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Sample records for endothelial cell lines

  1. Ultrasound fails to induce proliferation of human brain and mouse endothelial cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemer, Claus; Jenne, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G.; Meairs, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that ultrasound (US) is capable of inducing angiogenesis. There is no information, however, on whether ultrasound can induce proliferation of brain endothelial cells. We therefore explored the angiogenic potential of ultrasound on a novel immortalised human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) and on mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3). Ultrasound failed to enhance cell proliferation in both cell lines at all acoustic pressures studied. Endothelial cell damage occurred at 0.24 MPa with significantly slower proliferation. Cells growing in Opticell{trade mark, serif} dishes did not show damage or reduced proliferation at these pressures.

  2. Maslinic Acid Inhibits Proliferation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines and Suppresses Angiogenesis of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Parth; Song, Wenzhe; Subramanian, Ramalingam B.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.; Vesey, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of many novel therapeutics in clinical practice, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a treatment-resistant cancer. As red and processed meat are considered risk factors for RCC, and a vegetable-rich diet is thought to reduce this risk, research into plant-based therapeutics may provide valuable complementary or alternative therapeutics for the management of RCC. Herein, we present the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of maslinic acid, which occurs naturally in edible plants, particularly in olive fruits, and also in a variety of medicinal plants. Human RCC cell lines (ACHN, Caki-1, and SN12K1), endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cell line [HUVEC]), and primary cultures of kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) were treated with maslinic acid. Maslinic acid was relatively less toxic to PTEC when compared with RCC under similar experimental conditions. In RCC cell lines, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and colony formation. In HUVEC, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in capillary tube formation in vitro and vascular endothelial growth factor. This study provides a rationale for incorporating a maslinic acid–rich diet either to reduce the risk of developing kidney cancer or as an adjunct to existing antiangiogenic therapy to improve efficacy. PMID:28405545

  3. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation and characterization of conditionally immortalized mouse glomerular endothelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rops, Angelique L; van der Vlag, Johan; Jacobs, Cor W; Dijkman, Henry B; Lensen, Joost F; Wijnhoven, Tessa J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Berden, Jo H

    2004-12-01

    The culture and establishment of glomerular cell lines has proven to be an important tool for the understanding of glomerular cell functions in glomerular physiology and pathology. Especially, the recent establishment of a conditionally immortalized visceral epithelial cell line has greatly boosted the research on podocyte biology. Glomeruli were isolated from H-2Kb-tsA58 transgenic mice that contain a gene encoding a temperature-sensitive variant of the SV40 large tumor antigen, facilitating proliferative growth at 33 degrees C and differentiation at 37 degrees C. Glomerular endothelial cells were isolated from glomerular outgrowth by magnetic beads loaded with CD31, CD105, GSL I-B4, and ULEX. Clonal cell lines were characterized by immunofluorescence staining with antibodies/lectins specific for markers of endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells. Putative glomerular endothelial cell lines were analyzed for (1) cytokine-induced expression of adhesion molecules; (2) tube formation on Matrigel coating; and (3) the presence of fenestrae. As judged by immunostaining for Wilms tumor-1, smooth muscle actin (SMA), podocalyxin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF), we obtained putative endothelial, podocyte and mesangial cell lines. The mouse glomerular endothelial cell clone #1 (mGEnC-1) was positive for vWF, podocalyxin, CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, GSL I-B4, and ULEX, internalized acetylated-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and showed increased expression of adhesion molecules after activation with proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, mGEnC-1 formed tubes and contained nondiaphragmed fenestrae. The mGEnC-1 represents a conditionally immortalized cell line with various characteristics of differentiated glomerular endothelial cells when cultured at 37 degrees C. Most important, mGEnC-1 contains nondiaphragmed fenestrae, which is a unique feature of glomerular endothelial cells.

  5. Growth of Cowdria ruminantium in tissue culture endothelial cell lines from wild African mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, G E; Anderson, E C; Burridge, M J; Peter, T F; Mahan, S M

    1998-04-01

    Endothelial cell cultures were established from several wild African mammalian species. Long-term cultures were established from three ruminants, stable antelope (Hippotragus niger), buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and eland (Tragelaphus oryx), and from an omnivore, the bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus). Cowdria ruminanntium was isolated from plasma of clinically affected animals in these four cell lines and in bovine endothelial cells used routinely for C. ruminantium propagation. Nineteen different strains of C. ruminantium from Africa and the Caribbean region were grown and maintained in these cell lines and their growth was comparable with growth in the bovine endothelial cells. The role of sable antelope, eland, and bushpigs in the epidemiology of heartwater is unknown. However, these results extend the number of cell lines that can be used to isolate and grow C. ruminantium.

  6. CD133 positive progenitor endothelial cell lines from human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Maria; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Dus, Danuta; Kantor, Aneta; Carreau, Aude; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2011-08-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) modulate postnatal vascularization and contribute to vessel regeneration in adults. Stem cells and progenitor cells were found in umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, and mobilized peripheral blood cells, from where they were isolated and cultured. However, the yield of progenitor cells is usually not sufficient for clinical application and the quality of progenitor cells varies. The aim of the study was the immortalization of early progenitor cells with high proliferative potential, capable to differentiate to EPCs and, further, toward endothelial cells. Two cell lines, namely HEPC-CB.1 and HEPC-CB.2 (human endothelial progenitor cells-cord blood) were isolated. As assessed by specific antibody labeling and flow cytometric analysis, they express a panel of stem cell markers: CD133, CD13, CD271, CD90 and also endothelial cell markers: CD202b, CD309 (VEGFR2), CD146, CD105, and CD143 but they do not present markers of finally differentiated endothelial cells: CD31, vWf, nor CD45 which is a specific hematopoietic cell marker. Using the multiplex Cytometric Bead Assay, the simultaneous production of proangiogenic cytokines IL8, angiogenin, and VEGF was demonstrated in normoxia and was shown to be increased by hypoxia. Both cell lines, similarly as mature endothelial cells, underwent in vitro pre-angiogenic process, formed pseudovessel structures and present an accelerated angiogenesis in hypoxic conditions. To date, these are the first CD133 positive established cell lines from human cord blood cells. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Characterization of immortalized human umbilical and iliac vein endothelial cell lines after transfection with SV40 large T-antigen.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, E B; Veenstra, R; van Wijk, R; Molema, G; Hoekstra, A; Ruiters, M H; van der Meer, J

    2000-01-01

    Most in vitro studies of human endothelial cells have relied on cells derived from human umbilical veins (HUVEC); however, heterogeneity of primary cultured endothelial cells can make critical interpretation of results difficult. Several endothelial cell lines have been produced to serve as a more constant source of endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the endothelial cell lines EVLB3 and EVLC2 derived from HUVEC, and EVLK1 and EVLK2 derived from human iliac vein endothelial cells (HIVEC). These cell lines maintained the typical endothelial cell cobblestone morphology and appeared to be growth factor independent. They lost PECAM-1 and von Willebrand factor, GP96 was reduced to the level of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), but aSMC-actin was far less than in vascular SMC. Antigen levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) were comparable with young endothelial cells, and mRNA was present for tPA, PAI-1, tissue factor (TF), tissue factor pathway inhibitor and thrombomodulin. This study revealed that mRNA and protein expression of coagulation and fibrinolytic factors was influenced by the stage of cell confluence. No differences could be detected between the endothelial cell lines derived from HUVEC and HIVEC. These cell lines may be a useful tool for studies on cellular interactions of fibrinolytic components or exploring the regulation of TF expression.

  8. Immunochemical identification of human endothelial cells on the lining of a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, O H; Baldwin, R T; Eskin, S G; Duncan, J M

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the biologic (pseudointimal) lining that forms in the HeartMate (Thermo Cardiosystems, Inc.; Woburn, Massachusetts, USA), a left ventricular assist device with a pusher-plate blood pump, housed in solid titanium with uniquely textured blood-contacting surfaces. Sintered titanium microspheres cover the rigid surface, and integrally textured polyurethane lines the flexing diaphragm. The texture of the blood-contacting surfaces is designed to encourage formation of a biologic pseudointimal lining, which greatly reduces the risk of thromboembolic complications. We performed immunochemical analyses to characterize precisely the pseudointimal lining. Samples were taken from 2 explanted pumps; 1 had supported a patient for 132 days and the other, 189 days. The samples were cultured to detect factor-VIII-related antigen (von Willebrand factor), acetyl low-density lipoprotein receptors, smooth-muscle-cell actin, and surface adhesion molecules specific for monocytes/macrophages. Macrophage cells were predominant in both pumps, but in the 2nd pump, cultures from the center of the diaphragm were positive for acetyl low-density lipoprotein receptor and von Willebrand factor, indicating the presence of endothelial cells. We believe that blood-borne endothelial cells or endothelial cell precursors were deposited on the blood-contacting surfaces, which is an important clinical finding with regard to lowering the risk of thromboembolic complications and reducing the need for systemic anticoagulation in long-term left ventricular assist device patients. Images PMID:8392881

  9. Modifications in astrocyte morphology and calcium signaling induced by a brain capillary endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth J

    2002-04-15

    Astrocytes extend specialized endfoot processes to perisynaptic and perivascular regions, and thus are positioned to mediate the bidirectional flow of metabolic, ionic, and other transmissive substances between neurons and the blood stream. While mutual structural and functional interactions between neurons and astrocytes have been documented, less is known about the interactions between astrocytes and cerebrovascular cells. For example, although the ability of astrocytes to induce structural and functional changes in endothelial cells is established, the reciprocity of brain endothelial cells to induce changes in astrocytes is undetermined. This issue is addressed in the present study. Changes in primary cultures of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes were investigated following their coculture with mouse brain capillary endothelial (bEnd3) cells. The presence of bEnd3 cells altered the morphology of astrocytes by transforming them from confluent monolayers into networks of elongated multicellular columns. These columns did not occur when either bEnd3 cells or astrocytes were cocultured with other cell types, suggesting that astrocytes undergo specific morphological consequences when placed in close proximity to brain endothelial cells. In addition to these structural changes, the pharmacological profile of astrocytes was modified by coculture with bEnd3 cells. Astrocytes in the cocultures showed an increased Ca2+ responsiveness to bradykinin and glutamate, but no change in responsiveness to ATP, as compared to controls. Coculturing the astrocytes with a neuronal cell line resulted in increased responsiveness of the glial responses to glutamate but not to bradykinin. These studies indicate that brain endothelial cells induce changes in astrocyte morphology and pharmacology.

  10. Establishment of a new conditionally immortalized human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hironori; Sano, Yasuteru; Ishiguchi, Eri; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Maeda, Toshihiko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Takeshita, Yukio; Takahashi, Shiori; Oishi, Mariko; Kanda, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    In skeletal muscle, the capillaries have tight junctions (TJs) that are structurally similar to those in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-nerve barrier (BNB). Although many findings have been clarified in the territory of BBB and BNB, few have so far examined the TJs of capillaries in the skeletal muscle. In addition, no in vitro human skeletal muscle microvasculature models have been reported thus far. We newly established a new human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell (HSMMEC) line. HSMMECs were isolated from human skeletal muscle and were infected with retroviruses harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen and telomerase genes. This cell line, termed TSM15, showed a spindle fiber-shaped morphology, an immunoreactivity to anti-factor VIII and anti-VE-cadherin antibodies, and a temperature-sensitive growth. TSM15 cells grew stably for more than 40 passages when they were cultured at 33°C, thereby retaining their spindle fiber-shaped morphology and contact inhibition at confluence. The cells expressed tight junctional molecules such as claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens-1, as well as transporters such as a glucose transporter 1. The transendothelial electrical resistance of TSM15 was as high as those of the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line. This novel cell line might facilitate the analyses of the pathophysiology of inflammatory myopathy, such as dermatomyositis, and can improve our understanding of the physiological and biochemical properties of the microvasculature in human skeletal muscle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Establishment of human tumoral ependymal cell lines and coculture with tubular-like human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C; Lelong-Rebel, I; Mottolèse, C; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Saint Pierre, G; Rebel, G; Belin, M F

    2002-10-01

    Ependymomas, rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, occur predominantly in children. They are highly vascularized, and histological findings show many perivascular rosettes of tumoral cells radially organized around capillaries. Treatment of ependymomas relies on surgery combined with radio- or chemotherapy, but the efficiency of chemotherapy is limited, probably because of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Progress in the therapy of these neoplasms is dramatically limited by the absence of cell line models. We established conditions for the long-term culture of human tumoral ependymocytes and their 3D coculture in Matrigel with endothelial cells. Histological, immunological, and ultrastructural studies showed that the morphological features (microvilli, cilia, and caveolae) of these cultured cells were similar to those of the tumor in vivo. The cells expressed potential oncological markers related to the immature state of tumoral cells (nestin and Notch-1), their tumorigenicity [caveolae and epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)], or the MDR phenotype [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. The expression of P-gp, EGF-R, and caveolin-1 by these tumoral ependymocytes could be useful in studies on new drugs. This coculture model might represent a new powerful tool to study new therapeutic delivery strategies in tumoral cells.

  12. Study of endothelial cell apoptosis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor cell line with hemodynamic microfluidic chip system.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Q; Liu, X F; Chin, L K; Liu, A Q; Luo, K Q

    2013-07-21

    To better understand how hyperglycemia induces endothelial cell dysfunction under the diabetic conditions, a hemodynamic microfluidic chip system was developed. The system combines a caspase-3-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor cell line which can detect endothelial cell apoptosis in real-time, post-treatment effect and with a limited cell sample, by using a microfluidic chip which can mimic the physiological pulsatile flow profile in the blood vessel. The caspase-3-based FRET biosensor endothelial cell line (HUVEC-C3) can produce a FRET-based sensor protein capable of probing caspase-3 activation. When the endothelial cells undergo apoptosis, the color of the sensor cells changes from green to blue, thus sensing apoptosis. A double-labeling fluorescent technique (yo pro-1 and propidium iodide) was used to validate the findings revealed by the FRET-based caspase sensor. The results show high rates of apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells when high glucose concentration was applied in our hemodynamic microfluidic chip combined with an exhaustive pulsatile flow profile. The two apoptosis detection techniques (fluorescent method and FRET biosensor) are comparable; but FRET biosensor offers more advantages such as real-time observation and a convenient operating process to generate more accurate and reliable data. Furthermore, the activation of the FRET biosensor also confirms the endothelial cell apoptosis induced by the abnormal pulsatile shear stress and high glucose concentration is through caspase-3 pathway. A 12% apoptotic rate (nearly a 4-fold increase compared to the static condition) was observed when the endothelial cells were exposed to a high glucose concentration of 20 mM under 2 h exhaustive pulsatile shear stress of 30 dyne cm(-2) and followed with another 10 h normal pulsatile shear stress of 15 dyne cm(-2). Therefore, the most important finding of this study is to develop a novel endothelial cell apoptosis detection

  13. Degradation of endothelial basement membrane by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C.; Shiu, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    During metastasis, it is believed that tumor cells destroy the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels in order to disseminate through the circulatory system. By radioactively labeling the extracellular matrix produced by primary endothelial cells in vitro, the ability of human breast cancer cells to degrade BM components was studied. We found that T-47D, a human breast cancer line, was able to degrade significant amounts of (35S)methionine-labeled and (3H)proline-labeled BM, but not 35SO4-labeled BM. Six other tumor cell lines of human breast origin were assayed in the same manner and were found to degrade BM to varying degrees. Several non-tumor cell lines tested showed relatively little degrading activity. The use of serum-free medium greatly enhanced degradation of the BM by tumor cells, suggesting a role for naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors in the serum. Direct cell contact with the BM was required for BM degradation, suggesting that the active enzymes are cell associated. The addition of hormones implicated in the etiology of breast cancer did not significantly alter the ability of T-47D cells to degrade the BM. The use of this assay affords future studies on the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  14. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    2015-10-01

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  15. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  16. Generation and characterization of a porcine endometrial endothelial cell line susceptible to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lili; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Li, Yangyang; He, Shan; Sun, Huaichang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on the underlying mechanism for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-induced reproductive failure have been focused on the viral replication in the endothelial macrophages, and the susceptibility of porcine endometrial endothelial (PEE) cells to PRRSV has not yet been investigated. Therefore, in the present study we generated a PEE cell line by transfection of the primary cells with a SV40 large T antigen expression vector. The PEE cell line maintained the endothelial morphology with a significantly faster growth rate, shorter population doubling time and higher plating efficiency than the primary cells. The endothelial origination of the cell line was confirmed by detection of the endothelial cell-specific markers. The PEE cell line had been passed successively for 60 generations with an unlimited growth potential. To further characterize the PEE cell line, cells of different passages were infected with different PRRSV strains and analyzed for the viral antigen and replication. Overt cytopathic effect was observed from 36h postinfection (HPI) and the viral antigen detected as early as 12 HPI. The infectious virus was recovered from the infected PEE cells with a titer higher than that in MARC-145 cells. Since the data presented indicate a high susceptibility of PEE cells to PRRSV, we conclude that the PEE cell line generated will be useful for growth of PRRSV and further studies on the underlying mechanism for PRRSV infection of PEE cells. The finding of the susceptibility of PEE cells to PRRSV may provide an alternative explanation for PRRSV-induced reproductive failure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Engineering anastomosis between living capillary networks and endothelial cell-lined microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Sobrino, Agua; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports a method for generating an intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This platform incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. After formation of a capillary network inside the tissue chamber via vasculogenesis, the adjacent microfluidic channels are lined with a monolayer of ECs, which then serve as the high-pressure input ("artery") and low pressure output ("vein") conduits. To promote a tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network, sprouting angiogenesis is induced, which promotes anastomosis of the vasculature inside the tissue chamber with the EC lining along the microfluidic channels. Flow of fluorescent microparticles confirms the perfusability of the lumenized microvascular network, and minimal leakage of 70 kDa FITC-dextran confirms physiologic tightness of the EC junctions and completeness of the interconnections between artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein. The system has utility in a wide range of organ-on-a-chip applications as it enables the physiological vascular interconnection of multiple on-chip tissue constructs that can serve as disease models for drug screening.

  18. Establishment and characterization of a rainbow trout heart endothelial cell line with susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Luque, Alfonso; González Granja, Aitor; González, Lucia; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    In the current work, we have established and characterized a novel cell line from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The cell line, designated as RTH (rainbow trout heart), was obtained by immortalizing heart cells with recombinant retroviruses that transduced polyoma middle T antigen. This is the first time such a strategy is used to obtain an immortalized fish cell line. The cells showed an endothelial-like morphology and characteristics, constitutively transcribing collagen, selectin and VCAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule), as well as different chemokines and chemokine receptors, but not cytokeratin. As already described for heart endothelial cells, RTH cells actively phagocytized latex beads. Furthermore, RTH cells showed a high susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). VHSV modulated the transcription of Mx, major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II), VCAM and many of the chemokine and chemokine receptors expressed in these cells. Therefore, RTH cells constitute an excellent model to study the immune regulation of endothelial cells in fish and their role in leukocyte extravasation.

  19. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  20. LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced during melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture favors the transendothelial migration of melanoma cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic melanoma have a poor median rate of survival. It is therefore necessary to increase our knowledge about melanoma cell dissemination which includes extravasation, where cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier. Extravasation is well understood during travelling of white blood cells, and involves integrins such as LFA-1 (composed of two chains, CD11a and CD18) expressed by T cells, while ICAM-1 is induced during inflammation by endothelial cells. Although melanoma cell lines cross endothelial cell barriers, they do not express LFA-1. We therefore hypothesized that melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture might induce the LFA-1/ICAM ligand/receptor couple during melanoma transmigration. Methods A transwell approach has been used as well as blocking antibodies against CD11a, CD18 and ICAM-1. Data were analyzed with an epifluorescence microscope. Fluorescence intensity was quantified with the ImageJ software. Results We show here that HUVEC-conditioned medium induce cell-surface expression of LFA-1 on melanoma cell lines. Similarly melanoma-conditioned medium activates ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells. Accordingly blocking antibodies of ICAM-1, CD11a or CD18 strongly decrease melanoma transmigration. We therefore demonstrate that melanoma cells can cross endothelial monolayers in vitro due to the induction of ICAM-1 and LFA-1 occurring during the co-culture of melanoma and endothelial cells. Our data further suggest a role of LFA-1 and ICAM-1 in the formation of melanoma cell clumps enhancing tumor cell transmigration. Conclusion Melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture induces LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression, thereby favoring in vitro melanoma trans-migration. PMID:23039186

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibition in uveal melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Patrick; Burnier, Julia; Burnier, Miguel N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uveal melanoma (UM) is a disease that affects approximately five people per million in the United States. This disease metastasises predominantly to the liver, and treatment options following the clinical detection of these sequelae are limited. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the primary activator of tumour angiogenesis and functions by binding to VEGF-Receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) and is often required for tumour growth beyond 2–3 mm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of VEGF-A and the primary VEGF-R2 in three UM cell lines. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of VEGF-A inhibition on receptor activation and production of other cytokines. Finally, the effects of VEGF-A inhibition on the proliferation, migration, and invasion in the cell lines were ascertained. Materials: Three UM cell lines (92.1, OCM-1, and UW-1) were incubated with and without the addition of 100 μg/mL of bevacizumab. VEGF-A expression under both conditions was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and phosphorylated VEGF-R2 expression was determined using western blot. The effects of VEGF-A inhibition on 20 cytokines (IL-1a, IL-2, IL-5, IL-8, IL-12p70, GM-CSF, IFNy, CCL3, MMP-9, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, GRO, MCP-1, MIP-1b, and RANTES) were determined using a multiplex sandwich ELISA. Proliferation rates before and after treatment were evaluated via sulforhodamine B assay, and migration and invasion assays implementing the Boyden chamber technique, the latter with artificial extracellular matrix, were used to assess their respective abilities. The Student’s t-test was used to compare changes in cytokine expression following VEGF-A inhibition. Analysis of variance was used to compare changes in the functional abilities of three uveal melanoma cell lines following VEGF-A inhibition. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: All three cell lines produced copious amounts of

  2. Tetracycline suppresses ATP gamma S-induced CXCL8 and CXCL1 production by the human dermal microvascular endothelial cell-1 (HMEC-1) cell line and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, Anna; Zapolanski, Tamar; Watkins, Shannon; Khosraviani, Ava; Seiffert, Kristina; Ding, Wanhong; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    Tetracyclines (TCN) have powerful anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their anti-microbial effects. These anti-inflammatory effects are thought to play a role in inhibiting cutaneous inflammation in patients with rosacea and acne; however, the mechanism(s) of this action remains poorly understood. We have previously shown that adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)gamma S, a hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue, augments secretion of pro-inflammatory messengers by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1). ATP released by the sympathetic nerves during stress may stimulate release of pro-inflammatory chemokines by dermal vessel endothelial cells, resulting in recruitment of inflammatory cells and exacerbation of inflammatory skin disease. Here we demonstrate that TCN inhibits ATP gamma S-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. TCN dose-dependently inhibited ATP gamma S-induced augmentation of CXCL8 (interleukin-8) and CXCL1 (growth-regulated oncogene-alpha) production by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal endothelial cells in vitro. TCN and ATP gamma S did not affect HMEC-1 cell viability as determined by trypan-blue exclusion and cell counts. Inhibition of production of inflammatory mediators by endothelial cells may be one mechanism by which TCN improves inflammatory skin diseases. The ability to inhibit release of inflammatory mediators induced in HMEC-1 cells by purinergic agonists may be a useful way to screen for potential therapeutic agents for cutaneous inflammation.

  3. [Establishment of human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line XPTS-1 and animal model of human infancy hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Xiao, Xiao-e; Xu, Quan; Guo, Zheng-tuan

    2011-03-01

    To establish an immortalized human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line (HemEC) and animal model of human infancy hemangioma. Hemangioma-derived endothelial cells from specimen of human infancy hemangioma were cultured in vitro and monocloed, and then its growth curve was made, karyomorphism of chromosome analyzed, morphologic characteristics observe, factor VIII related antigen identified by immunohistochemical method.Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) was detected by flow cytometry. HemEC were inoculated subcutaneously in athymic mouse to establish animal model of infancy hemangioma. The animal model was observed closely and its pathological characteristic was also studied. The cultural cells grew active, and immortalized spontaneously when they were subcultured on sixteenth generation. This cell line was cultivated for more than 70 times within one year and in good condition after freezing and resuscitating once and again, and had the morphologic character of HemEC. The cell population doubling time was 22 h. Factor VIII and VEGFR-2 were expressed positively. Karyo type analysis of the cell line showed abnormal diploid with the modal chromosomal number varying between diploid and triploid. The cell line was then named XPTS-1. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and its character of histopathology was similar with that of infancy hemangioma. The cell line of HemEC was successfully established and immortalized spontaneously, and had the morphologic and biological character of HemEC. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and showed the character of histopathology similar with that of infancy hemangioma.

  4. Cell adhesion markers are expressed by a stable human endothelial cell line transformed by the SV40 large T antigen under vimentin promoter control.

    PubMed

    Vicart, P; Testut, P; Schwartz, B; Llorens-Cortes, C; Perdomo, J J; Paulin, D

    1993-10-01

    Markers of endothelium have been studied in a new endothelial cell line derived from human umbilical cord vein cells by microinjection of a recombinant gene that includes a deletion mutant of the human vimentin gene regulatory region controlling the large T and small t antigen coding region of the SV40 virus. In culture, this immortalized venous endothelial cell line (IVEC) demonstrated morphological characteristics of endothelium; uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein and presence of the Factor VIII-related antigen. Treatment of IVEC cells with Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) at 10 U.ml-1 activates the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as observed in primary culture. Prostacyclin secretion was induced in the IVEC cells by 100 nM PMA treatment and thrombin at 0.5 U/ml. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity detected in IVEC cells was present but lower than ACE activity in primary endothelial cells and was completely blocked by enalaprilat (1 microM), a specific ACE inhibitor. The presence of ACE mRNA was also demonstrated in IVEC cells by RT-PCR amplification. Our data demonstrate that endothelial cells immortalized by use of this recombinant gene retain the morphological organization and numerous differentiated properties of endothelium.

  5. Proteomic differences between microvascular endothelial cells and the EA.hy926 cell line forming three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao; Sickmann, Albert; Pietsch, Jessica; Wildgruber, Robert; Weber, Gerhard; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Proteomic changes of two types of human endothelial cells (ECs) were determined and compared to morphological alterations occurring during the scaffold-free in vitro formation of 3D structures resembling vascular intimas. The EA.hy926 cell line and human microvascular ECs (HMVECs) were cultured on a random positioning machine or static on ground (normal gravity) for 5 and 7 days, before their morphology was examined and their protein content was analysed by MS after free-flow electrophoretic separation. A total of 1175 types of proteins were found in EA.hy926 cells and 846 in HMVEC forming 3D structures faster than the EA.hy926 cells. Five hundred and eighty-four of these kinds of proteins were present in both types of cells. They included a number of metabolic enzymes, of structure-related and stress proteins. Comparing proteins of EA.hy926 cells growing either adherently on ground or in 3D aggregates on the random positioning machine revealed that ribosomal proteins were enhanced, while tubes are formed and various components of 26S proteasomes remained prevalent in static normal gravity control cells only. The fast developing tube-like 3D structures of HMVEC suggested a transient augmentation of ribosomal proteins during the 3D assembling of ECs.

  6. In situ cannulation, microgrid follow-up and low-density plating provide first passage endothelial cell masscultures for in vitro lining.

    PubMed

    Zilla, P; Fasol, R; Dudeck, U; Siedler, S; Preiss, P; Fischlein, T; Müller-Glauser, W; Baitella, G; Sanan, D; Odell, J

    1990-08-01

    A rapid and reliable harvest and culture technique was developed to provide a sufficient number of autologous endothelial cells for the confluent in vitro lining of cardiovascular prostheses. Enzymatic endothelial cell detachment was achieved by the in situ application of collagenase to short vessel segments. This harvest technique resulted in a complete lack of contaminating smooth muscle cells in all of 124 cultures from nonhuman primates and 13 cultures from human adults. The use of a microgrid technique enabled the daily in situ quantification of available endothelial cells. To assess ideal plating densities after passage the population doubling time was continuously related to the cell density. Surprisingly, a low plating density of 1.5 X 10(3) endothelial cells/cm2 achieved 43% shorter cell cycles than the usual plating density of 1.0 X 10(4) endothelial cells/cm2. Moreover, low density plating enabled mass cultures after one single cell passage, thereby reducing the cell damaging effect of trypsin. When the growth characteristics of endothelial cells from five anatomically different vessel sites were compared, the external jugular vein--which would be easily accessible and dispensable in each patient--proved to be an excellent source for endothelial cell cultures. By applying in situ administration of collagenase, low density plating and microgrid follow-up to adult human saphenous vein endothelial cells, 14,000,000 first passage endothelial cells--sufficient for the in vitro lining of long vascular prostheses--were obtained 26.2 days after harvest. (95% confidence interval:22.3 to 32.2 days).

  7. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  8. Biological effects of simulated microgravity on human umbilical vein endothelial cell line HUVEC-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Zhenlong; Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity has been reported to have multiple influences on human cells. To investigate the biological effects of simulated microgravity on human endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cell HUVEC-C was treated with microgravity for 24 hours and restored at 1 g gravity for extra 24 hours (group 1) and 48 hours and restored for 24 hours (group 2). Microgravity was simulated by using a two-dimensionally rotating clinostat, set on 30 rpm. As controls, cells were cultured paralleled at 1 g gravity. Two groups of treated cells and control cells were harvested at 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 (for group 2 and control only) hours for proliferation, cell cycles, apoptosis, proteome and microarray analysis. The influences of microgravity on cell proliferation were controversial in previous reports, and in our experiment, inhibitory effect was observed at 12 hour, and cell number of the treatment groups presented 9.26% decrease compared with that of control. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed using flow cytometry. The G2/M cell cycle arrest also occurred at 12 hour in both treatment groups, the cell rates at G2/M phase were 24% higher than in control. Effect of simulated microgravity on cell apoptosis was observed only after 48-hour-treatment, resulted in percentage of apoptotic cells increased by 53-67% compared with control. After cells returned to normal conditions for 24 hours, levels of cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell apoptosis in treatment groups were comparable to control. In order to investigate the molecular mechanism, we analyzed the treated cells at proteomic and transcriptomic levels respectively. Two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that after 24- hour-restoration under normal conditions, 189 proteins in control group disappeared and 187 new proteins presented in group 1; 469 proteins disappeared and 291 new proteins presented in group 2. By using microarray, we found that expression levels of 56 genes were up-regulated and 45 down-regulated in

  9. Uptake and inflammatory effects of nanoparticles in a human vascular endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ian M; Wilson, Dennis; Barakat, Abdul I

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the correlation between exposure to nanoparticles and the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease remain unknown. Nanoparticles appear to cross the pulmonary epithelial barrier into the bloodstream, raising the possibility of direct contact with the vascular endothelium. Because endothelial inflammation is critical for the development of cardiovascular pathology, we hypothesized that direct exposure of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs*) to nanoparticles induces an inflammatory response and that this response depends on the composition of the particles. To test this hypothesis, we incubated HAECs for 1 to 8 hours with different concentrations (0.001-50 microg/mL) of iron oxide (Fe2O3), yttrium oxide (Y2O3), cerium oxide (CeO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. Using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we subsequently measured messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of three markers of inflammation: intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). The particles were well characterized in terms of size, surface area, composition, and crystal structure. To determine the interactions of nanoparticles with HAECs, we used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to measure the concentration of internalized particles. Our data indicate that the delivery of nanoparticles to the HAEC surface and their uptake within the cells correlate directly with the concentration of particles in the cell culture medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the Fe2O3, Y2O3, and ZnO nanoparticles are internalized by HAECs and are often found within intracellular vesicles (the CeO2 particles were not imaged). Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not provoke an inflammatory response in HAECs at any of the concentrations tested, CeO2 particles elicited no response at low concentrations and a weak response above 10 microg/mL, and Y2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles

  10. Palmitic acid but not palmitoleic acid induces insulin resistance in a human endothelial cell line by decreasing SERCA pump expression.

    PubMed

    Gustavo Vazquez-Jimenez, J; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Romero-Garcia, Tatiana; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Manuel Galindo-Rosales, J; Rueda, Angelica; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid is a negative regulator of insulin activity. At the molecular level, palmitic acid reduces insulin stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have found that incubation with palmitic acid of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced a biphasic effect, an initial transient elevation followed by a sustained reduction of SERCA pump protein levels. However, palmitic acid produced a sustained inhibition of SERCA pump ATPase activity. Insulin resistance state appeared before there was a significant reduction of SERCA2 expression. The mechanism by which palmitic acid impairs insulin signaling may involve endoplasmic reticulum stress, because this fatty acid induced activation of both PERK, an ER stress marker, and JNK, a kinase associated with insulin resistance. None of these effects were observed by incubating HUVEC-CS cells with palmitoleic acid. Importantly, SERCA2 overexpression decreased the palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance state. All these results suggest that SERCA pump might be the target of palmitic acid to induce the insulin resistance state in a human vascular endothelial cell line. Importantly, these data suggest that HUVEC-CS cells respond to palmitic acid-exposure with a compensatory overexpression of SERCA pump within the first hour, which eventually fades out and insulin resistance prevails.

  11. Assessment of electrophile damage in a human brain endothelial cell line utilizing a clickable alkyne analog of 2-chlorohexadecanal.

    PubMed

    Nusshold, Christoph; Üllen, Andreas; Kogelnik, Nora; Bernhart, Eva; Reicher, Helga; Plastira, Ioanna; Glasnov, Toma; Zangger, Klaus; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Fauler, Günter; Wolinski, Heimo; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral leukocytes aggravate brain damage by releasing cytotoxic mediators that compromise blood-brain barrier function. One of the oxidants released by activated leukocytes is hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that is formed via the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system. The reaction of HOCl with the endogenous plasmalogen pool of brain endothelial cells results in the generation of 2-chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA), a toxic, lipid-derived electrophile that induces blood-brain barrier dysfunction in vivo. Here, we synthesized an alkynyl-analog of 2-ClHDA, 2-chlorohexadec-15-yn-1-al (2-ClHDyA) to identify potential protein targets in the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Similar to 2-ClHDA, 2-ClHDyA administration reduced cell viability/metabolic activity, induced processing of pro-caspase-3 and PARP, and led to endothelial barrier dysfunction at low micromolar concentrations. Protein-2-ClHDyA adducts were fluorescently labeled with tetramethylrhodamine azide (N3-TAMRA) by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in situ, which unveiled a preferential accumulation of 2-ClHDyA adducts in mitochondria, the Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes. Thirty-three proteins that are subject to 2-ClHDyA-modification in hCMEC/D3 cells were identified by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins include cytoskeletal components that are central to tight junction patterning, metabolic enzymes, induction of the oxidative stress response, and electrophile damage to the caveolar/endosomal Rab machinery. A subset of the targets was validated by a combination of N3-TAMRA click chemistry and specific antibodies by fluorescence microscopy. This novel alkyne analog is a valuable chemical tool to identify cellular organelles and protein targets of 2-ClHDA-mediated damage in settings where myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants may play a disease-propagating role.

  12. 3D Anastomosed Microvascular Network Model with Living Capillary Networks and Endothelial Cell-Lined Microfluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes detailed practical procedures for generating 3D intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This advanced 3D microvascular network model incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. The capillary network is first induced via vasculogenesis in a middle tissue chamber and then EC linings along the microfluidic channel on either side serve as artery and vein. The anastomosis is then induced by sprouting angiogenesis to facilitate tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological microcirculation transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein.

  13. Nornicotine impairs endothelial cell-cell adherens junction complexes in EA.hy926 cell line via structural reorganization of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Izdebska, Magdalena; Maczynska, Ewa; Grzanka, Alina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of nornicotine on endothelial EA.hy926 cells in the context of its impact on cell-cell junctions. The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between junctional proteins and F-actin after treating the cells with nornicotine. After 24 h of cell exposure to 0.08, 0.12, and 0.16 ng/mL nornicotine, analysis was performed of cell death, cell migration, ultrastructure, and colocalization of beta-catenin/F-actin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/F-actin. Our study did not reveal any alterations in EA.hy926 cell line survival following treatment with nornicotine. However, nornicotine exerted disparate effects on cell migration and led to changes in both the ultrastructure and organization of cell-cell junctional complexes and F-actin. Moreover, the cell migration observed in the experiments performed in the present work negatively correlated with the number of Weibel-Palade bodies seen through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Moreover, the mechanism of cell migration promotion was VEGF-independent, and the decrease in the number of Weibel-Palade bodies resulted from nornicotine-induced F-actin depolymerization. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that low concentrations of nornicotine do not affect cell survival, but promote cell movement and impair adherens junctions through changes in F-actin organization. Our results indicate for the first time the effect of nornicotine on endothelial EA.hy926 cells and suggest that nornicotine may induce transmigration pathways and, consequently, facilitate the transendothelial migration of monocytes associated with atherosclerosis.

  14. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and endothelial cells promote self-renewal of rabbit germ cells with spermatogonial stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Wu, Xin; Goodyear, Shaun M; Avarbock, Mary R; Brinster, Ralph L

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that exogenous factors crucial for spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) self-renewal are conserved among several mammalian species. Since glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) are critical for rodent SSC self-renewal, we hypothesized that they might promote self-renewal of nonrodent SSCs. Therefore, we cultured testicular germ cells from prepubertal rabbits in the presence of GDNF and FGF2 and found they proliferated indefinitely as cellular clumps that displayed characteristics previously identified for rodent SSCs. The rabbit germ cells could not be maintained on mouse embryonic fibroblast (STO) feeders that support rodent SSC self-renewal in vitro but were rather supported on mouse yolk sac-derived endothelial cell (C166) feeder layers. Proliferation of rabbit germ cells was dependent on GDNF. Of critical importance was that clump-forming rabbit germ cells colonized seminiferous tubules of immunodeficient mice, proliferated for at least 6 mo, while retaining an SSC phenotype in the testes of recipient mice, indicating that they were rabbit SSCs. This study demonstrates that GDNF is a mitogenic factor promoting self-renewal that is conserved between rodent and rabbit SSCs; with an evolutionary separation of ∼ 60 million years. These findings provide a foundation to study the mechanisms governing SSC self-renewal in nonrodent species.

  15. Comparison of the endothelial toxicity induced by short-term amiodarone and diazepam exposure in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (EVC304).

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Fang, Lei; Cai, Runlan; Zong, Chuanjie; Liu, Fen; Qi, Yun

    2014-10-01

    Venous irritation is the most common side effect of intravenous therapy. Although many in vitro models have been developed to evaluate intravenous drug irritation, these models are not widely accepted. The aim of this paper is to determine whether delayed or immediate cytotoxicity better reflects the in vivo venous irritation ranking. We compared the endothelial toxicity induced by high-concentrations of amiodarone and diazepam after short-term exposure (20 min) in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (EVC304) by using five in vitro models: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), glutathione (GSH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and MTT assays. In the 24-h MTT assay, the IC50 of diazepam and amiodarone was 1.08 and 1.96 mM, respectively. In the 48-h MTT assay, the IC50 of diazepam and amiodarone was 1.114 and 1.128 mM, respectively. In the intracellular LDH and G6PD assays, the EC50 of diazepam was found to be 3.307 and 1.53 mM, while the values of amiodarone were 0.853 and 0.325 mM, respectively. In the intracellular ATP and GSH assays, the EC50 of diazepam was 0.905 and 1.283 mM, while the values of amiodarone were 0.040 and 0.326 mM, respectively. Both the results of intracellular macromolecule activities and micromolecule concentrations were similar to that observed in in vivo venous irritation studies. However, the delayed cytotoxicity rank from the MTT assay is inconsistent with the in vivo venous irritation rank, suggesting that initial toxicity, but not the delayed toxicity, is related to venous irritation.

  16. [Transfection of human umbilical vein endothelial cell line ECV-304 with liposome-oligonucleotide complexes under hypothermic and anoxic conditions].

    PubMed

    Feng, Gui-wen; Yu, Li-xin; Zhang, Hong-tao; Zhao, Xian-guo

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the transfection efficiency of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) mediated by in vivo liposome in human umbilical vascular endothelial cell line ECV-304 under hypothermic and anoxic conditions. ECV-304 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 culture medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum at 37 degrees Celsius; in the presence of 5% CO2. Liposome-ODN complexes were prepared just before use and added to the cells with a liposome-ODN charge ratio of 2:1. ECV-304 cell monolayers were transfected with liposome-ODN complexes containing 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25 micromol/L ODN respectively in Euro-Collins solution (ECs) at 4 degrees celsius; and then stored for 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours respectively under anoxic condition. The ODN without liposome was transfected into ECV-304 cells under identical conditions as the control. The distribution of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled ODN in ECV-304 cells was observed by fluorescence microscope, and the transfection efficiency and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) were evaluated by flow cytometry. MFI was enhanced as the storage time extended and ODN concentration increased, reaching the peak level at 6 h (P<0.05). After a 6-hour storage, most of the ODN was found to locate in the cell nuclei, and the transfection efficiency did not vary significantly between the groups. Compared with the control group, however, the differences in transfection efficiency and MFI were significant. ODN can be highly efficiently transfected into ECV-304 cells by in vivo liposome in ECs under hypothermic and anoxic conditions, which provides an experimental basis for further study of the donor organ preservation at the level of genetic regulation.

  17. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  18. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2–4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research. PMID:27070801

  19. Cloning and Stable Expression of cDNA Coding For Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule -1 (PECAM-1, CD31) in NIH-3T3 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Lalemarzi, Hamed; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-06-01

    PECAM-1 (CD31) is a glycoprotein expressed on endothelial and bone marrow precursor cells. It plays important roles in angiogenesis, maintenance and integration of the cytoskeleton and direction of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. We aimed to clone the cDNA coding for human CD31 from KG1a for further subcloning and expression in NIH-3T3 mouse cell line. CD31 cDNA was cloned from KG1a cell line after total RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Pfu DNA polymerase-amplified specific band was ligated to pGEMT-easy vector and sub-cloned in pCMV6-Neo expression vector. After transfection of NIH-3T3 cells using 3 μg of recombinant construct and 6 μl of JetPEI transfection reagent, stable expression was obtained by selection of cells by G418 antibiotic and confirmed by surface flow cytometry. 2235 bp specific band was aligned completely to human CD31 reference sequence in NCBI database. Transient and stable expression of human CD31 on transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was achieved (23% and 96%, respectively) as shown by flow cytometry. Due to murine origin of NIH-3T3 cell line, CD31-expressing NIH-3T3 cells could be useful as immunogen in production of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies against human CD31, with no need for purification of recombinant proteins.

  20. Three cases of idiopathic "multiple-parallel-line" endotheliitis.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuichi; Maeda, Naoyuki; Kosaki, Ryo; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Tano, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    To report 3 cases of idiopathic endotheliitis that appeared clinically as multiple parallel lines of keratic precipitates on the corneal endothelium. Interventional case reports. Slit-lamp examinations of the 3 patients showed several parallel dotted lines of keratic precipitates on the corneal endothelium. Although all cases were managed successfully by topical steroid in 1 week, corneal endothelial cell damage occurred. No virus (herpes simplex virus 1, varicella zoster virus, or cytomegalovirus) could be detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the aqueous humor of 1 of the 3 patients. This series of cases presented a unique type of idiopathic endotheliitis with the clinical appearance of multiple and parallel lines of keratic precipitates. The expression patterns of the keratic precipitates were distinct from those of previously reported linear endotheliitis.

  1. Evidence of endothelial cell migration after descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Christina; Zhivov, Andrey; Korbmacher, Judit; Falke, Karen; Guthoff, Rudolf; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Cursiefen, Claus; Kruse, Friedrich E

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that adult corneal endothelial cells can migrate after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). Prospective observational study. Five patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy were examined 1 year after uneventful DMEK. These patients had been selected on the basis of slightly decentered grafts and/or large descemetorrhexis showing areas of denuded corneal stroma, which were covered by neither the patients' Descemet membrane (DM) nor the graft. These areas were investigated by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy using a specially designed Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II and Rostock cornea module equipped with custom-made software. Source data (frame rate 30 Hz, 384 × 384 pixels, 400 × 400 μm) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area in automatic real-time composite mode. In each case an on-line mapping with maximum size up to 3.2 × 3.2 mm (3072 × 3072 pixels) was performed. Corneal stroma overlying areas devoid of DM was transparent. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy of stroma devoid of DM revealed a monolayer of endothelial cells in all patients observed. The morphologic pattern of these cells was similar to that of endothelial cells on DM grafts but different from the morphology of the patients' own endothelium, suggesting migration of donor endothelial cells from DMEK grafts. The results strongly support the hypothesis that adult corneal endothelial cells are able to migrate in the human eye. Furthermore, we provide evidence to support the hypothesis that grafted endothelium migrates onto the host tissue, repopulating the corneal stroma with a regular endothelial phenotype. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Arterial versus venous endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    dela Paz, Nathaniel G; D'Amore, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) form the inner lining of all blood vessels from the largest artery and veins, viz., the aorta and venae cavae, respectively, to the capillaries that connect the arterial and venous systems. Because these two major conducting systems of the cardiovasculature differ functionally, it is not surprising that the physical makeup of arteries and veins, including the ECs that line their lumina, are also distinct. Although few would argue that the local environment contributes to the differences between arteries and veins, recent evidence has shown that the specification of arterial and venous identity is largely genetically determined.

  3. Inhibition of B16 melanoma growth and metastasis in C57BL mice by vaccination with a syngeneic endothelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiura, Kenta; Nishishita, Toshihide; Nakaoka, Takashi; Yamashita, Naohide; Yamashita, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Background Key role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and metastasis based on accumulating evidence and recent progress of immunotherapy have led us to investigate vaccine therapy targeting tumor angiogenesis. Methods C57BL/6J mice were vaccinated with a syngeneic endothelial cell line Tpit/E by subcutaneous injection once a week. Prior to ninth vaccination, the mice were challenged with B16/F10 melanoma cells by subcutaneous inoculation on the back for the tumor growth model or by tail venous injection for the lung metastasis model. Development of subcutaneous tumor and lung metastasis was monitored by computed tomography scanning, which enabled accurate evaluation with the minimized sacrifice of mice. Results Vaccination with Tpit/E cells inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth and appearance of lung metastasis compared to control. Survival period was elongated in the Tpit/E vaccination in both of the two models. We also obtained hybridomas secreting specific antibodies to Tpit/E cells from a mouse vaccinated with the cells, indicating that specific immune response to the syngeneic endothelial cells was elicited. Conclusion These results suggest that vaccination with an autologous endothelial cell line may be effective against melanoma. PMID:19183492

  4. Embryogenesis of the First Circulating Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Filla, Michael B.; Jones, Elizabeth A. V.; Lansford, Rusty; Cheuvront, Tracey; Al-Roubaie, Sarah; Rongish, Brenda J.; Little, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to this study, the earliest appearance of circulating endothelial cells in warm-blooded animals was unknown. Time-lapse imaging of germ-line transformed Tie1-YFP reporter quail embryos combined with the endothelial marker antibody QH1 provides definitive evidence for the existence of circulating endothelial cells – from the very beginning of blood flow. Blood-smear counts of circulating cells from Tie1-YFP embryos showed that up to 30% of blood-borne cells are Tie1 positive; though cells expressing low levels of YFP were also positive for benzidine, a hemoglobin stain, suggesting that these cells were differentiating into erythroblasts. Electroporation-based time-lapse experiments, exclusively targeting the intra-embryonic mesoderm were combined with QH1 immunostaining. The latter antibody marks quail endothelial cells. Together the optical data provide conclusive evidence that endothelial cells can enter blood flow from vessels of the embryo proper, as well as from extra-embryonic areas. When Tie1-YFP positive cells and tissues are transplanted to wild type host embryos, fluorescent cells emigrate from such transplants and join host vessels; subsequently a few YFP cells are shed into circulation. These data establish that entering circulation is a commonplace activity of embryonic vascular endothelial cells. We conclude that in the class of vertebrates most closely related to mammals a normal component of primary vasculogenesis is production of endothelial cells that enter circulation from all vessels, both intra- and extra-embryonic. PMID:23737938

  5. Treatment options in advanced renal cell carcinoma after first-line treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Basappa, Naveen S.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was introduced a decade ago and since then, a number of therapeutic options have been developed. Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy is the widely accepted first-line option for mRCC. After progression, treatment in the second-line setting has typically been with either axitinib or everolimus. However, with the advent of several new agents demonstrating efficacy in the second-line setting, including nivolumab, cabozantinib, and the combination of lenvatinib and everolimus, the treatment paradigm has shifted toward these novel therapies with improved patient outcomes. PMID:28096936

  6. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC)

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (LewisX), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system. PMID:26418972

  7. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  8. Endothelial Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janeczek Portalska, Karolina; Leferink, Anne; Groen, Nathalie; Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are increasingly used in regenerative medicine for restoring worn-out or damaged tissue. Newly engineered tissues need to be properly vascularized and current candidates for in vitro tissue pre-vascularization are endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. However, their use in therapy is hampered by their limited expansion capacity and lack of autologous sources. Our approach to engineering large grafts is to use hMSCs both as a source of cells for regeneration of targeted tissue and at the same time as the source of endothelial cells. Here we investigate how different stimuli influence endothelial differentiation of hMSCs. Although growth supplements together with shear force were not sufficient to differentiate hMSCs with respect to expression of endothelial markers such as CD31 and KDR, these conditions did prime the cells to differentiate into cells with an endothelial gene expression profile and morphology when seeded on Matrigel. In addition, we show that endothelial-like hMSCs are able to create a capillary network in 3D culture both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The expansion phase in the presence of growth supplements was crucial for the stability of the capillaries formed in vitro. To conclude, we established a robust protocol for endothelial differentiation of hMSCs, including an immortalized MSC line (iMSCs) which allows for reproducible in vitro analysis in further studies. PMID:23056481

  9. Capability of human umbilical cord blood progenitor-derived endothelial cells to form an efficient lining on a polyester vascular graft in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Xavier; Rémy-Zolghadri, Murielle; Bourget, Chantal; Turner, Neill; Bareille, Reine; Daculsi, Richard; Bordenave, Laurence

    2009-05-01

    One of the goals of vascular tissue engineering is to create functional conduits for small-diameter bypass grafting. The present biocompatibility study was undertaken to check the ability of cord blood progenitor-derived endothelial cells (PDECs) to take the place of endothelial cells in vascular tissue engineering. After isolation, culture and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells, the following parameters were explored, with a commercial knitted polyester prosthesis (Polymaille C, Laboratoires Pérouse, France) impregnated with collagen: cell adhesion and proliferation, colonization, cell retention on exposure to flow, and the ability of PDECs to be regulated by arterial shear stress via mRNA levels. PDECs were able to adhere to commercial collagen-coated vascular grafts in serum-free conditions, and were maintained but did not proliferate when seeded at 2.0 x 10(5) cm(-2). Cellularized conduits were analyzed by histology and histochemical staining, demonstrating collagen impregnation and the endothelial characteristics of the colonizing cells. Thirty-six hours after cell seeding the grafts were maintained for 6 h of either static conditions (controls) or application of pulsatile laminar shear stress, which restored the integrity of the monolayer. Finally, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis performed at 4 and 8 h from cells lining grafts showed that MMP1 mRNA only was increased at 4h whereas vWF, VE-cadherin and KDR were not significantly modified at 4 and 8 h. Our results show that human cord blood PDECs are capable of forming an efficient lining and to withstand shear stress.

  10. Arterial endothelial cytokines guide extravillous trophoblast invasion towards spiral arteries; an in-vitro study with the trophoblast cell line ACH-3P and female non-uterine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gregor; Huppertz, Berthold; Siwetz, Monika; Lang, Ingrid; Moser, Gerit

    2016-02-01

    Invasion of extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) is tightly linked to appropriate cell to cell contact as well as paracrine guidance of EVT by maternal uterine cells, conducted by a variety of locally expressed cytokines. Here we investigated the interaction of the first trimester trophoblast cell line ACH-3P with adult iliac arterial (AEC) and venous endothelial cells (VEC). The impact of ACH-3P conditioned medium (Cdm), obtained at 2.5% and 21% oxygen, on endothelial cell viability (LDH-Assay) and network formation (Matrigel-Assay) was tested. We investigated cytokine expression of AEC- and VEC-Cdm and confirmed results with ELISA analysis, and investigated the influence of Cdm on ACH-3P proliferation and invasion. Additionally, direct co-culture experiments with ACH-3P and AEC on Matrigel were performed. A subset of experiments was verified with primary trophoblasts as well as with first trimester placenta in situ specimens. ACH-3P-Cdm significantly enhanced cell viability of AEC and VEC after 72 h. ACH-3P-Cdm at 2.5% oxygen stabilized endothelial network structures in Matrigel up to 24 h, similar to the effect of a direct co-culture of AEC and ACH-3P. AEC and VEC showed a similar pattern of secreted cytokines. However, elevated levels of cytokines secreted by AEC were found for GRO, IL-6, MMP-1 and uPAR. ELISA confirmed elevated concentrations of IL-6 and uPAR in AEC compared to VEC. ACH-3P and primary trophoblasts more likely invaded towards AEC-Cdm than towards VEC-Cdm. Addition of IL-6 to Cdm increased the invasion potential of both cell types. AEC- and VEC-Cdm reduced ACH-3P cell proliferation after 24 h of culture. IL-6 was highly expressed in uterine AEC compared to VEC as visualized by immunohistochemistry. The presented results clearly demonstrate that cytokines of both cell types, AEC and trophoblasts, differentially contribute to successful guidance and interaction in the process of trophoblast invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. Arterial endothelial cytokines guide extravillous trophoblast invasion towards spiral arteries; an in-vitro study with the trophoblast cell line ACH-3P and female non-uterine endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Weiss; Berthold, Huppertz; Siwetz, Monika; Lang, Ingrid; Moser, Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Invasion of extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) is tightly linked to appropriate cell to cell contact as well as paracrine guidance of EVT by maternal uterine cells, conducted by a variety of locally expressed cytokines. Here we investigated the interaction of the first trimester trophoblast cell line ACH-3P with adult iliac arterial (AEC) and venous endothelial cells (VEC). Methods The impact of ACH-3P conditioned medium (Cdm), obtained at 2.5% and 21% oxygen, on endothelial cell viability (LDH-Assay) and network formation (Matrigel-Assay) was tested. We investigated cytokine expression of AEC- and VEC-Cdm and confirmed results with ELISA analysis, and investigated the influence of Cdm on ACH-3P proliferation and invasion. Additionally, direct co-culture experiments with ACH-3P and AEC on Matrigel were performed. A subset of experiments was verified with primary trophoblasts as well as with first trimester placenta in situ specimens. Results ACH-3P-Cdm significantly enhanced cell viability of AEC and VEC after 72 h. ACH-3P-Cdm at 2.5% oxygen stabilized endothelial network structures in Matrigel up to 24 h, similar to the effect of a direct co-culture of AEC and ACH-3P. AEC and VEC showed a similar pattern of secreted cytokines. However, elevated levels of cytokines secreted by AEC were found for GRO, IL-6, MMP-1 and uPAR. ELISA confirmed elevated concentrations of IL-6 and uPAR in AEC compared to VEC. ACH-3P and primary trophoblasts more likely invaded towards AEC-Cdm than towards VEC-Cdm. Addition of IL-6 to Cdm increased the invasion potential of both cell types. AEC- and VEC-Cdm reduced ACH-3P cell proliferation after 24 h of culture. IL-6 was highly expressed in uterine AEC compared to VEC as visualized by immunohistochemistry. Discussion The presented results clearly demonstrate that cytokines of both cell types, AEC and trophoblasts, differentially contribute to successful guidance and interaction in the process of trophoblast invasion. PMID

  12. Apium graveolens Extract Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Induces Apoptosis in the Human Prostatic Carcinoma Cell Line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Köken, Tülay; Koca, Buğra; Özkurt, Mete; Erkasap, Nilüfer; Kuş, Gökhan; Karalar, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Apium graveolens has been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer tissues. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of A. graveolens on the human prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP. LNCaP cells were treated with increasing concentrations of an ethanolic extract of A. graveolens ranging from 1000 to 3000 μg/mL, and viability was determined after 24 and 48 h using the XTT cell proliferation assay. The levels of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), one of the best biomarkers of apoptosis, were analyzed. Finally, quantitative gene expression analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a critical mediator of angiogenesis, was performed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A. graveolens extract inhibited cell viability in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Data from cleaved PARP assays suggested that A. graveolens caused induction of apoptosis in these cells. Treatment of cells with A. graveolens also resulted in downregulation of VEGF expression. This study showed that the antiproliferative effect exerted by an ethanolic extract of A. graveolens is triggered by induction of apoptosis. We also demonstrated that VEGF expression was downregulated by treatment with A. graveolens extract.

  13. Differential Effects of Indoxyl Sulfate and Inorganic Phosphate in a Murine Cerebral Endothelial Cell Line (bEnd.3)

    PubMed Central

    Stinghen, Andréa E. M.; Chillon, Jean-Marc; Massy, Ziad A.; Boullier, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in stroke in chronic kidney disease patients. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we evaluated the effects of two uremic toxins on cerebral endothelium function. bEnd.3 cells were exposed to indoxyl sulfate (IS) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and O2•– were measured using specific fluorophores. Peroxynitrite and eNOS uncoupling were evaluated using ebselen, a peroxide scavenger, and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), respectively. Cell viability decreased after IS or Pi treatment (p < 0.01). Both toxins reduced NO production (IS, p < 0.05; Pi, p < 0.001) and induced ROS production (p < 0.001). IS and 2 mM Pi reduced O2•– production (p < 0.001). Antioxidant pretreatment reduced ROS levels in both IS- and Pi-treated cells, but a more marked reduction of O2•– production was observed in Pi-treated cells (p < 0.001). Ebselen reduced the ROS production induced by the two toxins (p < 0.001); suggesting a role of peroxynitrite in this process. BH4 addition significantly reduced O2•– and increased NO production in Pi-treated cells (p < 0.001), suggesting eNOS uncoupling, but had no effect in IS-treated cells. This study shows, for the first time, that IS and Pi induce cerebral endothelial dysfunction by decreasing NO levels due to enhanced oxidative stress. However, Pi appears to be more deleterious, as it also induces eNOS uncoupling. PMID:24902077

  14. Tropomyosin-1 protects endothelial cell-cell junctions against cigarette smoke extract through F-actin stabilization in EA.hy926 cell line.

    PubMed

    Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Izdebska, Magdalena; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Grzanka, Alina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on EA.hy926 endothelial cells in culture in the context of maintenance of cell-cell junctions through the structural stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton. In the present study, F-actin was stabilized by the overexpression of tropomyosin-1, which is known to stabilize actin filaments in muscle and non-muscle cells. Our study showed that the stabilization of F-actin significantly increased the survival of cells treated with 25% CSE. In addition, after stabilization of F-actin the migratory potential of EA.hy926 cells subjected to CSE treatment was increased. Our results also showed increased fluorescence intensity of alpha- and beta-catenin after CSE treatment in cells which had stabilized F-actin. Analysis of fluorescence intensity of Zonula occludens-1 did not reveal any significant differences when EA.hy926 cells overexpressing tropomyosin-1 were compared with those lacking overexpression. It would appear that overexpression of tropomyosin-1 preserved the structure of actin filaments in the cells treated with CSE. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that stabilization of F-actin protects EA.hy926 cells against CSE-induced loss of both adherens and tight junctions. The data presented in this study suggest that overexpression of tropomyosin-1 stabilizes the organizational structure of actin filaments and helps preserve the endothelial barrier function under conditions of strong oxidative stress.

  15. Cellular biomarkers of endothelial health: microparticles, endothelial progenitor cells, and circulating endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dylan; Touyz, Rhian M

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, the shift from a healthy endothelium to a damaged pro-coagulative, pro-inflammatory, and pro-vasoconstrictive phenotype, is an early event in many chronic diseases that frequently precedes cardiovascular complications. Functional assessment of the endothelium can identify endothelial damage and predict cardiovascular risk; however, this assessment provides little information as to the mechanisms underlying development of endothelial dysfunction. Changes in plasma asymmetric dimethyl arginine levels, markers of lipid peroxidation, circulating levels of inflammatory mediators, indices of coagulation and cellular surrogates such as microparticles, circulating endothelial cells, and endothelial progenitor cells may reflect alterations in endothelial status and as such have been defined as "biomarkers" of endothelial function. Biomarkers may be chemical or cellular. This review examines some markers of endothelial dysfunction, with a particular focus on cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and their diagnostic potential. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence for mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by X-ray irradiation in a lung squamous carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Nojima, K; Majima, H; Ishihara, H; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Yamaguchi, H; Koike, S; Ando, K; Yamauchi, M; Kuriyama, T

    1998-10-23

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a multipotent cytokine which plays an important role in various angiogenic conditions as well as in some tumor behaviors. Here we examined the induction of VEGF mRNA by X-ray irradiation in a lung squamous cell carcinoma cell line (RERF-LC-AI). Irradiating the cells with 15 Gy X-rays significantly increased the mRNA expression up to 2.5-fold of control at a post-irradiation time of 16-24 h. The induction of VEGF mRNA by X-ray irradiation was completely blocked by treating cells with either genistein (Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor) or H7 (protein kinase C inhibitor). This suggests that the mechanism of induction might be concerned with the pathway which triggers Src tyrosine kinase of the cell surface and the protein kinase C pathway.

  17. Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Endothelial and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, M.S.; Hirschi, K.

    2016-01-01

    This brief overview of premature senescence of dysfunctional endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells provides information on endothelial cell differentiation and specialization, their ontogeny, and controversies related to endothelial stem and progenitor cells. Stressors responsible for the dysfunction of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells, as well as cellular mechanisms and consequences of endothelial cell dysfunction are presented. Metabolic signatures of dysfunctional endothelial cells and senescence pathways are described. Emerging strategies to rejuvenate endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells conclude the review. PMID:27451101

  18. Irradiation-Induced Regulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Six Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lines of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, Tuuli; Schilling, Daniela; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in neo-angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the irradiation-induced regulation of PAI-1 and VEGF in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines of varying radiation sensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six cell lines derived from SCCHN were investigated in vitro. The colorimetric AlamarBlue assay was used to detect metabolic activity of cell lines during irradiation as a surrogate marker for radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF secretion levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation with 0, 2, 6, and 10 Gy. The direct radioprotective effect of exogenous PAI-1 was measured using the clonogenic assay. For regulation studies, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), or both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha were downregulated using siRNA. Results: Although baseline levels varied greatly, irradiation led to a comparable dose-dependent increase in PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all six cell lines. Addition of exogenous stable PAI-1 to the low PAI-1-expressing cell lines, XF354 and FaDu, did not lead to a radioprotective effect. Downregulation of TGF-beta1 significantly decreased VEGF secretion in radiation-sensitive XF354 cells, and downregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha reduced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in radiation-resistant SAS cells. Conclusions: Irradiation dose-dependently increased PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all SCCHN cell lines tested regardless of their basal levels and radiation sensitivity. In addition, TGF-beta1 and HIF-1alpha could be partly responsible for VEGF and PAI-1 upregulation after irradiation.

  19. Endothelial cell promotion of early liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Deborah A; Kashima, Yasushige; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    Different steps of embryonic pancreas and liver development require inductive signals from endothelial cells. During liver development, interactions between newly specified hepatic endoderm cells and nascent endothelial cells are crucial for the endoderm's subsequent growth and morphogenesis into a liver bud. Reconstitution of endothelial cell stimulation of hepatic cell growth with embryonic tissue explants demonstrated that endothelial signalling occurs independent of the blood supply. During pancreas development, midgut endoderm interactions with aortic endothelial cells induce Ptf1a, a crucial pancreatic determinant. Endothelial cells also have a later effect on pancreas development, by promoting survival of the dorsal mesenchyme, which in turn produces factors supporting pancreatic endoderm. A major goal of our laboratory is to determine the endothelial-derived molecules involved in these inductive events. Our data show that cultured endothelial cells induce Ptf1a in dorsal endoderm explants lacking an endogenous vasculature. We are purifying endothelial cell line product(s) responsible for this effect. We are also identifying endothelial-responsive regulatory elements in genes such as Ptf1a by genetic mapping and chromatin-based assays. These latter approaches will allow us to track endothelial-responsive signal pathways from DNA targets within progenitor cells. The diversity of organogenic steps dependent upon endothelial cell signalling suggests that cross-regulation of tissue development with its vasculature is a general phenomenon.

  20. Hexachlorobenzene promotes angiogenesis in vivo, in a breast cancer model and neovasculogenesis in vitro, in the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1.

    PubMed

    Pontillo, Carolina; Español, Alejandro; Chiappini, Florencia; Miret, Noelia; Cocca, Claudia; Alvarez, Laura; Kleiman de Pisarev, Diana; Sales, María Elena; Randi, Andrea Silvana

    2015-11-19

    Exposure to environmental pollutants may alter proangiogenic ability and promotes tumor growth. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide found in maternal milk and in lipid foods, and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). HCB induces migration and invasion in human breast cancer cells, as well as tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. In this study, we examined HCB action on angiogenesis in mammary carcinogenesis. HCB stimulates angiogenesis and increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a xenograft model with the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1 exposed to HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5 and 5μM) showed an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and VEGF protein expression involving AhR. In addition, we found that HCB enhances VEGF-Receptor 2 (VEGFR2) expression, and activates its downstream pathways p38 and ERK1/2. HCB induces cell migration and neovasculogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Cells pretreatment with AhR, COX-2 and VEGFR2 selective inhibitors, suppressed these effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB promotes angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. HCB-induced cell migration and tubulogenesis are mediated by AhR, COX-2 and VEGFR2 in HMEC-1. These findings may help to understand the association among HCB exposure, angiogenesis and mammary carcinogenesis.

  1. The allo-epi-endothelial lining of the intervillous space.

    PubMed

    Ockleford, C D

    2010-12-01

    An unusual monolayer of cells lines the interface between the basal plate and the intervillous space in human term placenta but not the chorionic villi. Our recent descriptions of it are based on advanced microscopy, phenotyping and cytogenetic approaches. The papers show that the layer is partly epithelial (ectoderm) and partly endothelial (mesoderm): it is partly derived from the fetus and partly from the mother. This first accurate description of a naturally occurring human allo-epi-endothelium (monolayer of cells derived from two embryological germ layers and two individuals) is of interest in anatomy, obstetrics and gynaecology, developmental biology, histology and immunology. The most extensive evidence for this mosaic applies to the intervillous space lining layer of the basal plate where the endothelial proportion is of the order of 50%; it extends throughout central, intermediate and peripheral parts of the basal plate and is a consistent feature of the intervillous space lining of the chorionic plate also. Its presence lining chorionic plate is noteworthy as it includes the furthest parts of the sinus from the supplying and draining vessels which are endothelial lined.

  2. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. The human vascular endothelial cell line HUV-EC-C harbors the integrated HHV-6B genome which remains stable in long term culture.

    PubMed

    Shioda, Setsuko; Kasai, Fumio; Ozawa, Midori; Hirayama, Noriko; Satoh, Motonobu; Kameoka, Yousuke; Watanabe, Ken; Shimizu, Norio; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko; Kohara, Arihiro

    2017-07-28

    Human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) is a common human pathogen that is most often detected in hematopoietic cells. Although human cells harboring chromosomally integrated HHV-6 can be generated in vitro, the availability of such cell lines originating from in vivo tissues is limited. In this study, chromosomally integrated HHV-6B has been identified in a human vascular endothelial cell line, HUV-EC-C (IFO50271), derived from normal umbilical cord tissue. Sequence analysis revealed that the viral genome was similar to the HHV-6B HST strain. FISH analysis using a HHV-6 DNA probe showed one signal in each cell, detected at the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 9. This was consistent with a digital PCR assay, validating one copy of the viral DNA. Because exposure of HUV-EC-C to chemicals did not cause viral reactivation, long term cell culture of HUV-EC-C was carried out to assess the stability of viral integration. The growth rate was altered depending on passage numbers, and morphology also changed during culture. SNP microarray profiles showed some differences between low and high passages, implying that the HUV-EC-C genome had changed during culture. However, no detectable change was observed in chromosome 9, where HHV-6B integration and the viral copy number remained unchanged. Our results suggest that integrated HHV-6B is stable in HUV-EC-C despite genome instability.

  4. Retinal endothelial cell apoptosis stimulates recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D; Glenn, Josephine V; Curtis, Tim M; Grant, Maria B; Stitt, Alan W; Gardiner, Tom A

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05-0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-alpha when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment.

  5. Development of Eimeria bovis in vitro: suitability of several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, C; Barbisch, B; Heise, A; Kowalik, S; Zahner, H

    2002-04-01

    Several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal cells (BFGC), Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells were exposed in vitro to sporozoites of Eimeria bovis. Parasites invaded all cells used and changed their shape to more stumpy forms within 12 h. Sporozoites left their host cells and invaded new ones frequently within the first 12 h post-infection. Further development took place only in bovine cells, although parasites survived in the other cells for at least 3 weeks. Within the non-bovine cells, conspicuously enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles developed in VERO cells and reached a diameter of 15-20 microm. The best development to first generation schizonts with regard both to time required to mature, to schizont size and to merozoite yields was observed in BFGC, followed by bovine umbilical vein and bovine spleen lymphatic endothelial cells. MDBK cells were less suitable. The life cycle was completed (development of oocysts) only occasionally in BFGC. Results are considered under several aspects. Thus, infected VERO cells may represent a suitable tool for studying the parasitophorous vacuole, while infected endothelial cells represent a system quite narrow to the in vivo situation and should allow basic studies on parasite/host cell interactions and BFGC can be used for the mass production of E. bovis first generation merozoites.

  6. Receptor-Mediated Transport of Insulin across Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, George L.; Johnson, Sandra M.

    1985-03-01

    Hormones such as insulin are transported from the interior to the exterior of blood vessels. Whether endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels have a role in this transport of hormones is not clear, but it is known that endothelial cells can internalize and release insulin rapidly with little degradation. The transport of iodine-125-labeled insulin was measured directly through the use of dual chambers separated by a horizontal monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. In this setting, endothelial cells took up and released the labeled insulin, thereby transporting it across the cells. The transport of insulin across the endothelial cells was temperature sensitive and was inhibited by unlabeled insulin and by antibody to insulin receptor in proportion to the ability of these substances to inhibit insulin binding to its receptor. More than 80 percent of the transported insulin was intact. These data suggest that insulin is rapidly transported across endothelial cells by a receptor-mediated process.

  7. Endothelial cells and the IGF system.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-02-01

    Endothelial cells line blood vessels and modulate vascular tone, thrombosis, inflammatory responses and new vessel formation. They are implicated in many disease processes including atherosclerosis and cancer. IGFs play a significant role in the physiology of endothelial cells by promoting migration, tube formation and production of the vasodilator nitric oxide. These actions are mediated by the IGF1 and IGF2/mannose 6-phosphate receptors and are modulated by a family of high-affinity IGF binding proteins. IGFs also increase the number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, which may contribute to protection from atherosclerosis. IGFs promote angiogenesis, and dysregulation of the IGF system may contribute to this process in cancer and eye diseases including retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy. In some situations, IGF deficiency appears to contribute to endothelial dysfunction, whereas IGF may be deleterious in others. These differences may be due to tissue-specific endothelial cell phenotypes or IGFs having distinct roles in different phases of vascular disease. Further studies are therefore required to delineate the therapeutic potential of IGF system modulation in pathogenic processes.

  8. Endothelial-regenerating cells: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Martin; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2010-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for cardiovascular diseases and is based on endothelial dysfunction. A growing body of evidence suggests the contribution of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells, monocytic cells, and mature endothelial cells to vessel formation and endothelial rejuvenation. To this day, various subsets of these endothelial-regenerating cells have been identified according to cellular origin, phenotype, and properties in vivo and in vitro. However, the definition and biology, especially of endothelial progenitor cells, is complex and under heavy debate. In this review, we focus on current definitions of endothelial progenitor cells, highlight the clinical relevance of endothelial-regenerating cells, and provide new insights into cell-cell interactions involved in endothelial cell rejuvenation.

  9. Adult cutaneous hemangiomas are composed of nonreplicating endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tuder, R M; Young, R; Karasek, M; Bensch, K

    1987-12-01

    Thirty-four human "cherry" dermal hemangiomas were studied by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and cell culture to assess the neoplastic nature of these lesions. Electron microscopy of nine hemangiomas revealed a pronounced thickening of the basement membrane (0.6 to 14 micron) in 93% of the total 158 vascular structures examined within the lesions. This increase was caused mainly by multiple layers of basal lamina, which were irregular in outline and frequently associated with pericytes. Basement membrane changes were present both in the periphery of the hemangiomas, as well as in the center of the lesions. Immature vessels could not be identified and mitoses were absent in all endothelial cells. Using an immunohistochemical marker (Ki67) specific for proliferating cells in G2 and S phases, positive staining was not found in the endothelial cells lining the hemangiomatous vessels, whereas basal epidermal keratinocytes in the same preparations and cultured microvascular endothelial cells expressed the antigen. Endothelial cells of nine hemangiomas did not stain with an activation-related antibody (E12) specific for endothelial cells. When endothelial cells from 14 hemangiomas were isolated and cultured under conditions that support the growth of normal human skin microvascular endothelial cells, the cells of hemangiomatous origin failed to grow. We conclude that the adult hemangiomas may not be true neoplasms, but a tissue overgrowth composed of mature vessels resembling dermal venules, lined by endothelial cells with virtually no turnover.

  10. Characteristics of L-citrulline transport through blood-brain barrier in the brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-10

    L-Citrulline is a neutral amino acid and a major precursor of L-arginine in the nitric oxide (NO) cycle. Recently it has been reported that L-citrulline prevents neuronal cell death and protects cerebrovascular injury, therefore, L-citrulline may have a neuroprotective effect to improve cerebrovascular dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the brain transport mechanism of L-citrulline through blood-brain barrier (BBB) using the conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells), as an in vitro model of the BBB. The uptake study of [(14)C] L-citrulline, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and rLAT1, system b(0,+), and CAT1 small interfering RNA study were performed in TR-BBB cells. The uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline was a time-dependent, but ion-independent manner in TR-BBB cells. The transport process involved two saturable components with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 30.9 ± 1.0 μM (Km1) and 1.69 ± 0.43 mM (Km2). The uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline in TR-BBB cells was significantly inhibited by neutral and cationic amino acids, but not by anionic amino acids. In addition, [(14)C]L-citrulline uptake in the cells was markedly inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), which is the inhibitor of the large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), B(0), B(0,+) and harmaline, the inhibitor of system b(0,+). Gabapentin and L-dopa as the substrates of LAT1 competitively inhibited the uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline. IC50 values for L-dopa, gabapentin, L-phenylalanine and L-arginine were 501 μM, 223 μM, 68.9 μM and 33.4 mM, respectively. The expression of mRNA for LAT1 was predominantly increased 187-fold in comparison with that of system b(0,+) in TR-BBB cells. In the studies of LAT1, system b(0,+) and CAT1 knockdown via siRNA transfection into TR-BBB cells, the transcript level of LAT1 and [(14)C] L-citrulline uptake by LAT1 siRNA were significantly reduced

  11. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  12. Origins of circulating endothelial cells and endothelial outgrowth from blood

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Solovey, Anna; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2000-01-01

    Normal adults have a small number of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in peripheral blood, and endothelial outgrowth has been observed from cultures of blood. In this study we seek insight into the origins of CEC and endothelial outgrowth from cultures of blood. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of blood samples from bone marrow transplant recipients who had received gender-mismatched transplants 5–20 months earlier showed that most CEC in fresh blood had recipient genotype. Endothelial outgrowth from the same blood samples after 9 days in culture (5-fold expansion) was still predominantly of the recipient genotype. In contrast, endothelial outgrowth after ∼1 month (102-fold expansion) was mostly of donor genotype. Thus, recipient-genotype endothelial cells expanded only ∼20-fold over this period, whereas donor-genotype endothelial cells expanded ∼1000-fold. These data suggest that most CEC in fresh blood originate from vessel walls and have limited growth capability. Conversely, the data indicate that outgrowth of endothelial cells from cultures of blood is mostly derived from transplantable marrow-derived cells. Because these cells have more delayed outgrowth but a greater proliferative rate, our data suggest that they are derived from circulating angioblasts. PMID:10619863

  13. Endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fuyong; Zhou, Jun; Gong, Ren; Huang, Xiao; Pansuria, Meghana; Virtue, Anthony; Li, Xinyuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in the maintenance of endothelial homoeostasis and in the process of new vessel formation. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced numbers and dysfunction of EPCs; and that medications alone are able to partially reverse the impairment of EPCs in patients with atherosclerosis. Therefore, novel EPC-based therapies may provide enhancement in restoring EPCs’ population and improvement of vascular function. Here, for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis, we provide a comprehensive overview on EPC characteristics, phenotypes, and the signaling pathways underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis. PMID:22652782

  14. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  15. Walnut extract (Juglans regia L.) and its component ellagic acid exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in human aorta endothelial cells and osteoblastic activity in the cell line KS483.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Z; Kassi, E; Chinou, I; Halabalaki, M; Skaltsounis, L A; Moutsatsou, P

    2008-04-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that the incidence of CVD and postmenopausal osteoporosis is low in the Mediterranean area, where herbs and nuts, among others, play an important role in nutrition. In the present study, we sought a role of walnuts (Juglans regia L.) in endothelial and bone-cell function. As the endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules has been recognised as an early step in inflammation and atherogenesis, we examined the effect of walnut methanolic extract and ellagic acid, one of its major polyphenolic components (as shown by HPLC analysis), on the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in human aortic endothelial cells. After incubating the cells with TNF-alpha (1 ng/ml) in the absence and in the presence of walnut extract (10-200 microg/ml) or ellagic acid (10- 7-10- 5 m), the VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression was quantified by cell-ELISA. We further evaluated the effect of walnut extract (10-50 microg/ml), in comparison with ellagic acid (10- 9-10- 6m), on nodule formation in the osteoblastic cell line KS483. Walnut extract and ellagic acid decreased significantly the TNF-alpha-induced endothelial expression of both VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 (P < 0.01; P < 0.001). Both walnut extract (at 10-25 microg/ml) and ellagic acid (at 10- 9-10- 8 m) induced nodule formation in KS483 osteoblasts. The present results suggest that the walnut extract has a high anti-atherogenic potential and a remarkable osteoblastic activity, an effect mediated, at least in part, by its major component ellagic acid. Such findings implicate the beneficial effect of a walnut-enriched diet on cardioprotection and bone loss.

  16. Evolving functions of endothelial cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pober, Jordan S; Sessa, William C

    2007-10-01

    Inflammation is usually analysed from the perspective of tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. Microvascular endothelial cells at a site of inflammation are both active participants in and regulators of inflammatory processes. The properties of endothelial cells change during the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Mediators that act on endothelial cells also act on leukocytes and vice versa. Consequently, many anti-inflammatory therapies influence the behaviour of endothelial cells and vascular therapeutics influence inflammation. This Review describes the functions performed by endothelial cells at each stage of the inflammatory process, emphasizing the principal mediators and signalling pathways involved and the therapeutic implications.

  17. Glucose transporter 1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma exhibit features of facultative stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Nakayama, Hironao; Klagsbrun, Michael; Mulliken, John B; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is a definitive and diagnostic marker for infantile hemangioma (IH), a vascular tumor of infancy. To date, GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH have not been quantified nor directly isolated and studied. We isolated GLUT1-positive and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells from IH specimens and characterized their proliferation, differentiation, and response to propranolol, a first-line therapy for IH, and to rapamycin, an mTOR pathway inhibitor used to treat an increasingly wide array of proliferative disorders. Although freshly isolated GLUT1-positive cells, selected using anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads, expressed endothelial markers CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, they converted to a mesenchymal phenotype after 3 weeks in culture. In contrast, GLUT1-negative endothelial cells exhibited a stable endothelial phenotype in vitro. GLUT1-selected cells were clonogenic when plated as single cells and could be induced to redifferentiate into endothelial cells, or into pericytes/smooth muscle cells or into adipocytes, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype. These data demonstrate that, although they appear and function in the tumor as bona fide endothelial cells, the GLUT1-positive endothelial cells display properties of facultative stem cells. Pretreatment with rapamycin for 4 days significantly slowed proliferation of GLUT1-selected cells, whereas propranolol pretreatment had no effect. These results reveal for the first time the facultative nature of GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  19. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M. Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P.; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  20. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-11-27

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties.

  1. Glucose transporter 1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma exhibit features of facultative stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Nakayama, Hironao; Klagsbrun, Michael; Mulliken, John B.; Bischoff, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is a definitive and diagnostic marker for infantile hemangioma (IH), a vascular tumor of infancy. To date, GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH have not been quantified nor directly isolated and studied. We isolated GLUT1-positive and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells from IH specimens and characterized their proliferation, differentiation and response to propranolol, a first-line therapy for IH, and to rapamycin, an mTOR pathway inhibitor used to treat an increasingly wide array of proliferative disorders. Although freshly isolated GLUT1-positive cells, selected using anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads, expressed endothelial markers CD31, VE-Cadherin and VEGFR2, they converted to a mesenchymal phenotype after three weeks in culture. In contrast, GLUT1-negative endothelial cells exhibited a stable endothelial phenotype in vitro. GLUT1-selected cells were clonogenic when plated as single cells and could be induced to re-differentiate into endothelial cells, or into pericyte/smooth muscle cells or into adipocytes, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype. These data demonstrate that, although they appear and function in the tumor as bona fide endothelial cells, the GLUT1-positive endothelial cells display properties of facultative stem cells. Pretreatment with rapamycin for 4 days significantly slowed proliferation of GLUT1-selected cells, whereas propranolol pretreatment had no effect. These results reveal for the first time the facultative nature of GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma. PMID:25187207

  2. Endothelial cell micropatterning: Methods, effects, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deirdre E.J.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of flow on endothelial cells have been widely examined for the ability of fluid shear stress to alter cell morphology and function; however, the effects of endothelial cell morphology without flow have only recently been observed. An increase in lithographic techniques in cell culture spurred a corresponding increase in research aiming to confine cell morphology. These studies lead to a better understanding of how morphology and cytoskeletal configuration affect the structure and function of the cells. This review examines endothelial cell micropatterning research by exploring both the many alternative methods used to alter endothelial cell morphology and the resulting changes in cellular shape and phenotype. Micropatterning induced changes in endothelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organization, mechanical properties, and cell functionality. Finally, the ways these cellular manipulation techniques have been applied to biomedical engineering research, including angiogenesis, cell migration, and tissue engineering, is discussed. PMID:21761242

  3. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  4. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  5. Effects of ultrasound upon endothelial cell ultrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemer, Claus; Jenne, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G.; Meairs, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    A number of new brain applications for therapeutic ultrasound are emerging including drug delivery through BBB opening, enhancement of angiogenesis, sonothrombolysis and neuromodulation. Safety remains important as alterations in the cytoskeleton and tight junctions of endothelial cells have been described. In this study we characterize the in vitro effects of ultrasound on cell morphology using a new human brain cell line (hCMEC/D3). Changes in ultrastructure were analyzed with antibodies against tubulin, actin and catenin. Transport was analyzed by measuring transferrin uptake. No significant changes were seen after continuous wave ultrasound treatment of hCMEC/D3 cells grown in Opticell{trade mark, serif} chambers. We could not observe disassembled actin stress fibers or variations in the microtubule network. However, severe damage occurred in cells cultured in petri dishes.

  6. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohamad; Elsayh, Khalid Ibrahim; Mohamad, Ismail Lotfy; Hassan, Gamal Mohamad; Abdou, Madleen Adel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) in pediatric patients with sepsis and correlating it with the severity of the disease and its outcome. The study included 19 children with sepsis, 26 with complicated sepsis, and 30 healthy controls. The patients were investigated within 48 hours of pediatric intensive care unit admission together with flow cytometric detection of CECs and CEPs. The levels of both CECs and CEPs were significantly higher in patient with sepsis and complicated sepsis than the controls. The levels of CECs were higher in patients with complicated sepsis, whereas the levels of CEPs were lower in patients with complicated sepsis. Comparing the survival and nonsurvival septic patients, the levels of CEPs were significantly higher in the survival than in nonsurvival patients, whereas the levels of CECs were significantly lower in the survival than in nonsurvival patients. Serum albumin was higher in survival than in nonsurvival patients. Estimation of CECs and CEPs and their correlation with other parameters such as serum albumen could add important information regarding prognosis in septic pediatric patients.

  7. Impaired endothelial repair capacity of early endothelial progenitor cells in prehypertension: relation to endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giovanna; Doerries, Carola; Mocharla, Pavani S; Mueller, Maja F; Bahlmann, Ferdinand H; Horvàth, Tibor; Jiang, Hong; Sorrentino, Sajoscha A; Steenken, Nora; Manes, Costantina; Marzilli, Mario; Rudolph, K Lenhard; Lüscher, Thomas F; Drexler, Helmut; Landmesser, Ulf

    2010-06-01

    Prehypertension is a highly frequent condition associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to promote the development of hypertension and vascular disease; however, underlying mechanisms remain to be further determined. The present study characterizes for the first time the in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with prehypertension/hypertension and examines its relation with endothelial function. Early EPCs were isolated from healthy subjects and newly diagnosed prehypertensive and hypertensive patients (n=52). In vivo endothelial repair capacity of EPCs was examined by transplantation into a nude mouse carotid injury model. EPC senescence was determined (RT-PCR of telomere length). NO and superoxide production of EPCs were measured using electron spin resonance spectroscopy analysis. CD34(+)/KDR(+) mononuclear cells and circulating endothelial microparticles were examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilations were determined by high-resolution ultrasound. In vivo endothelial repair capacity of EPCs was substantially impaired in prehypertensive/hypertensive patients as compared with healthy subjects (re-endothelialized area: 15+/-3%/13+/-2% versus 28+/-3%; P<0.05 versus healthy subjects). Senescence of EPCs in prehypertension/hypertension was substantially increased, and NO production was markedly reduced. Moreover, reduced endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs was significantly related to an accelerated senescence of early EPCs and impaired endothelial function. The present study demonstrates for the first time that in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs is reduced in patients with prehypertension and hypertension, is related to EPC senescence and impaired endothelial function, and likely represents an early event in the development of hypertension.

  8. A Tie2-driven BAC-TRAP transgenic line for in vivo endothelial gene profiling

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Devi; Huang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological innovations including bacterial artificial chromosome-based translating ribosome affinity purification (BAC-TRAP) have greatly facilitated analysis of cell type-specific gene expression in vivo, especially in the nervous system. To better study endothelial gene expression in vivo, we have generated a BAC-TRAP transgenic mouse line where the L10a ribosomal subunit is tagged with EGFP and placed under the control of the endothelium-specific Tie2 (Tek) promoter. We show that transgene expression in this line is widely, but specifically, detected in endothelial cells in several brain regions throughout pre- and postnatal development, as well as in other organs. We also show that this line results in highly significant enrichment of endothelium-specific mRNAs from brain tissues at different stages. This BAC-TRAP line therefore provides a useful genetic tool for in vivo endothelial gene profiling under various developmental, physiological, and pathological conditions. PMID:26817747

  9. PPAR Gamma and Angiogenesis: Endothelial Cells Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the current knowledge concerning PPARγ function in angiogenesis. We discuss the mechanisms of action for PPARγ and its role in vasculature development and homeostasis, focusing on endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and bone marrow-derived proangiogenic cells. PMID:28053991

  10. Examination of the role of galectins and galectin inhibitors in endothelial cell biology.

    PubMed

    Schulkens, Iris A E; Kleibeuker, Esther A; Castricum, Kitty C M; Griffioen, Arjan W; Thijssen, Victor L J L

    2015-01-01

    The growth of new blood vessels is a key event in many (patho)physiological processes, including embryogenesis, wound healing, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Neovascularization requires different, well-coordinated actions of endothelial cells, i.e., the cells lining the luminal side of all blood vessels. Galectins are involved in several of these activities. In this chapter we describe methods to study galectins and galectin inhibition in three key functions of endothelial cells during angiogenesis, i.e., endothelial cell migration, endothelial cell sprouting, and endothelial cell network formation.

  11. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  12. Sera from early-onset, severely preeclamptic women directly modulate HLA-E expression in the EA.hy296 endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Sánchez, J C; Peña-Alzate, S; Peña, R B; Agudelo-Jaramillo, B; Cadavid-Jaramillo, A P; Chaouat, G; Maldonado-Estrada, J G

    2014-10-01

    The expression of endothelial HLA-E in the context of the systemic inflammatory response observed in preeclampsia has not been established. An experimental study was designed to determine the effect of the sera of pregnant women on the expression of HLA-E in EA.hy296 endothelial cells. First, measurements of protein fractions were performed in sera from early-onset, severely preeclamptic women without HELLP syndrome, in which there was no significant difference in total proteins between the groups, but a reduced level of plasma albumin and an increase in α1-globulin were observed in both groups of pregnant women compared with non-pregnant women. Measurements of colloid osmotic pressure (COP) using a recalculated albumin/globulin ratio formula determined only a significant decrease in COP in all pregnant groups compared with non-pregnant women. The expression of membrane HLA-E was increased in EA.hy296 endothelial cells stimulated with sera of early-onset, severely preeclamptic women, while recombinant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) significantly reduced the expression of membrane HLA-E. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by Luminex in the serum samples, and increased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and decreased levels of IFN-γ were observed in early-onset, severe preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Moreover, soluble HLA-E was detected in these serum samples by Western blot and ELISA, but no significant difference was found. This raises the possibility that a systemic inflammatory response promotes a compensatory mechanism of COP balance in severe preeclampsia by release of inflammation-induced factors, including endothelial HLA-E. Evidence is now provided regarding HLA-E expression by EA.hy296 cells.

  13. Production of soluble Neprilysin by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Minond, Dmitriy; Smith, A Ian

    2014-04-04

    A non-membrane bound form of Neprilysin (NEP) with catalytic activity has the potential to cleave substrates throughout the circulation, thus leading to systemic effects of NEP. We used the endothelial cell line Ea.hy926 to identify the possible role of exosomes and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM-17) in the production of non-membrane bound NEP. Using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate (40 μM) assay, we determined the activity of recombinant human NEP (rhNEP; 12 ng), and NEP in the media of endothelial cells (10% v/v; after 24 h incubation with cells) to be 9.35±0.70 and 6.54±0.41 μmols of substrate cleaved over 3h, respectively. The presence of NEP in the media was also confirmed by Western blotting. At present there are no commercially available inhibitors specific for ADAM-17. We therefore synthesised two inhibitors TPI2155-14 and TPI2155-17, specific for ADAM-17 with IC50 values of 5.36 and 4.32 μM, respectively. Treatment of cells with TPI2155-14 (15 μM) and TPI2155-17 (4.3 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NEP activity in media (62.37±1.43 and 38.30±4.70, respectively as a % of control; P<0.0001), implicating a possible role for ADAM-17 in NEP release. However, centrifuging media (100,000g for 1 h at 4 °C) removed all NEP activity from the supernatant indicating the likely role of exosomes in the release of NEP. Our data therefore indicated for the first time that NEP is released from endothelial cells via exosomes, and that this process is dependent on ADAM-17. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Andjelkovic, A V; Stamatovic, S M; Shakui, P; Ennis, S R

    2005-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation upon reperfusion therapy has focused attention on ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. This study examined whether hyperglycemia may induce hemorrhagic transformation by enhancing endothelial mitochondrial damage during ischemia and whether preconditioning (PC) stimuli may limit ischemia-induced endothelial damage. In vivo, rats received 2.8 M D-glucose or arabinose (1 ml/100 g; i.p.) prior to undergoing two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and transcardiac fixation for electron microscopy. In vitro, brain endothelial cells were exposed to a PC impulse (short-term oxygen glucose deprivation; OGD) prior to an injurious event (5 hours OGD). Endothelial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Hyperglycemia during cerebral ischemia resulted in marked changes in endothelial morphology and mitochondrial swelling. Thus, in the ischemic hemisphere, there was no evidence of endothelial mitochondrial swelling in normoglycemic rats (mean profile width 0.22 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 microm in contralateral hemisphere) but there was marked swelling in hyperglycemic rats (0.44 +/- 0.02 microm). In vitro, cells preconditioned with one hour of OGD one day prior to 5 hours of OGD, showed reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hyperglycemia may have specific adverse effects on endothelial cell mitochondria during ischemia. Preventing those effects may help to ameliorate blood-brain barrier disruption on reperfusion. Insights into how to prevent endothelial injury may come from determining the mechanisms involved in endothelial preconditioning.

  15. Fibronectin coating of oxygenator membranes enhances endothelial cell attachment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can replace the lungs’ gas exchange capacity in refractory lung failure. However, its limited hemocompatibility, the activation of the coagulation and complement system as well as plasma leakage and protein deposition hamper mid- to long-term use and have constrained the development of an implantable lung assist device. In a tissue engineering approach, lining the blood contact surfaces of the ECMO device with endothelial cells might overcome these limitations. As a first step towards this aim, we hypothesized that coating the oxygenator’s gas exchange membrane with proteins might positively influence the attachment and proliferation of arterial endothelial cells. Methods Sheets of polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylpentene (TPX) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), typical material used for oxygenator gas exchange membranes, were coated with collagen, fibrinogen, gelatin or fibronectin. Tissue culture treated well plates served as controls. Endothelial cell attachment and proliferation were analyzed for a period of 4 days by microscopic examination and computer assisted cell counting. Results Endothelial cell seeding efficiency is within range of tissue culture treated controls for fibronectin treated surfaces only. Uncoated membranes as well as all other coatings lead to lower cell attachment. A confluent endothelial cell layer develops on fibronectin coated PDMS and the control surface only. Conclusions Fibronectin increases endothelial cells’ seeding efficiency on different oxygenator membrane material. PDMS coated with fibronectin shows sustained cell attachment for a period of four days in static culture conditions. PMID:23356939

  16. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  17. Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and the Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelial lining of lesion-prone areas of the arterial vasculature is an important contributor to the pathobiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD), in its broadest sense, encompasses a constellation of various non-adaptive alterations in functional phenotype, which have important implications for the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis, local vascular tone and redox balance, and the orchestration of acute and chronic inflammatory reactions within the arterial wall. In this review, we trace the evolution of the concept of endothelial cell dysfunction, focusing on recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie its pivotal roles in atherosclerotic lesion initiation and progression; explore its relationship to classic, as well as more recently defined, clinical risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; consider current approaches to the clinical assessment of endothelial cell dysfunction; and outline some promising new directions for its early detection and treatment. PMID:26892962

  18. Selective human endothelial cell activation by chemokines as a guide to cell homing.

    PubMed

    Crola Da Silva, Claire; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Paprocka, Maria; Mitterrand, Michèle; Gosset, David; Dus, Danuta; Kieda, Claudine

    2009-03-01

    An original model of organo-specific, immortalized and stabilized endothelial cell lines was used to delineate the part played by some chemokines (CCL21, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CXCL12) and their receptors in endothelium organo-specificity. Chemokine receptor expression and chemokine presentation were investigated on organo-specific human endothelial cell lines. Although the chemokines showed distinct binding patterns for the various endothelial cell lines, these were not correlated with the expression of the corresponding receptors (CX3CR1, CXCR4, CCR5 and CCR7). Experiments with CCL21 on peripheral lymph node endothelial cells demonstrated that the chemokine did not co-localize with its receptor but was associated with extracellular matrix components. The specific activity of chemokines was clearly shown to be related to the endothelial cell origin. Indeed, CX3CL1 and CCL21 promoted lymphocyte recruitment by endothelial cells from the appendix and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively, while CX3CL1 pro-angiogenic activity was restricted to endothelial cells from the appendix and skin. The high specificity of the chemokine/endothelium interaction allowed the design of a direct in vitro endothelial cell targeting assay. This unique cellular model demonstrated a fundamental role for chemokines in conferring on the endothelium its organo-specificity and its potential for tissue targeting through the selective binding, presentation and activation properties of chemokines.

  19. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Arterial Endothelial Mitosis in Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Wright, H. Payling; Giacometti, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitized guinea-pigs received a shocking dose of ovalbumin. Within 8 min endothelial cells ranging in numbers between 24·0 and 13·88/1000 leukocytes were recovered from the peripheral blood. Control animals had counts between 0·00 and 4·40. Subsequent injection of T-3H and autoradiographic study of Hautchen preparations of aortic endothelium showed a 3-fold increase in mitosis in the shocked animals when compared with controls. The increase in mitosis represents the repair process following endothelial distruction caused by anaphylactic shock. ImagesFigs. 1-2 PMID:5014238

  20. Production of soluble Neprilysin by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W.; Minond, Dmitriy; Smith, A. Ian

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • A soluble full-length form of Neprilysin exists in media of endothelial cells. • Exosomal release is the key mechanism for the production of soluble Neprilysin. • Inhibition of ADAM-17 by specific inhibitors reduce Neprilysin release. • Exosome mediated release of Neprilysin is dependent on ADAM-17 activity. - Abstract: A non-membrane bound form of Neprilysin (NEP) with catalytic activity has the potential to cleave substrates throughout the circulation, thus leading to systemic effects of NEP. We used the endothelial cell line Ea.hy926 to identify the possible role of exosomes and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM-17) in the production of non-membrane bound NEP. Using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate (40 μM) assay, we determined the activity of recombinant human NEP (rhNEP; 12 ng), and NEP in the media of endothelial cells (10% v/v; after 24 h incubation with cells) to be 9.35 ± 0.70 and 6.54 ± 0.41 μmols of substrate cleaved over 3 h, respectively. The presence of NEP in the media was also confirmed by Western blotting. At present there are no commercially available inhibitors specific for ADAM-17. We therefore synthesised two inhibitors TPI2155-14 and TPI2155-17, specific for ADAM-17 with IC{sub 50} values of 5.36 and 4.32 μM, respectively. Treatment of cells with TPI2155-14 (15 μM) and TPI2155-17 (4.3 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NEP activity in media (62.37 ± 1.43 and 38.30 ± 4.70, respectively as a % of control; P < 0.0001), implicating a possible role for ADAM-17 in NEP release. However, centrifuging media (100,000g for 1 h at 4 °C) removed all NEP activity from the supernatant indicating the likely role of exosomes in the release of NEP. Our data therefore indicated for the first time that NEP is released from endothelial cells via exosomes, and that this process is dependent on ADAM-17.

  1. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Somatic Mutations in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Judith; Awad, Issam A.; Recksiek, Peter; Shenkar, Robert; Breeze, Robert; Handler, Michael; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette Kay

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Germline mutations in three genes have been found in familial cases of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). We previously discovered somatic and germline truncating mutations in the KRIT1 gene supporting the “two-hit” mechanism of CCM lesion formation in a single lesion. The purpose of this study was to screen for somatic, nonheritable, mutations in three more lesions from different patients and identify the cell type(s) in which somatic mutations occur. METHODS Somatic mutations were sought in DNA from three surgically excised, fresh-frozen CCM lesions by cloning and screening PCR products generated from KRIT1 or PDCD10 coding regions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolated endothelial and nonendothelial cells in order to determine if somatic mutations were found in endothelial cells. RESULTS A CCM lesion harbored somatic and germline KRIT1 mutations on different chromosomes and are therefore biallelic. Both mutations are predicted to truncate the protein. The KRIT1 somatic mutations (novel c.1800delG mutation and previously identified 34 nucleotide deletion) in CCMs from two different patients were only found in the vascular endothelial cells lining caverns. No obvious somatic mutations were identified in the two other lesions; however, the results were inconclusive possibly due to the technical limitations or the fact that these specimens had a small proportion of vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. CONCLUSION The “two-hit” mechanism occurs in vascular endothelial cells lining CCM caverns from two patients with somatic and Hispanic-American KRIT1 germline mutations. Methods for somatic mutation detection should focus on vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. PMID:19574835

  2. Neuropilin2 expressed in gastric cancer endothelial cells increases the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in response to VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Myung Hwan; Seo, Ji Heun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min A; Lee, You Mie

    2009-08-01

    The structure and characteristics of the tumor vasculature are known to be different from those of normal vessels. Neuropilin2 (Nrp2), which is expressed in non-endothelial cell types, such as neuronal or cancer cells, functions as a receptor for both semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After isolating tumor and normal endothelial cells from advanced gastric cancer tissue and normal gastric mucosa tissues, respectively, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in gastric tumor endothelial (TEC) and normal endothelial cells (NEC) using DNA oligomer chips. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we confirmed the chip results by showing that Nrp2 gene expression is significantly up-regulated in TEC. Genes that were found to be up-regulated in TEC were also observed to be up-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with gastric cancer cells. In addition, HUVECs co-cultured with gastric cancer cells showed an increased reactivity to VEGF-induced proliferation and migration. Moreover, overexpression of Nrp2 in HUVECs significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration induced by VEGF. Observation of an immunohistochemical analysis of various human tumor tissue arrays revealed that Nrp2 is highly expressed in the tumor vessel lining and to a lesser extent in normal tissue microvessels. From these results, we suggest that Nrp2 may function to increase the response to VEGF, which is more significant in TEC than in NEC given the differential expression, leading to gastric TEC with aggressive angiogenesis phenotypes.

  3. Apicobasal polarity of brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Normal brain homeostasis depends on the integrity of the blood–brain barrier that controls the access of nutrients, humoral factors, and immune cells to the CNS. The blood–brain barrier is composed mainly of brain endothelial cells. Forming the interface between two compartments, they are highly polarized. Apical/luminal and basolateral/abluminal membranes differ in their lipid and (glyco-)protein composition, allowing brain endothelial cells to secrete or transport soluble factors in a polarized manner and to maintain blood flow. Here, we summarize the basic concepts of apicobasal cell polarity in brain endothelial cells. To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying apicobasal polarity in brain endothelial cells, we draw on investigations in epithelial cells and discuss how polarity may go awry in neurological diseases. PMID:26661193

  4. Re-endothelialization of rat lung scaffolds through passive, gravity-driven seeding of segment-specific pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scarritt, Michelle E; Pashos, Nicholas C; Motherwell, Jessica M; Eagle, Zachary R; Burkett, Brian J; Gregory, Ashley N; Mostany, Ricardo; Weiss, Daniel J; Alvarez, Diego F; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2016-12-12

    Effective re-endothelialization is critical for the use of decellularized scaffolds for ex vivo lung engineering. Current approaches yield insufficiently re-endothelialized scaffolds that hemorrhage and become thrombogenic upon implantation. Herein, gravity-driven seeding coupled with bioreactor culture facilitated widespread distribution and engraftment of endothelial cells throughout rat lung scaffolds. Initially, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded into the pulmonary artery by either gravity-driven, variable flow perfusion seeding or pump-driven, pulsatile flow perfusion seeding. Gravity seeding evenly distributed cells and supported cell survival and re-lining of the vascular walls while perfusion pump-driven seeding led to increased cell fragmentation and death. Using gravity seeding, rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) and rat pulmonary vein endothelial cells (PVECs) attached in intermediate and large vessels, while rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) deposited mostly in microvessels. Combination seeding of PAECs, PVECs, and MVECs led to positive VE-cadherin staining. In addition, combination seeding improved barrier function as assessed by serum albumin extravasation; however, leakage was observed in the distal portions of the re-endothelialized tissue suggesting that recellularization of the alveoli is necessary to complete barrier function of the capillary-alveolar network. Overall, these data indicate that vascular recellularization of rat lung scaffolds is achieved through gravity seeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Cyclosporine triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress in endothelial cells: a role for endothelial phenotypic changes and death.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Nicolas; Flinois, Jean Pierre; Gilleron, Jerome; Sauvage, François-Ludovic; Legendre, Christophe; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Anglicheau, Dany; Pallet, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus are effective immunosuppressants, but both substances have the same intrinsic nephrotoxic potential that adversely affects allograft survival in renal transplant patients and causes end-stage renal disease in other solid organ or bone marrow transplant recipients. Endothelial cells are the first biological interface between drugs and the kidney, and calcineurin inhibitors may influence endothelial function and viability in a number of ways. Notably, endothelial cells have recently been shown to contribute to the accumulation of interstitial fibroblasts in nonrenal models, through endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Here we demonstrate that cyclosporine, but not tacrolimus or its metabolites, induces morphological and phenotypic endothelial changes suggestive of a partial endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human umbilical arterial endothelial cells. We identify for the first time a contingent of interstitial myofibroblasts that coexpress endothelial markers in rat kidneys treated with cyclosporine, suggesting that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition could occur in vivo. Finally, our findings suggest that endoplasmic reticulum stress triggered by cyclosporine induces endothelial cells to undergo endothelial phenotypic changes suggestive of a partial endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, whereas salubrinal partially preserves the endothelial phenotype. Inversely, tacrolimus does not induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition or endoplasmic reticulum stress. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that cyclosporine, and not tacrolimus, induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in endothelial cells. Our findings also suggest that endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial cell death and phenotypic changes similar to a partial endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  6. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  7. Transcript analysis reveals a specific HOX signature associated with positional identity of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J; McKinney, Eoin F; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D; Waters, John P; Ormiston, Mark L; Skepper, Jeremy N; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole "HOX transcriptome" of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity.

  8. Transcript Analysis Reveals a Specific HOX Signature Associated with Positional Identity of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D.; Waters, John P.; Ormiston, Mark L.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole “HOX transcriptome” of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity. PMID:24651450

  9. Characterization and comparison of embryonic stem cell-derived KDR+ cells with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Cheng, Lamei; Duan, Huaxin; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guangxiu

    2012-09-01

    Growing interest in utilizing endothelial cells (ECs) for therapeutic purposes has led to the exploration of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a potential source for endothelial progenitors. In this study, ECs were induced from hESC lines and their biological characteristics were analyzed and compared with both cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (CBEPCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. The results showed that isolated embryonic KDR+ cells (EC-KDR+) display characteristics that were similar to CBEPCs and HUVECs. EC-KDR+, CBEPCs and HUVECs all expressed CD31 and CD144, incorporated DiI-Ac-LDL, bound UEA1 lectin, and were able to form tube-like structures on Matrigel. Compared with CBEPCs and HUVECs, the expression level of endothelial progenitor cell markers such as CD133 and KDR in EC-KDR+ was significantly higher, while the mature endothelial marker vWF was lowly expressed in EC-KDR+. In summary, the study showed that EC-KDR+ are primitive endothelial-like progenitors and might be a potential source for therapeutic vascular regeneration and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endothelial cell-derived microparticles induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation: potential implications in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Angelot, Fanny; Seillès, Estelle; Biichlé, Sabeha; Berda, Yael; Gaugler, Béatrice; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Dignat-George, Françoise; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased circulating endothelial microparticles, resulting from vascular endothelium dysfunction, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell activation are both encountered in common inflammatory disorders. The aim of our study was to determine whether interactions between endothelial microparticles and plasmacytoid dendritic cells could contribute to such pathologies. Design and Methods Microparticles generated from endothelial cell lines, platelets or activated T cells were incubated with human plasmacytoid dendritic cells sorted from healthy donor blood or with monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Dendritic cell maturation was evaluated by flow cytometry, cytokine secretion as well as naive T-cell activation and polarization. Labeled microparticles were also used to study cellular interactions. Results Endothelial microparticles induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. In contrast, conventional dendritic cells were resistant to endothelial microparticle-induced maturation. In addition to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules, endothelial microparticle-matured plasmacytoid dendritic cells secreted inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 6 and 8, but no interferon-α) and also induced allogeneic naive CD4+ T cells to proliferate and to produce type 1 cytokines such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Endothelial microparticle endocytosis by plasmacytoid dendritic cells appeared to be required for plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Importantly, the ability of endothelial microparticles to induce plasmacytoid dendritic cells to mature was specific as microparticles derived from activated T cells or platelets (the major source of circulating microparticules in healthy subjects) did not induce such plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Conclusions Our data show that endothelial microparticles specifically induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation and production of inflammatory cytokines. This novel activation pathway may be implicated in

  11. HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Folkman, Judah

    1974-01-01

    Human endothelial cells, obtained by collagenase treatment of term umbilical cord veins, were cultured using Medium 199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum. Small clusters of cells initially spread on plastic or glass, coalesced and grew to form confluent monolayers of polygonal cells by 7 days. Cells in primary and subcultures were identified as endothelium by the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies by electron microscopy. A morphologically distinct subpopulation of cells contaminating some primary endothelial cultures was selectively subcultured, and identified by ultrastructural criteria as vascular smooth muscle. Autoradiography of endothelial cells after exposure to [3H]thymidine showed progressive increases in labeling in growing cultures beginning at 24 h. In recently confluent cultures, labeling indices were 2.4% in central closely packed regions, and 53.2% in peripheral growing regions. 3 days after confluence, labeling was uniform, being 3.5 and 3.9% in central and peripheral areas, respectively. When small areas of confluent cultures were experimentally "denuded," there were localized increases in [3H]thymidine labeling and eventual reconstitution of the monolayer. Liquid scintillation measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation in primary and secondary endothelial cultures in microwell trays showed a similar correlation of DNA synthesis with cell density. These data indicate that endothelial cell cultures may provide a useful in vitro model for studying pathophysiologic factors in endothelial regeneration. PMID:4363161

  12. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Poay Sian Sabrina; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vasculogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk factors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evaluate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome. PMID:25126384

  13. ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS: FROM SENESCENCE TO REJUVENATION

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Discovered more than 15 years ago, endothelial progenitor cells attract both basic and translational researchers. It has become clear that they represent a heterogeneous population of endothelial colony forming cells, early or late outgrowth endothelial cells, or blood outgrowth endothelial cells, each characterized by differing proliferative and regenerative capacity. Scattered within the vascular wall, these cells participate in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and support regeneration of epithelial cells. There is growing evidence that this cell population is impaired during the course of chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease when it undergoes premature senescence and loss of specialized functions. Senescence-associated secretory products released by such cells can affect the neighboring cells and further exacerbate their regenerative capacity. For those reasons adoptive transfer of endothelial progenitor cells is being used in more than 150 on-going clinical trials in diverse cardiovascular diseases. There is emergence of attempts to rejuvenate this cell population either ex vivo or in situ. The progress in this field is paramount to regenerate the injured kidney. PMID:25217265

  14. Endothelial progenitor cells: from senescence to rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    Discovered more than 15 years ago, endothelial progenitor cells attract both basic and translational researchers. It has become clear that they represent a heterogeneous population of endothelial colony-forming cells, early or late outgrowth endothelial cells, or blood outgrowth endothelial cells, each characterized by differing proliferative and regenerative capacity. Scattered within the vascular wall, these cells participate in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and support regeneration of epithelial cells. There is growing evidence that this cell population is impaired during the course of chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease when it undergoes premature senescence and loss of specialized functions. Senescence-associated secretory products released by such cells can affect the neighboring cells and further exacerbate their regenerative capacity. For these reasons, adoptive transfer of endothelial progenitor cells is being used in more than 150 ongoing clinical trials of diverse cardiovascular diseases. Attempts to rejuvenate this cell population either ex vivo or in situ are emerging. The progress in this field is paramount to regenerate the injured kidney. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The extracellular matrix is a novel attribute of endothelial progenitors and of hypoxic mature endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Zhao, Stephen; Gerecht, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) production is critical to preserve the function and integrity of mature blood vessels. Toward the engineering of blood vessels, studies have centered on ECM production by supporting cells, whereas few studies implicate endothelial cells (ECs) with ECM synthesis. Here, we elucidate variations between cultured human arterial, venous, and progenitor ECs with respect to ECM deposition assembly, composition, and response to biomolecular and physiological factors. Our studies reveal that progenitor ECs, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), deposit collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin that assemble to an organized weblike structure, as confirmed by decellularized cultures. Mature ECs only express these ECM proteins intracellularly. ECFC-derived ECM is abrogated in response to TGFβ signaling inhibition and actin cytoskeleton disruption. Hypoxic (1%) and physiological (5%) O2 tension stimulate ECM deposition from mature ECs. Interestingly, deposition of collagen I is observed only under 5% O2 tension. ECM production from all ECs is found to be regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors 1α and 2α but differentially in the different cell lines. Collectively, we suggest that ECM deposition and assembly by ECs is dependent on maturation stage and oxygen supply and that these findings can be harnessed to advance engineered vascular therapeutics.—Kusuma, S., Zhao, S., Gerecht, S. The extracellular matrix is a novel attribute of endothelial progenitors and of hypoxic mature endothelial cells. PMID:22919069

  16. PROLIFERATIVE CAPACITY OF CORNEAL ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    The corneal endothelial monolayer helps maintain corneal transparency through its barrier and ionic “pump” functions. This transparency function can become compromised, resulting in a critical loss in endothelial cell density (ECD), corneal edema, bullous keratopathy, and loss of visual acuity. Although penetrating keratoplasty and various forms of endothelial keratoplasty are capable of restoring corneal clarity, they can also have complications requiring re-grafting or other treatments. With the increasing worldwide shortage of donor corneas to be used for keratoplasty, there is a greater need to find new therapies to restore corneal clarity that is lost due to endothelial dysfunction. As a result, researchers have been exploring alternative approaches that could result in the in vivo induction of transient corneal endothelial cell division or the in vitro expansion of healthy endothelial cells for corneal bioengineering as treatments to increase ECD and restore visual acuity. This review presents current information regarding the ability of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) to divide as a basis for the development of new therapies. Information will be presented on the positive and negative regulation of the cell cycle as background for the studies to be discussed. Results of studies exploring the proliferative capacity of HCEC will be presented and specific conditions that affect the ability of HCEC to divide will be discussed. Methods that have been tested to induce transient proliferation of HCEC will also be presented. This review will discuss the effect of donor age and endothelial topography on relative proliferative capacity of HCEC, as well as explore the role of nuclear oxidative DNA damage in decreasing the relative proliferative capacity of HCEC. Finally, potential new research directions will be discussed that could take advantage of and/or improve the proliferative capacity of these physiologically important cells in order to develop new

  17. Tricellulin expression in brain endothelial and neural cells.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Cibelle; Palmela, Inês; Pereira, Pedro; Fernandes, Adelaide; Falcão, Ana Sofia; Cardoso, Filipa Lourenço; Vaz, Ana Rita; Campos, Alexandre Rainha; Gonçalves-Ferreira, António; Kim, Kwang Sik; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Tricellulin is a tight junction (TJ) protein, which is not only concentrated at tricellular contacts but also present at bicellular contacts between epithelial tissues. We scrutinized the brain for tricellulin expression in endothelial and neural cells by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical analysis of cultured brain cells and paraffin sections of brain. Tricellulin mRNA was detected in primary cultures and in a cell line of human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Protein expression was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis, which further highlighted the localization of tricellulin in the cell membrane at tricellular and along bicellular contacts, and in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Compared with the well-studied TJ protein, zonula occludens-1, tricellulin expression was less marked at the cell membrane but more evident in the nuclear and perinuclear regions. The presence of tricellulin in cultured endothelial cells was corroborated by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining in brain blood vessels, where it was colocalized with another TJ protein, claudin-5. Tricellulin mRNA was detected in neurons and astrocytes, whereas protein expression was observed in astrocytes but not in neurons, as shown by immunofluorescence analysis. This study reveals the presence and subcellular distribution of tricellulin in brain endothelial cells, both in vitro and in situ and its colocalization with other relevant TJ proteins. Moreover, it demonstrates the expression of the protein in astrocytes opening new avenues for future research to establish the biological significance of tricellulin expression in glial cells.

  18. Connexin 43 expressed in endothelial cells modulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion by regulating cell adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongdong; Sun, Guoliang; Zhang, Rui; Luo, Chenfang; Ge, Mian; Luo, Gangjian; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion between circulating monocytes and vascular endothelial cells is a key initiator of atherosclerosis. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that the expression of connexin (Cx)43 in monocytes modulates cell adhesion, however, the effects of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells in the process of cell adhesion. A total of four different methods with distinct mechanisms were used to change the function and expression of Cx43 channels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Cx43 channel inhibitor (oleamide), enhancer (retinoic acid), overexpression of Cx43 by transfection with pcDNA‑Cx43 and knock‑down of the expression of Cx43 by small interfering RNA against Cx43. The results indicated that the upregulation of the expression of Cx43 enhanced monocyte‑endothelial adhesion and this was markedly decreased by downregulation of Cx43. This mechanism was associated with Cx43‑induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule‑1. The effects of Cx43 in endothelial cells was independent of Cx37 or Cx40. These experiments suggested that local regulation of endothelial Cx43 expression within the vasculature regulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion, a critical event in the development of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory pathologies, with baseline adhesion set by the expression of Cx43. This balance may be crucial in controlling leukocyte involvement in inflammatory cascades.

  19. Openings between Defective Endothelial Cells Explain Tumor Vessel Leakiness

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Hiroya; Baluk, Peter; Morikawa, Shunichi; McLean, John W.; Thurston, Gavin; Roberge, Sylvie; Jain, Rakesh K.; McDonald, Donald M.

    2000-01-01

    Leakiness of blood vessels in tumors may contribute to disease progression and is key to certain forms of cancer therapy, but the structural basis of the leakiness is unclear. We sought to determine whether endothelial gaps or transcellular holes, similar to those found in leaky vessels in inflammation, could explain the leakiness of tumor vessels. Blood vessels in MCa-IV mouse mammary carcinomas, which are known to be unusually leaky (functional pore size 1.2–2 μm), were compared to vessels in three less leaky tumors and normal mammary glands. Vessels were identified by their binding of intravascularly injected fluorescent cationic liposomes and Lycopersicon esculentum lectin and by CD31 (PECAM) immunoreactivity. The luminal surface of vessels in all four tumors had a defective endothelial monolayer as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. In MCa-IV tumors, 14% of the vessel surface was lined by poorly connected, overlapping cells. The most superficial lining cells, like endothelial cells, had CD31 immunoreactivity and fenestrae with diaphragms, but they had a branched phenotype with cytoplasmic projections as long as 50 μm. Some branched cells were separated by intercellular openings (mean diameter 1.7 μm; range, 0.3–4.7 μm). Transcellular holes (mean diameter 0.6 μm) were also present but were only 8% as numerous as intercellular openings. Some CD31-positive cells protruded into the vessel lumen; others sprouted into perivascular tumor tissue. Tumors in RIP-Tag2 mice had, in addition, tumor cell-lined lakes of extravasated erythrocytes. We conclude that some tumor vessels have a defective cellular lining composed of disorganized, loosely connected, branched, overlapping or sprouting endothelial cells. Openings between these cells contribute to tumor vessel leakiness and may permit access of macromolecular therapeutic agents to tumor cells. PMID:10751361

  20. Inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 interaction leads to decreased survival in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, Elizabeth A; Ma, Xiaojie; Stewart, Jerry E; Megison, Michael; Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena V

    2014-03-01

    Neuroblastoma continues to be a devastating childhood solid tumor and is responsible for over 15% of all childhood cancer-related deaths. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) are protein tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in a number of human cancers, including neuroblastoma. These two kinases can directly interact and provide survival signals to cancer cells. In this study, we utilized siRNA to VEGFR-3 to demonstrate the biologic importance of this kinase in neuroblastoma cell survival. We also used confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation to show that FAK and VEGFR-3 bind in neuroblastoma. Finally, employing a 12-amino-acid peptide (AV3) specific to VEGFR-3, we showed that the colocalization between FAK and VEGFR-3 could be disrupted, and that disruption resulted in decreased neuroblastoma cell survival. These studies provide insight to the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction in neuroblastoma and demonstrate its importance in this tumor type. Focusing upon the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction may provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of new strategies for treatment of neuroblastoma.

  1. Isolation, characterization, and biologic features of bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Porada, G; Ascensão, J L

    1996-10-01

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) are an integral part of the bone marrow microenvironment and are likely to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, either by producing growth factors or inhibitory cytokines or by displaying adhesion molecules that can interact with hematopoietic progenitors. In the present study we demonstrate the isolation, propagation, and characterization of BMECs with regard to morphology, growth characteristics, phenotype, and production of cytokines. Furthermore, we report the creation of a cell line with "BMEC-like" characteristics and compare the characteristics of primary BMEC cultures to those of the immortalized cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that BMECs are susceptible to infection by a laboratory strain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that CMV infection of endothelial cells in vivo could potentially play a role in the hematologic abnormalities observed during CMV infection.

  2. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  3. Glassy Dynamics, Cell Mechanics and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Corey; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of all inflammatory processes is disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier. Such disruption is initiated in part through active contraction of the cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell (EC). Because contractile forces are propagated from cell to cell across a great many cell-cell junctions, this contractile process is strongly cooperative and highly nonlocal. We show here that the characteristic length scale of propagation is modulated by agonists and antagonists that impact permeability of the endothelial barrier. In the presence of agonists including thrombin, histamine, and H202, force correlation length increases, whereas in the presence of antagonists including sphingosine-1-phosphate, hepatocyte growth factor, and the rho kinase inhibitor, Y27632, force correlation length decreases. Intercellular force chains and force clusters are also evident, both of which are reminiscent of soft glassy materials approaching a glass transition. PMID:23638866

  4. Endothelial cell dynamics in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Barbacena, Pedro; Carvalho, Joana R; Franco, Claudio A

    2016-01-01

    In this ESCHM 2016 conference talk report, we summarise two recently published original articles Franco et al. PLoS Biology 2015 and Franco et al. eLIFE 2016. The vascular network undergoes extensive vessel remodelling to become fully functional. Is it well established that blood flow is a main driver for vascular remodelling. It has also been proposed that vessel pruning is a central process within physiological vessel remodelling. However, despite its central function, the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating vessel regression, and their interaction with blood flow patterns, remain largely unexplained. We investigated the cellular process governing developmental vascular remodelling in mouse and zebrafish. We established that polarised reorganization of endothelial cells is at the core of vessel regression, representing vessel anastomosis in reverse. Moreover, we established for the first time an axial polarity map for all endothelial cells together with an in silico method for the computation of the haemodynamic forces in the murine retinal vasculature. Using network-level analysis and microfluidics, we showed that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarisation at lower shear stress levels. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  5. Regulation of Endothelial Cell Differentiation and Specification

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Goldie, Lauren C.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all blood and lymphatic vessels, emerge de novo from the mesoderm in a process known as vasculogenesis. The vascular plexus that is initially formed is then remodeled and refined via proliferation, migration and sprouting of endothelial cells to form new vessels from pre-existing ones during angiogenesis. Mural cells are also recruited by endothelial cells to form the surrounding vessel wall. During this vascular remodeling process, primordial endothelial cells are specialized to acquire arterial, venous, and blood-forming hemogenic phenotypes and functions. A subset of venous endothelium is also specialized to become lymphatic endothelium later in development. The specialization of all endothelial cell subtypes requires extrinsic signals and intrinsic regulatory events, which will be discussed in this review. PMID:23620236

  6. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  7. Reduced Ang2 expression in aging endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hohensinner, P.J.; Ebenbauer, B.; Kaun, C.; Maurer, G.; Huber, K.; Wojta, J.

    2016-06-03

    Aging endothelial cells are characterized by increased cell size, reduced telomere length and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we describe here that aging reduces the migratory distance of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the quiescence protein Ang1 and a decrease of the endothelial activation protein Ang2 upon aging. Supplementing Ang2 to aged endothelial cells restored their migratory capacity. We conclude that aging shifts the balance of the Ang1/Ang2 network favouring a quiescent state. Activation of endothelial cells in aging might be necessary to enhance wound healing capacities. -- Highlights: •Endothelial cells display signs of aging before reaching proliferative senescence. •Aging endothelial cells express more angiopoietin 1 and less angiopoietin 2 than young endothelial cells. •Migratory capacity is reduced in aging endothelial cells.

  8. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  9. Dynamics of Caveolae in Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, Meron

    2005-03-01

    The blood flow subjects endothelial cells to various shear stress conditions, regulating the formation and localization of caveolae for macromolecular transport and potentially mechanosensing. We simulate this condition by exposing cultured bovine endothelial cells to various flow conditions in flow chambers. Using GFP-constructs of caveolar markers such as caveolin-1, dynamin II, and intersectin, we targeted caveolae with optical tweezers laser as probes to measure changes in viscoelastic properties that the cell undergoes in the different flow conditions. We also tracked the transport of fluorescently labeled Bovine serum albumin (BSA) through caveolae using confocal microscopy. This technique allows us to study the transport dynamics of caveolae once they are internalized in endothelial cells. Integrating optical tweezers and confocal fluorescence microscopy will allow us to measure the micro-mechanical properties of caveolae and give us insights into its function as a mechanosensor as well as its role in transcytosis.

  10. Proliferation status defines functional properties of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lipps, Christoph; Badar, Muhammad; Butueva, Milada; Dubich, Tatyana; Singh, Vivek Vikram; Rau, Sophie; Weber, Axel; Kracht, Michael; Köster, Mario; May, Tobias; Schulz, Thomas F; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Homeostasis of solid tissue is characterized by a low proliferative activity of differentiated cells while special conditions like tissue damage induce regeneration and proliferation. For some cell types it has been shown that various tissue-specific functions are missing in the proliferating state, raising the possibility that their proliferation is not compatible with a fully differentiated state. While endothelial cells are important players in regenerating tissue as well as in the vascularization of tumors, the impact of proliferation on their features remains elusive. To examine cell features in dependence of proliferation, we established human endothelial cell lines in which proliferation is tightly controlled by a doxycycline-dependent, synthetic regulatory unit. We observed that uptake of macromolecules and establishment of cell-cell contacts was more pronounced in the growth-arrested state. Tube-like structures were formed in vitro in both proliferating and non-proliferating conditions. However, functional vessel formation upon transplantation into immune-compromised mice was restricted to the proliferative state. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) infection resulted in reduced expression of endothelial markers. Upon transplantation of infected cells, drastic differences were observed: proliferation arrested cells acquired a high migratory activity while the proliferating counterparts established a tumor-like phenotype, similar to Kaposi Sarcoma lesions. The study gives evidence that proliferation governs endothelial functions. This suggests that several endothelial functions are differentially expressed during angiogenesis. Moreover, since proliferation defines the functional properties of cells upon infection with KSHV, this process crucially affects the fate of virus-infected cells.

  11. Multifactorial Optimizations for Directing Endothelial Fate from Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madfis, Nicole; Wong, Lian; Zamora, Jose; White, Nicholas; Reyes, Samuel; Burns, Andrew B.; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive in vitro models of vascular development, therapeutic angiogenesis, and tissue engineering. However, distinct ESC and iPS cell lines respond differentially to the same microenvironmental factors. Developing improved/optimized differentiation methodologies tailored/applicable in a number of distinct iPS and ESC lines remains a challenge in the field. Currently published methods for deriving endothelial cells (EC) robustly generate high numbers of endothlelial progenitor cells (EPC) within a week, but their maturation to definitive EC is much more difficult, taking up to 2 months and requiring additional purification. Therefore, we set out to examine combinations/levels of putative EC induction factors—utilizing our stage-specific chemically-defined derivation methodology in 4 ESC lines including: kinetics, cell seeding density, matrix signaling, as well as medium treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The results indicate that temporal development in both early and late stages is the most significant factor generating the desired cells. The generation of early Flk-1+/KDR+ vascular progenitor cells (VPC) from pluripotent ESC is directed predominantly by high cell seeding density and matrix signaling from fibronectin, while VEGF supplementation was NOT statistically significant in more than one cell line, especially with fibronectin matrix which sequesters autocrine VEGF production by the differentiating stem cells. Although some groups have shown that the GSK3-kinase inhibitor (CHIR) can facilitate EPC fate, it hindered the generation of KDR+ cells in our preoptimized medium formulations. The methods summarized here significantly increased the production of mature vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin+ EC, with up to 93% and 57% purity from mouse and human ESC, respectively, before VE-cadherin+ EC purification. PMID:27907001

  12. Microvesicles Derived from Indoxyl Sulfate Treated Endothelial Cells Induce Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Andres; Guerrero, Fatima; Buendia, Paula; Obrero, Teresa; Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a typical protein-bound uremic toxin that cannot be effectively cleared by conventional dialysis. Increased IS is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease and development of cardiovascular disease. After endothelial activation by IS, cells release endothelial microvesicles (EMV) that can induce endothelial dysfunction. We developed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by IS to evaluate the functional effect of EMV on the endothelial repair process developed by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). EMV derived from IS-treated endothelial cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized for miRNAs content. The effects of EMV on healthy EPCs in culture were studied. We observed that IS activates endothelial cells and the generated microvesicles (IsEMV) can modulate the classic endothelial roles of progenitor cells as colony forming units and form new vessels in vitro. Moreover, 23 miRNAs were contained in IsEMV including four (miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, miR-150-5p, and hsa-let-7i-5p) that were upregulated in IsEMV compared with control endothelial microvesicles. Other authors have found that miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, and miR-150-5p are involved in promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Interestingly, we observed an increase in NFκB and p53, and a decrease in IκBα in EPCs treated with IsEMV. Our data suggest that IS is capable of inducing endothelial vesiculation with different membrane characteristics, miRNAs and other molecules, which makes maintaining of vascular homeostasis of EPCs not fully functional. These specific characteristics of EMV could be used as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor signalling in endothelial cell survival: A role for NF{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, Jennifer . E-mail: Jennifer.grosjean@imperial.ac.uk; Kiriakidis, Serafim; Reilly, Kerri; Feldmann, Marc; Paleolog, Ewa

    2006-02-17

    Angiogenesis is the development of blood capillaries from pre-existing vessels. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of vessel growth and regression, and acts as an endothelial survival factor by protecting endothelial cells from apoptosis. Many genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis are regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) transcription factor family. This study aimed to address the hypothesis that VEGF-mediated survival effects on endothelium involve NF{kappa}B. Using an NF{kappa}B-luciferase reporter adenovirus, we observed activation of NF{kappa}B following VEGF treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and found to involve nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B sub-unit p65. However, NF{kappa}B activation occurred without degradation of inhibitory I{kappa}B proteins (I{kappa}B{alpha}, I{kappa}B{beta}, and I{kappa}B{epsilon}). Instead, tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} was observed following VEGF treatment, suggesting NF{kappa}B activation was mediated by degradation-independent dissociation of I{kappa}B{alpha} from NF{kappa}B. Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of either native I{kappa}B{alpha}, or of I{kappa}B{alpha} in which tyrosine residue 42 was mutated to phenylalanine, inhibited induction of NF{kappa}B-dependent luciferase activity in response to VEGF. Furthermore, VEGF-induced upregulation of mRNA for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell survival following serum withdrawal was reduced following I{kappa}B{alpha} over-expression. This study highlights that different molecular mechanisms of NF{kappa}B activation may be involved downstream of stimuli which activate the endothelial lining of blood vessels.

  14. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative stress has never been addressed. This is of crucial importance since smokers have a much higher risk for cerebrovascular stroke and tobacco smoke exposure has been clearly shown to enhance BBB damage following an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, the goal of our study was to investigate the defense pathways activated at the BBB endothelial level by TS exposure. Specifically we focused on Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B signaling response (NF-κβ) as the central protective mechanisms related to oxidative insult. With the exception of Nicotine, both full flavor (3R4F) and decotinized (ULN) cigarettes activated Nrf2 and NFκβ pathways in hCMEC/D3 endothelial cells. Several detoxification and anti-oxidant genes including downstream products were also activated including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1), catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), solute carrier-SLC7A11). Gene expression levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2S1 and CYP51A1) and efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multi-drug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) were also enhanced. Increase of P-gp functional activity and depletion of GSH were also observed. Strikingly, toxicity of denicotinized ("reduced exposure") cigarettes was equivalent to 3R4F (or worse). This study provides a detailed analysis of Nrf2-related cytoprotective mechanisms activated in response to 3R4F and ULN-derived TS exposure correlating the results with their

  15. Digital imaging of diabetic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltauf-Doburzynska, Jolanta; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2001-05-01

    Endothelial cells release factors that regulate dilatation and contraction of the vessels. They play an important role in modulating both the inflammatory response and vasomotor abnormalities that occur in coronary artery diseases. This endothelial function is associated with changes of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. For this study we used spatially and temporally resolved measurements of local Ca2+ concentration in human endothelial cells cultured in high glucose containing medium. Deconvolution techniques procedure allowed determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and its distribution into cellular compartments. We also used a confocal microscope for visualization of intracellular compartments (endoplasmatic reticulum, mitochondria) under normal and pathological conditions. We showed that the interrupted connection between superficial compartments and membrane channels is already the beginning of the cell damage in diabetes.

  16. Mechanical property quantification of endothelial cells using scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, A.; Brand, S.; Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Blase, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical properties of cells reflect dynamic changes of cellular organization which occur during physiologic activities like cell movement, cell volume regulation or cell division. Thus the study of cell mechanical properties can yield important information for understanding these physiologic activities. Endothelial cells form the thin inner lining of blood vessels in the cardiovascular system and are thus exposed to shear stress as well as tensile stress caused by the pulsatile blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction might occur due to reduced resistance to mechanical stress and is an initial step in the development of cardiovascular disease like, e.g., atherosclerosis. Therefore we investigated the mechanical properties of primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC) of different age using scanning acoustic microscopy at 1.2 GHz. The HUVECs are classified as young (tD < 90 h) and old (tD > 90 h) cells depending upon the generation time for the population doubling of the culture (tD). Longitudinal sound velocity and geometrical properties of cells (thickness) were determined using the material signature curve V(z) method for variable culture condition along spatial coordinates. The plane wave technique with normal incidence is assumed to solve two-dimensional wave equation. The size of the cells is modeled using multilayered (solid-fluid) system. The propagation of transversal wave and surface acoustic wave are neglected in soft matter analysis. The biomechanical properties of HUVEC cells are quantified in an age dependent manner.

  17. [Endothelial cell apoptosis in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2012-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common male diseases, which seriously affects the patient's quality of life. The risk factors of ED include aging, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and unhealthy lifestyle, and its exact mechanism remains unclear. The apoptosis of endothelial cells in the corpus cavernosum penis may reduce NOS activity, block NO synthesis, and affect penile erection, and the mechanisms of their apoptosis vary with different causes of ED. This article updates the relationship between the apoptosis of endothelial cells and the development of ED.

  18. Islet Endothelial Cells Derived From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    The islet endothelium comprises a specialized population of islet endothelial cells (IECs) expressing unique markers such as nephrin and α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) that are not found in endothelial cells in surrounding tissues. However, due to difficulties in isolating and maintaining a pure population of these cells, the information on these islet-specific cells is currently very limited. Interestingly, we have identified a large subpopulation of endothelial cells exhibiting IEC phenotype, while deriving insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These cells were identified by the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and were successfully isolated and subsequently expanded in endothelial cell culture medium. Further analysis demonstrated that the mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (mESC-ECs) not only express classical endothelial markers, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM1), thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but also IEC-specific markers such as nephrin and AAT. Moreover, mESC-ECs secrete basement membrane proteins such as collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin in culture and form tubular networks on a layer of Matrigel, demonstrating angiogenic activity. Further, mESC-ECs not only express eNOS, but also its eNOS expression is glucose dependent, which is another characteristic phenotype of IECs. With the ability to obtain highly purified IECs derived from pluripotent stem cells, it is possible to closely examine the function of these cells and their interaction with pancreatic β-cells during development and maturation in vitro. Further characterization of tissue-specific endothelial cell properties may enhance our ability to formulate new therapeutic angiogenic approaches for diabetes.

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  1. A Tie2-driven BAC-TRAP transgenic line for in vivo endothelial gene profiling.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Devi; Huang, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Recent technological innovations including bacterial artificial chromosome-based translating ribosome affinity purification (BAC-TRAP) have greatly facilitated analysis of cell type-specific gene expression in vivo, especially in the nervous system. To better study endothelial gene expression in vivo, we have generated a BAC-TRAP transgenic mouse line where the L10a ribosomal subunit is tagged with EGFP and placed under the control of the endothelium-specific Tie2 (Tek) promoter. We show that transgene expression in this line is widely, but specifically, detected in endothelial cells in several brain regions throughout pre- and postnatal development, as well as in other organs. We also show that this line results in highly significant enrichment of endothelium-specific mRNAs from brain tissues at different stages. This BAC-TRAP line therefore provides a useful genetic tool for in vivo endothelial gene profiling under various developmental, physiological, and pathological conditions. genesis 54:136-145, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Zebrafish Stromal Cells have Endothelial Properties and Support Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Troy C.; Glass, Tiffany J.; Somani, Arif; Nair, Sethu; Tolar, Jakub; Nyquist, Mick; Patrinostro, Xiaobai; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine if we could establish a mesenchymal stromal line from zebrafish that would support hematopoietic cells. Such a co-culture system would be a great benefit to study the hematopoietic cell-stromal cell interaction in both the in vitro and in vivo environments. Methods Zebrafish stromal cells, ZStrC, were isolated from the “mesenchymal” tissue of the caudal tail and expanded in a specialized growth media. ZStrC were evaluated for phenotype, gene expression, and the ability to maintain zebrafish marrow cells in co-culture experiments. Results ZStrC showed mesenchymal and endothelial gene expression. Although ZStrC lacked the ability to differentiate into classic MSC lineages (osteocytes, adipocytes, chondrocytes), they did have the capacity for endotube formation on matrigel and LDL-uptake. ZStrC supported marrow cells for greater than 2 weeks in vitro. Importantly, the marrow cells were shown to retain homing ability in adoptive transfer experiments. ZStrC also were shown to improve hematopoietic recovery after sub-lethal irradiation after adoptive transfer. Conclusion As the zebrafish model grows in popularity and importance in the study of hematopoiesis, new tools to aid in our understanding of the hematopoietic cell-stromal cell interaction are required. ZStrC represent an additional tool in the study of hematopoiesis and will be useful to understand the factors that mediate the stromal cell-hematopoietic cell interaction that are important in hematopoietic maintenance. PMID:21920471

  3. PC12 Cells Differentiate into Chromaffin Cell-Like Phenotype in Coculture with Adrenal Medullary Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrachi, Yaffa; Naranjo, Jose R.; Levi, Ben-Zion; Pollard, Harvey B.; Lelkes, Peter I.

    1990-08-01

    Previously we described specific in vitro interactions between PC12 cells, a cloned, catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma cell line derived from the rat adrenal medulla, and bovine adrenal medullary endothelial cells. We now demonstrate that these interactions induce the PC12 cells to acquire physical and biochemical characteristics reminiscent of chromaffin cells. Under coculture conditions involving direct cell-cell contact, the endothelial cells and the PC12 cells reduced their rates of proliferation; upon prolonged coculture PC12 cells clustered into nests of cells similar to the organization of chromaffin cells seen in vivo. Within 3 days in coculture with endothelial cells, but not with unrelated control cells, PC12 cells synthesized increased levels of [Met]enkephalin. In addition, PC12 cells, growing on confluent endothelial monolayers, failed to extend neurites in response to nerve growth factor. Neither medium conditioned by endothelial cells nor fixed endothelial cells could by themselves induce all of these different phenomena in the PC12 cells. These results suggest that under coculture conditions PC12 cells change their state of differentiation toward a chromaffin cell-like phenotype. The rapid, transient increase in the expression of the protooncogene c-fos suggests that the mechanism(s) inducing the change in the state of differentiation in PC12 cells in coculture with the endothelial cells may be distinct from that described for the differentiation of PC12 cells--e.g., by glucocorticoids. We propose that similar interactions between endothelial cells and chromaffin cell precursors may occur during embryonic development and that these interactions might be instrumental for the organ-specific differentiation of the adrenal medulla in vivo.

  4. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    PubMed

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  5. Characterization of bioeffects on endothelial cells under acoustic droplet vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bul, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), which result in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events leading to cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was exposed to ADV using a 3.5 MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional), and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The generated bubble cloud was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application. PMID:26403698

  6. Functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC) antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, a human blood–brain barrier model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the molecular basis and transport function of the human blood–brain barrier (BBB) is important for not only understanding human cerebral physiology, but also development of new central nervous system (CNS)-acting drugs. However, few studies have been done using human brain capillary endothelial cells, because human brain materials are difficult to obtain. The purpose of this study is to clarify the functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC) antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, which has been recently developed as an in vitro human BBB model. Methods Diphenhydramine, [3H]pyrilamine and oxycodone were used as cationic drugs that proved to be H+/OC antiporter substrates. The in vitro uptake experiments by hCMEC/D3 cells were carried out under several conditions. Results Diphenhydramine and [3H]pyrilamine were both transported into hCMEC/D3 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with Km values of 59 μM and 19 μM, respectively. Each inhibited uptake of the other in a competitive manner, suggesting that a common mechanism is involved in their transport. The diphenhydramine uptake was significantly inhibited by amantadine and quinidine, but not tetraethylammonium and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (substrates for well-known organic cation transporters). The uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors, but was insensitive to extracellular sodium and membrane potential. Further, the uptake was increased by extracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification. These transport properties are completely consistent with those of previously characterized H+/OC antiporter in rat BBB. Conclusions The present results suggest that H+/OC antiporter is functionally expressed in hCMEC/D3 cells. PMID:23351963

  7. Modulation of the sis Gene Transcript during Endothelial Cell Differentiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaye, Michael; McConathy, Evelyn; Drohan, William; Tong, Benton; Deuel, Thomas; Maciag, Thomas

    1985-05-01

    Endothelial cells, which line the interior walls of blood vessels, proliferate at the site of blood vessel injury. Knowledge of the factors that control the proliferation of these cells would help elucidate the role of endothelial cells in wound healing, tumor growth, and arteriosclerosis. In vitro, endothelial cells organize into viable, three-dimensional tubular structures in environments that limit cell proliferation. The process of endothelial cell organization was found to result in decreased levels of the sis messenger RNA transcript and increased levels of the messenger RNA transcript for fibronectin. This situation was reversed on transition from the organized structure to a proliferative monolayer. These results suggest a reciprocity for two biological response modifiers involved in the regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro.

  8. Regulation of endothelial cell differentiation and specification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all bl...

  9. Proinflammatory response of human endothelial cells to Brucella infection.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Bregante, Julieta; Delpino, M Victoria; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Baldi, Pablo C

    2011-09-01

    Although vascular pathologies such as vasculitis, endocarditis and mycotic aneurysms have been described in brucellosis patients, the interaction of Brucella with the endothelium has not been characterized. In this study we show that Brucella abortus and Brucella suis can infect and replicate in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in the microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1. Infection led to an increased production of IL-8, MCP-1 and IL-6 in HUVEC and HMEC-1 cells, and an increased expression of adhesion molecules (CD54 in both cells, CD106 and CD62E in HUVEC). Experiments with purified antigens from the bacterial outer membrane revealed that lipoproteins (Omp19) but not lipopolysaccharide mediate these proinflammatory responses. Infection of polarized HMEC-1 cells resulted in an increased capacity of these cells to promote the transmigration of neutrophils from the apical to the basolateral side of the monolayer, and the same phenomenon was observed when the cells were stimulated with live bacteria from the basolateral side. Overall, these results suggest that Brucella spp. can infect and survive within endothelial cells, and can induce a proinflammatory response that might be involved in the vascular manifestations of brucellosis. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Late outgrowth endothelial cells resemble mature endothelial cells and are not derived from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tura, Olga; Skinner, Elizabeth M; Barclay, G Robin; Samuel, Kay; Gallagher, Ronald C J; Brittan, Mairi; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Newby, David E; Turner, Marc L; Mills, Nicholas L

    2013-02-01

    A decade of research has sought to identify circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in order to harness their potential for cardiovascular regeneration. Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) most closely fulfil the criteria for an EPC, but their origin remains obscure. Our aim was to identify the source and precursor of EOC and to assess their regenerative potential compared to mature endothelial cells. EOC are readily isolated from umbilical cord blood (6/6 donors) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (4/6 donors) but not from bone marrow (0/6) or peripheral blood following mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (0/6 donors). Enrichment and depletion of blood mononuclear cells demonstrated that EOC are confined to the CD34(+)CD133(-)CD146(+) cell fraction. EOC derived from blood mononuclear cells are indistinguishable from mature human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by morphology, surface antigen expression, immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, proliferation, and functional assessments. In a subcutaneous sponge model of angiogenesis, both EOC and HUVEC contribute to de novo blood vessel formation giving rise to a similar number of vessels (7.0 ± 2.7 vs. 6.6 ± 3.7 vessels, respectively, n = 9). Bone marrow-derived outgrowth cells isolated under the same conditions expressed mesenchymal markers rather than endothelial cell markers and did not contribute to blood vessels in vivo. In this article, we confirm that EOC arise from CD34(+)CD133(-)CD146(+) mononuclear cells and are similar, if not identical, to mature endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that EOC do not arise from bone marrow and challenge the concept of a bone marrow-derived circulating precursor for endothelial cells. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Endothelial cells synthesize and process apolipoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, P; Vanni-Reyes, T; Goldberg, I J

    1996-06-21

    We reported previously that a 116-kDa lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-binding protein from endothelial cells has sequence homology to the amino-terminal region of apolipoprotein (apo) B. We now tested whether endothelial cells synthesize apoB mRNA and protein. Primers were designed to the human apoB cDNA sequence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed using total RNA isolated from bovine and human endothelial cells. With primers to the 5' region of the apoB mRNA (amino-terminal region of apoB protein) expected size PCR products were generated from both bovine and human endothelial cells as well as from mouse liver RNA, which was used as a control. Primers designed to the 3' region of apoB mRNA generated PCR products from human endothelial cells and HepG2 cells but not from bovine or mouse cells. These data suggest that endothelial cells contain full-length apoB mRNA and that the 5' or the amino-terminal region of apoB is highly conserved from mouse to human. This was confirmed by direct sequencing of the mouse and bovine PCR products. To test whether apoB protein was produced, bovine endothelial cell proteins were metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine/cysteine or [3H]leucine and immunoprecipitated with anti-human apoB antibodies. Using extracts from cells labeled for 1 h, monoclonal antibody 47, directed to the low density lipoprotein receptor binding region of apoB, precipitated a protein of approximate molecular mass 550,000, the size of full-length apoB. Immunoprecipitation of the 550-kDa protein was abolished in the presence of added unlabeled low density lipoprotein. From cells labeled for 16 h, a 116-kDa protein was immunoprecipitated by polyclonal anti-apoB antibodies. This protein was partly released from cells by heparin treatment. Pulse-chase analysis showed that the 116-kDa fragment appeared at the same time as the full-length apoB began disappearing. The immunoprecipitated 116-kDa fragment also bound labeled LPL on ligand blot

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of blood endothelial cells induces lymphatic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Patrick A; Brazeau, Elizabeth; Lagunoff, Michael

    2004-10-10

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is necessary for KS, a highly vascularized tumor predominated by endothelial-derived spindle cells that express markers of lymphatic endothelium. Following KSHV infection of TIME cells, an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (DMVEC) line, expression of many genes specific to lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR3, podoplanin, LYVE-1, and Prox-1, is significantly increased. Increases in VEGFR3 and podoplanin protein are also demonstrated following latent infection. Examination of cytokine secretion showed that KSHV infection significantly induces hIL-6 while strongly inhibiting secretion of IL-8, a gene product that is decreased by differentiation of blood to lymphatic endothelial cells. These studies support the hypotheses that latent KSHV infection of blood endothelial cells drives their differentiation to lymphatic endothelial cells.

  13. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  14. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Preface Endothelial cells lining blood vessel capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establish specialized vascular niches that deploy specific sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors, which actively participate in inducing, specifying, patterning, and guiding organ regeneration and maintaining homeostasis and metabolism. Angiocrine factors upregulated in response to injury orchestrates self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific repopulating resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the precise mechanisms whereby physiological-levels of angiocrine factors are spatially and temporally produced, and distributed by organotypic endothelium to repopulating cells, will lay the foundation for driving organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  16. Endothelial cells mediate the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Bailey, Alexis S.; Jiang, Shuguang; Liu, Bin; Goldman, Devorah C.; Fleming, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endothelial cells are a critical component of the normal hematopoietic microenvironment. Therefore, we sought to determine whether primary endothelial cells have the capacity to repair damaged hematopoietic stem cells. Highly purified populations of primary CD31+ microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the brain or lung did not express the pan hematopoietic marker CD45, hematopoietic lineage markers, or the progenitor marker c-kit and did not give rise hematopoietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Remarkably, the transplantation of small numbers of these microvascular endothelial cells consistently restored hematopoiesis following bone marrow lethal doses of irradiation. Analysis of the peripheral blood of rescued recipients demonstrated that both short term and long term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution was exclusively of host origin. Secondary transplantation studies revealed that microvascular endothelial cell-mediated hematopoietic regeneration also occurs at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell. These findings suggest a potential therapeutic role for microvascular endothelial cells in the self-renewal and repair of adult hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:19720572

  17. Endothelial cell regulation of leukocyte infiltration in inflammatory tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, A.; Introna, M.; Dejana, E.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important, active role in the onset and regulation of inflammatory and immune reactions. Through the production of chemokines they attract leukocytes and activate their adhesive receptors. This leads to the anchorage of leukocytes to the adhesive molecules expressed on the endothelial surface. Leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is frequently followed by their extravasation. The mechanisms which regulate the passage of leukocytes through endothelial clefts remain to be clarified. Many indirect data suggest that leukocytes might transfer signals to endothelial cells both through the release of active agents and adhesion to the endothelial cell surface. Adhesive molecules (such as PECAM) on the endothelial cell surface might also ‘direct’ leukocytes through the intercellular junction by haptotaxis. The information available on the molecular structure and functional properties of endothelial chemokines, adhesive molecules or junction organization is still fragmentary. Further work is needed to clarify how they interplay in regulating leukocyte infiltration into tissues. PMID:18475659

  18. High-mobility group box 1 protein is implicated in advanced glycation end products-induced vascular endothelial growth factor A production in the rat retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Jer; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Yang, I-Hui; Chou, Ming-Huei; Wu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yin-Chu; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has been reported to be a potent proangiogenic factor induced by inflammatory stress. In this study, we explore the role of HMGB1 in advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) production in rat retinal ganglion cell line 5 (RGC-5) cells. The VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels in conditioned medium of RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA) were examined with real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and BSA-treated cells were used as controls. The expression of HMGB1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was assessed with immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry measurements of peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), glycyrrhizin (GZ), and SP600125 were used to block ROS, HMGB1, and JNK, respectively. Compared with the BSA controls, the RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-BSA showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in VEGF-A mRNA and VEGF-A protein secretion in the supernatant, with the highest levels achieved at 24 h. AGE-BSA stimulated a significant release of HMGB1 in the supernatant and a significant increase of intracellular ROS production at 3 h. NAC blocked HMGB1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking with GZ, NAC, and JNK significantly suppressed AGE-induced VEGF-A production. HMGB1 is implicated in the production of VEGF-A in retinal ganglion cell line-5 (RGC-5). Blocking HMGB1, ROS, or the JNK pathway may attenuate VEGF-A production, suggesting HMGB1 and related signaling molecules play a role in diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Endothelial cells and cathepsins: biochemical and biomechanical regulation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Manu O.; Shockey, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsins are mechanosensitive proteases that are regulated not only by biochemical factors, but are also responsive to biomechanical forces in the cardiovascular system that regulate their expression and activity to participate in cardiovascular tissue remodeling. Their elastinolytic and collagenolytic activity have been implicated in atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and in heart valve disease, all of which are lined by endothelial cells that are the mechanosensitive monolayer of cells that sense and respond to fluid shear stress as the blood flows across the surfaces of the arteries and valve leaflets. Inflammatory cytokine signaling is integrated with biomechanical signaling pathways by the endothelial cells to transcribe, translate, and activate either the cysteine cathepsins to remodel the tissue or to express their inhibitors to maintain healthy cardiovascular tissue structure. Other cardiovascular diseases should now be included in the study of the cysteine cathepsin activation because of the additional biochemical cues they provide that merges with the already existing hemodynamics driving cardiovascular disease. Sickle cell disease causes a chronic inflammation including elevated TNFα and increased numbers of circulating monocytes that alter the biochemical stimulation while the more viscous red blood cells due to the sickling of hemoglobin alters the hemodynamics and is associated with accelerated elastin remodeling causing pediatric strokes. HIV-mediated cardiovascular disease also occurs earlier in than the broader population and the influence of HIV-proteins and antiretrovirals on endothelial cells must be considered to understand these accelerated mechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets for prevention. PMID:26458976

  20. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  1. Reduced Ang2 expression in aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, P J; Ebenbauer, B; Kaun, C; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Wojta, J

    2016-06-03

    Aging endothelial cells are characterized by increased cell size, reduced telomere length and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we describe here that aging reduces the migratory distance of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the quiescence protein Ang1 and a decrease of the endothelial activation protein Ang2 upon aging. Supplementing Ang2 to aged endothelial cells restored their migratory capacity. We conclude that aging shifts the balance of the Ang1/Ang2 network favouring a quiescent state. Activation of endothelial cells in aging might be necessary to enhance wound healing capacities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  3. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  4. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics.

  5. Mycobacteria entry and trafficking into endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Baltierra-Uribe, Shantal Lizbeth; García-Vásquez, Manuel de Jesús; Castrejón-Jiménez, Nayeli Shantal; Estrella-Piñón, Mayra Patricia; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; García-Pérez, Blanca Estela

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cells are susceptible to infection by mycobacteria, but the endocytic mechanisms that mycobacteria exploit to enter host cells and their mechanisms of intracellular transport are completely unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that the internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSM), and Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) is dependent on the cytoskeleton and is differentially inhibited by cytochalasin D, nocodazole, cycloheximide, wortmannin, and amiloride. Using confocal microscopy, we investigated their endosomal trafficking by analyzing Rab5, Rab7, LAMP-1, and cathepsin D. Our results suggest that MSM exploits macropinocytosis to enter endothelial cells and that the vacuoles containing these bacteria fuse with lysosomes. Conversely, the entry of MTB seems to depend on more than one endocytic route, and the observation that only a subset of the intracellular bacilli was associated with phagolysosomes suggests that these bacteria are able to inhibit endosomal maturation to persist intracellularly. The route of entry for MAB depends mainly on microtubules, which suggests that MAB uses a different trafficking pathway. However, MAB is also able to inhibit endosomal maturation and can replicate intracellularly. Together, these findings provide the first evidence that mycobacteria modulate proteins of host endothelial cells to enter and persist within these cells.

  6. Measurements of endothelial cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate gaps and micromechanical properties of endothelial cells during monocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Noriyuki; Iwaki, Kanso; Hashimoto, Ken; Mochizuki, Seiichi; Ogasawara, Yasuo; Sato, Masaaki; Tsujioka, Katsuhiko; Kajiya, Fumihiko

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between monocytes and endothelial cells is considered to play a major role in the early stage of atherosclerosis, and the involved endothelial cell micromechanics may provide us with important aspects of atherogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated (i) the endothelial cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate gaps with the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing system, which can detect the nanometer order changes of cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate distances separately, and (ii) the endothelial cell micromechanical properties with an atomic force microscope after application of monocytes to endothelial cells. Application of monocytic THP-1 cells to IL-1β-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells immediately decreased the electrical resistance of the endothelial cell-to-substrate (increase of the cell-to-substrate gap), whereas the endothelial cell-to-cell resistance (cell-to-cell gap) did not change. The elastic modulus of the endothelial cells decreased after 2-h monocyte application, indicating an increase of endothelial cell deformability. In conclusion, the interaction of the monocytes to the endothelial cells reduced the adhesiveness to the substrate and increased the deformability of endothelial cells. These changes in the adhesiveness and the deformability may facilitate migration of monocytes, a key process of atherogenesis in the later stage. PMID:12434019

  7. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells.

  8. Microenvironmental Regulation of the Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Phenotype In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    March, Sandra; Hui, Elliot E.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Khetani, Salman; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2010-01-01

    Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells (LSEC) differ, both structurally and functionally, from endothelial cells (EC) lining blood vessels of other tissues. For example, in contrast to other EC, LSEC posses fenestrations, have low detectable levels of PECAM-1 expression, and in rat tissue, they distinctively express a cell surface marker recognized by the SE-1 antibody. These unique phenotypic characteristics seen in hepatic tissue are lost over time upon culture in vitro; therefore, this study sought to systematically examine the effects of microenvironmental stimuli, namely, extracellular matrix (ECM) and neighboring cells, on the LSEC phenotype in vitro. In probing the role of the underlying extracellular matrix, we identified collagen I and collagen III as well as mixtures of collagen I/collagen IV/fibronectin as having a positive effect on LSEC survival. Furthermore, using a stable hepatocellular model (hepatocyte-fibroblast) we were able to prolong the expression of both SE-1 and phenotypic functions of LSEC such as Factor VIII activity in co-cultured LSECs through the production of short-range paracrine signals. In the course of these experiments, we identified the antigen recognized by SE-1 as CD32b. Collectively, this study has identified several microenvironmental regulators of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells that prolong their phenotypic functions for up to 2 weeks in culture, enabling the development of better in vitro models of liver physiology and disease. PMID:19585615

  9. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Vindigni, Giulia; Testa, Barbara; Raniolo, Sofia; Fasciglione, Giovanni Francesco; Coletta, Massimiliano; Biocca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding.

  10. Arecoline is cytotoxic for human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mafaz; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, Elizabeth; Boadle, Ross; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis is a pre-malignant fibrotic condition caused by areca nut use and involves reduced mucosal vascularity. Arecoline is the principal areca nut alkaloid and is cytotoxic for epithelium and fibroblasts. Endothelial cell cycle arrest is reported on exposure to arecoline, as is cytotoxicity for endothelial-lung carcinoma hybrid cells. We here describe cytotoxicity for primary human endothelial cultures from seven separate donors. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of arecoline and examined by: phase-contrast microscopy, haemocytometer counts, transmission electron microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assay. Vacuolation and detachment of endothelium were observed at and above arecoline concentrations of 333 μg/ml or more. Ultrastructural features of cellular stress were seen after 24-h treatment with 111 μg/ml arecoline and included reduced ribosomal studding of endoplasmic reticulum, increased autophagolysosomal structures, increased vacuolation and reduced mitochondrial cristae with slight swelling. Similar changes were seen at 4 h with arecoline at 333 μg/ml or above, but with more severe mitochondrial changes including increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix and greater cristal swelling, while by 24 h, these cells were frankly necrotic. Haemocytometer counts were paralleled by both lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assays. Arecoline is cytotoxic via necrosis for endothelium, while biochemical assays indicate no appreciable cellular leakage before death and detachment, as well as no clear effect on mitochondrial function in viable cells. Arecoline toxicity may thus contribute to reduced vascularity in oral submucous fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Universal cancer vaccine: an update on the design of cancer vaccines generated from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2013-07-01

    Among the potential cancer immunotherapies, vaccination against antigens expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive options because this approach may prevent the growth of any solid tumor. Therefore, endothelial cells can be used as a source of antigens for developing a so-called "universal" cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, efficient endothelial cell-based cancer vaccines have not yet been developed because previous approaches utilized direct endothelial cell immunizations which is not effective and can result in the elicitation of autoimmune responses associated with systemic autoimmune vasculitis. Recently, the heterogeneity of the endothelial cell surface was defined using an in vitro system as a means of developing antiangiogenic cancer vaccines. This analysis demonstrated that tumors induced specific changes to the microvascular of human endothelial cell (HMEC) surface thereby providing a basis for the design of endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target the tumor endothelium. (1) This commentary further describes HMEC heterogeneity from the perspective of designing an endothelial cell-based universal (for the treatment of all solid tumors) cancer vaccine with high immunogenicity that does not pose the risk of eliciting autoimmunity.

  12. Endothelial cell lesion in preeclampsia. Morphofunctional study using umbilical endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gilabert, R; Bellart, J; Jové, M; Miralles, R M; Piera, V

    1999-01-01

    Morphofunctional study of umbilical cords from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia shows both activation and lesion of endothelium. The cellular findings in umbilical cords from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia can be summarized as: (i) higher number of cells with secretion bladders and increase in the number and size of both secretion bladders and microvilli-like protrusions; (ii) increase in collagen, fibrin, fibronectin and lipidic vesicles in the vessel wall; (iii) vacuolization of endothelial cells; (iv) presence of lipidic vacuoles and lipophages in the vessel wall; (v) erosion and disorganisation of the endothelium that exposes extracellular proteins to the blood flow. Endothelial cell cultures from preeclamptic pregnancies show kinetic disorders and cell detachment. The results confirm that an endothelial cell lesion occurs in preeclampsia and this cellular disorder can be reproduced in vitro.

  13. Collective cell motion in endothelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, A.; Ünnep, R.; Méhes, E.; Twal, W. O.; Argraves, S. W.; Cao, Y.; Czirók, A.

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell motility is an important aspect of several developmental and pathophysiological processes. Despite its importance, the mechanisms that allow cells to be both motile and adhere to one another are poorly understood. In this study we establish statistical properties of the random streaming behavior of endothelial monolayer cultures. To understand the reported empirical findings, we expand the widely used cellular Potts model to include active cell motility. For spontaneous directed motility we assume a positive feedback between cell displacements and cell polarity. The resulting model is studied with computer simulations, and is shown to exhibit behavior compatible with experimental findings. In particular, in monolayer cultures both the speed and persistence of cell motion decreases, transient cell chains move together as groups, and velocity correlations extend over several cell diameters. As active cell motility is ubiquitous both in vitro and in vivo, our model is expected to be a generally applicable representation of cellular behavior. PMID:21076204

  14. Arterial identity of endothelial cells is controlled by local cues.

    PubMed

    Othman-Hassan, K; Patel, K; Papoutsi, M; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Christ, B; Wilting, J

    2001-09-15

    The ephrins and their Eph receptors comprise the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Studies on mice have revealed an important function of ephrin-B2 and Eph-B4 for the development of the arterial and venous vasculature, respectively, but the mechanisms regulating their expression have not been studied yet. We have cloned a chick ephrin-B2 cDNA probe. Expression was observed in endothelial cells of extra- and intraembryonic arteries and arterioles in all embryos studied from day 2 (stage 10 HH, before perfusion of the vessels) to day 16. Additionally, expression was found in the somites and neural tube in early stages, and later also in the smooth muscle cells of the aorta, parts of the Müllerian duct, dosal neural tube, and joints of the limbs. We isolated endothelial cells from the internal carotid artery and the vena cava of 14-day-old quail embryos and grafted them separately into day-3 chick embryos. Reincubation was performed until day 6 and the quail endothelial cells were identified with the QH1 antibody. The grafted arterial and venous endothelial cells expressed ephrin-B2 when they integrated into the lining of arteries. Cells that were not integrated into vessels, or into vessels other than arteries, were ephrin-B2-negative. The studies show that the expression of the arterial marker ephrin-B2 is controlled by local cues in arterial vessels of older embryos. Physical forces or the media smooth muscle cells may be involved in this process.

  15. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB.

  16. Adhesion of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells on peptide-linked polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cooper, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    The initial adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cord blood endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (HBOECs) was studied under radial flow conditions. The surface of a variable shear-rate device was either coated with polymer films or covered by synthetic fibers. Spin-coating was applied to produce smooth polymer films, while fibrous scaffolds were generated by electrospinning. The polymer was composed of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA), and CGRGDS peptide. The peptide was incorporated into the polymer system by coupling to an acrylate-PEG-N-hydroxysuccinimide comonomer. A shear-rate-dependent increase of the attached cells with time was observed with all cell types. The adhesion of ECs increased on RGD-linked polymer surfaces compared to polymers without adhesive peptides. The number of attached ECFCs and HBOECs are significantly higher than that of HUVECs within the entire shear-rate range and surfaces examined, especially on RGD-linked polymers at low shear rates. Their superior adhesion ability of endothelial progenitor cells under flow conditions suggests they are a promising source for in vivo seeding of vascular grafts and shows the potential to be used for self-endothelialized implants.

  17. Amyloid β induces adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and affects endothelial viability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Kuriwada, Satoko; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) might mediate the adhesion of erythrocytes to the endothelium which could disrupt the properties of endothelial cells. We provide evidence here that Aβ actually induced the binding of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and decreased endothelial viability, perhaps by the generation of oxidative and inflammatory stress. These changes are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  19. Exosomes derived from endothelial progenitor cells attenuate vascular repair and accelerate reendothelialization by enhancing endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaocong; Chen, Chunyuan; Wei, Liming; Li, Qing; Niu, Xin; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Jungong

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes, a key component of cell paracrine secretion, can exert protective effects in various disease models. However, application of exosomes in vascular repair and regeneration has rarely been reported. In this study, we tested whether endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-derived exosomes possessed therapeutic effects in rat models of balloon-induced vascular injury by accelerating reendothelialization. Exosomes were obtained from the conditioned media of EPCs isolated from human umbilical cord blood. Induction of the endothelial injury was performed in the rats' carotid artery, and the pro-re-endothelialization capacity of EPC-derived exosomes was measured. The in vitro effects of exosomes on the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells were investigated. We found that the EPC-derived exosomes accelerated the re-endothelialization in the early phase after endothelial damage in the rat carotid artery. We also demonstrated that these exosomes enhanced the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, endothelial cells stimulated with these exosomes showed increased expression of angiogenesis-related molecules. Taken together, our results indicate that exosomes are an active component of the paracrine secretion of human EPCs and can promote vascular repair in rat models of balloon injury by up-regulating endothelial cells function. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Filamin B Plays a Key Role in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-induced Endothelial Cell Motility through Its Interaction with Rac-1 and Vav-2*

    PubMed Central

    del Valle-Pérez, Beatriz; Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Lacasa-Salavert, Cristina; Figueras, Agnès; Shapiro, Sandor S.; Takafuta, Toshiro; Casanovas, Oriol; Capellà, Gabriel; Ventura, Francesc; Viñals, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins filamin A (FLNA) and B (FLNB) are expressed in endothelial cells and play an essential role during vascular development. In order to investigate their role in adult endothelial cell function, we initially confirmed their expression pattern in different adult mouse tissues and cultured cell lines and found that FLNB expression is concentrated mainly in endothelial cells, whereas FLNA is more ubiquitously expressed. Functionally, small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous FLNB in human umbilical vein endothelial cells inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced in vitro angiogenesis by decreasing endothelial cell migration capacity, whereas FLNA ablation did not alter these parameters. Moreover, FLNB-depleted cells increased their substrate adhesion with more focal adhesions. The molecular mechanism underlying this effect implicates modulation of small GTP-binding protein Rac-1 localization and activity, with altered activation of its downstream effectors p21 protein Cdc42/Rac-activated kinase (PAK)-4/5/6 and its activating guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav-2. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a signaling complex, including FLNB, Rac-1, and Vav-2, under basal conditions that would further interact with VEGFR2 and integrin αvβ5 after VEGF stimulation. In conclusion, our results reveal a crucial role for FLNB in endothelial cell migration and in the angiogenic process in adult endothelial cells. PMID:20110358

  1. Circulating endothelial cells: a new biomarker of endothelial dysfunction in hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-08-01

    The endothelium and its integrity are in the center of numerous cardiovascular, pulmonary and tumoral diseases. Several studies identified different circulating cellular sub-populations, which allow a noninvasive exploration of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, angiogenesis plays a major role in the biology of benign and malignant hematologic diseases. Among these biomarkers, circulating endothelial cells could be considered as a marker of endothelial injury and/or endothelial activation as well as vascular remodeling, whereas circulating endothelial progenitor cells would be only involved in the vascular regeneration. In the future, the quantification of circulating endothelial cells in many diseases could be a noninvasive biomarker used in diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic follow-up of lung vasculopathy and/or residual disease of hematological malignancies.

  2. In vitro endothelial cell susceptibility to xenobiotics: comparison of three cell types.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Fernandez, P; Bareille, R; Beneteau, M; Bourget, C; Cambar, J; Bordenave, L

    2005-03-01

    In three different endothelial cell (EC) cultures (primary human umbilical cord vein, so-called HUVEC; and immortalized cell lines HBMEC and EA-hy-926), the effects of different xenobiotics were studied in order to standardize vascular EC models for in vitro pharmacotoxicological studies. Cell characteristics were first investigated by the production and the mRNA levels of known endothelial markers in the three EC culture models. EC secretory products, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and von Willebrand factor (vWF), were present in the supernatant of the immortalized cell lines. The mRNA levels of vWF, tPA, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31), and beta -integrin subunit, which are involved in the control of platelet function, coagulation, and fibrinolysis as well as in cell-matrix interactions, were investigated in all EC types. For at least three parameters, cultured cells provided marked characteristics of EC phenotype, in HUVEC and in immortalized cell lines, regardless of their origin from the macro- or microcirculation. Toxicity experiments were assessed after 24 h exposure to cadmium, cyclosporin A and cisplatin by MTT assay. These experiments show nonsignificant difference in susceptibility to cyclosporin A and cadmium on HUVEC, HBMEC, and EA-hy-926. However, HBMEC, seems to be highly susceptible to cisplatin compared to HUVEC, the latter being more sensitive than EA-hy-926. For experiments conducted with cyclosporin and cadmium, cell lines could constitute an alternative material for routine cytotoxicity studies.

  3. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  4. Transient disruptions of aortic endothelial cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q C; McNeil, P L

    1992-12-01

    Cells of gut, skin, and muscle frequently suffer transient survivable plasma membrane disruptions ("wounds") under physiological conditions, but it is not known whether endothelial cells of the aorta, which are constantly exposed to hemodynamically generated mechanical forces, similarly are injured in vivo. We have used serum albumin as a molecular probe for identifying endothelial cells of the rat aorta that incurred and survived transient plasma membrane wounds in vivo. Such wounded endothelial cells were in fact observed in the aortas of all rats examined. However, the percentage of wounded cells in the total aortic endothelial population varied remarkably between individuals ranging from 1.4% to 17.9% with a mean of 6.5% (+/- 4.6% SD). Wounded endothelial cells were heterogeneously distributed, being found in distinct clusters often in the shape of streaks aligned with the long axis of the vessel, or in the shape of partial or complete rims surrounding bifurcation openings, such as the ostia of the intercostal arteries. Physical exercise (running) did not increase the frequency of aortic endothelial cell membrane wounding, nor did spontaneous hypertension. Surprisingly, 80% of mitotic endothelial cell figures were identified as wounded. This article identified a previously unrecognized form of endothelial cell injury, survivable disruptions of the plasma membrane, and shows that injury to the endothelial cells of the normal aorta is far more commonplace than previously suspected. Plasma membrane wounding of endothelial cells could be linked to the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  5. Cell line provenance.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R Ian

    2002-07-01

    Cultured cell lines have become an extremely valuable resource, both in academic research and in industrial biotechnology. However, their value is frequently compromised by misidentification and undetected microbial contamination. As detailed elsewhere in this volume, the technology, both simple and sophisticated, is available to remedy the problems of misidentification and contamination, given the will to apply it. Combined with proper records of the origin and history of the cell line, assays for authentication and contamination contribute to the provenance of the cell line. Detailed records should start from the initiation or receipt of the cell line, and should incorporate data on the donor as well as the tissue from which the cell line was derived, should continue with details of maintenance, and include any accidental as well as deliberate deviations from normal maintenance. Records should also contain details of authentication and regular checks for contamination. With this information, preferably stored in a database, and suitable backed up, the provenance of the cell line so created makes the cell line a much more valuable resource, fit for validation in industrial applications and more likely to provide reproducible experimental results when disseminated for research in other laboratories.

  6. Biomechanics and Intracellular Dynamics of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the internal mechanical properties of living cells is essential to gain insight to basic cellular functions ranging from cellular signal transduction, intracellular traffics to cell motility. Vascular endothelial cells form a single cell layer that lines all blood vessels and serves to regulate exchanges between the blood stream and the surrounding tissues. Endothelial cells are one of the most studied cell types because of their roles in cardiovascular diseases and the linkage between their growth control and strategies of cancer treatments. This talk reports the application of a novel methodology by which scientists can explore cellular functions and study cytoskeleton dynamics of living cells at the subcellular level with minimal invasion. The methodology is based on the realization that optical tweezers can be used to measure the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton in the vicinity of organelles and cellular structures. Optical tweezers is a technique based on the physics that dielectric materials, such as silica beads, latex particles or protein aggregates are attracted to and thus trapped at the focal point of a tightly focused laser beam in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that viscoelasticity can be determined from the movements of the trapped object in an oscillating optical tweezers. Applying the oscillating tweezers to intracellular cellular structures, we were able to determine the frequency dependent mechanical properties of the interior of cultured bovine endothelial cells. In contrast to the viscoelastic behavior expected of a network of cytoskelatal proteins, we found unusually large fluctuations in both elastic and loss moduli of the cell interior. More surprisingly, both mechanical moduli showed rhythmic behavior with a periodicity in the range of 20 - 30 seconds in healthy living cells. The rhythm could be altered by drug treatments, and the amplitude of the fluctuations diminished when cells were depleted of nutrients

  7. Plasticity of human dedifferentiated adipocytes toward endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Antonella; Maurizi, Giulia; Anastasi, Sara; Mondini, Eleonora; Mattiucci, Domenico; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Tiberi, Fabiola; Mancini, Stefania; Partelli, Stefano; Maurizi, Angela; Cinti, Saverio; Olivieri, Attilio; Leoni, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    The process of cellular differentiation in terminally differentiated cells is thought to be irreversible, and these cells are thought to be incapable of differentiating into distinct cell lineages. Our previous study showed that mature adipocytes represent an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells. Here, results showed the capacity of mature adipocytes to differentiate into endothelial-like cells, using the ability of these cells to revert into an immature phase without any relievable chromosomal alterations. Mature adipocytes were isolated from human omental and subcutaneous fat and were dedifferentiated in vitro. The resulting cells were subcultivated for endothelial differentiation and were analyzed for their expression of specific genes and proteins. Endothelial-like cells were harvested from the differentiation medium and were traditionally cultured to evaluate the endothelial markers and the karyotype. Cells cultured in specific medium formed tube-like structures and expressed several endothelial marker genes and proteins. The endothelial-like cells expressed significantly higher levels of vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial cadherin, Von Willebrand factor, and CD133 than the untreated cells. These cells were positively stained for CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin, markers of mature endothelial cells. Moreover, the low-density lipoprotein-uptake assay demonstrated a functionally endothelial differentiation of these cells. When these cells were harvested and reseeded in basal medium, they lost the endothelial markers and reacquired the typical mesenchymal stem cell markers and the ability to expand in a short time period. Moreover, karyotype analysis showed that these cells reverted into an immature phase without any karyotype alterations. In conclusion, the results showed that adipocytes exhibited a great plasticity toward the endothelial lineage, suggesting their possible use in cell therapy applications for

  8. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  9. NGF and NGF-receptor expression of cultured immortalized human corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sornelli, Federica; Lambiase, Alessandro; Mantelli, Flavio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several growth factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play an important role in the homeostasis of the ocular surface. The involvement of both these growth factors in the pathophysiology of intraocular tissues has been extensively investigated. Despite the expression of NGF receptors by corneal endothelium, to date the role of NGF on the endothelial cell remains to be determined. Using a clonal cell line of human corneal endothelial cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the NGF-receptor and the potential partnership of NGF and VEGF in maintaining cell viability in vitro. Methods A human endothelial cell line (B4G12), was cultured under serum-free conditions as previously described with and without addition of different concentrations of NGF, anti-NGF-antibody (ANA), or VEGF for 4 days and these cells were used for immuno-istochemical, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Results NGF induces overexpression of NGF-receptors and synthesis and release of VEGF by endothelial cells and these cells are able to produce and secrete NGF. Conclusions These observations indicate that human corneal endothelial cells are receptive to the action of NGF and that these cells may regulate NGF activity through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. PMID:20680101

  10. Imbalance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk in isocyanate mediated pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction☆

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Hariom; Jain, Deepika; Khan, Saba; Pathak, Neelam; Raghuram, Gorantla V.; Bhargava, Arpit; Banerjee, Smita; Mishra, Pradyumna K.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic investigations coupled with epidemiology, case-control, cohort and observational studies have increasingly linked isocyanate exposure (both chronic and acute) with pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Though ascribed for impairment in endothelial cell function, molecular mechanisms of these significant adverse pulmonary outcomes remains poorly understood. As preliminary studies conducted in past have failed to demonstrate a cause-effect relationship between isocyanate toxicity and compromised pulmonary endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that direct exposure to isocyanate may disrupt endothelial structural lining, resulting in cellular damage. Based on this premise, we comprehensively evaluated the molecular repercussions of methyl isocyanate (MIC) exposure on human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAE-26). We examined MIC-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine response, oxidative DNA damage response and apoptotic index. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MIC, augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, depletion in antioxidant defense enzymes, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response and induced endothelial cell apoptosis via affecting the balance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk. We herein delineate the first and direct molecular cascade of isocyanate-induced pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. The results of our study might portray a connective link between associated respiratory morbidities with isocyanate exposure, and indeed facilitate to discern the exposure-phenotype relationship in observed deficits of pulmonary endothelial cell function. Further, understanding of inter- and intra-cellular signaling pathways involved in isocyanate-induced endothelial damage would not only aid in biomarker identification but also provide potential new avenues to target specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:24024149

  11. Imbalance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk in isocyanate mediated pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Jain, Deepika; Khan, Saba; Pathak, Neelam; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Bhargava, Arpit; Banerjee, Smita; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic investigations coupled with epidemiology, case-control, cohort and observational studies have increasingly linked isocyanate exposure (both chronic and acute) with pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Though ascribed for impairment in endothelial cell function, molecular mechanisms of these significant adverse pulmonary outcomes remains poorly understood. As preliminary studies conducted in past have failed to demonstrate a cause-effect relationship between isocyanate toxicity and compromised pulmonary endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that direct exposure to isocyanate may disrupt endothelial structural lining, resulting in cellular damage. Based on this premise, we comprehensively evaluated the molecular repercussions of methyl isocyanate (MIC) exposure on human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAE-26). We examined MIC-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine response, oxidative DNA damage response and apoptotic index. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MIC, augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, depletion in antioxidant defense enzymes, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response and induced endothelial cell apoptosis via affecting the balance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk. We herein delineate the first and direct molecular cascade of isocyanate-induced pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. The results of our study might portray a connective link between associated respiratory morbidities with isocyanate exposure, and indeed facilitate to discern the exposure-phenotype relationship in observed deficits of pulmonary endothelial cell function. Further, understanding of inter- and intra-cellular signaling pathways involved in isocyanate-induced endothelial damage would not only aid in biomarker identification but also provide potential new avenues to target specific therapeutic interventions.

  12. Cell trafficking of endothelial progenitor cells in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2013-07-01

    Blood vessel formation plays an essential role in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including normal tissue growth and healing, as well as tumor progression. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a subtype of stem cells with high proliferative potential that are capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells, thus contributing to neovascularization in tumors. In response to tumor-secreted cytokines, EPCs mobilize from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, home to the tumor site, and differentiate to mature endothelial cells and secrete proangiogenic factors to facilitate vascularization of tumors. In this review, we summarize the expression of surface markers, cytokines, receptors, adhesion molecules, proteases, and cell signaling mechanisms involved in the different steps (mobilization, homing, and differentiation) of EPC trafficking from the bone marrow to the tumor site. Understanding the biologic mechanisms of EPC cell trafficking opens a window for new therapeutic targets in cancer.

  13. KRIT1 protein depletion modifies endothelial cell behavior via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Kuebel, Julia M; Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-11-21

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1(+/-) mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1.

  14. Endothelial cell metabolism in normal and diseased vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Eelen, Guy; de Zeeuw, Pauline; Simons, Michael; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Higher organisms rely on a closed cardiovascular circulatory system with blood vessels supplying vital nutrients and oxygen to distant tissues. Not surprisingly, vascular pathologies rank among the most life-threatening diseases. At the crux of most of these vascular pathologies are (dysfunctional) endothelial cells (ECs), the cells lining the blood vessel lumen. ECs display the remarkable capability to switch rapidly from a quiescent state to a highly migratory and proliferative state during vessel sprouting. This angiogenic switch has long been considered to be dictated by angiogenic growth factors (eg vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF) and other signals (eg Notch) alone, but recent findings show that it is also driven by a metabolic switch in ECs. Furthermore, these changes in metabolism may even override signals inducing vessel sprouting. Here, we review how EC metabolism differs between the normal and dysfunctional/diseased vasculature and how it relates to or impacts the metabolism of other cell types contributing to the pathology. We focus on the biology of ECs in tumor blood vessel and diabetic ECs in atherosclerosis as examples of the role of endothelial metabolism in key pathological processes. Finally, current as well as unexplored ‘EC metabolism’-centric therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:25814684

  15. Toxicity of fatty acids on ECV-304 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laureane Nunes; Portioli-Sanches, Erica Paula; Lima-Salgado, Thaís Martins; Curi, Rui

    2011-12-01

    The effects of stearic (saturated) or oleic (monounsaturated) acids and their combination with ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on death of endothelial cells (ECV-304 cell line) were investigated. We examined: loss of plasma membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation, accumulation of neutral lipids (NL) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The fatty acids studied were: stearic (SA), oleic (OA), docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), linoleic (LA) and gamma-linolenic (γA) acids. SA at 150 μM induced cell death, did not lead to accumulation of NL and raised the release of ROS. ω-3 PUFA decreased ROS production, increased NL content but did not protect against ECV-304 cell death induced by SA. ω-6 PUFA inhibited SA-induced cell death, increased NL content and decreased ROS production. OA caused cell death but did not increase NL content and ROS production even at 300 μM. ω-3 and ω-6 FA associated with OA further increased cell death with no change in ROS production and NL content. Concluding, ω-6 PUFA had a greater protective effect than ω-3 PUFA on the deleterious effects caused by SA whereas OA had low cytotoxicity but, when associated with PUFA, presented marked toxic effects on ECV-304 endothelial cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of an endothelial cell mimicking surface containing thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, Karl Erich

    Synthetic materials for use in blood contacting applications have been studied for many years with limited success. One of the main areas of need for these materials is the design of synthetic vascular grafts for use in the hundreds of thousands of patients who have coronary artery bypass grafting, many without suitable veins for autologous grafts. The design of these grafts is constrained by two common modes of failure, the formation of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and thrombosis. IH formation has been previously linked to a mismatching of the mechanical properties of the graft and has been overcome by creating grafts using materials whose compliance mimics that of the native artery. Several techniques and surface modification have been designed to limit thrombosis on the surface of synthetic materials. One which has shown the greatest promise is the immobilization of Thrombomodulin (TM), a protein found on the endothelial cell membrane lining native blood vessels involved in the activation of the anticoagulant Protein C (PC). While TM immobilization has been shown to arrest thrombin formation and limit fibrous formations in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, it has shown to be transport limiting under arterial flow. On the endothelial cell surface, TM is co-localized with Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR), which increases PC transport onto the cell surface and increases PC activation via TM between 20-100 fold. This dissertation will describe the chemical modification of medical grade polyurethane (PU), whose compliance has been shown to match that of native arteries. This modification will enable the immobilization of two proteins on an enzymatically relevant scale estimated at less than 10 nm. This dissertation will further describe the immobilization of the proteins TM and EPCR, and analyze the ability of a surface co-immobilized with these proteins to activate the anticoagulant PC. Finally, it will compare the ability of this co-immobilized surface to delay

  17. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Sarah; Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung.

  18. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung. PMID:28913354

  19. Endothelial Cell Dynamics during Anastomosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Santana, Anthony; Shan, Mengrou; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anastomosis –the fusion of vessels from two distinct branches of the vascular system – represents a critical step in vascular growth under both healthy and pathological conditions, in vivo, and presents an important target for engineering of vascularized tissues, in vitro. Recent works in animal models have advanced our understanding of the molecular and cellular players in vascular anastomosis, but questions remain related to cellular dynamics and control of this process, in vitro. In this study, we exploited a three-dimensional (3-D) culture platform to examine the dynamics of endothelial cell (EC) during and after vascular anastomosis by allowing angiogenesis and vasculogenesis to proceed in parallel. We show that anastomosis occurs between sprouts formed by angiogenesis from an endothelium and tubes formed by vasculogenesis in the bulk of a 3-D matrix. This fusion leads to highly connected vessels that span from the surface of the matrix into the bulk in a manner that depends on cell density and identity. Further, we observe and analyze intermixing of endothelial cells of distinct origin (surface versus bulk) within the vessels structures that are formed; we provide evidence that the cells migrate along pre-existing vessels segments as part of this intermixing process. We conclude that anastomosis can occur between vessels emerging by angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and that this process may play an important role in contexts such as wound healing. PMID:25790315

  20. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions.

  1. Angiogenesis in Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gaoyuan; Fehrenbach, Melane L.; Williams, James T.; Finklestein, Jeffrey M.; Zhu, Jing-Xu; DeLisser, Horace M.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 has been previously implicated in endothelial cell migration; additionally, anti-PECAM-1 antibodies have been shown to inhibit in vivo angiogenesis. Studies were therefore performed with PECAM-1-null mice to further define the involvement of PECAM-1 in blood vessel formation. Vascularization of subcutaneous Matrigel implants as well as tumor angiogenesis were both inhibited in PECAM-1-null mice. Reciprocal bone marrow transplants that involved both wild-type and PECAM-1-deficient mice revealed that the impaired angiogenic response resulted from a loss of endothelial, but not leukocyte, PECAM-1. In vitro wound migration and single-cell motility by PECAM-1-null endothelial cells were also compromised. In addition, filopodia formation, a feature of motile cells, was inhibited in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells as well as in human endothelial cells treated with either anti-PECAM-1 antibody or PECAM-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of PECAM-1 promoted filopodia formation and increased the protein expression levels of Cdc42, a Rho GTPase that is known to promote the formation of filopodia. In the developing retinal vasculature, numerous, long filamentous filopodia, emanating from endothelial cells at the tips of angiogenic sprouts, were observed in wild-type animals, but to a lesser extent in the PECAM-1-null mice. Together, these data further establish the involvement of endothelial PECAM-1 in angiogenesis and suggest that, in vivo, PECAM-1 may stimulate endothelial cell motility by promoting the formation of filopodia. PMID:19574426

  2. EGFL6 Promotes Endothelial Cell Migration and Angiogenesis through the Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Shek Man; Qin, An; Tickner, Jennifer; Pavlos, Nathan; Davey, Tamara; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is required for bone development, growth, and repair. It is influenced by the local bone environment that involves cross-talks between endothelial cells and adjacent bone cells. However, data regarding factors that directly contribute to angiogenesis by bone cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that EGFL6, a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat superfamily proteins, induces angiogenesis by a paracrine mechanism in which EGFL6 is expressed in osteoblastic-like cells but promotes migration and angiogenesis of endothelial cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that EGFL6 is secreted in culture medium as a homodimer protein. Using scratch wound healing and transwell assays, we found that conditioned medium containing EGFL6 potentiates SVEC (a simian virus 40-transformed mouse microvascular endothelial cell line) endothelial cell migration. In addition, EGFL6 promotes the endothelial cell tube-like structure formation in Matrigel assays and angiogenesis in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Furthermore, we show that EGFL6 recombinant protein induces phosphorylation of ERK in SVEC endothelial cells. Inhibition of ERK impaired EGFL6-induced ERK activation and endothelial cell migration. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that osteoblastic-like cells express EGFL6 that is capable of promoting endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis via ERK activation. Thus, the EGLF6 mediates a paracrine mechanism of cross-talk between vascular endothelial cells and osteoblasts and might offer an important new target for the potential treatment of bone diseases, including osteonecrosis, osteoporosis, and fracture healing. PMID:21531721

  3. EGFL6 promotes endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis through the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Chim, Shek Man; Qin, An; Tickner, Jennifer; Pavlos, Nathan; Davey, Tamara; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2011-06-24

    Angiogenesis is required for bone development, growth, and repair. It is influenced by the local bone environment that involves cross-talks between endothelial cells and adjacent bone cells. However, data regarding factors that directly contribute to angiogenesis by bone cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that EGFL6, a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat superfamily proteins, induces angiogenesis by a paracrine mechanism in which EGFL6 is expressed in osteoblastic-like cells but promotes migration and angiogenesis of endothelial cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that EGFL6 is secreted in culture medium as a homodimer protein. Using scratch wound healing and transwell assays, we found that conditioned medium containing EGFL6 potentiates SVEC (a simian virus 40-transformed mouse microvascular endothelial cell line) endothelial cell migration. In addition, EGFL6 promotes the endothelial cell tube-like structure formation in Matrigel assays and angiogenesis in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Furthermore, we show that EGFL6 recombinant protein induces phosphorylation of ERK in SVEC endothelial cells. Inhibition of ERK impaired EGFL6-induced ERK activation and endothelial cell migration. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that osteoblastic-like cells express EGFL6 that is capable of promoting endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis via ERK activation. Thus, the EGLF6 mediates a paracrine mechanism of cross-talk between vascular endothelial cells and osteoblasts and might offer an important new target for the potential treatment of bone diseases, including osteonecrosis, osteoporosis, and fracture healing.

  4. Endothelial monolayers on collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes: cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Donggu; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Yoon, Sik; Jin, Songwan

    2016-05-17

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer lining over the entire vascular wall and play an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis and cancer metastasis. Loss of proper endothelial function can lead to vascular diseases. Therefore, the endothelial monolayer is particularly important in tissue regeneration and mimicking vascular tissue in vitro. Numerous studies have described the effects of ECs on nanofibers made from a variety of synthetic polymer materials designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, little is known about maintaining the integrity of ECs in in vitro systems. Here we describe polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes coated with collagen gel that overcome many limitations of conventional nanofibers used for engineering endothelia. We investigated cell-cell and cell-ECM junctional complexes using collagen-coated and conventional nanofibrous membranes. Conventional nanofibrous membranes alone did not form a monolayer with ECs, whereas collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes did. Several concentrations of collagen in the gel coating promoted the formation of cell-cell junctional complexes, facilitated the deposition of laminin, and increased the focal contact organization of ECs. These results suggest the possible use of collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes for vascular tissue engineering applications and a vascular platform for organ-on-a-chip systems.

  5. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  6. Andrographolide inhibits the adhesion of gastric cancer cells to endothelial cells by blocking E-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia-Bin; Liu, Fu-Rong; Wu, Tao; Yu, Miao; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2007-01-01

    Andrographolide, an active component isolated from the Chinese official herbal Andrographis paniculata, has recently been reported to have anticancer activity. However the molecular mechanism responsible for its anticancer action has not been fully defined. In this study, we investigated the effect of andrographolide on the adhesion of gastric cancer cells to the activated endothelial cells and the expression of some cell adhesion molecules. Human endothelial cells were preincubated with andrographolide for 6 h and then incubated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor for 4 h. Endothelial surface expression of E-selectin was evaluated by flow cytometry, immunostaining and ELISA. Further, we investigated E-selectin mRNA expression by RT-PCR. Surface expression of sialyl Lewis(X) of three gastric cancer cell lines (SGC7901, MGC803, BGC823) and a normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 was evaluated by flow cytometry and immunostaining. Adherence of CFSE-labeled gastric cancer cells and GES-1 cells to endothelial cell monolayers was then determined. Andrographolide significantly reduced E-selectin expression of activated endothelial cells, and inhibited the E-selectin expression on mRNA level. Three gastric cancer cell lines expressed high levels of sialyl Lewis(X), whereas GES-1 did not. Andrographolide also significantly decreased gastric cancer cells adherence to stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibition of E-selectin expression corresponded to the reduction of tumor cell adherence. The effects of andrographolide on tumor adhesion were almost nullified by pre-incubation with E-selectin and sialyl Lewis(X) antibody. These findings demonstrate that andrographolide suppresses the adhesion of gastric cancer cells which express high level sialyl Lewis(X) to human vascular endothelial cells by blocking E-selectin expression and, thus, may represent a candidate therapeutic agent for cancer.

  7. Sarcomere mechanics in capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert J; Xia, Shen-Ling; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2009-09-16

    Tension generation in endothelial cells of the aorta, spleen, and eye occurs in actin stress fibers, and is necessary for normal cell function. Sarcomeres are the tension-generating units of actin stress fibers in endothelial cells. How sarcomeres generate and maintain tension in stress fibers is not well understood. Using femtosecond laser ablation, we severed living stress fibers and measured sarcomere contraction under zero tension. The length of the sarcomere decreased in two phases: an instantaneous initial response, followed by a slower change in length attributed to myosin activity. The latter phase ceased abruptly after a minimum sarcomere length was reached, suggesting a rigid resistance that prevents further contraction. Furthermore, severed, contracted stress fibers did not relax when treated with myosin inhibitors, indicating that contracted stress fibers do not store elastic potential energy. These novel measurements combined with modeling suggest that myosin-generated forces in adjacent sarcomeres are directly in balance, and argue against sarcomere models with springlike elements in parallel with myosin contractile elements. We propose a new model for tension generation in the sarcomere, which provides a mechanistic interpretation for our observations and previous observations of inhomogeneous sarcomere contraction and apparent stress fiber viscoelastic behavior.

  8. Renal cell carcinoma alters endothelial receptor expression responsible for leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Krueger, Geraldine; Rutz, Jochen; Nelson, Karen; Werner, Isabella; Relja, Borna; Seliger, Barbara; Fisslthaler, Beate; Fleming, Ingrid; Tsaur, Igor; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-04-12

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) escapes immune recognition. To elaborate the escape strategy the influence of RCC cells on endothelial receptor expression and endothelial leukocyte adhesion was evaluated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were co-cultured with the RCC cell line, Caki-1, with and without tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial (E)-selectin, standard and variants (V) of CD44 were then analysed in HUVEC, using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. To determine which components are responsible for HUVEC-Caki-1 interaction causing receptor alteration, Caki-1 membrane fragments versus cell culture supernatant were applied to HUVECS. Adhesion of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelium was evaluated by co-culture adhesion assays. Relevance of endothelial receptor expression for adhesion to endothelium was determined by receptor blockage. Co-culture of RCC and HUVECs resulted in a significant increase in endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, CD44 V3 and V7 expression. Previous stimulation of HUVECs with TNF-alpha and co-cultivation with Caki-1 resulted in further elevation of endothelial CD44 V3 and V7 expression, whereas ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were significantly diminished. Since Caki-1 membrane fragments also caused these alterations, but cell culture supernatant did not, cell-cell contact may be responsible for this process. Blocking ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin or CD44 with respective antibodies led to a significant decrease in PBL and PMN adhesion to endothelium. Thus, exposing HUVEC to Caki-1 results in significant alteration of endothelial receptor expression and subsequent endothelial attachment of PBL and PMN.

  9. Phosphoproteomic analysis of interacting tumor and endothelial cells identifies regulatory mechanisms of transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Locard-Paulet, Marie; Lim, Lindsay; Veluscek, Giulia; McMahon, Kelly; Sinclair, John; van Weverwijk, Antoinette; Worboys, Jonathan D; Yuan, Yinyin; Isacke, Clare M; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-02-09

    The exit of metastasizing tumor cells from the vasculature, extravasation, is regulated by their dynamic interactions with the endothelial cells that line the internal surface of vessels. To elucidate signals controlling tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transendothelial migration, we performed phosphoproteomic analysis to map cell-specific changes in protein phosphorylation that were triggered by contact between metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. From the 2669 unique phosphorylation sites identified, 77 and 43 were differentially phosphorylated in the tumor cells and endothelial cells, respectively. The receptor tyrosine kinase ephrin type A receptor 2 (EPHA2) exhibited decreased Tyr(772) phosphorylation in the cancer cells upon endothelial contact. Knockdown of EPHA2 increased adhesion of the breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their transendothelial migration in coculture cell assays, as well as early-stage lung colonization in vivo. EPHA2-mediated inhibition of transendothelial migration of breast cancer cells depended on interaction with the ligand ephrinA1 on HUVECs and phosphorylation of EPHA2-Tyr(772). When EPHA2 phosphorylation dynamics were compared between cell lines of different metastatic ability, EPHA2-Tyr(772) was rapidly dephosphorylated after ephrinA1 stimulation specifically in cells targeting the lung. Knockdown of the phosphatase LMW-PTP reduced adhesion and transendothelial migration of the breast cancer cells. Overall, cell-specific phosphoproteomic analysis provides a bidirectional map of contact-initiated signaling between tumor and endothelial cells that can be further investigated to identify mechanisms controlling the transendothelial cell migration of cancer cells.

  10. Endothelial Cell Implantation and Survival within Experimental Gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Bachchu; Indurti, Ravi R.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Goldstein, Gary W.; Laterra, John

    1994-10-01

    The delivery of therapeutic genes to primary brain neoplasms opens new opportunities for treating these frequently fatal tumors. Efficient gene delivery to tissues remains an important obstacle to therapy, and this problem has unique characteristics in brain tumors due to the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers. The presence of endothelial mitogens and vessel proliferation within solid tumors suggests that genetically modified endothelial cells might efficiently transplant to brain tumors. Rat brain endothelial cells immortalized with the adenovirus E1A gene and further modified to express the β-galactosidase reporter were examined for their ability to survive implantation to experimental rat gliomas. Rats received 9L, F98, or C6 glioma cells in combination with endothelial cells intracranially to caudate/putamen or subcutaneously to flank. Implanted endothelial cells were identified by β-galactosidase histochemistry or by polymerase chain reaction in all tumors up to 35 days postimplantation, the latest time examined. Implanted endothelial cells appeared to cooperate in tumor vessel formation and expressed the brain-specific endothelial glucose transporter type 1 as identified by immunohistochemistry. The proliferation of implanted endothelial cells was supported by their increased number within tumors between postimplantation days 14 and 21 (P = 0.015) and by their expression of the proliferation antigen Ki67. These findings establish that genetically modified endothelial cells can be stably engrafted to growing gliomas and suggest that endothelial cell implantation may provide a means of delivering therapeutic genes to brain neoplasms and other solid tumors. In addition, endothelial implantation to brain may be useful for defining mechanisms of brain-specific endothelial differentiation.

  11. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  12. Endothelial Cell Junctional Adhesion Molecules: Role and Regulation of Expression in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of all blood vessels and play a critical role in maintaining the barrier function of the vasculature. Sealing of the vessel wall between adjacent endothelial cells is facilitated by interactions involving junctionally expressed transmembrane proteins, including tight junctional molecules, such as members of the junctional adhesion molecule family, components of adherence junctions, such as VE-Cadherin, and other molecules, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. Of importance, a growing body of evidence indicates that the expression of these molecules is regulated in a spatiotemporal manner during inflammation: responses that have significant implications for the barrier function of blood vessels against blood-borne macromolecules and transmigrating leukocytes. This review summarizes key aspects of our current understanding of the dynamics and mechanisms that regulate the expression of endothelial cells junctional molecules during inflammation and discusses the associated functional implications of such events in acute and chronic scenarios. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Method for in vitro differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into endothelial progenitor cells and vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qihong; Zhang, Weifeng; He, Guifen; Sha, Huifang; Quan, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Vascular development is a regulated process and is dependent on the participation and differentiation of many cell types including the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to mesodermal precursor cells. Thus, reconstitution of this process in vitro necessitates providing ambient conditions for generating and culturing EPCs in vitro and differentiating them to vascular endothelial cells. In the present study, we developed methods to differentiate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into EPCs and to vascular endothelial cells. Bone marrow MSC from canines and human sources were differentiated in vitro in to EPCs. These EPCs were able to express a variety of endothelial markers following 7 days in culture. Further culturing led to the appearance of an increased number and proportion of endothelial cells. These cells were stable even after 30 generations in culture. There was a gradual loss of CD31 and increased expression of factor VIII, VEGFR and CD133. VEGF being highly angiogenic, helps in the vascular development. These results provide the basis for the possible development of vasculature in vitro conditions for biomedical applications and in vivo for organ/tissue reconstruction therapies. PMID:27878275

  14. Stiffness of polyelectrolyte multilayer film influences endothelial function of endothelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Zhang, He; Hu, Mi; Chen, Jia-Yan; Li, Bo-Chao; Ren, Ke-Feng; Martins, M Cristina L; Barbosa, Mário A; Ji, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Endothelialization has proved to be critical for maintaining long-term success of implantable vascular devices. The formation of monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) on the implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for the endothelialization. However, endothelial function of regenerated EC monolayer, which plays a much more important role in preventing the complications of post-implantation, has not received enough attention. Here, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-incorporated poly(l-lysine)/hyaluronan (PLL/HA) polyelectrolyte multilayer film was fabricated. Through varying the crosslinking degree, stiffness of the film was manipulated, offering either soft or stiff film. We demonstrated that ECs were able to adhere and proliferate on both soft and stiff films, subsequently forming an integrated EC monolayer. Furthermore, endothelial functions were evaluated by characterizing EC monolayer integrity, expression of genes correlated with the endothelial functions, and nitric oxide production. It demonstrated that EC monolayer on the soft film displayed higher endothelial function compared to that on the stiff film. Our study highlights the influence of substrate stiffness on endothelial function, which offers a new criterion for surface design of vascular implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  16. Vascular endothelial cells minimize the total force on their nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Hazel, A L; Pedley, T J

    2000-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the arterial walls. It plays a vital role in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis, an occlusive arterial disease responsible for 50% of deaths in the Western world. The focal nature of the disease suggests that hemodynamic forces are an important factor in its pathogenesis. This has led to the investigation of the effects of mechanical forces on the endothelial cells themselves. It has been found that endothelial cells do respond to stresses induced by the flowing blood; in particular, they elongate and align with an imposed flow direction. In this paper, we calculate the distribution of force exerted on a three-dimensional hump, representing the raised cell nucleus, by a uniform shear flow. It is found that, for a nonaxisymmetric ellipsoidal hump, the least total force is experienced when the hump is aligned with the flow. Furthermore, for a hump of fixed volume, there is a specific aspect ratio combination that results in the least total force upon the hump, (0.38:2.2:1.0; height:length:width). This is approximately the same as the average aspect ratio taken up by the cell nuclei in vivo (0.27:2.23:1.0). It is possible, therefore, that the cells respond to the flow in such a way as to minimize the total force on their nuclei. PMID:10620272

  17. Endothelial progenitor cells, cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle modifications.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Rossella; Felice, Francesca; Feriani, Roberto; Balbarini, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute substantially to preservation of a structurally and functionally intact endothelium. EPCs home in to the sites of endothelial injury and ischemia, where they proliferate, differentiate and integrate into the endothelial layer or exert a paracrine function by producing vascular growth factors. This review will focus on successful lifestyle interventions that aim to maintain vascular health through beneficial actions on cell populations with vasculogenic potential. The results of the studies proving the role of healthy lifestyle are particularly emphasized.

  18. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  19. Purification of endothelial cells from rodent brain by immunopanning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of immunopanning to purify endothelial cells from the rodent brain. Immunopanning permits the prospective isolation of endothelial cells from nervous tissue by relying on the binding of the endothelial cells to an anti-CD31 antibody adhered to a Petri dish. The cells are viable at the end of this gentle procedure, and they can be analyzed acutely for gene expression or cultured alone or in coculture with other central nervous system (CNS) cell types, including CNS pericytes and CNS astrocytes. This procedure can be used to isolate endothelial cells from either rat or mouse. We have suggested specific antibodies that work for each species. Note that endothelial cells from rats and mice have different morphologies; in general, rat CNS endothelial cells are longer and thinner than mouse CNS endothelial cells. This procedure can also be used to purify endothelial cells from different regions of the CNS, including brain and optic nerve. Dissociation procedures must be optimized for each tissue.

  20. Modulation of endothelial cell phenotype by physical activity: impact on obesity-related endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bender, Shawn B; Laughlin, M Harold

    2015-07-01

    Increased levels of physical activity are associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality in obesity and diabetes. Available evidence suggests that local factors, including local hemodynamics, account for a significant portion of this CVD protection, and numerous studies have interrogated the therapeutic benefit of physical activity/exercise training in CVD. Less well established is whether basal differences in endothelial cell phenotype between/among vasculatures related to muscle recruitment patterns during activity may account for reports of nonuniform development of endothelial dysfunction in obesity. This is the focus of this review. We highlight recent work exploring the vulnerability of two distinct vasculatures with established differences in endothelial cell phenotype. Specifically, based largely on dramatic differences in underlying hemodynamics, arteries perfusing soleus muscle (slow-twitch muscle fibers) and those perfusing gastrocnemius muscle (fast-twitch muscle fibers) in the rat exhibit an exercise training-like versus an untrained endothelial cell phenotype, respectively. In the context of obesity, therefore, arteries to soleus muscle exhibit protection from endothelial dysfunction compared with vulnerable arteries to gastrocnemius muscle. This disparate vulnerability is consistent with numerous animal and human studies, demonstrating increased skeletal muscle blood flow heterogeneity in obesity coincident with reduced muscle function and exercise intolerance. Mechanistically, we highlight emerging areas of inquiry exploring novel aspects of hemodynamic-sensitive signaling in endothelial cells and the time course of physical activity-associated endothelial adaptations. Lastly, further exploration needs to consider the impact of endothelial heterogeneity on the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction independently predicts CVD events. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Modulation of endothelial cell phenotype by physical activity: impact on obesity-related endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, M. Harold

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of physical activity are associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality in obesity and diabetes. Available evidence suggests that local factors, including local hemodynamics, account for a significant portion of this CVD protection, and numerous studies have interrogated the therapeutic benefit of physical activity/exercise training in CVD. Less well established is whether basal differences in endothelial cell phenotype between/among vasculatures related to muscle recruitment patterns during activity may account for reports of nonuniform development of endothelial dysfunction in obesity. This is the focus of this review. We highlight recent work exploring the vulnerability of two distinct vasculatures with established differences in endothelial cell phenotype. Specifically, based largely on dramatic differences in underlying hemodynamics, arteries perfusing soleus muscle (slow-twitch muscle fibers) and those perfusing gastrocnemius muscle (fast-twitch muscle fibers) in the rat exhibit an exercise training-like versus an untrained endothelial cell phenotype, respectively. In the context of obesity, therefore, arteries to soleus muscle exhibit protection from endothelial dysfunction compared with vulnerable arteries to gastrocnemius muscle. This disparate vulnerability is consistent with numerous animal and human studies, demonstrating increased skeletal muscle blood flow heterogeneity in obesity coincident with reduced muscle function and exercise intolerance. Mechanistically, we highlight emerging areas of inquiry exploring novel aspects of hemodynamic-sensitive signaling in endothelial cells and the time course of physical activity-associated endothelial adaptations. Lastly, further exploration needs to consider the impact of endothelial heterogeneity on the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction independently predicts CVD events. PMID:25934096

  2. Pneumolysin Is the Main Inducer of Cytotoxicity to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zysk, Gregor; Schneider-Wald, Barbara Katharina; Hwang, Jae Hyuk; Bejo, Levente; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Hakenbeck, Regine; Heinz, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    In pneumococcal meningitis it is assumed that bacteria cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of cerebral endothelial cells. The effect of Streptococcus pneumoniae on the BBB was investigated with an in vitro BBB model using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBMEC) and primary cultures of bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BBMEC). Within a few hours of incubation with pneumococci, rounding and detachment of the HBMEC were observed, and the transendothelial electrical resistance of the BBMEC monolayer decreased markedly. An S. pneumoniae mutant deficient in pneumolysin did not affect the integrity of the endothelial cell monolayer. Neither cell wall fragments nor isolated pneumococcal cell walls induced changes of endothelial cell morphology. However, purified pneumolysin caused endothelial cell damage comparable to that caused by the viable pneumococci. The cell detachment was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and required the activities of caspase and tyrosine kinases. The results show that pneumolysin is an important component for damaging the BBB and may contribute to the entry of pneumococci into the cerebral compartment and to the development of brain edema in pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:11159977

  3. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph; Kolb, Hubert; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants.In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25–1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects.iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT–PCR. PMID:9421302

  4. Kisspeptin-10 induces endothelial cellular senescence and impaired endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Usui, Sayaka; Iso, Yoshitaka; Sasai, Masahiro; Mizukami, Takuya; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Takuya; Shioda, Seiji; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    The KPs (kisspeptins) are a family of multifunctional peptides with established roles in cancer metastasis, puberty and vasoconstriction. The effects of KPs on endothelial cells have yet to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of KP-10 on endothelial cell growth and the mechanisms underlying those effects. The administration of recombinant KP-10 into the hindlimbs of rats with ischaemia significantly impaired blood flow recovery, as shown by laser Doppler, and capillary growth, as shown using histology, compared with the controls. HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) express the KP receptor and were treated with KP-10 in culture studies. KP-10 inhibited endothelial cell tube formation and proliferation in a significant and dose-dependent manner. The HUVECs treated with KP exhibited the senescent phenotype, as determined using a senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, cell morphology analysis, and decreased Sirt1 (sirtuin 1) expression and increased p53 expression shown by Western blot analysis. Intriguingly, a pharmacological Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, was found to increase the proliferation of HUVECs and to reduce the number of senescent phenotype cells affected by KP-10. In conclusion, KP-10 suppressed endothelial cells growth both in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The adverse effect of KP on endothelial cells was attributable, at least in part, to the induction of cellular senescence.

  5. Sodium caffeate induces endothelial cell apoptosis and inhibits VEGF expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ou-Yang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Song, Dan-Qing; Shao, Rong-Guang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the induction of endothelial cell apoptosis and the suppression of VEGF expression in cancer cells by sodium caffeate (SCA). Apoptosis of transformed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 cell line) was detected by flow cytometry, DNA electrophoresis assay and morphological assessment. Western blotting analysis was applied for determination of VEGF expression in cancer cells. Substrate degradation by type IV collagenase was measured by zymography. ELISA was used to detect the binding of type IV collagenase with relevant monoclonal antibody. SCA induced ECV304 cell apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment with 100 and 250 microg X mL(-1) of SCA for 48 h, DNA laddering appeared. SCA treated cells showed strong blue fluorescence and distinct changes of nuclear morphology, such as pyknosis and the occurrence of apoptotic bodies. VEGF expression in hepatoma HepG-2 cells and prostate carcinoma DU145 cells was reduced after SCA treatment. The degradation activity of type IV collagenase including MMP-2 and MMP-9 secreted by giant cell pulmonary carcinoma PG cells was inhibited by SCA in a dose-dependent manner. SCA also reduced the binding of mAb 3D6, a relevant monoclonal antibody, to type IV collagenase. SCA can induce endothelial cell apoptosis and inhibit VEGF expression as well as type IV collagenase activity in cancer cells. SCA might be active in modulating tumor angiogenesis and the microenvironment.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  7. Characterization of iron uptake from transferrin by murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, R; Savigni, D L; Morgan, E H; Baker, E

    2000-01-01

    Iron is required by the brain for normal function, however, the mechanisms by which it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are poorly understood. The uptake and efflux of transferrin (Tf) and Fe by murine brain-derived (bEND3) and lymph node-derived (m1END1) endothelial cell lines was compared. The effects of iron chelators, metabolic inhibitors and the cellular activators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on Tf and Fe uptake were investigated. Cells were incubated with 59Fe-125I-Tf; Fe uptake was shown to increase linearly over time for both cell lines, while Tf uptake reached a plateau within 2 h. Both Tf and Fe uptake were saturable. bEND3 cells were shown to have half as many Tf receptors as m1END1 cells, but the mean cycling times of a Tf molecule were the same. Tf and Fe efflux from the cells were measured over time, revealing that after 2 h only 25% of the Tf but 80% of the Fe remained associated with the cells. Of 7 iron chelators, only deferriprone (L1) markedly decreased Tf uptake. However, Fe uptake was reduced by more than 50% by L1, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) and desferrithiocin (DFT). The cellular activators TNF-alpha or LPS had little effect on Tf turnover, but they accelerated Fe uptake in both endothelial cell types. Phenylarsenoxide (PhAsO) and N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), inhibitors of Tf endocytosis, reduced both Tf and Fe uptake in both cell lines, while bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, reduced Fe uptake but did not affect Tf uptake. The results suggest that Tf and Fe uptake by both bEND3 and m1END1 is via receptor-mediated endocytosis with release of Fe from Tf within the cell and recycling of apo-Tf. On the basis of Tf- and Fe-metabolism both cell lines are similar and therefore well suited for use in in vitro models for Fe transport across the BBB.

  8. Vascular mechanobiology: endothelial cell responses to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Ando, Joji; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2009-11-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessel walls respond to shear stress, a fluid mechanical force generated by flowing blood, and the EC responses play an important role in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. Abnormal EC responses to shear stress impair various vascular functions and lead to vascular diseases, including hypertension, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Bioengineering approaches in which cultured ECs are subjected to shear stress in fluid-dynamically designed flow-loading devices have been widely used to analyze EC responses at the cellular and molecular levels. Remarkable progress has been made, and the results have shown that ECs alter their morphology, function, and gene expression in response to shear stress. Shear stress affects immature cells, as well as mature ECs, and promotes differentiation of bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and embryonic stem cells into ECs. Much research has been done on shear stress sensing and signal transduction, and their molecular mechanisms are gradually coming to be understood. However, much remains uncertain, and many candidates have been proposed for shear stress sensors. More extensive studies of vascular mechanobiology should increase our understanding of the molecular basis of the blood-flow-mediated control of vascular functions.

  9. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qiangsong; Zheng Liduan; Li Bo; Wang Danming; Huang Chuanshu; Matuschak, George M.; Li Dechun . E-mail: dli2@slu.edu

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) has angiogenic properties in an in vivo matrigel plug model and HIMF upregulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse lungs and cultured lung epithelial cells. However, whether HIMF exerts angiogenic effects through modulating endothelial cell function remains unknown. In this study, mouse aortic rings cultured with recombinant HIMF protein resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting and increased endothelial cell spreading as confirmed by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake, von Willebrand factor and CD31 staining. In cultured mouse endothelial cell line SVEC 4-10, HIMF dose-dependently enhanced cell proliferation, in vitro migration and tubulogenesis, which was not attenuated by SU1498, a VEGFR2/Flk-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Moreover, HIMF stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK1/2 kinases in SVEC 4-10 cells. Treatment of mouse aortic rings and SVEC 4-10 cells with LY294002, but not SB203580, PD098059 or U0126, abolished HIMF-induced vascular sprouting and angiogenic responses. In addition, transfection of a dominant-negative mutant of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), {delta}p85, blocked HIMF-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial activation and tubulogenesis. These results indicate that HIMF enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells via activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathways.

  10. Effects of Escherichia coli hemolysin on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, N; Flöer, B; Schnittler, H; Seeger, W; Bhakdi, S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin is considered an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections. The present study demonstrates that cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells are susceptible to attack by low concentrations of E. coli hemolysin (greater than or equal to 0.05 hemolytic units/ml; greater than or equal to 5 ng/ml). Sublytic amounts of hemolysin increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The hydraulic conductivity increased approximately 30-fold and the reflection coefficient for large molecules dropped from 0.71 to less than 0.05, indicating a toxin-induced loss of endothelial barrier function. The alterations of endothelial monolayer permeability were accompanied by cell retraction and interendothelial gap formation. In addition, E. coli hemolysin stimulated prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not of Mg2+. An enhanced passive influx of 45Ca2+ and 3H-sucrose but not of tritiated inulin and dextran was noted in toxin-treated cells, indicating that small transmembrane pores comparable to those detected in rabbit erythrocytes had been generated in endothelial cell membranes. These pores may act as nonphysiologic Ca2+ gates, thereby initiating different Ca2+-dependent cellular processes. We conclude that endothelial cells are highly susceptible to E. coli hemolysin and that two major endothelial cell functions are altered by very low concentrations of hemolysin. Images PMID:2121650

  11. Basal and inducible anti-inflammatory epoxygenase activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Ara A.; Thomson, Scott; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • We examined epoxygenase product formation and regulation in endothelial cells. • The epoxygenase CYP2J2 is an LPS (TLR-4) inducible enzyme in endothelial cells. • The endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 synthesises epoxygenase products. • Inhibition of endothelial epoxygenases increases TNFα secretion. • Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors reduce inflammation-induced TNFα and NFκB. - Abstract: The roles of CYP lipid-metabolizing pathways in endothelial cells are poorly understood. Human endothelial cells expressed CYP2J2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) mRNA and protein. The TLR-4 agonist LPS (1 μg/ml; 24 h) induced CYP2J2 but not sEH mRNA and protein. LC–MS/MS analysis of the stable commonly used human endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 showed active epoxygenase and epoxide hydrolase activity: with arachidonic acid (stable epoxide products 5,6-DHET, and 14,15-DHET), linoleic acid (9,10-EPOME and 12,13-EPOME and their stable epoxide hydrolase products 9,10-DHOME and 12,13-DHOME), docosahexaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 19,20-DiHDPA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 17,18-DHET) being formed. Inhibition of epoxygenases using either SKF525A or MS-PPOH induced TNFα release, but did not affect LPS, IL-1β, or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNFα release. In contrast, inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase by AUDA or TPPU inhibited basal, LPS, IL-1β and PMA induced TNFα release, and LPS-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, human endothelial cells contain a TLR-4 regulated epoxygenase CYP2J2 and metabolize linoleic acid > eicosapentaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > docosahexaenoic acid to products with anti-inflammatory activity.

  12. Endothelial progenitor cells: a new player in lupus?

    PubMed

    Haque, Sahena; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2012-02-20

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There is growing interest in the link between vascular damage and lupus-specific inflammatory factors. Impaired endothelial repair could account for the endothelial dysfunction in this patient group. This review describes the contribution that endothelial progenitor cells could play in the pathogenesis of premature vascular damage in this disease. The methods of isolation, detection, and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells, together with their potential role in repair of the endothelium and as a therapeutic target in SLE, are discussed.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide induces a fibrotic-like phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Sarmiento, Daniela; Becerra, Alvaro; Nuñez-Villena, Felipe; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Simon, Felipe

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is crucial in endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome pathogenesis. It is well accepted that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces endothelial dysfunction through immune system activation. However, LPS can also directly generate actions in endothelial cells (ECs) in the absence of participation by immune cells. Although interactions between LPS and ECs evoke endothelial death, a significant portion of ECs are resistant to LPS challenge. However, the mechanism that confers endothelial resistance to LPS is not known. LPS-resistant ECs exhibit a fibroblast-like morphology, suggesting that these ECs enter a fibrotic programme in response to LPS. Thus, our aim was to investigate whether LPS is able to induce endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells and explore the underlying mechanism. Using primary cultures of ECs and culturing intact blood vessels, we demonstrated that LPS is a crucial factor to induce endothelial fibrosis. We demonstrated that LPS was able and sufficient to promote endothelial fibrosis, in the absence of immune cells through an activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) activity-dependent mechanism. LPS-challenged ECs showed an up-regulation of both fibroblast-specific protein expression and extracellular matrix proteins secretion, as well as a down-regulation of endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that LPS is a crucial factor in inducing endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells through an ALK5-dependent mechanism. It is noteworthy that LPS-induced endothelial fibrosis perpetuates endothelial dysfunction as a maladaptive process rather than a survival mechanism for protection against LPS. These findings are useful in improving current treatment against endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome and other inflammatory diseases.

  14. Tissue factor expression by endothelial cells in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Solovey, A; Gui, L; Key, N S; Hebbel, R P

    1998-01-01

    The role of the vascular endothelium in activation of the coagulation system, a fundamental homeostatic mechanism of mammalian biology, is uncertain because there is little evidence indicating that endothelial cells in vivo express tissue factor (TF), the system's triggering mechanism. As a surrogate for vessel wall endothelium, we examined circulating endothelial cells (CEC) from normals and patients with sickle cell anemia, a disease associated with activation of coagulation. We find that sickle CEC abnormally express TF antigen (expressed as percent CEC that are TF-positive), with 66+/-13% positive in sickle patients in steady-state, 83+/-19% positive in sickle patients presenting with acute vasoocclusive episodes, and only 10+/-13% positive in normal controls. Repeated samplings confirmed this impression that TF expression is greater when sickle patients develop acute vasoocclusive episodes. Sickle CEC are also positive for TF mRNA, with excellent concurrence between antigen and mRNA expression. The TF expressed on the antigen-positive CEC is functional, as demonstrated by a binding assay for Factor VIIa and a chromogenic assay sensitive to generation of Factor Xa. By establishing that endothelial cells in vivo can express TF, these data imply that the vast endothelial surface area does provide an important pathophysiologic trigger for coagulation activation. PMID:9576754

  15. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  16. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Daniel; Spinell, Thomas; Vrettos, Anastasios; Stoecklin-Wasmer, Christin; Celenti, Romanita; Demmer, Ryan T; Kebschull, Moritz; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-12-01

    Several biologically plausible mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD), including adverse effects on vascular endothelial function. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPCs) are known to contribute to vascular repair, but limited data are available regarding the relationship between cEPC levels and periodontitis. The aims of this cross-sectional study are to investigate the levels of hemangioblastic and monocytic cEPCs in patients with periodontitis and periodontally healthy controls and to associate cEPC levels with the extent and severity of periodontitis. A total of 112 individuals (56 patients with periodontitis and 56 periodontally healthy controls, aged 26 to 65 years; mean age: 43 years) were enrolled. All participants underwent a full-mouth periodontal examination and provided a blood sample. Hemangioblastic cEPCs were assessed using flow cytometry, and monocytic cEPCs were identified using immunohistochemistry in cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells. cEPC levels were analyzed in the entire sample, as well as in a subset of 50 pairs of patients with periodontitis/periodontally healthy controls, matched with respect to age, sex, and menstrual cycle. Levels of hemangioblastic cEPCs were approximately 2.3-fold higher in patients with periodontitis than periodontally healthy controls, after adjustments for age, sex, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index (P = 0.001). A non-significant trend for higher levels of monocytic cEPCs in periodontitis was also observed. The levels of hemangioblastic cEPCs were positively associated with the extent of bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment loss. Hemangioblastic and monocytic cEPC levels were not correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.03, P = 0.77), suggesting that they represent independent populations of progenitor cells. These findings further support the notion that

  17. Endothelial cell death and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Tuder, R M; Cool, C D; Lynch, D A; Flores, S C; Voelkel, N F

    2001-03-01

    Emphysema due to cigarette smoking is characterized by a loss of alveolar structures. We hypothesize that the disappearance of alveoli involves apoptosis of septal endothelial cells and a decreased expression of lung vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor 2 (VEGF R2). By terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in combination with immunohistochemistry, we found that the number of TUNEL+ septal epithelial and endothelial cells/lung tissue nucleic acid (microg) was increased in the alveolar septa of emphysema lungs (14.2 +/- 2.0/microg, n = 6) when compared with normal lungs (6.8 +/- 1.3/microg, n = 7) (p < 0.01) and with primary pulmonary hypertensive lungs (2.3 +/- 0.8/microg, n = 5) (p < 0.001). The cell death events were not significantly different between healthy nonsmoker (7.4 +/- 1.9/microg) and smoker (5.7 +/- 0.7/microg) control subjects. The TUNEL results were confirmed by single-stranded DNA and active caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and by DNA ligation assay. Emphysema lungs (n = 12) had increased levels of oligonucleosomal-length DNA fragmentation when compared with normal lungs (n = 11). VEGF, VEGF R2 protein, and mRNA expression were significantly reduced in emphysema. We propose that epithelial and endothelial alveolar septal death due to a decrease of endothelial cell maintenance factors may be part of the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  18. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Noemi; McCarter, Rachel V.; O’Neill, Christina; Medina, Reinhold J.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Patients with DR may irreversibly lose sight as a result of the development of diabetic macular edema (DME) and/or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR); retinal blood vessel dysfunction and degeneration plays an essential role in their pathogenesis. Although new treatments have been recently introduced for DME, including intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGFs) and steroids, a high proportion of patients (~40–50%) do not respond to these therapies. Furthermore, for people with PDR, laser photocoagulation remains a mainstay therapy despite this being an inherently destructive procedure. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a low-frequency population of circulating cells known to be recruited to sites of vessel damage and tissue ischemia where they promote vascular healing and re-perfusion. A growing body of evidence suggests that the number and function of EPCs are altered in patients with varying degrees of diabetes duration, metabolic control, and in the presence or absence of DR. Although there are no clear-cut outcomes from these clinical studies, there is mounting evidence that some EPC sub-types may be involved in the pathogenesis of DR and may also serve as biomarkers for disease progression and stratification. Moreover, some EPC sub-types have considerable potential as therapeutic modalities for DME and PDR in the context of cell therapy. This study presents basic clinical concepts of DR and combines this with a general insight on EPCs and their relation to future directions in understanding and treating this important diabetic complication. PMID:24782825

  19. Phage display selection of scFv to murine endothelial cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Stephen J; Lankford, Trish; Foote, Linda; Wall, Melissa; Davern, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of endothelial cells is becoming more apparent and more important in defining vessel systems that supply blood to normal organs and to tumors. Reagents that identify expression of cell surface determinants on these cells are crucial for differentiating among different vessel types. As a first step in this process we have selected a panel of 25 scFvs from a phage display library that bind to the endothelial cell line LEII. The scFvs are of high affinity and bind to some tumor cells as well as to the target endothelial cell. The scFvs can be divided into 8 epitope groups by use of competition binding studies. DNA sequencing of the members of these groups generally support the classification. This work shows that phage display is a rapid and efficient method for identification of reagents for cell surface molecules.

  20. Phagocytosis by macrophages and endothelial cells inhibits procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Gao, Chunyan; Li, Wen; Zhu, Jiuxin; Novakovic, Valerie; Wang, Jing; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhou, Jin; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2012-03-08

    The coagulopathy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is mainly related to procoagulant substances and fibrinolytic activators of APL blasts, but the fate of these leukemic cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of APL blasts by macrophages and endothelial cells in vitro and consequent procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL cells. We found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as THP-1 and monocyte-derived macrophages bound, engulfed, and subsequently degraded immortalized APL cell line NB4 and primary APL cells. Lactadherin promoted phagocytosis of APL cells in a time-dependent fashion. Furthermore, factor Xa and prothrombinase activity of phosphatidylserine-exposed target APL cells was time-dependently decreased after incubation with phagocytes (THP-1-derived macrophages or HUVECs). Thrombin production on target APL cells was reduced by 40%-45% after 2 hours of coincubation with phagocytes and 80% by a combination of lactadherin and phagocytes. Moreover, plasmin generation of target APL cells was inhibited 30% by 2 hours of phagocytosis and ∼ 50% by lactadherin-mediated engulfment. These results suggest that engulfment by macrophages and endothelial cells reduce procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL blasts. Lactadherin and phagocytosis could cooperatively ameliorate the clotting disorders in APL.

  1. Unidirectional transfer of prostaglandin endoperoxides between platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, A I; Crawford, D D; Gimbrone, M A

    1984-01-01

    An important determinant of platelet-vessel wall interactions is the local balance of production of endothelial prostacyclin (PGI2) and platelet thromboxane (TX) A2, labile eicosanoids with opposing effects on hemostasis. Disputed evidence suggests that platelet-derived prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates may be utilized as substrates for vascular PGI2 synthesis. Using several different approaches, we have found that platelets can transfer endoperoxides to cultured endothelial cells for efficient conversion to PGI2, but a reciprocal transfer of endothelial endoperoxides for utilization by platelet thromboxane synthetase does not occur under the same experimental conditions. However, platelets can utilize arachidonic acid released by endothelial cells for lipoxygenase metabolism. We have directly demonstrated the production of [3H]6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the breakdown product of [3H]PGI2) by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets stimulated with [3H]arachidonic acid. In coincubation experiments using either arachidonate or ionophore A23187 as a stimulus, radioimmunoassay of the net production of arachidonic acid metabolites showed that 6-keto-PGF1 alpha generation by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets may actually exceed its generation by uninhibited endothelial cells alone. In functional assays, platelet aggregation was inhibited in the presence of aspirin-treated endothelial cells after stimulation with either arachidonate or ionophore A23187. In contrast, the inverse experiments, using aspirin-treated platelets and uninhibited endothelial cells, failed to demonstrate platelet utilization of endothelial endoperoxides for TXA2 production by any of the above methods. These studies thus provide evidence that efficient unidirectional transfer and utilization of platelet-derived endoperoxides for endothelial PGI2 production can occur. This process may serve to amplify PGI2 generation adjacent to areas of vascular

  2. Actin Filament Stress Fibers in Vascular Endothelial Cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Albert J.; Pollard, Thomas D.; Herman, Ira M.

    1983-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-3-diazole phallacidin was used to survey vertebrate tissues for actin filament bundles comparable to the stress fibers of cultured cells. Such bundles were found only in vascular endothelial cells. Like the stress fibers of cultured cells, these actin filament bundles were stained in a punctate pattern by fluorescent antibodies to both alpha-actinin and myosin. The stress fibers were oriented parallel to the direction of blood flow and were prominent in endothelial cells from regions exposed to high-velocity flow, such as the left ventricle, aortic valve, and aorta. Actin bundles may help the endothelial cell to withstand hemodynamic stress.

  3. Adaptation to oxygen deprivation in cultures of human pluripotent stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Truitt, Rachel; Luong, Eli; Drazer, German

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in vascular development through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) accumulation and downstream pathway activation. We sought to explore the in vitro response of cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs), and human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to normoxic and hypoxic oxygen tensions. We first measured dissolved oxygen (DO) in the media of adherent cultures in atmospheric (21% O2), physiological (5% O2), and hypoxic oxygen conditions (1% O2). In cultures of both hEPCs and HUVECs, lower oxygen consumption was observed when cultured in 1% O2. At each oxygen tension, feeder-free cultured hESCs and iPSCs were found to consume comparable amounts of oxygen. Transport analysis revealed that the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of hESCs and iPSCs decreased distinctly as DO availability decreased, whereas the OUR of all cell types was found to be low when cultured in 1% O2, demonstrating cell adaptation to lower oxygen tensions by limiting oxygen consumption. Next, we examined HIF-1α accumulation and the expression of target genes, including VEGF and angiopoietins (ANGPT; angiogenic response), GLUT-1 (glucose transport), BNIP3, and BNIP3L (autophagy and apoptosis). Accumulations of HIF-1α were detected in all four cell lines cultured in 1% O2. Corresponding upregulation of VEGF, ANGPT2, and GLUT-1 was observed in response to HIF-1α accumulation, whereas upregulation of ANGPT1 was detected only in hESCs and iPSCs. Upregulation of BNIP3 and BNIP3L was detected in all cells after 24-h culture in hypoxic conditions, whereas apoptosis was not detectable using flow cytometry analysis, suggesting that BNIP3 and BNIP3L can lead to cell autophagy rather than apoptosis. These results demonstrate adaptation of all cell types to hypoxia but different cellular responses, suggesting that continuous measurements and control over oxygen environments will

  4. Tubeless Microfluidic Angiogenesis Assay With Three-Dimensional Endothelial-lined Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Bischel, Lauren L.; Young, Edmond W.K.; Mader, Brianah R.; Beebe, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The study of angiogenesis is important to understanding a variety of human pathologies including cancer, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. In vivo angiogenesis assays can be costly and time-consuming, limiting their application in high-throughput studies. While traditional in vitro assays may overcome these limitations, they lack the ability to accurately recapitulate the main elements of the tissue microenvironment found in vivo, thereby limiting our ability to draw physiologically relevant biological conclusions. To bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro angiogenesis assays, several microfluidic methods have been developed to generate in vitro assays that incorporate blood vessel models with physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) lumen structures. However, these models have not seen widespread adoption, which can be partially attributed to the difficulty in fabricating these structures. Here, we present a simple, accessible method that takes advantage of basic fluidic principles to create 3D lumens with circular cross-sectional geometries through ECM hydrogels that are lined with endothelial monolayers to mimic the structure of blood vessels in vitro. This technique can be used to pattern endothelial cell-lined lumens in different microchannel geometries, enabling increased flexibility for a variety of studies. We demonstrate the implementation and application of this technique to the study of angiogenesis in a physiologically relevant in vitro setting. PMID:23191982

  5. Endothelial Cell Density to Predict Endothelial Graft Failure After Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Benetz, Beth Ann; Beck, Roy W.; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Gross, Robert; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J.; Mannis, Mark J.; Raber, Irving; Stark, Walter; Stulting, R. Doyle

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative and/or postoperative central endothelial cell density (ECD) and its rate of decline postoperatively are predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation following penetrating keratoplasty to treat a moderate-risk condition, principally, Fuchs dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema. Methods In a subset of Cornea Donor Study participants, a central reading center determined preoperative and postoperative ECD from available specular images for 17 grafts that failed because of endothelial decompensation and 483 grafts that did not fail. Results Preoperative ECD was not predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation (P = .91). However, the 6-month ECD was predictive of subsequent failure (P < .001). Among those that had not failed within the first 6 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence (±95% confidence interval) of failure was 13% (±12%) for the 33 participants with a 6-month ECD of less than 1700 cells/mm2 vs 2%(±3%) for the 137 participants with a 6-monthECDof 2500 cells/mm2 or higher. After 5 years’ follow-up, 40 of 277 participants (14%) with a clear graft had an ECD below 500 cells/mm2. Conclusions Preoperative ECD is unrelated to graft failure from endothelial decompensation, whereas there is a strong correlation of ECD at 6 months with graft failure from endothelial decompensation. A graft can remain clear after 5 years even when the ECD is below 500 cells/mm2. PMID:20065219

  6. Endothelial cell density to predict endothelial graft failure after penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lass, Jonathan H; Sugar, Alan; Benetz, Beth Ann; Beck, Roy W; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L; Kollman, Craig; Gross, Robert; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J; Mannis, Mark J; Raber, Irving; Stark, Walter; Stulting, R Doyle

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether preoperative and/or postoperative central endothelial cell density (ECD) and its rate of decline postoperatively are predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation following penetrating keratoplasty to treat a moderate-risk condition, principally, Fuchs dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema. In a subset of Cornea Donor Study participants, a central reading center determined preoperative and postoperative ECD from available specular images for 17 grafts that failed because of endothelial decompensation and 483 grafts that did not fail. Preoperative ECD was not predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation (P = .91). However, the 6-month ECD was predictive of subsequent failure (P < .001). Among those that had not failed within the first 6 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence (+/-95% confidence interval) of failure was 13% (+/-12%) for the 33 participants with a 6-month ECD of less than 1700 cells/mm(2) vs 2% (+/-3%) for the 137 participants with a 6-month ECD of 2500 cells/mm(2) or higher. After 5 years' follow-up, 40 of 277 participants (14%) with a clear graft had an ECD below 500 cells/mm(2). Preoperative ECD is unrelated to graft failure from endothelial decompensation, whereas there is a strong correlation of ECD at 6 months with graft failure from endothelial decompensation. A graft can remain clear after 5 years even when the ECD is below 500 cells/mm(2).

  7. [Research and clinical applications regarding endothelial progenitor cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Kefang; Sun, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial injury or dysfunction leads to multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are precursor cells of endothelial cells, including the early endothelial progenitor cells and the late endothelial progenitor cells. These two EPC types have different function and surface markers. EPC in this article mainly means late endothelial progenitors which could grow into endothelial cloning and form vessels in vivo. Late EPCs can express CD133, CD31, KDR, CD144, CD34 etc, take in low density lipoprotein, bind with ulex europaeus lectin 1 and form blood vessels in vitro and in vivo. EPCs not only participate in new blood vessels formation, but also are closely related to the repair of damaged endothelium. Many studies confirm that the transplanted EPCs are able to be mobilized to vascular injury location and repair the damaged endothelial cells thus promote new blood vessel formation, which provides a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and ischemic diseases.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Circulating Lymphatic Endothelial Colony Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Terri A.; Wentz, Breanna L.; Lagunoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The identification of circulating endothelial progenitor cells has led to speculation regarding their origin as well as their contribution to neovascular development. Two distinct types of endothelium make up the blood and lymphatic vessel system. However, it has yet to be determined whether there are distinct lymphatic-specific circulating endothelial progenitor cells. Objective This study aims to isolate and characterize the cellular properties and global gene expression of lymphatic-specific endothelial progenitor cells. Methods and Results We isolated circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) from whole peripheral blood. These cells are endothelial in nature, as defined by their expression of endothelial markers and their ability to undergo capillary morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. A subset of isolated colonies express markers of lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR-3 and Prox-1, with low levels of VEGFR-1, a blood endothelial marker, while the bulk of the isolated cells express high VEGFR-1 levels with low VEGFR-3 and Prox-1 expression. The different isolates have differential responses to VEGF-C, a lymphatic endothelial specific cytokine, strongly suggesting that there are lymphatic specific and blood specific ECFCs. Global analysis of gene expression revealed key differences in the regulation of pathways involved in cellular differentiation between blood and lymphatic-specific ECFCs. Conclusion These data indicate that there are two distinguishable circulating ECFC types, blood and lymphatic, which are likely to have discrete functions during neovascularization. PMID:26597759

  9. Morphological changes in corneal endothelial cells after penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Laing, R A; Sandstrom, M; Berrospi, A R; Leibowitz, H M

    1976-09-01

    Fifteen patients who had had a successful penetrating keratoplasty were photographed with the clinical specular microscope and the resulting endothelial photomicrographs were analyzed. The average endothelial cell area was one to six times larger and the average endothelial cell perimeter was one to 2 1/2 times larger than that of a normal cornea of a subject the same age as the donor. In each corneal graft, endothelial cell areas and perimeters clustered tightly around a mean value, although the mean value for different corneas varied significantly. The thickness and transparency of each graft was normal, indicating that within the observed limits the success of the transplantation procedure did not depend on final endothelial cell size or perimeter.

  10. Apoptosis of Endothelial Cells by 13-HPODE Contributes to Impairment of Endothelial Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Valerie E.; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential host response during bacterial infections such as bovine mastitis. Endothelial cells are critical for an appropriate inflammatory response and loss of vascular barrier integrity is implicated in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus uberis-induced mastitis. Previous studies suggested that accumulation of linoleic acid (LA) oxygenation products derived from 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) metabolism could regulate vascular functions. The initial LA derivative from the 15-LOX-1 pathway, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE), can induce endothelial death, whereas the reduced hydroxyl product, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), is abundantly produced during vascular activation. However, the relative contribution of specific LA-derived metabolites on impairment of mammary endothelial integrity is unknown. Our hypothesis was that S. uberis-induced LA-derived 15-LOX-1 oxygenation products impair mammary endothelial barrier integrity by apoptosis. Exposure of bovine mammary endothelial cells (BMEC) to S. uberis did not increase 15-LOX-1 LA metabolism. However, S. uberis challenge of bovine monocytes demonstrated that monocytes may be a significant source of both 13-HPODE and 13-HODE during mastitis. Exposure of BMEC to 13-HPODE, but not 13-HODE, significantly reduced endothelial barrier integrity and increased apoptosis. Changing oxidant status by coexposure to an antioxidant during 13-HPODE treatment prevented adverse effects of 13-HPODE, including amelioration of apoptosis. A better understanding of how the oxidant status of the vascular microenvironment impacts endothelial barrier properties could lead to more efficacious treatments for S. uberis mastitis. PMID:27818578

  11. Evaluation of Bioenergetic Function in Cerebral Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rellick, Stephanie L; Hu, Heng; Simpkins, James W; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-11-19

    The integrity of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is critical to prevent brain injury. Cerebral vascular endothelial (CVE) cells are one of the cell types that comprise the BBB; these cells have a very high-energy demand, which requires optimal mitochondrial function. In the case of disease or injury, the mitochondrial function in these cells can be altered, resulting in disease or the opening of the BBB. In this manuscript, we introduce a method to measure mitochondrial function in CVE cells by using whole, intact cells and a bioanalyzer. A mito-stress assay is used to challenge the cells that have been perturbed, either physically or chemically, and evaluate their bioenergetic function. Additionally, this method also provides a useful way to screen new therapeutics that have direct effects on mitochondrial function. We have optimized the cell density necessary to yield oxygen consumption rates that allow for the calculation of a variety of mitochondrial parameters, including ATP production, maximal respiration, and spare capacity. We also show the sensitivity of the assay by demonstrating that the introduction of the microRNA, miR-34a, leads to a pronounced and detectable decrease in mitochondrial activity. While the data shown in this paper is optimized for the bEnd.3 cell line, we have also optimized the protocol for primary CVE cells, further suggesting the utility in preclinical and clinical models.

  12. Interferon-alpha and dexamethasone inhibit adhesion of T cells to endothelial cells and synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A.; Nakashima, M.; Ida, H.; Sakito, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Terada, K.; Sakai, M.; Kawabe, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ishimaru, T.; Kurouji, K.; Fujita, N.; Aoyagi, T.; Maeda, K.; Nagataki, S.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated whether interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and glucocorticoids affected the adhesion of T cells to human umbilical endothelial cells or human synovial cells. About 30% of peripheral blood T cells could bind to unstimulated endothelial cells, but only a few T cells could bind to unstimulated synovial cells. When both endothelial cells and synovial cells were cultured with recombinant IFN-γ (rIFN-γ), the percentage of T cell binding to both types of cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. rIFN-α and dexamethasone blocked the T cell binding to unstimulated endothelial cells. Furthermore, rIFN-α and dexamethasone suppressed T cell binding to both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ, and also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ. These results suggest that IFN-α and glucocorticoids may inhibit T cell binding to endothelial cells or synovial cells by modulating adhesion molecule expression on these cells. PMID:1606729

  13. Rapid cytopathic effects of Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin on porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gurtner, Corinne; Popescu, Francesca; Wyder, Marianne; Sutter, Esther; Zeeh, Friederike; Frey, Joachim; von Schubert, Conrad; Posthaus, Horst

    2010-07-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates cause fatal, segmental necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in animals and humans. Typically, acute intestinal lesions result from extensive mucosal necrosis and hemorrhage in the proximal jejunum. These lesions are frequently accompanied by microvascular thrombosis in affected intestinal segments. In previous studies we demonstrated that there is endothelial localization of C. perfringens type C beta-toxin (CPB) in acute lesions of necrotizing enteritis. This led us to hypothesize that CPB contributes to vascular necrosis by directly damaging endothelial cells. By performing additional immunohistochemical studies using spontaneously diseased piglets, we confirmed that CPB binds to the endothelial lining of vessels showing early signs of thrombosis. To investigate whether CPB can disrupt the endothelium, we exposed primary porcine aortic endothelial cells to C. perfringens type C culture supernatants and recombinant CPB. Both treatments rapidly induced disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, cell border retraction, and cell shrinkage, leading to destruction of the endothelial monolayer in vitro. These effects were followed by cell death. Cytopathic and cytotoxic effects were inhibited by neutralization of CPB. Taken together, our results suggest that CPB-induced disruption of endothelial cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type C enteritis.

  14. Brugia malayi Asparaginyl - tRNA Synthetase Stimulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Vasodilation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D, Jeeva Jothi; Dhanraj, Muthu; Solaiappan, Shanmugam; Sivanesan, Sanjana; Kron, Michael; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic infection with lymphatic filarial parasites is the development of lymphatic disease which often results in permanent vasodilation and lymphedema, but all of the mechanisms by which filarial parasites induce pathology are not known. Prior work showed that the asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (BmAsnRS) of Brugia malayi, an etiological agent of lymphatic filariasis, acts as a physiocrine that binds specifically to interleukin-8 (IL-8) chemokine receptors. Endothelial cells are one of the many cell types that express IL-8 receptors. IL-8 also has been reported previously to induce angiogenesis and vasodilation, however, the effect of BmAsnRS on endothelial cells has not been reported. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that BmAsnRS might produce physiological changes in endothelial by studying the in vitro effects of BmAsnRS using a human umbilical vein cell line EA.hy926 and six different endothelial cell assays. Our results demonstrated that BmAsnRS produces consistent and statistically significant effects on endothelial cells that are identical to the effects of VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. This study supports the idea that new drugs or immunotherapies that counteract the adverse effects of parasite-derived physiocrines may prevent or ameliorate the vascular pathology observed in patients with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26751209

  15. Podocalyxin Regulates Murine Lung Vascular Permeability by Altering Endothelial Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Debruin, Erin J.; Hughes, Michael R.; Sina, Christina; Liu, Alex; Cait, Jessica; Jian, Zhiqi; Lopez, Martin; Lo, Bernard; Abraham, Thomas; McNagny, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of CD34-family sialomucins (CD34, podocalyxin and endoglycan) as vascular endothelial cell markers, there is remarkably little known of their vascular function. Podocalyxin (gene name Podxl), in particular, has been difficult to study in adult vasculature as germ-line deletion of podocalyxin in mice leads to kidney malformations and perinatal death. We generated mice that conditionally delete podocalyxin in vascular endothelial cells (PodxlΔEC mice) to study the homeostatic role of podocalyxin in adult mouse vessels. Although PodxlΔEC adult mice are viable, their lungs display increased lung volume and changes to the matrix composition. Intriguingly, this was associated with increased basal and inflammation-induced pulmonary vascular permeability. To further investigate the etiology of these defects, we isolated mouse pulmonary endothelial cells. PodxlΔEC endothelial cells display mildly enhanced static adhesion to fibronectin but spread normally when plated on fibronectin-coated transwells. In contrast, PodxlΔEC endothelial cells exhibit a severely impaired ability to spread on laminin and, to a lesser extent, collagen I coated transwells. The data suggest that, in endothelial cells, podocalyxin plays a previously unrecognized role in maintaining vascular integrity, likely through orchestrating interactions with extracellular matrix components and basement membranes, and that this influences downstream epithelial architecture. PMID:25303643

  16. Development of new therapeutic modalities for corneal endothelial disease focused on the proliferation of corneal endothelial cells using animal models.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Noriko; Okumura, Naoki; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2012-02-01

    This review describes our recent attempts to develop new therapeutic modalities for corneal endothelial disease using animal models including non-human primate model in which the proliferative ability of corneal endothelial cells is severely limited, as is the case in humans. First, we describe our attempt to develop new surgical treatments using cultivated corneal endothelial cells for advanced corneal endothelial dysfunction. It includes two different approaches; a "corneal endothelial cell sheet transplantation" with cells grown on a type-I collagen carrier, and a "cell-injection therapy" combined with the application of Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. Recently, it was reported that the selective ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, promotes cell adhesion and proliferation and inhibits the apoptosis of primate corneal endothelial cells in culture. When cultivated corneal endothelial cells were injected into the anterior chamber of animal eyes in the presence of ROCK inhibitor, endothelial cell adhesion was promoted and the cells achieved a high cell density and a morphology similar to corneal endothelial cells in vivo. We are also trying to develop a novel medical treatment for the early phase of corneal endothelial disease by the use of ROCK inhibitor eye drops. In rabbit and monkey experiments using partial endothelial dysfunction models, corneal endothelial wound healing was accelerated by the topical application of ROCK inhibitor to the ocular surface, and resulted in the regeneration of a corneal endothelial monolayer with a high endothelial cell density. We are now trying to advance the clinical application of these new therapies for patients with corneal endothelial dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  18. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  19. The impact of microgravity and hypergravity on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maier, Jeanette A M; Cialdai, Francesca; Monici, Monica; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs), which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature.

  20. The Impact of Microgravity and Hypergravity on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs), which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature. PMID:25654101

  1. Sulodexide reduces senescence-related changes in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suminska-Jasinska, Katarzyna; Polubinska, Alicja; Ciszewicz, Marta; Mikstacki, Adam; Antoniewicz, Artur; Breborowicz, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Senescent endothelial cells acquire functional properties that make the vascular wall more prone to atherosclerotic changes. We tested whether senescence of the endothelial cells maintained in in vitro culture can be moderated by their simultaneous exposure to sulodexide. Material/Methods Replicative aging of the endothelial cells was studied during their 15 passages performed every 4 days in cells cultured in standard medium or in medium supplemented with sulodexide 0.5 LRU/mL. Changes in population doubling time and β-galactosidase activity were used as indexes of aging and compared with other cellular parameters. Results Repeated passages of endothelial cells induce their senescence, as reflected by prolongation of the population doubling time, increased β-galactosidase activity, oxidative stress and release of cytokines. Healing of the injured endothelial monolayer is impaired in senescent cells. Sulodexide partially prevents oxidative stress and totally eliminates other senescence-related changes such as increased release of MCP-1, lengthening of the population doubling time, and impaired healing of the cellular monolayer after its mechanical injury. Conclusions Sulodexide prevented cellular senescence in cultured endothelial cells, moderating features of the cellular senescence in endothelial cells in in vitro conditions, which potentially may have practical application. The administration of sulodexide could potentially be used in prevention of atherosclerotic changes. PMID:21455109

  2. Autocrine VEGF Isoforms Differentially Regulate Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Rundqvist, Helene; Branco, Cristina; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration, and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell homeostasis in

  3. Targeting Endothelial Cells with Multifunctional GaN/Fe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braniste, Tudor; Tiginyanu, Ion; Horvath, Tibor; Raevschi, Simion; Andrée, Birgit; Cebotari, Serghei; Boyle, Erin C.; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the interaction of multifunctional nanoparticles with living endothelial cells. The nanoparticles were synthesized using direct growth of gallium nitride on zinc oxide nanoparticles alloyed with iron oxide followed by core decomposition in hydrogen flow at high temperature. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that porcine aortic endothelial cells take up GaN-based nanoparticles suspended in the growth medium. The nanoparticles are deposited in vesicles and the endothelial cells show no sign of cellular damage. Intracellular inert nanoparticles are used as guiding elements for controlled transportation or designed spatial distribution of cells in external magnetic fields.

  4. Mutual interaction between endothelial cells and mural cells enhances BMP9 signaling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tachida, Yuki; Izumi, Nanae; Sakurai, Toyo; Kobayashi, Hideki

    2017-03-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is characterized by the formation of abnormal vascular networks and caused by the mutation of genes involved in BMP9 signaling. It is also known that the interaction between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells (MCs) is critical to maintain vessel integrity. However, it has not yet fully been uncovered whether the EC-MC interaction affects BMP9 signaling or not. To elucidate this point, we analyzed BMP9 signaling in a co-culture of several types of human primary culture ECs and MCs. The co-culture activated the Notch pathway in both types of cells in a co-culture- and BMP9-dependent manner. In HUVECs, the genes induced by BMP9 were significantly and synergistically induced in the presence of pericytes, fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. The synergistic induction was greatly reduced in a non-contact condition. In fibroblasts, PDGFRB expression was potently induced in the presence of HUVECs, and BMP9 additively increased this response. Taken together, these results suggest that the EC-MC interaction potentiates BMP9 signaling both in ECs and MCs and plays a critical role in the maintenance of proper vessel functions.

  5. Mutual interaction between endothelial cells and mural cells enhances BMP9 signaling in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tachida, Yuki; Izumi, Nanae; Sakurai, Toyo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is characterized by the formation of abnormal vascular networks and caused by the mutation of genes involved in BMP9 signaling. It is also known that the interaction between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells (MCs) is critical to maintain vessel integrity. However, it has not yet fully been uncovered whether the EC–MC interaction affects BMP9 signaling or not. To elucidate this point, we analyzed BMP9 signaling in a co-culture of several types of human primary culture ECs and MCs. The co-culture activated the Notch pathway in both types of cells in a co-culture- and BMP9-dependent manner. In HUVECs, the genes induced by BMP9 were significantly and synergistically induced in the presence of pericytes, fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. The synergistic induction was greatly reduced in a non-contact condition. In fibroblasts, PDGFRB expression was potently induced in the presence of HUVECs, and BMP9 additively increased this response. Taken together, these results suggest that the EC–MC interaction potentiates BMP9 signaling both in ECs and MCs and plays a critical role in the maintenance of proper vessel functions. PMID:28298363

  6. Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Basalis Reduce Endothelial Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Alshabibi, Manal A; Al Huqail, Al Joharah; Khatlani, Tanvir; Abomaray, Fawaz M; Alaskar, Ahmed S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Kalionis, Bill; Abumaree, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-09-15

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from the decidua basalis of human placenta (DBMSCs). These cells express a unique combination of molecules involved in many important cellular functions, which make them good candidates for cell-based therapies. The endothelium is a highly specialized, metabolically active interface between blood and the underlying tissues. Inflammatory factors stimulate the endothelium to undergo a change to a proinflammatory and procoagulant state (ie, endothelial cell activation). An initial response to endothelial cell activation is monocyte adhesion. Activation typically involves increased proliferation and enhanced expression of adhesion and inflammatory markers by endothelial cells. Sustained endothelial cell activation leads to a type of damage to the body associated with inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the ability of DBMSCs to protect endothelial cells from activation through monocyte adhesion, by modulating endothelial proliferation, migration, adhesion, and inflammatory marker expression. Endothelial cells were cocultured with DBMSCs, monocytes, monocyte-pretreated with DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes were also evaluated. Monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was examined following treatment with DBMSCs. Expression of endothelial cell adhesion and inflammatory markers was also analyzed. The interaction between DBMSCs and monocytes reduced endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cell migration increased in response to DBMSCs and monocytes. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion and inflammatory molecules was reduced by DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes. The mechanism of reduced endothelial proliferation involved enhanced phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our study shows for the first time that DBMSCs protect endothelial cells from activation by

  7. Focally regulated endothelial proliferation and cell death in human synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. A.; Wade, M.; Mapp, P. I.; Blake, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular insufficiency each may support the chronic synovial inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis. We have shown by quantitative immunohistochemistry and terminal uridyl deoxynucleotide nick end labeling that endothelial proliferation and cell death indices were each increased in synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with osteoarthritic and noninflamed controls, whereas endothelial fractional areas did not differ significantly among disease groups. Markers of proliferation were associated with foci immunoreactive for vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin alpha(v)beta3, whereas cell death was observed in foci in which immunoreactivities for these factors were weak or absent. No association was found with thrombospondin immunoreactivity. The balance between angiogenesis and vascular regression in rheumatoid synovitis may be determined by the focal expression of angiogenic and endothelial survival factors. Increased endothelial cell turnover may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and thereby facilitate persistent synovitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9502411

  8. Defining Minimum Essential Factors to Derive Highly Pure Human Endothelial Cells from iPS/ES Cells in an Animal Substance-Free System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I.-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-01-01

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner. PMID:25864432

  9. Defining minimum essential factors to derive highly pure human endothelial cells from iPS/ES cells in an animal substance-free system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-04-13

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner.

  10. Pharmacological aspects of targeting cancer gene therapy to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, H H

    2001-03-01

    Targeting cancer gene therapy to endothelial cells seems to be a rational approach, because (a) a clear correlation exists between proliferation of tumor vessels and tumor growth and malignancy, (b) differences of cell membrane structures between tumor endothelial cells and normal endothelial cells exist which could be used for targeting of vectors and (c) tumor endothelial cells are accessible to vector vehicles in spite of the peculiarities of the transvascular and interstitial blood flow in tumors. Based on the knowledge on the pharmacokinetics of macromolecules it can be concluded that vectors targeting tumor endothelial cells should own a long blood residence time after intravascular application. This precondition seems to be fulfilled best by vectors exhibiting a slight anionic charge. A long blood residence time would allow the formation of a high amount of complexes between tumor endothelial cells and vector particles. Such high amount of complexes should enable a high transfection rate of tumor endothelial cells. In view of their pharmacokinetic behavior nonviral vectors seem to be more suitable for in vivo targeting tumor endothelial cells than viral vectors. Specific binding of nonviral vectors to tumor endothelial cells should be enhanced by multifunctional ligands and the transduction efficiency should be improved by cationic carriers. Effector genes should encode proteins potent enough to induce reactions which eliminate the tumor tissue. To be effective to that degree such proteins should induce self-amplifying antitumor reactions. Examples for proteins which have the potential to induce such self-amplifying tumor reactions are proteins endowed with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity, enzymes which convert prodrugs into drugs and possibly also proteins which induce embolization of tumor vessels. The pharmacological data for such examples are discussed in detail.

  11. The natural antioxidants, pomegranate extract and soy isoflavones, favourably modulate canine endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that "vasoprotective factors" (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas "risk factors" such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs.

  12. The Natural Antioxidants, Pomegranate Extract and Soy Isoflavones, Favourably Modulate Canine Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M.; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that “vasoprotective factors” (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas “risk factors” such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs. PMID:23762588

  13. Systematic high-content genome-wide RNAi screens of endothelial cell migration and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Steven P.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Karnezis, Tara; Achen, Marc G.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Stacker, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    Many cell types undergo migration during embryogenesis and disease. Endothelial cells line blood vessels and lymphatics, which migrate during development as part of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other types of vessel remodelling. These processes are also important in wound healing, cancer metastasis and cardiovascular conditions. However, the molecular control of endothelial cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we present a dataset containing siRNA screens that identify known and novel components of signalling pathways regulating migration of lymphatic endothelial cells. These components are compared to signalling in blood vascular endothelial cells. Further, using high-content microscopy, we captured a dataset of images of migrating cells following transfection with a genome-wide siRNA library. These datasets are suitable for the identification and analysis of genes involved in endothelial cell migration and morphology, and for computational approaches to identify signalling networks controlling the migratory response and integration of cell morphology, gene function and cell signaling. This may facilitate identification of protein targets for therapeutically modulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the context of human disease. PMID:28248931

  14. Androgens Modulate Endothelial Function and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Erectile Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Galoosian, Artin

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with age and cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. These risk factors are thought to contribute to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thus contributing to the pathophysiology of ED. The role of the endothelium in regulating erectile physiology is well established. However, the role of androgens in modulating endothelial function and endothelial repair mechanisms subsequent to vascular injury in erectile tissue remains a subject of intensive research. The clinical and preclinical evidence discussed in this review suggests that androgens regulate endothelial function and also play an important role in the development and maturation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are thought to play a critical role in repair of endothelial injury in vascular beds. In this review, we discuss the data available on the effects of androgens on endothelial function and EPCs in the repair of vascular injury. Indeed, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular and cellular basis of androgen action in regulating the development, differentiation, maturation, migration, and homing of EPCs to the site of injury. A better understanding of these processes will be critical to the development of new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of vascular ED. PMID:24255752

  15. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  16. Propranolol inhibits endothelial progenitor cell homing: a possible treatment mechanism of infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hai-Xiao; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Propranolol effectively treats infantile hemangioma, but its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Although the antiangiogenesis role of propranolol has been previously demonstrated, several lines of evidence suggest that this therapeutic agent may affect the neovascular formation in infantile hemangioma by targeting vasculogenesis. In addition, the homing of endothelial progenitor cells to the lesion of infantile hemangioma plays an important role during the process of vasculogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether propranolol inhibits the vasculogenesis in infantile hemangioma by targeting endothelial progenitor cells recruitment. Endothelial progenitor cells were treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μM) of propranolol for indicated times (24, 48, 72 h). Cell proliferation and viability were assessed by MTT assay and trypan blue staining. Cell migration was determined by wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. The expression levels of extracellular signal regulated kinase, phospho-extracellular signal regulated kinase, Akt, and phospho-Akt were measured by Western blot analysis to explore the molecular mechanism of propranolol on endothelial progenitor cells. In addition, the expression of CXCR4 was measured by Western blot and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Propranolol did not significantly affect the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells. It inhibited stromal-cell-derived factor 1α-induced migration of endothelial progenitor cells through the Akt and MAPK pathways and the expression of CXCR4 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of CXCR4 was suppressed by propranolol most likely through the Akt and MAPK pathways. Propranolol inhibits stromal-cell-derived factor 1α-induced endothelial progenitor cell homing by suppressing the expression of CXCR4 most likely through the Akt and MAPK pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Endothelial Cell Morphology and Migration are Altered by Changes in Gravitational Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhado, Caroline; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cell migration is important to vascular wall regeneration following injury or stress. However, the mechanism(s) governing this response is not well understood. The microgravity environment of space may complicate the response of these cells to injury. To date, there are no reports in this area. We examined how bovine aortic (BAEC) and pulmonary (BPEC) endothelial cells respond to denudation injury under hypergravity (HGrav) and simulated microgravity (MGrav), using image analysis. In 10% FBS, the migration of confluent BAEC and BPEC into the denuded area was not affected by HGrav or MGrav. However, in low FBS (0.5%), signficantly retarded migration under MGrav, and increased migration under HGrav was found. MGrav also decreased the migration of postconfluent BPEC while HGrav showed no difference. Both MGrav and HGrav strongly decreased the migration of postconfluent BAEC. Also, both cell lines showed significant morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. These studies indicate that endothelial cell function is affected by changes in gravity.

  18. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  19. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  20. Cellular senescence determines endothelial cell damage induced by uremia.

    PubMed

    Carracedo, Julia; Buendía, Paula; Merino, Ana; Soriano, Sagrario; Esquivias, Elvira; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is closely associated with endothelial damage leading to cardiovascular disease. However, the extent to which endothelial damage induced by uremia is modulated by aging is poorly known. Aging can render endothelial cells more susceptible to apoptosis through an oxidative stress-dependent pathway. We examined whether senescence-associated to oxidative stress determines the injury induced by the uremia in endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was incubated with human uremic serum and, in the animal model, endothelial cells were obtained from aortas of uremic and no uremic rats. Vitamin C was used to prevent oxidative stress. Senescence, assessed by telomere length and enzyme-betagalactosidase (β-gal), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial depolarization (JC-1 probe), caspase 3, and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. NF-κB activity was determined by Western blot. Uremic serum increased ROS and NF-κB in young and aging HUVEC. However only in aging cells, uremic serum induced apoptosis (vs young HUVEC, p<0.01). The endothelial damage induced by uremia seems to be related with the increased oxidative stress, since in both HUVEC and in the experimental model of renal disease in rats, vitamin C prevents endothelial apoptosis. However, vitamin C did not decrease the oxidative stress associated to senescence. These results showed that as compared with young cells, senescent cells have high sensitivity to damage associated to the oxidative stress induced by the uremia. Consequently, protecting senescent endothelial cells from increased oxidative stress might be an effective therapeutic approach in the treatment of vascular disorders in chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Ascorbate Transporters in Brain Cortical Capillary Endothelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Ascorbic acid in its reduced form is not transported across the capillary endothelial cell blood-brain barrier. This is thought to be due to absence of the SVCT2, a specific transporter for ascorbate. To assess this directly we prepared primary cultures of mouse cortical microvascular endothelial cells. When still in the capillaries, these cells did not express the SVCT2 protein as assessed by immunocytochemistry and by immunoblotting. However, during several days in culture, they developed SVCT2 expression and showed ascorbate transport rates comparable to those in immortalized endothelial cell lines. SVCT2 expression was inversely proportional to cell density, was enhanced by culture at low physiologic plasma ascorbate concentrations, was inhibited by ascorbate concentrations expected in the brain interstitium, and was stimulated by cobalt ions. Expression of the SVCT2 was associated with ascorbate-dependent maturation and release of type IV collagen by the cells in culture. Although the SVCT2 is induced by culture of cortical capillary endothelial cells, its absence in vivo remains perplexing, given the need for intracellular ascorbate to facilitate type IV collagen maturation and release by endothelial cells. PMID:18394593

  2. Endothelial colony-forming cells ameliorate endothelial dysfunction via secreted factors following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Collett, Jason A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Crone, Allison; Shelley, W Christopher; Yoder, Mervin C; Basile, David P

    2017-05-01

    Damage to endothelial cells contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI) by leading to impaired perfusion. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are endothelial precursor cells with high proliferative capacity, pro-angiogenic activity, and in vivo vessel forming potential. We hypothesized that ECFC may ameliorate the degree of AKI and/or promote repair of the renal vasculature following ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with high proliferative potential were compared with pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) with low proliferative potential in rats subjected to renal I/R. PMVEC administration reduced renal injury and hastened recovery as indicated by serum creatinine and tubular injury scores, while PAEC did not. Vehicle-treated control animals showed consistent reductions in renal medullary blood flow (MBF) within 2 h of reperfusion, while PMVEC protected against loss in MBF as measured by laser Doppler. Interestingly, PMVEC mediated protection occurred in the absence of homing to the kidney. Conditioned medium (CM) from human cultured cord blood ECFC also conveyed beneficial effects against I/R injury and loss of MBF. Moreover, ECFC-CM significantly reduced the expression of ICAM-1 and decreased the number of differentiated lymphocytes typically recruited into the kidney following renal ischemia. Taken together, these data suggest that ECFC secrete factors that preserve renal function post ischemia, in part, by preserving microvascular function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Effects of diabetic HDL on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Pan, Bing; Ren, Hui; Zheng, Lemin

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is accompanied by dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and this is characterized by alterations in its composition and structure compared with HDL from normal subjects (N-HDL). HDL from diabetic subjects (D-HDL) has a diminished endothelial protective capacity including reducted ability to exert antioxidative activity, stimulate endothelial cell (EC) production of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent vasomotion, promote endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-mediated endothelial repair. In addition, D-HDL promotes EC proliferation, migration and adhesion to the matrix. The present review provides an overview of these effects of diabetic HDL on EC function, as well as the possible changes of D-HDL structure and composition which may be responsible for the diminished endothelial protective capacity of D-HDL.

  4. Crosstalk between cancer cells and blood endothelial and lymphatic endothelial cells in tumour and organ microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour and organ microenvironments are crucial for cancer progression and metastasis. Crosstalk between multiple non-malignant cell types in the microenvironments and cancer cells promotes tumour growth and metastasis. Blood and lymphatic endothelial cells (BEC and LEC) are two of the components in the microenvironments. Tumour blood vessels (BV), comprising BEC, serve as conduits for blood supply into the tumour, and are important for tumour growth as well as haematogenous tumour dissemination. Lymphatic vessels (LV), comprising LEC, which are relatively leaky compared with BV, are essential for lymphogenous tumour dissemination. In addition to describing the conventional roles of the BV and LV, we also discuss newly emerging roles of these endothelial cells: their crosstalk with cancer cells via molecules secreted by the BEC and LEC (also called angiocrine and lymphangiocrine factors). This review suggests that BEC and LEC in various microenvironments can be orchestrators of tumour progression and proposes new mechanism-based strategies to discover new therapies to supplement conventional anti-angiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic therapies. PMID:25634527

  5. T-cell receptor-negative natural killer cells display antigen-specific cytotoxicity for microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, J R; Pardi, R; Engleman, E

    1990-09-01

    Based upon prior demonstrations that human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) could serve as natural killer (NK) cell targets, we established NK cell lines and clones by repeated stimulation of highly purified CD16-positive, CD3/T-cell receptor (Ti)-negative cells with allogeneic ECs. After 3 weeks in culture these lymphoid cells, which neither expressed surface CD3/Ti molecules nor rearranged Ti beta- or gamma-chain genes and which lysed K562 human erythroleukemia cells, displayed specific cytotoxicity for the stimulating ECs. Furthermore, freshly isolated NK cells bound and then removed from each of several allogeneic EC lines displayed selective cytotoxicity for the adsorbing EC line. These results provide evidence for alloantigen-specific recognition of microvascular ECs by NK cells that appears to be determined, at least in part, at the level of adherence. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

  6. Substrates for Expansion of Corneal Endothelial Cells towards Bioengineering of Human Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Jesintha; Utheim, Tor P.; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Shahdadfar, Aboulghassem

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium is a single layer of specialized cells that lines the posterior surface of cornea and maintains corneal hydration and corneal transparency essential for vision. Currently, transplantation is the only therapeutic option for diseases affecting the corneal endothelium. Transplantation of corneal endothelium, called endothelial keratoplasty, is widely used for corneal endothelial diseases. However, corneal transplantation is limited by global donor shortage. Therefore, there is a need to overcome the deficiency of sufficient donor corneal tissue. New approaches are being explored to engineer corneal tissues such that sufficient amount of corneal endothelium becomes available to offset the present shortage of functional cornea. Although human corneal endothelial cells have limited proliferative capacity in vivo, several laboratories have been successful in in vitro expansion of human corneal endothelial cells. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of different substrates employed for in vitro cultivation of human corneal endothelial cells. Advances and emerging challenges with ex vivo cultured corneal endothelial layer for the ultimate goal of therapeutic replacement of dysfunctional corneal endothelium in humans with functional corneal endothelium are also presented. PMID:26378588

  7. Endothelial cells are intrinsically defective in xenophagy of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiou-Ling; Kawabata, Tsuyoshi; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Omori, Hiroko; Hamasaki, Maho; Kusaba, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Ryo; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is deleterious pathogenic bacteria whose interaction with blood vessels leads to life-threatening bacteremia. Although xenophagy, a special form of autophagy, eliminates invading GAS in epithelial cells, we found that GAS could survive and multiply in endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were competent in starvation-induced autophagy, but failed to form double-membrane structures surrounding GAS, an essential step in xenophagy. This deficiency stemmed from reduced recruitment of ubiquitin and several core autophagy proteins in endothelial cells, as demonstrated by the fact that it could be rescued by exogenous coating of GAS with ubiquitin. The defect was associated with reduced NO-mediated ubiquitin signaling. Therefore, we propose that the lack of efficient clearance of GAS in endothelial cells is caused by their intrinsic inability to target GAS with ubiquitin to promote autophagosome biogenesis for xenophagy. PMID:28683091

  8. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. PMID:22683922

  9. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  10. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  11. Generation and Characterization of Telomerase-Transfected Human Lymphatic Endothelial Cells with an Extended Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Nisato, Riccardo E.; Harrison, Jillian A.; Buser, Raphaele; Orci, Lelio; Rinsch, Chris; Montesano, Roberto; Dupraz, Philippe; Pepper, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    The study of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphangiogenesis has, in the past, been hampered by the lack of lymphatic endothelial-specific markers. The recent discovery of several such markers has permitted the isolation of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) from human skin. However, cell numbers are limited and purity is variable with the different isolation procedures. To overcome these problems, we have transfected human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVECs) with a retrovirus containing the coding region of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and have produced a cell line, hTERT-HDLEC, with an extended lifespan. hTERT-HDLEC exhibit a typical cobblestone morphology when grown in culture, are contact-inhibited, and express endothelial cell-specific markers. hTERT-HDLEC also express the recognized lymphatic markers, Prox-1, LYVE-1 and podoplanin, as well as integrin α9, but do not express CD34. They also form tube-like structures in three-dimensional collagen gels when stimulated with vascular endothelial growth factors -A and -C. Based on these currently recognized criteria, these cells are LEC. Surprisingly, we also found that the widely studied HMEC-1 cell line expresses recognized lymphatic markers; however, these cells are also CD34-positive. In summary, the ectopic expression of hTERT increases the life span of LECs and does not affect their capacity to form tube-like structures in a collagen matrix. The production and characterization of hTERT-HDLEC will facilitate the study of the properties of lymphatic endothelium in vitro. PMID:15215158

  12. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation. PMID:26108661

  13. Gemcitabine kills proliferating endothelial cells exclusively via acid sphingomyelinase activation.

    PubMed

    van Hell, Albert J; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Tap, William D; Kolesnick, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Gemcitabine is a widely-used anti-cancer drug with a well-defined mechanism of action in normal and transformed epithelial cells. However, its effect on endothelial cells is largely unknown. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) is highly expressed in endothelial cells, converting plasma membrane sphingomyelin to pro-apoptotic ceramide upon activation by diverse stresses. In the current study, we investigated gemcitabine impact in primary cultures of endothelial cells. We find baseline ASMase increases markedly in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) as they transit from a proliferative to a confluent growth-arrested state. Further, gemcitabine activates ASMase and induces release of a secretory ASMase form into the media only in proliferating endothelial cells. Additionally, proliferative, but not growth-arrested BAEC, are sensitive to gemcitabine-induced apoptotic death, an effect blocked by inhibiting ASMase with imipramine or by binding ceramide on the cell surface with an anti-ceramide Ab. Confluent growth-arrested BAEC can be re-sensitized to gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by provision of exogenous sphingomyelinase. A highly similar phenotype was observed in primary cultures of human coronary artery endothelial cells. These findings reveal a previously-unrecognized mechanism of gemcitabine cytotoxicity in endothelium that may well contribute to its clinical benefit, and suggest the potential for further improvement of its clinical efficacy via pharmacologic modulation of ASMase/ceramide signaling in proliferative tumor endothelium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of the beta 7 integrin by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brezinschek, R. I.; Brezinschek, H. P.; Lazarovits, A. I.; Lipsky, P. E.; Oppenheimer-Marks, N.

    1996-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors mediate fundamental intercellular interactions of many cell types as well as cellular interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. To date, the beta 7 integrin has been shown to be expressed by leukocyte subsets and to mediate interactions of these cells with extracellular matrix molecules as well as with endothelial and epithelial cells. The data presented here indicate that human endothelial cells also express the beta 7 integrin both in vitro and in situ. Analysis of cDNA indicated that endothelial beta 7 was identical to that expressed by leukocytes. Cell surface expression of beta 7 was increased by exposure of the endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta. In leukocytes, beta 7 complexes with alpha 4 or alpha E integrin chains. Endothelial cells also expressed a number of alpha-integrin chains, including alpha 4, but not alpha E. The expression and utilization of beta 7, presumably complexed with alpha 4, by endothelial cells may be instrumental in the maintenance of the function or phenotype of endothelial cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8909254

  15. Elevated PTH induces endothelial-to-chondrogenic transition in aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Tang, Ri-Ning; Crowley, Steven D; Liu, Hong; Lv, Lin-Li; Ma, Kun-Ling; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) attributable to secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease accelerates the arteriosclerotic fibrosis and calcification. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, endothelial cells (ECs) have recently been demonstrated to participate in calcification in part by providing chondrogenic cells via the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether elevated PTH could induce endothelial-to-chondrogenic transition in aortic ECs and to determine the possible underlying signaling pathway. We found that treatment of ECs with PTH significantly upregulated the expression of EndMT-related markers. Accordingly, ECs treated with PTH exhibited chondrogenic potential. In vivo, lineage-tracing model-subjected mice with endothelial-specific green fluorescent protein fluorescence to chronic PTH infusion showed a marked increase in the aortic expression of chondrocyte markers, and confocal microscopy revealed the endothelial origin of cells expressing chondrocyte markers in the aorta after PTH infusion. Furthermore, this in vitro study showed that PTH enhanced the nuclear localization of β-catenin in ECs, whereas β-catenin siRNA or DKK1, an inhibitor of β-catenin nuclear translocation, attenuated the upregulation of EndMT-associated and chondrogenic markers induced by PTH. In summary, our study demonstrated that elevated PTH could induce the transition of ECs to chondrogenic cells via EndMT, possibly mediated by the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  17. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  18. Arteries provide essential guidance cues for lymphatic endothelial cells in the zebrafish trunk.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Bos, Frank L; Urasaki, Akihiro; Kawakami, Koichi; Duckers, Henricus J; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    The endothelial cells of the vertebrate lymphatic system assemble into complex networks, but local cues that guide the migration of this distinct set of cells are currently unknown. As a model for lymphatic patterning, we have studied the simple vascular network of the zebrafish trunk consisting of three types of lymphatic vessels that develop in close connection with the blood vasculature. We have generated transgenic lines that allow us to distinguish between arterial, venous and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) within a single zebrafish embryo. We found that LECs migrate exclusively along arteries in a manner that suggests that arterial endothelial cells serve as the LEC migratory substrate. In the absence of intersegmental arteries, LEC migration in the trunk is blocked. Our data therefore demonstrate a crucial role for arteries in LEC guidance.

  19. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, Susan L.; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4–stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechanosensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking. PMID:16172263

  20. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, Susan L; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2005-09-19

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4-stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechano-sensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking.

  1. The use of novel lymphatic endothelial cell-specific immunohistochemical markers to differentiate cutaneous angiosarcomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Halsey, C H C; Worley, D R; Curran, K; Charles, J B; Ehrhart, E J

    2016-09-01

    Lymphangiosarcomas are uncommon vascular neoplasms that arise from lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). They efface and replace normal subcutaneous tissue and are characterised by arborising, vascular channels lined by a single layer of pleomorphic endothelial cells and a paucity of erythrocytes. Lymphangiosarcomas are architecturally similar to hemangiosarcomas, a common malignancy of vascular origin arising from blood vascular endothelial cells. Common immunohistochemical markers for vascular endothelium, such as Factor VIII-related antigen (F8RA) and CD31, have traditionally been used to confirm the diagnosis of tumours of vascular origin. However, these markers fail to differentiate between lymphangiosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma, which often show overlapping morphologic features, disparate clinical behaviour and require different treatment modalities. Here we describe the use of two novel LEC-specific markers, lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 (LYVE-1) and prospero-related homeobox gene-1 (PROX-1), to further differentiate between vascular tumours of lymphatic (lymphangiosarcoma) and blood (hemangiosarcoma) endothelial cell origin in the dog.

  2. Convolution neural network for contour extraction of corneal endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katafuchi, Saya; Yoshimura, Motohide

    2017-03-01

    The corneal endothelial cells exist on the human's cornea. To extract every cell contour from them is indispensable for the assessment of cell condition. However, it is difficult to distinguish the contour of large cells from the cytoplasm because of their homogeneity of gray scale pattern. In this paper, we construct the CNNs for the precise cell extraction regardless to scale of the cell. We utilize software library Caffe as a Deep Learning framework. We show the effectiveness of CNNs for the contour extraction of corneal endothelial cells.

  3. Intradialytic hypertension and its association with endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Inrig, Jula K; Van Buren, Peter; Kim, Catherine; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Povsic, Thomas J; Toto, Robert D

    2011-08-01

    Intradialytic hypertension is associated with adverse outcomes, yet the mechanism is uncertain. Patients with intradialytic hypertension exhibit imbalances in endothelial-derived vasoregulators nitric oxide and endothelin-1, indirectly suggesting endothelial cell dysfunction. We hypothesized that intradialytic hypertension is associated in vivo with endothelial cell dysfunction, a novel predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We performed a case-control cohort study including 25 hemodialysis (HD) subjects without (controls) and 25 with intradialytic hypertension (an increase in systolic BP pre- to postdialysis ≥10 mmHg ≥4/6 consecutive HD sessions). The primary outcome was peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) assessed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(br)) and cell surface marker expression (CD34(+)CD133(+)). We also assessed endothelial function by ultrasonographic measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) normalized for shear stress. Parametric and nonparametric t tests were used to compare EPCs, FMD, and BP. Baseline characteristics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Compared with controls, 2-week average predialysis systolic BP was lower among subjects with intradialytic hypertension (144.0 versus 155.5 mmHg), but postdialysis systolic BP was significantly higher (159.0 versus 128.1 mmHg). Endothelial cell function was impaired among subjects with intradialytic hypertension as measured by decreased median ALDH(br) cells and decreased CD34(+)CD133(+) cells (ALDH(br), 0.034% versus 0.053%; CD34(+)CD133(+), 0.033% versus 0.059%). FMD was lower among subjects with intradialytic hypertension (1.03% versus 1.67%). Intradialytic hypertension is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction. We propose that endothelial cell dysfunction may partially explain the higher event rates observed in these patients.

  4. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria: reduction of endothelial cell apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Christoph Josef; Lehr, Hans Anton; Westphal, Kathi; Unverricht, Marcus; Kratzius, Manja; Reisinger, Emil Christian

    2005-03-01

    Organ failure in Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with neutrophil activation and endothelial damage. This study investigates whether neutrophil-induced endothelial damage involves apoptosis and whether it can be prevented by neutralization of neutrophil secretory products. Endothelial cells from human umbilical veins were coincubated with neutrophils from healthy donors and with sera from eight patients with P. falciparum malaria, three patients with P. vivax malaria, and three healthy controls. Endothelial apoptosis was demonstrated by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V staining. The rate of apoptosis of cells was markedly increased after incubation with patient serum compared to that with control serum. Apoptosis was most pronounced after incubation with sera from two patients with fatal cases of P. falciparum malaria, followed by sera of survivors with severe P. falciparum malaria and, finally, by sera of patients with mild P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria. Ascorbic acid, tocopherol, and ulinastatin reduced the apoptosis rate, but gabexate mesilate and pentoxifylline did not. Furthermore, in fatal P. falciparum malaria, apoptotic endothelial cells were identified in renal and pulmonary tissue by TUNEL staining. These findings show that apoptosis caused by neutrophil secretory products plays a major role in endothelial cell damage in malaria. The antioxidants ascorbic acid and tocopherol and the protease inhibitor ulinastatin can reduce malaria-associated endothelial apoptosis in vitro.

  6. Primary monocytes regulate endothelial cell survival through secretion of Angiopoietin-1 and activation of endothelial Tie2

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Shai Y.; Benarroch, Alejandro; Monter-Solans, Juan; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Monocyte recruitment and interaction with the endothelium is imperative to vascular recovery. Tie2 plays a key role in endothelial health and vascular remodeling. We studied monocyte-mediated Tie2/Angiopoietin signaling following interaction of primary monocytes with endothelial cells and its role in endothelial cell survival. Methods and results The direct interaction of primary monocytes with subconfluent endothelial cells resulted in transient secretion of Angiopoietin-1 from monocytes and the activation of endothelial Tie2. This effect was abolished by preactivation of monocytes with TNFα. While primary monocytes contained high levels of both Angiopoietin 1 and 2, endothelial cells contained primarily Angiopoietin 2. Seeding of monocytes on serum starved endothelial cells reduced caspase-3 activity by 46% ± 5.1%, and 52% ± 5.8% after TNFα treatment, and decreased detected single strand DNA levels by 41% ± 4.2% and 40± 3.5% respectively. This protective effect of monocytes on endothelial cells was reversed by Tie2 silencing with specific siRNA. The anti-apoptotic effect of monocytes was further supported by the activation of cell survival signaling pathways involving PI3K, STAT3 and AKT. Conclusions Monocytes and endothelial cells form a unique Tie2/Angiopoietin-1 signaling system which effects endothelial cell survival and may play critical a role in vascular remodeling and homeostasis. PMID:21273558

  7. [Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and endothelial cell injury].

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    During recent years, evidences have been accumulated demonstrating bidirectional crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation. This review outlines the influences that coagulation and inflammation exert on each other to the endothelium and how these systems induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Then we discussed the implications of leucocyte-endothelial activation to endothelial cell injury followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with sustained SIRS. Last we demonstrated an important role of inflammatory circulation disturbance induced by endothelial cell injury for the pathogenesis of MODS in SIRS and sepsis.

  8. Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0029 TITLE: Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and...CONTRACT NUMBER Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02- 1 -0029...as a means to kill prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. The scope of this project involved: ( 1 ) creating adenoviral

  9. Hepatic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regulates Recruitment of Rat Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lei; Chiu, Jenny D.; van de Ven, Gijs; Gaarde, William A.; DeLeve, Laurie D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims After liver injury, bone marrow-derived liver sinusoidal endothelial cell progenitor cells (BM SPCs) repopulate the sinusoid as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). After partial hepatectomy, BM SPCs provide hepatocyte growth factor, promote hepatocyte proliferation, and are necessary for normal liver regeneration. We examined how hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates recruitment of BM SPC and their effects on liver injury. Methods Rats were given injections of dimethylnitrosamine to induce liver injury, which was assessed by histology and transaminase assays. Recruitment of SPCs was analyzed by examining BM SPC proliferation, mobilization to the circulation, engraftment in liver, and development of fenestration (differentiation). Results Dimethylnitrosamine caused extensive denudation of LSEC at 24 hours, followed by centrilobular hemorrhagic necrosis at 48 hours. Proliferation of BM SPCs, number of SPCs in the bone marrow, and mobilization of BM SPCs to the circulation increased 2- to 4-fold by 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine; within 5 days, 40% of all LSEC came from engrafted BM SPC. Allogeneic resident SPCs, infused 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine, repopulated the sinusoid as LSEC and reduced liver injury. Expression of hepatic VEGF mRNA and protein increased 5-fold by 24 hours after dimethylnitrosamine injection. Knockdown of hepatic VEGF with antisense oligonucleotides completely prevented dimethylnitrosamine-induced proliferation of BM SPCs and their mobilization to the circulation, reduced their engraftment by 46%, completely prevented formation of fenestration after engraftment as LSEC, and exacerbated dimethylnitrosamine injury. Conclusions BM SPC recruitment is a repair response to dimethylnitrosamine liver injury in rats. Hepatic VEGF regulates recruitment of BM SPCs to liver and reduces this form of liver injury. PMID:22902870

  10. High-density lipoprotein exerts vasculoprotection via endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Vasileios; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) enhance endothelial cell repair, improve endothelial dysfunction and are a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events and have vasculoprotective effects. Here we postulate that HDL influences EPC biology. HDL and EPC were isolated according to standard procedures. Differentiation of mononuclear cells into DiLDL/lectin positive cells was enhanced after HDL treatment compared to vehicle. HDL was able to inhibit apoptosis (TUNEL assay, annexin V staining) while proliferation (BrdU incorporation) of early outgrowth colonies after extended cell cultivation (14 days) was increased. Flow chamber experiments revealed an improved adhesion of HDL pre-incubated EPC on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) compared to vehicle while HDL treatment of HCAEC prevented adhesion of inflammatory cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated an up-regulation of β2- and α4-integrins on HDL pre-incubated EPC. Blocking experiments revealed a unique role of β2-integrin in EPC adhesion. Treatment of wild-type mice with recombinant HDL after endothelial denudation resulted in enhanced re-endothelialization compared to vehicle. Finally, in patients with coronary artery disease a correlation between circulating EPC and HDL concentrations was demonstrated. We provide evidence that HDL mediates important vasculoprotective action via the improvement of function of circulating EPC. PMID:18705697

  11. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs.

  12. Novel Identity and Functional Markers for Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartakova, Alena; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Weisman, Alejandra D.; Salero, Enrique; Raffa, Gabriella A.; Merkhofer, Richard M.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) density decreases with age, surgical complications, or disease, leading to vision impairment. Such endothelial dysfunction is an indication for corneal transplantation, although there is a worldwide shortage of transplant-grade tissue. To overcome the current poor donor availability, here we isolate, expand, and characterize HCECs in vitro as a step toward cell therapy. Methods Human corneal endothelial cells were isolated from cadaveric corneas and expanded in vitro. Cell identity was evaluated based on morphology and immunocytochemistry, and gene expression analysis and flow cytometry were used to identify novel HCEC-specific markers. The functional ability of HCEC to form barriers was assessed by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) assays. Results Cultured HCECs demonstrated canonical morphology for up to four passages and later underwent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Quality of donor tissue influenced cell measures in culture including proliferation rate. Cultured HCECs expressed identity markers, and microarray analysis revealed novel endothelial-specific markers that were validated by flow cytometry. Finally, canonical HCECs expressed higher levels of CD56, which correlated with higher TEER than fibroblastic HCECs. Conclusions In vitro expansion of HCECs from cadaveric donor corneas yields functional cells identifiable by morphology and a panel of novel markers. Markers described correlated with function in culture, suggesting a basis for cell therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27196322

  13. Circulating Activated Endothelial Cells in Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Aaron S.; Hebbel, Robert P.; Solovey, Anna N.; Jane Schwarzenberg, Sarah; Metzig, Andrea M.; Moran, Antoinette; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Jacobs, David R.; Steinberger, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Objective We characterized the state of the vascular endothelium in pediatric obesity by comparing circulating endothelial cell (CEC) number and activation phenotype in severely obese children to normal weight, overweight, and obese children. Study design We used immunohistochemical examination of buffy-coat smears to enumerate CEC and immunofluorescence microscopy to quantify activated CEC in 107 children and adolescents. Normal weight (body mass index [BMI] <85th percentile; N=40), overweight (BMI 85th-<95th percentile; N=17), and obese (BMI 95th-<99th percentile; N=23) participants were recruited from a longitudinal study. Severely obese (BMI ≥99th percentile; N=27) participants were recruited from a pediatric obesity clinic. Group means (adiposity; systolic blood pressure [SBP] quartiles) were compared with general linear models, adjusted for sex, age, and race. Pearson correlations characterized relations of CEC with cardiovascular risk factors. Results Activated CEC increased across BMI groups (p<0.002) and SBP quartiles (p<0.05). CEC number and activated CEC were highest in the severely obese group. CEC number was significantly associated with SBP, diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides. Activated CEC were significantly associated with SBP and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions The vascular endothelium was activated in relation to excess adiposity, particularly in the severely obese, and to elevated SBP in children and adolescents. PMID:20547395

  14. Enhanced progenitor cell recruitment and endothelial repair after selective endothelial injury of the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Bernd; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Addabbo, Francesco; Yasuda, Kaoru; Ratliff, Brian; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Hugo, Christian P M; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    Primary and/or secondary injury of the renal microvascular endothelium is a common finding in various renal diseases. Besides well-known endothelial repair mechanisms, including endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration, homing of extrinsic cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been shown in various organs and may contribute to microvascular repair. However, these mechanisms have so far not been studied after selective microvascular injury in the kidney. The present study investigated the time course of EPC and HSC stimulation and homing following induction of selective EC injury in the mouse kidney along with various angiogenic factors potentially involved in EC repair and progenitor cell stimulation. Erythropoietin was used to stimulate progenitor cells in a therapeutic approach. We found that selective EC injury leads to a marked stimulation of EPCs, HSCs, and various angiogenic factors to orchestrate microvascular repair. Angiogenic factors started to increase as early as 30 min after disease induction. Progenitor cells could be first detected in the circulation and the spleen before they selectively homed to the diseased kidney. Injection of a high dose of erythropoietin 2 h after disease induction markedly attenuated vascular injury through nonhemodynamic mechanisms, possibly involving vascular endothelial growth factor release.

  15. Cellular and Molecular Biology of Aging Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J.; Morgan, R. Garrett; Walker, Ashley E.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage have been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway that results in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current

  16. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  17. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R.; Albini, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  18. [Regression analysis of idiopathic endothelial cell loss after perforating normal risk keratoplasty: basic principles for long-term analysis of endothelial risk factors in a retrospective clinical study].

    PubMed

    Böhringer, D; Reinhard, T; Godehardt, E; Sundmacher, R

    2001-06-01

    For the characterisation of influencing factors on chronic endothelial cell loss after penetrating keratoplasty by means of multivariate statistics, a mathematical description of the course of the individual postoperative endothelial cell density is a prerequisite. This mathematical description should result in a standardized index value describing course and amount of the postoperative endothelial cell loss over time in a canonical way. The slopes of the linear regression lines for each individual scatter plot of a) the endothelial cell density values plotted against the respective postoperative time directly (linear regression), and b) after logarithmic transformation (exponential regression) are evaluated, respectively. 58 patients after normal-risk keratoplasty (26x keratokonus, 22x Fuchs-dystrophy and 10 cases of corneal decompensation after cataract surgery) with 5 or more postoperatively acquired endothelial density values and without any episodes of graft rejection were included in this study. Mean follow up was 2.9 +/- 1.1 years. The postoperative endothelial cell density values were plotted against the respective time for each patient individually. The coefficients of variation (R2) derived from the linear and the exponential regression models were calculated for each of these scatter plots. The pairs of R2 values (linear vs. exponential) were compared statistically. A dependence of the difference of linear and exponential R2-values on the ophthalmologic diagnosis was tested as well. The linear model is able to declare 83% the total variance of the course of the endothelial cell density. The exponential model even declares 86%. This small difference was statistically significant. Since both methods of regression describe the course of the cell density well, intra/and extrapolation of missing endothelial values is possible with both models. No dependence of the difference of linear and exponential R2-values on the ophthalmologic diagnosis could be

  19. Nesting of colon and ovarian cancer cells in the endothelial niche is associated with alterations in glycan and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Halama, Anna; Guerrouahen, Bella S.; Pasquier, Jennifer; Satheesh, Noothan J.; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic phenotype of a cancer cell is determined by its genetic makeup and microenvironment, which dynamically modulates the tumor landscape. The endothelial cells provide both a promoting and protective microenvironment – a niche for cancer cells. Although metabolic alterations associated with cancer and its progression have been fairly defined, there is a significant gap in our understanding of cancer metabolism in context of its microenvironment. We deployed an in vitro co-culture system based on direct contact of cancer cells with endothelial cells (E4+EC), mimicking the tumor microenvironment. Metabolism of colon (HTC15 and HTC116) and ovarian (OVCAR3 and SKOV3) cancer cell lines was profiled with non-targeted metabolic approaches at different time points in the first 48 hours after co-culture was established. We found significant, coherent and non-cell line specific changes in fatty acids, glycerophospholipids and carbohydrates over time, induced by endothelial cell contact. The metabolic patterns pinpoint alterations in hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, glycosylation and lipid metabolism as crucial for cancer – endothelial cells interaction. We demonstrated that “Warburg effect” is not modulated in the initial stage of nesting of cancer cell in the endothelial niche. Our study provides novel insight into cancer cell metabolism in the context of the endothelial microenvironment. PMID:28051182

  20. Induction of hematopoietic and endothelial cell program orchestrated by ETS transcription factor ER71/ETV2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Li, Daofeng; Yu, Yik Yeung Lawrence; Kang, Inyoung; Cha, Min-Ji; Kim, Ju Young; Park, Changwon; Watson, Dennis K; Wang, Ting; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-05-01

    The ETS factor ETV2 (aka ER71) is essential for the generation of the blood and vascular system, as ETV2 deficiency leads to a complete block in blood and endothelial cell formation and embryonic lethality in the mouse. However, the ETV2-mediated gene regulatory network and signaling governing hematopoietic and endothelial cell development are poorly understood. Here, we map ETV2 global binding sites and carry out in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and germ line and conditional knockout mouse studies to uncover mechanisms involved in the hemangiogenic fate commitment from mesoderm. We show that ETV2 binds to enhancers that specify hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. We find that the hemangiogenic progenitor population in the developing embryo can be identified as FLK1(high)PDGFRα(-). Notably, these hemangiogenic progenitors are exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Importantly, ETV2 turns on other Ets genes, thereby establishing an ETS hierarchy. Consequently, the hematopoietic and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 is maintained partly by other ETS factors through an ETS switching mechanism. These findings highlight the critical role that transient ETV2 expression plays in the regulation of hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineage specification and stability. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Intravascularly Administered RGD-Displaying Measles Viruses Bind to and Infect Neovessel Endothelial Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hooi Tin; Trejo, Theodore R; Pham, Linh D; Oberg, Ann L; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2009-01-01

    Systemically administered vectors must cross the endothelial lining of tumor blood vessels to access cancer cells. Vectors that interact with markers on the lumenal surface of these endothelial cells might have enhanced tumor localization. Here, we generated oncolytic measles viruses (MVs) displaying αvβ3 integrin-binding peptides, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) or echistatin, on the measles hemagglutinin protein. Both viruses had expanded tropisms, and efficiently entered target cells via binding to integrins, but also retained their native tropisms for CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). When fluorescently labeled and injected intravascularly into chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAMs), in contrast to unmodified viruses, the integrin-binding viral particles bound to the lumenal surface of the developing chick neovessels and infected the CAM vascular endothelial cells. In a mouse model of VEGF-induced angiogenesis in the ear pinna, the integrin-binding viruses, but not the parental virus, infected cells at sites of new blood vessel formation. When given intravenously to mice bearing tumor xenografts, the integrin-binding virus infected endothelial cells of tumor neovessels in addition to tumor parenchyma. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that oncolytic MVs can be engineered to target the lumenal endothelial surface of newly formed blood vessels when administered intravenously in living animals. PMID:19277014

  2. Monoclonal endothelial cells in appetite suppressant-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tuder, R M; Radisavljevic, Z; Shroyer, K R; Polak, J M; Voelkel, N F

    1998-12-01

    Anorexigens such as aminorex fumarate and dexfenfluramine are associated with the development of severe pulmonary hypertension (PH), which clinically and histopathologically is considered indistinguishable from idiopathic or primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). For the current study, we asked whether anorexigen-associated PH is characterized by monoclonal pulmonary endothelial cell proliferation (such as in PPH) or, alternatively, is associated with a polyclonal endothelial cell proliferation as found in secondary PH. Analysis of clonality by the human androgen receptor assay was performed in microdissected endothelial cells of plexiform lesions of two patients with anorexigen-associated PH. The four plexiform lesions of Patient 1 and the six of Patient 2 with anorexigen-associated PH exhibited a monoclonal expansion of pulmonary endothelial cells, with a mean clonality ratio of 0.03 +/- 0.01 SE. Our results indicate that appetite suppressant-associated PH is identical to PPH not only in clinical and histopathologic features but also, at a molecular level, in terms of the monoclonal nature of the endothelial cell proliferation. The anorexigens may accelerate the growth of pulmonary endothelial cells in patients with predisposition to develop PPH.

  3. Radiation Effects on the Cytoskeleton of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Monolayer Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrys, Dorota; Greco, Olga; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Kanthou, Chryso

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on the endothelial cytoskeleton and endothelial monolayer permeability and to evaluate associated signaling pathways, which could reveal potential mechanisms of known vascular effects of radiation. Methods and Materials: Cultured endothelial cells were X-ray irradiated, and actin filaments, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junctions were examined by immunofluorescence. Permeability was determined by the passage of fluorescent dextran through cell monolayers. Signal transduction pathways were analyzed using RhoA, Rho kinase, and stress-activated protein kinase-p38 (SAPK2/p38) inhibitors by guanosine triphosphate-RhoA activation assay and transfection with RhoAT19N. The levels of junction protein expression and phosphorylation of myosin light chain and SAPK2/p38 were assessed by Western blotting. The radiation effects on cell death were verified by clonogenic assays. Results: Radiation induced rapid and persistent actin stress fiber formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin junctions in microvascular, but not umbilical vein endothelial cells, and microtubules and intermediate filaments remained unaffected. Radiation also caused a rapid and persistent increase in microvascular permeability. RhoA-guanosine triphosphatase and Rho kinase were activated by radiation and caused phosphorylation of downstream myosin light chain and the observed cytoskeletal and permeability changes. SAPK2/p38 was activated by radiation but did not influence either the cytoskeleton or permeability. Conclusion: This study is the first to show rapid activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase by radiation in endothelial cells and has demonstrated a link between this pathway and cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability. The results also suggest that the RhoA pathway might be a useful target for modulating the permeability and other effects of radiation for therapeutic gain.

  4. Comparative Evaluation for Potential Differentiation of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Endothelial-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, Dina; Noh, Olfat; Samir, Mai

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of vascular remodeling could lead to more effective treatments for ischemic conditions. We aimed to compare between the abilities of both human Wharton jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) and CD34+ to induce angiogenesis in vitro. hMSCs, hEPCs, and CD34+ were isolated from human umbilical cord blood using microbead (MiniMacs). The cells characterization was assessed by flow cytometry following culture and real-time PCR for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) to prove stem cells differentiation. The study revealed successful isolation of hEPCs, CD34+, and hMSCs. The hMSCs were identified by gaining CD29+ and CD44+ using FACS analysis. The hEPCs were identified by having CD133+, CD34+, and KDR. The potential ability of hEPCs and CD34+ to differentiate into endothelial-like cells was more than hMSCs. This finding was assessed morphologically in culture and by higher significant VEGFR2 and vWF genes expression (p<0.05) in differentiated hEPCs and CD34+ compared to differentiated hMSCs. hEPCs and CD34+ differentiation into endothelial-like cells were much better than that of hMSCs. PMID:27426085

  5. In vitro neutron irradiation of glioma and endothelial cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Gaetano, L; Zampolli, A; Del Turco, S; Ferrari, C; Bortolussi, S; Stella, S; Altieri, S; Salvadori, P A; Cionini, L

    2009-07-01

    To fully develop its potential boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires the combination of a suitable thermal/epithermal neutron flux together with a selective intake of (10)B-boron nuclei in the target tissue. The latter condition is the most critical to be realized as none of the boron carriers used for experimental or clinical purposes proved at the moment an optimal selectivity for cancer cells compared to normal cells. In addition to complex physical factors, the assessment of the intracellular concentration of boron represent a crucial parameter to predict the dose delivered to the cancer cells during the treatment. Nowadays the dosimetry calculation and then the prediction of the treatment effectiveness are made using Monte Carlo simulations, but some of the model assumption are still uncertain: the radiobiological dose efficacy and the probability of tumour cell survival are crucial parameters that needs a more reliable experimental approach. The aim of this work was to evaluate the differential ability of two cell lines to selectively concentrate the boron-10 administered as di-hydroxyboryl-phenylalanine (BPA)-fructose adduct, and the effect of the differential boron intake on the damage produced by the irradiation with thermal neutrons; the two cell lines were selected to be representative one of normal tissues involved in the active/passive transport of boron carriers, and one of the tumour. Recent in vitro studies demonstrated how BPA is taken by proliferating cells, however the mechanism of BPA uptake and the parameters driving the kinetics of influx and the elimination of BPA are still not clarified. In these preliminary studies we analysed the survival of F98 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cells line after irradiation, using different thermal fluencies at the same level of density population and boron concentration in the growing medium prior the irradiation. This is first study performed on endothelium model obtained by a

  6. Protein kinase C activators suppress stimulation of capillary endothelial cell growth by angiogenic endothelial mitogens

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The intracellular events regulating endothelial cell proliferation and organization into formalized capillaries are not known. We report that the protein kinase C activator beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) suppresses bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cell proliferation (K50 = 6 +/- 4 nM) and DNA synthesis in response to human hepatoma-derived growth factor, an angiogenic endothelial mitogen. In contrast, PDBu has no effect on the proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells and is mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth muscle and BALB/c 3T3 cells. Several observations indicate that the inhibition of human hepatoma- derived growth factor-stimulated BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated through protein kinase C. Different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to their potencies as protein kinase C activators (12- O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate greater than PDBu much greater than beta-phorbol 12,13-diacetate much much greater than beta-phorbol; alpha- phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate; alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). PDBu binds to a single class of specific, saturable sites on the BCE cell with an apparent Kd of 8 nM, in agreement with reported affinities of PDBu for protein kinase C in other systems. Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2- dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a calcium/phosphatidylserine-dependent protein kinase that is activated by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol and PDBu, but not by beta-phorbol. These findings indicate that protein kinase C activation can cause capillary endothelial cells to become desensitized to angiogenic endothelial mitogens. This intracellular regulatory mechanism might be invoked during certain phases of angiogenesis, for example when proliferating endothelial cells become

  7. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Paiva, Artur; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cell count and endothelial activation in a pediatric population with obesity. Observational and transversal study, including 120 children and adolescents with primary obesity of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, who were recruited at this Cardiovascular Risk Clinic. The control group was made up of 41 children and adolescents with normal body mass index. The variables analyzed were: age, gender, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, E-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine and circulating progenitor endothelial cell count. Insulin resistance was correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine (ρ=0.340; p=0.003), which was directly, but weakly correlated to E-selectin (ρ=0.252; p=0.046). High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not found to be correlated to markers of endothelial activation. Systolic blood pressure was directly correlated to body mass index (ρ=0.471; p<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (ρ=0.230; p=0.012), and inversely correlated to adiponectin (ρ=-0.331; p<0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ρ=-0.319; p<0.001). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count was directly, but weakly correlated, to body mass index (r=0.211; p=0.016), leptin (ρ=0.245; p=0.006), triglyceride levels (r=0.241; p=0.031), and E-selectin (ρ=0.297; p=0.004). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count is elevated in obese children and adolescents with evidence of endothelial activation, suggesting that, during infancy, endothelial repairing mechanisms are present in the context of endothelial activation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Outgrowing endothelial and smooth muscle cells for tissue engineering approaches.

    PubMed

    Kolster, Moritz; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Schrimpf, Claudia; Hilfiker, Andres; Haverich, Axel; Aper, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, circulating progenitors of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were identified in the peripheral blood. In our study, we evaluated the utilization of both cell types isolated and differentiated from peripheral porcine blood in terms for their use for tissue engineering purposes. By means of density gradient centrifugation, the monocyte fraction from porcine blood was separated, split, and cultivated with specific culture media with either endothelial cell growth medium-2 or smooth muscle cell growth medium-2 for the differentiation of endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells. Obtained cells were characterized at an early stage of cultivation before the first passage and a late stage (fourth passage) on the basis of the expression of the antigens CD31, CD34, CD45, nitric oxide synthase, and the contractile filaments smooth-muscle alpha-actin (sm-alpha-actin) and smoothelin. Functional characterization was done based on the secretion of nitric oxide, the formation of a coherent monolayer on polytetrafluoroethylene, and capillary sprouting. During cultivation in both endothelial cell growth medium-2 and smooth muscle cell growth medium-2, substantially two types of cells grew out: early outgrown CD45-positive cells, which disappeared during further cultivation, and in 85% (n = 17/20) of cultures cultivated with endothelial cell growth medium-2 colony-forming late outgrowth endothelial cells. During cultivation with smooth muscle cell growth medium-2 in 80% (n = 16/20) of isolations colony-forming late outgrowth smooth muscle cells entered the stage. Cultivation with either endothelial cell growth medium-2 or smooth muscle cell growth medium-2 had selective effect on the late outgrown cells to that effect that the number of CD31-positive cells increased from 34.8% ± 13% to 83.9% ± 8% in cultures cultivated with endothelial cell growth medium-2 and the number of sm-α-actin+ cells increased from 52.6% ± 18% to 88% ± 5

  9. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhanced fusions between oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and endothelial cells via VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Zhu, Fei; Zhang, Han-zhong; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2012-08-15

    Fusion between cancer cells and host cells, including endothelial cells, may strongly modulate the biological behavior of tumors. However, no one is sure about the driving factors and underlying mechanism involved in such fusion. We hypothesized in this study that inflammation, one of the main characteristics in tumor microenvironment, serves as a prominent catalyst for fusion events. Our results showed that oral cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with endothelial cells in co-culture and inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) increased fusion of human umbilical vein endothelium cells and oral cancer cells by up to 3-fold in vitro. Additionally, human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and 35 out of 50 (70%) oral squamous carcinoma specimens express VLA-4, an integrin, previously implicated in fusions between human peripheral blood CD34-positive cells and murine cardiomyocytes. Expression of VCAM-1, a ligand for VLA-4, was evident on vascular endothelium of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis revealed that expression of VCAM-1 increased obviously in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. Anti-VLA-4 or anti-VCAM-1 treatment can decrease significantly cancer-endothelial adhesion and block such fusion. Collectively, our results suggested that TNF-{alpha} could enhance cancer-endothelial cell adhesion and fusion through VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway. This study provides insights into regulatory mechanism of cancer-endothelial cell fusion, and has important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for prevention of metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous oral cancer-endothelial cell fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} enhanced cell fusions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCAM-1/VLA-4 expressed in oral cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increased expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. Black

  11. Cell biology and pathology of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Katsuhiko; Nishikawa, Yuji; Omori, Yasufumi; Tokairin, Takuo; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ohi, Naoto; Nishimura, Takuya; Yamamoto, Youhei; Li, Qinchang

    2004-12-01

    Growing evidence revealed that liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) play several important roles in physiology and pathology of the liver. It has been well understood that their structural characteristics, such as the membrane sieve and lack of basement membrane, facilitate direct contact of soluble and insoluble serum substances with hepatic parenchymal cells, resulting in enhancement of hepatic metabolic activity. In addition, SEC is now regarded as a member of the scavenger endothelial cells, which have potential to eliminate a variety of macromolecules from the blood circulation by receptor-mediated endocytosis. It is reported that molecules preferentially eliminated by SEC are denatured or modified proteins such as advanced glycation end products, extracellular matrix components including hyaluronic acid, and some lipoproteins. The nature of the scavenger receptors corresponding to these molecules remains to be clarified. Recently, it was noted that SEC has an antigen-presenting function similar to dendritic cells. Taken together, it is suggested that SEC, cooperating with Kupffer cells and hepatic dendritic cells, may partake of immunoregulatory functions in the liver. SEC also plays a pivotal role in the pathological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury following liver surgery and liver transplantation. Thus, it is of importance to elucidate the mechanisms of apoptosis and proliferation of SEC. Recent results on the regulation of growth and apoptotic signaling of SEC are discussed.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  13. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-09

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD.

  14. Dexamethasone Enhances ATP-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic nucleotide ATP is released from stressed cells and is implicated in vascular inflammation. Glucocorticoids are essential to stress responses and are used therapeutically, yet little information is available that describes the effects of glucocorticoids on ATP-induced inflammation. In a human microvascular endothelial cell line, extracellular ATP-induced interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When cells were pretreated with dexamethasone, a prototypic glucocorticoid, ATP-induced IL-6 production was enhanced in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, blocked these effects. ATP-induced IL-6 release was significantly inhibited by a phospholipase C inhibitor [1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)] (63.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001) and abolished by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580)] (88 ± 1%, p < 0.001). Cells treated with dexamethasone induced mRNA expression of the purinergic P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) 1.8- ± 0.1-fold and, when stimulated with ATP, enhanced Ca2+ release and augmented IL-6 mRNA expression. Silencing of the P2Y2R by its small interfering RNA decreased ATP-induced IL-6 production by 81 ± 1% (p < 0.001). Dexamethasone enhanced the transcription rate of P2Y2R mRNA and induced a dose-related increase in the activity of the P2Y2R promoter. Furthermore, dexamethasone-enhanced ATP induction of adhesion molecule transcription and augmented the release of IL-8. Dexamethasone leads to an unanticipated enhancement of endothelial inflammatory mediator production by extracellular ATP via a P2Y2R-dependent mechanism. These data define a novel positive feedback loop of glucocorticoids and ATP-induced endothelial inflammation. PMID:20826566

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, vascular pathology, endothelial function and endothelial cells and circulating microparticles.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Pablo; Sánchez-Armengol, Maria Angeles; Villar, José; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Capote, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk are frequently reported in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome. In this article the authors attempt a review of the current understanding of the relationship between vascular risk and OSA syndrome based on large cohort studies that related the disease to several cardiovascular risk factors and vascular pathologies. We also discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that may be involved in this relationship, starting with endothelial dysfunction and its mediators. These include an increased oxidative stress and inflammation as well as several disorders of coagulation and lipid metabolism. Moreover, circulating microparticles from activated leukocytes (CD62L_MPs) are higher in patients with OSA and there is a positive correlation between circulating levels of CD62L_MPs and nocturnal hypoxemia severity. Finally, circulating level of endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial cells seem to be increased in patients with OSA. Also, endothelial progenitor cells are reduced and plasma levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor are increased.

  16. Modulating putative endothelial progenitor cells for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wils, Julien; Favre, Julie; Bellien, Jérémy

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes induces a decrease in the number and function of different pro-angiogenic cell types generically designated as putative endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), which encompasses cells from myeloid origin that act in a paracrine fashion to promote angiogenesis and putative "true" EPC that contribute to endothelial replacement. This not only compromises neovasculogenesis in ischemic tissues but also impairs, at an early stage, the reendotheliziation process at sites of injury, contributing to the development of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia promote putative EPC dysregulation by affecting the SDF-1/CXCR-4 and NO pathways and the p53/SIRT1/p66Shc axis that contribute to their mobilization, migration, homing and vasculogenic properties. To optimize the clinical management of patients with hypoglycemic agents, statins and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, which display pleiotropic effects on putative EPC, is a first step to improve their number and angiogenic potential but specific strategies are needed. Among them, mobilizing therapies based on G-CSF, erythropoietin or CXCR-4 antagonism have been developed to increase putative EPC number to treat ischemic diseases with or without prior cell isolation and transplantation. Growth factors, genetic and pharmacological strategies are also evaluated to improve ex vivo cultured EPC function before transplantation. Moreover, pharmacological agents increasing in vivo the bioavailability of NO and other endothelial factors demonstrated beneficial effects on neovascularization in diabetic ischemic models but their effects on endothelial dysfunction remain poorly evaluated. More experiments are warranted to develop orally available drugs and specific agents targeting p66Shc to reverse putative EPC dysfunction in the expected goal of preventing endothelial dysfunction and diabetic cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  17. The effects of glucocorticoids on cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hoak, J C

    1978-04-01

    The effects of hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and prednisone on the morphology, replication, DNA synthesis, cell protein content and protein synthesis of cultured, human endothelial cells were evaluated. After culturing the cells with these glucocorticoids for 24-48 h, the cells covered a greater portion of the culture surface area. The mean surface area of the individual endothelial cell treated with glucocorticoids was 1.53 times greater than that of the untreated control endothelial cell. When compared with controls, the endothelial cover provided by the cells treated with glucocorticoids was more extensive and in many instances covered the entire culture surface. The change in morphology was associated with an increase in protein synthesis and protein content of the cells without an increase in DNA synthesis or cellular replication. Dexamethasone was approximately 10-fold more effective than hydrocortisone, while prednisone was the least effective. Aldosterone, DOCA, testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and oestriol were ineffective. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids can alter the morphology and biochemistry of cultured endothelial cells and may have implications for the effects of steroids in the treatment of thrombocytopenic states and vascular disorders in man.

  18. Skewing of immune cell cytokine production by mediators from adipocytes and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A; Klein, Richard L; Levingston, Corinne A; Young, M Rita I

    2014-01-01

    Since adipose tissue is composed of adipocytes as well as other cell types including endothelial cells, this study sought to determine how mediators from adipocytes and from endothelial cells impact on immune cell production of cytokines. A minimalistic design was used in which media conditioned by adipocytes or by endothelial cells were added individually or as a mixture to normal spleen cells. Media from adipocytes or endothelial cells each stimulated spleen cell production of Th1 cytokines, Th2 cytokines, most of the measured inflammatory cytokines, and some chemokines. However, a mixture of media conditioned by adipocytes and by endothelial cells inhibited production of Th1 cytokines and skewed reactivity toward a Th2 and inflammatory phenotype. Adiponectin, but not leptin, was shown to contribute to the skewing of immune responsiveness to endothelial cell-derived mediators. PMID:24719786

  19. Recent insights in the paracrine modulation of cardiomyocyte contractility by cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noireaud, Jacques; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology.

  20. Recent Insights in the Paracrine Modulation of Cardiomyocyte Contractility by Cardiac Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology. PMID:24745027

  1. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2013-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight junctions, which limit paracellular permeability. Several reports suggest that nanoparticles have a unique capacity to cross the BBB. However, direct evidence of nanoparticle transcytosis is difficult to obtain, and we found that typical transport studies present several limitations when applied to nanoparticles. In order to investigate the capacity of nanoparticles to access and transport across the BBB, several different nanomaterials, including silica, titania and albumin- or transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles of different sizes, were exposed to a human in vitro BBB model of endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. Extensive transmission electron microscopy imaging was applied in order to describe nanoparticle endocytosis and typical intracellular localisation, as well as to look for evidence of eventual transcytosis. Our results show that all of the nanoparticles were internalised, to different extents, by the BBB model and accumulated along the endo-lysosomal pathway. Rare events suggestive of nanoparticle transcytosis were also observed for several of the tested materials.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight junctions, which limit paracellular permeability. Several reports suggest that nanoparticles have a unique capacity to cross the BBB. However, direct evidence of nanoparticle transcytosis is difficult to obtain, and we found that typical transport studies present several limitations when applied to nanoparticles. In

  2. Interleukin-24 (IL-24) Expression and Biological Impact on HECV Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxia; Sanders, Andrew J; Zhang, Yulu; Martin, Tracey A; Owen, Sioned; Ruge, Fiona; Jiang, Wen G

    2015-01-01

    IL-24, also termed MDA-7, is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines. IL-24 is reported to be expressed in a series of cell lines, including keratinocytes as well as breast, lung and prostate cancer cells, but was primarily found in a human melanoma cell line. IL-24 is suggested to have many biological properties displaying anti-tumour effects via induction of apoptosis, suppressing proliferation, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. IL-24 has also been reported to inhibit the migration of cancer cells and keratinocytes, and have anti-angiogeneic properties. The biological functions of IL-24 are regulated through both autocrine and paracrine methods. However, currently there exists little knowledge regarding the effect of IL-24 on endothelial cell biology. The impact of rhIL-24 on human endothelial HECV cell growth, migration, trans-endothelial resistance and angiogenic potential was examined using cellular functional assays. Additionally, the relationship between IL-24 and a number of cell junction proteins were examined using immunofluorescence staining. IL-24 and receptor molecules was found to be expressed in HECV endothelial cells. Treatment of this cell line with rhIL-24 was found to promote cell migration rates and suppress tubule formation. Treatment of HECV cells with rhIL-24 can promote migration and inhibit tubule formation but does not impact cell growth or permeability at the tested concentrations. Potential links between IL-24 and AKT or PLCγ-related pathways with regard to these effects are also presented in the present study. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct Regulatory Effects of Myeloid Cell and Endothelial Cell NAPDH Oxidase 2 on Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sag, Can Martin; Schnelle, Moritz; Zhang, Juqian; Murdoch, Colin E; Kossmann, Sabine; Protti, Andrea; Santos, Celio X C; Sawyer, Greta; Zhang, Xiaohong; Mongue-Din, Heloise; Richards, Daniel A; Brewer, Alison C; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Maier, Lars S; Wenzel, Philip; Eaton, Philip J; Shah, Ajay M

    2017-05-30

    Hypertension caused by increased renin-angiotensin system activation is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species production. Previous studies implicate NADPH oxidase (Nox) proteins as important reactive oxygen species sources during renin-angiotensin system activation, with different Nox isoforms being potentially involved. Among these, Nox2 is expressed in multiple cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune cells, and microglia. Blood pressure (BP) is regulated at the central nervous system, renal, and vascular levels, but the cell-specific role of Nox2 in BP regulation is unknown. We generated a novel mouse model with a floxed Nox2 gene and used Tie2-Cre, LysM Cre, or Cdh5-CreERT2 driver lines to develop cell-specific models of Nox2 perturbation to investigate its role in BP regulation. Unexpectedly, Nox2 deletion in myeloid but not endothelial cells resulted in a significant reduction in basal BP. Both Tie2-CreNox2 knockout (KO) mice (in which Nox2 was deficient in both endothelial cells and myeloid cells) and LysM CreNox2KO mice (in which Nox2 was deficient in myeloid cells) had significantly lower BP than littermate controls, whereas basal BP was unaltered in Cdh5-CreERT2 Nox2KO mice (in which Nox2 is deficient only in endothelial cells). The lower BP was attributable to an increased NO bioavailability that dynamically dilated resistance vessels in vivo under basal conditions without a change in renal function. Myeloid-specific Nox2 deletion had no effect on angiotensin II-induced hypertension, which, however, was blunted in Tie2-CreNox2KO mice, along with preservation of endothelium-dependent relaxation during angiotensin II stimulation. We identify a hitherto unrecognized modulation of basal BP by myeloid cell Nox2, whereas endothelial cell Nox2 regulates angiotensin II-induced hypertension. These results identify distinct cell-specific roles for Nox2 in BP regulation. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Hyperketonemia increases monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is mediated by LFA-1 expression in monocytes and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rains, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that hyperketonemia increases monocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and the development of vascular disease in diabetes. Human U937 and THP-1 monocyte cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with acetoacetate (AA) (0–10 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0–10 mM) for 24 h prior to evaluating adhesion and adhesion molecule expression. The results demonstrate a significant (P < 0.01) increase in both U937 and THP-1 adhesion to HUVEC monolayers treated with 4 mM AA compared with control. Equal concentrations of BHB resulted in similar increases in monocyte-EC adhesion. Similarly, treatments of AA or BHB to isolated monocytes from human blood also show increases in adhesion to endothelial cells. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was significantly increased on the surface of HUVECs and an increase in total protein expression with AA treatment compared with control. The expression level of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) was increased in monocytes treated with AA, and LFA-1 affinity was altered from low to high affinity following treatment with both AA and BHB. Monocyte adhesion could be blocked when cells were preincubated with an antibody to ICAM-1 or LFA-1. Results also show a significant increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in monocytes and HUVECs treated with 0–10 mM AA. These results suggest that hyperketonemia can induce monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and that it is mediated via increased ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells and increased expression and affinity of LFA-1 in monocytes. PMID:21540444

  5. Hyperketonemia increases monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is mediated by LFA-1 expression in monocytes and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rains, Justin L; Jain, Sushil K

    2011-08-01

    Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that hyperketonemia increases monocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and the development of vascular disease in diabetes. Human U937 and THP-1 monocyte cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with acetoacetate (AA) (0-10 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0-10 mM) for 24 h prior to evaluating adhesion and adhesion molecule expression. The results demonstrate a significant (P < 0.01) increase in both U937 and THP-1 adhesion to HUVEC monolayers treated with 4 mM AA compared with control. Equal concentrations of BHB resulted in similar increases in monocyte-EC adhesion. Similarly, treatments of AA or BHB to isolated monocytes from human blood also show increases in adhesion to endothelial cells. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was significantly increased on the surface of HUVECs and an increase in total protein expression with AA treatment compared with control. The expression level of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) was increased in monocytes treated with AA, and LFA-1 affinity was altered from low to high affinity following treatment with both AA and BHB. Monocyte adhesion could be blocked when cells were preincubated with an antibody to ICAM-1 or LFA-1. Results also show a significant increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in monocytes and HUVECs treated with 0-10 mM AA. These results suggest that hyperketonemia can induce monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and that it is mediated via increased ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells and increased expression and affinity of LFA-1 in monocytes.

  6. Differential Effects of Isoxazole-9 on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells, Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Osumi, Noriko; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hong; Holder, Julie C.; Chuang, Tsu Tshen; McNeish, John D.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brain can be plastic after injury and disease. Therefore, boosting endogenous repair mechanisms would be a useful therapeutic approach for neurological disorders. Isoxazole-9 (Isx-9) has been reported to enhance neurogenesis from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). However, the effects of Isx-9 on other types of progenitor/precursor cells remain mostly unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of Isx-9 on the three major populations of progenitor/precursor cells in brain: NSPCs, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Cultured primary NSPCs, OPCs, or EPCs were treated with various concentrations of Isx-9 (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μM), and their cell numbers were counted in a blinded manner. Isx-9 slightly increased the number of NSPCs and effectively induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. However, Isx-9 significantly decreased OPC number in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting cytotoxicity. Isx-9 did not affect EPC cell number. But in a matrigel assay of angiogenesis, Isx-9 significantly inhibited tube formation in outgrowth endothelial cells derived from EPCs. This potential anti-tube-formation effect of Isx-9 was confirmed in a brain endothelial cell line. Taken together, our data suggest that mechanisms and targets for promoting stem/progenitor cells in the central nervous system may significantly differ between cell types. PMID:26407349

  7. Distinct molecular basis for endothelial differentiation: gene expression profiles of human mesenchymal stem cells versus umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Wang, Yuezeng; Ye, Yilu; Yin, Guoli; Chen, Liqiong

    2014-01-01

    The capacity for endothelial differentiation has been described in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from human bone marrow. To identify genes associated with the endothelial differentiation potential of this cell-type, and search for the optimal regulatory factors, the expression profile of MSC was compared with cDNA from primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells as controls, using cDNA chips with 4096 genes. The data were corroborated by quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Among the 3948 effective genes, ∼84% (3321) were co-expressed in both cell-types, and 627 were differentially expressed more than twofold in MSC versus EC. MSC highly expressed numerous stem-cell-like genes. Early development genes of endothelial cells, though not up-regulated, had a high expression in MSC, such as EDF1, MDG1, and EDG2. In contrast, mature endothelial growth and signal pathway genes, like VEGF, CXCR4, and CTNNB1, were down-regulated in MSC. In conclusion, human MSC have a distinct molecular basis for endothelial differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential proinflammatory effects of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on endothelial cells in a monocyte-endothelial cell coculture model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Sun, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Currently, synthetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HANPs) are used in nanomedicine fields. The delivery of nanomedicine to the bloodstream exposes the cardiovascular system to a potential threat. However, the possible adverse cardiovascular effects of HANPs remain unclear. Current observations using coculture models of endothelial cells and monocytes with HANPs to mimic the complex physiological functionality of the vascular system demonstrate that monocytes could play an important role in the mechanisms of endothelium dysfunction induced by the exposure to HANPs. Our transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and endothelial cells could take up HANPs. Moreover, our findings demonstrated that at a subcytotoxic dose, HANPs alone did not cause direct endothelial cell injury, but they did induce an indirect activation of endothelial cells, resulting in increased interleukin-6 production and elevated adhesion molecule expression after coculture with monocytes. The potential proinflammatory effect of HANPs is largely mediated by the release of soluble factors from the activated monocytes, leading to an inflammatory response of the endothelium, which is possibly dependent on p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B signaling activation. The use of in vitro monocyte-endothelial cell coculture models for the biocompatibility assessment of HANPs could reveal their potential proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells, suggesting that exposure to HANPs possibly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Tissue substitutes with improved angiogenic capabilities: an in vitro investigation with endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Grieb, G; Groger, A; Piatkowski, A; Markowicz, M; Steffens, G C M; Pallua, N

    2010-01-01

    The use of implantable biomaterials, such as artificial skin substitutes used for dermal defects, remains limited by the low angiogenic potential of these products. The rapid in vivo degradation of growth factors contributes to the limiting of angiogenesis in biomaterials. Here, we report on collagen sponges in which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was immobilized through physical binding to heparin, covalently incorporated in the matrix via cross-linking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. The in vitro release of VEGF over time and endothelial cell proliferation were investigated in matrices modified at varying heparin to EDC ratios either nonloaded or loaded with VEGF. ELISA demonstrated a significantly slower in vitro release of VEGF over a period of 5 days from heparinized matrices as compared to their unmodified and cross-linked counterparts. The effects of these modifications on the proliferation of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells were evaluated after 1, 3 and 5 days either according to the bromodeoxyuridine assay or total cell counting with a Neubauer chamber. The endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells cultured in contact with heparinized matrices loaded with VEGF revealed both the highest rate of DNA synthesis and the highest total cell count. Furthermore, these results show that the cross-linking of collagen matrices - both in the presence and absence of heparin - leads to increases of the proliferative activities. We can assume that these changes lead to matrices with increased angiogenic capabilities. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Electrical field effects on endothelial cell adhesion and growth on conducting biomaterials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gwen Elaine

    A major problem for vascular graft implants is poor long-term patency for small-diameter (<6 mm) prostheses. Small-diameter woven Dacron RTM or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) grafts often occlude in a short time due to thrombus or polytetrafluoroethylene intimal hyperplasia. It has generally been considered that an endothelial cell lining of such grafts might reduce thrombogenicity and thereby produce a more biomimetic prosthesis. Electrical stimulation has been studied for effects on in vitro cell growth, motility, and adhesion characteristics, as well as for in vivo wound healing. A comprehensive literature review was conducted which suggested the need for further research concerning the effects of electrical fields on endothelial cell adhesion and growth properties. The focus of these studies was therefore to determine the effect of electrical fields on the proliferation and adhesion characteristics of endothelial cells cultured on various substrates using low-voltage direct current. Voltages of 0, 0.5, and 1 volt were used for in vitro endothelial cell cultures plated at 50,000 and 100,000 cells/mL. Growth experiments were performed on glass, MylarRTM, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-glass, on ITO-, carbon-, and gold-palladium-coated MylarRTM, and on polypyrrole-coated DacronRTM. Proliferation of endothelial cells was determined at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Adhesion characteristics were measured using a novel flow adhesion system. Characterization was via cell staining in conjunction with optical microscopy and a 6-keto-prostaglandin-F 1alpha assay to measure cell viability. Results of these cell growth studies in electric fields indicate that low voltage stimulation moderately increased endothelial cell growth on most substrates. The release of 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1alpha decreased over time at most cell concentrations and voltage levels. Cell adhesion experiments provided contrary results to the growth studies and suggested Rested that low-voltage electric

  11. Genetic manipulation of sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yoshiyuki; Maruyama, Atsushi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Yamashina, Shunhei; Lemasters, John J; Sato, Nobuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Altered gene expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) is associated with a variety of aspects of liver pathophysiology. It is, therefore, possible to envision a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of intractable liver diseases and achievement of graft-specific immunotolerance through modulation of SEC functions by genetic engineering. The SEC possesses unique hyaluronan receptors that recognize and internalize hyaluronic acid (HA). This characteristic was used in the development of a system for targeting foreign DNA to SEC. A gene carrier system was prepared by coupling HA oligomers to poly L-lysine (PLL) in a 1:1 weight ratio by reductive amination reaction. The resulting copolymer (PLL-g-HA) was mixed with various amounts of DNA in 154 mM NaCl. Inter-polyelectrolyte complex formation between PLL-g-HA and DNA exhibited minimal self-aggregation, explaining the highly soluble nature of the complex. Complex formation between PLL-g-HA and DNA was further assessed with a gel retardation assay. The titration point representing the minimum proportion of PLL-g-HA required to retard the DNA completely occurred at a 1:1 copolymer (based on PLL) to DNA charge ratio. Following intravenous injection of (32)P-labeled pSV beta-Gal plasmid complexed to PLL-g-HA in Wistar rats, >90% of the injected counts were shown to be taken up by the liver. Further, it was shown that the PLL-g-HA/DNA complex was distributed exclusively in the SEC. At 72 h after injection of 90 mug of pSV beta-Gal in a PLL-g-HA-complexed form, a large number of SEC expressing beta-galactosidase were detected. So, the PLL-g-HA/DNA system permits targeted delivery of exogenous nucleotide agents selectively to the liver SEC, providing a novel strategy for manipulation of SEC functions.

  12. Glioma-associated endothelial cells show evidence of replicative senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Charalambous, Christiana; Virrey, Jenilyn; Kardosh, Adel; Jabbour, Mark N.; Qazi-Abdullah, Lubna; Pen, Ligaya; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Schoenthal, Axel H.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M. . E-mail: hofman@usc.edu

    2007-04-01

    The innately programmed process of replicative senescence has been studied extensively with respect to cancer, but primarily from the perspective of tumor cells overcoming this stringent innate barrier and acquiring the capacity for unlimited proliferation. In this study, we focus on the potential role of replicative senescence affecting the non-transformed endothelial cells of the blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the well-documented aberrant structural and functional features of blood vessels within solid tumors, we hypothesized that tumor-derived factors may lead to premature replicative senescence in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells (TuBEC). We show here that glioma tissue, but not normal brain tissue, contains cells that express the signature of replicative senescence, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), on CD31-positive endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human TuBEC stain for SA-{beta}-gal and exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence, including increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs, increased growth factor production, and inability to proliferate. These data provide the first demonstration that tumor-derived brain endothelial cells may have reached an end-stage of differentiation known as replicative senescence and underscore the need for anti-angiogenic therapies to target this unique tumor-associated endothelial cell population.

  13. Tumour-cell-induced endothelial cell necroptosis via death receptor 6 promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Strilic, Boris; Yang, Lida; Albarrán-Juárez, Julián; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Han, Kang; Müller, Ulrike C; Pasparakis, Manolis; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-08-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans. It is a complex multistep process during which individual tumour cells spread primarily through the circulatory system to colonize distant organs. Once in the circulation, tumour cells remain vulnerable, and their metastatic potential largely depends on a rapid and efficient way to escape from the blood stream by passing the endothelial barrier. Evidence has been provided that tumour cell extravasation resembles leukocyte transendothelial migration. However, it remains unclear how tumour cells interact with endothelial cells during extravasation and how these processes are regulated on a molecular level. Here we show that human and murine tumour cells induce programmed necrosis (necroptosis) of endothelial cells, which promotes tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. Treatment of mice with the receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)-inhibitor necrostatin-1 or endothelial-cell-specific deletion of RIPK3 reduced tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis, tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. In contrast, pharmacological caspase inhibition or endothelial-cell-specific loss of caspase-8 promoted these processes. We furthermore show in vitro and in vivo that tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis leading to extravasation and metastasis requires amyloid precursor protein expressed by tumour cells and its receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), on endothelial cells as the primary mediators of these effects. Our data identify a new mechanism underlying tumour cell extravasation and metastasis, and suggest endothelial DR6-mediated necroptotic signalling pathways as targets for anti-metastatic therapies.

  14. Excess centrosomes disrupt endothelial cell migration via centrosome scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Erich J.; Ferro, Luke S.; Liu, Jie-Yu; Durrant, Jessica R.; Rogers, Stephen L.; Dudley, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes contribute to spindle defects and aneuploidy at mitosis, but the effects of excess centrosomes during interphase are poorly understood. In this paper, we show that interphase endothelial cells with even one extra centrosome exhibit a cascade of defects, resulting in disrupted cell migration and abnormal blood vessel sprouting. Endothelial cells with supernumerary centrosomes had increased centrosome scattering and reduced microtubule (MT) nucleation capacity that correlated with decreased Golgi integrity and randomized vesicle trafficking, and ablation of excess centrosomes partially rescued these parameters. Mechanistically, tumor endothelial cells with supernumerary centrosomes had less centrosome-localized γ-tubulin, and Plk1 blockade prevented MT growth, whereas overexpression rescued centrosome γ-tubulin levels and centrosome dynamics. These data support a model whereby centrosome–MT interactions during interphase are important for centrosome clustering and cell polarity and further suggest that disruption of interphase cell behavior by supernumerary centrosomes contributes to pathology independent of mitotic effects. PMID:25049273

  15. Excess centrosomes disrupt endothelial cell migration via centrosome scattering.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Erich J; Ferro, Luke S; Liu, Jie-Yu; Durrant, Jessica R; Rogers, Stephen L; Dudley, Andrew C; Bautch, Victoria L

    2014-07-21

    Supernumerary centrosomes contribute to spindle defects and aneuploidy at mitosis, but the effects of excess centrosomes during interphase are poorly understood. In this paper, we show that interphase endothelial cells with even one extra centrosome exhibit a cascade of defects, resulting in disrupted cell migration and abnormal blood vessel sprouting. Endothelial cells with supernumerary centrosomes had increased centrosome scattering and reduced microtubule (MT) nucleation capacity that correlated with decreased Golgi integrity and randomized vesicle trafficking, and ablation of excess centrosomes partially rescued these parameters. Mechanistically, tumor endothelial cells with supernumerary centrosomes had less centrosome-localized γ-tubulin, and Plk1 blockade prevented MT growth, whereas overexpression rescued centrosome γ-tubulin levels and centrosome dynamics. These data support a model whereby centrosome-MT interactions during interphase are important for centrosome clustering and cell polarity and further suggest that disruption of interphase cell behavior by supernumerary centrosomes contributes to pathology independent of mitotic effects. © 2014 Kushner et al.

  16. Clinical Application of Endothelial Progenitor Cell: Are We Ready?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Lee, Ming-Feng; Yang, Ning-I; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) opened up a new era of EPC-based therapies for cardiovascular diseases. While researchers are enthusiastic about applying EPCs to clinical therapy, progress has been substantially limited due to the lack of a thorough characterization and understanding of early and late outgrowth EPCs (also called endothelial colony-forming cell, ECFCs) biology. As a means of facilitating the understanding of how late EPCs can most effectively be applied to clinical therapeutics, this article reviews the recent progress covering 5 important issues: (1) The best passages of ex vivo-cultivated EPCs for cell therapy; (2) inflammatory activation of late EPCs: a real world consideration; (3) late EPC is not an endothelial cell: an issue of cell contamination; (4) ways to improve EPC function and differentiation; and (5) how to separate and delete smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs). PMID:27122748

  17. ROCK inhibitor converts corneal endothelial cells into a phenotype capable of regenerating in vivo endothelial tissue.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoki; Koizumi, Noriko; Ueno, Morio; Sakamoto, Yuji; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Hamuro, Junji; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    Corneal endothelial dysfunction accompanied by visual disturbance is a primary indication for corneal transplantation. We previously reported that the adhesion of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) to a substrate was enhanced by the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. It is hypothesized that the inhibition of ROCK signaling may manipulate cell adhesion properties, thus enabling the transplantation of cultivated CECs as a form of regenerative medicine. In the present study, using a rabbit corneal endothelial dysfunction model, the transplantation of CECs in combination with Y-27632 successfully achieved the recovery of corneal transparency. Complications related to cell injection therapy, such as the abnormal deposition of the injected cells as well as the elevation of intraocular pressure, were not observed. Reconstructed corneal endothelium with Y-27632 exhibited a monolayer hexagonal cell shape with a normal expression of function-related markers, such as ZO-1, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, whereas reconstruction without Y-27632 exhibited a stratified fibroblastic phenotype without the expression of markers. Moreover, transplantation of CECs in primates in the presence of the ROCK inhibitor also achieved the recovery of long-term corneal transparency with a monolayer hexagonal cell phenotype at a high cell density. Taken together, these results suggest that the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 enables cultivated CEC-based therapy and that the modulation of Rho-ROCK signaling activity serves to enhance cell engraftment for cell-based regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxia induces angiogenic factors in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Martinez, J; Yin, X; Sanchez, A; Tripathy, D; Grammas, P

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia is increasingly recognized as an important contributing factor to the development of brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the periphery, hypoxia is a powerful regulator of angiogenesis. However, vascular endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous and little is known about how brain endothelial cells respond to hypoxic challenge. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of hypoxic challenge on the angiogenic response of cultured brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells. Brain endothelial cell cultures were initiated from isolated rat brain microvessels and subjected to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for various time periods. The results showed that hypoxia induced rapid (≤ 0.5h) expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and that cell viability, assessed by MTT assay, was unaffected within the first 8h. Examination of brain endothelial cell cultures for pro- and anti-angiogenic proteins by western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA revealed that within 0.5 to 2h of hypoxia levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelin-1 mRNA and protein were elevated. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 also increased but only after 8h of hypoxia. In contrast, similar hypoxia exposure evoked a decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombospondin-2 levels. Exposure of brain endothelial cell cultures to hypoxia resulted in a significant (p<0.001) decrease (94%) in tube length, an in vitro index of angiogenesis, compared to control cultures. The data indicate that, despite a shift toward a pro-angiogenic phenotype, hypoxia inhibited vessel formation in brain endothelial cells. These results suggest that in brain endothelial cells expression of angiogenic factors is not sufficient for the development of new vessels. Further work is needed to determine what factors/conditions prevent hypoxia-induced angiogenic changes from culminating in the formation of new brain blood vessels and what role this may play in the pathologic

  19. Triazole RGD antagonist reverts TGFβ1-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in endothelial precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Francesca; Peppicelli, Silvia; Fabbrizzi, Pierangelo; Biagioni, Alessio; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Menchi, Gloria; Calorini, Lido; Pupi, Alberto; Trabocchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis is the dramatic consequence of a dysregulated reparative process in which activated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) play a central role. When exposed to TGFβ1, fibroblast and epithelial cells differentiate in myofibroblasts; in addition, endothelial cells may undergo endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) and actively participate to the progression of fibrosis. Recently, the role of αv integrins, which recognize the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptide, in the release and signal transduction activation of TGFβ1 became evident. In this study, we present a class of triazole-derived RGD antagonists that interact with αvβ3 integrin. Above different compounds, the RGD-2 specifically interferes with integrin-dependent TGFβ1 EndoMT in Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells (ECPCs) derived from circulating Endothelial Precursor Cells (ECPCs). The RGD-2 decreases the amount of membrane-associated TGFβ1, and reduces both ALK5/TGFβ1 type I receptor expression and Smad2 phosphorylation in ECPCs. We found that RGD-2 antagonist reverts EndoMT, reducing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression in differentiated ECPCs. Our results outline the critical role of integrin in fibrosis progression and account for the opportunity of using integrins as target for anti-fibrotic therapeutic treatment.

  20. Secreted Endothelial Cell Factors Immobilized on Collagen Scaffolds Enhance the Recipient Endothelial Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strategies to design novel vascular scaffolds are a continuing aim in tissue engineering and often such designs encompass the use of recombinant factors to enhance the performance of the scaffold. The established use of cell secretion utilized in feeder systems and conditioned media offer a source of paracrine factors, which has potential to be used in tissue-engineered (TE) scaffolds. Here we utilize this principle from endothelial cells (ECs), to create a novel TE scaffold by harnessing secreted factors and immobilizing these to collagen scaffolds. This research revealed increased cellular attachment and positive angiogenic gene upregulation responses in recipient ECs grown on these conditioned scaffolds. Also, the conditioning method did not affect the mechanical structural integrity of the scaffolds. These results may advocate the potential use of this system to improve vascular scaffolds' in vivo performance. In addition, this process may be a future method utilized to improve other tissue engineering scaffold therapies. PMID:27057474

  1. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that the glycocalyx, which is important for endothelial integrity, is lost in severe malaria. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, resulting in cerebral malaria, or P. chabaudi AS, resulting in uncomplicated malaria. We visualized the glycocalyx with transmission electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested that glycocalyx disruption preceded cerebral manifestations. The contribution of this loss to pathogenesis should be studied further.

  2. CXCL12 Mediates Trophic Interactions between Endothelial and Tumor Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Eun Joo; Woerner, B. Mark; Jackson, Erin; Sun, Tao; Leonard, Jeffrey; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests endothelial cells (EC) play a critical role in promoting Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell proliferation and resistance to therapy. The molecular basis for GBM-EC interactions is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 could mediate direct interactions between GBM cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells and that disruption of this interaction might be the molecular basis for the anti-tumor effects of CXCR4 antagonists. We investigated this possibility in vivo and in an in vitro co-culture model that incorporated extracellular matrix, primary human brain microvascular ECs (HBMECs) and either an established GBM cell line or primary GBM specimens. Depletion of CXCR4 in U87 GBM cells blocked their growth as intracranial xenografts indicating that tumor cell CXCR4 is required for tumor growth in vivo. In vitro, co-culture of either U87 cells or primary GBM cells with HBMECs resulted in their co-localization and enhanced GBM cell growth. Genetic manipulation of CXCL12 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 revealed that the localizing and trophic effects of endothelial cells on GBM cells were dependent upon CXCL12 and CXCR4. These findings indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway directly mediates endothelial cell trophic function in GBMs and that inhibition of CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling may uniquely target this activity. Therapeutic disruption of endothelial cell trophic functions could complement the structural disruption of anti-angiogenic regimens and, in combination, might also improve the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy in treating GBMs. PMID:22427929

  3. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  4. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can recapitulate one or more aspects of angiogenesis in vitro, they are often limited by a lack of definition to the substratum and lack of dependence on key angiogenic signaling axes. Here, we designed and characterized a chemically-defined model of endothelial sprouting behavior in vitro using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs). Thiol-ene photopolymerization was used to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-ECs at high density in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel spheres and subsequently to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-EC-containing hydrogel spheres in a cell-free over-layer. The hydrogel sprouting array here maintained pro-angiogenic phenotype of iPSC-ECs and supported growth factor-dependent proliferation and sprouting behavior. The sprouting model responded appropriately to several reference pharmacological angiogenesis inhibitors, which suggests the functional role of vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, matrix metalloproteinase-2/9, protein kinase activity, and β-tubulin in endothelial sprouting. A blinded screen of 38 putative vascular disrupting compounds (pVDCs) from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast library identified five compounds th

  5. Vascular Bed–specific Expression of an Endothelial Cell Gene Is Programmed by the Tissue Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Aird, William C.; Edelberg, Jay M.; Weiler-Guettler, Hartmut; Simmons, William W.; Smith, Thomas W.; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    The endothelium is morphologically and functionally adapted to meet the unique demands of the underlying tissue. At the present time, little is known about the molecular basis of endothelial cell diversity. As one approach to this problem, we have chosen to study the mechanisms that govern differential expression of the endothelial cell–restricted von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene. Transgenic mice were generated with a fragment of the vWF gene containing 2,182 bp of 5′ flanking sequence, the first exon and first intron coupled to the LacZ reporter gene. In multiple independent lines of mice, β-galactosidase expression was detected within endothelial cells in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. In isogeneic transplantation models, LacZ expression in host-derived auricular blood vessels was specifically induced by the microenvironment of the heart. In in vitro coculture assays, expression of both the transgene and the endogenous vWF gene in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) was upregulated in the presence of cardiac myocytes. In contrast, endothelial cell levels of thrombomodulin protein and mRNA were unchanged by the addition of ventricular myocytes. Moreover, CMEC expression of vWF was not influenced by the addition of 3T3 fibroblasts or mouse hepatocytes. Taken together, the results suggest that the vWF gene is regulated by vascular bed–specific pathways in response to signals derived from the local microenvironment. PMID:9281588

  6. Live endothelial cells imaged by Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM): capabilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Katarzyna; Rygula, Anna; Szafraniec, Ewelina; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-08-22

    The scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) shows a potential to study details of biological samples, since it provides the optical images of objects with nanometric spatial resolution (50-200 nm) and the topographic information at the same time. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the capabilities of SNOM in transmission configuration to study human endothelial cells and their morphological changes, sometimes very subtle, upon inflammation. Various sample preparations were tested for SNOM measurements and promising results are collected to show: 1) the influence of α tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) on EA.hy 926 cells (measurements of the fixed cells); 2) high resolution images of various endothelial cell lines, i.e. EA.hy 926 and HLMVEC (investigations of the fixed cells in buffer environment); 3) imaging of live endothelial cells in physiological buffers. The study demonstrate complementarity of the SNOM measurements performed in air and in liquid environments, on fixed as well as on living cells. Furthermore, it is proved that the SNOM is a very useful method for analysis of cellular morphology and topography. Changes in the cell shape and nucleus size, which are the symptoms of inflammatory reaction, were noticed in TNF-α activated EA.hy 926 cells. The cellular structures of submicron size were observed in high resolution optical images of cells from EA.hy 926 and HLMVEC lines.

  7. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Weijers, Ester M.; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.; Malik, Asrar B.; van Hinsbergh, Victor W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. PMID:27343194

  8. A comparison of the antigen-presenting capabilities of class II MHC-expressing human lung epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A C; Zhang, J G; Moy, J V; Ali, S; Kirby, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human lung alveolar epithelial cells constitutively express class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Human lung microvascular endothelial and small airway epithelial cells can be induced to express class II MHC by stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. The levels of class II MHC on lung epithelial and endothelial cells were comparable to those seen on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell line. However, the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 were not expressed. The ability of the class II MHC expressing human lung parenchymal cells to present alloantigen to CD4+ T lymphocytes was investigated. Freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells (type II pneumocytes) and monolayers of interferon-gamma-stimulated small airway epithelial and lung microvascular endothelial cells were co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes and proliferation determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. A clear difference was observed between effects of the epithelial and endothelial cells on CD4+ T-lymphocyte activation. Alveolar and small airway epithelial cells failed to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes whereas lung microvascular endothelial cells did stimulate proliferation. This difference could not be explained by the levels of class II MHC or the lack of B7-1 and B7-2 solely. Microvascular endothelial cells, and not alveolar or small airway epithelial cells, possess B7-independent costimulatory pathways. PMID:9301537

  9. Circulating endothelial cells as marker of endothelial damage in male hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Milardi, Domenico; Grande, Giuseppe; Giampietro, Antonella; Vendittelli, Francesca; Palumbo, Sara; Tartaglione, Linda; Marana, Riccardo; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; de Marinis, Laura; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency has become a frequently diagnosed condition in today's society affected by epidemic obesity, and is associated with cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have established the importance of altered vascular endothelium function in cardiovascular disease. The damage to the endothelium might also cause endothelial cell detachment, resulting in increased numbers of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) within the bloodstream. To evaluate whether hypogonadism could modify CEC count in peripheral bloodstream, we investigated peripheral blood CEC count using the CellSearch System, a semiautomatic method to accurately and reliably enumerate CECs, which are sorted based on a CD146(+), CD105(+), DAPI(+), CD45(-) phenotype, in a population of 20 patients with hypogonadism. The control group comprised 10 age- and sex-matched healthy participants. CEC count per milliliter was significantly increased in patients with hypogonadism vs the control group. In the group with hypogonadism, an inverse exponential correlation was present between testosterone levels and CEC count per milliliter. A direct linear correlation was present between waist circumference and CECs and between body mass index and CECs. The regression analysis showed that testosterone was the significant independent determinant of CECs. Our results underline that male hypogonadism is associated with endothelial dysfunction. The correlation between CEC and waist circumference underlines that visceral obesity may be synergically implicated in this regulation. Future studies are required to unveil the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of testosterone-induced endothelial disfunction, which may provide novel therapeutic targets to be incorporated in the management of hypogonadism.

  10. Descending vasa recta endothelial cells and pericytes form mural syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong; Lin, Hai; Cao, Chunhua; Payne, Kristie

    2013-01-01

    Using patch clamp, we induced depolarization of descending vasa recta (DVR) pericytes or endothelia and tested whether it was conducted to distant cells. Membrane potential was measured with the fluorescent voltage dye di-8-ANEPPS or with a second patch-clamp electrode. Depolarization of an endothelial cell induced responses in other endothelia within a millisecond and was slowed by gap junction blockade with heptanol. Endothelial response to pericyte depolarization was poor, implying high-resistance myo-endothelial coupling. In contrast, dual patch clamp of neighboring pericytes revealed syncytial coupling. At high sampling rate, the spread of depolarization between pericytes and endothelia occurred in 9 ± 2 or 12 ± 2 μs, respectively. Heptanol (2 mM) increased the overall input resistance of the pericyte layer to current flow and prevented transmission of depolarization between neighboring cells. The fluorescent tracer Lucifer yellow (LY), when introduced through ruptured patches, spread between neighboring endothelia in 1 to 7 s, depending on location of the flanking cell. LY diffused to endothelial cells on the ipsilateral but not contralateral side of the DVR wall and minimally between pericytes. We conclude that both DVR pericytes and endothelia are part of individual syncytia. The rate of conduction of membrane potential exceeds that for diffusion of hydrophilic molecules by orders of magnitude. Gap junction coupling of adjacent endothelial cells may be spatially oriented to favor longitudinal transmission along the DVR axis. PMID:24381184

  11. Multi-scale undulations in human aortic endothelial cell fibers.

    PubMed

    Frketic, Jolie B; DeLaPeña, Abigail; Suaris, Melanie G; Zehnder, Steven M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Blood vessels often have an undulatory morphology, with excessive bending, kinking, and coiling occuring in diseased vasculature. The underlying physical causes of these morphologies are generally attributed, in combination, to changes in blood pressure, blood flow rate, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, pathological vascular morphologies often start during developmental vasculogenesis. At early stages of vasculogenesis, angioblasts (vascular endothelial cells that have not formed a lumen) assemble into primitive vessel-like fibers before blood flow occurs. If loose, fibrous aggregates of endothelial cells can generate multi-cellular undulations through mechanical instabilities, driven by the cytoskeleton, new insight into vasculature morphology may be achieved with simple in vitro models of endothelial cell fibers. Here we study mechanical instabilities in vessel-like structures made from endothelial cells embedded in a collagen matrix. We find that endothelial cell fibers contract radially over time, and undulate at two dominant wavelengths: approximately 1cm and 1mm. Simple mechanical models suggest that the long-wavelength undulation is Euler buckling in rigid confinement, while the short-wavelength buckle may arise from a mismatch between fiber bending energy and matrix deformation. These results suggest a combination of fiber-like geometry, cystoskeletal contractions, and extracellular matrix elasticity may contribute to undulatory blood vessel morphology in the absence of a lumen or blood pressure.

  12. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  13. A patient-specific intracranial aneurysm model with endothelial lining: a novel in vitro approach to bridge the gap between biology and flow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Naoki; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Namba, Katsunari; Tateshima, Satoshi; Watanabe, Eiju; Kawai, Kensuke

    2017-06-26

    To develop an in vitro model for studying the biological effect of complex-flow stress on endothelial cells in three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific vascular geometry. A vessel replica was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxanes using 3D printing technology from vascular image data acquired by rotational angiography. The vascular model was coated with fibronectin and immersed in a tube filled with a cell suspension of endothelium, and then cultured while being slowly rotated in three dimensions. Culture medium with viscosity was perfused in the circulation with the endothelialized vascular model. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted using perfusion conditions used in the flow experiment. The morphology of endothelial cells was observed under a confocal microscope. The CFD study showed low wall shear stress and circulating flow in the apex of the basilar tip aneurysm, with linear flow in the parent artery. Confocal imaging demonstrated that the inner surface of the vascular model was evenly covered with monolayer endothelial cells. After 24 h of flow circulation, endothelial cells in the parent artery exhibited a spindle shape and aligned with the flow direction. In contrast, endothelial cells in the aneurysmal apex were irregular in shape and size. A geometrically realistic intracranial aneurysm model with live endothelial lining was successfully developed. This in vitro model enables a new research approach combining study of the biological impact of complex flow on endothelial cells with CFD analysis and patient information, including the presence of aneurysmal growth or rupture. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. The Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling pathway contributes to the integrity of tight junctions in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Artus, Cédric; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Ziegler, Nicole; Godet, Maeva; Guilbert, Thomas; Liebner, Stefan; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Wnt morphogens released by neural precursor cells were recently reported to control blood–brain barrier (BBB) formation during development. Indeed, in mouse brain endothelial cells, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, was shown to stabilize endothelial tight junctions (TJs) through transcriptional regulation of the expression of TJ proteins. Because Wnt proteins activate several distinct β-catenin-dependent and independent signaling pathways, this study was designed to assess whether the noncanonical Wnt/Par/aPKC planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway might also control TJ integrity in brain endothelial cells. First we established, in the hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cell line, that the Par/aPKC PCP complex colocalizes with TJs and controls apicobasal polarization. Second, using an siRNA approach, we showed that the Par/aPKC PCP complex regulates TJ stability and reassembling after osmotic shock. Finally, we provided evidence that Wnt5a signals in hCMEC/D3 cells through activation of the Par/aPKC PCP complex, independently of the Wnt canonical β-catenin-dependent pathway and significantly contributes to TJ integrity and endothelial apicobasal polarity. In conclusion, this study suggests that the Wnt/Par/aPKC PCP pathway, in addition to the Wnt/β-catenin canonical pathway, is a key regulator of the BBB. PMID:24346691

  15. In Vitro Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important event during developmental processes, and it plays a key role in neovascularization. The development of an in vitro model that can be used for live imaging of vessel growth will facilitate the study of molecular and cellular mechanisms for the growth of blood vessels. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are considered to be a novel renewable source for the derivation of genetically manipulable endothelial cells (ECs). To derive green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing ECs, we used a transgenic ESC line in which a GFP reporter was driven by the endothelial-specific promoter fetal liver kinase 1. ESC-ECs were isolated from 11-day embryoid bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Embedding the aggregated ESC-ECs in a 3-dimensional collagen gel matrix resulted in ESC-EC migration out of the aggregates and coalescence into a capillary network. Time-lapse microscopy revealed EC migration, proliferation, lumen formation, and anastomosis to other capillary vessels during this process, which were reminiscent of angiogenic processes. Vascular endothelial growth factor plays major roles in the induction of ESC-EC angiogenesis in vitro. Blockage of the β1 integrin subunit severely impaired ESC-EC survival and migration. We demonstrate that our in vitro ESC-EC angiogenesis model represents a high-resolution dynamic video-image system for observing the cellular events underlying angiogenic cascades. We also consider this model as an image screening tool for the identification of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecules. PMID:21385073

  16. [Effect of Qige Powder on Angiogenesis Induced by Esophageal Cancer Cell Line Eca-9706].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling; Wu, Yao-song; Yin, Su-gai; Wang, Hui-hui; Chen, Yu-long

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect Qige powder on esophageal cancer angiogenesis. Inhibitive effect of Qige powder ethanol extract on proliferation of Esophageal cancer cell line Eca-9706 was detected by MTT assay. The Eca-9706 cells conditioned medium in Qige powder IC50 concentration were collected. Angiogenesis, as well as proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were observed by Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model(CAM), MTT assay, the migration and tube formation assay. VEGF and IL-6 contents in culture medium supernatant of Eca-9706 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were detected by ELISA. Qige powder ethanol extract could inhibit the proliferation of Eca-9706 cells, with a certain dose-effect relationship, IC50 value was 96 µg/mL. Eca-9706 cells conditioned medium could significantly increase the CAM generating total vessel area, human umbilical vein endothelial cells proliferation,migration and tube formation, while the Eca-9706 cell conditioned medium of Qige powder ethanol extract could reduce CAM angiogenesis, human umbilical vein endothelial cells proliferation and tube formation, but increase endothelial cells migration. Qige powder ethanol extract could reduce endothelial cells secreting VEGF and IL-6 while increase Eca-9706 cells secreting. Qige powder ethanol extract can inhibit angiogenesis, endothelial cell proliferation, and tube formation induced by Eca-9706 cells, while reduce VEGF and IL-6 secretion of endothelial cells.

  17. Shaping of Peripheral T Cell Responses by Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marion; Hugues, Stéphanie; Dubrot, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) have newly been promoted to the rank of new modulators of T cell responses. The different non-hematopoietic cell subsets in lymph node (LN) were considered for years as a simple scaffold, forming routes and proper environment for antigen (Ag)-lymphocyte encountering. Deeper characterization of those cells has recently clearly shown their impact on both dendritic cell and T cell functions. In particular, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control lymphocyte trafficking and homeostasis in LNs and limit adaptive immune responses. Therefore, the new role of LECs in shaping immune responses has drawn the attention of immunologists. Striking is the discovery that LECs, among other LNSCs, ectopically express a large range of peripheral tissue-restricted Ags (PTAs), and further present PTA-derived peptides through major histocompatibility class I molecules to induce self-reactive CD8+ T cell deletional tolerance. In addition, both steady-state and tumor-associated LECs were described to be capable of exogenous Ag cross-presentation. Whether LECs can similarly impact CD4+ T cell responses through major histocompatibility class II restricted Ag presentation is still a matter of debate. Here, we review and discuss our current knowledge on the contribution of Ag-presenting LECs as regulators of peripheral T cell responses in different immunological contexts, including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:28127298

  18. Human neural stem cell-induced endothelial morphogenesis requires autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chung-Hsing; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Transplanted neural stem cells (NSC) interact with the host brain microenvironment. A neovascularization is commonly observed in the vicinity of the cell deposit, which is correlated with behavioral improvements. To elucidate the signaling mechanisms between human NSCs and endothelial cells (ECs), these were cocultured in an in vitro model in which NSC-induced endothelial morphogenesis produced a neurovascular environment. Soluble (autocrine/paracrine) and contact–mediated (juxtacrine) signaling molecules were evaluated for two conditionally immortalized fetal NSC lines derived from the cortical anlage (CTXOE03) and ganglionic eminence (STROC05), as well as an adult EC line (D3) derived from the cerebral microvasculature of a hippocampal biopsy. STROC05 were 4 times as efficient to induce endothelial morphogenesis compared to CTXOE03. The cascade of reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs in this process was determined by quantifying soluble factors, receptor mapping, and immunocytochemistry for extracellular matrix molecules. The mechanistic significance of these was further evaluated by pharmacological blockade. The sequential cell-specific regulation of autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling accounted for the differential efficiency of NSCs to induce endothelial morphogenesis. These in vitro studies shed new light on the reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs, which are pivotal for our mechanistic understanding of the efficacy of NSC transplantation. PMID:27374240

  19. Endothelial cell responses to castor oil-based polyurethane substrates functionalized by direct laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Cortella, Lucas; Cestari, Idágene A; Guenther, Denise; Lasagni, Andrés Fabian; Cestari, Ismar Newton

    2017-08-01

    Surface-induced thrombosis and lack of endothelialization are major drawbacks that hamper the widespread application of polyurethanes for the fabrication of implantable cardiovascular devices. Endothelialization of the blood-contacting surfaces of these devices may avoid thrombus formation and can be implemented by strategies that introduce micro and submicron patterns that favor adhesion and growth of endothelial cells. In this study, we used laser radiation to directly introduce topographical patterns in the low micrometer range on castor oil-based polyurethane, which is currently employed to fabricate cardiovascular devices. We have investigated cell adhesion, proliferation, morphology and alignment in response to these topographies. Reported results show that line-like and pillar-like patterns improved adhesion and proliferation rate of cultured endothelial cells. The line-like pattern with 1 µm groove periodicity was the most efficient to enhance cell adhesion and induced marked polarization and alignment. Our study suggests the viability of using laser radiation to functionalize PU-based implants by the introduction of specific microtopography to facilitate the development of a functional endothelium on target surfaces. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. The effects of adiponectin and leptin on human endothelial cell proliferation: a live-cell study.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Granada; Visitación Bartolomé, M; Miana, María; Jurado-López, Raquel; Martín, Ruben; Zuluaga, Pilar; Martinez-Martinez, Ernesto; Nieto, M Luisa; Alvarez-Sala, Luis A; Millán, Jesús; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The effect of adiponectin and leptin on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was studied in the absence or presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The participation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI-3K/Akt) pathways in this effect were evaluated. We studied the effect of both adipokines on the motility, mitosis, proliferation and cell death processes of HMEC-1 cells using live-cell imaging techniques. Adiponectin but not leptin further increased the proliferative effect induced by FBS on HMEC-1. This effect seems to be the consequence of an increase in the mitotic index in adiponectin-treated cells when compared to untreated ones. The presence of either the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059), or PI-3K inhibitor (LY294002), reduced the effect of adiponectin in a dose-dependent manner. Neither adipokine was able to affect HMEC-1 proliferation in FBS-free conditions. Duration of mitosis, cell motility and the cell death process were similar in all conditions. These data suggest that adiponectin and leptin exert different effects on endothelial cell function. Adiponectin was able to potentiate proliferation of HMEC-1. This effect involves the activation of both PI3-K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways. However, it seems to exert minimal effects on HMEC-1 function in the case of leptin.

  1. Biophysical Assessment of Single Cell Cytotoxicity: Diesel Exhaust Particle-Treated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yangzhe; Yu, Tian; Gilbertson, Timothy A.; Zhou, Anhong; Xu, Hao; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major source of traffic-related air pollution, has become a serious health concern due to its adverse influences on human health including cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. To elucidate the relationship between biophysical properties (cell topography, cytoskeleton organizations, and cell mechanics) and functions of endothelial cells exposed to DEPs, atomic force microscope (AFM) was applied to analyze the toxic effects of DEPs on a model cell line from human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were also applied to further explore DEP-induced cytotoxicity in HAECs. Results revealed that DEPs could negatively impair cell viability and alter membrane nanostructures and cytoskeleton components in a dosage- and a time-dependent manner; and analyses suggested that DEPs-induced hyperpolarization in HAECs appeared in a time-dependent manner, implying DEP treatment would lead to vasodilation, which could be supported by down-regulation of cell biophysical properties (e.g., cell elasticity). These findings are consistent with the conclusion that DEP exposure triggers important biochemical and biophysical changes that would negatively impact the pathological development of cardiovascular diseases. For example, DEP intervention would be one cause of vasodilation, which will expand understanding of biophysical aspects associated with DEP cytotoxicity in HAECs. PMID:22662129

  2. Molecular basis for globotriaosylceramide regulation and enzyme uptake in immortalized aortic endothelial cells from Fabry mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing-Li; Day, Taniqua S; McNeill, Nathan; Ashcraft, Paula; Frischmuth, Thomas; Cheng, Seng H; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Shen, Jin-Song; Schiffmann, Raphael

    2016-05-01

    Fabry disease is caused by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A and subsequent intracellular accumulation of glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Vascular endothelial cells may play important roles in disease pathogenesis, and are one of the main target cell types in therapeutic interventions. In this study, we generated immortalized aortic endothelial cell lines from a mouse model of Fabry disease. These cells retained endothelial cell-specific markers and functions. Gb3 expression level in one of these clones (referred to as FMEC2) was highly susceptible to culture media, and appeared to be regulated by glucosylceramide synthase. Results also showed that Gb3 could be upregulated by hydrocortisone. FMEC2 express the mannose 6-phosphate receptor and sortilin but not the mannose receptor. Uptake studies suggested that sortilin plays a role in the binding and internalization of mammalian cell-produced α-galactosidase A. Moss-aGal (a plant-made enzyme) was endocytosed by FMEC2 via a receptor other than the aforementioned receptors. In conclusion, this study suggests that glucosylceramide synthase and hydrocortisone may play important roles in modulating Gb3 levels in Fabry mouse aortic endothelial cells, and that endocytosis of recombinant α-galactosidase A involves a combination of multiple receptors depending on the properties of the enzyme.

  3. Directing migration of endothelial progenitor cells with applied DC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Qin, Lu; Reid, Brian; Pu, Jin; Hara, Takahiko; Zhao, Min

    2012-01-01

    Naturally-occurring, endogenous electric fields (EFs) have been detected at skin wounds, damaged tissue sites and vasculature. Applied EFs guide migration of many types of cells, including endothelial cells to migrate directionally. Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to an injury site is important for repair of vasculature and also for angiogenesis. However, it has not been reported whether EPCs respond to applied EFs. Aiming to explore the possibility to use electric stimulation to regulate the progenitor cells and angiogenesis, we tested the effects of direct-current (DC) EFs on EPCs. We first used immunofluorescence to confirm the expression of endothelial progenitor markers in three lines of EPCs. We then cultured the progenitor cells in EFs. Using time-lapse video microscopy, we demonstrated that an applied DC EF directs migration of the EPCs toward the cathode. The progenitor cells also align and elongate in an EF. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor signaling completely abolished the EF-induced directional migration of the progenitor cells. We conclude that EFs are an effective signal that guides EPC migration through VEGF receptor signaling in vitro. Applied EFs may be used to control behaviors of EPCs in tissue engineering, in homing of EPCs to wounds and to an injury site in the vasculature.

  4. Sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside promotes endothelial cell apoptosis in inflammation: elucidation of a novel glycosphingolipid-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Somsankar; Wang, Guanghu; Yu, Robert K

    2011-11-01

    Sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG), a minor glycosphingolipid of endothelial cells, is a ligand for L-selectin and has been implicated in neuro-inflammatory diseases, such as Guillian-Barré syndrome. Inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα and IL-1β, up-regulate SGPG expression by stimulating gene expression for glucuronosyltransferases, both P and S forms (GlcATp and GlcATs), and the human natural killer antigen (HNK-1) sulfotransferase (HNK-1 ST). Transfection of a human cerebromicrovascular endothelial cell (SV-HCEC) line with HNK-1 ST siRNA down-regulated SGPG expression, inhibited cytokine-stimulated T-cell adhesion, and offered protection against apoptosis. However, the precise mechanisms of SGPG elevation in endothelial cell apoptosis and the maintenance of blood-brain or blood-nerve barrier integrity in inflammation have not been elucidated. Blocking SGPG expression inhibited cytokine-mediated stimulation of NF-κB activity but stimulated MAP kinase activity. Furthermore, elevation of SGPG by over-expression of GlcATp and GlcATs triggered endothelial cell apoptosis, with GlcATs being more potent than GlcATp. Although SGPG-mediated endothelial cell apoptosis was preceded by inhibiting the intracellular NF-κB activity, interfering with Akt and ERK activation and stimulating caspase 3 in SV-HCECs, HNK-1ST siRNA transfection also interfered with IκB phosphorylation but stimulated ERK activation. Our data indicate that SGPG is a critical regulatory molecule for maintaining endothelial cell survival and blood-brain or blood-nerve barrier function.

  5. Extra- and intracellular innate immune recognition in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Bastian; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Eitel, Julia; Suttorp, Norbert

    2007-08-01

    The innate immune system represents the principal sensor of infections in multicellular organisms and might also mediate responses to some endogenous molecules. In this context, endothelial cells are among the first cells coming into contact with microbial or endogenous (danger-associated) molecules or whole pathogens entering the bloodstream. Since many bacteria and viruses invade the endothelium, endothelial cells are equipped with both extracellular and cytosolic surveillance systems capable of sensing microbial components, and endogenous danger-associated molecules. The receptor molecules, called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are classified as transmembrane or cytosolic molecules. While the transmembrane PRRs recognize extracellular and membrane-enclosed foreign organisms, the cytosolic PRRs appear to sense intracellular infections. Here we focus on both PRR classes in general, and outline the current knowledge of extra- and intracellular pattern recognition in endothelial cells and its potential role in vascular diseases and sepsis.

  6. Dynamic Endothelial Cell Rearrangements Drive Developmental Vessel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Claudio A.; Jones, Martin L.; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Geudens, Ilse; Mathivet, Thomas; Rosa, Andre; Lopes, Felicia M.; Lima, Aida P.; Ragab, Anan; Collins, Russell T.; Phng, Li-Kun; Coveney, Peter V.; Gerhardt, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Patterning of functional blood vessel networks is achieved by pruning of superfluous connections. The cellular and molecular principles of vessel regression are poorly understood. Here we show that regression is mediated by dynamic and polarized migration of endothelial cells, representing anastomosis in reverse. Establishing and analyzing the first axial polarity map of all endothelial cells in a remodeling vascular network, we propose that balanced movement of cells maintains the primitive plexus under low shear conditions in a metastable dynamic state. We predict that flow-induced polarized migration of endothelial cells breaks symmetry and leads to stabilization of high flow/shear segments and regression of adjacent low flow/shear segments. PMID:25884288

  7. Fibroblast nemosis induces angiogenic responses of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Enzerink, Anna; Rantanen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti

    2010-03-10

    Increasing evidence points to a central link between inflammation and activation of the stroma, especially of fibroblasts therein. However, the mechanisms leading to such activation mostly remain undescribed. We have previously characterized a novel type of fibroblast activation (nemosis) where clustered fibroblasts upregulated the production of cyclooxygenase-2, secretion of prostaglandins, proteinases, chemotactic cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and displayed activated nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Now we show that nemosis drives angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. In addition to HGF, nemotic fibroblasts secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and conditioned medium from spheroids promoted sprouting and networking of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). The response was partly inhibited by function-blocking antibodies against HGF and VEGF. Conditioned nemotic fibroblast medium promoted closure of HUVEC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell monolayer wounds, by increasing the motility of the endothelial cells. Wound closure in HUVEC cells was partly inhibited by the antibodies against HGF. The stromal microenvironment regulates wound healing responses and often promotes tumorigenesis. Nemosis offers clues to the activation process of stromal fibroblasts and provides a model to study the part they play in angiogenesis-related conditions, as well as possibilities for therapeutical approaches desiring angiogenesis in tissue.

  8. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1. PMID:24996922

  9. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  10. Human cultured endothelial cells do secrete endothelin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Clozel, M.; Fischli, W. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been identified in the conditioned medium of porcine endothelial cells. Human endothelin (ET-1) cloned from a placenta cDNA library is similar to porcine, but it is not known whether endothelin itself is secreted by human endothelial cells. To answer this question, a conditioned medium taken every 48 h from confluent cultures of umbilical vein endothelial cells was analyzed by HPLC and all fractions were tested for their ability to inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding on human placenta membranes. Only one fraction did inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding. When the conditioned medium was spiked with ET-1, the same single fraction inhibited ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding showing that ET-1, itself, is present in the conditioned medium of human endothelial cells. ET-1 accumulates with time, reaching a plateau at 48 h. ET-1 secretion is not increased by a 24-h incubation of endothelial cells with phorbol myristate acetate, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, thrombin or neuropeptide Y.

  11. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  12. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  13. Aging impairs transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells: implications for angiogenesis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K; Szabo, S; Tarnawski, A S

    2014-04-01

    In some tissues, aging impairs angiogenesis and reduces expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), a fundamental regulator of angiogenesis. We previously examined angiogenesis in aging and young gastric mucosa in vivo and in vitro and showed that an imbalance between expressions of VEGF (pro-angiogenic factor) and endostatin (anti-angiogenic protein) results in an aging-related impairment of angiogenesis in rats. However, the human relevance of these findings, and whether these mechanisms apply to endothelial cells derived from other tissues, is not clear. Since P-STAT3 and P-CREB are transcription factors that, in association with HIF-1α, can activate VEGF gene expression in some cells (e.g., liver cancer cells, vascular smooth muscle cells), we examined the expression of these two proteins in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) derived from aging and neonatal individuals. We examined and quantified in vitro angiogenesis, expression of VEGF, P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in HMVECs isolated from neonates (neonatal) and a 66 year old subject (aging). We also examined the effects of treatment with exogenous VEGF and endostatin on in vitro angiogenesis in these cells. Endothelial cells isolated from aging individuals had impaired angiogenesis (vs. neonatal endothelial cells) and reduced expression of VEGF mRNA and protein. Aged HMVECs also had reduced importin-α expression, and reduced expression and nuclear translocation of P-STAT3 and P-CREB. Reduced VEGF gene expression in aged HMVECs strongly correlated with the decreased levels of P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in these cells. Our study clearly demonstrates that endothelial cells from aging individuals have impaired angiogenesis and reduced expression of VEGF likely due to impaired nuclear transport of P-STAT3 and P-CREB transcription factors in these cells.

  14. Principles of targeting endothelial cell metabolism to treat angiogenesis and endothelial cell dysfunction in disease

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Jermaine; Stapor, Peter; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is the orchestral conductor of blood vessel function. Pathological blood vessel formation (a process termed pathological angiogenesis) or the inability of endothelial cells (ECs) to perform their physiological function (a condition known as EC dysfunction) are defining features of various diseases. Therapeutic intervention to inhibit aberrant angiogenesis or ameliorate EC dysfunction could be beneficial in diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, respectively, but current strategies have limited efficacy. Based on recent findings that pathological angiogenesis and EC dysfunction are accompanied by EC-specific metabolic alterations, targeting EC metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how EC metabolism is altered in disease and discuss potential metabolic targets and strategies to reverse EC dysfunction and inhibit pathological angiogenesis. PMID:25063693

  15. Mechanism of induction of fibroblast to corneal endothelial cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Fu, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Lin

    2014-08-01

    To explore mechanism of nduction of fibroblast to corneal endothelial cell. Rabbit conjunctiva fibroblasts were used as feeder cells, rabbit oral mucosa epithelial cells were used as seed cells, and human denuded amniotic membrane was used as carrier to establish tissue engineering corneal endothelium. The transformation effect was observed. As concentration of mitomycin C increased, cell survival rate gradually decreased, cell proliferation was obviously inhibited when concentration≥25 μg/mL; 5 days after being treated by 5 μg/mL mitomycin C, cell body was enlarged and extended without cell fusion, however after being treated by 0.5 μg/mL mitomycin C, cell body was significantly proliferated and gradually fused; after 3 weeks of culture, stratified epithelium appeared on rabbit oral mucosa epithelial cells, differentiation layers were 4-5 and were well differentiated, the morphology was similar to corneal endothelial cells; Under electron microscope, surface layer of cells were polygonal, tightly connected to another with microvilli on the border, there was hemidesmosome between basal cells and human denuded amniotic membrane. Fibroblast cells have the potential of multi-directional differentiation, effective induction can promote emergence of intercellular desmosomes between seed cells and emergence of epithelial surface microvilli, and differentiate to the corneal endothelial cell. However, clinical application still needs more research and safety evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nicotine and cotinine up-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Brian S; Zhao, Weidong; Zhong, Dian-Sheng; Chen, Changyi

    2002-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for both vascular disease and various forms of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial-specific mitogen that is normally expressed only in low levels in normal arteries but may be involved in the progression of both vascular disease and cancer. Some clinical evidence suggests that cigarette smoking may increase plasma VEGF levels, but there is a lack of basic science studies investigating this possibility. We show here, using an intact porcine common carotid artery perfusion culture model, that nicotine and cotinine, the major product of nicotine metabolism, cause a significant increase in endothelial cell VEGF expression. VEGF mRNA levels were compared between groups using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, whereas protein level changes were demonstrated with Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed significant increases in endothelial cell VEGF mRNA and protein levels because of nicotine and cotinine at concentrations representative of plasma concentrations seen in habitual smokers. VEGF immunostaining also paralleled these results. These findings may give a clue as to the mechanisms by which nicotine and cotinine from cigarette smoking increase vascular disease progression and tumor growth and metastasis.

  17. Cimetidine inhibits the adhesion of gastric cancer cells expressing high levels of sialyl Lewis x in human vascular endothelial cells by blocking E-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Rong; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Li, Yan-Shu; Li, Jia-Bin; Li, Feng

    2011-04-01

    Cimetidine has been shown to have anti-metastatic activity and improves the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. One hypothesis is its modulation of the expression of the cell adhesion molecule by target organ endothelial cells.