ang II decreased the expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine in vessels (450±50 versus 260±35 pmol/mg of protein; P<0.01) but not plasma. Tempol prevented any significant changes with Ang II. In conclusion, Ang redirected endothelial responses from relaxation to contraction, reduced vascular NO, and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine. These effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species and could, therefore, be targeted with effective antioxidant therapy.

  11. Anti-angiogenic quassinoid-rich fraction from Eurycoma longifolia modulates endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Al-Salahi, Omar Saeed Ali; Kit-Lam, Chan; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul; Al-Suede, Fouad Saleih R; Mohammed Saghir, Sultan Ayesh; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Ahamed, Mohamed B Khadeer; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2013-11-01

    Targeting angiogenesis could be an excellent strategy to combat angiogenesis-dependent pathophysiological conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, proliferative retinopathy and atherosclerosis. Recently a number of clinical investigations are being undertaken to assess the potential therapeutic application of various anti-angiogenic agents. Many of these angiogenesis inhibitors are directed against the functions of endothelial cells, which are considered as the building blocks of blood vessels. Similarly, roots of a traditional medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia, can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat the angiogenesis-related diseases. In the present study, antiangiogenic potential of partially purified quassinoid-rich fraction (TAF273) of E. longifolia root extract was evaluated using ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis models and the anti-angiogenic efficacy of TAF273 was investigated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). TAF273 caused significant suppression in sprouting of microvessels in rat aorta with IC50 11.5μg/ml. TAF273 (50μg/ml) showed remarkable inhibition (63.13%) of neovascularization in chorioallantoic membrane of chick embryo. Tumor histology also revealed marked reduction in extent of vascularization. In vitro, TAF273 significantly inhibited the major angiogenesis steps such as proliferation, migration and differentiation of HUVECs. Phytochemical analysis revealed high content of quassinoids in TAF273. Specially, HPLC characterization showed that TAF273 is enriched with eurycomanone, 13α(21)-epoxyeurycomanone and eurycomanol. These results demonstrated that the antiangiogenic activity of TAF273 may be due to its inhibitory effect on endothelial cell proliferation, differentiation and migration which could be attributed to the high content of quassinoids in E. longifolia.

  12. Vascular endothelial function is improved by oral glycine treatment in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Zamudio, Jaime H; García-Macedo, Rebeca; Lázaro-Suárez, Martha; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Kumate, Jesús; Cruz, Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Glycine has been used to reduce oxidative stress and proinflammatory mediators in some metabolic disorders; however, its effect on the vasculature has been poorly studied. The aim of this work was to explore the effect of glycine on endothelial dysfunction in aged rats. Aortic rings with intact or denuded endothelium were obtained from untreated or glycine-treated male Sprague-Dawley rats at 5 and 15 months of age. Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine (PHE) were obtained from aortic rings incubated with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), superoxide dismutase (SOD), indomethacin, SC-560, and NS-398. Aortic mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX-4), cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin-1 β was measured by real time RT-PCR. The endothelial modulation of the contraction by PHE was decreased in aortic rings from aged rats. Glycine treatment improved this modulator effect and increased relaxation to acetylcholine. Glycine augmented the sensitivity for PHE in the presence of l-NAME and SOD. It also reduced the contraction by incubation with indomethacin, SC-560, and NS-398. Glycine increased the mRNA expression of eNOS and decreased the expression of COX-2 and TNF-α. Glycine improved the endothelium function in aged rats possibly by enhancing eNOS expression and reducing the role of superoxide anion and contractile prostanoids that increase the nitric oxide bioavailability.

  13. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air